Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Face of teenage girl from 9,000 years ago reconstructedA team of researchers with the University of Athens and a Swedish archaeologist has reconstructed the face of a teenage girl from the Mesolithic period whose remains were found in a Greek cave. They have publicized their efforts by showcasing their work at the Acropolis Museum.
4h
Ingeniøren
Forslag: Staten vil give dine data til mediko-giganterBrug danskernes sundhedsdata til at lokke virksomheder til landet, foreslår udvalg.
10h
Viden
Ny forskning afslører voldsom forurening fra gammelt giftdepot i GrindstedForskere fra DTU har opdaget en ny og alvorlig forurening fra en fabriksgrund i Grindsted.
11h

LATEST

EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Pyridostigmine treatment reverses pediatric complications of botulinum toxin therapyIn an article published online ahead of print by The Journal of Pediatrics, physicians at the Medical University of South Carolina report that complications from botox therapy for nerve disorders can be reversed with pyridostigmine, a common treatment for myasthenia gravis. The report is the first such use in pediatric patients.
2min
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Investigation to combat muscular atrophy with implantable deviceExtended spaceflight takes a toll on many systems within the human body, including the musculoskeletal system. An investigation aboard the International Space Station will examine a drug compound and drug delivery system aimed at preventing, slowing, or even reversing muscular breakdown, both in space and on Earth.
2min
New on MIT Technology Review
Here are the secrets to useful AI, according to designers
4min
Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
The sugar-attaching enzyme that defines colon cancerResearchers have identified an enzyme that is absent in healthy colon tissue but abundant in colon cancer cells, according to a new report. The enzyme appears to drive the conversion of normal colon tissue into cancer by attaching sugar molecules, or glycans, to certain proteins in the cell.
4min
Viden
Google lancerer hyperlokal nyheds-appAppen Bulletin skal aktivere lokalsamfundet til at producere nyheder - og indsamle endnu flere lokale data.
12min
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Botulinum-type toxins jump to a new kind of bacteriaEnterococci are hardy microbes that thrive in the gastrointestinal tracts of nearly all land animals, including our own, and generally cause no harm. But their ruggedness has lately made them leading causes of multi-drug-resistant infections, especially in settings like hospitals where antibiotic use disrupts the natural balance of intestinal microbes.
14min
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
X-ray experiments suggest high tunability of 2-D materialTo see what is driving the exotic behavior in some atomically thin - or 2-D - materials, and find out what happens when they are stacked like Lego bricks in different combinations with other ultrathin materials, scientists want to observe their properties at the smallest possible scales.
14min
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Research boosts efficiency and stability of optical rectennasThe research team that announced the first optical rectenna in 2015 is now reporting a two-fold efficiency improvement in the devices—and a switch to air-stable diode materials. The improvements could allow the rectennas - which convert electromagnetic fields at optical frequencies directly to electrical current - to operate low-power devices such as temperature sensors.
14min
Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
Graphene oxide is ‘sensed’ by specialized cells of the immune systemA new study shows that our immune system handles graphene oxide in a manner similar to pathogens, paving the way for safer biomedical applications of this two-dimensional material.
18min
Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
Research boosts efficiency and stability of optical rectennasThe research team that announced the first optical rectenna in 2015 is now reporting a two-fold efficiency improvement in the devices -- and a switch to air-stable diode materials. The improvements could allow the rectennas -- which convert electromagnetic fields at optical frequencies directly to electrical current -- to operate low-power devices such as temperature sensors.
18min
Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
Could the biological clock be a key ally in the fight against inflammatory disease?What if the symptoms and seriousness of certain inflammatory diseases were linked to time of day? Researchers have been working on this hypothesis, after noting that the seriousness and mortality associated with fulminant hepatitis were dependent on the time at which the disease was induced. Their study, conducted on human cells and mice, shows that the anti-inflammatory action of a biological clo
18min
The Atlantic
Getting Trump to NoThursday’s revelation that President Trump tried to fire special counsel Robert Mueller in June 2017 is important, but not shocking. Around the time of the attempted dismissal, Trump surrogates were raising the idea in public, and news reports said he was considering the move. The White House was careful to say that while the president was not considering a firing, he certainly would be within hi
19min
The Atlantic
How Not to Measure Americans' Support for IsraelWhen the Pew Research Center released its findings this week on American views of the Israeli-Palestinian conflict, the traditional handwringing ensued. Many pundits and reporters read in the results that Republicans and Democrats are growing further and further apart in their support for Israel. Based on the findings, some Israeli pundits and politicians, and many on the American right, have bee
19min
EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Aerobic exercise may mildly delay, slightly improve Alzheimer's symptomsGeriatrics experts have suggested that exercising can improve brain health in older adults. However, not all studies of exercise and older adults have proven the benefits of exercise. A team of researchers designed a study to learn whether exercise could delay or improve AD symptoms. They reviewed 19 studies that examined the effect of an exercise training program on cognitive function in older ad
23min
EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Botulinum-type toxins jump to a new kind of bacteriaA toxin much like the one that causes botulism has unexpectedly turned up in a completely different type of bacteria - Enterococcus. Where it came from is unclear, but the finding is concerning because enterococci have lately become a leading cause of multi-drug-resistant infections, especially in health care settings.
23min
EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Scientists have discovered a new type of BotoxA new source of the botulinum neurotoxin was discovered by Canadian and American scientists in a strain of animal gut bacteria known as Enterococcus faecium. The neurotoxic protein is known for its paradoxical ability to remove wrinkles yet cause botulism, a potentially fatal illness associated with food poisoning.
23min
Science | The Guardian
Tessa Jowell is right about cancer treatment: Britain must do better | Christina PattersonHer fearless speech was also a reasonable demand for more shared knowledge, faster diagnosis and wider access to experimental treatments On 24 May last year, Tessa Jowell found she could not speak. Two days later, she was diagnosed with a brain tumour. Two weeks after that, the tumour was cut out. Six months on, she can’t say she was cured, but she sure as hell could speak this week. “I don’t thin
26min
Scientific American Content: Global
If You Want to Explain Your Science to the Public, Here's Some AdviceTap into the ample resources that can get you started -- Read more on ScientificAmerican.com
43min
EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Study: Site of 1st chlamydia exposure makes big differenceExposing the gut to chlamydia protects against subsequent infection in the genital tract and other tissues, researchers from UT Health San Antonio discovered. Chlamydia is the nation's most common sexually transmitted disease and causes infertility, ectopic pregnancy and pelvic inflammatory disease if left untreated.
44min
EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Stress and diet associated with brain bleeds in sub-Saharan AfricaStress may double the risk of brain bleeds related to high blood pressure, while consuming green leafy vegetables is strongly protective, according to the largest study of stroke in sub-Saharan Africa, presented at the American Stroke Association's International Stroke Conference 2018, a world premier meeting dedicated to the science and treatment of cerebrovascular disease for researchers and cli
44min
Science : NPR
One Of The World's Rarest Fish Is A Little Less Rare Than We ThoughtThe red handfish, named for hand-shaped fins on the sides of its body, doesn't really swim — it walks slowly along the sea floor. A new population of the striking creature has been found off Tasmania. (Image credit: Antonia Cooper)
45min
Science : NPR
Viral Video From A Somali Comic Conquers The InternetMillions are watching Barbar, a music video from Somali-born comedian Oomaar. Fans are making their own versions. What's it all about? (Image credit: Liibaan Jama/Screenshot by NPR (https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=AOk6YvTZT3Y))
52min
cognitive science
The evolved structure of the mind constrains learning, the Christian God as a case studysubmitted by /u/SpenFen [link] [comments]
1h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News
X-ray experiments suggest high tunability of 2-D materialResearchers used MAESTRO, an X-ray platform at Berkeley Lab, to zero in on signatures of exotic electronic behavior in a 2-D material. They found that the material may be highly tunable, with potential applications in spintronics and other emerging fields.
1h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Cancer patients less likely to receive clot-busting drugs after strokeWhen a stroke occurs in patients with cancer, they are one-third less likely to receive standard clot-busting medication as patients without a malignancy, according to preliminary research presented at the American Stroke Association's International Stroke Conference 2018, a world premier meeting dedicated to the science and treatment of cerebrovascular disease for researchers and clinicians.
1h
The Atlantic
The Art of the Presidential Non-Apology“A stunning admission from the world’s most powerful man” is how Piers Morgan, the British TV presenter, characterized what President Trump said to him in the first interview he’s granted to an international outlet. Morgan, who has been close with Trump since winning The Apprentice in 2007, seemed to have scored an extraordinarily uncharacteristic offering by the U.S. president—an apology. (Trump
1h
The Atlantic
A Week Around the World With The AtlanticWhat We’re Writing The complexity of free speech: The opening of a Bollywood movie has caused an uproar in India because of religious and caste tensions. Critics worry that this symbolizes the deterioration of freedom of speech in India. And in Egypt, where free speech is not a guarantee under the regime of President Abdel Fattah El-Sisi, an online group is hoping to use a digital archive to keep
1h
NYT > Science
How a Church Deacon Found the Biggest Prime Number Yet (It Wasn’t as Hard as You Think)The Memphis area man used the church computer to discover a Mersenne prime with over 23 million digits. He had been looking for 14 years.
1h
Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
Starving cancer cells of sugar -- does it work?Researchers from the Duke-NUS Medical School and collaborators from Austria have demonstrated for the first time a novel cell death pathway that describes how depletion of sugar causes cancer cell death.
1h
Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
Cancer researchers hit a bullseye with new drug target for Ewing sarcomaResearchers have found that Ewing sarcoma cells die if an enzyme called CDK12 is knocked out genetically or chemically inhibited. What's more, when a CDK12 inhibitor is combined with another drug, called a PARP inhibitor, the two drugs double down to deliver a lethal punch to Ewing sarcoma cells.
1h
Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
Study sheds light on alternative, more convenient method of cell preservationResearchers have taken an important step toward a more convenient, less expensive means of preserving mammalian cells for in vitro fertilization, species conservation, cell therapy and other purposes.
1h
New on MIT Technology Review
This drone learned to fly through streets by studying driverless-car data
1h
Feed: All Latest
How Ouray Ice Park Made the Largest Man-Made Frozen WaterfallAt the Colorado attraction, the world’s first and largest man-made frozen climbing grounds, you can chill on an ice wall 10 feet thick.
1h
Popular Science
The sparrows seem to be shrinkingNexus Media News Rising temperatures are breeding smaller birds. Little birds are sending us a big message: rising temperatures are causing them to shrink.
1h
Futurity.org
If you’re going to eat big portions, use this strategyChoosing healthier foods may be a more effective way to lose weight than aiming to eat less, report researchers. In a recent study, researchers measured how much participants ate when given meals that varied in portion size. Despite about one-third of participants having been trained in different strategies to manage food portions during a previous yearlong weight loss trial, all participants ate
1h
The Atlantic
How Trump Built an Obstruction of Justice Case Against HimselfPresident Trump’s own actions, as reported on Thursday night, have strengthened the case for obstruction of justice against him, despite the significant legal obstacles to pursuing such a case against a sitting president. Trump ordered his White House counsel, Donald F. McGahn II, to fire Special Counsel Robert Mueller, who is investigating Russian interference in the 2016 election and potential
1h
The Atlantic
Shrugging Toward Doomsday“As of today,” said Rachel Bronson, the president and CEO of the Bulletin of the Atomic Scientists, “it is two minutes to midnight.” On Thursday, the Bulletin of Atomic Scientists moved the Doomsday Clock—a symbolic assessment of how close the world stands to total destruction—as close to midnight as it has ever been, reflecting the expert group’s “grim assessment” that the world is now “as dange
1h
Scientific American Content: Global
Anatomy of a Hunt: Speed, Strategy and SurvivalIn the race for survival, predators can achieve impressive strengths and speeds—but research reveals that when it comes to strategy, their prey may have the upper hand. This video was... -- Read more on ScientificAmerican.com
1h
TED Talks Daily (SD video)
The thrilling potential for off-grid solar energy | Amar InamdarThere's an energy revolution happening in villages and towns across Africa -- off-grid solar energy is becoming a viable alternative to traditional electricity systems. In a bold talk about a true leapfrog moment, Amar Inamdar introduces us to proud owners of off-grid solar kits -- and explains how this technology has the opportunity to meet two extraordinary goals: energy access for all and a low
1h
Futurity.org
These apps boost literacy of struggling young readersUsing speech recognition apps in early elementary classrooms can help give children who struggle to read an early boost in literacy, a new study suggests. The apps allowed the students to make mistakes and grow as readers without any embarrassment. More than 71 million children and adults in the United States, or 22 percent of the population, are functionally illiterate. Past research, however, s
1h
Futurity.org
Astronauts may one day turn poo into foodMicrobes may one day help astronauts on deep-space missions turn human waste into food, a new study suggests. Researchers have shown it’s possible to rapidly break down solid and liquid waste to grow food with a series of microbial reactors, while simultaneously minimizing pathogen growth. “We envisioned and tested the concept of simultaneously treating astronauts’ waste with microbes while produ
1h
Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
Particle collision in large accelerators is simulated by using a quantum computerIn 2011 an innovative theoretical proposal to reproduce particle collisions like those taking place in large accelerators but without having to use these huge infrastructures. Now they have confirmed the validity of the proposal by using a trapped-ion quantum simulator.
1h
Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
Archaeologists say they may have discovered one of the earliest examples of a 'crayon'Archaeologists say they may have discovered one of the earliest examples of a 'crayon' -- possibly used by our ancestors 10,000 years ago for applying color to their animal skins or for artwork.
1h
Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
Drug trial protocol redactions by industry sponsors exposedNew research exposes the extent of redactions in protocols for industry-sponsored randomized drug trials. Trial protocols are needed for a proper assessment of the veracity of drug trial reports. The researchers found widespread redactions in the protocols for commercially sponsored trials.
1h
Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
Tactic for controlling motor symptoms of advanced Parkinson's diseaseStandard drug treatment for Parkinson's disease can over time induce motor complications that reduce the effectiveness of restoring mobility. These complications include abnormal involuntary movements known as dyskinesias. In a nonhuman primate model of Parkinson's, scientists have been probing the origin of these abnormal responses to treatment, particularly dyskinesias, and have successfully tes
1h
Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
Just one cigarette a day carries greater risk of heart disease and stroke than expected, warn expertSmoking just one cigarette a day has a much higher risk of developing coronary heart disease and stroke than expected -- about half the risk of smoking 20 per day -- concludes a new review.
1h
Scientific American Content: Global
Tiny Particles of Pollution May Strengthen StormsUltra-fine aerosol particles, produced by industrial activity, are helping storms grow bigger and more intense in the Amazon basin -- Read more on ScientificAmerican.com
2h
Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
Highly stretchable aqueous batteriesA team of researchers has succeeded in developing world's first stretchable aqueous Li-ion batteries that may power the next generation of wearable devices.
2h
Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
Potential enzyme as therapeutic target for diabetesResearchers report a new mechanism for regulating glucose uptake by the liver which has implications for type 2 diabetes and its treatment.
2h
Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
Polio labs equipped to study rare tropical diseasesResearchers have investigated the possibility of utilizing the Polio network of 145 labs set up around the world to help tackle neglected tropical diseases which impact on the lives of about a billion of people.
2h
Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
From stem cells to a functional heart: The role of the Mesp1 geneResearchers have identified the role of key gene Mesp1 in the earliest step of cardiovascular lineage segregation. This discovery may help to better understand congenital heart defects.
2h
Science | The Guardian
Harmless or vicious hunter? The uneasy return of Europe's wolvesThis winter the first wolf in 100 years arrived in Belgium, completing the animals’ return to mainland Europe. But can Europeans relearn how to live alongside the predators? To some it is a roe deer that eats meat: an adaptable animal capable of living peaceably alongside humans. To others it is a demonic killing machine that ruins farmers – and whose presence is a symbol of the city’s contempt f
2h
Ingeniøren
Bagsiden: Ørsteds logohistorie er ikke helt stueren ...Ugens logoudvikling
2h
The Atlantic
Nick Foles Is the Eagles' Unlikely Best HopeSix weeks before the Philadelphia Eagles cruised by the Vikings to reach their third ever Super Bowl, the team’s championship hopes had appeared to wither. On December 11, the coach Doug Pederson had confirmed the league MVP candidate quarterback Carson Wentz would miss the rest of the season with a torn ACL, meaning the National Football Conference’s best team would be forced to confront the pla
2h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Could the biological clock be a key ally in the fight against inflammatory disease?What if the symptoms and seriousness of certain inflammatory diseases were linked to time of day? Researchers from Inserm have been working on this hypothesis, after noting that the seriousness and mortality associated with fulminant hepatitis were dependent on the time at which the disease was induced. Their study, conducted on human cells and mice, shows that the anti-inflammatory action of a bi
2h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Research boosts efficiency and stability of optical rectennasThe research team that announced the first optical rectenna in 2015 is now reporting a two-fold efficiency improvement in the devices -- and a switch to air-stable diode materials. The improvements could allow the rectennas -- which convert electromagnetic fields at optical frequencies directly to electrical current - to operate low-power devices such as temperature sensors.
2h
Futurity.org
Light acts as precision weapon to attack cancerA new anti-cancer strategy goes beyond traditional light therapy—which is limited to the skin and areas accessible with an endoscope—to target and attack cancer cells that have spread deep inside the body, a study with mice shows. “…[this] technology is particularly suited to attacking small tumors that spread to different parts of the body, including deep in the bone marrow.” Light emitted as pa
2h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Sourcing contamination in waterwaysUnderstanding the source of contaminants in our waterways is crucial for public health and safety, and a University of Connecticut professor is developing an easy way to do just that.
2h
Dana Foundation
Winter Sports Concussion Prevention TipsPhoto: Shutterstock With the XXIII Olympic Games set to take place in a few weeks in South Korea, the issue of concussions is front and center, thanks largely to well publicized concussion management protocols established as an outgrowth of a tragic history of traumatic brain injuries among professional football players. For winter sports such as skiing, snowboarding, sledding, hockey, and ice sk
2h
Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
Many second hand plastic toys could pose a risk to children's health, study suggestsScientists have discovered high concentrations of hazardous elements including antimony, barium, bromine, cadmium, chromium and lead in many second hand plastic toys.
2h
Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
Rainfall and ocean circulation linked in past and presentResearch has found that changes in ocean currents in the Atlantic Ocean influence rainfall in the Western Hemisphere, and that these two systems have been linked for thousands of years.
2h
Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
Microbes may help astronauts transform human waste into foodHuman waste may one day be a valuable resource for astronauts on deep-space missions. Now, a research team has shown that it is possible to rapidly break down solid and liquid waste to grow food with a series of microbial reactors, while simultaneously minimizing pathogen growth.
2h
Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
Too few with stroke of the eye are treated to reduce future strokeOnly one-third of 5,600 patients with retinal infarction, or stroke in the eye, underwent basic stroke work-up, and fewer than one in 10 were seen by a neurologist. One in 100 of the retinal infarction patients studied experienced another stroke within 90 days of their retinal infarction.
2h
Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
Working before and after stroke is good for brain healthWorking-age adults who suffer stroke are likely to have healthier brains, sharper minds and less risk of depression and death two years after stroke if they worked prior to stroke, versus being unemployed. Those who work after stroke also seem to benefit with better long-term cognitive status than those who don't.
2h
Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
Microbiome research refines HIV risk for womenDrawing from data collected for years by AIDS researchers in six African nations, scientists have pinpointed seven bacterial species whose presence in high concentrations may significantly increase the risk of HIV infection in women.
2h
Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
Lack of essential and affordable medicines in India revealedResearch has revealed the shocking lack of access to essential medicines in India, despite thousands being approved in an attempt to generate wider availability.
2h
Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
Using virtual reality to identify brain areas involved in memoryVirtual reality is helping neuroscientists get new insight into how different brain areas assemble memories in context.
2h
Feed: All Latest
How to Optimize Your Home for Robot ServantsIf you want robots at your beck and call someday, start thinking about robo-fitting your digs now.
2h
New on MIT Technology Review
The number of cyber incidents doubled in 2017
2h
The Atlantic
The Lovely Tale of an Adorable Squid and Its Glowing PartnerA few years ago, in a laboratory at the University of Wisconsin at Madison, I walked into a mostly dark room, with a single light illuminating a plastic cup. Within the cup were dozens of tiny white blobs, each smaller than a pea. They were baby Hawaiian bobtail squid, and they were adorable. Their diminutive arms trailed behind them as they bobbed in the water, and the pigment cells that would e
2h
Scientific American Content: Global
As Cape Town Water Crisis Deepens, Scientists Prepare for "Day Zero"Researchers make plans to modify studies and prioritize public health as city reservoirs run dry -- Read more on ScientificAmerican.com
2h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Ariane 5 rocket puts European GPS satellites into orbitAn Ariane 5 rocket put four GPS satellites into orbit on Tuesday for Europe's Galileo navigation project, Arianespace said.
2h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Mass baboon breakout shuts Paris zooAround 50 baboons escaped from their enclosure in Paris's main zoo on Friday, forcing wardens to evacuate visitors while order was restored, the zoo said.
2h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Should you feed your pet raw meat? The real risks of a 'traditional' dog dietJust as many people are trying to eat less processed food to improve their health, some dog owners are turning away from conventional pet food. Instead they're trying to get back to what they see as a more traditional "butcher's dog" diet of raw meat, albeit with pre-prepared products that can be served easily and frozen for convenience.
2h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Total lunar eclipse "trifecta" on January 31stJanuary 31st will be a busy day in the sky, as three skygazing events are occurring together. First, there's a total lunar eclipse—the first time the moon has been completely immersed in Earth's shadow since September 27-28, 2015. Second, this event falls on the second full moon of the month, what's often called a blue moon. And, third, the eclipse comes just 27 hours after the moon reaches its cl
2h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Applying GRADE-CERQual approach to qualitative evidence synthesis findingsA series of papers published in Implementation Science this week provides guidance on how to apply the GRADE-CERQual approach. CERQual helps assess how much confidence to place in findings from qualitative evidence syntheses.
2h
Live Science
Should You Capitalize the 'Universe'?Grammar wars innnnnn spaaaaaaaace!
2h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News
The sugar-attaching enzyme that defines colon cancerResearchers have identified an enzyme that is absent in healthy colon tissue but abundant in colon cancer cells, according to a report in the Jan. 26 issue of the Journal of Biological Chemistry. The enzyme appears to drive the conversion of normal colon tissue into cancer by attaching sugar molecules, or glycans, to certain proteins in the cell.
2h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Versatile C. difficile blockerClostridium difficile (C. difficile) infection is the leading cause of hospital-acquired diarrhea, causing nearly a half million infections in the United States each year. Recurrence after treatment with antibiotics is common and new therapies are needed.
2h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Researchers develop highly stretchable aqueous batteriesThe current development of stretchable battery materials that mimic the functions of nature has emerged for the next wave of wearable electronics. A recent study presented a bioinspired Jabuticaba-like hybrid carbon/polymer (HCP) composite that was developed into a stretchable current collector using a simple, cost-effective solution process. Using the HCP composite as a stretchable current collec
2h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Graphene oxide is detected by specialised cells of the immune systemA study by researchers at Karolinska Institutet, the University of Manchester and Chalmers University of Technology published in CHEM shows that our immune system handles graphene oxide in a manner similar to pathogens, paving the way for safer biomedical applications of this two-dimensional material.
2h
Popular Science
How to return a lost phone to its ownerDIY Do your good deed for the day. If you find a lost phone, you should try to return it. Don't let a locked screen stop you—here are the tricks you can use to track down its owner.
2h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Does America have a caste system?In the United States, inequality tends to be framed as an issue of either class, race or both. Consider, for example, criticism that Republicans' new tax plan is a weapon of "class warfare," or accusations that the recent U.S. government shutdown was racist.
2h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Hyperspectral imaging technology enables new artificial intelligence applicationsVTT Technical Research Centre of Finland has developed a highly cost-efficient hyperspectral imaging technology, which enables the introduction of new artificial intelligence applications into consumer devices. Spectral filtering technology takes advantage of the very-near-infrared (VNIR) wavelengths, which even low-cost mobile phone cameras can detect. Artificial intelligence can be used to inter
2h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Health visitors use of video helps vulnerable familiesThe video-based method Marte Meo -- which some municipalities use in their initiatives for families experiencing difficulties with newborn children -- works as intended. This is shown by the first Danish research study of a widely used parenting program.
2h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News
No sex without a kiss! Researchers discover how the brain controls sexKisspeptin has already been identified as the key molecule within the brain responsible for triggering puberty and controlling fertility. A new study reveals that a subset of neurons in an evolutionarily ancient part of brain, the hypothalamus, drive both attraction to the opposite sex and sexual behavior by two independent mechanisms.
2h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Nearly one out of five NSAID users exceed daily limitChances are you or someone you know has used nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs) within the last month. NSAIDs, such as Advil (ibuprofen), Aleve (naproxen) and Celebrex, are among the most commonly used medicines in the US. Now, for the first time, researchers have found that 15 percent of adult ibuprofen users exceed the maximum recommended dose of ibuprofen or other NSAIDs in a one-wee
2h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Drug trial protocol redactions by industry sponsors exposedNew research published by the Journal of the Royal Society of Medicine exposes the extent of redactions in protocols for industry-sponsored randomised drug trials. Trial protocols are needed for a proper assessment of the veracity of drug trial reports. The researchers, from the Nordic Cochrane Centre in Copenhagen, found widespread redactions in the protocols for commercially sponsored trials the
2h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Ancient lake reveals a colorful pastArchaeologists say they may have discovered one of the earliest examples of a 'crayon' -- possibly used by our ancestors 10,000 years ago for applying color to their animal skins or for artwork.
2h
Science : NPR
'The Marvelous Ms. Maisel': Science, Comedy And GeniusIn addition to its beautiful costumes and sweet homage to the New York City of the 1950s, the show offers an opportunity to reflect on the nature of genius, says commentator Adam Frank. (Image credit: Jordan Strauss/Invision/AP)
2h
New on MIT Technology Review
How Baidu plans to profit from its free autonomous-car technology
3h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Study reveals long time scale of recovery for marine sea fans and other speciesPink seafans, Ross corals and white sea squirts could take up to 20 years to recover after an area of the seabed was closed to scallop dredging, according to predictions by a team of scientists at Bangor University.
3h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Cryptocurrencies fall after Japan's Coincheck halts withdrawalsCryptocurrencies fell Friday after Japan-based digital exchange Coincheck suspended client deposits and withdrawals for virtual currencies except bitcoin.
3h
Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
Quality of children's sleep may affect eating habits and weightSeveral measures of poor sleep quality were associated with higher body mass index (BMI) in children, according to new data.
3h
Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
High body fat levels associated with increased breast cancer risk in women with normal BMIAmong postmenopausal women with normal body mass index (BMI), those with higher body fat levels had an increased risk for invasive breast cancer.
3h
Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
Paleontology: The eleventh ArchaeopteryxResearchers report the first description of the geologically oldest fossil securely attributable to the genus Archaeopteryx, and provide a new diagnostic key for differentiating bird-like dinosaurs from their closest relatives.
3h
Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
How microbes emerged from hot springs to conquer early Earth: DNA exchangeMany researchers assume the first life on Earth evolved in hot springs. A new study provides insights into how one type of extremophile microbe may have moved from hot springs to conquer more moderate environments across the globe. The first-ever analysis of DNA of one ammonia-oxidizing hot-spring microbe living today reveals that evolution of the necessary adaptations may have been helped by high
3h
Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
World’s smallest sensor measures growth force of plants, animals and humansHow do you visualize the extremely small forces connected to processes in our body, such as embryonic growth and development? Researchers experimented with a combination of laser technology and chemical knowledge, coming up with a sensor consisting of one single molecule that is a few hundred times more accurate than existing devices used to measure nano-forces on the molecular level. The force me
3h
Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
The genome of vascular plants bears witness to the evolution of viruses of the family CaulimoviridaeEndogenous viral elements are viral sequences integrated into the nuclear genome of their host. They are veritable molecular fossils that prove infections that may have happened millions of years ago, and studying them can serve to understand how viruses evolve over time.
3h
Viden
Amerikansk astronaut fik besøg i rummet af Andreas Mogensen: - Andy er en awesome fyr!Scott Kelly opholdt sig på den Internationale rumstation uafbrudt i et år. Nu fortæller han om hverdagen i vægtløs tilstand.
3h
Dagens Medicin
Sundhedsministeren vil ikke svare på, om hun har tillid til Styrelsen for PatientsikkerhedDet er vigtigt at se fremad, styrke dialogen og komme over de forskellige opfattelser af, hvad der skal journaliseres, og hvad der er strafbart. Det siger Sundhedsminister Ellen Trane Nørby (V), der ikke vil svare på, om hun har tillid til Styrelsen for Patientsikkerhed.
3h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Vaccine attitude rises and falls with ideologyPolitical views and a person's trust in government play a role in whether or not they get vaccinated, according to a study by three faculty members at the University of Idaho.
3h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Potential enzyme as therapeutic target for diabetesResearchers from Kanazawa University and the National Centre for Global Health and Medicine in Tokyo report, in Nature Communications, a new mechanism for regulating glucose uptake by the liver which has implications for type 2 diabetes and its treatment.
3h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Stenting system shown to benefit certain stroke patientsA specialized stenting system used to open blocked arteries in the brain resulted in a low complication rate among a specific group of patients with stroke histories, a study led by Cedars-Sinai researchers has found. The Wingspan® Stent System Post-Market Surveillance Study (WEAVE™) trial examined patients with a narrowing of the arteries in the brain, called intracranial stenosis, resulting from
3h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News
UNIST researchers develop highly stretchable aqueous batteriesA team of researchers, affiliated with South Korea's Ulsan National Institute of Science and Technology (UNIST) has succeedeed in developing world's first stretchable aqueous Li-ion batteries that may power the next generation of wearable devices.
3h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News
From stem cells to a functional heart: The role of the Mesp1 geneResearchers at the Université libre de Bruxelles and University of Cambridge identified the role of key gene Mesp1 in the earliest step of cardiovascular lineage segregation. This discovery may help to better understand congenital heart defects.
3h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Surgery patients in enhanced recovery program leave hospital sooner, take fewer opioidsColorectal and bariatric surgery patients benefited from an enhanced recovery after surgery (ERAS) program, leaving the hospital sooner and requiring fewer opioids to control pain, according to new research presented at the American Society of Anesthesiologists PRACTICE MANAGEMENT 2018 meeting.
3h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Older adults who are frail more likely to experience delirium after surgeryOlder adults who are frail are twice as likely to experience delirium following elective surgery than those of an older age, a new study suggests.
3h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Starving cancer cells of sugar -- does it work?Researchers from the Duke-NUS Medical School and collaborators from Austria have demonstrated for the first time a novel cell death pathway that describes how depletion of sugar causes cancer cell death.
3h
Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
Distinct brain rhythms, regions help us reason about categoriesThe brain's ability to categorize based on straightforward resemblance or on a more abstract similarity arises from its use of distinct rhythms, at distinct times, in distinct parts of the prefrontal cortex. Gamma in one region handles sensory comparisons, but beta in another region considers the less obvious ways things go together.
3h
Science | The Guardian
Cremation urns' dusty bones tell tale of death in Roman LondonExperts study remains dug up in 19th century for first time ahead of Museum of London Docklands exhibition A puff of dust almost 2,000 years old rose as archaeologist Jackie Keily gently tipped a wastepaper bin-sized lead container, and a pile of cremated Roman remains slid out towards bones expert Rebecca Redfern. “Oh wonderful, look!” Redfern said, pouncing on a bone with the excitement of a tr
3h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Can mirrors boost solar panel output - and help overcome Trump's tariffs?Falling costs for solar power have led to an explosive growth in residential, commercial and utility-scale solar use over the past decade. The levelized cost of solar electricity using imported solar panels – that is, the solar electricity cost measured over the life of the panels – has dropped in cost so much that it is lower than electricity from competing sources like coal in most of America.
3h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Image: Yukon DeltaThe Copernicus Sentinel-2 mission takes us over part of the Yukon Delta in the US state of Alaska.
3h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
New study reveals how icy surface ponds on Himalayan glaciers influence water flowThe flow of water that supports hydro-electric and irrigation infrastructure in the mountain regions of Nepal and India is regulated by hundreds of large icy ponds on the surface of some of the world's highest glaciers, scientists have revealed.
3h
Futurity.org
Watch: To avoid swatting, mosquitoes remember your scentMosquitoes can learn to associate an odor with a mechanical shock similar to a swat—and then avoid that scent in the future—new research suggests. “Once mosquitoes learned odors in an aversive manner, those odors caused aversive responses on the same order as responses to DEET, which is one of the most effective mosquito repellents,” says senior author Jeff Riffell, a professor of biology at the
3h
Feed: All Latest
Tesla's Autopilot Crashes and More Car News This WeekPlus: Elon Musk's $0 salary, details form Uber's secretive Strategic Services Group, and more slightly catastrophic news from this week.
3h
Futurity.org
People with tetraplegia master brain implant in minutesNew techniques have allowed three participants with tetraplegia to achieve peak brain-computer interface (BCI) performance within three minutes of engaging in an easy, one-step process, a new study shows. For a BCI to be truly useful for a person with tetraplegia, it should be ready whenever it’s needed, with minimal expert intervention, including the very first time it’s used. One participant in
3h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Why people often don't properly prepare for hurricanesOver the past few decades, advances in hurricane forecasting, construction codes, and evacuation procedures have helped to save lives and mitigate property damage. Yet economic damage from hurricanes has steadily increased. Researchers from Columbia University, University of Miami, and University of Pennsylvania wanted to find out why. In a paper published last week, the authors outlined the ways
3h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Polio labs equipped to study rare tropical diseasesResearchers from LSTM have investigated the possibility of utilising the Polio network of 145 labs set up around the world to help tackle neglected tropical diseases which impact on the lives of about a billion of people.
3h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Particle collision in large accelerators is simulated by using a quantum computerIn 2011 the UPV/EHU's QUTIS Group published in the Physical Review Letters an innovative theoretical proposal to reproduce particle collisions like those taking place in large accelerators but without having to use these huge infrastructures. Now, with the collaboration of the laboratory of Prof Kihwan Kim of the University of Tsinghua in Beijing they have confirmed the validity of the proposal by
3h
The Atlantic
The Flaw in America's 'Holy Grail' Against GerrymanderingConsidering that barely one-third of Americans can name their U.S. House representative, you’d think that the size, shape, and makeup of their voting district wouldn’t matter much to them. But the issue of gerrymandering—manipulating elections by redrawing district boundaries to favor one party over another—has suddenly become a political flash point. Cases from several states are winding through
3h
Latest Headlines | Science News
Clumps of dark matter could be lurking undetected in our galaxyDark matter, assumed to form featureless blobs, might clump together into smaller objects.
3h
Scientific American Content: Global
How the Doomsday Clock Could Help Trigger the Armageddon It Warns ofHowever well-intentioned, this symbolic gesture undermines the Bulletin of the Atomic Scientists’ stated mission to put “issues and events into context” -- Read more on ScientificAmerican.com
3h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Data doom: 5 steps from Davos to digital dystopiaIntelligent robots and all-knowing online networks threaten to drag humanity into a "totalitarian" nightmare of mind control, mass unemployment and children hooked on smartphones, experts warned at this week's Davos summit.
3h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Dutch police launch biggest-ever DNA hunt for boy's killerDutch police on Friday launched the country's biggest ever DNA search, asking over 20,000 men to come forward as they seek to resolve the 1998 murder of a young boy.
3h
Futurity.org
How proteins become dangerous droplets in ALSFor the first time, researchers have outlined the atom-by-atom changes in a group of proteins as they form cell-damaging clumps linked to amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS), a group of brain disorders known as frontotemporal dementia, and degenerative diseases of muscle and bone. The long-term goal of the research is to target this cellular pathway with a drug or other therapy to prevent these d
3h
Ingeniøren
Sci-fi 200 års dag: En teenager skabte den gale videnskabsmand og hans monster'Frankenstein or the Modern Prometheus' blev udgivet januar 1818. Siden har den dannet skole for skildringer af mennesket og videnskabens forandrende kraft.
3h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Climate change concerns much higher in Latin America, Caribbean than U.S., CanadaMore than eight in 10 adults in Mexico and Central America believe climate change is a very serious problem for their country, more than twice the proportion of adults in the United States and Canada, according to a newaccording to a new "Insights" report from Vanderbilt's Latin American Public Opinion Project (LAPOP) titled "Education and Risk Assessments Predict Climate Change Concerns in Latin
4h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Making lighter vehicles with magnesium alloysEPFL researchers have developed models of magnesium alloys to understand how to make the metal more pliable. Magnesium is the lightest metal on earth but cannot easily be shaped into usable forms. The researchers hope that with the models will lead to the discovery of new, more malleable alloys, so that carmakers can make lighter vehicles that consume less energy.
4h
The Atlantic
Trump Declares America 'Open for Business'President Trump told the world’s elite business leaders gathered in Davos that “America is open for business” as he tried to balance that message with the “America First” policies that he has put in place over the past year. “The world is witnessing the resurgence of a strong and prosperous America,” Trump told the audience at the World Economic Forum. “There has never been a better time to hire,
4h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Ancient lake reveals a colourful pastArchaeologists say they may have discovered one of the earliest examples of a 'crayon' – possibly used by our ancestors 10,000 years ago for applying colour to their animal skins or for artwork.
4h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
The kilogram gets a makeoverIn Sèvres, a small commune on the outskirts of Paris, lies a gleaming lump of metal the size of a palm. Le Grand K, or Big K as they call the platinum and iridium alloy, sits underground in a high-security vault. It is held under three glass bell jars, and can only be retrieved using three separate keys, each held by different individuals.
4h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Simple preparation, fast lasers overcome analysis roadblockImagine a big glass jar full of candy, a colorful mixture of jelly beans. You want to know how rare your favorite green ones are. Specifically, you want to know the number of green ones relative to the number of grams of the whole mixture. If you just pull out a handful from the jar and meticulously count the number of green jelly beans, you don't know what fraction of the total candy you removed!
4h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Tiny scales could serve as safe material in implants to reinforce bones and jointsScales are the material of choice for animals from pangolins to fish: They're customizable, water-friendly, strong but flexible, and easy to fix when damaged.
4h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Flow apparatus samples up to 1500 chemical reactions a dayA team of researchers at Pfizer, the pharmaceutical giant, has developed an automated flow chemistry system that is capable of carrying out 1500 reactions over a 24-hour period. In their paper published in the journal Science, the group describes the system, how well it tested and its limitations.
4h
The Scientist RSS
Image of the Day: Caught Red-HandedDivers come upon a new population of red handfish near Tasmania.
4h
The Scientist RSS
Jawbone Fossil Suggests Humans Left Africa Earlier than Previously BelievedThe find is estimated to be at least 177,000 years old.
4h
Popular Science
You should be listening to video game soundtracks at workScience Productivity studies suggest you can boost your output with the right music. It's a whole genre designed to simultaneously stimulate your senses and blend into the background of your brain…
4h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
A cap-and-trade system of water conservation and resiliencyCalifornia has struggled with drought for most of the last decade. From 2011-2015, the state experienced the driest four-year stretch in recorded history, leading to unprecedented water restrictions for residents, including a state mandate to reduce water use by 25 percent.
4h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Improving the piezoelectric microscopy characterization of ceramic materialsA team of researchers from ICMAB has proved that unconventional AFM probes are suitable for acquiring a true piezoelectric signal in piezoresponse force microscopy. The work, titled "Diminish electrostatic in piezoresponse force microscopy through longer or ultra-stiff tips," is published in Applied Surface Science.
4h
Feed: All Latest
How Math Can Help Unravel the Weird Interactions of MicrobesThe dizzying network of interactions within microbe communities can defy analysis. But a new approach simplifies the math.
4h
Feed: All Latest
'Celeste' Review: The Exact Kind of Game the Nintendo Switch NeedsThe console already has a series of excellent first-party games and older ports. What it needs are more new indie titles.
4h
Science-Based Medicine
Rabies Claims the Life of a 6-Year-Old Florida Child: The Tragic Case of Ryker RoqueRabies is an incredibly deadly infection, but one that is virtually 100% preventable. Unfortunately a Florida child recently paid the ultimate price when his parents failed to seek out appropriate medical care for a bat bite, and despite an experimental but flawed treatment protocol.
4h
Ingeniøren
VIDEO: Byg din egen TV-sender for lommepengeneFor få penge kan man skabe sin egen TV-sender med open source software. Og det er skam tilladt at sende i Danmark, hvis reglerne følges.
4h
The Atlantic
Urban Bird Feeders Are Changing the Course of EvolutionT o my knowledge , no one has ever been killed by a plummeting bird feeder. Still, when you live on the 25th floor of a Manhattan high-rise, you can’t hang one outside the window and risk knocking off a pedestrian below. Several winters ago, I sat at my desk lamenting this fact while gazing across the gray expanse of chimneys and water towers stretching to the East River and beyond. I was holed u
4h
The Atlantic
Organized Labor’s Growing Class DivideLately it seems that, every week, a new group of media employees votes to join a union. On Tuesday, a majority of employees at Slate voted to join the Writers Guild of America, East. This came a few days after newsroom employees of the Los Angeles Times voted to join the NewsGuild–Communications Workers of America. Two weeks before that Vox Media recognized the Writers Guild of America, East, as
4h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
BuzzFeed in deal to distribute content in ChinaBuzzFeed has struck an agreement with Chinese technology group Bytedance to distribute its content in China, a rare foray behind the "Great Firewall of China" for Western media as Beijing tightens its censorship of the internet.
4h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
The most detailed radio map of the Milky WayAstronomers have conducted a large-scale survey of the invisible Milky Way using the Nobeyama 45-m Radio Telescope.
4h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Squeezed-light source to make gravitational wave detector even more sensitiveA team of researchers from the Max Planck Institute for Gravitational Physics (Albert Einstein Institute; AEI) in Hannover and from the Institute for Gravitational Physics at Leibniz Universität Hannover has developed an advanced squeezed-light source for the gravitational-wave detector Virgo near Pisa. Now, the Hannover scientists have delivered the setup, installed it, and handed it over to thei
4h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Scientists pioneer use of deep learning for real-time gravitational wave discoveryScientists at the National Center for Supercomputing Applications (NCSA), located at the University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign, have pioneered the use of GPU-accelerated deep learning for rapid detection and characterization of gravitational waves. This new approach will enable astronomers to study gravitational waves using minimal computational resources, reducing time to discovery and incre
4h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Chemical engineers discover how some bacteria resist threatsBacteria are stealthy organisms. They can multiply in minutes and evolve to survive what we throw at them—including antibiotics.
5h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Paleontology: The eleventh ArchaeopteryxResearchers from Ludwig-Maximilians-Universitaet (LMU) in Munich report the first description of the geologically oldest fossil securely attributable to the genus Archaeopteryx, and provide a new diagnostic key for differentiating bird-like dinosaurs from their closest relatives.
5h
Dagens Medicin
Ny ledende overlæge på Røntgenafdelingen på Vejle SygehusRadiolog Jakob Møller er netop blevet ansat som ny ledende overlæge på Røntgenafdelingen på Vejle Sygehus og Rygcenter Syddanmark.
5h
The Atlantic
The Establishment Strikes BackSince Donald Trump became president, pundits have wondered what it would take for the Republican establishment to stand up to him. Now we know. On Thursday, The New York Times reported that White House Counsel Donald McGahn had threatened to resign if Donald Trump fired Special Counsel Robert Mueller. Some liberals—having spent the Obama years cursing McGahn for his efforts while at the Federal E
5h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
New research yields super-strong aluminum alloyResearchers have demonstrated how to create a super-strong aluminum alloy that rivals the strength of stainless steel, an advance with potential industrial applications.
5h
Feed: All Latest
Scientists Hate the NIH’s New Rules for Experimenting on HumansFor a decade, the government has been working on a revision for grant applications. It’s finally done. It’s ethical, sensible, and a big enough pain that it might actually hurt science.
5h
Feed: All Latest
AI-enabled Face-Swap Porn is on the Rise—and the Law Can't Help YouRight now there's just about no recourse for victims. Here's the lay of the legal land.
5h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
The eleventh ArchaeopteryxResearchers from Ludwig-Maximilians-Universitaet (LMU) in Munich report the first description of the geologically oldest fossil securely attributable to the genus Archaeopteryx, and provide a new diagnostic key for differentiating bird-like dinosaurs from their closest relatives.
5h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Scientists elucidate the mechanism for inserting protein molecules into the outer compartment of mitochondriaResearchers at the University of Freiburg have succeeded in describing how so-called beta-barrel proteins are inserted into the membranes of mitochondria. The proteins enable mitochondria to import and export molecules. With this discovery, the team led by Prof. Dr. Nils Wiedemann and Prof. Dr. Nikolaus Pfanner, in cooperation with the group of Prof. Dr. Carola Hunte, has clarified a fundamental q
5h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
When the 'guardian' and the 'caretaker' of the genome join forcesBiologists and chemists at the University of Konstanz have deciphered a molecular cellular mechanism related to the development of cancer. They report the interaction between the tumour-suppressor protein p53, known as the "guardian of the genome," and the enzyme PARP-1, the "caretaker of the genome." The collaboration with the University of Ulm and the Karlsruhe Institute of Technology (KIT) resu
5h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Quantum cocktail provides insights on memory controlExperiments based on atoms in a shaken artificial crystal made of light offer novel insight into the physics of quantum many-body systems, which might help in the development of future data-storage technologies.
5h
Dagens Medicin
SDU udnævner ny professor i onkologiOverlæge og ph.d. Karina Dahl Steffensen er udnævnt til professor i klinisk onkologi på Syddansk Universitet og Vejle Sygehus.
5h
Viden
Hjernen i Mars-robot er en Apple-bærbar fra 1999Rummets ekstreme omstændigheder stiller store krav til elektronikken ombord på Mars-køretøjerne
5h
Latest Headlines | Science News
Life may have been possible in Earth’s earliest, most hellish eonHeat from asteroid bombardment during Earth’s earliest eon wasn’t too intense for life to exist on the planet, a new study suggests.
5h
The Atlantic
Grammys Preview: In With the New, Finally?When the sound of popular music shifts, it takes a while for the supposed scorekeepers of popular music to notice. In 1991 , Nielsen and Billboard switched to new, more statistically rigorous methods to measure sales and spins (rather than trusting radio stations and record stores to self-report) and suddenly, hip-hop began landing No. 1 albums. Something similar is happening now. The counting in
5h
Scientific American Content: Global
View to a Kill: Galápagos Sea Lions Team Up to Capture Huge TunaIn a newly documented behavior, sea lions use teamwork to trap their prey along shorelines -- Read more on ScientificAmerican.com
5h
Science | The Guardian
Diversity starts in schools – children need to see a wider range of careersStep into the classroom to help the next generation discover exciting and diverse career opportunities Ask a seven-year-old “what do you want to do when you grow up?” and you’ll get an answer built on very limited experience. But unless children are exposed to a wide range of options how can they know what opportunities exist that might interest them? The lack of awareness of primary school child
5h
Scientific American Content: Global
A Private Place Where HIV, Zika and Ebola HideTesticles protect viruses from immune attack, foiling attempts to destroy the pathogens -- Read more on ScientificAmerican.com
6h
Live Science
Nope, Women's Cycles Don't Make Them Crave Macho MenWomen think all guys are hotter during fertile phases of their menstrual cycle.
6h
Ingeniøren
Hør ugens podcast om kampfly og kloningerIngeniørens ugentlige podcast, Transformator, sætter i denne uge fokus på Danmarks nye kampfly F35, som endnu en gang er blevet forsinket og plages af over 1.000 fejl. Du kan også høre om forureningsskandalen i Grindsted, klonede aber og DTU’s næsten hjemmebyggede fusionsreaktor.
6h
BBC News - Science & Environment
Planet rumblesThe seismic region has seen lots of activity in recent weeks, but is there anything to worry about?
6h
Feed: All Latest
The Dangers of Keeping Women Out of TechThe number of women in computer science has steadily decreased since the 80s. The industry needs to change—and it could take a lesson from Maria Klawe.
6h
Feed: All Latest
The Dirty War Over Diversity Inside GoogleAdvocates of greater diversity at Google say they are being harassed and targeted on right-wing websites.
6h
Feed: All Latest
How Does MoviePass Make Money? We're About to Find OutAfter growing more quickly than its wildest expectations, MoviePass settles in for the hard part: actually making money.
6h
Feed: All Latest
Your Sloppy Bitcoin Drug Deals Will Haunt You For YearsScouring the blockchain, researchers found years-old evidence tying Silk Road transaction to users' public accounts.
6h
Feed: All Latest
Crispr’s Next Big Challenge: Getting Where It Needs to GoIn the 34 trillion-cell sea that is your body, an IV bag full of Crispr’d cells won’t make a dent. So scientists are working on ways to put the gene editors right where they need to go.
6h
Big Think
Can Silicon Valley save the world? Or are social networks ruining everything?"At times, it seems as if we are condemned to try to understand our own time with conceptual frameworks more than half a century old." Historian Niall Ferguson says it's time for an update. Read More
6h
The Atlantic
Why America Is Fighting About ImmigrationGovernment shutdowns are a useful window into what really matters to politicians. It’s one thing to say you care about an issue. It’s another to care about it enough to tell hundreds of thousands of federal employees to stay home, and to risk the political blowback that arises when their absence starts wreaking havoc on ordinary Americans’ lives. So it’s noteworthy that, according to Vox ’s Dylan
6h
Dagens Medicin
Hovedstaden afskediger projektdirektør på Bispebjerg efter kritikProjektdirektøren på det nye akuthus på Bispebjerg Hospital er afskediget efter kritik af processen i forbindelse med udbud af byggeriet.
6h
Ingeniøren
Studie: Lavtflyvende droner gør folk utryggeFolk bliver utrygge og irriterede, når store droners flyvehøjde nærmer sig 25 meter, og piloten ikke er synlig, viser to nye undersøgelser fra Syddansk Universitet.
6h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Nanoscale generation of white light for ultrabroadband nanospectroscopyScientists from ITMO University have used a silicon-gold nanoparticle agitated by a pulse laser in IR band as an effective source of white light. One such "nanobulb" was integrated into a standard probe microscope, which allowed the researchers to overcome the diffraction limit and examine subwavelength-size objects. The new technology makes modern near-field microscopy cheaper and simpler, and is
6h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Researchers describe unique cephalo-thoracic scissors in extinct insect speciesInsects are the most diverse group of animals on earth, with more than 1 million species, and account for more than 50 percent of all living species, including bacteria, fungi, and viruses. Insects are divided into more than 30 insect orders, such as Coleoptera, Lepidoptera, Hymenoptera, etc.
7h
Ingeniøren
Medie: Amerikanske it-kæmper udleverer kildekode til russiske myndighederRuslands myndigheder kræver, at amerikanske softwareselskaber udleverer deres kildekode for at få adgang til de russiske marked. Amerikanske politikere er nervøse for, at det giver bagslag.
7h
Ingeniøren
Indflydelsesrig investor: Google og Facebook er en trussel mod demokratietMilliardæren George Soros gik hårdt til techgiganterne, men roste Margrethe Vestager for hendes kamp mod dem, under hans årlige middag i World Economic Forum.
7h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
MMV malaria box phenotyped against plasmodium and toxoplasmaA Singapore-India collaborative research project has completed phenotypic screening of MMV Malaria Box, a large collection of potent chemical inhibitors against pathogenic parasites Toxoplasma gondii and Plasmodium falciparum, the causative agents of human toxoplasmosis and malaria. This research opens up new avenues to study unique stages of the infectious cycle that are affected by inhibitor cla
7h
New Scientist - News
Early Earth’s air may show us how to find signs of alien lifeOxygen isn’t the best beacon of life on an alien world. We need to look for other gases organisms spew into the air, and early Earth can show us what to target
7h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Research finds link between rainfall and ocean circulation in past and presentResearch conducted at The University of Texas at Austin has found that changes in ocean currents in the Atlantic Ocean influence rainfall in the Western Hemisphere, and that these two systems have been linked for thousands of years.
7h
Ingeniøren
Region Syddanmark: Vi har ikke penge til at rydde forurening af Grindsted ÅDet er forkert at bruge penge på at rydde op i Kærgaard Klitplantage, når det samme spildevand ligger midt i Grindsted, uden at nogen rører en finger, mener DTU-forsker.
7h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
'Day Zero': Water shut-off looms in South Africa's Cape TownLong lines of South Africans collect water daily from a natural spring pipeline in an upscale suburb of Cape Town, illustrating the harsh impact of a drought that authorities say could force the closure of most taps in the country's second largest city in just over two months, an occasion ominously known as "Day Zero."
7h
Science : NPR
An Uncle's Overdose Spurs Medicaid Official To Change CourseDr. Andrey Ostrovsky, until recently chief medical officer for Medicaid, quit his job to more directly fight the stigma of addiction — a stigma that made his beloved uncle afraid to ask for help. (Image credit: Gary Waters/Getty Images )
7h
The Atlantic
The Startling Link Between Sugar and Alzheimer'sIn recent years, Alzheimer’s disease has occasionally been referred to as “ type 3” diabetes , though that moniker doesn’t make much sense. After all, though they share a problem with insulin, type 1 diabetes is an autoimmune disease, and type 2 diabetes is a chronic disease caused by diet. Instead of another type of diabetes, it’s increasingly looking like Alzheimer’s is another potential side e
7h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Research finds link between rainfall and ocean circulation in past and presentResearch conducted at The University of Texas at Austin has found that changes in ocean currents in the Atlantic Ocean influence rainfall in the Western Hemisphere, and that these two systems have been linked for thousands of years.
7h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Report: Dutch spies caught Russian hackers on videoA Dutch newspaper and television show are jointly reporting that the Netherlands' spy service broke into the computers used by a Russian hacking group often nicknamed Cozy Bear and may be sitting on evidence relating to the hack of the U.S. Democratic National Committee.
7h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Chinese volunteers spend 200 days on virtual 'moon base'Chinese students spent 200 continuous days in a "lunar lab" in Beijing, state media said Friday, as the country prepares for its long-term goal of putting people on the moon.
7h
Ingeniøren
Professor: Elvarme i stedet for varmepumper kan koste kassenProfessor frygter, at en nedsættelse af elvarmeafgiften ikke vil medføre flere varmepumper, men regulær elvarme.
7h
Ingeniøren
Ugens it-job: Ørsted, Bloom og Netcompany jagter it-professionellePå dagens liste er der job for både konsulenter, specialister, projektledere og udviklere. Find det rette job for dig.
8h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
'Job-killing' robots, AI under scrutiny in Davos"Artificial intelligence and robots will kill many jobs."
9h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Volcanos, earthquakes: Is the 'Ring of Fire' alight?A volcanic eruption in the Philippines forces mass evacuations, while another in Japan kills one person. Across the Pacific, a 7.9 magnitude earthquake hits off Alaska. So what's the link?
9h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Ariane 5 satellites in orbit but not in right locationTwo commercial satellites have been placed in orbit by an Ariane 5 rocket but have yet to reach their correct position, Arianespace said Thursday, after mission control briefly lost contact with the craft in a rare malfunction.
9h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Soros to Google and Facebook: 'Your days are numbered'Billionaire investor George Soros launched a scathing attack on tech giants at the Davos summit on Thursday, calling them monopolies that could be manipulated by authoritarians to subvert democracy.
9h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
US Treasury official urges regulation of crypto currenciesA senior U.S. Treasury official has urged banks and financial regulators to do more to tighten oversight of trading in bitcoin and other cryptocurrencies.
9h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Walmart getting into the e-book market, an Amazon strengthWalmart is planning to sell e-books and audiobooks, its latest effort to encroach on an area of Amazon strength.
9h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Lava spilling from Philippine volcano, ash coating landMore lava was spilling from a Philippine volcano also sending up columns of ash over farmland and towns already coated in gray after a nearly two-week eruption.
9h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Many second hand plastic toys could pose a risk to children's health, study suggestsScientists at the University of Plymouth have discovered high concentrations of hazardous elements including antimony, barium, bromine, cadmium, chromium and lead in many second hand plastic toys.
10h
Ingeniøren
Professor: Fremtidsanalyse fra kommunerne taler til ‘bullshit-bæltet’Teknologi kan ikke løse lærernes egentlige problemer.
10h
Science | The Guardian
'Space graffiti': astronomers angry over launch of fake star into skyGiant disco ball dubbed ‘Humanity Star’, launched by startup Rocket Lab, will interfere with scientific study of the universe, experts say Astronomers across the world have criticised a privately owned, New Zealand -based space company after it secretively put a satellite likened to a giant disco ball into orbit. Last week the space exploration startup Rocket Lab launched a rocket from a remote s
11h
Science | The Guardian
Searching for an Alzheimer’s cure while my father slips awayAt the beginning, we hunted frantically for any medical breakthrough that might hint at a cure. Then hope gave way to the unbearable truth. By Peter Savodnik One night several years ago, I checked out of a hotel in Cairo and hailed a cab to the airport. It was just after 1am. I had been in Egypt for a week, researching a story on the Muslim Brotherhood, and I had come down with a nasty bug. A blo
11h
Ingeniøren
Leder: Giv nu de statsansatte roen og troen tilbage
11h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Getting out of hot water -- does mobile DNA help?Many researchers assume the first life on Earth evolved in hot springs. A new study provides insights into how one type of extremophile microbe may have moved from hot springs to conquer more moderate environments across the globe. The first-ever analysis of DNA of one ammonia-oxidizing hot-spring microbe living today reveals that evolution of the necessary adaptations may have been helped by high
12h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Obese men may have higher chance of recurrence following radical prostatectomyAmong men with prostate cancer who underwent radical prostatectomy (RP), those who were obese had a higher risk of biochemical recurrence, according to data presented at the American Association for Cancer Research Special Conference Obesity and Cancer: Mechanisms Underlying Etiology and Outcomes, held Jan. 27-30.
12h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News
High body fat levels associated with increased breast cancer risk in women with normal BMIAmong postmenopausal women with normal body mass index (BMI), those with higher body fat levels had an increased risk for invasive breast cancer, according to data presented at the American Association for Cancer Research Special Conference Obesity and Cancer: Mechanisms Underlying Etiology and Outcomes, held Jan. 27-30.
12h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Quality of children's sleep may affect eating habits and weightSeveral measures of poor sleep quality were associated with higher body mass index (BMI) in children, according to data presented at the American Association for Cancer Research Special Conference Obesity and Cancer: Mechanisms Underlying Etiology and Outcomes, held Jan. 27-30.
12h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Predicted rise in Canadian obesity rate may lead to higher cancer burdenReducing the number of overweight and obese Canadians by 50 percent could potentially prevent a cumulative 59,829 cases of cancer by 2042, according to estimates presented at the American Association for Cancer Research Special Conference Obesity and Cancer: Mechanisms Underlying Etiology and Outcomes, held Jan. 27-30.
12h
The Atlantic
Radio Atlantic: Who Gets to Be American?Once again, immigration is at the top of America's legislative agenda, as it has been, seemingly every generation, for much of the nation's history. But while many recent discussions of immigration have focused on unauthorized immigrants, some of the most contentious aspects of the current debate concern legal immigration: Who should the U.S. allow to be an American? Priscilla Alvarez, an editor
12h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Getting out of hot water—does mobile DNA help?Extremophiles—hardy organisms living in places that would kill most life on Earth—provide fascinating insights into evolution, metabolism and even possible extraterrestrial life. A new study provides insights into how one type of extremophile, a heat-loving microbe that uses ammonia for energy production, may have been able to make the transition from hot springs to more moderate environments acro
12h
Dagens Medicin
Friheden til at fungere som lægeKristian Rørbæk Madsens underskriftindsamling er kulminationen på flere års opsparet frustration blandt landets læger. De føler sig i stigende grad udsat for mistro og kontrol, siger en lang række iagttagere.
12h
Dagens Medicin
Fem store læge-oprør9.000 underskrifter på et mistillidsvotum er blot den seneste manifestation på, at de danske læger har mistet tilliden til politikere og embedsmænd.
13h
Ingeniøren
Dårlige vitser kan gavne karrieren - og det er ikke en jokeNy undersøgelse fra Harvard Business School viser, at vellykkede vitser får dig til at virke mere kompetent. Faktisk kan selv dårlige jokes fremme din chefs og kollegers syn på dig
13h
Dagens Medicin
Henrik Dibbern: Kravene oppefra opleves simpelthen ikke som relevanteAnsvaret ligger hos de politikere, der ud fra nogle overordnede ideologiske dagsordener begynder at lave regler og styring af et system, de jo ikke forstår, mener den tidligere PLO-formand.
13h
Dagens Medicin
Hospitalernes udgifter til kræftmedicin 14-doblet på 20 årTal fra Sundhedsdatastyrelsen, som sundhedsøkonom Jes Søgaard har analyseret, viser, at priserne på kræftmedicin er vokset støt siden midten af 90’erne.
13h
Dagens Medicin
Anne Mette Dons: Alt er smidt ud med badevandetStyrelsen for Patientsikkerhed virker ikke til at have forståelse for den virkelighed loven skal agere i, mener den tidligere chef i Sundhedsstyrelsen.
13h
Dagens Medicin
Henrik Sillesen: Nogle gange er medicinsk handling er vigtigere end dokumentationHvis man arbejder i en system, der vægter dokumentation højere end faglighed, så bliver det svært, mener klinikchef Henrik Sillesen
13h
Dagens Medicin
Michael Dupont: Det er mange års opsparet vrede over mistillidsdagsordenenProblematikken er det misforhold, der er mellem den aktuelle virkelighed, vi arbejder i og så de regler og forordninger, der tordner ned over os, mener næstformand i Lægeforeningen.
13h
Dagens Medicin
Mads Koch Hansen: Man starter med at mistænkeliggøreMed den skærpede retorik om politianmeldelser og fratagelse af autorisation, bliver folk bange for at passe deres arbejde, mener lægefaglig direktør.
13h
Dagens Medicin
Biomarkør kan bremse antibiotikaoverforbrugAntibiotikaforbruget hos patienter med akutte lungeinfektioner kan reduceres markant, hvis det reguleres efter en biomarkør. Det fastslår en ny metaanalyse, som også overraskende viser, at strategien mindsker dødeligheden og giver færre antibiotikarelaterede bivirkninger.
13h
NeuWrite West
Cuttlefish camouflage reveals how they see the worldHumans are r--lly g--d at filling in th- bl-nks... but can cuttlefish do the same? It’s very common for objects to be partially hidden from view, but we perceive them clearly even when only bits and pieces are actually visible. If a rock is partially covered in sand, it’s easy for us to see that the different bits poking out all belong to a single bigger rock. In perception research, this is call
13h
The Atlantic
Out of ControlThe news that President Trump tried to fire Robert Mueller is one more moment of shock and awe in this period of American history. The good news is that this was the political massacre that didn’t happen. According to The New York Times , White House Counsel Don McGahn II threatened to quit, and that was enough to kill the plan. The bad news is that Trump tried to do this once, and all evidence s
14h
Dagens Medicin
Fagpolitisk disruptionNok er nok for de danske læger, der i protest mod kontrol og styring er stukket helt af fra deres egen fagforening.
14h
Dagens Medicin
Magtglidning i den offentlige forvaltningSagen om en nyvalgt regionspolitiker og overlæge, der erklæres generelt inhabil, skaber frygt for berufsverbot. Samtidig udhules det repræsentative demokrati med risiko for udvikling af ‘politiske’ embedsmænd.
14h
Dagens Medicin
Innovation – just do it!Patienterne må aldrig tabe, men vi bør blive langt bedre til at eksperimentere med organiseringer
14h
The Atlantic
The Saturday Night Massacre That Wasn'tFor months after Special Counsel Robert Mueller was appointed, President Trump openly flirted with firing him, delivering threats via public warnings about “red lines” Mueller shouldn’t cross. It turns out that Trump wasn’t just rattling his saber publicly: According to a New York Times report late Thursday , the president attempted to fire Mueller in June 2017, roughly a month after Deputy Attor
14h
BBC News - Science & Environment
A third of coral reefs 'entangled with plastic'Plastic is one of the biggest risks to the future of coral reefs after ocean warming, say scientists.
16h
NYT > Science
A Science Denier at the Natural History Museum? Scientists Rebel.More than 200 scientists and other academics are asking the American Museum of Natural History to remove Rebekah Mercer, an influential donor to conservative causes, from its board.
17h
Scientific American Content: Global
Nobelist Crafts Light-Switchable AntibioticsDrugs modified by chemistry Nobel laureate Ben Feringa can be turned on and off by light, which could help keep bacteria from developing antibiotic resistance. -- Read more on ScientificAmerican.com
17h
Futurity.org
How the brain adapts to a hand transplantWhen a person loses a hand, nerves that control sensation and movement are severed. This trauma deprives sensory and movement areas of the brain of stimulation, causing them to reorganize their functions. Whether these reorganizational changes are reversible in the adult brain is of broad relevance to neurorehabilitation. “While conceptually similar to heart, lung, and kidney transplants, hand tr
17h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Lack of essential and affordable medicines in India revealedResearch has revealed the shocking lack of access to essential medicines in India, despite thousands being approved in an attempt to generate wider availability.
17h
Futurity.org
Record temperature surge from 2014 to 2016Global surface temperatures surged by a record amount from 2014 to 2016, researchers report. The surge boosted the total amount of warming since the start of the last century by more than 25 percent in just three years, according to a new paper describing the research. “Our paper is the first one to actually quantify this jump and identify the fundamental reason for this jump,” says lead author J
17h
BBC News - Science & Environment
Edible bandages for bears' burnt pawsAfter two bears are injured in California wildfires, a creative solution to get them back on their feet.
17h
Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
Discovery offers new genetic pathway for injured nerve regenerationResearchers on the hunt for genes involved in regenerating critical nerve fibers came away with a surprise: the discovery of a new genetic pathway that carries hope for victims of traumatic injuries -- from stroke to spinal cord damage.
17h
Futurity.org
Graphene ink could lead to washable electronicsNew graphene printing technology can produce electronic circuits that are low-cost, flexible, highly conductive and water repellent, researchers report. The nanotechnology “would lend enormous value to self-cleaning wearable/washable electronics that are resistant to stains, or ice and biofilm formation,” according to the new paper. Jonathan Claussen and his research group are printing and proces
17h
BBC News - Science & Environment
Ariane rocket suffers rare launch anomalyEurope's normally highly dependable rocket, the Ariane 5, loses contact as it flies skyward.
17h
Dagens Medicin
Fire ud af fem danskere med KOL får ikke en diagnoseEt nyt stort studie viser, at hele 78 pct. af danskere med KOL ikke får stillet en diagnose. Underdiagnosticering har i årevis kendetegnet KOL-området, og de nye tal understreger for alvor vigtigheden af ikke længere at sidde problemet overhørigt, lyder det fra forskerne.
17h
Futurity.org
School mental health screenings may miss kids who need supportWhile many educators, counselors, and social workers are working to improve practices to identify children who need help through risk assessments such as mental health screenings, there is a high degree of variance between teacher reports when using these screenings, a new study indicates. “If we can get input from several different sources…involved in a young person’s life we may have a better u
17h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Microbiome research refines HIV risk for womenDrawing from data collected for years by AIDS researchers in six African nations, scientists have pinpointed seven bacterial species whose presence in high concentrations may significantly increase the risk of HIV infection in women.
18h
Big Think
Let’s delete sex-identity from birth certificatesW hen we are asked to check a sex-identity box on a bureaucratic form, what definition of sex is being invoked and to what end? Read More
18h
NeuWrite San Diego
Instant Gratification: Weighing the Psychological Benefits and Costs of MDMA UseCan a pill exist that brings instant happiness without any negative side effects? Probably not.
18h
The Atlantic
The Atlantic Daily: Harsh Judgment, Shutdown Blame, Plastic PollutionWhat We’re Following Gymnasts’ Justice: Larry Nassar has been sentenced to 40 to 175 years in prison for sexually abusing over 150 women in his capacity as an athletic doctor at Michigan State University and for the USA Gymnastics team. Judge Rosemarie Aquilina, who presided in the case, has drawn criticism for her unusually harsh sentencing statement , in which she expressed that she might “allo
18h
Science : NPR
New Fossil Found In Israel Suggests A Much Earlier Human Migration Out Of AfricaScientists have discovered a part of a fossilized human skull that's around 180,000 years old. It is now the oldest human fossil outside Africa. (Image credit: Gerhard Weber/University of Vienna/Science)
18h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News
New research shows diabetes and worse blood sugar control are associated with long-term cognitive declineA new study in Diabetologia of some 5,000 older people in the UK has shown that rates of long-term cognitive decline are steeper in those who have diabetes compared with people with normal blood sugar control, and that efforts to delay the onset of diabetes and/or control blood sugar levels might prevent subsequent progression of brain function decline.
18h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Simple test speeds recognition of posterior strokeA simple finger-to-nose test by medical professionals almost doubled the recognition of possible stroke involving the circulation at the back of the brain, according to preliminary research presented at the American Stroke Association's International Stroke Conference 2018, a world premier meeting dedicated to the science and treatment of cerebrovascular disease for researchers and clinicians.
18h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Asian-American ethnicity associated with severe stroke, worse outcomesAsian-American race was more associated with severe ischemic strokes and worse outcomes than being whites. Asian-Americans tend to receive clot busting stroke treatment less frequently than whites.
18h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Too few with stroke of the eye are treated to reduce future strokeOnly one-third of 5,600 patients with retinal infarction, or stroke in the eye, underwent basic stroke work-up, and fewer than one in 10 were seen by a neurologist. One in 100 of the retinal infarction patients studied experienced another stroke within 90 days of their retinal infarction.
18h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Working before and after stroke is good for brain healthWorking-age adults who suffer stroke are likely to have healthier brains, sharper minds and less risk of depression and death two years after stroke if they worked prior to stroke, versus being unemployed. Those who work after stroke also seem to benefit with better long-term cognitive status than those who don't.
18h
Popular Science
Mosquitoes learn not to mess with you when you swat themAnimals And they’ll likely go looking for a less combative meal. The heat of your body, the vapor of your sweat, the breeze of your breath, and your scent, oh, your scent! The combination is beyond enticing, drawing in a mosquito with…
18h
The Scientist RSS
NIHs New Rules Governing Human Research Go Into EffectMore than 3,500 scientists had signed an open letter to NIH Director Francis Collins opposing the rules change.
18h
The Atlantic
The Atlantic Politics & Policy Daily: Here's the DealToday in 5 Lines President Trump will support a path to citizenship for 1.8 million young immigrants brought to the U.S. illegally as children, in exchange for a $25 billion fund for the border wall and other immigration cuts. During Trump's first day at the Economic World Forum in Davos, he met with British Prime Minister Theresa May and threatened to withhold aid money from Palestinians unless
18h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News
MIND diet slows cognitive decline in stroke survivorsThe MIND diet, which zeros in on foods that promote brain health, including vegetables, berries, fish and olive oil, helps to greatly slow cognitive decline in stroke survivors. In prior studies, neither adherence to the Mediterranean or the DASH diet patterns were significantly associated with slower decline in cognitive abilities. More research is needed to confirm the role of diet in stroke sur
19h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News
A usually ignored finding in the kidneys may signal stroke riskSacs of fluid in the kidneys may indicate there is also blood vessel damage in the brain and a heightened risk of stroke, according to preliminary research presented at the American Stroke Association's International Stroke Conference 2018, a world premier meeting dedicated to the science and treatment of cerebrovascular disease for researchers and clinicians.
19h
Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
Parental provision of alcohol to teenagers does not reduce risks, compared to no supply, Australian study findsThere is no evidence to support the practice of parents providing alcohol to their teenagers to protect them from alcohol-related risks during early adolescence, according to a prospective cohort study in Australia.
19h
Live Science
Are 'Heat-Not-Burn' Tobacco Products Safer Than Cigarettes?A new tobacco device, known as IQOS, could soon be sold in the U.S. But is it safer than a regular cigarette? An FDA panel has weighed in.
19h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Method assesses how well dialysis clinics refer patients for transplantationA new method is useful for assessing how well individual dialysis facilities are referring patients for kidney transplantation.When the method was applied to dialysis facilities in Georgia, researchers found that most of the variation in referrals for transplantation were due to characteristics within the dialysis facilities rather than patient characteristics.
19h
Popular Science
What the heck is the Doomsday Clock, and why did it just tick?Science We're two minutes to midnight. Again. The Doomsday Clock just ticked 30 seconds, bringing us at an uncomfy two minutes to midnight for the first time since the Cold War.
19h

Vil du være med til at finde de mest interessante nyheder? Send email herom til BioNyt

Se nyheder fra en tidligere dato

Tegn abonnement på

BioNyt Videnskabens Verden (www.bionyt.dk) er Danmarks ældste populærvidenskabelige tidsskrift for naturvidenskab. Det er det eneste blad af sin art i Danmark, som er helliget international forskning inden for livsvidenskaberne.

Bladet bringer aktuelle, spændende forskningsnyheder inden for biologi, medicin og andre naturvidenskabelige områder som f.eks. klimaændringer, nanoteknologi, partikelfysik, astronomi, seksualitet, biologiske våben, ecstasy, evolutionsbiologi, kloning, fedme, søvnforskning, muligheden for liv på mars, influenzaepidemier, livets opståen osv.

Artiklerne roses for at gøre vanskeligt stof forståeligt, uden at den videnskabelige holdbarhed tabes.