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Moving in the Anthropocene: Global reductions in terrestrial mammalian movementsAnimal movement is fundamental for ecosystem functioning and species survival, yet the effects of the anthropogenic footprint on animal movements have not been estimated across species. Using a unique GPS-tracking database of 803 individuals across 57 species, we found that movements of mammals in areas with a comparatively high human footprint were on average one-half to one-third the extent of
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Viden
Folk der jævnligt går til koncerter har et godt helbredEn undersøgelse viser en sammenhæng mellem et godt helbred og det at have et aktivt forhold til musik.
14h
Ingeniøren
Pentagon-rapport afslører 1.000 mangler og nye forsinkelser for F-35Nye forsinkelser bringer færdiggørelsen af de første kampklare F-35 snublende tæt på leveringen af de første danske fly i 2021. Der går dog mange år, før Danmark rent faktisk skal bruge flyet i kamp.
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Live Science
Quantum Physicist Named 'Australian of the Year'Chalk one up for the physicists, as 2018’s "Australian of the Year" title goes to a quantum physicist who created the world’s first transistor made from a single atom.
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Ingeniøren
DTU-tal afslører voldsom forurening fra gammelt giftdepot i GrindstedNye målinger viser, at der hvert år siver 100 kg kræftfremkaldende stoffer ud i Grindsted Å. En af Danmarks værste forureningssager, siger forskerne bag tallene.
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Latest Headlines | Science News
Plastic pollution increases risk of devastating disease in coralsResearchers estimate about 11 billion pieces of plastic are polluting Asia-Pacific corals, raising the risk of disease at scores of reefs.
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NYT > Science
Trilobites: Swatting at Mosquitoes May Help You Avoid Bites, Even if You MissWhen a feeding situation isn’t favorable, a mosquito can switch preferences, and it may learn to associate your scent with avoiding your incoming hand.
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NYT > Science
F.D.A. Panel Rejects Philip Morris’ Claim That Tobacco Stick Is Safer Than CigarettesThe committee expressed doubts about the company’s health claims that the device, called iQOS, would not cause tobacco-related diseases.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
The bacterial 'Game of Thrones'Much like animals and to a degree humans, bacteria enjoy a good fight. While their aggressive characteristics are broadly known, their approach to conflict is less understood. Now, researchers have shed light on this area of bacterial behavior, revealing that they approach conflict in much the same way as a human platoon, responding to a threat with a coordinated, collective retaliation.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
Thirty years of innovation pays off as oligonucleotide therapeutics come to marketThe recent approval of SpinrazaTM (nusinersen) marks the arrival of a new class of biological products -- oligonucleotide therapeutics. A recent publication shows that the thirty year path from the initiation of research on oligonucleotides as therapeutics to the emergence of effective products followed predictable patterns of innovation, in which novel products are successfully developed only aft
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Science : NPR
Rebellious Cow Finds Winter Home Among Polish BisonShe has been spotted twice on the outskirts of Poland's Bialowieza Forest. She appears to be healthy, but she'll need to be removed from the herd before mating season. (Image credit: Rafal Kowalczyk/AP)
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New on MIT Technology Review
We all think our jobs are safe from automation
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Study sheds light on alternative, more convenient method of cell preservationResearchers at Oregon State University have taken an important step toward a more convenient, less expensive means of preserving mammalian cells for in vitro fertilization, species conservation, cell therapy and other purposes.
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Tactic for controlling motor symptoms of advanced Parkinson's diseaseStandard drug treatment for Parkinson's disease can over time induce motor complications that reduce the effectiveness of restoring mobility. These complications include abnormal involuntary movements known as dyskinesias. In a nonhuman primate model of Parkinson's, scientists have been probing the origin of these abnormal responses to treatment, particularly dyskinesias, and have successfully tes
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Study sheds light on alternative, more convenient method of cell preservationResearchers have taken an important step toward a more convenient, less expensive means of preserving mammalian cells for in vitro fertilization, species conservation, cell therapy and other purposes.
25min
EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Better insurance access hasn't eliminated cost barriers to post-stroke medsDespite federal programs to improve the availability of medical insurance, drug costs still keep more than one in ten stroke survivors from obtaining their recommended medications, putting them at risk of another stroke, according to preliminary research presented at the American Stroke Association's International Stroke Conference 2018, a world premier meeting dedicated to the science and treatme
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Science : NPR
How To Teach Mosquitoes To Leave You AloneMosquitoes find some people way more delicious than others. Now scientists have found a way to make you less attractive, no chemicals needed. (Image credit: Tyler Stableford / Aurora Outdoo/Getty Images/Aurora Creative)
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Science | The Guardian
Spacewatch: Moon landing contest closes for lack of entrantsGoogle Lunar XPRIZE withdraws $30m prize for first robotic spacecraft touchdown by private firm as deadline defeats finalists A lucrative competition to land a robotic spacecraft on the moon will end on 31 March this year without a winner. The Google Lunar XPrize promised to reward the first private company to make such a touchdown with $30m, a prize it was hoped would stimulate a new era of cost
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
Ecologist unearths the foothill yellow-legged frog's past in order to inform its futureOnce abundant in Southern California, the foothill yellow-legged frog inexplicably vanished from the region sometime between the late 1960s and early 1970s. The reasons behind its rapid extirpation have been an ecological mystery.
33min
New on MIT Technology Review
China’s facial-recognition startups can probably pick you out of a crowdFacebook News Feed
41min
Live Science
Rare, Mohawk-Wearing Fish Discovered 'Walking' on SeafloorThe discovery of a new group of weird fish - which sport bright red, Mohawk-like fins on their heads and finger-like fins on their sides - has delighted the divers who encountered them, just as they were trying to find the extremely endangered species.
42min
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Britain urges global regulation of bitcoinThe British government called Thursday for global regulation of controversial virtual currency bitcoin, adding that the G20 would address the topic in March.
45min
EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Pennsylvania deer, like mammals worldwide, move less in human-modified landscapesIn the big woods of Pennsylvania's Northern Tier, the home range of the average white-tailed deer is more than twice as large as that of a deer in urban or agricultural areas of the state. Penn State researcher Duane Diefenbach documented that phenomenon early on in his work, but it did not occur to him it might be representative of many different mammal species around the globe.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Federal report shows punch of last year's Hurricane HarveyThe official numbers for last year's Hurricane Harvey are in, and they go beyond the 68 dead and $125 billion in damage.
51min
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Microbes may help astronauts transform human waste into foodHuman waste may one day be a valuable resource for astronauts on deep-space missions. Now, a Penn State research team has shown that it is possible to rapidly break down solid and liquid waste to grow food with a series of microbial reactors, while simultaneously minimizing pathogen growth.
51min
Latest Headlines | Science News
Scientists find 10 new defense systems used by bacteriaScientists identify 10 groups of genes that appear to govern defense systems used by bacteria against virus attacks.
53min
Inside Science
BRIEF: Supernova Wannabe Dies With a Supersonic QuiverBRIEF: Supernova Wannabe Dies With a Supersonic Quiver New theoretical model predicts stars that fail to go supernovae may still not go gentle into that good night. Supernva-Wannabes.gif Image credits: Composite image by Yuen Yiu, source images by Dave Gandy ( speaker icon) / NASA, ESA, and G. Bacon ( Artist impression of supernova 1993J.) Rights information: CC BY 4.0 Space Thursday, January 25,
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Study shows investors lose, insiders win when IPOs involve analystsWhen equity analysts are more involved in a firm's initial public offering, investors who purchase stock based on these analysts' reports lose more than 3 percent of their investment, according to a new study from the University at Buffalo School of Management.
57min
Popular Science
The price of solar panels just went up—here's what that means for youTechnology A steep new tariff on imported solar panels will have a profound effect on the industry. President Trump's new tariff on imported solar panels could alter the technology's future.
1h
TED Talks Daily (SD video)
What's it like to be a robot? | Leila TakayamaWe already live among robots: tools and machines like dishwashers and thermostats so integrated into our lives that we'd never think to call them that. What will a future with even more robots look like? Social scientist Leila Takayama shares some unique challenges of designing for human-robot interactions -- and how experimenting with robotic futures actually leads us to a better understanding of
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Science : NPR
This Mummified Woman Now Has A Name — And A Famous Relative: Boris JohnsonMeet Anna Catharina Bischoff, an 18th century syphilitic woman found in 1975. Researchers announced her name Thursday. And the U.K. foreign secretary says he's "very proud" to have the new family tie. (Image credit: Gregor Brändli/Courtesy of Naturhistorisches Museum Basel)
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
Do western societies promote narcissism?Researchers have been able to show that people who grew up in the former western states of Germany have higher levels of narcissism than those whose socialization took place in the former eastern states. According to a new study, the reunification of Germany ushered in a gradual re-balancing of the distribution of these traits among the younger generation.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
Researchers pose revolutionary theory on horse evolutionWhile it is largely believed that horses simply evolved with fewer digits, researchers pose a new theory that suggests remnants of all five toes are still present within the hooves of the horse.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
Learning to make healthy choices can counter the effects of large portionsResearchers have found that after going through a training program designed to help people control portion sizes, participants still ate larger portions but chose healthier foods, lowering their calorie intake.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
Study shows a potential new approach to opioid crisisIn a six-month study recently concluded, a research unit affiliated with two hospital institutions and a university in Ottawa found that a reduction in the number of cigarettes smoked daily also reduced a smoker's dependence on opioids.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
Cannabidiol may help to reduce seizures for people with treatment-resistant form of epilepsy, study suggestsTreatment with a pharmaceutical formulation of cannabidiol alongside other anti-epilepsy treatments helped to reduce the number of drop seizures -- seizures which involve sudden falls due to loss of muscle tone -- in people with Lennox-Gastaut syndrome who did not respond to previous treatment, according to a recent phase 3 randomized clinical trial.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
New study debunks the theory of 'war-like' business competition in financial marketsA new study shows that the perception of war-like competitiveness is flawed and misleading. The research demonstrates that firms within syndicated financial markets, such as reinsurance, are just as likely to take a relational approach to competition, incorporating collaboration and reciprocity, contributing to and creating value for many players in the same market, even when they are rivals.
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The Scientist RSS
Stem Cells Made by Modifying the Epigenome with CRISPRResearchers use the technique to turn on Oct4 or Sox2 in mouse embryonic fibroblasts and convert them into pluripotent cells.
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Microbes may help astronauts transform human waste into foodHuman waste may one day be a valuable resource for astronauts on deep-space missions. Now, a Penn State research team has shown that it is possible to rapidly break down solid and liquid waste to grow food with a series of microbial reactors, while simultaneously minimizing pathogen growth.
1h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Using virtual reality to identify brain areas involved in memoryVirtual reality is helping neuroscientists at UC Davis get new insight into how different brain areas assemble memories in context.
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Cancer researchers hit a bullseye with new drug target for Ewing sarcomaKimberly Stegmaier of Dana-Farber/Boston Children's Cancer and Blood Disorders Center and collaborators have found that Ewing sarcoma cells die if an enzyme called CDK12 is knocked out genetically or chemically inhibited. What's more, when a CDK12 inhibitor is combined with another drug, called a PARP inhibitor, the two drugs double down to deliver a lethal punch to Ewing sarcoma cells.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Ecologist unearths the foothill yellow-legged frog's past in order to inform its futureOnce abundant in Southern California, the foothill yellow-legged frog inexplicably vanished from the region sometime between the late 1960s and early 1970s. The reasons behind its rapid extinction have been an ecological mystery.
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The Atlantic
Trump's Best Friend in EuropePresident Trump doesn’t have many friends in Europe. In countries like Germany and Spain, his approval ratings stand at 7 and 11 percent , respectively. He fares no better in the U.K., where the “special relationship” between the U.S. and the U.K. has given way to the president publicly sparring with British lawmakers and even canceling a long-anticipated visit to London. But if there’s one frien
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
Investors lose, insiders win when IPOs involve analysts, study showsWhen equity analysts are more involved in a firm's initial public offering, investors who purchase stock based on these analysts' reports lose more than 3 percent of their investment, according to a new study.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
Do our mitochondria run at 50 degrees C?A new study presents surprising evidence that mitochondria can run more than 10 degrees C hotter than the body's bulk temperature, and indeed are optimized to do so.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
Developing a roadside test for marijuana intoxication isn't as easy as it soundsAs marijuana legalization gains momentum in the United States, researchers worry about keeping the public safe, particularly on the roads. Recent studies have identified new biomarkers that can be used to estimate a person's recent cannabinoid intake. But, using those markers to judge cognitive and behavioral impairment is complex, say toxicologists.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
Scientists discover stem cells that build a fly's nervous systemScientists have uncovered new insights into how stem cells transform into brain cells that control leg movements. The surprising details of this process, observed in the brains of fruit flies, could shed light on how the human brain develops -- and what happens when problems arise. By providing key insight into how stem cells develop and mature, this research should help scientists in their quest
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
Study could explain link between high-cholesterol diet and colon cancerScientists discovered that boosting mice's cholesterol levels spurred intestinal stem cells to divide more quickly, enabling tumors to form 100 times faster. The study identifies a molecular pathway that could serve as a new drug target for colon cancer treatment.
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Blog » Languages » English
January Marathon: Results!Very nicely done, Eyewirers. This month’s first cell took 12 hours 45 minutes to complete and the second took 6 hours 45 minutes, which is a NEW RECORD! It sure is an auspicious start to our new marathon system. Pat yourselves on the back and enjoy those bonuses… oh, and did you know it’s been two years since we began the Dig? Wow!
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Feed: All Latest
Why No Gadget Can Prove How Stoned You AreMarijuana is such a confounding drug that scientists and law enforcement are struggling to create an objective standard for marijuana intoxication.
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Big Think
Does Taking Photos for Social Media Enhance or Degrade an Experience?It all surrounds your outlook on the self-presentation process. Read More
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Remains of earliest modern human outside of Africa unearthed in IsraelA jawbone complete with teeth recently discovered at Israel's Misliya cave by Tel Aviv University and University of Haifa researchers has now been dated to 177,000-194,000 years ago. The finding indicates that modern humans were present in the Levant at least 50,000 years earlier than previously thought.
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Science | The Guardian
Giving teenagers alcohol may increase risk of drink-related problems – studyParents offering even limited amounts of alcohol may increase risk of binge-drinking and other problems, study concludes Parents who give alcohol to their teenagers could be increasing their offspring’s risk of binge drinking and other alcohol-related problems, research has revealed. The study found that compared with secondary-school aged children who had no access to alcohol, those who were giv
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
Historical migrations left genetic footprints on the Irish genomeA genome-wide study of the people of Ireland reveals a previously hidden genetic landscape, shaped through geography and historical migrations.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
Genetic link between thinner corneas and increased risk of glaucomaGenetic studies in mice point to a protein called POU6F2, which can modulate corneal thickness, as a possible risk factor for glaucoma in humans, researchers report.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
Surprising discovery links sour taste to the inner ear's ability to sense balanceScientists have discovered an entirely new class of ion channels. These channels let protons (H+ ions) into cells, are important in the inner ear for balance, and are present in the taste cells that respond to sour flavors.
2h
Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
Think of honeybees as 'livestock,' not wildlife, argue expertsContrary to public perception, die-offs in honeybee colonies are an agricultural not a conservation issue, argue researchers, who say that manged honeybees may contribute to the genuine biodiversity crisis of Europe's declining wild pollinators.
2h
Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
Spintronics and nanophotonics combined in 2-D materialResearchers have found a way to convert the spin information into a predictable light signal at room temperature. The discovery brings the worlds of spintronics and nanophotonics closer together and might lead to the development of an energy-efficient way of processing data, in data centers, for example.
2h
Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
When the 'guardian' and the 'caretaker' of the genome join forcesBiologists and chemists have deciphered a molecular mechanism of the cell with relevance for the development of cancer and the fight against that disease.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
Honeycomb maze offers significant improvement over current spatial navigation testsA powerful new tool for the study of spatial memory offers a significant improvement over the current gold standard, the Morris Water Maze. The novel Honeycomb Maze design allows for systematic analysis of the decisions an animal makes during navigation.
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The Scientist RSS
Researchers Discover 10 New Immune Systems in BacteriaThe findings more than double the number of known defense mechanisms, piquing the interests of molecular biology tool developers.
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Scientific American Content: Global
Our Coastlines Are Eroding, Along with Our Democratic Norms and InstitutionsCivility and decency are crumbling on a daily basis, undercut and weakened by language emanating from the White House -- Read more on ScientificAmerican.com
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Big Think
Traders now regularly do $100 million deals on mobile appsA new survey indicates that large financial institutions are relaxing restrictions around mobile trading, increasing the volume of deals done via mobile apps 31% in 2017 from the year before. Read More
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
Tiny particles have outsize impact on storm clouds, precipitationTiny particles fuel powerful storms and influence weather much more than has been appreciated, according to a new study. While scientists have known that aerosols may play an important role in shaping weather and climate, the new study shows that the smallest of particles have an outsize effect. The tiny pollutants -- long considered too small to have much impact on droplet formation -- are, in ef
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
Humans take up too much space -- and it's affecting how mammals moveHuman beings take up a lot of real estate -- around 50-70 percent of the Earth's land surface. And our increasing footprint affects how mammals of all sizes, from all over the planet, move.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
Bacterial immune systems take the stageResearchers now understand that most microorganisms have sophisticated immune systems of which CRISPR is just one element; but there has been no good way to identify these systems. In a massive, systematic study, scientists have now revealed the existence of 10 previously unknown immune defense mechanisms in bacteria.
2h
Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
Quantum race accelerates development of silicon quantum chipScientists have shown that the quantum information of an electron spin can be transported to a photon, in a silicon quantum chip. This is important in order to connect quantum bits across the chip and allowing to scale up to large numbers of qubits.
2h
Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
Swaths of Asia inhabited by surprisingly related 'Lizards of the Lost Arcs'A varied collection of lizards throughout Asia are unexpectedly close cousins of beach-dwelling mourning geckos, all descended from a common ancestor species that thrived along an ancient archipelago in the West Pacific that served as a 'superhighway' of biodiversity.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
Shape-shifting organic crystals use memory to improve plastic electronicsResearchers have identified a mechanism that triggers shape-memory phenomena in organic crystals used in plastic electronics. Shape-shifting structural materials are made with metal alloys, but the new generation of economical printable plastic electronics is poised to benefit from this phenomenon, too. Shape-memory materials science and plastic electronics technology, when merged, could open the
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
Repurposed drug found to be effective against Zika virusIn both cell cultures and mouse models, a drug used to treat Hepatitis C effectively protected and rescued neural cells infected by the Zika virus -- and blocked transmission of the virus to mouse fetuses. Researchers say their findings support further investigation of using the repurposed drug as a potential treatment for Zika-infected adults, including pregnant women.
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Live Science
'Search for Extraterrestrial Intelligence' Needs a New Name, SETI Pioneer SaysSETI pioneer Jill Tarter thinks the "search for extraterrestrial intelligence" needs to undergo a rebranding.
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Live Science
Immaculate Conception: Centuries-Old Theological Rift Shows Up on CNNA tense argument about politics turns theological on prime time.
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Big Think
The Doomsday Clock is set to 2 minutes to midnight amid global tensionsDoomsday Clock D. TrumpCiting political tensions and climate change, the Bulletin of the Atomic Scientist have moved their symbolic Clock to its highest point since 1953 Read More
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Popular Science
How polar animals cope with frigid darkness for months at a timeAnimals Endless darkness? Subzero temperatures? They can work with that. The Arctic in winter is dark—but it's not empty. Some animals choose to stay put.
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New Scientist - News
Ancient jawbone suggests humans left Africa 50,000 years earlierWe thought that Homo sapiens were confined to Africa until 120,000 years ago, but a jawbone from an Israeli cave reveals an exodus over 170,000 years ago
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New Scientist - News
Are human clones next? Your trickiest cloning questions answeredWe answer your technical and ethical concerns raised after the arrival of the world’s first cloned monkeys using the Dolly technique
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New Scientist - News
How do you stop your smart glasses filming in the toilet?Body cameras and smart glasses can capture your every waking move, so a new device stares at your eyeball to know when to record
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New Scientist - News
Calm down – China is not racing ahead with human CRISPR trialsDespite treating 86 people since 2015, China's approach to CRISPR genome-editing in humans is basic and risky
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
Scientists discover oldest known modern human fossil outside of AfricaAfrica Human FossilA large international research team has discovered the earliest modern human fossil ever found outside of Africa. The finding suggests that modern humans left the continent at least 50,000 years earlier than previously thought.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
A 'marine motorhome for microbes': Oceanic plastic trash conveys disease to coral reefsFor coral reefs, the threat of climate change and bleaching are bad enough. An international research group has now found that plastic trash -- ubiquitous throughout the world's oceans -- intensifies disease for coral, adding to reef peril.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
Ancient Eurasian DNA sequencing is revealing links with modern humansUntil recently, very little was known about the genetic relationship between modern humans of the Upper Paleolithic age (the period of time between 50,000 and 10,000 years ago, also called the Late Stone age) and today's populations. But with direct DNA sequencing, researchers are discovering unexpected genetic connections between individuals on opposing sides of Eurasia. These suggest a complex h
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
'Forgotten' antibiotic offers hope against worst superbugsAn antibiotic overlooked since its discovery 40 years ago could help develop new drugs against life-threatening infections caused by some of the world's most dangerous superbugs.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
Recycling and reusing worn cathodes to make new lithium ion batteriesNanoengineers have developed an energy-efficient recycling process that restores used cathodes from spent lithium ion batteries and makes them work just as good as new. The process involves harvesting the degraded cathode particles from a used battery and then boiling and heat treating them. Researchers built new batteries using the regenerated cathodes. Charge storage capacity, charging time and
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The Atlantic
More Taxes, Less Death?Sugar is having a tobacco moment, not just here , but around the world. Urbanization, falling poverty rates, and growing global trade have changed the diets and expanded the waistlines of the world’s poor, with processed food and sweetened drinks becoming household staples. Even very low-income communities are seeing rising rates of obesity, diabetes, cancer, and heart disease as a result. But ma
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The Atlantic
The Ominous Rumblings of Mount MayonFor the past two weeks, the Philippine volcano Mount Mayon has been sporadically erupting, releasing small to medium amounts of ash and lava as local authorities warn that the magma underlying Mayon is still building and a more violent eruption may be imminent. Some 75,000 residents have been evacuated already, most removed from areas where they would be vulnerable to pyroclastic flows—avalanches
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Big Think
Scientists unlock the axolotl genome, the largest to ever be sequencedYou see a gorgeous salamander. Science sees the key to regrowing limbs, eyes, and even bones. Read More
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Study shows investors lose, insiders win when IPOs involve analystsWhen equity analysts are more involved in a firm's initial public offering, investors who purchase stock based on these analysts' reports lose more than 3 percent of their investment, according to a new study from the University at Buffalo School of Management.
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Aspiration as good as stent retrievers for large vessel clot removal in stroke patientsResults of COMPASS trial are presented at the International Stroke Conference by J. Mocco, M.D., Vice Chair of Neurosurgery for the Mount Sinai Health System.
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Humans get in the way of mammal movementA new study, co-authored by biologists at the University of Maryland, describes the extent to which highly modified landscapes impede the movement of 57 land-based mammal species from around the world. On average, these mammals cover about a third to half of the distance they would otherwise travel in wild, unmodified landscapes. An international team of more than 100 co-authors published its find
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Quantum race accelerates development of silicon quantum chipIn a neck-and-neck race with their competitors, a team of TU Delft scientists led by Professor Vandersypen showed that quantum information of an electron spin can be transported to a photon, in a silicon quantum chip. This is important in order to connect quantum bits across the chip and allowing to scale up to large numbers of qubits.
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Researchers from TU Delft combine spintronics and nanophotonics in 2-D materialResearchers from the Kavli Institute of Nanoscience at TU Delft, working with the Netherlands Organisation for Scientific Research's AMOLF institute, have found a way to convert the spin information into a predictable light signal at room temperature. The discovery brings the worlds of spintronics and nanophotonics closer together and might lead to the development of an energy-efficient way of pro
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Bacterial immune systems take the stageResearchers now understand that most microorganisms have sophisticated immune systems of which CRISPR is just one element; but there has been no good way to identify these systems. In a massive, systematic study, Prof. Rotem Sorek and his team at the Weizmann Institute of Science have now revealed the existence of 10 previously unknown immune defense mechanisms in bacteria.
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Plastics linked to disease in coralAn international team led by a JCU scientist has found that contact with plastic waste massively increases the chance of disease in corals.
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Humans limit animal movementsHumans change entire landscapes -- by building cities and roads, by farming land and by exploiting natural resources. What effects does this have on animals and their habitats? Using the GPS location data of more than 800 animals, a team of scientists was able to prove a reduction in animal movements in areas with a high human footprint.
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
A 'marine motorhome for microbes': Oceanic plastic trash conveys disease to coral reefsFor coral reefs, the threat of climate change and bleaching are bad enough. An international research group led by Cornell University has found that plastic trash -- ubiquitous throughout the world's oceans -- intensifies disease for coral, adding to reef peril, according to a new study in the journal Science.
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Historical migrations left genetic footprints on the Irish genomeA genome-wide study of the people of Ireland reveals a previously hidden genetic landscape, shaped through geography and historical migrations. Ross Byrne and Russell McLaughlin of Trinity College Dublin in Ireland report their findings Jan. 25, 2018, in PLOS Genetics.
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Even the tiniest aerosol particles can kick up a stormA new study suggests that tiny aerosol particles from pollution plumes have a greater influence on stormy weather over pristine regions of the world, such as oceans and large forests, than previously believed.
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Where humans set up camp, animals roam much shorter distancesIn areas with high levels of human activity, mammal movements can be reduced by as much as three-fold, a new study reports.
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Billions of plastic items are sickening coral reefsA new study estimates that 11.1 billion plastic items are lodged along coral reefs across the Asia-Pacific, and that their presence increases the risk of coral disease from 4 to 89 percent, in some cases.
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Oldest human fossil outside of Africa discovered, with tools nearbyA human fossil found in Israel substantially shifts the estimated timeframe for when humans first left Africa, suggesting they did so approximately 40,000 to 50,000 years sooner than previously thought.
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Mammals move less in human-modified landscapesOn average, mammals move only half to one third of the distance in human-modified landscapes than they do in the wild. These findings have been published today by an international team lead by researchers at the Senckenberg Nature Research Society and Goethe University Frankfurt in the journal Science.
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Think of honeybees as 'livestock,' not wildlife, argue expertsContrary to public perception, die-offs in honeybee colonies are an agricultural not a conservation issue, argue Cambridge researchers, who say that manged honeybees may contribute to the genuine biodiversity crisis of Europe's declining wild pollinators.
2h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Surprising discovery links sour taste to the inner ear's ability to sense balanceScientists at the USC Dornsife College of Letters, Arts and Sciences have discovered an entirely new class of ion channels. These channels let protons (H+ ions) into cells, are important in the inner ear for balance, and are present in the taste cells that respond to sour flavors.
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Humans take up too much space -- and it's affecting how mammals moveA study recently published by Science found that, on average, mammals living in human-modified habitats move two to three times less far than their counterparts in areas untouched by humans.
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Scientists discover oldest known modern human fossil outside of AfricaA large international research team, led by Israel Hershkovitz from Tel Aviv University and including Rolf Quam from Binghamton University, State University of New York, has discovered the earliest modern human fossil ever found outside of Africa. The finding suggests that modern humans left the continent at least 50,000 years earlier than previously thought.
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Tiny particles have outsize impact on storm clouds, precipitationTiny particles fuel powerful storms and influence weather much more than has been appreciated, according to a study in the Jan. 26 issue of the journal Science. While scientists have known that aerosols may play an important role in shaping weather and climate, the new study shows that the smallest of particles have an outsize effect. The tiny pollutants -- long considered too small to have much i
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Study finds genetic link between thinner corneas and increased risk of glaucomaGenetic studies in mice point to a protein called POU6F2, which can modulate corneal thickness, as a possible risk factor for glaucoma in humans, report Eldon Geisert of Emory University, and colleagues, Jan. 25 in PLOS Genetics.
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Polio labs equipped to study rare tropical diseasesIn 1988, the World Health Organization set out to eradicate polio and established a network of 145 labs around the world that are designed to process polio tests. Now, those labs are well-equipped to help tackle neglected tropical diseases, researchers report in PLOS Neglected Tropical Diseases.
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Do our mitochondria run at 50 degrees C?A new study publishing Jan. 25 in the open-access journal PLOS Biology by INSERM and CNRS researchers at Hôpital Robert Debré in Paris led by Dr. Pierre Rustin (and their international collaborators from Finland, South Korea, Lebanon and Germany) presents surprising evidence that mitochondria can run more than 10 degrees C hotter than the body's bulk temperature, and indeed are optimized to do so.
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Inside Science
A One-Way Street for LightA One-Way Street for Light Researchers provide a blueprint for a tiny device that can control the direction of light. light-trapping.jpg Internal refraction of a beam of laser light inside a prism. Image credits: dgdean viaWikimedia Commons Rights information: CC BY 3.0 Physics Thursday, January 25, 2018 - 13:15 Yuen Yiu, Staff Writer (Inside Science) -- Researchers have come up with a blueprint
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Science : NPR
Some Types Of Songs Are Universally Identifiable, Study SuggestsTo see if music really is a universal language, researchers gave people 14 second samples of songs from around the world and asked them to say what kind of song it is. (Image credit: Klubovy/Getty Images )
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
Mosquitoes remember human smells, but also swatsA new study shows that mosquitoes can rapidly learn and remember the smells of hosts and that dopamine is a key mediator of this process. The study proved a mosquito's preference can shift if that person's smell is associated with an unpleasant sensation.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
Nearly half of California's vegetation at risk from climate stressCurrent levels of greenhouse gas emissions are putting nearly half of California's natural vegetation at risk from climate stress. However, cutting emissions so that global temperatures increase by no more than 2 degrees Celsius could reduce those impacts by half, with about a quarter of the state's natural vegetation affected, according to a new study.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
Lifestyle changes prevent cognitive decline even in genetically susceptible individualsEnhanced lifestyle counselling prevents cognitive decline even in people who are carriers of the APOE4 gene, a common risk factor of Alzheimer's disease, according to a new study.
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Science | The Guardian
Oldest known human fossil outside Africa discovered in IsraelHuman ancestors left Africa far earlier than previously thought, discovery of prehistoric jawbone and tools suggest A prehistoric jawbone discovered in a cave in Israel has prompted scientists to rethink theories of how the earliest human pioneers came to populate the planet, suggesting that our ancestors left Africa far earlier than previously thought. The fossil, dated to nearly 200,000 years a
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The Atlantic
An Internet Archive Seeks to Rekindle the Egyptian Revolution's SpiritE gypt’s 2011 revolution was remarkable for its self-awareness. The power to photograph, film, and broadcast protests across the Internet in real time seemed to prove the emancipatory power of technology. At Tahrir Square, an independent media group formed by a handful of young activists called Mosireen collected videos recorded by smartphone-wielding protesters that documented police abuses. Mos
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The Atlantic
11 Billion Pieces of Plastic Are Riddling Corals With DiseaseCoral reefs are meant to be riots of color, but those that Joleah Lamb studied in the Indo-Pacific were colorful for all the wrong reasons. Their branches and crevices were frequently festooned with plastic junk. “We came across chairs, chip wrappers, Q-tips, garbage bags, water bottles, old nappies,” she says. “Everything you see on the beach is probably lying on the reef. And it seems like it’s
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The Atlantic
A Young-Adult Trend Fizzles With The Death CureAs young-adult franchises go, The Maze Runner has always had a grab-bag, bargain-bin quality to it. There’s a little bit of something for everyone—a wicked corporation (that’s conveniently named “WCKD”); a post-apocalyptic society choked with hordes of roving zombies; a futuristic city housing the elite; a love triangle; and a cornucopia of middle-aged character actors surrounding our teenaged he
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The Atlantic
A Jawbone Is the Oldest Modern-Human Fossil Outside of AfricaAfrica Human IsraelBetween 1929 and 1934, the legendary British archaeologist Dorothy Garrod excavated a series of caves and rock shelters on the slopes of Israel’s Mount Carmel. Within those caves, she uncovered a series of historically important hominid fossils. Some were Neanderthals. Others belonged to early modern humans— Homo sapiens . Among the latter, skeletons of 10 individuals from one cave, Skhul , turne
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Science current issue
Response to Comment on "Precipitation drives global variation in natural selection"The comment by Myers-Smith and Myers focuses on three main points: (i) the lack of a mechanistic explanation for climate-selection relationships, (ii) the appropriateness of the climate data used in our analysis, and (iii) our focus on estimating climate-selection relationships across (rather than within) taxonomic groups. We address these critiques in our response.
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A tale of two cultures
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Critics see only risks, no benefits in horsepox paper
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Australian state forecasts deadly thunderstorm asthma
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The light fantastic
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Clean Meat: How Growing Meat Without Animals Will Revolutionize Dinner and the World
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Conscious machines: Defining questions
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Response
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Having your longevity and eating too
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Nanoscale chiral valley-photon interface
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A framework for more ductile magnesium
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Building an essential quantum component
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Earliest modern humans out of Africa
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The neuronal population is the key unit
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Boron sneaks polarity into polystyrene
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Substantial convection and precipitation enhancements by ultrafine aerosol particles
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Superhuman AI for heads-up no-limit poker: Libratus beats top professionalsNo-limit Texas hold’em is the most popular form of poker. Despite artificial intelligence (AI) successes in perfect-information games, the private information and massive game tree have made no-limit poker difficult to tackle. We present Libratus, an AI that, in a 120,000-hand competition, defeated four top human specialist professionals in heads-up no-limit Texas hold’em, the leading benchmark a
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Science current issue
The nature of nurture: Effects of parental genotypesSequence variants in the parental genomes that are not transmitted to a child (the proband) are often ignored in genetic studies. Here we show that nontransmitted alleles can affect a child through their impacts on the parents and other relatives, a phenomenon we call "genetic nurture." Using results from a meta-analysis of educational attainment, we find that the polygenic score computed for the
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Science current issue
A platform for automated nanomole-scale reaction screening and micromole-scale synthesis in flowThe scarcity of complex intermediates in pharmaceutical research motivates the pursuit of reaction optimization protocols on submilligram scales. We report here the development of an automated flow-based synthesis platform, designed from commercially available components, that integrates both rapid nanomole-scale reaction screening and micromole-scale synthesis into a single modular unit. This sy
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Science current issue
Synthesis of partially and fully fused polyaromatics by annulative chlorophenylene dimerizationSince the discovery by Ullmann and Bielecki in 1901, reductive dimerization (or homocoupling) of aryl halides has been extensively exploited for the generation of a range of biaryl-based functional molecules. In contrast to the single-point connection in these products, edge-sharing fused aromatic systems have not generally been accessible from simple aryl halides via annulation cascades. Here we
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Science current issue
Resonantly driven CNOT gate for electron spinsSingle-qubit rotations and two-qubit CNOT operations are crucial ingredients for universal quantum computing. Although high-fidelity single-qubit operations have been achieved using the electron spin degree of freedom, realizing a robust CNOT gate has been challenging because of rapid nuclear spin dephasing and charge noise. We demonstrate an efficient resonantly driven CNOT gate for electron spi
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Science current issue
Nanoscale chiral valley-photon interface through optical spin-orbit couplingThe emergence of two-dimensional transition metal dichalcogenide materials has sparked intense activity in valleytronics, as their valley information can be encoded and detected with the spin angular momentum of light. We demonstrate the valley-dependent directional coupling of light using a plasmonic nanowire–tungsten disulfide (WS 2 ) layers system. We show that the valley pseudospin in WS 2 co
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Science current issue
Mechanistic origin and prediction of enhanced ductility in magnesium alloysPure magnesium exhibits poor ductility owing to pyramidal dislocation transformations to immobile structures, making this lowest-density structural metal unusable for many applications where it could enhance energy efficiency. We show why magnesium can be made ductile by specific dilute solute additions, which increase the cross-slip and multiplication rates to levels much faster than the deleter
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Science current issue
High-temperature pairing in a strongly interacting two-dimensional Fermi gasThe nature of the normal phase of strongly correlated fermionic systems is an outstanding question in quantum many-body physics. We used spatially resolved radio-frequency spectroscopy to measure pairing energy of fermions across a wide range of temperatures and interaction strengths in a two-dimensional gas of ultracold fermionic atoms. We observed many-body pairing at temperatures far above the
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Science current issue
The earliest modern humans outside AfricaAfrica Human FossilTo date, the earliest modern human fossils found outside of Africa are dated to around 90,000 to 120,000 years ago at the Levantine sites of Skhul and Qafzeh. A maxilla and associated dentition recently discovered at Misliya Cave, Israel, was dated to 177,000 to 194,000 years ago, suggesting that members of the Homo sapiens clade left Africa earlier than previously thought. This finding changes o
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Science current issue
Plastic waste associated with disease on coral reefsPlastic waste can promote microbial colonization by pathogens implicated in outbreaks of disease in the ocean. We assessed the influence of plastic waste on disease risk in 124,000 reef-building corals from 159 reefs in the Asia-Pacific region. The likelihood of disease increases from 4% to 89% when corals are in contact with plastic. Structurally complex corals are eight times more likely to be
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Science current issue
Learning and attention reveal a general relationship between population activity and behaviorPrior studies have demonstrated that correlated variability changes with cognitive processes that improve perceptual performance. We tested whether correlated variability covaries with subjects’ performance—whether performance improves quickly with attention or slowly with perceptual learning. We found a single, consistent relationship between correlated variability and behavioral performance, re
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Science current issue
The ER membrane protein complex is a transmembrane domain insertaseInsertion of proteins into membranes is an essential cellular process. The extensive biophysical and topological diversity of membrane proteins necessitates multiple insertion pathways that remain incompletely defined. Here we found that known membrane insertion pathways fail to effectively engage tail-anchored membrane proteins with moderately hydrophobic transmembrane domains. These proteins ar
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Science current issue
New Products
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Science current issue
Cheating on my mentor
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Science current issue
Spermidine in health and diseaseInterventions that delay aging and protect from age-associated disease are slowly approaching clinical implementation. Such interventions include caloric restriction mimetics, which are defined as agents that mimic the beneficial effects of dietary restriction while limiting its detrimental effects. One such agent, the natural polyamine spermidine, has prominent cardioprotective and neuroprotecti
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Science current issue
Comment on "Precipitation drives global variation in natural selection"Siepielski et al . (Reports, 3 March 2017, p. 959) claim that "precipitation drives global variation in natural selection." This conclusion is based on a meta-analysis of the relationship between climate variables and natural selection measured in wild populations of invertebrates, plants, and vertebrates. Three aspects of this analysis cause concern: (i) lack of within-year climate variables, (i
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NYT > Science
Trilobites: Billions of Plastic Pieces Litter Coral in Asia and AustraliaBig and small pieces of plastic make coral more prone to disease, the researchers found, but it is possible to control the impact of coastal pollution on reefs.
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NYT > Science
Matter: You Are Shaped by the Genes You Inherit. And Maybe by Those You Don’t.An unusual study of educational attainment in children finds that gene variants linked to parental nurturing were highly influential even though children had not inherited them.
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NYT > Science
In an Israeli Cave, Scientists Discover Jawbone of Earliest Modern Human Out of AfricaAfrica Human IsraelThe discovery could rewrite the migration story of our species, pushing back by about 50,000 years when Homo sapiens were thought to have first left Africa.
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NYT > Science
Doomsday Clock Is Set at 2 Minutes to Midnight, Closest Since 1950sDonald Trump DoomsdayThe “clock,” kept by the Bulletin of the Atomic Scientists, is a symbolic measurement of scientists’ concerns about disaster.
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Feed: All Latest
How Much Kinetic Energy Could Black Panther Collect from Bullets?Enough to charge two iPhones—or flip a car.
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BBC News - Science & Environment
Modern humans left Africa much earlierAfrica Human FossilResearchers identify the remains of the earliest known modern humans to have left Africa.
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Live Science
Human History Gets Longer: Oldest Fossils Outside of Africa FoundThe oldest fossils of modern humans outside Africa have been discovered in Israel.
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Latest Headlines | Science News
An ancient jaw pushes humans’ African departure back in timeIf an ancient jaw found in an Israeli cave belongs to Homo sapiens, the humans left Africa tens of thousands of years earlier than we thought.
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Latest Headlines | Science News
Overlooked air pollution may be fueling more powerful stormsThe tiniest particles in air pollution aren’t just a health threat. They also strengthen thunderstorms, new research suggests.
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The Atlantic
India's Free-Speech ProblemThe opening Thursday of the Indian film Padmavaat should have been an occasion for the liberal use of cliches about movies made in the world’s largest film industry: epic, colorful, vibrant. It has instead evoked another stereotype of modern India: violence, intolerance, and the diminishing space for free expression in a nation that, to its critics, is slowly reflecting the Hindu-nationalist etho
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Thirty years of innovation pays off as oligonucleotide therapeutics come to marketThe recent approval of SpinrazaTM (nusinersen), jointly developed by Ionis Pharmaceuticals and Biogen, marks the arrival of a new class of biological products -- oligonucleotide therapeutics. A recent publication from the Center for Integration of Science and Industry at Bentley University shows that the thirty year path from the initiation of research on oligonucleotides as therapeutics to the em
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Humans get in the way of mammal movementHumans modify natural landscapes in a variety of ways, from constructing expansive cityscapes to fencing off otherwise untouched rangeland. A new study, co-authored by biologists at the University of Maryland, describes the extent to which highly modified landscapes impede the movement of 57 land-based mammal species from around the world. On average, these mammals cover about a third to half of t
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Study uncovering multiple new, unusual bacterial immune defense mechanisms could pave the way toward new biotech toolsUntil a decade ago, scientists were not aware that bacteria had complex immune systems - ones that could keep up with the pace of evolution in viruses called phages that infect bacteria. That changed with the discovery of what is now the most famous bacterial immune mechanism: CRISPR. Scientists realized that CRISPR is a natural gene editor, and it has revolutionized the world of biological resear
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Surprising discovery links sour taste to the inner ear's ability to sense balanceScientists at the USC Dornsife College of Letters, Arts and Sciences have discovered an entirely new class of ion channels. These channels let protons (H+ ions) into cells, are important in the inner ear for balance, and are present in the taste cells that respond to sour flavors.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Researchers combine spintronics and nanophotonics in 2-D materialSpintronics is an emerging field in which the spin of electrons, rather than the charge, is used to process data. Unfortunately, the spin only lasts for a very short time, making it difficult to exploit in electronics. Researchers from the Kavli Institute of Nanoscience at TU Delft, working with the Netherlands Organisation for Scientific Research's AMOLF institute, have now found a way to convert
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Quantum race accelerates development of silicon quantum chipA team of TU Delft scientists led by Professor Vandersypen seeks to create better and more reliable quantum processors. In a neck-and-neck race with competitors, they showed that quantum information of an electron spin can be transported to a photon in a silicon quantum chip. This is important in order to connect quantum bits across the chip and to scale up to large numbers of qubits. Their work w
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Scientists discover oldest known modern human fossil outside of AfricaAfrica Human FossilA large international research team, led by Israel Hershkovitz from Tel Aviv University and including Rolf Quam from Binghamton University, State University of New York, has discovered the earliest modern human fossil ever found outside of Africa. The finding suggests that modern humans left the continent at least 50,000 years earlier than previously thought.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Historical migrations left genetic footprints on the Irish genomeA genome-wide study of the people of Ireland reveals a previously hidden genetic landscape, shaped through geography and historical migrations. Ross Byrne and Russell McLaughlin of Trinity College Dublin in Ireland report their findings January 25th, 2018 in PLOS Genetics.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Think of honeybees as 'livestock,' not wildlife, argue expertsThe 'die-off' events occurring in honeybee colonies that are bred and farmed like livestock must not be confused with the conservation crisis of dramatic declines in thousands of wild pollinator species, say Cambridge researchers.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Do our mitochondria run at 50 degrees C?Our body temperature is held at a fairly steady 37.5°C, and the assumption has always been that most of our physiological processes take place at this temperature. The heat needed to maintain this temperature in the face of a colder environment is generated by tiny subcellular structures called mitochondria. But a new study publishing January 25 in the open access journal PLOS Biology by INSERM an
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
A 'marine motorhome for microbes': Oceanic plastic trash conveys disease to coral reefsFor coral reefs, the threat of climate change and bleaching are bad enough. An international research group led by Cornell University has found that plastic trash - ubiquitous throughout the world's oceans - intensifies disease for coral, adding to reef peril, according to a new study in the journal Science.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Tiny particles have outsize impact on storm clouds, precipitationTiny particles fuel powerful storms and influence weather much more than has been appreciated, according to a study in the Jan. 26 issue of the journal Science.
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Science : NPR
Plastic Pollution Is Killing Coral Reefs, 4-Year Study FindsA study in the Pacific Ocean finds that bags and bottles are sickening and killing reefs from Thailand to Australia. Coral reefs already are susceptible to disease due to unusually warm water. (Image credit: Michael O'Neill/Science Source)
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Scientific American Content: Global
Unique Oil Spill in East China Sea Frustrates ScientistsThe lighter petroleum that spilled has never before been released in such massive quantities in the ocean -- Read more on ScientificAmerican.com
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
Silicon nanoblock arrays create vivid colors with subwavelength resolutionResearchers in Japan have demonstrated a range of highly tunable vivid color pixels controlled by the geometry of a monocrystalline silicon metamaterial surface. The pixels created showed dual-color response dependent on the polarization of the light source, as well as subwavelength resolution. These materials have potential applications in high-resolution printing, particularly for anti-counterfe
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
Two new snout moth genera and three new species discovered in southern ChinaNew members have joined the ranks of the snout moths -- one of the largest groups within the insect order known formally as Lepidoptera, comprising all moths and butterflies. Recently, a team of four taxonomists described two genera and three species previously unknown to science.
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Big Think
France will close all its coal power stations by 2021French president Emmanuel Macron recently announced plans to close all of the country's coal-fired power plants two years ahead of schedule. Read More
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Science | The Guardian
Tessa Jowell calls for global cooperation to help cancer patientsLabour peer given standing ovation for moving speech in House of Lords about her brain cancer Tessa Jowell has received a standing ovation in the House of Lords for a moving speech about her brain cancer in which she urged peers to support an international initiative to share resources, research and new treatments. The former Labour culture secretary, who is seriously ill with a high-grade brain
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Learning to make healthy choices can counter the effects of large portionsPenn State researchers have found that after going through a training program designed to help people control portion sizes, participants still ate larger portions but chose healthier foods, lowering their calorie intake.
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
The eye is not immune to immunityContrary to long-established dogma, the eye can host an active immune response that could both heal injury and contribute to loss of vision.
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Live Science
American Cats Are Too Fat — But This Diet Can HelpHow do you get a house cat to lose weight? The onus is on the owner.
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Viden
Facebook under beskydning: “Skal reguleres som cigaret-industrien”Sociale medier er afhængighedsskabende og skadelige som cigaretter, mener direktør for den store amerikanske virksomhed Salesforce.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
Proteins' fluorescence a little less mysteriousScientists use simulations to understand the mechanism behind a popular fluorescent protein used to monitor signals between neurons. Their work could lead to a practical screening tool for designing fluorescent proteins.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
Prader-Willi syndrome reversed in brain cells growing in the labStem cell researchers have reversed Prader-Willi syndrome in brain cells growing in the lab. The discovery provides clues that could lead to a treatment for Prader-Willi, a genetic disorder that silences genes necessary for normal brain function. Prader-Willi occurs in about one out of every 15,000 births, and is the most common genetic cause of life-threatening childhood obesity.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
A simple new approach to plastic solar cellsResearchers in Japan have built on their previous work to develop new advanced organic polymer. When applied in the solar cells, the polymers formed as amorphous films, which maintained high power conversion efficiency. Typical solar cells require special treatments to make the polymer films crystalline. These new devices could offer a way toward simpler and more cost-effective printing of solar c
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
Prediction of titanic nitride proved unsinkableA team of experimental and computational scientists have synthesized a long sought-after form of titanium nitride, which has promising mechanical and optoelectronic properties.
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Big Think
China is the world's new science superpower, topping the U.S. in publicationsA new report finds China is now the leading nation in the publication of science and engineering research. Read More
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Bob Lord Is the DNC's New Chief Security OfficerAt Yahoo, Bob Lord led the response to two massive cyberattacks. Now he's bringing that know-how to the Democratic National Committee.
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Ingeniøren
Hologrammer får kamp til stregen – og på savannen vinder den stærkeste ikke altidBlandt højdepunkterne i ugens videnskabelige nyhedstrøm finder vi en ny 3D-billedteknik, studier af løvers og geparders jagt samt en forslag til, hvilke gasser man skal lede efter på exoplaneter, som tegn på liv – og nej det er ikke ilt.
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Missing in actionA UCSB ecologist unearths the foothill yellow-legged frog's past in order to inform its future.
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The Atlantic
The Strange Cases of Anti-Islam Politicians Turned MuslimsLast fall, Arthur Wagner was part of something remarkable: His political party, the anti-Islam, anti-immigrant Alternative für Deutschland, entered the Bundestag , becoming the first far-right party in the body since the 1950s. This year, Wagner has done something even more remarkable: He has converted to Islam and left AfD. Wagner was a leading party official in the state of Brandenburg, and had
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
Phosphorus pollution reaching dangerous levels worldwideHuman-made phosphorus pollution is reaching dangerously high levels in freshwater basins around the world, according to new research.
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Quanta Magazine
Tissue Engineers Hack Life’s Code for 3-D Folded ShapesWhen it comes to tissue engineering, scientists tend to be micromanagers. Traditional approaches involve introducing cells to a synthetic scaffold that guides the cells’ growth as a new tissue. That method can work for relatively simple tissues, like skin. But for more complex structures, like those in our internal organs, it fails to take into account the “developmental history associated with t
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
NASA honors 7 killed on space shuttle Columbia 15 years agoNASA is honoring the seven astronauts killed aboard shuttle Columbia 15 years ago, with a special musical tribute by the son of Israel's first astronaut.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
5.8 magintude quake strikes 100 miles off California coastA 5.8 magnitude earthquake struck 100 miles (164 kilometers) off the coast of Northern California.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Shape-shifting organic crystals use memory to improve plastic electronicsResearchers have identified a mechanism that triggers shape-memory phenomena in organic crystals used in plastic electronics. Shape-shifting structural materials are made with metal alloys, but the new generation of economical printable plastic electronics is poised to benefit from this phenomenon, too. Shape-memory materials science and plastic electronics technology, when merged, could open the
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BBC News - Science & Environment
Boris Johnson: Mummy is distant ancestorResearchers have taken two years to identify a lady who lived 230 years ago.
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Big Think
Dark matter killed the dinosaurs, says a noted cosmologistHarvard's theoretical physicist Lisa Randall links the extinction of the dinosaurs to the mysterious "dark matter". Read More
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Viden
Engang var Jorden og Mars ens: Hvorfor blev vores røde nabo livløs?Til manges skuffelse har al søgen efter liv på Mars indtil videre vist, at Jordens røde nabo er en kold, død sten. Men der er håb endnu.
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Science : NPR
Helping Farmed Animals: High-Impact RescueFollowing the example of an elephant caught on video that apparently thanked human rescuers, anthropologist Barbara King gives a shout-out to new campaigns that help farmed animals. (Image credit: branex/Getty Images/iStockphoto)
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New on MIT Technology Review
Telegram’s ICO: Give us $2 billion and we’ll solve all of blockchain’s problemsThe encrypted messaging company’s plan is bold, but short on details.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Integration of AI and robotics with materials sciences will lead to new clean energy technologyMaterials are the foundation of essentially all clean energy technologies including advanced batteries, solar cells, low-energy semiconductors, catalysts for capturing and storing CO2, and more. But discovering new materials is currently a time consuming and expensive process: to determine whether they will be useful, newly discovered molecules are run through simulation, synthesis, and testing in
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
Air pollution linked to irregular menstrual cyclesThe air your teenage daughter breathes may be causing irregular menstrual cycles. Well documented negative health effects from air pollution exposure include infertility, metabolic syndrome and polycystic ovary syndrome. This study is the first to show that exposure to air pollution among teen girls (ages 14-18) is associated with slightly increased chances of menstrual irregularity and longer tim
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
Quantum cocktail provides insights on memory controlExperiments based on atoms in a shaken artificial crystal made of light offer novel insight into the physics of quantum many-body systems -- which might help in the development of future data-storage technologies.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
Music really is a universal languageSongs serve many different purposes: accompanying a dance, soothing an infant, or expressing love. Now, after analyzing recordings from all around the world, researchers show that vocal songs sharing one of those many functions tend to sound similar to one another, no matter which culture they come from. As a result, people listening to those songs could make accurate inferences about them, even a
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
Energy supply channelsScientists elucidate the mechanism for inserting protein molecules into the outer compartment of mitochondria.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
Pulling power reveals new insights into membrane dynamics in human cellsScientists have now discovered how the movement and membrane dynamics of a specific organelle -- called peroxisomes -- are mediated.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
People with diabetes face increased risk of infectionsDiabetes patients have an increased risk of suffering serious infections or death compared to the general public, new research has shown.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Research reveals swaths of Asia inhabited by surprisingly related 'Lizards of the Lost Arcs'A new paper appearing in Proceedings of the Royal Society B shows a varied collection of lizards throughout Asia to be unexpectedly close cousins of beach-dwelling mourning geckos, all descended from a common ancestor species that thrived along an ancient archipelago in the West Pacific that served as a "superhighway" of biodiversity.
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Shape-shifting organic crystals use memory to improve plastic electronicsResearchers have identified a mechanism that triggers shape-memory phenomena in organic crystals used in plastic electronics. Shape-shifting structural materials are made with metal alloys, but the new generation of economical printable plastic electronics is poised to benefit from this phenomenon, too. Shape-memory materials science and plastic electronics technology, when merged, could open the
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Repurposed drug found to be effective against Zika virusIn both cell cultures and mouse models, a drug used to treat Hepatitis C effectively protected and rescued neural cells infected by the Zika virus -- and blocked transmission of the virus to mouse fetuses. Researchers at University of California San Diego School of Medicine, with colleagues in Brazil and elsewhere, say their findings support further investigation of using the repurposed drug as a
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Researchers pose revolutionary theory on horse evolutionWhile it is largely believed that horses simply evolved with fewer digits, researchers at New York Institute of Technology College of Osteopathic Medicine (NYITCOM) pose a new theory that suggests remnants of all five toes are still present within the hooves of the horse.
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Do western societies promote narcissism?Researchers from Charité - Universitätsmedizin Berlin have been able to show that people who grew up in the former western states of Germany have higher levels of narcissism than those whose socialization took place in the former eastern states. According to research published in the journal PlosOne*, the reunification of Germany ushered in a gradual re-balancing of the distribution of these trait
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Research reveals swaths of Asia inhabited by surprisingly related 'Lizards of the Lost Arcs'A varied collection of lizards throughout Asia are unexpectedly close cousins of beach-dwelling mourning geckos, all descended from a common ancestor species that thrived along an ancient archipelago in the West Pacific that served as a 'superhighway' of biodiversity.
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Energy supply channelsFreiburg scientists elucidate the mechanism for inserting protein molecules into the outer compartment of mitochondria.
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Integration of AI and robotics with materials sciences will lead to new clean energy technologyThe proposed integrated Materials Acceleration Platforms could cut the average time for developing a useful new material from 20 years down to one or two years.
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Heart cells sense stiffness by measuring contraction forces and resting tension simultaneouslyResearchers from Queen Mary University of London have identified a new mechanism in which adhesive structures within the cells of the heart sense stiffness through muscle contractions and resting tension at the same time.
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Novel body structure likely tied to mating in new extinct insect speciesBased on 2-D and 3-D data of several morphological features, researchers scanned all specimens with different μ-Ct devices at Institute of Zoology of the Chinese Academy of Sciences, Beijing Synchrotron Radiation Facility (BSRF) and Shanghai Synchrotron Radiation Facility (SSRF).
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Researchers overcome obstacle for future stem cell therapiesResearchers have discovered a new technique that overcomes one of the major challenges of stem cell therapy.A drug, co-created by UBC researchers, might overcome one of the major challenges of stem cell therapy -- their tendency to differentiate, becoming specific tissue cells too early and too quickly.
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Mosquitoes remember human smells, but also swats, researchers findA Virginia Tech study shows that mosquitoes can rapidly learn and remember the smells of hosts and that dopamine is a key mediator of this process. The study proved a mosquito's preference can shift if that person's smell is associated with an unpleasant sensation.
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
UCLA study could explain link between high-cholesterol diet and colon cancerUCLA scientists discovered that boosting mice's cholesterol levels spurred intestinal stem cells to divide more quickly, enabling tumors to form 100 times faster. The study identifies a molecular pathway that could serve as a new drug target for colon cancer treatment.
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
The bacterial 'Game of Thrones'Much like animals and to a degree humans, bacteria enjoy a good fight. While their aggressive characteristics are broadly known, their approach to conflict is less understood.In research published in Current Biology, researchers at the University of Oxford have shed light on this area of bacterial behavior, revealing that they approach conflict in much the same way as a human platoon, responding t
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
'Forgotten' antibiotic offers hope against worst superbugsAn antibiotic overlooked since its discovery 40 years ago could help develop new drugs against life-threatening infections caused by some of the world's most dangerous superbugs.
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Research test identifies BRCA2 gene mutations that lead to breast, ovarian cancersA new test developed by researchers at Mayo Clinic shows which mutations in the BRCA2 gene make women susceptible to developing breast or ovarian cancers. The research behind the test was published today in the American Journal of Human Genetics.
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Discovery offers new genetic pathway for injured nerve regenerationResearchers on the hunt for genes involved in regenerating critical nerve fibers came away with a surprise: the discovery of a new genetic pathway that carries hope for victims of traumatic injuries -- from stroke to spinal cord damage. Although no cures exist for many nervous system injuries, if the damaged neurons do not die, 'there is hope to find ways to make them stronger and help them regrow
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
A new strategy induces the regression of advanced lung tumors in miceA study conducted by researchers at the Spanish National Cancer Research Centre (CNIO) shows how the elimination of the c-Raf kinase by genetic manipulation causes the regression of Kras oncogene-driven advanced lung tumors in a genetically designed mouse model. It has also been shown that the elimination of the c-Raf protein produces very tolerable toxic effects. This opens a new possibility for
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Scientists discover stem cells that build a fly's nervous systemScientists at Columbia's Zuckerman Institute have uncovered new insights into how stem cells transform into brain cells that control leg movements. The surprising details of this process, observed in the brains of fruit flies, could shed light on how the human brain develops -- and what happens when problems arise. By providing key insight into how stem cells develop and mature, this research shou
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Distinct brain rhythms, regions help us reason about categoriesThe brain's ability to categorize based on straightforward resemblance or on a more abstract similarity arises from its use of distinct rhythms, at distinct times, in distinct parts of the prefrontal cortex. Gamma in one region handles sensory comparisons, but beta in another region considers the less obvious ways things go together.
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Developing a roadside test for marijuana intoxication isn't as easy as it soundsAs marijuana legalization gains momentum in the United States, researchers worry about keeping the public safe, particularly on the roads. Recent studies have identified new biomarkers that can be used to estimate a person's recent cannabinoid intake. But, using those markers to judge cognitive and behavioral impairment is complex, say toxicologists in a commentary published on Jan. 25 in a specia
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Ancient Eurasian DNA sequencing is revealing links with modern humansUntil recently, very little was known about the genetic relationship between modern humans of the Upper Paleolithic age (the period of time between 50,000 and 10,000 years ago, also called the Late Stone age) and today's populations. But with direct DNA sequencing, researchers are discovering unexpected genetic connections between individuals on opposing sides of Eurasia. These suggest a complex h
4h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Music really is a universal languageSongs serve many different purposes: accompanying a dance, soothing an infant, or expressing love. Now, after analyzing recordings from all around the world, researchers reporting in Current Biology show that vocal songs sharing one of those many functions tend to sound similar to one another, no matter which culture they come from. As a result, people listening to those songs could make accurate
4h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News
If you swat mosquitoes, they may learn to avoid your scentMost of us surely don't think of mosquitoes as being especially adept at learning. But researchers reporting in Current Biology on Jan. 25 now show that mosquitoes can in fact learn to associate a particular odor with an unpleasant mechanical shock akin to being swatted. As a result, they'll avoid that scent the next time.
4h
New on MIT Technology Review
A 3-D imaging robot could help construction workers make fewer mistakes
4h
Live Science
Why a Pot 'Breathalyzer' Won't WorkIt's really tricky to measure how much marijuana a person has used on a given day — and how impaired their driving may be as the result of that use — a new review says.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
Gender, education and class impacts on retirement and quality of life in older ageResearchers have found that raising your level of education and skills during your working life are key factors in determining your quality of life in retirement and older age.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
Everyday exercise has surprisingly positive health benefitsThe benefits of low-intensity physical activity, such as standing, walking or doing household chores, can be more health beneficial than once thought. Replacing half an hour’s sedentariness a day with everyday activity reduces the risk of fatal cardiovascular disease by 24 per cent.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
Mechanism of familial Parkinson's disease clarified in fruit fly modelParkinson's disease (PD) is the second most common neurodegenerative disorder, with up to 10 million people affected worldwide. PD is characterized by progressive increase in movement disability and impaired balance, which are resulted from the loss of dopaminergic neurons in the substantia nigra of the midbrain. While most PD occurs sporadically, about 15% of cases are hereditary and linked to ge
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
Modern human brain organization emerged only recentlyHomo sapiens fossils demonstrate a gradual evolution of the human brain towards its modern globular shape.
4h
Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
The origin of snakes: New evolutionary scenarioThe early evolution of snakes happened from surface-terrestrial to burrowing in the lizard-snake transition suggests a research group.
4h
Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
Thin is in? Think again.Models used in social media postings, or more than a decade's worth of Miss USA beauty pageant winners tell us that thin female bodies are still rated as attractive. However, US women's perceptions of what constitutes the perfect female figure have evolved in recent years to a 'thin and toned' ideal.
4h
Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
MMV malaria box phenotyped against plasmodium and toxoplasmaScientists have completed phenotypic screening of a large collection of potent chemical inhibitors (known as MMV Malaria Box), against pathogenic parasites toxoplasma gondii and plasmodium falciparum, causative agents of human toxoplasmosis and malaria. This knowledge opens up new avenues to study unique stages of infectious cycle that are affected by inhibitor classes towards anti-parasitic drug
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
Putting an end to allergic reactions: Newly found mechanism could pave the wayResearchers have found a new mechanism in which an antibody can prevent allergic reactions in a broad range of patients. The breakthrough could pave the way for a far more effective allergy medicine.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
Study of 3,000 drinkers' attempts to cut down produces sobering resultsJanuary is a popular month for people trying to reduce their alcohol intake but how successful are they in doing so? A new study that assessed data on the drinking patterns of nearly 3,000 drinkers who reported that they were planning to reduce their alcohol consumption found that very few managed it when followed up six months later.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Phosphorus pollution reaching dangerous levels worldwide, new study findsMan-made phosphorus pollution is reaching dangerously high levels in freshwater basins around the world, according to new research.
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Science | The Guardian
Are you a mosquito magnet? Swatting really can deter them, study showsResearchers have discovered why mosquitoes prefer some people over others – and how a swat teaches them to avoid you Researchers have found a solution for those plagued by mosquitoes: thrash about, and the insects will learn to give you a wide berth. While it has long been known that mosquitoes favour some individuals over others – and can shift those preferences when availability is scarce – it
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Big Think
Chinese scientists successfully clone two monkeys—and the implications are vastMonkeys Human Hua HuaThis latest breakthrough allows for a limitless production of clones. Read More
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The Atlantic
A Study Suggests That People Can Hear Universal Traits in MusicImagine that you’re a researcher who has unlimited time and resources, and a time machine that can travel anywhere in the world. You use these wondrous gifts to get a recording of every song that has ever been sung, whether by people in big cities or those in small hunter-gatherer groups. You play these recordings to random volunteers, and ask them to guess the behaviors that were associated with
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The Atlantic
'Charlottesville': A Government-Commissioned Story About Nuclear WarEditor’s Note: “Charlottesville” is a short story that was commissioned by the Office of Technology Assessment in 1979 as an appendix to the report The Effects of Nuclear War . The story was written by Nan Randall, a young journalist who had previously worked on nuclear stories with the executive director of the Arms Control Association. It had a remarkable life for a governmental report appendix
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Pulling power reveals new insights into membrane dynamics in human cellsOrganelles are the functional units of a cell. Like different parts of a production line in a factory, they perform specialised functions but depend on and interact with each other.
5h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Honeycomb maze offers significant improvement over current spatial navigation testsA powerful new tool for the study of spatial memory was today described in Nature as a significant improvement over the current gold standard, the Morris Water Maze. The novel Honeycomb Maze design allows for systematic analysis of the decisions an animal makes during navigation.
5h
Popular Science
'Incredible genes' can only do so much to counteract an unhealthy lifestyleHealth Your genes are only part of you. What defines our health? We know it’s some combination of genes, the environment, and the choices we make. But which one has the most impact?
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New on MIT Technology Review
Facebook’s experimental chatbot is learning to do small talkFacebook News Feed
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
NASA poised to topple a planet-finding barrierNASA Space TrumpNASA optics experts are well on the way to toppling a barrier that has thwarted scientists from achieving a long-held ambition: building an ultra-stable telescope that locates and images dozens of Earth-like planets beyond the solar system and then scrutinizes their atmospheres for signs of life.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Brexit is one of the greatest threats to women's rights: studyBrexit is one the greatest threats to women's rights and social inclusion, a new study in the Journal of Social Policy and Society reports.
5h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Ancient Eurasian DNA sequencing is revealing links with modern humansUntil recently, very little was known about the genetic relationship between modern humans of the Upper Paleolithic age (the period of time between 50,000 and 10,000 years ago, also called the Late Stone age) and today's populations. But with direct DNA sequencing, researchers are discovering unexpected genetic connections between individuals on opposing sides of Eurasia. These suggest a complex h
5h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Octapeptin: 'Forgotten' antibiotic offers hope against worst superbugsAn antibiotic overlooked since its discovery 40 years ago could help develop new drugs against life-threatening infections caused by some of the world's most dangerous superbugs.
5h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
The bacterial 'Game of Thrones'Much like animals and to a degree humans, bacteria enjoy a good fight. They stab, shove and poison each other in pursuit of the best territory. While this much is clear, little is known about the tactics and strategy that bacteria use during their miniature wargames.
5h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Mosquitoes remember human smells, but also swats, researchers findYour grandmother's insistence that you receive more bug bites because you're 'sweeter' may not be that far-fetched after all, according to pioneering research from Virginia Tech scientists.
5h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Music really is a universal languageEvery culture enjoys music and song, and those songs serve many different purposes: accompanying a dance, soothing an infant, or expressing love. Now, after analyzing recordings from all around the world, researchers reporting in Current Biology on January 25 show that vocal songs sharing one of those many functions tend to sound similar to one another, no matter which culture they come from. As a
5h
Scientific American Content: Global
How Secure Is Your Data When It's Stored in the Cloud?As cloud storage becomes more common, data security is an increasing concern -- Read more on ScientificAmerican.com
5h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Aspiration as good as stent retrievers for removing large-vessel clots in stroke patientsADAPT, an aspiration technique pioneered at the Medical University of South Carolina, is non-inferior to stent retrievers for mechanical thrombectomy in stroke patients with large-vessel clots, according to the preliminary results of the COMPASS trial reported at the International Stroke Conference on Jan. 25, 2018.
5h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Heparan sulfate biomaterials retain structure and function after gamma irradiationA new study has shown that heparan sulfate, a desirable natural material for use in bioengineered tissues and orthotic implants, can withstand the stress of gamma irradiation for sterilization and retain its structure, binding ability, and biological function.
5h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News
When the 'guardian' and the 'caretaker' of the genome join forcesAchievement in the field of cancer research: Biologists and chemists at the University of Konstanz decipher a molecular mechanism of the cell with relevance for the development of cancer and the fight against that disease.
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Progress toward an HIV cure in annual special issue of AIDS Research & Human RetrovirusesResearchers have shown that despite effective combined antiretroviral therapy (cART), HIV can hide in the spleen of patients with no detectable HIV in their blood.
5h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Study shows a potential new approach to opioid crisisIn a six-month study recently concluded, a research unit affiliated with two hospital institutions and a university in Ottawa found that a reduction in the number of cigarettes smoked daily also reduced a smoker's dependence on opioids.
5h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Study provides first systematic survey of metabolites across tumor typesIn an advance reminiscent of the earliest maps of genomic mutations in cancer, investigators at Dana-Farber Cancer Institute and Memorial Sloan Kettering Cancer Center have completed the first systematic survey of the products of biochemical reactions within cancer and their relation to the progress of the disease. The products, known as metabolites, arise from the myriad chemical reactions that k
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The Atlantic
The CFPB’s New MissionSince the day in late November when he showed up at the Consumer Financial Protection Bureau, doughnuts in hand , Mick Mulvaney has said that things were going to change. For almost two months, the acting director appointed by Trump has implemented seemingly small, but important , shifts that indicate what the bureau will look like in the years ahead. In a memo to bureau staff made public by ProP
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The Atlantic
There Will Never Be Another Vladimir GuerreroBaseball revels in numbers, and this year’s Hall of Fame class—elected by the Baseball Writers Association of America and announced Wednesday evening—boasts plenty of impressive ones. Chipper Jones, the Atlanta Braves’ stalwart third baseman and left fielder, hit over .300 from both sides of the plate, tallying 2,726 hits and 468 home runs. Jim Thome, the well-traveled and barn-sized slugger, has
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
Conservation efforts reveal new details about Alamo cannonsConservators have revealed new details about two cannons used during the Texas Revolution’s 1836 Battle of the Alamo. The Rio Grande Cannon and Spanish Cannon returned home to the Alamo in San Antonio on Monday after almost four months in the lab.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
The eye is not immune to immunityContrary to long-established dogma, the eye can host an active immune response that could both heal injury and contribute to loss of vision.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
Vitamin D supplements could ease painful IBS symptoms· New research finds high prevalence of vitamin D deficiency in IBS patients – regardless of their ethnicity
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
What is the environmental impact of your lunch-time sandwich?The carbon footprint of your sandwich could be having a major impact on greenhouse gas emissions according to new research. Researchers have carried out the first ever study looking at the carbon footprint of 40 sandwich varieties, both homemade and pre-packaged.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
New technology standard could shape the future of electronics designScientists have discovered a way of enhancing the capabilities of an emerging nanotechnology that could open the door to a new generation of electronics.
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Letting silenced genes speakStem cell researchers at UConn Health have reversed Prader-Willi syndrome in brain cells growing in the lab. The discovery provides clues that could lead to a treatment for Prader-Willi, a genetic disorder that silences genes necessary for normal brain function. Prader-Willi occurs in about one out of every 15,000 births, and is the most common genetic cause of life-threatening childhood obesity.
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Air pollution linked to irregular menstrual cyclesThe air your teenage daughter breathes may be causing irregular menstrual cycles. Well documented negative health effects from air pollution exposure include infertility, metabolic syndrome and polycystic ovary syndrome. This study is the first to show that exposure to air pollution among teen girls (ages 14-18) is associated with slightly increased chances of menstrual irregularity and longer tim
5h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Quantum cocktail provides insights on memory controlExperiments based on atoms in a shaken artificial crystal made of light offer novel insight into the physics of quantum many-body systems -- which might help in the development of future data-storage technologies.
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The Atlantic
The Transformative Justice of Judge AquilinaIn 2013, a judge in Montana, G. Todd Baugh, sentenced a former high-school teacher who’d pleaded guilty to raping a 14-year-old student. Giving the accused a suspended sentence plus 31 days, with credit for time served, Baugh remarked that the victim was “older than her chronological age,” and was “as much in control of the situation” as the teacher had been. The teenager couldn’t respond, becaus
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Phosphorus pollution reaching dangerous levels worldwide, new study findsMan-made phosphorus pollution is reaching dangerously high levels in freshwater basins around the world, according to new research.
5h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Pulling power reveals new insights into membrane dynamics in human cellsScientists have now discovered how the movement and membrane dynamics of a specific organelle -- called peroxisomes -- are mediated.
5h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Honeycomb maze offers significant improvement over current spatial navigation testsA powerful new tool for the study of spatial memory was today described in Nature as a significant improvement over the current gold standard, the Morris Water Maze. The novel Honeycomb Maze design allows for systematic analysis of the decisions an animal makes during navigation.
5h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Proteins' fluorescence a little less mysteriousRice University scientists use simulations to understand the mechanism behind a popular fluorescent protein used to monitor signals between neurons. Their work could lead to a practical screening tool for designing fluorescent proteins.
5h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Understanding emotional responses to traumatic injury key to planning & treatment effortsInjuries are a major public health problem in the United States, accounting for nearly 60 percent of all deaths among Americans between the ages of 1 and 44 years. Survivors of traumatic injuries often face significant physical and mental health challenges, including depression and post-traumatic stress disorder.
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
'Nanobulb' helps see subwavelength-size objects with ordinary microscopeScientists from ITMO University have proven that a silicon-gold nanoparticle can act as an effective source of white light when agitated by a pulse laser in IR band. One such "nanobulb" was integrated into a standard probe microscope, which allowed the researchers to overcome the diffraction limit and examine subwavelength-size objects. The new technology makes modern near-field microscopy cheaper
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Yale cancer researchers propose new ways to select patients for clinical trialsYale Cancer Center investigators have demonstrated in a new study that more sophisticated models to assess patient risk for cancer can result in better clinical trials with more definitive results.
5h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Combining drugs that lower blood pressure and cholesterol could do more to prevent strokeCombining medication that lowers blood pressure with medication that lowers cholesterol reduced first-time strokes by 44 percent. For those with very high blood pressure -- readings 143.5 mm Hg or higher -- taking two types of blood pressure-lowering drugs together every day reduced stroke by 42 percent.
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The Economist: The world this week
Politics this week
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The Economist: The world this week
KAL's cartoon
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The Economist: The world this week
Business this week
6h
Live Science
Crystal Slab of 'Snowflakes' to Become World's Tiniest Sonic ShieldAcoustics go nano.
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Ingeniøren
Statens vagthunde i oprør: Minister nægter ansvar for vaccine-fadæsenSundhedsministeren og hendes ministerium afviser som noget helt enestående den væsentligste kritik af salget af Statens Serum Instituts vaccineproduktion. Chokerede statsrevisorer kalder det »uhørt« og vil reagere.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Fiat Chrysler nearly doubles profits in 2017Italian-US carmaker Fiat Chrysler said Thursday that its net profit nearly doubled in 2017, outpacing analysts' expectations, but it downgraded its sales target for the current year.
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Futurity.org
Submit your pics for ‘forever’ storage in DNAResearchers are looking to collect 10,000 original images from around the world to preserve them indefinitely in synthetic DNA, which holds promise as a revolutionary storage medium that lasts much longer and is many orders of magnitude denser than current technologies. What would you pick? A picture of your family, an endangered landscape, a page of poetry, or a snapshot that sends a message to
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TED Talks Daily (SD video)
What if you could turn plastic trash into cash? | David KatzCan we solve the problem of ocean plastic pollution and end extreme poverty at the same time? That's the ambitious goal of The Plastic Bank: a worldwide chain of stores where everything from school tuition to cooking fuel and more is available for purchase in exchange for plastic garbage -- which is then sorted, shredded and sold to brands who reuse "social plastic" in their products. Join David K
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New on MIT Technology Review
These 3-D laser images float effortlessly in the air
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Facebook wins EU court fight against class action lawsuitThe EU's top court on Thursday dismissed a bid by an Austrian activist to bring a class action against Facebook for privacy breaches, although he can sue the US social media giant on a personal basis.
6h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
The evolution of the Australian accentAustralia Day; it's snags on the barbie, mozzies, long necks, Akubra hats and that all Aussie sun blazing through our SPF 50+.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
Primordial oceans had oxygen 250 million years before the atmosphereNew research has pushed a major milestone in the evolution of Earth's environment back by about 250 million years.
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Thin is in? Think againModels used in social media postings, or more than a decade's worth of Miss USA beauty pageant winners tell us that thin female bodies are still rated as attractive. However, US women's perceptions of what constitutes the perfect female figure have evolved in recent years to a 'thin and toned' ideal. This is according to Frances Bozsik of the University of Missouri-Kansas City in the US, who led a
6h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News
New study debunks the theory of 'war-like' business competition in financial marketsA new study, 'Toward a Social Practice Theory of Relational Competing' shows that the perception of war-like competitiveness is flawed and misleading. The research demonstrates that firms within syndicated financial markets, such as reinsurance, are just as likely to take a relational approach to competition, incorporating collaboration and reciprocity, contributing to and creating value for many
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
The origin of snakes -- new evolutionary scenario presentedThe early evolution of snakes happened from surface-terrestrial to burrowing in the lizard-snake transition suggests a research group at the University of Helsinki.
6h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Modern human brain organization emerged only recentlyHomo sapiens fossils demonstrate a gradual evolution of the human brain towards its modern globular shape.
6h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Mechanism of familial Parkinson's disease clarified in fruit fly modelParkinson's disease (PD) is a common neurodegenerative disorder, in which 15 percent of cases are linked to genetic mutations. The DNAJC13 gene has been linked to a hereditary form of PD called PARK21, although the gene's role in PD is unclear. Researchers found that expression of mutant DNAJC13 caused defective cell transport, accumulation of toxic αSYN, neuronal death, and impaired motor functio
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Brexit is one of the greatest threats to women's rightsBrexit is one the greatest threats to women's rights and social inclusion, a new study in the Journal of Social Policy and Society reports.
6h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Specific protein plays key role in the spread of breast cancerResearchers from the University of Liverpool have found an explanation for how breast cancer spreads to the lungs, which could potentially hold the key to preventing the progression of the disease.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Plants increase flower production within a day of soil nutrient applicationThe molecular mechanisms enabling plants to quickly adapt their rate of flower production in response to changing nutrient levels in soil have been revealed by researchers at the Sainsbury Laboratory.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Image: Space weather effectsSpace weather refers to the environmental conditions in space as influenced by solar activity.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
American Airlines earnings dip on higher costsAmerican Airlines reported a dip in fourth-quarter profits Thursday due to higher costs as it projected stronger-than-expected 2018 profits because of strong demand.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Nuclear concerns push 'Doomsday Clock' closer to midnightMounting concerns about the possibility of a nuclear war along with US President Donald Trump's "unpredictability" have pushed the symbolic "Doomsday Clock" to two minutes before midnight, the Bulletin of Atomic Scientists said Thursday.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Sea butterflies repair shell damage from ocean acidificationA new study of tiny marine snails called sea butterflies shows the great lengths these animals go to repair damage caused by ocean acidification. The paper, led by researchers at British Antarctic Survey, is published this month in the journal Nature Communications.
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Science | The Guardian
How 'provocative clothes' affect the brain – and why it's no excuse for assaultHere’s why the persistent idea that a woman’s outfit can make her responsible for her own assault has no basis in science Sterling work by undercover reporters for the Financial Times have caused a storm around the Presidents Club. Reports of their annual gala dinner involving horrific harassment of hostesses , paid (surprisingly little) to cater to the whims of rich powerful men under alarmingly
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Ingeniøren
Erhvervsminister fremlægger plan: Teknologipagt skal øge engagement og motivationBrian Mikkelsen har nu fremlagt planen for en Teknologipagt, hvor uddannelser, virksomheder, interesseorganisationer og det offentlige går sammen om at promovere de tekniske og naturvidenskabelige uddannelser.
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Scientific American Content: Global
Ancient Forests May Protect Birds from Rising HeatOld-growth forests tend to have moderate temperatures compared to their surroundings, which could potentially provide heat-sensitive birds a refuge -- Read more on ScientificAmerican.com
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Religion isn't the enemy of science: it's been inspiring scientists for centuriesTake notice of any debate in the media and you'll see that science and religion are, and always were, at loggerheads. Science is about evidence-based fact, religion is about faith-based belief.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
What would it have been like to witness the beginning of the universe?Something wonderful happened about 13.8 billion years ago. Everything in the universe was created in an instant as an infinitesimally small point of energy: the Big Bang. We know that this event happened, as the universe is constantly expanding and galaxies are moving away from us. The more we peer into the past, the smaller it gets – that's how we know it must have once been infinitesimally small
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Feed: All Latest
The Doomsday Clock Ticks Closer to Midnight Over Nuclear War FearsDoomsday Clock D. TrumpAs the so-called Doomsday Clock ticks even closer to midnight, a reminder of just how easy it is to slip into nuclear war.
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Prompt clot-grabbing treatment produces better stroke outcomesClot removal may be beneficial up to 24 hours following stroke in carefully selected patients, but every hour delayed after symptoms begin may be associated with more disability, according to preliminary research presented at the American Stroke Association's International Stroke Conference 2018, a world premier meeting dedicated to the science and treatment of cerebrovascular disease for research
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Live Science
Armageddon Update: 'Doomsday Clock' Stands at 2 Minutes to MidnightThe "Doomsday Clock," a hypothetical countdown to global Armageddon, gets a new position.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Two new snout moth genera and three new species discovered in southern ChinaNew members have joined the ranks of the snout moths - one of the largest groups within the insect order known formally as Lepidoptera, comprising all moths and butterflies.
6h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
The origin of snakes—new evolutionary scenario presentedThe early evolution of snakes happened from surface-terrestrial to burrowing in the lizard-snake transition suggests a research group at the University of Helsinki.
6h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
How secure is your data when it's stored in the cloud?As cloud storage becomes more common, data security is an increasing concern. Companies and schools have been increasing their use of services like Google Drive for some time, and lots of individual users also store files on Dropbox, Box, Amazon Drive, Microsoft OneDrive and the like. They're no doubt concerned about keeping their information private – and millions more users might store data onli
6h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Primordial oceans had oxygen 250 million years before the atmosphereResearch by a University of Minnesota Duluth (UMD) graduate student Mojtaba Fakhraee and Associate Professor Sergei Katsev has pushed a major milestone in the evolution of the Earth's environment back by about 250 million years. While oxygen is believed to have first accumulated in the Earth atmosphere around 2.45 billion years ago, new research shows that oceans contained plentiful oxygen long be
6h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Recycling and reusing worn cathodes to make new lithium ion batteriesNanoengineers at the University of California San Diego have developed an energy-efficient recycling process that restores used cathodes from spent lithium ion batteries and makes them work just as good as new. The process involves harvesting the degraded cathode particles from a used battery and then boiling and heat treating them. Researchers built new batteries using the regenerated cathodes. C
6h
The Atlantic
How to Fact Check The AtlanticThis article is edited from a story shared exclusively with members of The Masthead , the membership program from The Atlantic ( find out more ). Atlantic fact-checking editor Yvonne Rolzhausen walks us through her fact-checking routine, a process that continues, sometimes for months, until she and her team have confirmed every last line. In a world where misinformation thrives and basic editoria
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Nearly half of California's vegetation at risk from climate stressCurrent levels of greenhouse gas emissions are putting nearly half of California's natural vegetation at risk from climate stress, with transformative implications for the state's landscape and the people and animals that depend on it, according to a study led by the University of California, Davis.
7h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Metals in taps and water pipes can dissolve into drinking waterSignificant amounts of nickel, lead and copper can dissolve into the water from the water pipes and taps in buildings. This was revealed in the master's thesis of Meri Sipilä, who graduated recently from Aalto University. Tap water samples were taken from 30 buildings in different parts of Finland in her study.
7h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Negative media attention during election campaign does not harm party leaders: studyPositive media attention for politicians has a far larger effect on citizen's voting behaviour than negative media reporting. Interestingly: negative attention during an election campaign has no negative consequences whatsoever for party leaders. Loes Aaldering discovered this during her research "Images with Impact. The Electoral Consequences of Party Leader Portrayal in the Media." The researche
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Seniors want to know whom they can trust onlineSeniors have grown so concerned about their safety online that some avoid even low-risk activities such as online banking and shopping that could make their lives easier, a U of T study has found.
7h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
The state of the U.S. solar industryOn Jan. 22, 2018, the Trump administration announced plans to impose punitive duties on solar panels imported from abroad. This decision came in response to a complaint filed by two solar companies, but much of the industry opposes the action, which trade groups say will increase the cost of solar projects and depress demand. To illustrate what's at stake, energy scholar Joshua Rhodes provides som
7h
Dagens Medicin
Odense-læger: Rørbæks forsømmelser ligner dem, Svendborg-lægen blev dømt forDen oprørske læge Kristian Rørbæk Madsen og flere af hans mest markante kolleger skærper nu deres udlægning af begivenhederne på den vagt, som styrelsesdirektør Anne-Marie Vangsted fulgte. Rørbæk begik op imod 4.500 ulovligheder, hvoraf de fleste minder om dem, Svendborg-lægen blev dømt for, siger de nu.
7h
Big Think
SpaceX's Falcon Heavy rocket passes crucial test, launch date imminentTickets are on sale to view the launch of SpaceX's largest rocket, the Falcon Heavy, which carries with it humanity's ambition to land astronauts on the surface of Mars. Read More
7h
Feed: All Latest
Best Super Bowl Home and TV Deals for 2018: LG, Vizio, Sonos, Roku, Crock PotsThere are always some fun TV and tech deals before the Big Game, and we've got them right here!
7h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
The multitasking catalystProfessor Takashi Ooi and his team of researchers from Nagoya University, Japan, have designed a catalyst that performs two tasks during the course of the reaction.
7h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Two new snout moth genera and three new species discovered in southern ChinaNew members have joined the ranks of the snout moths -- one of the largest groups within the insect order known formally as Lepidoptera, comprising all moths and butterflies. Recently, a team of four taxonomists from the Institute of Zoology at the Chinese Academy of Sciences described two genera and three species previously unknown to science. Their study is published in the open access journal Z
7h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News
A simple new approach to plastic solar cellsOsaka University researchers built on their previous work to develop new advanced organic polymer. When applied in the solar cells, the polymers formed as amorphous films, which maintained high power conversion efficiency. Typical solar cells require special treatments to make the polymer films crystalline. These new devices could offer a way toward simpler and more cost-effective printing of sola
7h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News
New research can put an end to allergic reactionsScientists from Denmark and Germany have discovered an antibody, which through a complex biochemical process prevents the human allergy antibody (IgE) from attaching to cells, thus keeping all allergic symptoms from occurring.
7h
Futurity.org
Beads from sub-Saharan Africa upend history of glassmakingDirect evidence that people produced glass in sub-Saharan Africa centuries before the arrival of Europeans represents a “new chapter in the history of glass technology,” report researchers. Lead author Abidemi Babatunde Babalola, a recent graduate of Rice University with a PhD in anthropology and a visiting fellow at Harvard University, came across evidence of early glassmaking during archaeologi
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New on MIT Technology Review
The UK is doubling down on AI ethics and fake news
7h
Ingeniøren
Første gang: Kinesiske forskere kloner primaterKloning af mennesker rykker – teknisk set – et skridt nærmere, idet forskere for første gang kloner en primat.
7h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Silicon nanoblock arrays create vivid colors with subwavelength resolutionOsaka University researchers demonstrated a range of highly tunable vivid color pixels controlled by the geometry of a monocrystalline silicon metamaterial surface. The pixels created showed dual-color response dependent on the polarization of the light source, as well as subwavelength resolution. These materials have potential applications in high-resolution printing, particularly for anti-counte
7h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Lifestyle changes prevent cognitive decline even in genetically susceptible individualsEnhanced lifestyle counselling prevents cognitive decline even in people who are carriers of the APOE4 gene, a common risk factor of Alzheimer's disease, according to a new study published in JAMA Neurology.
7h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News
MMV malaria box phenotyped against plasmodium and toxoplasmaA Singapore-India collaborative research project between the Singapore University of Technology & Design (SUTD) and CSIR-National Chemical Laboratories (NCL) completed phenotypic screening of a large collection of potent chemical inhibitors (known as MMV Malaria Box), against pathogenic parasites toxoplasma gondii and plasmodium falciparum, causative agents of human toxoplasmosis and malaria. This
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Protein YAP in early life influences adult spinocerebellar ataxia pathologyYAP and its neuronal isoform YAPdeltaC are involved in expression and regulation of genes. A team of Tokyo Medical and Dental University (TMDU)-centered researchers found expression of YAPdeltaC during development, but not adulthood, stopped neurodegenerative disease spinocerebellar ataxia type 1 (SCA1) in mice. Notably, YAPdeltaC supplementation overcame the toxic effect of mutant Atxn1 protein i
7h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Cranky employees more likely to violate cybersecurity policiesAs professionals return to work after holidays, their moods are undoubtedly affected by the emotional impact of their holiday experiences, but these moods may be more critical to workplace cybersecurity than previously realized.
7h
Science | The Guardian
How afraid of human cloning should we be? | Philip BallThe creation of two monkeys brings the science of human cloning closer to reality. But that doesn’t mean it will happen The cloning of macaque monkeys in China makes human reproductive cloning more conceivable. At the same time, it confirms how difficult it would be to clone a random adult – Adolf Hitler, say – from a piece of their tissue. And it changes nothing in the debate about whether such h
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Popular Science
We pitted digital assistants against each other to find the most useful AIDIY Alexa vs Siri vs Google Assistant vs Cortana vs Bixby. We decided to compare all the leading digital assistants—Alexa, Siri, Google Assistant, Cortana, and Bixby—to discover which best meets your every need.
7h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Research challenges the popular belief that biofuels are better for the environmentThe European Union is raising the bar for renewable energy goals, but some climate change experts say the new targets could do more harm than good.
7h
Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
Low carbohydrate intake to increased risk of birth defectsWomen who are pregnant or planning to become pregnant may want to avoid diets that reduce or eliminate carbohydrates, as they could increase the risk of having babies with neural tube birth defects, according to a new study.
7h
Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
Tracing the evolution of E. coliScientists recently uncovered new insights about how E. coli bacteria mutate in response to a life-threatening challenge.
7h
Live Science
New Ocean-Dwelling, Bacteria-Killing Tailless Virus Hid in Plain SightScientists have identified a new family of ocean-dwelling, bacteria-killing viruses.
7h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Nearly half of California's vegetation at risk from climate stressCurrent levels of greenhouse gas emissions are putting nearly half of California's natural vegetation at risk from climate stress. However, cutting emissions so that global temperatures increase by no more than 2 degrees Celsius could reduce those impacts by half, with about a quarter of the state's natural vegetation affected, according to UC Davis study.
7h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Discount distortionsA 25-year-old drug discount program aimed at boosting resources for hospitals treating low-income patients did not deliver on its promise to enhance care for the needy, according to research from Harvard Medical School and the NYU School of Medicine.
7h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Russian experts submit 'impenetrable' smartphone protection systemThe team of the Institute of Laser and Plasma Technologies at the National Researcj Nuclear University MEPhI has developed a system of continuous authentication of mobile device users based on behavioral biometrics. The research results have been presented in several international conferences and published in an article titled "Mobile authentication over hand-waving".
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Robots to the rescue: Saving lives with unmanned vehiclesLast week's sea rescue of Australian swimmers by an Unmanned Aerial Vehicle (UAV) is just the start of a robotics revolution.
7h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Effective Space signs deal with satellite company to use drones to lengthen life of satellites in orbitRepresentatives for Effective Space, a U.K. based space technology company, have announced to the press that a deal has been struck between their company and a well-known satellite operator to provide satellite support in orbit. The support, in this case, will involve placing two drones on a rocket, sending them into space and then using them to rescue two satellites that are about to run out of f
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
Enhanced evolution: Scientists find genetic swap changes physical expressionThe difference between webbed toes and distinct digits may be the result of not just genetic information, but of how the genes regulate that information. Researchers have found that a small, nonspecific tweak to a mammal's DNA can potentially cause specific and significant physical changes.
7h
Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
Teenagers are sophisticated users of social mediaTeenagers are far more critical users of social media than we give them credit for, and need to be better supported in reaping the benefits social media can have.
7h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Psychologist Jordan Peterson says lobsters help to explain why human hierarchies exist – do they?Hierarchies are everywhere. It is often argued that they are a social construct, invented to allow certain people (such as white men) to have power over others. But not everyone agrees. While promoting his new book, 12 Rules for Life: An Antidote to Chaos, psychology professor Jordan Peterson, of the University of Toronto, has sparked debate by arguing that hierarchies are in fact natural to some
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Futurity.org
New strategy for finding alien life goes beyond oxygenResearchers have found a new recipe for providing evidence that a distant planet harbors life, one that might be more promising than just looking for oxygen. “…our suggestion is doable, and may lead to the historic discovery of an extraterrestrial biosphere in the not-too-distant future…” “This idea of looking for atmospheric oxygen as a biosignature has been around for a long time. And it’s a go
8h
Feed: All Latest
With Sundance, VR Is Officially a Film-Festival Staple. Now How Does It Make Money?For yet another year, there are VR projects aplenty at the Sundance Film Festival. The question is: Where do they go from here?
8h
Live Science
Why Are So Many People So Unhappy?The likely culprit? Changes in how we spend our free time.
8h
Dagens Medicin
Frede Olesen: Opgør med automatreaktioner fra det politiske systemSystemet dukker hovedet for meget og halshugger de enkelte individer, mener Frede Olesen.
8h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Smart speakers could be the tipping point for home automationOne of the biggest trends of the Consumer Electronics Show (CES) in Las Vegas this year was companies taking digital smart assistants – think Apple's Siri, Google's Assistant and Amazon's Alexa – and incorporating them into more and more consumer devices.
8h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Recycling and reusing worn cathodes to make new lithium ion batteriesNanoengineers at the University of California San Diego have developed an energy-efficient recycling process that restores used cathodes from spent lithium ion batteries and makes them work just as good as new. The process involves harvesting the degraded cathode particles from a used battery and then boiling and heat treating them. Researchers built new batteries using the regenerated cathodes. C
8h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Primordial oceans had oxygen 250 million years before the atmosphereResearch by a University of Minnesota Duluth (UMD) graduate student Mojtaba Fakhraee and Associate Professor Sergei Katsev has pushed a major milestone in the evolution of the Earth's environment back by about 250 million years.
8h
Viden
VIDEO Danske forskere bygger på den næste Mars-robotI 2020 sendes den næste store Mars-robotbil afsted. Om bord er instrumenter bygget delvist af danske hænder.
8h
Futurity.org
Bigger honey bee colonies create less buzzWhen honey bee colonies get larger, common sense suggests it would be noisier with more bees buzzing around. But a new study reports that bigger honey bee colonies actually have quieter combs than smaller ones. “The surprising result was that—and at first I thought something must be wrong—when there are more bees on the comb, the vibrations are actually reduced,” says Michael Smith, a doctoral st
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Science-Based Medicine
Georgian College’s Homeopathy Program: Magical Thinking Presented as FactGeorgian College in Ontario, Canada is now offering a 3-year advanced diploma in the pseudoscience of homeopathy.
8h
The Scientist RSS
Image of the Day: Bacterial HighwaysFungal pathways in cheese rinds affect the composition of bacterial communities residing there.
8h
The Scientist RSS
Kyoto University Finds Stem Cell Researcher Guilty of Data FabricationThe scientist was a member of a stem cell research team led by Nobel laureate Shinya Yamanaka.
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Ingeniøren
Den kinesiske olietanker brændte i en uge – nu vil Norge lære af rekordudslippetErfaringerne er begrænsede med den type olieudslip, som skete i januar sidste år i Kina.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Homicides committed by women are motivated by either gain or love, study findsMost homicides committed by women are motivated by either gain or love, a new analysis of homicide motives matched with certain victim and offender characteristics has found.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
What makes a classic song? The economics of the Hottest 100This year's Triple J Hottest 100 promises to be a memorable one, and not just because of the youth network's controversial recent decision to move the countdown of the world's largest annual online music poll away from Australia Day. A record 2,386,133 votes have been cast and it's a chance for the songs of 2017 to make their pitch for posterity.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Silicon nanoblock arrays create vivid colors with subwavelength resolutionUntil now, the metamaterials used to create tunable color from structural geometry have been based on metals. Although effective in achieving high resolutions, metallic materials suffer from inherent energy losses at visible wavelengths, which makes optimizing color purity challenging. By comparison, the resonance of silicon materials enables high reflectance and purity.
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Science : NPR
Grumpy Cat Awarded $710,000 In Copyright Infringement SuitA jury said that Grenade Beverages illegally used the social media star's likeness on a line of coffee grounds and T-shirts promoting its "Grumppuccino" brand iced coffee. (Image credit: Richard Vogel/AP)
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Rare Australian rodents under attack from all sidesThe continued survival of one of Australia's rarest rodents, the water mouse, could hinge on significantly increasing the size of development buffer zones around their habitats.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
A simple new approach to plastic solar cellsHumankind is in the midst of a massive drive to harness solar energy to power our homes, gadgets, and industry. Plastic solar cells, based on blends of conducting organic polymers, are of interest for making lightweight and cheap solar cells. The problem with these kinds of solar cells is that their solar power efficiencies are very closely related to the way the different types of materials mix a
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Crying off script in workplace can ruin women's careers, researcher findsAs sexual harassment allegations against well-known men in entertainment, media and politics make news, everyday office dynamics are under the microscope. Professor Kimberly Elsbach of the Graduate School of Management at the University of California, Davis, has been examining workplace behavior for more than a decade.
8h
BBC News - Science & Environment
Sound waves 'can help' early tsunami detectionPeople in high-risk tsunami areas could be helped by an alarm system devised by Cardiff scientists.
8h
Dagens Medicin
Mundtlige ordinationer og alternative fakta fra STPSEnten benægter Anne-Marie Vangsted åbenlyse fakta, eller også har hun ikke den fornødne klinisk sundhedsfaglige indsigt til at forstå, hvad hun har været vidne til.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
New study shows freshwater input route from melting ice led to rapid coolingScientists have long known that a reduction in Atlantic Ocean currents bringing warm water to the Northern Hemisphere from the tropics created abrupt cooling known as the Younger Dryas cold period nearly 13,000 years ago, but the cause of this phenomenon has not been proved.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Changing technology and viewing habits could jeopardize Super Bowl advertisingThe Super Bowl, coming Feb. 4, has been an advertising showcase for decades now. But advertising professor Mike Yao, who studies digital media, says changes in technology and viewing habits are also changing the game for advertisers. He explained how with News Bureau social sciences editor Craig Chamberlain.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Permafrost in continuous motionETH researchers have identified a rock glacier in canton Valais that is degrading and moving very quickly. Fortunately, it does not present an immediate threat to people and infrastructure.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Egypt places colossus of Ramses II at new museum's entranceEgypt's Antiquities Ministry says it has placed the ancient colossus of famed pharaoh Ramses II at the entrance of a museum under construction near the country's famed pyramids outside the capital Cairo.
8h
Ingeniøren
Kronik: Dagbodssystemet kan gøres meget mere simpelt
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Study reveals reasons behind big drop in British young people driving cars since 1990sSweeping changes to social-economic conditions and living circumstances are the main factors behind a marked drop in car ownership among young people over the past 25 years, academics from the University of the West of England (UWE Bristol) and the University of Oxford have concluded in a study for the Department for Transport.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Researchers develop thin, transparent and lightweight touchscreen pressure sensor arraysTouchscreens on mobile handheld devices can detect if and where a user is touching the screen, but standard technology cannot determine how much pressure is being exerted. Now, researchers at the University of California San Diego and the University of Texas at Austin have demonstrated a new technology for 'force sensing' that can be added to any type of display, including flexible devices, and po
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Researchers reveal sexual prowess of older males not to be underestimatedQuality sperm, good genes, and courtship knowledge are just a few reasons why females might benefit from mating with older males.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Scientists develop method to test fluorescent biosensors before they're synthesizedRice University scientists have effectively quenched a debate over the mechanism behind a fluorescent biosensor that monitors neurons by sensing changes in voltage.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
New tool visualizes employment trends in biomedical scienceScientists looking for jobs after completing their training may soon have a new tool that helps them evaluate various career paths. The new tool uses a method that was developed by scientists at the National Institute of Environmental Health Sciences (NIEHS), part of the National Institutes of Health. The method differs from others in that it separates employment trends in biomedical science by se
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Video: Artificial leaves to produce fuel on Earth and, one day, MarsCall it "liquid sunlight." With the right technology, the gas station of the future will make its own fuel directly from sunlight, in the process sucking up carbon and producing oxygen.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Modifications enhance fish passage on San Francisquito CreekFish passage in nearby San Francisquito Creek has been enhanced, thanks to modifications Stanford made to a concrete roadway creek crossing in the Jasper Ridge Biological Preserve.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Novel methods of synthesizing quantum dot materialsFor quantum dot (QD) materials to perform well in devices such as solar cells, the nanoscale crystals in them need to pack together tightly so that electrons can hop easily from one dot to the next and flow out as current. MIT researchers have now made QD films in which the dots vary by just one atom in diameter and are organized into solid lattices with unprecedented order. Subsequent processing
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Feed: All Latest
America’s First Climate Change Refugees Try to Save Their TownLouisiana’s Isle de Jean Charles Resettlement Project is the only government-funded climate relocation in the country—and a test case for more to come.
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Popular Science
Deep-sea robots are scoping out the secret origins of algae bloomsNexus Media News “They work everywhere, any time.” Scientists are using robots to better understand algae blooms in the fight against climate change.
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Viden
Tidslinje: Her er de nuværende - og næste 20 års Mars-missionerUdforskningen af vores røde naboplanet fortsætter med et hav af nye missioner. Få et overblik her.
9h
BBC News - Science & Environment
Most UK bat species 'recovering or stable'Volunteer data on the country's 18 resident bat species suggests a positive outlook for the animals.
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Dagens Medicin
Markant flere piger får HPV-vaccine i 2017Dobbelt så mange piger blev HPV-vaccineret i 2017 som i 2016, viser nye tal. Statens Serums Institut tror, at det øgede tilslutning skyldes flere positive effektstudier og en kampagne.
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Science | The Guardian
Forget Ebola, Sars and Zika: ticks are the next global health threatTicks carry a wide array of pathogens – and environmental changes mean they are spreading Since the beginning of our species we have been at war. It’s a continuous, neverending fight against the smallest of adversaries: armies of pathogens and parasites. As we have developed new ways to survive and stop them, they have evolved ever more complex and ingenious methods to thwart our efforts. Humans
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Scientific American Content: Global
The Pharma Exec behind the First Approved Gene Therapy Is Hunting for His Next Big BreakNovartis’s retiring CEO hopes such treatments will soon be deployed against lymphoma, other cancers -- Read more on ScientificAmerican.com
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The Scientist RSS
Monkeys Cloned by Dolly-the-Sheep TechnologyThe approach, which has never before been successfully attempted in primates, could lead to improved animal models for human biology and disease.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
New population of world's rarest fish discovered off Tasmanian coastA team of divers from IMAS and the citizen science project Reef Life Survey (RLS) have discovered a new population of what is believed to be the world's rarest fish.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Modern human brain organization emerged only recentlyResearchers from the Max Planck Institute for Evolutionary Anthropology in Leipzig, Germany, reveal how and when the typical globular brain shape of modern humans evolved. Their analyses based on changes in endocranial size and shape in Homo sapiens fossils show that brain organization, and possibly brain function, evolved gradually within our species and unexpectedly reached modern conditions onl
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Research shows first jet from massive young star detected outside our galaxyIn a significant astronomical discovery, a University of Canterbury (UC) scientist has made the very first detection of a jet from a very young, massive star in a galaxy that is not our own.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Nature-inspired soft millirobot makes its way through enclosed spacesScientists at the Max Planck Institute for Intelligent Systems invented a magnetically controlled soft robot only four millimeters in size, that can walk, crawl or roll through uneven terrain, carry cargo, climb onto the water surface, and even swim in it. The inspiration comes from soft-bodied beetle larvae and caterpillars, and even jellyfishes posed as biological models. One day, this small-sca
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Europa and other planetary bodies may have extremely low-density surfacesSpacecraft landing on Jupiter's moon Europa could see the craft sink due to high surface porosity, research by Planetary Science Institute Senior Scientist Robert Nelson shows.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Temperature swings could cause pothole problems for driversMotorists enjoying days of above-freezing temperatures after shivering through frigid single digits may encounter a jarring reality by spring.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Physicists create self-directed molecular motors that walk on tracksMolecular cargo transportation is an ongoing and vital undertaking in every cell of the human body. However, Nature does not use wheeled vehicles to perform this task. Instead, Nature transports intracellular cargos using bipedal molecular motors that walk along a mesh of molecular filaments called cytoskeletons. By mimicking Nature, the development of artificial track-walking molecular motors (na
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Dagens Medicin
Per Kjær bliver professor i ryg- og nakkeforskningSyddansk Universitet og University College Lillebælt styrker ryg- og nakkeforskning med nyt professorat.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Enhancer adoption changes limb morphologyThe difference between webbed toes and distinct digits may result from how genes regulate genetic information. Researchers at the National Institute of Genetics, Research Organization of Information and Systems (ROIS) in Japan found that a small, non-specific tweak to a mammal's DNA can potentially cause specific physical changes. The scientists recently published the results of their study in the
9h
Scientific American Content: Global
Ursula K. Le Guin, 1929–2018Her work was that of a complete person of letters and an important public intellectual -- Read more on ScientificAmerican.com
9h
The Atlantic
The People Who Would Survive Nuclear WarSomehow, some way, nuclear war is once again a live possibility. The most startling incident came earlier this month when a state employee accidentally clicked the wrong choice in a piece of emergency-alert software, sending a notice of imminent destruction to everyone with a phone in Hawaii. But what’s striking is that people believed the message. For much of the past 30 years, it would have bee
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The Atlantic
Jenny Diski's Curious WomenTo my mind, the quintessential Jenny Diski moment comes in her essay “Rape-rape,” published November 2009 in the London Review of Books . Considering the director Roman Polanski’s statutory rape of a teenager alongside her own assault at 14, Diski explains, “I was neither dazzled nor drugged into sex when I was 14—I was embarrassed into it.” It’s the kind of thing you’re not supposed to admit. It
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Live Science
Origin of Universe's Most Energetic Particles Possibly FoundA new theory connects three of the most energetic particles in the universe.
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New Scientist - News
These are the worst ready-made sandwiches for the climateProducing ready-made sandwiches can generate twice as much carbon dioxide as simply making them at home, and one particular filling is egregiously bad
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Dagens Medicin
Regionerne giver tre bud på bedre samarbejde med kommunerneFormand og næstformand for Danske Regioner kommer med tre løsninger til bedre sammenhæng på tværs af sektorer.
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Feed: All Latest
How Uber May Have Tried to Spy on Its Self-Driving RivalsThe embattled company's Strategic Services Group spills its secrets in court.
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Latest Headlines | Science News
Robots map largest underwater volcanic eruption in 100 yearsHigh-resolution mapping of a 2012 underwater volcanic eruption just goes to show there’s a lot we don’t know about deep-sea volcanism.
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Scientific American Content: Global
Quantum Epistemology for BusinessTo truly understand data, we need to rethink what we mean by "measurement" -- Read more on ScientificAmerican.com
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Live Science
Do Supplements Really Work? Check Out These Fact Sheets for AnswersSeveral new resources from the National Institutes of Health aim to help people cut through the confusion over supplements.
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Live Science
Photos: Burnt Wreck May Be Last Known Ship to Carry Slaves to USA burnt wreck found near Mobile, Alabama, may be the long-lost Clotilda, the last known ship to bring slaves to the United States.
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Live Science
Alabama Reporter Finds Last Known Slave Ship in USThe discovery of a burnt, 19th-century wreck near Alabama has experts wondering whether the Clotilda's remains have finally been found.
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Dagens Medicin
Rigsrevisionen kritiserer SSI’s vaccinefrasalgBeslutningsgrundlag, forberedelse og gennemførelse af salget af vaccineproduktionen på Statens Serum Institut var meget utilfredsstillende, mener Rigsrevisionen. Sundhedsministeriet er uenig i store dele af kritikken.
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Scientific American Content: Global
For AI to Get Creative, It Must Learn the Rules--Then How to Break 'EmNew artificial intelligence systems are using “adversarial networks” to develop creativity and originality by more fluidly mixing and matching real-world information -- Read more on ScientificAmerican.com
10h
Big Think
Everything you should know about happiness in one infographicAccording to science, you can control about 40% of your happiness. Read More
10h
Ingeniøren
Benzin- og dieselbiler kan blive forbudt i Oslo allerede om 6 årEt forbud mod benzin- og dieselbiler i Oslo kan være en realitet allerede om seks år. Oslos byråd undersøger nu, hvordan området inden for Ring 3 kan blive fossilfrit i 2024.
10h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
UV laser photolyses to enhance diamond growthEnergy influences the rates of chemical reactions dramatically. Simply heating a gas-phase reaction system deposits energy indiscriminately in internal and translational motions of precursor and intermediate molecules.
10h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
New sensor for measuring electric field strengthAccurately measuring electric fields is important in a variety of applications, such as weather forecasting, process control on industrial machinery, or ensuring the safety of people working on high-voltage power lines. Yet from a technological perspective, this is no easy task.
10h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
New method measures rare traces of a volatile gasThe gas nitrogen monoxide (NO) belongs to the group of nitrogen oxides, infamous as toxic emissions in urban agglomerations. But NO is also produced in nature and plays a role in the nitrogen cycle, which is essential for most organisms. However, in the ocean, Earth's largest ecosystem, NO levels were not known. Researchers from the GEOMAR Helmholtz Centre for Ocean Research Kiel and the Collabora
10h
Ingeniøren
Nedbrud på datacenter lukker hospitaler i WalesEt IT-nedbrud på to datacentre i Wales onsdag gjorde det umuligt at tilgå patientjournaler på flere hospitaler i Wales i flere timer. Ifølge myndighederne er der ikke tegn på ondsindet angreb eller tab af data.
10h
The Atlantic
A New Group Wants to Elect More Veterans—From Both PartiesEven the most optimistic interpretation of this week’s government shutdown quickly slides into the abyss of the bottomless distrust between Republicans and Democrats in the House. The brief standoff over immigration and funding the government mostly dramatized Washington’s dysfunction. But it offered one glimmer of the hope when about two dozen senators from both parties coalesced to urge a quick
10h
The Atlantic
The Real Cause of the Last Government Shutdown—and the Next OneFor Chuck Schumer and his Senate Democrats, the reaction since the government shutdown ended has been nothing short of brutal. Schumer and his colleagues are being hit from all sides: Trump and his acolytes like Brit Hume who are contemptuous of the cave-in, pundits like David Brooks decrying their ineptitude, progressives and Dreamers screaming about betrayal. It all fits the penchant of journal
10h
Feed: All Latest
You Can’t Trust Facebook’s Search for Trusted NewsFacebook News FeedFacebook plans to poll users on the news sources they trust. The same users who are prone to spreading false stories and extreme content.
10h
Feed: All Latest
Why Tesla's Autopilot Can't See a Stopped FiretruckSemi-autonomous driving systems are designed to ignore unmoving obstacles because otherwise, they couldn't work at all.
10h
BBC News - Science & Environment
Boris Johnson 'is descendant' of mummified Basel womanA Swiss woman who died in 1787 after contracting syphilis is identified as an ancestor of the politician.
11h
Ingeniøren
Med genbrug og småindkøb har DTU bygget sin egen fusionsreaktorPlasmafysikgruppen på DTU Fysik har nu fået gang i en simpel fusionsreaktor, der først og fremmest skal anvendes til undervisning af studerende i plasmafysik.
11h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Sky delivers profits surge awaiting takeover by FoxSky, the pan-European TV giant, announced Thursday a 40-percent increase in first-half net profit on higher revenues, while awaiting a takeover by Rupert Murdoch's 21st Century Fox.
11h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Quantum physics scientist named 'Australian of Year'A groundbreaking quantum physics professor was named "Australian of the Year" on Thursday for her work heralded as ushering in a new era for computer science.
11h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
How smelly is your rubbish?According to some estimates, every year, over 8 billion tonnes of urban waste are generated worldwide, and there is every reason to believe that this figure will increase in coming years due to population growth. Compositing, by which organic waste is converted into fertiliser, is a process that provides a use for part of this huge amount of waste.
11h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Scientists culture human placenta stem cells for first timeIn a milestone achievement for better understanding the development and function of the human placenta, scientists have derived and grown trophoblast stem cells for the first time.
11h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Why wind turbines annoy residents and how to reduce the problemWhen falling asleep, relaxing or undertaking recreational activities, nearly a third of residents living near a wind farm report that they are not at all annoyed, or only slightly annoyed by the noise of wind turbines. One in 10 people experience symptoms of stress, such as irritability or difficulty falling asleep. However, noise is not the only problem for those affected, according to psychologi
11h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News
MIND diet may slow cognitive decline in stroke survivorsA diet created by researchers at Rush University Medical Center may help substantially slow cognitive decline in stroke survivors, according to preliminary research presented on Jan. 25, at the American Stroke Association's International Stroke Conference 2018 in Los Angeles. The finding are significant because stroke survivors are twice as likely to develop dementia compared to the general popula
11h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Vitamin C in the body can be tracked by fluorescenceVitamin C is best known as a nutrient. In high enough doses, however, vitamin C also shows potential against many cancers, according to recent studies. To successfully develop vitamin C (chemically named ascorbic acid) as a medication, it is crucial to probe its concentration in the body, thus ensuring safe and effective doses.
11h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Ultralow power consumption for data recordingA team of researchers at Tohoku University, in collaboration with the National Institute of Advanced Industrial Science and Technology (AIST) and Hanyang University, has developed new phase change material with electrical characteristics different from those of conventional materials. This new material allows a drastic reduction in power consumption for data recording in non-volatile random access
11h
Science : NPR
Hidden Brain: Researchers Delve Into Improving ConcentrationCan we improve concentration when our attention is constantly being diverted? Researchers found running electrical current through someone's head helps — but it isn't the most practical solution.
12h
Science : NPR
Will State Voters Continue To Pour Money Into Stem Cell Research?California alone has spent billions in state funds over the last 14 years to support stem cell research. Scientists want another round of cash. So, what exactly did voters get for their money so far? (Image credit: Courtesy of Alysia Padilla-Vaccaro )
12h
Ingeniøren
Maersk-topchef: Tusindvis af servere og pc'er udskiftet efter cyberangrebDa Maersk sidste år blev ramt af NotPetya kostede det 4.000 nye servere, 45.000 nye pc’er og 2.500 applikationer.
12h
Science | The Guardian
Australian of the year named as quantum physicist Michelle Yvonne SimmonsMatildas striker Sam Kerr named young Australian of the year and biophysicist Dr Graham Farquhar the senior Australian of the year The quantum physicist Prof Michelle Yvonne Simmons has been named the 2018 Australian of the year for her pioneering work in the field of quantum computing. At an awards ceremony on Thursday, Simmons was praised for world-leading research that could result in the firs
12h
New Scientist - News
Chimps are now dying of the common cold and they are all at riskThe deaths of five Ugandan chimpanzees have been traced to a human cold virus, and DNA tests suggest all African chimps are vulnerable
12h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
EU top court rules privacy campaigner can go after FacebookThe European Union's top court says that Austrian privacy campaigner Maximillian Schrems can bring a case against Facebook Ireland as an individual but there cannot be a class action suit.
12h
The Atlantic
What Happens If We Start Solar Geo-Engineering—And Then Suddenly Stop?Volcanoes, nuclear war, and solar geo-engineering. With a research portfolio that includes all three, Alan Robock is used to thinking about sudden, catastrophic change. A professor of environmental science at Rutgers University, Robock studies the movement of small particles and liquids through Earth’s atmosphere. In that role, he researches some very large and particle-producing events: the sudd
12h
Ingeniøren
Spørg Scientariet: hvorfor skummer te fra mikroovnsvand?Vores læser vil gerne vide, hvad det gør ved vandet at blive opvarmet i hhv. mikroovn eller elkoger. Det svarer professor fra KU på.
12h
Dagens Medicin
Hjerteafdeling får ny ledende overlægeOverlæge Ida Gustafsson skal sammen med den ledende oversygeplejerske stå i spidsen for Hjerteafdelingen på Bispebjerg og Frederiksberg Hospital.
13h
Dagens Medicin
Skal vi lave syge børn?Er det ud fra en risikoberegning velbegrundet at forbyde barnløshedsbehandling af beslægtede?
13h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Philippines plans forced evacuations around erupting volcanoPhilippine authorities who have declared a no-go zone around an erupting volcano said Thursday they will remove all holdouts, by force if necessary, to avoid casualties after tens of thousands of other residents fled to safety.
13h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Dutch robots help make cheese, 'smell' the rosesIt might be one small move for a robot, but it could prove an important step for Dutch cheesemakers. Moonlander, invented by students, is here to help take the hard work out of curds and whey.
13h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Century of data shows sea-level rise shifting tides in Delaware, Chesapeake baysThe warming climate is expected to affect coastal regions worldwide as glaciers and ice sheets melt, raising sea level globally. For the first time, an international team has found evidence of how sea-level rise already is affecting high and low tides in both the Chesapeake and Delaware bays, two large estuaries of the eastern United States.
13h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
New technology standard could shape the future of electronics designScientists at the University of Southampton have discovered a way of enhancing the capabilities of an emerging nanotechnology that could open the door to a new generation of electronics.
13h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Revolutionizing drug discovery with RNA in the spotlightThe rise of antibiotic resistance among common infectious bacteria is a worrisome health threat that has many scientists looking for a solution. Jennifer Hines, Ph.D., professor of chemistry and biochemistry at Ohio University, is one of the few looking to ribonucleic acid (RNA) structures for new drug discovery. Her research group is studying a key regulator for bacterial gene expression made up
14h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Long sought-after form of cubic, semiconducting titanium nitride synthesizedA team of experimental and computational scientists led by Carnegie's Tim Strobel and Venkata Bhadram have synthesized a long sought-after form of titanium nitride, Ti3N4, which has promising mechanical and optoelectronic properties.
14h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
GDP: Gross Domestic Problem?It can topple governments, confer international bragging rights and pretty much obsessed the government of China once the country began its long march back to economic prowess.
14h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Hyundai Motor 2017 net profit sinks 20.5%South Korea's biggest automaker Hyundai saw profits slump last year, it said Thursday, as it was battered by tougher competition and Chinese retaliation over the deployment of a US missile system.
14h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
SK Hynix posts record quarterly net profitThe world's second-largest memory chipmaker SK Hynix saw profits nearly double to hit a record in the fourth quarter on strong demand, it said Thursday.
14h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Don't want to bother with cat litter? Japan offers robotsJapan, home of the "kawaii" cult of cute, has always had a soft spot for companion robots, in contrast to the more industrial or mechanical types used for assembly lines, surgeries and military missions. The Associated Press spent some time recently with three relatively affordable home robots from Japanese makers that target the elderly, kids and hard-working salarymen pressed for time. Unlike re
14h
Dagens Medicin
Har du tid i uge 27 og en smule forstand på fodbold?Så har du mulighed for at komme på lægernes landshold, som skal kæmpe om VM-guld i Prag. Ambitionerne går mest på at skabe en god stemning i omklædningsrummet.
14h
BBC News - Science & Environment
Cloned monkeys: First primate clones are created in labMonkeys Human Hua HuaTwo monkeys named Zhong Zhong and Hua Hua have become the first primates to be cloned.
14h
Ingeniøren
Dansk elsystem kørte uden store kraftværker i sammenlagt 41 døgnFor to år siden frygtede Energinets folk i kontrolrummet et døgns drift uden de store kraftværker til at stabilisere nettet. I 2017 klarede systemet sig nemt uden i en hel uge
15h
Ingeniøren
Styrelse måtte betale timepris for ekstra support efter masse-nulstilling af kodeordNulstilling af kodeord uden varsel er kritisabel, meddeler Lægemiddelstyrelsen.
15h
Ingeniøren
Justitia: Regeringens data-drømme slipper billigt rundt om tvivl om retssikkerhedenTre forskellige politiske og lovgivningsmæssige tiltag peger alle i retning af mere automatisk kontrol med data. Men ansvaret for borgerens retssikkerhed svæver i vinden, mener jurist.
15h
Science | The Guardian
Scientists calculate carbon emissions of your sandwichAll-day breakfast filling identified as worst offender It’s a staple of the British diet and a popular choice for a quick and easy lunch. But new research reveals the carbon footprint of the humble sandwich could be fuelling harmful greenhouse emissions. The worst offender is revealed as the ready-made “all-day breakfast” sandwich, crammed with egg, bacon and sausage. Continue reading...
15h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Enhanced evolution: Scientists find genetic swap changes physical expressionThe difference between webbed toes and distinct digits may be the result of not just genetic information, but of how the genes regulate that information. Researchers at the National Institute of Genetics, Research Organization of Information and Systems in Japan found that a small, nonspecific tweak to a mammal's DNA can potentially cause specific and significant physical changes. The scientists r
16h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News
UV laser photolyses to enhance diamond growthResearchers at the University of Nebraska-Lincoln, USA, reported on a new laser-enabled synthesis route to explore the advantages of laser photochemistry in practical material synthesis in a recent article in Light: Science & Applications. In this work, it is demonstrated that UV laser photolysis of hydrocarbon species altered the flame chemistry to promote the diamond growth rate and film quality
16h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Study of 3,000 drinkers' attempts to cut down produces sobering resultsJanuary is a popular month for people trying to reduce their alcohol intake but how successful are they in doing so? A new study by the University of Bristol in the UK that assessed data on the drinking patterns of nearly 3,000 drinkers who reported that they were planning to reduce their alcohol consumption found that very few managed it when followed up six months later.
16h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Study links low carbohydrate intake to increased risk of birth defectsWomen who are pregnant or planning to become pregnant may want to avoid diets that reduce or eliminate carbohydrates, as they could increase the risk of having babies with neural tube birth defects, according to a new study from the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill.
16h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Prediction of titanic nitride proved unsinkableA team of experimental and computational scientists led by Carnegie's Tim Strobel and Venkata Bhadram have synthesized a long sought-after form of titanium nitride, Ti3N4, which has promising mechanical and optoelectronic properties.
16h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News
New meta-analysis: Recreational football is broad-spectrum medicineThe most popular sport in the world is much more than entertainment: football is broad-spectrum medicine against lifestyle diseases. A new meta-analysis of 31 scientific studies provides strong evidence that short-term football training improves aerobic fitness, blood pressure, resting heart rate, fat percentage, LDL cholesterol and muscle strength for several patient groups.
17h
The Atlantic
Where Nassar's Judge Went WrongIn 2001, I went to Xipamanine market, a huge open-air bazaar in Maputo, Mozambique, where you can buy everything from clothes to traditional medicine. A Mozambican friend told me how to keep safe from pickpockets. “If someone takes something from you, yell Ladrão ! Ladrão !”—Thief! Thief!—“and point to him.” “What happens next?” I asked. “People will grab him,” she said, “and possibly beat him to
17h
Ingeniøren
Prisvindende virksomhed: Ledere skal være servicemedarbejdereTre gange er det svenske konsulentfirma kåret til den bedste arbejdsplads i Europa og fire gange til Sveriges bedste. Den administrerende direktør i Cygni, Jon Persson, leverer fire råd til at løfte niveauet for ledelse.
17h
Scientific American Content: Global
Catching Flu Also Boosts Heart RiskResearchers found a sixfold increase in heart attacks in patients in the week following a flu. Christopher Intagliata reports. -- Read more on ScientificAmerican.com
18h
Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
Sleep apnea after stroke heightens risk of another stroke; deathStroke survivors, especially Mexican-Americans, whose sleep is interrupted by pauses in breathing (sleep apnea) are more likely to die or experience another stroke, according to preliminary research.
18h
Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
Less than one in 100 stroke survivors meet heart health goalsFewer than one in 100 stroke survivors meet all of Life's Simple 7 goals for ideal cardiovascular health identified by the American Heart Association. Moreover, the proportion who fail to meet almost all of the criteria is on the rise, according to preliminary research.
18h
ArXiv Query
Fractal analyses of networks of integrate-and-fire stochastic spiking neuronsAlthough there is increasing evidence of criticality in the brain, the processes that guide neuronal networks to reach or maintain criticality remain unclear. The present research examines the role of neuronal gain plasticity in time-series of simulated neuronal networks composed of integrate-and-fire stochastic spiking neurons, and the utility of fractal methods in assessing network criticality.
18h
Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
Amid ADHD spike, doctors urge closer look at sleep issuesAmid a steady rise in the number of children diagnosed with ADHD, debate is brewing whether the condition may be a sleep disorder.
18h
BBC News - Science & Environment
App shows water refill stations to tackle plastic wasteThousands of water stations are being installed to tackle plastic use - with users able to find them via an app.
18h
Live Science
Liver: Function, Failure & DiseaseThe liver is a vital organ that supports nearly every other organ to some capacity. You cannot live without a healthy liver.
20h

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