Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
VW under fire for diesel tests on monkeys, humansThe world's biggest carmaker Volkswagen faced fresh scrutiny Monday over reports it helped finance experiments that saw monkeys and humans breathe car exhaust fumes.
13h
Ingeniøren
Ozonhullet er langsomt, men sikkert ved at lukke sigKoncentrationen af klor over Antarktis er faldende og korreleret med formindsket nedbrydning af ozon. Men ukontrollerede gasser er en joker.
19h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News
New Egyptian dinosaur reveals ancient link between Africa and EuropeWhen it comes to the final days of the dinosaurs, Africa is something of a blank page. Fossils found in Africa from the Late Cretaceous, the time period from 100 to 66 million years ago, are few and far between. That means that the course of dinosaur evolution in Africa has largely remained a mystery. But in the Egyptian Sahara Desert, scientists have discovered a new species of dinosaur that help
7h
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
How to reduce heat extremes by 2-3 degrees CelsiusNew research shows how simple, proven geo-engineering measures can reduce the hottest days by 2-3 degrees C. Lightening buildings, roads and infrastructure in densely populated areas and changing crop types and using no till agricultural practices over farmland can all take the edge off the hottest days as climate change raises extreme temperatures.
2min
Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
Why do investors seek out stock swindles?The chance to get rich quick by investing in a penny stock, even if it is widely suspected that the stock price is being manipulated, is too tempting for some investors to resist. New research finds that some investors actually seek out stocks suspected of 'pump-and-dump' schemes, despite the risks and warnings from financial experts, in hopes of winning big, akin to the lottery.
2min
New on MIT Technology Review
Strava’s privacy PR nightmare shows why you can’t trust social fitness apps to protect your dataStrava Military USCompanies still aren’t taking user privacy seriously enough, so you need to figure it out for yourself.
12min
Popular Science
Astronauts lose weight in space, and it might be because their food is literally floating around inside themFat Month Stomachs weren't built for space. We were curious. What do we know about what happens to fat when we try to metabolize it in space?
19min
The Atlantic
The Atlantic Politics & Policy Daily: A More Perfect UniomToday in 5 Lines FBI Deputy Director Andrew McCabe stepped down from his post on Monday, but will remain on the payroll until he retires in mid-March. Republican Representative Rodney Frelinghuysen of New Jersey announced that he will not seek reelection in November. The White House released the list of invitees who will sit with First Lady Melania Trump during President Trump’s first State of th
25min
Big Think
Scientists are zeroing in on where intuition comes from, biologicallyThere’s a complex biological system behind our intuition. Read More
38min
Big Think
Engineers design artificial synapse for “brain-on-a-chip” hardwareMIT Color ObjectsA significant hangup on the way to portable artificial intelligence has been the neural synapse, which has been particularly tricky to reproduce in hardware. Until now. Read More
45min
Feed: All Latest
Proposal for Government Wireless Network Shows Fear of ChinaNational Security Council presentation argues that the government, rather than private companies, should build a fast wireless network to minimize Chinese influence.
51min
Live Science
Superpowered Chinese Lasers Could Soon Rip Open Raw VacuumChinese physicists are about to start building a 100-petawatt laser, powerful enough to rip matter out of a vacuum.
1h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News
How to reduce heat extremes by 2-3 degrees CNew research published in Nature Geoscience shows how simple, proven geo-engineering measures can reduce the hottest days by 2-3 degrees C. Lightening buildings, roads and infrastructure in densely populated areas and changing crop types and using no till agricultural practices over farmland can all take the edge off the hottest days as climate change raises extreme temperatures.
1h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Analysis looks at long-term risks of living kidney donationLiving kidney donors are not at increased risk for some health outcomes previously of concern, but do seem at risk for worse blood pressure and kidney function than nondonors. Female donors seem to be at increased risk for preeclampsia.
1h
Quanta Magazine
Job One for Quantum Computers: Boost Artificial IntelligenceIn the early ’90s, Elizabeth Behrman , a physics professor at Wichita State University, began working to combine quantum physics with artificial intelligence — in particular, the then-maverick technology of neural networks. Most people thought she was mixing oil and water. “I had a heck of a time getting published,” she recalled. “The neural-network journals would say, ‘What is this quantum mecha
1h
NYT > Science
Arno Motulsky, a Founder of Medical Genetics, Dies at 94Dr. Motulsky narrowly escaped the Nazis as a teenager and went on to become what one scientist called “a maestro of human genetics.”
1h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Study shows wetlands provide landscape-scale reduction in nitrogen pollutionIn agricultural regions such as the U.S. Midwest, excess nitrate from crop fertilizer makes its way into rivers and streams through subsurface drainage channels and agricultural ditches.
1h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Microbubbles make breast cancer more susceptible to radiation therapyBursting oxygen-filled microbubbles in breast cancer makes tumors three times more sensitive to radiation therapy in preliminary tests with animal models of the disease
1h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Study shows wetlands provide landscape-scale reduction in nitrogen pollutionIn agricultural regions such as the US Midwest, excess nitrate from crop fertilizer makes its way into rivers and streams through subsurface drainage channels and agricultural ditches.
1h
Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
Heritage turkey production research profitable but more difficultTo meet increasing consumer demand for heritage-breed turkeys to be the centerpiece of holiday and other meals, researchers are studying methods producers can use to raise the historical birds.
1h
Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
Men hold secret to protect women from multiple sclerosisMen are much less likely to get multiple sclerosis (MS) than women, and one reason is that they are protected by high levels of testosterone. Scientists have now discovered how it works. They have identified a guardian molecule -- triggered by testosterone -- that appears to protect males from disease. When female mice with disease are treated with this protective molecule, their symptoms were eli
1h
Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
New, low cost alternative for ethylene productionScientists have discovered a new reaction mechanism of performing Oxidative coupling of methane (OCM) at a temperature as low as 150ºC. The novel catalytic reaction found in the study, which demonstrated both high yield and catalytic activity, was done in an electric field, and could provide a more cost-effective method of synthesizing ethylene in the future.
1h
Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
Adults with autism show a diminished brain response to hearing their own namePreviously, research has shown that children at risk of an autism diagnosis respond less to hearing their own name. Now, a new study shows for the first time that the brain response to hearing one’s own name is also diminished in adults with an autism diagnosis.
1h
Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
Hidden genetic effects behind immune diseases may be missed, study suggestsThe role of genetics in the risk of having an immune disease could be missed in research, scientists suggest. Using a combination of stem cells and novel analytical tools, scientists have discovered that clues to the contribution of genetic variation to disease risk lie not only in the genes, but also in the molecular switches that control those genes.
1h
Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
Mammals and birds could have best shot at surviving climate changeNew research that analyzed more than 270 million years of data on animals shows that mammals and birds -- both warm-blooded animals -- may have a better chance of evolving and adapting to the Earth's rapidly changing climate than their cold-blooded peers, reptiles and amphibians.
1h
New on MIT Technology Review
Self-driving trucks could solve a labor shortage—and put truckers out of work
1h
New Scientist - News
Snake alarm call makes birds scan for approaching predatorsThe ability to visualise an object associated with a sound was once thought to be unique to humans. But some birds seem to have that ability as well, a study has found
1h
New Scientist - News
Dark matter near black holes sends gamma rays from galaxy’s coreAn overabundance of gamma rays come from the centre of our galaxy. Dark matter annihilating near the edges of medium-sized black holes could be the source
1h
Live Science
New 'Hologram' Device Levitates Particles to Create 3D Objects in Thin AirA team of researchers at Brigham Young University has developed a new device that creates fully three-dimensional images.
1h
Science | The Guardian
Weatherwatch: tiny particles in the air can trigger massive stormsUS scientists taking measurements above the Amazon rainforest have recorded the effects of smoke and aerosols on the weather Mankind has made the world warmer, but we’ve also made it stormier. In a study conducted over the Amazon rainforest, scientists have shown that tiny particles – smaller than one-thousandth of the width of a human hair – cause storms to intensify, and potentially have knock-
1h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Updates on recovery attempts for NASA IMAGE missionAfter an amateur astronomer recorded observations of a satellite in high Earth orbit on Jan. 20, 2018, his initial research suggested it was the Imager for Magnetopause-to-Aurora Global Exploration (IMAGE)—a NASA mission launched into orbit around Earth on March 25, 2000.
1h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
NASA's GOLD powers on for the first timeNASA's Global-scale Observations of the Limb and Disk, or GOLD, mission powered on the GOLD instrument for the first time after launch on Jan. 28, 7:23 p.m. EST.
1h
Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
Weak hydrogen bonds key to strong, tough infrastructureEngineers study what it takes to make strong and tough infrastructures by probing the interfacial interactions of polymer and cement, which are key to composite properties.
1h
Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
Why do we trust, or not trust, strangers? The answer is PavlovianOur trust in strangers is dependent on their resemblance to others we've previously known, finds a new study.
1h
Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
Visualizing danger from songbird warning callsA researcher finds that a small songbird, the Japanese tit (Parus minor), can retrieve a visual image of a predator from specific alarm calls.
1h
Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
Through the looking glass: New mirror-image molecules could lead to better medicinesScientists have developed a new technology for designing mirror-image versions of molecules, paving the way for longer lasting medicines. For patients, this would mean less frequent injections and more drugs could one day be developed in a pill form. They show the method works by creating mirror image versions of blockbuster diabetes and osteoporosis drugs, GLP1 and PTH, respectively, which had lo
1h
Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
Boosting Sirt4 gene activity extends healthy lifespan in fruit fliesResearchers illustrate that Sirt4, also found in humans, may be an important factor in age-related metabolic decline and healthy lifespan.
1h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Psychiatric medications are not overprescribed for kids, finds studyA new study at Columbia University Irving Medical Center (CUIMC) challenges the popular notion that psychiatric medications are overprescribed in children and adolescents in the US. When the researchers compared prescribing rates with prevalence rates for the most common psychiatric disorders in children, they discovered that some of these medications may be underprescribed.
1h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Morris Animal Foundation-funded study points way to improved stem cell therapiesIn a study using equine mesenchymal stem cells, Morris Animal Foundation-funded researchers from Cornell University and North Carolina State University found that stem cell function can be enhanced through manipulation of their culture environment, and that 'priming' prior to patient administration could optimize their therapeutic potential. The research team published their results in Veterinary
1h
Scientific American Content: Global
A Future for American EnergyAt the first Science Meets Congress event, Energy Solutions for a Sustainable Future, energy and innovation experts from academia, government and the private sector talked with Scientific American... -- Read more on ScientificAmerican.com
1h
Latest Headlines | Science News
Here’s how cells rapidly stuff two meters of DNA into microscopic capsulesScientists have figured out how cells quickly pack up their chromosomes before a cell divides.
1h
The Atlantic
The Circumscribed Ethics Investigation Into Devin NunesEarly last April, the House Ethics Committee opened an investigation into whether the chairman of the House Intelligence Committee, Devin Nunes, broke rules governing the public disclosure of classified information when he told reporters that he had obtained details about “American intelligence monitoring foreign officials” who may have “incidentally picked up communications of Trump transition t
1h
Big Think
The problem with Ayn Rand? She isn't a philosopherWhy is it that people say Ayn Rand isn't a "real" philosopher? Read More
2h
The Atlantic
The Mystery of Andrew McCabe's ExitUpdated on January 29 at 4:16 p.m. In a win for President Trump, FBI Deputy Director Andrew McCabe is leaving his post effective Monday—and that’s about the only clear thing about his departure. McCabe, who was appointed to that job under former FBI Director James Comey, was expected to leave his job this spring, when he reached eligibility for a pension. New FBI directors typically choose their
2h
Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
Scientists pinpoint how ocean acidification weakens coral skeletonsThe rising acidity of the oceans threatens coral reefs by making it harder for corals to build their skeletons. A new study identifies the details of how ocean acidification affects coral skeletons, allowing scientists to predict more precisely where corals will be more vulnerable.
2h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Tyson Foods invests in firm trying to make meat from cellsTyson Foods Inc. has invested in a food-tech startup that's developing methods to produce meat directly from animal cells.
2h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Heritage turkey production research profitable but more difficultTo meet increasing consumer demand for heritage-breed turkeys to be the centerpiece of holiday and other meals, researchers in Penn State's College of Agricultural Sciences are studying methods producers can use to raise the historical birds.
2h
Big Think
What happens when anarchists run a country? History has an answer."Anarchy" is often used as a synonym for chaos. Does the historical record match up with that? Read More
2h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Heritage turkey production research profitable but more difficultTo meet increasing consumer demand for heritage-breed turkeys to be the centerpiece of holiday and other meals, researchers in Penn State's College of Agricultural Sciences are studying methods producers can use to raise the historical birds.
2h
Live Science
This Is Why You Trust Some Strangers and Not OthersIs your brain hardwired for bias?
2h
NYT > Science
Trump Says Climate Is Both ‘Cooling’ and ‘Heating.’ He’s Only Half Right.President Trump's comments about climate change in an interview with Piers Morgan were rich in misinformation.
2h
New on MIT Technology Review
The Trump administration says it wants to nationalize the 5G network
2h
Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
Wetlands provide landscape-scale reduction in nitrate pollutionA new study provides new insights to demonstrate that multiple wetlands or ‘wetland complexes’ within a watershed are extremely effective at reducing harmful nitrate in rivers and streams. These wetlands can be up to five times more efficient per unit area at reducing nitrate than the best land-based nitrogen mitigation strategies.
2h
Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
Plotting the path of plant pathogensIn a sneak attack, some pathogenic microbes manipulate plant hormones to gain access to their hosts undetected. Biologists have exposed one such interloper by characterizing the unique biochemical pathway it uses to synthesize auxin, a central hormone in plant development.
2h
Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
Light-triggered nanoparticles show promise against metastatic cancerA new anti-cancer strategy wields light as a precision weapon. Unlike traditional light therapy -- which is limited to the skin and areas accessible with an endoscope -- this technique can target and attack cancer cells that have spread deep inside the body.
2h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Trump team weighs plan to nationalize high-speed networks (Update)Ajit Pai 5G GovernmentPresident Donald Trump's national security team is mulling a plan to nationalize the newest generation of high-speed wireless internet networks, sparking sharp criticism Monday from across industry and the political spectrum.
2h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Pentagon probes fitness-app use after map shows sensitive sites (Update)Strava Military USThe US military is reviewing how troops use fitness trackers and other devices, the Pentagon said Monday after an exercise-logging company published a map revealing potentially sensitive information about US and allied forces in places including the Middle East.
2h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Foxconn wants to tap 7 million gallons of water a dayFoxconn Technology Group wants to tap 7 million gallons of water a day from Lake Michigan to meet its needs.
2h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Apple's stock sinks as high hope for iPhone X sales fadeApple iPhone X ProductionApple's stock is backtracking from its recent highs amid mounting concerns that iPhone X sales will fall short of the high hopes for a device that brought facial recognition technology and a $1,000 price tag to the company's flagship product line.
2h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Human genome decoded with pocket-sized deviceScientists used a portable device no bigger than a cellphone to sequence the most complete human genome ever assembled with a single technology, according to a study published Monday.
2h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Boosting Sirt4 gene activity extends healthy lifespan in fruit fliesA new study on the mechanics of aging and longevity finds that fruit flies inhibited from producing the protein Sirt4—which is also found in humans—are short-lived, while flies modified to make extra Sirt4 are long-lived. In addition, flies lacking Sirt4 display increased sensitivity to starvation, decreased fertility and activity, and an inability to use energy stores in their bodies.
2h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Boosting Sirt4 gene activity extends healthy lifespan in fruit fliesResults from study led by Brown University researchers illustrate that Sirt4, also found in humans, may be an important factor in age-related metabolic decline and healthy lifespan.
2h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Weak hydrogen bonds key to strong, tough infrastructureThe right mix of hydrogen bonds in polymer and cement composites is critical to making strong, tough and ductile infrastructure material, according to Rice University scientists who want to mimic the mechanics of mother-of-pearl and similar natural composites with synthetic materials.
2h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Networking, data experts design a better portal for scientific discoveryThese days, it's easy to overlook the fact that the World Wide Web was created nearly 30 years ago primarily to help researchers access and share scientific data. Over the years, the web has evolved into a tool that helps us eat, shop, travel, watch movies and even monitor our homes.
2h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Why do investors seek out stock swindles?The chance to get rich quick by investing in a penny stock, even if it is widely suspected that the stock price is being manipulated, is too tempting for some investors to resist.
2h
Live Science
Photos: School-Bus-Size Dinosaur Discovered in EgyptResearchers in Egypt just uncovered a newly identified long-necked dinosaur known as Mansourasaurus shahinae . This is only the sixth dinosaur to be discovered in Egypt.
2h
Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
Body clock disruptions occur years before memory loss in Alzheimer’sPeople with Alzheimer’s disease have disturbances in their internal body clocks that affect the sleep/wake cycle and may increase risk of developing the disorder. Researchers have found that such circadian rhythm disruptions also occur much earlier in people whose memories are intact but whose brain scans show early, preclinical evidence of Alzheimer’s.
2h
Live Science
Man Dies in MRI Accident: How Does This Happen?A man in India has reportedly died after being yanked toward a magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) machine, according to news reports.
3h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Weak hydrogen bonds key to strong, tough infrastructureRice University engineers study what it takes to make strong and tough infrastructures by probing the interfacial interactions of polymer and cement, which are key to composite properties.
3h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Reach out and feed someone: Automated system finds rapid honey bee communication networksBy developing a system that allows automated, in-depth monitoring of the social interactions of honey bees, researchers have now uncovered an unexpected property of the bee social network that may someday help us design more effective human and machine communication systems.
3h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Why do we trust, or not trust, strangers? The answer is PavlovianOur trust in strangers is dependent on their resemblance to others we've previously known, finds a new study by a team of psychology researchers.
3h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Men hold secret to protect women from multiple sclerosisMen are much less likely to get multiple sclerosis (MS) than women, and one reason is that they are protected by high levels of testosterone. Scientists have now discovered how it works. They have identified a guardian molecule -- triggered by testosterone -- that appears to protect males from disease. When female mice with disease are treated with this protective molecule, their symptoms were eli
3h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Scientists pinpoint how ocean acidification weakens coral skeletonsThe rising acidity of the oceans threatens coral reefs by making it harder for corals to build their skeletons. A new study identifies the details of how ocean acidification affects coral skeletons, allowing scientists to predict more precisely where corals will be more vulnerable.
3h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Language is learned in brain circuits that predate humansIt has often been claimed that humans learn language using brain components that are specifically dedicated to this purpose. Now, new evidence strongly suggests that language is in fact learned in brain systems that are also used for many other purposes and even pre-existed humans.
3h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Visualizing danger from songbird warning callsKyoto University researcher finds that a small songbird, the Japanese tit (Parus minor), can retrieve a visual image of a predator from specific alarm calls.
3h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Through the looking glass: New mirror-image molecules could lead to better medicinesToronto scientists have developed a new technology for designing mirror-image versions of molecules, paving the way for longer lasting medicines. For patients, this would mean less frequent injections and more drugs could one day be developed in a pill form. They show the method works by creating mirror image versions of blockbuster diabetes and osteoporosis drugs, GLP1 and PTH, respectively, whic
3h
Big Think
Seven fascinating facts about Ikea's late founder Ingvar KampradIngvar Kamprad may be the most influential aesthete in the history of interior design, thanks to the mass-produced and self-assembled furniture created by his company, Ikea. Read More
3h
Science | The Guardian
Study reveals why we trust some strangers and not othersResearchers probe how we make an initial judgment on whether to trust or cooperate with others From getting into a taxi to asking a fellow train passenger to keep an eye on your luggage while buying a coffee, we’ve all put our trust in those we do not know. Now researchers have revealed that strangers are more likely to be trusted if they look like someone who has earned your trust before – and m
3h
Feed: All Latest
Film Festivals Are Forever Changed in the Wake of #MeTooAt this year's Sundance Film Festival, female directors and the Time's Up movement received top billing.
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The Atlantic
The Third Gender“There are women, men, and muxes ,” says a non-binary individual from the Mexican town of Juchitan in Ivan Olita’s short documentary. “We have our own muxe identity, which is what defines us.” Muxes explores the indigenous Zapotec culture of Oaxaca, which not only accepts but also celebrates a third category of mixed gender. Some muxes are men who live as women; others are gender-fluid, with both
3h
Live Science
Lion and Dog 'Shake Hands': What's Really Happening?What's the story behind the viral GIF of a dog and lion that appear to be "shaking hands?"
3h
Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
Basic mechanisms for root growth and cell replenishmentInterdisciplinary collaboration between physics and molecular biology enabled researchers to solve fundamental questions on plant root growth. These findings provide opportunities to create more drought-resistant plants, which is one of the most important problems in the current context of the climate change.
3h
Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
Novel periodic autoinflammatory syndrome: It's all about the eyesScientists have identified a new genetic mutation that alters the function of cryopyrin and leads to a life-long periodic inflammation of the cornea, the transparent window of the human eye. Patients who carry the mutation also develop corneal opacities that compromise vision.
3h
Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
Researchers map out the atlas of gene regulators in human cardiac cells for the first timeInformation for building cells is stored in our genetic material, otherwise known as DNA. It is here that you find all the blueprints for the more than 20,000 different proteins in the human body. Each and every cell requires several thousand different proteins in order to function. If you were to roll every single protein blueprint into one, the information they contain would fit on less than two
3h
Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
New optics solution: 360-degree panoramic view onto single sensor matrixScientists have developed a new solution for thermal infrared applications, making it possible to fold a 360-degree panoramic view on a single sensor matrix. The concept guaranteeing optimal image quality is especially suitable for security, surveillance, military, and building diagnostic applications, where the objects to be imaged lie in the horizontal directions from the camera.
3h
Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
Teens whose mothers had an abortion are more likely to undergo abortionTeens whose mothers had abortions were more likely to also have abortions, according to new research.
3h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Close-packing rules may not guide nanoparticle self-assembly after allThree-dimensional shapes fill physical space in a certain way. If you pour marbles into a jar, the marbles will randomly pack within the jar. If you carefully placed every marble, layer-by-layer in the jar such that the marbles in one layer sit within the crevices between marbles on the layer below it, you can pack a few more marbles in the jar than if it was randomly packed. This will give you th
3h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Visualizing danger from songbird warning calls"Watch out! Snake!" Hearing this, people cannot help but imagine a snake as they prepare for a possible attack. In human conversation, hearing a particular word (e.g., "snake") can cause a listener to retrieve a specific mental image, even if there is nothing in the field of vision.
3h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Reach out and feed someone: Automated system finds rapid honey bee communication networksE. M. Forster's pithy quotation captures an essential feature of any society, human or animal: the patterns of interactions among individuals out of which collective behaviors arise. By developing a system that allows automated, in-depth monitoring of the social interactions of honey bees, researchers have now uncovered an unexpected property of the bee social network that may someday help us desi
3h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Through the looking glass: New mirror-image molecules could lead to better medicinesUniversity of Toronto researchers have developed a new technology for creating more durable disease-fighting molecules which could lead to drugs with longer-lasting effects.
3h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Scientists pinpoint how ocean acidification weakens coral skeletonsThe rising acidity of the oceans threatens coral reefs by making it harder for corals to build their skeletons. A new study identifies the details of how ocean acidification affects coral skeletons, allowing scientists to predict more precisely where corals will be more vulnerable.
3h
Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
Medications to treat cardiovascular risk factors do not impact erectile functionErectile dysfunction (ED) is a major public health problem. Men being treated for cardiovascular risk factors such as high blood pressure and high cholesterol are at increased risk of developing ED and often consider this condition a side effect of their medications. However, a new study into the effects of cholesterol-lowering statins and blood-pressure lowering candesartan/HCTZ concludes that th
3h
Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
Nutritionally-speaking, soy milk is best plant-based milkA new study looks at the four most-commonly consumed types of milk beverages from plant sources around the world -- almond milk, soy milk, rice milk and coconut milk -- and compares their nutritional values with those of cow's milk. After cow's milk, which is still the most nutritious, soy milk comes out a clear winner.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
Walk in groups to keep exercise goals on trackPeople may be more likely to stick to taking exercise if they walk in groups, according to a new article.
3h
Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
Interim publications of randomized trials make news but may not be ready for prime timeEarly results from randomized trials are sometimes published before the trial is completed. The results of such interim publications may generate a wide interest in the medical community because the findings often hold a great deal of promise for new and effective therapies. However, when researchers compared the consistency and prominence of interim publications with the final publications they f
3h
Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
Study suggests PD-1 inhibitors against aggressive pediatric brain cancer subtypeA new study lays the scientific groundwork for the use of PD-1 inhibitors with an aggressive form of brain cancer, namely supratentorial pediatric ependymoma.
3h
Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
Diamonds show promise for spintronic devicesRecently, researchers have been exploring the potential for a new technology, called spintronics, that relies on detecting and controlling a particle's spin. This technology could lead to new types of more efficient and powerful devices. Researchers have now measured how strongly a charge carrier's spin interacts with a magnetic field in diamond. This crucial property shows diamond as a promising
3h
Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
Symptoms in neurologic disease reversed in modelRett syndrome is a devastating genetic, neurologic disorder that typically affects girls, resulting in severe disability and often accompanied by autistic behavior. Most Rett patients will live into middle age and require specialized full-time care. There is no cure, but researchers have been working to find ways to restore brain function and reverse disabilities associated with Rett syndrome.
3h
Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
Bone experts offer how-to video for forensic professionalsAdvances in recent years allow forensic practitioners to use bone mineral density to extract more information from human remains -- but many forensic experts are unfamiliar with the techniques and technology. Now forensic researchers have published a step-by-step methodology, providing forensic professionals with a guide that can help them extract as much information as possible from this emerging
3h
NYT > Science
High Times Beckon for Using Hemp to Build HousesWidely used in other countries, a variety of the cannabis plant is providing contractors with more efficient construction materials for houses and other structures.
3h
Live Science
Gross Souvenir: Caribbean Trip Lands Couple with Hookworm FeetA Canadian couple is warning travelers about the risks of going shoeless on the beach after the pair returned from a Caribbean trip with hookworms in their feet.
3h
Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
Tickling the brain with electrical stimulation improves memoryTickling the brain with low-intensity electrical stimulation in a specific area can improve verbal short-term memory.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
Coal phase-out: Announcing CO2-pricing triggers divestmentPutting the Paris climate agreement into practice will trigger opposed reactions by investors on the one hand and fossil fuel owners on the other hand. A new study now finds that on balance, divestment beats the so-called 'green paradox' if substantial carbon pricing is credibly announced. Consequently, overall CO2 emissions would be effectively reduced.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
Menopause found to worsen symptoms of rheumatoid arthritisA recent study suggests that women with rheumatoid arthritis suffer a greater decline in physical function following menopause. After studying 8,189 women with rheumatoid arthritis, researchers found that pre-menopausal women experienced a slower physical decline than those that were post-menopausal.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
Sixty-four percent of women suffer from insomnia in late pregnancyA new study warns that health systems need to address the problem of insomnia in pregnancy systematically, since as well as affecting the quality of life of pregnant women, insomnia is a risk factor for high blood pressure and pre-eclampsia, gestational diabetes mellitus, depression, preterm birth and unplanned caesarean sections.
3h
Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
Relativity matters: Two opposing views of the magnetic force reconciledOur understanding of how a point-particle carrying a charge moves in presence of an inhomogenous magnetic field relied until now on two theories that were believed to differ. Scientists have now succeeded in resolving this ambiguity. Their solution makes it possible to characterize the interaction of particles whose speed is close to the speed of light in the presence of inhomogeneous electromagne
3h
Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
New insight into how the intestine repairs itselfResearchers propose that, contrary to the current thinking, how the intestine repairs itself seems to depend on the type of damage, and they found that triggers that were previously thought to be unimportant are actually essential for repairing rotavirus-caused injury.
3h
Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
What happens to language as populations grow? It simplifies, say researchersLanguages have an intriguing paradox. Languages with lots of speakers, such as English and Mandarin, have large vocabularies with relatively simple grammar. Yet the opposite is also true: Languages with fewer speakers have fewer words but complex grammars.
3h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Why do investors seek out stock swindles?The chance to get rich quick by investing in a penny stock, even if it is widely suspected that the stock price is being manipulated, is too tempting for some investors to resist.New research from the University of Chicago Booth School of Business finds that some investors actually seek out stocks suspected of 'pump-and-dump' schemes, despite the risks and warnings from financial experts, in hopes
3h
The Atlantic
Is MoviePass Here to Stay?When MoviePass—the subscription-based company that allows its customers to see a film a day—announced it was dropping its monthly fee to $10, the biggest theater chain in the country objected. On paper, it was hard to tell why AMC would do this: MoviePass reimburses cinemas for the full cost of each ticket purchased, theoretically driving more traffic to participating multiplexes without any fina
3h
Scientific American Content: Global
Climate Researchers' Work Is Turned into Fake NewsSkeptics twist a cold snap into an impending Ice Age, and other bad spins -- Read more on ScientificAmerican.com
4h
New on MIT Technology Review
Faced with failing antibiotics, scientists are using killer viruses to fight superbugsAdvances in DNA sequencing and AI could make the idea a more practical treatment option.
4h
Big Think
Elon Musk selling $4 million of flamethrowers fits a pattern of eccentricityElon Musk The Boring CompanyElon Musk's latest product is the next in a long line of PR stunts for companies like Tesla, The Boring Company and more. Read More
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The Atlantic
After Four Months, Much of Puerto Rico Still Dark and DamagedHurricane Maria devastated the U.S. territory of Puerto Rico in late September of last year, and residents are still struggling to regain their footing. Approximately 450,000 of Puerto Rico’s 1.5 million electricity customers are still without power , and those who do have electricity suffer frequent blackouts. Locals are doing what they can, some stringing their own power lines, others looking t
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Big Think
'Super blue blood moon' forces NASA to shut down lunar spacecraftWhile millions catch a glimpse of a rare lunar event, NASA plans to shut down an orbiter whose purpose is to study the moon. Read More
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This "Crypto Genius" Tried to Debate Bitcoin. It Wasn't Pretty.A "debate" over the value of cryptocurrency turns out to be mostly a debate about nothing.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
Getting to zero deforestationA new synthesis paper reveals strengths and weaknesses of corporate environmental pledges; prescribes solutions to boost effectiveness.
4h
Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
Americans are spending more time at home, and it's saving a lot of energyResearchers have identified a positive trade-off for the rise in online shopping, our consumption of streaming video, and employees working from home. Despite increasing the amount of residential energy demand, the decrease in travel and use of non-residential spaces was responsible for a net 1,700 trillion bTU in energy savings for the United States in 2012, 1.8 percent of the national total.
4h
Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
New Egyptian dinosaur reveals ancient link between Africa and EuropeWhen it comes to the final days of the dinosaurs, Africa is something of a blank page. Fossils found in Africa from the Late Cretaceous, the time period from 100 to 66 million years ago, are few and far between. That means that the course of dinosaur evolution in Africa has largely remained a mystery. But in the Egyptian Sahara Desert, scientists have discovered a new species of dinosaur that help
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
Brown recluse: Pest management tips for the spider that's not as common as you thinkThe brown recluse is one of the few spiders that can bite a human and should be regarded with great caution. But, it is also frequently misattributed as the cause of a variety of unrelated medical conditions, especially in locations far outside its known range. Entomologists have published a new guide to aid both the public and pest management professionals in properly identifying and managing the
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
Viruses that infect bacteria abound in bladderPhages -- viruses that infect bacteria -- are abundant in the bacteria that inhabit the female bladder. This is good news, because phage could be used as alternative treatment when antibiotics become resistant to pathogenic bacteria.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
'Chemical net' could be key to capturing pure hydrogenResearchers have uncovered exceptionally efficient gas separation properties in a nanomaterial called MXene that could be incorporated into the membranes used to purify hydrogen.
4h
Live Science
Why Paleontologists Are Stoked to Find This Bus-Size Dinosaur in EgyptEgypt is known its magnificent pyramids, but now the country is gaining fame among paleontologists, especially now that an international team has uncovered the remains of an 80-million-year-old dinosaur the size of a school bus.
4h
Scientific American Content: Global
Safe Injection Facilities Save LivesTo fight the opioid crisis, let substance users shoot up under medical supervision -- Read more on ScientificAmerican.com
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How to Build a Better Flu ShotIn the midst of a brutal influenza season, researchers are working toward a single vaccine that could ward off multiple strains of the virus.
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Popular Science
How did Heist engineer such magical tights? They bothered to try.Technology Women have waited far too long for companies to pay attention to their needs. I expected the purportedly “perfect” pair of tights to be somehow advanced. Turns out I was wrong.
4h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Americans say President Trump should prioritize science to strengthen US infrastructureA strong majority of Americans (81 percent) say it is important for President Trump to assign a high priority to putting science, technology and engineering to work to strengthen our nation's infrastructure. The percentages are high across the political spectrum -- 86 percent of Republicans, 85 percent of Democrats, 72 percent of Independents, according to a new national public opinion survey comm
4h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Tickling the brain with electrical stimulation improves memory, study showsTickling the brain with low-intensity electrical stimulation in a specific area can improve verbal short-term memory. Mayo Clinic researchers report their findings in Brain.
4h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Viruses that infect bacteria abound in bladderPhages -- viruses that infect bacteria -- are abundant in the bacteria that inhabit the female bladder. This is good news, because phage could be used as alternative treatment when antibiotics become resistant to pathogenic bacteria.
5h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Drug improves PTSD traits in rat model of explosive blastsMale rats exposed to air blasts designed to mimic those from explosives used in recent military conflicts have symptoms of post-traumatic stress disorder (PTSD) that are improved by a drug currently being evaluated in humans for treatment-resistant depression and suicidal tendencies. The research, published in eNeuro, provides a new direction for addressing the mental health problems that often ar
5h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News
These carbon dioxide-sensing neurons wake up miceStimulating a population of neurons in the midbrain with carbon dioxide (CO2) awakens adult male mice without enhancing breathing, finds a study published in JNeurosci. These findings are relevant to understanding disorders such as obstructive sleep apnea, sudden infant death syndrome and sudden unexpected death in epilepsy.
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Big Think
Fermented foods shown to protect against the fluAmid all the troubling stats about flu season, here's a little bit of positive news from Georgia State University. Read More
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
Changing the color of 3-D printed objectsThree-dimensional printing has come a long way since the first 'rapid prototyping' patent was rejected in 1980. We've evolved from basic designs to a wide range of highly-customizable objects. Still, there's a big issue: once objects are printed, they're final. If you need a change, you'll need a reprint.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
Uncovering the early origins of Huntington's diseaseThe symptoms of Huntington's disease typically appear in middle age, but new research shows that neural abnormalities are evident much earlier, in the first steps of embryonic development. The findings suggest that treating the disease earlier may be beneficial.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
Novel technologies reveal key information about depleted East Pacific green sea turtlesUsing new technologies developed to extract life history information from bones, researchers are learning more than ever about populations of green sea turtles living in the eastern region of the Pacific Ocean. While their numbers remain dangerously depleted, the new data show that green sea turtles are spending more time offshore, increasing their risk as fishing bycatch.
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Inside Science
Brain Scans Show Signs of Football ImpactBrain Scans Show Signs of Football Impact Two small clinical studies show brain changes among young football players with a history of concussion and exposure to high-impact hits. Pee-Wee-Football.jpg Image credits: C Watts via Flickr Rights information: CC BY 2.0 Sports Monday, January 29, 2018 - 09:45 Jason Socrates Bardi, Editor (Inside Science) -- Two clinical studies in which a handful of yo
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The Atlantic
The Unlikely Martyrdom of Carter PageThe meta-fight over releasing a memo prepared by Republicans on the House Intelligence Committee has at times obscured what exactly is in the memo, but its contents are slowly starting to come into view. A New York Times story Monday provides one crucial element. According to that report, Deputy Attorney General Rod Rosenstein signed off on an application for a warrant to surveil Carter Page, a f
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Popular Science
Robert Afzal is developing powerful laser blasters for the U.S. militaryTechnology Dynamite with a laser beam. Lasers can map planets, cut metal, play your old CDs, zap tattoos, and send cats into furry frenzies of clickbait. But Robert Afzal wants them to do more.
5h
New on MIT Technology Review
Amazon isn’t allowing ads on Alexa just yet
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Diamonds show promise for spintronic devicesConventional electronics rely on controlling electric charge. Recently, researchers have been exploring the potential for a new technology, called spintronics, that relies on detecting and controlling a particle's spin. This technology could lead to new types of more efficient and powerful devices.
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
CRAG and UB researchers find basic mechanisms for root growth and cell replenishmentInterdisciplinary collaboration between physics and molecular biology enabled researchers to solve fundamental doubts on plant root growth.These findings provide opportunities to create more drought-resistant plants, which is one of the most important problems in the current context of the climate change.
5h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Diamonds show promise for spintronic devicesRecently, researchers have been exploring the potential for a new technology, called spintronics, that relies on detecting and controlling a particle's spin. This technology could lead to new types of more efficient and powerful devices. In a paper published in Applied Physics Letters, researchers measured how strongly a charge carrier's spin interacts with a magnetic field in diamond. This crucia
5h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Researchers reverse symptoms in neurologic disease modelRett syndrome is a devastating genetic, neurologic disorder that typically affects girls, resulting in severe disability and often accompanied by autistic behavior. Most Rett patients will live into middle age and require specialized full-time care. There is no cure, but researchers from Case Western Reserve University School of Medicine have been working to find ways to restore brain function and
5h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Researchers identify a novel periodic autoinflammatory syndrome: It's all about the eyesA research team from the University of Helsinki, Helsinki University Hospital and Folkhälsan Institute of Genetics in Helsinki, Finland, have identified a new genetic mutation that alters the function of cryopyrin and leads to a life-long periodic inflammation of the cornea, the transparent window of the human eye. Patients who carry the mutation also develop corneal opacities that compromise visi
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Study suggests PD-1 inhibitors against aggressive pediatric brain cancer subtypeA University of Colorado Cancer Center study published in the journal Pediatric Blood Cancers lays the scientific groundwork for the use of PD-1 inhibitors with an aggressive form of brain cancer, namely supratentorial pediatric ependymoma.
5h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Blue moon, super moon, total lunar eclipse rolled into oneThe moon is providing a rare triple treat this week.
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Feed: All Latest
The Legend of Chimp, the Vaguely Humanoid RobotTwo and a half years after Chimp competed in the Darpa Robotics Challenge, it remains one of the weirdest humanoid robots on Earth.
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The Atlantic
The Nassar Investigation That Never Made HeadlinesAfter months of court hearings, Larry Nassar, the former Olympic doctor convicted of molesting dozens of young female athletes, has now been sentenced to up to 175 years in prison. The last time Nassar’s abuse came under formal scrutiny, however, incarceration was apparently never considered. When a 2014 Title IX investigation at Michigan State University found no evidence of misconduct, he retur
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Viden
Gå på opdagelse i fremtidens månebaseEn menneskelig koloni på Månen kræver alt fra komplicerede kraftværker til særlige motionsrum. Tag med på en tur gennem en model af månebasen - som den kan komme til at se ud – bygget i LEGO.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
As Paris mops up, warning of more floods in Europe's futureAs Paris began mopping up after the rain-gorged river Seine overflowed for the second time in two years, researchers warned Monday that Europe faces a flood-filled future due to global warming.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Copper hydroxychloride in diets fed to weanling pigs improves performance and healthCopper is an essential element in diets for pigs, and it can be provided in a number of different forms. Copper hydroxychloride is less likely to react with other vitamins and minerals in a premix than the more commonly used copper sulfate, but research on its effects when fed to pigs is limited. Results of recent research at the University of Illinois indicate that including copper hydroxychlorid
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Rotavirus vaccine could reduce UK health inequalities, new study suggestsNew research led by the University of Liverpool has found that childhood vaccination against rotavirus has greatest benefit in the most deprived communities and could contribute to reducing health inequalities in the UK.
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Outpatient clinic reduces no-shows by 34 percent amid 13 percent patient visit increaseDr. Guiney notes that many external factors in the patients' lives contributed to no-show rates; however, ETHC found improvements they could make within their organization. He adds, 'We designed an intervention to address every road block that was within our control.'
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Interim publications of randomized trials make news but may not be ready for prime timeEarly results from randomized trials are sometimes published before the trial is completed. The results of such interim publications may generate a wide interest in the medical community because the findings often hold a great deal of promise for new and effective therapies. However, in an article recently published in JAMA, Dartmouth researchers compared the consistency and prominence of interim
6h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Researchers gain new insight into how the intestine repairs itselfResearchers propose that, contrary to the current thinking, how the intestine repairs itself seems to depend on the type of damage, and they found that triggers that were previously thought to be unimportant are actually essential for repairing rotavirus-caused injury.
6h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News
'Chemical net' could be key to capturing pure hydrogenResearchers from Drexel University have uncovered exceptionally efficient gas separation properties in a nanomaterial called MXene that could be incorporated into the membranes used to purify hydrogen.
6h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Copper hydroxychloride in diets fed to weanling pigs improves performance and healthResults of recent research at the University of Illinois indicate that including copper hydroxychloride in diets fed to weanling pigs improves growth performance and reduces diarrhea.
6h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Nutritionally speaking, soy milk is best plant-based milkA new study from McGill University looks at the four most-commonly consumed types of milk beverages from plant sources around the world -- almond milk, soy milk, rice milk and coconut milk -- and compares their nutritional values with those of cow's milk. After cow's milk, which is still the most nutritious, soy milk comes out a clear winner.
6h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Americans are spending more time at home, and it's saving a lot of energyResearchers have identified a positive trade-off for the rise in online shopping, our consumption of streaming video, and employees working from home. Despite increasing the amount of residential energy demand, the decrease in travel and use of non-residential spaces was responsible for a net 1,700 trillion bTU in energy savings for the United States in 2012, 1.8 percent of the national total. The
6h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
'Chemical net' could be key to capturing pure hydrogenHydrogen is one of the most abundant elements on Earth and an exceptionally clean fuel source. While it is making its way into the fuel cells of electric cars, busses and heavy equipment, its widespread use is hampered by the expensive gas-separation process required to produce pure hydrogen. But that process could soon become more efficient and cost-effective thanks to a discovery by an internati
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Predicting influencers has just been made simplerSocial networks, such as Twitter, thrive on key influencers spreading news. Like information, epidemics also spread from key individuals. To identify the most influential actors in such networks, many studies have, until now, focused on ranking the influence of individual nodes. But these methods are not accurate enough to single out influential spreaders because they fail to take into account the
6h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
What happens to language as populations grow? It simplifies, say researchersLanguages have an intriguing paradox. Languages with lots of speakers, such as English and Mandarin, have large vocabularies with relatively simple grammar. Yet the opposite is also true: Languages with fewer speakers have fewer words but complex grammars.
6h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Better health and economic activity key to easing UK pension crisisRaising the UK state pension age is not enough to address the challenges caused by an ageing population, a new report from the Centre for the Study of Financial Innovation (CSFI) argues.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Relativity matters: Two opposing views of the magnetic force reconciledCurrent textbooks often refer to the Lorentz-Maxwell force governed by the electric charge. But they rarely refer to the extension of that theory required to explain the magnetic force on a point particle. For elementary particles, such as muons or neutrinos, the magnetic force applied to such charges is unique and immutable. However, unlike the electric charge, the magnetic force strength is not
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Science | The Guardian
Vaping may raise cancer and heart disease risk, study suggestsNicotine in e-cigarettes may convert into DNA-damaging chemicals, mouse trial indicates, but critics say results are irrelevant to humans Vaping may raise the risk of certain cancers and heart disease, according to a team of scientists who studied the effects of e-cigarette smoke on healthy mice and human cells. Researchers found evidence that nicotine inhaled from e-cigarettes could be converted
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Science | The Guardian
Did you solve it? The puzzle of the red and green hatsThe answer to today’s headwear conundrum Earlier today in this puzzle blog I set you the following puzzle: A box contains two red hats and three green hats. Azalea, Barnaby and Caleb close their eyes, take a hat from the box and put it on. When they open their eyes they can see each other’s hats but not their own. They do not know which hats are left in the box. Continue reading...
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The Atlantic
What's Next After Federer's Australian Open VictoryHe may have downplayed his chances by claiming a 36-year-old should never be the favorite going into a major tournament. But on Sunday the irrepressible Roger Federer demonstrated exactly why he’s been so worthy of the label over the last two weeks in Melbourne, battling to a landmark 20th Grand Slam singles title—more than any other man in the game. The Swiss veteran overcame the towering Marin
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Minimizing exposure to harmful flame retardant chemicals in waste foams and plasticsContinued research and new policies and practices to ensure proper use and disposal of foam and plastic products that contain potentially harmful flame retardant chemicals are needed to minimize health risks from environmental exposure to humans and animals. A new two-part article detailing responsible, proactive strategies for managing end-of-life foams and plastics is published in Environmental
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Smarter cities, smarter livingA home thermostat automatically establishes a comfortable environment for its occupants. A washing machine sends a text message when its cycle is complete. Lights throughout a house are controlled with a tap and swipe on a tablet, saving Dad a final trip down the stairs before bed.
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Futurity.org
‘Failed motors’ may cause rare lung diseaseResearchers may have pinpointed the cause of a rare genetic lung disease. While most people recover from respiratory infections within a few weeks, for those with primary ciliary dyskinesia, the sniffling, coughing, and congestion never end. The tiny hairlike structures called cilia that normally sweep mucus through the airways don’t work properly in people with the disease. When the cilia don’t
6h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News
What happens to language as populations grow? It simplifies, say researchersLanguages have an intriguing paradox. Languages with lots of speakers, such as English and Mandarin, have large vocabularies with relatively simple grammar. Yet the opposite is also true: Languages with fewer speakers have fewer words but complex grammars.
6h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Walk in groups to keep exercise goals on trackPeople may be more likely to stick to taking exercise if they walk in groups, according to a paper published in the International Journal of Technology Assessment in Health Care.
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Life expectancy gains are slowing in both rich and poor countriesIncreases in human life expectancy have slowed dramatically across the world since 1950, according to a study from researchers at Johns Hopkins Bloomberg School of Public Health.
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Bevacizumab dramatically improves severe hereditary hemorrhagic telangiectasia (HHT) associated bleedingPatients with hereditary hemorrhagic telangiectasia (HHT) with severe bleeding, who were treated with intravenous bevacizumab, reported a marked reduction in nose bleeds and gastrointestinal bleeding and were able to stop or considerably reduce blood transfusions, resulting in significantly improved quality of life. A new study published in Mayo Clinic Proceedings provides good quality evidence fo
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Latest issue of Structural Heart: The Journal of the Heart Team is now availableThe Cardiovascular Research Foundation (CRF) is pleased to announce that the latest issue of Structural Heart: The Journal of the Heart Team is now available online.
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Predicting influencers has just been made simplerSocial networks, such as Twitter, thrive on key influencers spreading information or rumours. Like information, epidemics also spread from key individuals, but identifying the most influential actors in such networks is tricky. Now, Byungjoon Min from the Institute of Interdisciplinary Physics and Complex Systems, Balearic Island University, Palma de Mallorca, Spain, has accurately predicted the i
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cognitive science
A paper in Current Directions in Psychological Science looked at communication between dogs and humans.submitted by /u/markmana [link] [comments]
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
Study shows effectiveness of the school fruit scheme in North Rhine-WestphaliaHow can you convince elementary school students to consume more fruit and vegetables? Scientists have found that school fruit schemes can actually help to achieve this goal. If children receive fruit and vegetables free of charge in their schools several times a week, they consume considerably more of this food group, which is often less popular with children, even on days without school fruit dis
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
Parasite mimics human proteins to provide 'ready meals' from the gutGiardia parasites -- responsible for one of the world's most common gastric diseases -- mimic human cell functions to break apart cells in the gut and feed off them. The secret behind giardia's success has eluded scientists for more than 300 years. Researchers found that the parasite produces two types of protein that enable it to cut through layers of protective mucus in the gut, breaking the lin
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
Moving pictures, feeble words: Emotional images sway people more than emotional wordsNew research suggests that your behavior can be influenced by subtle, barely visible images: people consume more of a beverage when exposed to positive images, such as smiling faces or cute dogs, and less when exposed to negative images, such as scowling faces or guns. However, exposure to emotionally charged words does not have the same effect.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
Causes and consequences of the 2015 Wimberley floods in TexasA new study by civil and environmental engineers delves into the 2015 Wimberley, Texas floods that destroyed 350 homes and claimed 13 lives. Scientists researched the factors that led to the catastrophic flooding and shed light on new ways people in flood-prone areas can protect against future tragedies.
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Scientific American Content: Global
Scientists, Have We Got a Challenge for You!Can you explain a complex scientific concept to 11-year-olds without making their eyes glaze over? -- Read more on ScientificAmerican.com
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Americans are spending more time at home, and it's saving a lot of energyResearchers have identified a positive trade-off for the rise in online shopping, our consumption of streaming video, and employees working from home. Despite increasing the amount of residential energy demand, the decrease in travel and use of non-residential spaces was responsible for a net 1,700 trillion bTU in energy savings for the United States in 2012, 1.8% of the national total. The analys
6h
Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
To improve self-control, call weight loss what it is: difficultAn intervention that focused on changing the external food environment, rather than internal willpower, actually boosted participants' cognitive restraint and led to greater long-term weight loss.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
Short-course radiation treatment is safe and effective for skin cancerA recent physician’s study review suggests that shorter courses of radiation are preferable to longer ones for older patients receiving treatment for slow-growing skin cancers.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
Untangling the complex taxonomic history of a Neotropical liana genusHow do you separate one species from another? Having remained a major challenge in biology as a whole, species delimitation becomes an especially daunting task when it comes to tropical plant groups, where information in biology, morphology and distribution is often scarce. To tackle this issue, a new monograph demonstrates how integrative taxonomy can untangle taxonomic complexities for a genus o
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
New molecular muscle responds to visible lightResearchers have created a completely new kind of artificial molecular muscle from a polymer that’s capable of some heavy lifting — relatively speaking.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
'Sodium-scooter’ delivers tellurium to MoS2Korean food delivery system is renowned to be fast and efficient. Scooters speed through the city to bring orders timely to your doorstep. Researchers have now developed a low-temperature reaction, where a “chemical scooter delivery” can be used as a metaphor. A “sodium-scooter”, namely Na2Te, transports tellurium to molybdenum disulfide (MoS2) and tungsten disulfide (WS2) monolayers. With the hel
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
NASA poised to topple a planet-finding barrierAstronomers have shown for the first time that they can dynamically detect subatomic- or picometer-sized distortions -- changes that are far smaller than an atom -- across a five-foot segmented telescope mirror and its support structure.
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Futurity.org
How wings let bugs take over the worldThe evolution of wings may have been central to insects’ becoming as abundant and widespread as they are today. Comprising up to 10 million living species, insects today live on all seven continents and inhabit every terrestrial niche imaginable. But according to the fossil record, they were scarce before about 325 million years ago, outnumbered by their arthropod cousins the arachnids (spiders,
6h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Minimizing exposure to harmful flame retardant chemicals in waste foams and plasticsContinued research and new policies and practices to ensure proper use and disposal of foam and plastic products that contain potentially harmful flame retardant chemicals are needed to minimize health risks from environmental exposure to humans and animals.
6h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Medications to treat cardiovascular risk factors do not impact erectile functionErectile dysfunction (ED) is a major public health problem. Men being treated for cardiovascular risk factors such as high blood pressure and high cholesterol are at increased risk of developing ED and often consider this condition a side effect of their medications. However, a new study into the effects of cholesterol-lowering statins and blood-pressure lowering candesartan/HCTZ concludes that th
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
Motivational music increases risk-taking but does not improve sports performanceListening to motivational music increases risk-taking behavior during sport activities and exercise -- particularly in men and when participants made their own playlist -- but does not improve performance, new research shows.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
Astrochemists reveal the magnetic secrets of methanolA team of scientists has solved an important puzzle in astrochemistry: how to measure magnetic fields in space using methanol, the simplest form of alcohol. Their results give astronomers a new way of investigating how massive stars are born.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
Access to water and diverse terrain encourage elderly in physical activityA recently published study found associations between features of natural environment in the home neighborhood and physical activity of older people.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
Life expectancy gains are slowing in both rich and poor countriesIncreases in human life expectancy have slowed dramatically across the world since 1950, according to a new study.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
One step ahead – What happens in the brain before a bungee jump?Psychiatrists and neuroscientists have for the very first time succeeded in measuring the readiness potential, outside a laboratory and under extreme conditions, namely prior to a 192-meter bungee jump.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
Antiferromagnets prove their potential for spin-based information technologyWithin the emerging field of spin-based electronics, or spintronics, information is typically defined by the orientation of the magnetization of ferromagnets. Researchers have recently been also interested in the utilization of antiferromagnets, which are materials without macroscopic magnetization but with a staggered orientation of their microscopic magnetic moments.
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Science : NPR
The 'IKEA Effect' — And Getting Kids To Eat Their VeggiesWhat can Swedish furniture teach us about getting kids to eat their veggies? Cognitive scientist Tania Lombrozo considers new research on the "IKEA effect." (Image credit: Inga Kjer/Photothek via Getty Images)
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NYT > Science
We’re Getting More Sleep. A Whole 18 Minutes. It’s Not Enough.Starting in 2003, Americans added 1.4 minutes of sleep each year, for a gain of 18 minutes per weeknight through 2016, government data shows.
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NYT > Science
Scientists Discover a Bone-Deep Risk for Heart DiseaseFew doctors, and even fewer patients, have heard of CHIP. But it is emerging as a major cause of heart attacks and stroke, as deadly as high blood pressure or cholesterol.
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The Atlantic
South Korea's Chilly Response to a Joint Olympic Team1991 was a watershed year for sports diplomacy in the Korean Peninsula. That year, South Korea and North Korea fielded joint men’s and women’s teams at the World Table Tennis Championships, as well as a joint boys’ team in the FIFA World Youth Championship. Both teams—the Koreas’ first in international competitions since their division in 1945—performed well: The unified ping pong team won gold i
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BBC News - Science & Environment
Lost history of African dinosaurs revealedA new species of dinosaur unearthed in the Egyptian desert sheds light on Africa's Age of the Dinosaurs.
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Science | The Guardian
One in 50 of us is face blind – and many don’t even realiseProsopagnosia, which makes those with the condition unable to recognise others, often goes undetected – despite being more common than autism Ever found yourself confronted by someone who seems to knows you, but you have no idea who they are? You could be suffering from prosopagnosia , a condition that new research shows affects more people in the UK than autism, yet largely goes undetected. Also
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Science | The Guardian
'Professors eat their own young': how competition can stifle good scienceThere is often more pressure for scientists to work against each other than together – but why? In an ideal world, academic scientists would work together towards a common goal: discovery. Researchers would unite for a common cause, motivated by boundless curiosity, working selflessly towards the Greater Good. While the pursuit of knowledge may be a noble thing, it’s not actually that different f
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New on MIT Technology Review
A new artificial synapse is faster and more efficient than ones in your brain
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New Scientist - News
Pocket-sized scanner helps fill gaps in the human genomeA device barely bigger than a USB stick has produced the most complete human genome to date
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New Scientist - News
Wave of massive volcanoes created Earth’s first supercontinent2.2 billion years ago, a huge build-up of pressure inside the Earth triggered vast volcanic eruptions, which formed the first ever supercontinent
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Low cost, easy to administer drug may be the key to preventing maternal deathsIn a multicenter, randomized controlled trial, researchers demonstrated that tranexamic acid can prevent postpartum hemorrhage in certain vaginal deliveries.
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Relativity matters: Two opposing views of the magnetic force reconciledOur understanding of how a point-particle carrying a charge moves in presence of an inhomogenous magnetic field relied until now on two theories that were believed to differ. In a new study just published in EPJ C, the authors Johann Rafelski and colleagues from the University of Arizona, USA, succeeded in resolving this ambiguity. Their solution makes it possible to characterise the interaction o
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
More than 100,000 switchesFreiburg researchers map out the atlas of gene regulators in human cardiac cells for the first time.
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Interstellar fullerenes may help find solutions for earthly mattersThe nearest interstellar clouds with confirmed fullerene presence are about 1,000 light years away from Earth. Electromagnetic spectra of 19 distant stars were provided by the VLT telescope in Chile, one of the largest in the world. The authors found fullerenes which left traces -- absorption lines in certain frequencies.
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
To improve self-control, call weight loss what it is: DifficultAn intervention that focused on changing the external food environment, rather than internal willpower, actually boosted participants' cognitive restraint and led to greater long-term weight loss.
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Motivational music increases risk-taking but does not improve sports performanceListening to motivational music increases risk-taking behavior during sport activities and exercise -- particularly in men and when participants made their own playlist -- but does not improve performance, new research shows.
7h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Bone experts offer how-to video for forensic professionalsAdvances in recent years allow forensic practitioners to use bone mineral density to extract more information from human remains -- but many forensic experts are unfamiliar with the techniques and technology. Now forensic researchers have published a step-by-step methodology in the video journal JOVE, providing forensic professionals with a guide that can help them extract as much information as p
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Better health and economic activity key to easing UK pension crisisRaising the UK state pension age is not enough to address the challenges caused by an ageing population, a new report from Cass Business School for the Centre for the Study of Financial Innovation (CSFI) argues.
7h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Study shows effectiveness of the school fruit scheme in North Rhine-WestphaliaHow can you convince elementary school students to consume more fruit and vegetables? Scientists from the University of Bonn and the University of Koblenz-Landau have found that school fruit schemes can actually help to achieve this goal. If children receive fruit and vegetables free of charge in their schools several times a week, they consume considerably more of this food group, which is often
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Astrochemists reveal the magnetic secrets of methanolA team of scientists, led by Boy Lankhaar at Chalmers University of Technology, has solved an important puzzle in astrochemistry: how to measure magnetic fields in space using methanol, the simplest form of alcohol. Their results, published in the journal Nature Astronomy, give astronomers a new way of investigating how massive stars are born.
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
OHSU research provides new insight about antidepressantsNew molecular research shows how chemically diverse drugs used to treat depression and anxiety disorders interact with the protein that transports serotonin in the brain. The discovery by researchers at the OHSU Vollum Institute could open the way for the development of additional forms of antidepressants collectively known as selective serotonin reuptake inhibitors, or SSRIs.
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Body clock disruptions occur years before memory loss in Alzheimer'sPeople with Alzheimer's disease have disturbances in their internal body clocks that affect the sleep/wake cycle and may increase risk of developing the disorder. Researchers at Washington University School of Medicine in St. Louis have found that such circadian rhythm disruptions also occur much earlier in people whose memories are intact but whose brain scans show early, preclinical evidence of
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
High rates of diabetes, hypertension found in IndiaRates of diabetes and hypertension are high among middle-aged and elderly people across all geographic measures and sociodemographic groups in India, according to the first nationally representative study of those conditions in the country. The study, led by researchers at Harvard T.H. Chan School of Public Health, also found unexpectedly high rates of hypertension among young adults.
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Graduates of early childhood program show greater educational gains as adultsStudents who participated in an intensive childhood education program from preschool to third grade were more likely to achieve an academic degree beyond high school, compared to a similar group that received other intervention services as children, according to a study funded by the National Institutes of Health.
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Hidden genetic effects behind immune diseases may be missed, study suggestsThe role of genetics in the risk of having an immune disease could be missed in research, scientists suggest. Using a combination of stem cells and novel analytical tools, scientists at the Wellcome Sanger Institute and their collaborators discovered that clues to the contribution of genetic variation to disease risk lie not only in the genes, but also in the molecular switches that control those
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Blood clot in lungs rare in patients at emergency department after faintingA blood clot in the lungs was rarely identified in patients who went to the emergency department after fainting.
7h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Evolving sets of gene regulators explain some of our differences from other primatesToday, biologists add an important discovery to a growing body of data explaining why we're different from chimps and other primate relatives, despite the remarkable similarity of our genes. The new evidence has to do with the way genes are regulated. It's the result of a comprehensive genome-wide computational analysis of multiple individuals across three primate species -- human, chimpanzee and
7h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Coal phase-out: Announcing CO2-pricing triggers divestmentPutting the Paris climate agreement into practice will trigger opposed reactions by investors on the one hand and fossil fuel owners on the other hand. A new study now finds that on balance, divestment beats the so-called 'green paradox' if substantial carbon pricing is credibly announced. Consequently, overall CO2 emissions would be effectively reduced.
7h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Mammals and birds could have best shot at surviving climate changeNew research that analyzed more than 270 million years of data on animals shows that mammals and birds -- both warm-blooded animals -- may have a better chance of evolving and adapting to the Earth's rapidly changing climate than their cold-blooded peers, reptiles and amphibians.
7h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Getting to zero deforestationStanford-led synthesis paper reveals strengths and weaknesses of corporate environmental pledges; prescribes solutions to boost effectiveness.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
A ski jacket that actively gets rid of sweatHumans are warm-blooded animals. If they gets too hot, they can tune down their body temperature. This feat is achieved by an evolutionarily refined "AC system" in the skin: the sweat glands. However, evolution did not yet know anything about winter sports, and so our heat balance is thrown into a spin if we want to protect ourselves from the freezing cold while skiing and at the same time sweat u
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
Increasing public awareness is vital in the fight against infectious diseasesPublic awareness campaigns on spotting the signs and symptoms of infectious diseases and how to prevent them, play a key role in helping to stop the spread of such infections, a new study.
7h
Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
Global warming poses substantial flood risk increase for Central and Western EuropeEurope is expected to see a considerable increase in flood risk in coming years, even under an optimistic climate change scenario of 1.5°C warming compared to pre-industrial levels.
7h
Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
Estrogen causes neuroblastoma cells to mature into neuronsThe female sex hormone estrogen can perform an important role in neuroblastoma, a form of cancer mainly affecting young children. In laboratory experiments, researchers demonstrate that estrogen treatment and overexpression of the estrogen receptor cause malignant neuroblastoma cells to mature into neuron-like cells. The studygives hope of new treatment possibilities.
7h
Scientific American Content: Global
Photographing a Lunar Eclipse in 1960 Took More Than a SnapDiagrams from the Scientific American archive document a feat of citizen science -- Read more on ScientificAmerican.com
7h
TED Talks Daily (SD video)
Why I study the most dangerous animal on earth -- mosquitoes | Fredros OkumuWhat do we really know about mosquitoes? Fredros Okumu catches and studies these disease-carrying insects for a living -- with the hope of crashing their populations. Join Okumu for a tour of the frontlines of mosquito research, as he details some of the unconventional methods his team at the Ifakara Health Institute in Tanzania have developed to target what has been described as the most dangerou
7h
The Atlantic
The Grammys Paid Lip Service to the NowThe Grammys pulled off an impressive feat in its 60th year: giving its biggest prizes to the safest possible work—and still making it feel like a shock. When Bruno Mars, the 32-year-old master craftsman of nostalgic pop, swept Song of the Year (for “That’s What I Like”), Record of the Year (for “24K Magic”), and Album of the Year (for 24K Magic ), it could hardly be called a surprise. Mars makes
7h
Popular Science
A microscopic fungus could mop up our Cold War-era nuclear wasteEnvironment This hardcore yeast thrives amidst acid and radiation. This hardcore yeast thrives amidst acid and radiation, and now it's coming for our radioactive sludge.
7h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
France overturns ban on captive dolphin breedingFrance's highest administrative court on Monday overturned a ban on the breeding of dolphins in captivity, a victory for marine parks which had argued the move could put them out of business.
7h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Untangling the complex taxonomic history of a Neotropical liana genusWhile untangling the complex taxonomy of Neotropical liana genus Pachyptera, scientists Ms. Jéssica Nayara Carvalho Francisco and Dr. Lúcia Garcez Lohmann from the University of São Paulo used integrative taxonomy to help them recognize five well-defined species, one of which newly described from Colombia and Venezuela. The monograph study was published in the open access journal PhytoKeys.
7h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
What your face says about your heartbeatResearchers at Utah State University don't need an Apple Watch or stethoscope to measure your heartbeat. They only need a video camera.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Four personas including the Lurker and the Geek that explain teenagers' online behaviorAcademics have identified four distinct personas of social media user that teenagers describe as shaping how they behave on social media.
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cognitive science
Engati helps to cut down operational costs and makes financial services more accessible without the need to go to a bank. Engati chatbots are going to make life lot easier for banks and consumers alike. So, the next time you bank, think Chatbots! Create yours @ www.engati.comsubmitted by /u/getengati [link] [comments]
7h
Scientific American Content: Global
New Wave of Mini Satellites Could Boost Climate ResearchSmall, low-cost satellites may vastly improve future predictions of weather and climate change -- Read more on ScientificAmerican.com
7h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Coal phase-out—announcing CO2 pricing triggers divestmentPutting the Paris climate agreement into practice will trigger opposed reactions by investors and fossil fuel owners. Paradoxically, it has been feared that the anticipation of strong CO2 reduction policies might drive up these emissions. Before the regulations kick in, fossil fuel owners might accelerate their resource extraction to maximize profits. Yet at the same time, investors might stop put
7h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Unlocking the potential of metal nanoparticles as catalysts for fast and efficient CO2 conversionO2 and sustainably produced hydrogen have the potential to serve as ingredients for converting electrical power generated by windmills or solar panels into a gas fuel. This 'power-to-gas' concept can solve two problems at once, reducing CO2 emissions while creating more flexible applications of sustainable energy. However, profitable conversion of CO2 would require an extremely effective catalyst.
7h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
New Egyptian dinosaur reveals ancient link between Africa and EuropeWhen it comes to the final days of the dinosaurs, Africa is something of a blank page. Fossils found in Africa from the Late Cretaceous, the time period from 100 to 66 million years ago, are few and far between. That means that the course of dinosaur evolution in Africa has largely remained a mystery. But in the Sahara Desert of Egypt, scientists have discovered a new species of dinosaur that help
7h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Evolving sets of gene regulators explain some of our differences from other primatesToday, biologists add an important discovery to a growing body of data explaining why we're different from chimps and other primate relatives, despite the remarkable similarity of our genes. The new evidence has to do with the way genes are regulated. It's the result of a comprehensive genome-wide computational analysis of multiple individuals across three primate species - human, chimpanzee and r
7h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Mammals and birds could have best shot at surviving climate changeNew research that analyzed more than 270 million years of data on animals shows that mammals and birds - both warm-blooded animals - may have a better chance of evolving and adapting to the Earth's rapidly changing climate than their cold-blooded peers, reptiles and amphibians.
7h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Synthesis paper reveals strengths and weaknesses of corporate environmental pledgesWhen the world's largest fast food company announced in 2015 that it planned to use only cage-free eggs, poultry farmers scrambled to meet the new standards. So, can we expect zero-deforestation pledges by McDonald's and other influential companies to slow environmental degradation? A Stanford-led study examines why these otherwise remarkable and promising industry pledges often fall short of mean
7h
The Atlantic
The Making of Blue Planet II’s Incredible Deep Ocean EpisodeThere are lakes at the bottom of the ocean. These are places where the water contains far more salt than usual, making it extremely dense. It sinks, pools, and refuses to mix with the surrounding seawater, creating perception-defying lakes that, despite being hundreds of meters deep, have their own surfaces and shorelines. One such lake features in “The Deep”—the second episode of Blue Planet II
7h
New Scientist - News
Vaping could cause cancer – but it’s still safer than smokingWhen human lung and bladder cells are grown in the lab, they turn cancerous at a higher rate if exposed to nicotine compounds found in e-cigarettes
7h
New Scientist - News
Facebook is making a chatbot that can fill awkward silencesGiving chatbots an artificial personality can help them make small talk – though some just end up talking about themselves
7h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Untangling the complex taxonomic history of a Neotropical liana genusHow do you separate one species from another? Having remained a major challenge in biology as a whole, species delimitation becomes an especially daunting task when it comes to tropical plant groups, where information in biology, morphology and distribution is often scarce. To tackle this issue, a new monograph in PhytoKeys demonstrates how integrative taxonomy can untangle taxonomic complexities
7h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Increasing public awareness is vital in the fight against infectious diseasesPublic awareness campaigns on spotting the signs and symptoms of infectious diseases and how to prevent them, play a key role in helping to stop the spread of such infections, a new study in the journal Epidemiology and Infection reports.
7h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Antiferromagnets prove their potential for spin-based information technologyAs published in the online science journal Nature Communications, scientists at the Institute of Phyics at Johannes Gutenberg University Mainz (JGU) were now able to demonstrate current-induced switching of the Néel vector also for metallic thin films of a compound consisting of manganese and gold, Mn2Au, which orders antiferromagnetically at high temperatures.
7h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Sixty-four percent of women suffer from insomnia in late pregnancyStudy led by the University of Granada warns that health systems need to address this problem systematically, since as well as affecting the quality of life of pregnant women, insomnia is a risk factor for high blood pressure and pre-eclampsia, gestational diabetes mellitus, depression, preterm birth and unplanned cesarean sections.
7h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Estrogen causes neuroblastoma cells to mature into neuronsThe female sex hormone estrogen can perform an important role in neuroblastoma, a form of cancer mainly affecting young children. In laboratory experiments, researchers at Karolinska Institutet in Sweden demonstrate that estrogen treatment and overexpression of the estrogen receptor cause malignant neuroblastoma cells to mature into neuron-like cells. The study, which is published in PNAS, gives h
7h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Schools key to successful integration of child refugees, says studySchools can provide the ideal environment to improve integration and reduce the difficulties faced by refugee children in Western asylum countries, according to a new study from psychologists at City, University of London.
7h
Ingeniøren
I dag er råbene stilnet af, og der er stadig ingen penge til at rydde op i GrindstedFredag stod politikere i kø for at kommentere den voldsomme forurening af Grindsted Å, men foreløbig er der ikke fundet en krone til at rydde op.
7h
The Atlantic
No, Trump Will Not 'Hit Reset' With His State of the UnionAmong flacks and politicians, there is a fondness for a metaphor that journalists shouldn’t reflexively adopt: that of a CEO or a corporation or an elected official or even a whole nation hitting reset , or the reset button . The terms are invoked especially often around State of the Union speeches. And if reporters thought President Trump was poised to tell Congress that he is changing his party
7h
The Atlantic
There's a Sexual-Harassment Epidemic on America’s FarmsMarlyn Perez had no choice but to take the job at C&C Agricultural Farms in Clewiston, Florida. She was new to farming, new to America, undocumented, and desperately in need of money. Perez had just come from Guatemala. She had worked briefly at another farm in North Carolina, harvesting sweet potatoes, but when she got to C&C, a farm located in a remote area called Devil’s Garden, she “saw prett
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The Atlantic
The Conversation #MeToo Needs to HaveIf you haven’t noticed, we’re angry. We’re seething. For some of us, it began the first time we were groped on public transportation and discovered one of the dark realities of living life in a female body. For others—among them, famously, Oprah Winfrey—it began even earlier, and in a much more terrifying way. “I knew that it was bad,” she has said of the sexual abuse she endured as a child, “bec
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Science : NPR
The Cheese Does Not Stand Alone: How Fungi And Bacteria Team Up For A Tastier RindCheese rinds may seem simple, even discardable, but the microbial world they contain is complex. Among their inhabitants: bacterial swimmers that hop on highways of fungal tendrils to get around. (Image credit: Benjamin Wolfe/Benjamin Wolfe)
7h
New on MIT Technology Review
Hackers stole $530 million in the biggest cryptocurrency theft yet
8h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Method of petroleum extraction based on injections of nanosized metal oxide colloidsThe extraction of high-viscosity oils is complicated by the fact that they occur in hardly permeable reservoirs such as shales, strong sands, or limestones. Using thermal methods is not enough to extract oil, so modifications are needed.
8h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Coral lifestyles reflected in their genesA comparison of the genomes of two species of coral demonstrates unexpected genetic diversity.
8h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Flexing for the next silicon waveUltrathin, rigid silicon segments that are wired through interdigitated metal contacts produce ultraflexible high-performance solar cells.
8h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Access to water and diverse terrain encourage elderly in physical activityA recently published study, conducted at the Gerontology Research Center of the University of Jyväskylä, found associations between features of natural environment in the home neighborhood and physical activity of older people.
8h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News
USTC realizes strong indirect coupling in distant nanomechanical resonatorsUSTC Guo's team realized strong coupling between distant phonon modes, by introducing a third resonator as a phonon cavity mode.
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Brown recluse: Pest management tips for the spider that's not as common as you thinkThe brown recluse is one of the few spiders that can bite a human and should be regarded with great caution. But, it is also frequently misattributed as the cause of a variety of unrelated medical conditions, especially in locations far outside its known range. The open-access Journal of Integrated Pest Management has published a new guide to aid both the public and pest management professionals i
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Brown recluse: Pest management tips for the spider that's not as common as you thinkOne of the first things you should know about the brown recluse spider is that its reputation far exceeds its actual prevalence.
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Science | The Guardian
Would London survive the impact of a blue whale dropped from space? | Notes and queriesThe long-running series in which readers answer other readers’ questions on subjects ranging from trivial flights of fancy to profound scientific concepts This question has been bothering me for some time. If a whale (specifically, the Balaenoptera musculus or blue whale, at 180 tonnes) was dropped from space (the outer limit of the Earth’s atmosphere), what impact would it have on a city, compar
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Science | The Guardian
Do fingerprints serve any evolutionary purpose? | Notes and queriesThe long-running series in which readers answer other readers’ questions on subjects ranging from trivial flights of fancy to profound scientific concepts Does anyone know if there is an evolutionary reason for fingerprints? David Taylor, Ennis, Co Clare, Ireland Continue reading...
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Popular Science
Last week in tech: Yes, Elon Musk really made a 'flamethrower'Technology Customers have purchased more than 7,000 flamethrowers so far for some reason. A look back at all of last week's biggest tech stories including a branded flamethrower.
8h
Viden
Efter syg Windows-opdatering: Microsoft klar med nødløsningIntel advarede i sidste uge mod firmaets eget sikkerheds-fix. Nu træder Microsoft til med en midlertidig lap.
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Feed: All Latest
Intimate Glimpses of Ordinary Life in IranA photographer goes beyond the headlines to capture day-to-day life in the ever-opening country.
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Leading experts in high-risk pregnancy to gather in Dallas next weekExperts in high-risk pregnancy will gather in Dallas next week. In addition to sharing research, they will provide services to the Dallas community through a mentoring program and visits to four Dallas-area women's shelters.
8h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News
New, low cost alternative for ethylene productionScientists at Waseda University discovered a new reaction mechanism of performing Oxidative coupling of methane (OCM) at a temperature as low as 150ºC. The novel catalytic reaction found in the study, which demonstrated both high yield and catalytic activity, was done in an electric field, and could provide a more cost-effective method of synthesizing ethylene in the future.
8h
Latest Headlines | Science News
Slower speed, tricky turns give prey a chance against cheetahs and lionsA bonanza of data on wild predators running shows that hunting is more than sprinting.
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Scientific American Content: Global
Photographing a Lunar Eclipse in 1960 Took More Than a SnapDiagrams from the Scientific American archive document a feat of citizen science -- Read more on ScientificAmerican.com
8h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Team finds two theoretical physics models to be equivalentTwo Yale-NUS College undergraduates are part of a research team that concluded that two different mathematical models, which describe the same physical phenomenon, are essentially equivalent. The discovery could have implications for future research into magnetoresistance and its practical applications in a wide range of electronic devices. After implementing the two different models of magnetores
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Dagens Medicin
Odense-læge tiltalt for grov forsømmelseEn overlæge fra Odense Universitetshospital er tiltalt for grov forsømmelse eller skødesløshed i forbindelse med en patients død. Sagens minder om Svendborg-sagen, og Lægeforening ser det også som en principiel sag.
8h
The Atlantic
The Atlantic’s March Cover Story: Franklin Foer on Paul Manafort and the Fall of WashingtonWashington, D.C. (January 28, 2017)—Paul Manafort has become a central villain in perhaps the central scandal of our times. But before he was charged with conspiracy and money laundering, and decades before he would join then-candidate Trump’s presidential campaign, Manafort was instrumental in creating the very Washington swamp Trump vowed to drain. In The Atlantic’s explosive March issue cover
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Model predicts scenarios for energy generation using nuclear fusionA study by Brazilian researcher helps scientists understand and control physical processes that are essential to the success of ITER, a fusion reactor designed to reproduce on a small scale the process that generates energy in the sun. A future fusion reactor would feature advantages when compared to nuclear fission technology: in addition to the absence of radioactive waste, its system works by a
8h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News
The evolution of industry-sponsored patient registriesThis important commentary provides insights into the past and future of registries and the critical and unique role that the life-sciences industry can play in supporting the proliferation of these objective research programs, particularly within the context of the importance of accommodating patient perspectives through advanced technology.
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Leading experts in obstetric care and addiction medicine gather to discuss substance use disordersThree national organizations are coming together next week, along with representatives from the federal government, to address opioid misuse in pregnancy.
8h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Yale-NUS undergraduates part of team that finds two theoretical physics models to be equivalentTwo Yale-NUS College undergraduates are part of a research team that concluded that two different mathematical models, which describe the same physical phenomenon, are essentially equivalent. After implementing the two different models of magnetoresistance as computer simulations, Lai Ying Tong, 21, and Silvia Lara, 22, found that the two simulations produced similar results under identical condit
8h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News
KAIST team develops flexible vertical micro LEDA KAIST research team has developed flexible vertical micro LEDs (f-VLEDs) using anisotropic conductive film (ACF)-based transfer and interconnection technology. The team also succeeded in controlling animal behavior via optogenetic stimulation of the f-VLEDs.
8h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News
'Sodium-scooter' deliversA 'sodium-scooter,' namely Na2Te, transports tellurium to molybdenum disulfide (MoS2) and tungsten disulfide (WS2) monolayers. With the help of the scooter, sulfur atoms were replaced with tellurium. The process occurs at 525°C, about 300°C lower than previously achievable. This study is expected to facilitate the exploration of new properties in these 2-D materials.
8h
New on MIT Technology Review
Intel told Chinese firms about its chip flaws before telling US officials
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
BMW takes full control of car-sharing platform DriveNowGerman high-end carmaker BMW said Monday it had bought partner Sixt's share in car-sharing platform DriveNow, stoking speculation a merger with a competing service from Daimler may lie ahead.
8h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Bone experts offer how-to video for forensic professionalsAdvances in recent years allow forensic practitioners to use bone mineral density to extract more information from human remains – but many forensic experts are unfamiliar with the techniques and technology. Now forensic researchers from North Carolina State University have published a step-by-step methodology in the video journal JOVE, providing forensic professionals with a guide that can help t
8h
Ingeniøren
GRAFIK: Mere slagkraft til de danske fregatterFregatterne Iver Huitfeldt, Peter Willemoes og Niels Juel skal som en del af det nye forsvarsforlig klargøres og udrustes med luftværnsmissiler.
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Futurity.org
Blood vessels are key to building a strong heartDoctors haven’t known why some babies are born with thin, spongy heart muscles. New research links the disease to poorly developed blood vessels around the heart. Apart from a deeper understanding of congenital heart disease, the results could shed light on how heart muscle forms in the first place, say the study’s two senior authors, Ashby Morrison and Kristy Red-Horse, assistant professors of b
9h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Top Dutch banks, revenue service hit by cyber attacksThe top three banks in the Netherlands have been targeted in multiple cyber attacks over the past week, blocking access to websites and internet banking services, they said on Monday.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Explainer: Why are crypto exchanges vulnerable to hacks?Blockchain technology can make transactions safe and secure, but crypto-currency exchanges that trade bitcoins and other virtual currencies that are based on this technology have been hacked because they are not working on secure networks, experts say. Late last week, the Tokyo-based Coincheck exchange reported a 58 billion yen ($530 million) loss of crypto currency due to hacking. The Coincheck e
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Solar heat could make power + water for Namibia: studyA research study from Stellenbosch University finds that a 100 MW concentrated solar power (CSP) plant adapted to also "co-generate" water via multi-effect distillation (MED) would potentially be financially viable for Namibia given a world class solar resource at Arandis, where state utility NamPower plans a solar park close to the demand.
9h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Solar heat could make power + water for Namibia: StudySeawater desalination can be integrated into a solar thermal energy plant using a variety of desalination technologies. Is solar-driven multi-effect distillation a financially feasible solution for water-stressed Namibia?
9h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News
New clinical trial using water to treat polycystic kidney diseaseA cheap, safe and effective treatment to polycystic kidney disease may soon be available, thanks to a new national clinical out of Westmead, Australia, which is trialing water to treat the disease.
9h
New on MIT Technology Review
Fitness app data is revealing military bases to enemy fighters
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Global warming poses substantial flood risk increase for Central and Western EuropeEurope is expected to see a considerable increase in flood risk in coming years, even under an optimistic climate change scenario of 1.5°C warming compared to pre-industrial levels.
9h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Artificial intelligence is the weapon of the next Cold WarIt is easy to confuse the current geopolitical situation with that of the 1980s. The United States and Russia each accuse the other of interfering in domestic affairs. Russia has annexed territory over U.S. objections, raising concerns about military conflict.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Researchers study interstellar medium in the galaxy NGC 3665Using ESA's Herschel telescope a team of Chinese researchers has performed analysis of the interstellar medium in the early-type galaxy NGC 3665. The study offers insights into physical properties of the matter between its star systems. The results were presented January 16 in a paper published on arXiv.org.
9h
Dagens Medicin
#detkuhaværetmig-læger bekymret over Vangsted-meldingerLægegruppen #detkuhaværetmig kritiserer i et åbent brev til Anne-Marie Vangsted, direktør for Styrelsen for Patientsikkerhed, hendes meldinger efter vagt med Kristian Rørbæk Madsen.
9h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Scientists grapple with worms to improve co-existence with wildlife in AfricaFarming at the border of National Parks in Africa can lead to conflict with wildlife, due to the belief that wild animals bring disease, prey upon livestock, and damage crops. In an unexpected twist, research conducted by the University of Bristol and Queen's University Belfast with the charity 'Elephants for Africa' and the University of Pretoria has found that grazing livestock with wildlife may
9h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Student uses novel approach to analyse the value of wordsPip Thornton, a Ph.D. student in Geopolitics and Cybersecurity at Royal Holloway, University of London, uses Google AdWords to analyse poetry.
9h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Antiferromagnets prove their potential for spin-based information technologyWithin the emerging field of spin-based electronics, or spintronics, information is typically defined by the orientation of the magnetization of ferromagnets. Researchers have recently been also interested in the utilization of antiferromagnets, which are materials without macroscopic magnetization but with a staggered orientation of their microscopic magnetic moments. Here the information is enco
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Comparison of the genomes of two species of coral demonstrates unexpected genetic diversityThe first comparative genome study between two corals reveals significant evolutionary differences. These findings could help scientists understand the resilience of corals and how they might respond to climate change.
9h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
A type of metamaterial device that allows better water-to-air sound transmissionA team of researchers from Yonsei University in Korea and Hokkaido University in Japan, has developed a metamaterial device that allows for much better than normal sound transfer between water and air. In their paper published in Physical Review Letters, the researchers describe their device, how it works and the ways it needs to be improved.
9h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Flexing for the next silicon waveUltrathin, rigid silicon segments that are wired through interdigitated metal contacts produce ultraflexible high-performance solar cells.
9h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Method to visualize hidden statistical structures in environmental dataPrediction of climate and weather relies on statistical models that can capture variability at one location over time as well as the relationship with other geographical locations. Sometimes future conditions at one location can be predicted from the current conditions at another location, while in other cases there may be no such correlation. The assumption of whether two sites are 'covariant' in
9h
Futurity.org
Good attitude about math gets kid brains in high gearHaving a positive attitude about math is connected to better function of the hippocampus, an important memory center in the brain, during performance of arithmetic problems, a new study of elementary school students suggests. Educators have long observed higher math scores in children who show more interest in math and perceive themselves as being better at it. But it has not been clear if this a
9h
Feed: All Latest
Star Wars News: Guide to All the ‘The Last Jedi’ Easter EggsThere were a lot of hidden gems in Rian Johnson's movie—and now you'll be able to spot all of them.
9h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Researchers find blood vessel endothelial cells stop more nanoparticles than the liverNanoparticles that transport medicines to a specific part of the human body are usually broken down in the liver prematurely. Jeroen Bussmann from Leiden University has discovered a new method to prevent this from happening. Publication in ACS Nano.
9h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
360-degree panoramic view via single-sensor matrixVTT Technical Research Centre of Finland has developed a new solution for thermal infrared applications, making it possible to fold a 360-degree panoramic view on a single sensor matrix. The concept guaranteeing optimal image quality is especially suitable for security, surveillance, military, and building diagnostic applications, where the objects to be imaged lie in the horizontal directions fro
9h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Living with volcanic gasesProfessor Tamsin Mather, a volcanologist in Oxford's Department of Earth Sciences reflects on her many fieldwork experiences at Massaya volcano in Nicaragua, and what she has learned about how they effect the lives of the people who live around them.
9h
Dagens Medicin
Giv os nu hurtig adgang til patientdata på tværs af sektorer og sygehuseSundheds-it skal være nemt at arbejde med og støtte op om lægers og andet sundhedspersonales daglige arbejde. Men sådan er det desværre langt fra alle steder i dag.
9h
Viden
Aber og mennesker blev udsat for diesel-os: Nu vil Volkswagen granske omstridt forsøgDe ansvarlige for forsøget skal stilles til ansvar, siger bestyrelsesformanden hos Volkswagen.
9h
The Scientist RSS
Retired Mice Find New Life as Top Models for AutismAfter years of obscurity, strains of mice with mutations in particular genes are thrust to the fore of autism research.
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The Scientist RSS
Image of the Day: Red-Hot MitochondriaMitochondria may sustain temperatures more than 10 °C warmer than human cells, say researchers.
9h
The Scientist RSS
ProteinSimple: Transferring your Traditional Western Blot to WesMeet Wes.
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The Scientist RSS
ProteinSimple: RNA-Seq Target Validation with Single-Cell Westerns with MiloMeet Milo.
9h
The Scientist RSS
ATCC: CRISPR-edited Isogenic Cell ModelsRecapitulating disease in a dish
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The Scientist RSS
Beckman Coulter: Immunotherapy 101The basics of immunotherapy
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Futurity.org
Human stuff constrains mammal movementOn average, mammals move distances two to three times shorter in human-modified landscapes than they do in the wild, according to a new study. One coauthor of the paper in Science , Penn State researcher Duane Diefenbach, has found that the home range of the average white-tailed deer in the big woods of Pennsylvania’s Northern Tier is more than twice as large as that of a deer in urban or agricul
9h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
How should we decide what to do?Most of us are faced with ethical decisions on a regular basis. Some are relatively minor – perhaps your cousin makes a new recipe and it really doesn't taste good, and you have to decide whether to tell the truth or a little white lie so as not to hurt her feelings.
9h
Ingeniøren
Bilfabrikanter betalte forsøg med dieselrøg på menneskerForskningsgruppe, der blev grundlagt af Volkswagen, BMW og Daimler, har udsat både aber og mennesker for dieselrøg i forsøg.
9h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Pushing liquids to their limits with next-gen materials simulation methodsMaterials in industrial and engineering applications, such as iron and steel, are often used at extreme pressures and temperatures or in complex environments where their properties may be very different from those found under normal circumstances.
10h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Indian sacred texts and the logic of computer ethicsThe Indian sacred texts of the Vedas have been studied for millennia. But now, for the first time in history, computer scientists in Vienna analyse them by applying the methods of mathematical logic. This gives Sanskritists new insights and can even settle philosophical disputes which are more than one or two thousand years old. On the other hand, it helps computer scientists to develop reasoning
10h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Factories get more business when they treat workers rightFor years, academics have debated if relaxing labor and environmental standards attracts or repels international business. Now a new study finds that manufacturers that adhere to basic labor and environmental standards saw a 4 percent increase in annual purchases over those that did not.
10h
Live Science
Teach Your Kids About the Super Blue Blood Moon of Jan. 31 with These ActivitiesGet children and teens ready for the lunar eclipse (and supermoon!) with these fun STEM activities.
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Live Science
Photos: Ancient Arrows from Reindeer Hunters Found in NorwayAs climate change melts the ice patches of Norway, artifacts from the past 6,000 years are being exposed.
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Live Science
Reindeer Weapons: Ancient Hunting Implements Emerge as Ice MeltsArchaeologists have collected more than 2,000 artifacts dropped by ancient reindeer hunters in Norway's icy mountains.
10h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
The future of realityThink you know reality? Think again! In 2018, digital technologies are moving into the physical world.
10h
New Scientist - News
Children get new ears grown from their own cells in world firstA team in China have 3D printed ear-shaped scaffolds which have been seeded with a child’s own cells to create a personalised ear for transplantation
10h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Baby red panda spells hope for the speciesRed pandas are in trouble, but the efforts of a global breeding programme could help save some of the world's most adorable animals.
10h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Less money, more problems – trying to get fisheries rightSustainable marine fisheries seem to tick all the boxes. They can fill your belly, fill your wallet, and do it all for a fraction of the carbon emissions generated by conventional agriculture. They are the last major source of wild food that we can forage.
10h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Biomining the elements of the futureBiomining is the kind of technique promised by science fiction: a vast tank filled with microorganisms that leach metal from ore, old mobile phones and hard drives.
10h
Feed: All Latest
Why the Tech Elite Love New ZealandBeyond Wellington’s obsessive coffee culture and Queenstown’s unspoiled landscape, New Zealand has established itself as an unlikely bolt-hole for the impending apocalypse.
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Feed: All Latest
Don’t Call It a Blood Moon. Or Supermoon. Or Blue MoonThe first was recently popularized by this-must-be-prophecy types, the second was created by an astrologer, and the third is highly subjective.
10h
Live Science
This Parasite Uses Your Own Gut Bacteria Against YouIf you've ever sipped some untreated tap water while you were abroad on vacation, you may have returned home with an unexpected souvenir: diarrhea.
10h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
How cities still work around the dominance of parking spaceCar parking is expected but often unnoticed, taking up surprisingly large proportions of city space. A parking bay occupies at least 13 square metres – some codes specify up to 30 square metres including accessways.
10h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Muon machine makes milestone magnetic mapMuons are mysterious, and scientists are diving deep into the particle to get a handle on a property that might render it—and the universe—a little less mysterious.
10h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Research could help electric cars beat the coldLeave a car overnight in extreme cold and you might get an unpleasant surprise in the morning.
10h
Nyheder - Forskning - Videnskab
Nyt mærkningssystem kan sætte en stopper for kopivarerForskere fra Københavns Universitet har udviklet verdens sikreste mærkningssystem, som kan...
10h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
How plants 'muscle up' against bacteria in the coldMichigan State University scientists have furthered our understanding on how a plant protein, called CAMTA, helps plants strengthen themselves as they anticipate long periods of cold, such as three to four months of winter in the American midwest or northern Europe.
10h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Researcher establishes two Jack the Ripper letters authored by a single personA forensic linguist from The University of Manchester who analysed letters supposedly signed by Jack the Ripper has concluded that two of the most famous examples were written by the same person.
10h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Defining collapse—step forward for ecosystemsA team of researchers has created a four-step guide for defining ecosystem collapse, to improve resource management and help protect ecosystems.
10h
Science | The Guardian
Heard the one about the standup showing academics how to be interesting?Comedian Iszi Lawrence on helping academics use humour to make their research more accessible “So, what do you do?” It’s the dreaded question we all get asked at parties. As a member of the self employed the question might as well be “can you justify your existence”? I know what NOT to say. I don’t say I’m a podcaster, because then follows a tedious explanation of what a podcast actually is. I ne
10h
Live Science
800-Year-Old 'Knight' Chess Piece Discovered in NorwayThe decorated game piece would have been used to play what was called shatranj.
10h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
How 'slow science' can improve the way we do and interpret researchScientists don't usually get involved in politics. But they took to the streets in last April's March for Science, spurred by what they saw as the Trump Administration's aggressive eroding of their institutions.
11h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Designing deep-sea oil rigs could be improved by simplified wave simulationsEvaluating the impact of waves on deep-sea oil rigs has been made easier by an A*STAR-developed computational technique that should increase the operational lifetime of floating platforms and make them cheaper to manufacture.
11h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Easy decryption shows that chat-app designers should improve the ways they protect users' personal dataA*STAR researchers have successfully recovered decryption keys for two popular chat-apps—WeChat and WhatsApp. With these decryption keys, they could potentially collect users' personal data and private information.
11h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Good storytelling at the base of modern societyGood stories are not just fairy tales made to amuse and entertain. They transmit important values that may have helped build our society, a new study found.
11h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Uncovering the early origins of Huntington's diseaseThe symptoms of Huntington's disease typically appear in middle age, but new research shows that neural abnormalities are evident much earlier, in the first steps of embryonic development. The findings suggest that treating the disease earlier may be beneficial.
11h
Scientific American Content: Global
Missing Neutrons May Lead a Secret Life as Dark MatterThis may be the reason experiments can’t agree on the neutron lifetime, according to a new idea -- Read more on ScientificAmerican.com
11h
Feed: All Latest
Podcast Listeners Really Are the Holy Grail Advertisers Hoped They'd BeAfter a month of Apple's Podcast Analytics tools being available to creators, the numbers are in—and they're good news for the medium.
11h
Dagens Medicin
Medicinrådet skal vurdere ny pris på SpinrazaMedicinrådet skal tirsdag tage stilling til ny pris, som Amgros har forhandlet med producenten Biogen på lægemidlet Spinraza til behandling af spinal muskelatrofi.
11h
Latest Headlines | Science News
Here’s why so many saiga antelope mysteriously died in 2015Higher than normal temperatures turned normally benign bacteria lethal, killing hundreds of thousands of the saiga antelopes.
11h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Tiny gold spheres can be manipulated on surfaces using the effects of solvent evaporationUnlocking the molecule-detecting capabilities of gold nanoparticles often requires positioning techniques that are beyond the limits of conventional lithography. An A*STAR team now demonstrates that a combination of topographical templates and localized traps left by evaporating liquids can fabricate arrays of nanoparticles with controllable separations below five nanometers.
11h
Ingeniøren
ANALYSE: Bevidste omskrivninger af sandheden og total inkompetence i salg af vaccinefabrikMens ministeriet lod som om, alt kørte på skinner, sejlede salget af Statens Serum Instituts vaccineproduktion. Men ministeren afviser fortsat ethvert ansvar.
11h
NYT > Science
German Carmakers Criticized for Emissions Research on MonkeysTests that exposed monkeys to diesel exhaust provoked public outrage and are likely to intensify criticism of pro-diesel lobbying by carmakers.
11h
Scientific American Content: Global
Bad Science Underlies EPA's Air Pollution ProgramFor decades, the agency has used numbers that often underestimate industry emissions of dangerous substances—and isn’t going to change soon -- Read more on ScientificAmerican.com
11h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Destruction of Queensland's threatened forests gathers paceLaws intended to protect Queensland's most-threatened forests are failing, with the most vulnerable forests falling even faster than other forests.
11h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
New molecular muscle responds to visible lightPicture a tiny, makeshift muscle that can curl a 20 milligram suspended weight when exposed to light. Under the right conditions, another mix packs enough power to bench-press a dime.
11h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
The well-being paradox—people are getting richer, but not more satisfiedFor decades, there was a single main indicator of how countries were faring—the growth of gross domestic product. But earnings do not say much about how healthy people are. Jan-Pieter Smits, professor at Eindhoven University of Technology (TU/e) and senior statistics researcher at Statistics Netherlands (CBS), is the spiritual father of a new measuring instrument that gives policymakers a better u
11h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
On unconscious bias in scienceScience is never truly objective. Charles Darwin and his failed theory on the Parallel Roads of Glen Roy can provide an excellent role model, writes Jaboury Ghazoul.
11h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Image: Hubble's standout stars bound together by gravityThis image from the NASA/ESA Hubble Space Telescope reveals a glistening and ancient globular cluster named NGC 3201—a gathering of hundreds of thousands of stars bound together by gravity. NGC 3201 was discovered in 1826 by the Scottish astronomer James Dunlop, who described it as a "pretty large, pretty bright" object that becomes "rather irregular" towards its center.
11h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
A greener way to make ketonesResearchers at McGill University have discovered a new, more environmentally friendly way to make ketones, an important chemical ingredient in pharmaceuticals. While ketones are found in a wide range of useful chemicals, they are commonly prepared through energy-intensive, multi-step technologies that create significant chemical waste.
11h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Grand Bend fireball may have dropped meteoritesNothing lights up the night – or sparks the interest of researchers – quite like a meteor sighting.
11h
Ingeniøren
Ugens job: Forsvaret, Sweco og flere store firmaer jagter fagfolkPå dagens liste finder du job for ingeniører og naturvidenskabelige kandidater i flere forskellige firmaer. Blandt andet som specialist, projektleder, konsulent og mere endnu.
11h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Global toll from landslides is heaviest in developing countriesThis month's tragic mudslides in Montecito, California are a reminder that natural hazards lurk on the doorsteps of many U.S. homes, even in affluent communities. Similar events occur every year around the world, often inflicting much higher casualties yet rarely making front-page headlines.
12h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Image: Mark Vande Hei's 'space selfie'On Tuesday, Jan. 23, 2018, Mark Vande Hei snapped his own portrait, better known as a "space selfie," during the first spacewalk of the year.
12h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
A chemical cloak of invisibility could reveal RNA's secretsBiologists used to think they knew DNA's less famous cousin, RNA, but in the last two decades it's become clear the molecule is keeping far more secrets than it has ever revealed. Recent discoveries have it taking on never-before-anticipated roles in regulating how a cell functions.
12h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
New algorithm for simulating the structure of quantum systems on a quantum photonic chipAn international collaboration of quantum physicists from the University of Bristol, Microsoft, Google, Imperial College, Max Planck Institute, and the Sun Yat-sen University have introduced a new algorithm to solve the energy structure of quantum systems on quantum computers.
12h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
New evidence shows might of Pharaoh Ramses is fake newsArchaeological evidence from an Egyptian excavation 200 miles east of the Libyan border has helped bust the fearsome reputation of one of the country's most famous pharaohs.
12h
New Scientist - News
What does China’s monkey breakthrough mean for human cloning?The creation of monkey clones is a big breakthrough, but making a copy of an adult is still not possible and the ethics of cloning remain unchanged
12h
New Scientist - News
Vaping could cause cancer – but it’s still safer than smokingWhen human lung and bladder cells are grown in the lab, they turn cancerous at a higher rate if exposed to nicotine compounds found in e-cigarettes
12h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Using AI to uncover the mystery of Voynich manuscriptComputing scientists at the University of Alberta are using artificial intelligence to decipher an ancient manuscript.
12h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Image: Jupiter's swirling south poleThis image of Jupiter's swirling south polar region was captured by NASA's Juno spacecraft as it neared completion of its tenth close flyby of the gas giant planet.
12h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
The genome of vascular plants bears witness to the evolution of viruses of the family CaulimoviridaeEndogenous viral elements are viral sequences integrated into the nuclear genome of their host. They are veritable molecular fossils that prove infections that may have happened millions of years ago, and studying them can serve to understand how viruses evolve over time.
12h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
World's smallest sensor measures growth force of plants, animals and humansHow do you visualise the extremely small forces connected to processes such as embryonic growth and development? Researchers at Wageningen have experimented with a combination of laser technology and chemistry, coming up with a sensor consisting of one single molecule that is a few hundred times more accurate than existing devices used to measure nano-forces on the molecular level. The researchers
12h
The Atlantic
Americans Are Rising to This Historic MomentA writer usually itches to rewrite any article that is more than a week old: I confess to no such temptation with my first article for The Atlantic , published a year ago. I stand by every word. I think now as I did then that Trump will not grow into his job, “because the problem is one of temperament and character;” I continue to think that to be associated with him “will be for all but the stro
12h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Team sheds light on the mysteries of Saturn's ringsA Skoltech-led team of international scientists has developed a mathematical model that makes sense of one of the great mysteries of Saturn's rings.
12h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Scientists develop process to produce higher quality fuel from biowasteResearchers have found a way to produce a higher quality, more stable fuel from biowaste, such as sewage, that is simpler and cleaner than existing methods.
12h
Ingeniøren
Hovsa! Data fra fitness-app afslører militærbaserNår soldater løber en tur, så tænder de lige deres trænings-app. Men når firmaet bag appen så laver et kort over, hvor alle deres brugere løber ture - ja, så er det pludselig tydeligt, hvor der er baser.
12h
Ingeniøren
Hackere stjæler over tre milliarder fra japansk kryptobørs523 millioner enheder af kryptovalutaen NEM blev overført af hackere fra kryptovaluta-børsen CoinCheck.
12h
Ingeniøren
Techtopia #37: Kunstig intelligens laver ansættelsessamtalePodcast: Det kinesiske firma Seedlink har lavet en kunstig intelligens, der eliminerer cv’et for jobsøgere. I stedet får de tre spørgsmål, som bliver evalueret af den kunstige intelligens.
12h
Ingeniøren
Forsvarsforlig afslører nye dronesatsningerDroner bliver en del af forsvarets nye brigade og skal udvikles sammen med private dronevirksomheder.
12h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Guideline adherence, not patient volume, may be better hospital heart failure metricIn evaluating the quality of inpatient heart failure care, patients and policy makers should consider how well a hospital meets clinical care guidelines. Hospitals that treat more heart failure patients tend to follow heart failure guidelines more closely. However, death and hospital readmission rates can be just as good at hospitals with small numbers of heart failure patients whose treatment adh
13h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News
US energy colonialism a key cause of Puerto Rico's Hurricane María crisisA new study investigating US and territorial government energy policies and industrial contracts in Puerto Rico argues that energy colonialism has played a central role in the country's current humanitarian crisis.
13h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Moving pictures, feeble words: Emotional images sway people more than emotional wordsNew research suggests that your behavior can be influenced by subtle, barely visible images: people consume more of a beverage when exposed to positive images, such as smiling faces or cute dogs, and less when exposed to negative images, such as scowling faces or guns. However, exposure to emotionally charged words does not have the same effect.
13h
Viden
Fitness-app er sikkerhedsbrist: Løbende soldater kan ses af alle fjenderAnsatte på baser rundt om i verden har via en fitness-app afsløret deres placeringer.
13h
Ingeniøren
Afføring omdannes til Marmite-lignende astronautmadAmerikanske forskere arbejder på at omdanne afføring til en spiselig og proteinrig masse, som kan blive vigtig for fremtidige årelange rummissioner.
13h
Science : NPR
Got Your Flu Shot Yet? Consider This A ReminderA research review suggests reminding people when their vaccinations are due or overdue increases the number of people who get immunized. (Image credit: Mladen Zivkovic/Getty Images)
13h
Science : NPR
Is Smoking Pot While Pregnant Safe For The Baby?Adults in a growing number of states can now legally use marijuana without a doctor's prescription. But obstetricians worry pregnant women don't realize the drug could hurt their kids. (Image credit: Sarah Varney/Kaiser Health News)
13h
Viden
Det kolde gys stresser kroppen - på en sund mådeForskere vil undersøge, om vinterbadning hjælper mod overvægt og sukkersyge.
13h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
US energy colonialism a key cause of Puerto Rico's Hurricane Maria crisisFour months after Hurricane María blasted Puerto Rico with 250 km/hour winds, the Caribbean island remains in crisis—a humanitarian disaster that a new paper published in open-access journal Frontiers in Communications argues is as much to blame on US energy colonialism as it is on the hurricane itself.
13h
Dagens Medicin
STPS er korrumperet af magtfuldkommenhedI den seneste retssag mod en læge stiller Styrelsen for Patientsikkerhed i retten med et nærmest hensynsløst hold – en embedsmand fra styrelsen og en såkaldt sagkyndig, som gør deres bedste for at få hængt lægen op på tiltalten.
13h
Ingeniøren
Kom med dit bud: Hvad kan vi bruge nye, gratis vejrdata til?Regeringen afsætter 82 millioner kroner til at gøre DMI's meteorologisk data gratis over de kommende år. Men hvad kan man bruge data om vejr, klima og hav til?
13h
Viden
Fitness-app afslører hemmelige militærbaserMilitærpersonel, der bruger fitness-appen Strava, kan ufrivilligt have afsløret fortrolige og hemmelige baser.
14h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Fearless Philippine farmers defy volcano angerAs blistering lava spews from the seething volcano nearby, Philippine farmer Jay Balindang leads his buffalo through the ash-strewn paddy fields of the no-go zone, creeping closer to danger in a desperate bid to support his family.
14h
Science | The Guardian
We’ve despoiled the Earth … now artificial stars are ruining space | Philip HoareThe launch of the Humanity Star is proof that the human urge to dominate wild places is as untamed as ever News that Rocket Lab, a New Zealand space company, has somewhat surreptitiously sent a 3ft-wide geodesic sphere into space – looking somewhat like an oversized Christmas tree bauble, has not met with unalloyed joy . Dubbed the Humanity Star , it is due to shine there for nine months (until it
14h
Science | The Guardian
Orange cave crocodiles may be mutating into new speciesIn 2008 an archaeologist discovered crocodiles living in remote caves in Gabon. Now, genetics hint that these weird cave crocodilians may be in the process of evolving into a new species. It sounds like something out of a children’s book: it’s orange, it dwells in a cave and it lives on bats and crickets. But this isn’t some fairy story about a lonely troll – it’s the much weirder tale of a group
14h
Viden
En kunstig sol og helium fra Månen: Sådan vil forskerne revolutionere energiproduktionTrods årtiers forskning er fusionsteknologien langtfra effektiv nok til, at vi kan bygge kraftværker. Månen kan dog få en afgørende rolle, forklarer forsker.
14h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
In the Galapagos, an idyllic hammerhead shark nurseryFor millions of years, new-born hammerhead sharks have grown up in nurseries sheltered by the mangrove swamps and reefs of the Galapagos Islands, safe from all human threat.
14h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Seine reaches peak in flood-hit ParisThe swollen Seine peaked Monday at more than four metres above its normal level, leaving a lengthy mop-up job for Parisians after days of rising waters that have put the soggy city on alert.
14h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Japan to sanction Coincheck after massive cryptocurrency heistJapan said Monday it would impose administrative measures on virtual currency exchange Coincheck after hackers stole hundreds of millions of dollars in digital assets from the Tokyo-based firm.
14h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Exercise tracking map highlights locations of deployed troopsA map showing paths taken by users of an exercise tracking app reveals potentially sensitive information about American and allied military personnel in places including Iraq and Syria.
14h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Salt, the solution to winter's dangers, threatens US watersWhen roads turn into ice rinks, consider trying beet juice, molasses, and even beer or cheese waste to make them safer. So say experts who fear road salt is starting to take a toll on the nation's waterways, putting everything from fish and frogs to microscopic zooplankton at risk.
14h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Novel technologies reveal key information about depleted east pacific green sea turtlesPopulations of green sea turtles living in the eastern region of the Pacific Ocean have rebounded in recent years, but their numbers remain dangerously depleted. Research by led by biologists at the University of California San Diego and NOAA's National Marine Fisheries Service is offering previously unknown information about where these turtles live and how they use their habitats, key data that
14h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Parasite mimics human proteins to provide 'ready meals' from the gutGiardia parasites - responsible for one of the world's most common gastric diseases - are able to mimic human cell functions to break apart cells in the gut and feed off them, new research has shown.
14h
Science-Based Medicine
The effort of integrative medicine advocates to co-opt the opioid crisis to claim non pharmacological treatments for pain as solely theirs continues apaceLast week, I wrote about how advocates for quackery were trying, and succeeding, at persuading state Medicaid agencies to pay for acupuncture for pain. This week, I discuss how they are promoting the integration of quackery with medicine. In this case, they are promoting a white paper and trying to influence the AHRQ.
14h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
New study examines the causes and consequences of the 2015 Wimberley floodsA new study by Chad Furl, postdoctoral research associate, and Hatim Sharif, professor of civil and environmental engineering at The University of Texas at San Antonio, delves into the 2015 Wimberley, Texas floods that destroyed 350 homes and claimed 13 lives. Furl and Sharif researched the factors that led to the catastrophic flooding and shed light on new ways people in flood-prone areas can pro
15h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Copyright board boosts songwriters' music streaming feesA federal copyright board has raised the music streaming royalties for songwriters and music publishers by more than 40 percent to narrow the financial divide separating them from recording labels.
15h
Science | The Guardian
Can you solve it? The puzzle of the red and green hatsThinking caps on! Hi guzzlers, A box contains two red hats and three green hats... Continue reading...
16h
Ingeniøren
Revner i aksler: DSB fortsætter hastetjek af ME-lokomotiverDSB tog fredag alle ME-lokomotiver ud til kontroleftersyn efter at have fundet begyndende revnedannelser på to af lokomotivernes aksler. De gamle ME-lokomotiver skulle egentlig have været udrangeret fra 2011.
16h
Ingeniøren
Ny malware rammer IoT-enheder: Stort potentiale for at lave skade, siger DTUEn ny type malware angriber IoT-enheder med ARC, den næstmest udbredte indlejrede processor, for at skabe et botnet til DDos-angreb
16h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Novel technologies reveal key information about depleted East Pacific green sea turtlesUsing new technologies developed to extract life history information from bones, researchers at UC San Diego are learning more than ever about populations of green sea turtles living in the eastern region of the Pacific Ocean. While their numbers remain dangerously depleted, the new data show that green sea turtles are spending more time offshore, increasing their risk as fishing bycatch.
18h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News
New UTSA study examines the causes and consequences of the 2015 Wimberley floodsA new study by Chad Furl, postdoctoral research associate, and Hatim Sharif, professor of civil and environmental engineering at The University of Texas at San Antonio, delves into the 2015 Wimberley, Texas floods that destroyed 350 homes and claimed 13 lives. Furl and Sharif researched the factors that led to the catastrophic flooding and shed light on new ways people in flood-prone areas can pro
18h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Calculating the CO2 emissions of biofuels is not enoughA new EU regulation aims to shrink the environmental footprint of biofuels starting in 2021. But an EPFL scientist thinks we should go one step further and take into account all compounds produced at biorefineries, not just biofuel. And he has developed a model for doing just that.
18h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Management of diaphragmatic hernia in children: Canadian guideline to standardize careFor babies diagnosed with congenital diaphragmatic hernia, a comprehensive new guideline in CMAJ (Canadian Medical Association Journal) aims to provide guidance to physicians in diagnosing and managing the condition from the time a diagnosis is made during pregnancy through the teen years.
18h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Teens whose mothers had an abortion are more likely to undergo abortionTeens whose mothers had abortions were more likely to also have abortions, according to new research in CMAJ (Canadian Medical Association Journal).
18h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Changing the color of 3-D printed objects3-D printing has come a long way since the first 'rapid prototyping' patent was rejected in 1980. We've evolved from basic designs to a wide range of highly-customizable objects. Still, there's a big issue: once objects are printed, they're final. If you need a change, you'll need a reprint.
18h
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MIT's New ColorFab Process Recolors 3-D Printed ObjectsMIT Color ObjectsA new type of photochromic ink makes it possible to dynamically change the color of an object after it's been printed using UV light.
18h
The Atlantic
The Pain in Kesha's #MeToo Grammys SongIt was only a few weeks ago that a group of women working at record labels realized that, after the wave of #MeToo-related activism that defined the Golden Globes, there was no similar effort to mobilize en masse against sexual assault at the Grammys. Roc Nation’s Meg Harkins and Interscope’s Karen Rait hit upon the idea to ask attendees to wear white roses—a symbol, they told The New York Times
19h
Ingeniøren
Selv en slukket mobil gør dig dårligere til dit arbejdeAmerikanske forskere har fundet frem til, at både smartphones uden strøm og mobiler på lydløs begrænser menneskets kognitive kapacitet. Det har derfor stor betydning, hvor du lægger din telefon, mens du arbejder.
19h
The Atlantic
Kendrick Lamar Opens the Grammys With RageThe dark heart of Kendrick Lamar’s Damn comes midway through “XXX,” when Lamar is given a chance to offer a message of peace—and declines. He raps about a friend of his whose only son was murdered and who then came to Lamar asking for Christian solace: “He was lookin’ for some closure / Hopin’ I could bring him closer to the spiritual.” Lamar’s reply is squarely Old Testament, preaching not forgi
21h
Futurity.org
Rising sea levels already altering tides in Chesapeake BayResearchers have found evidence that sea-level rise is already affecting high and low tides in both the Chesapeake and Delaware bays, two large estuaries of the eastern United States. The team combined a computer model with 100 years of observations to tease out the fact that global sea-level rise is increasing the tidal range, or the distance between the high and low tides, in many areas through
22h
Futurity.org
Backward wind on ‘hot Jupiter’ confuses astronomersAstronomers have discovered that the winds on a giant gaseous planet are blowing in an unexpected direction, presenting a mystery that could reshape what researchers understand about these types of planets. “Hot Jupiters” are distant planets that, like our Jupiter, are very large and gaseous. But unlike our Jupiter, they orbit their host stars very closely—closer than Mercury orbits our own sun.
22h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Menopause found to worsen symptoms of rheumatoid arthritisA recent study published in Rheumatology suggests that women with rheumatoid arthritis suffer a greater decline in physical function following menopause. After studying 8,189 women with rheumatoid arthritis, researchers found that pre-menopausal women experienced a slower physical decline than those that were post-menopausal.
23h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Parasite mimics human proteins to provide 'ready meals' from the gutGiardia parasites -- responsible for one of the world's most common gastric diseases -- mimic human cell functions to break apart cells in the gut and feed off them.The secret behind giardia's success has eluded scientists for more than 300 years.Researchers found that the parasite produces two types of protein that enable it to cut through layers of protective mucus in the gut, breaking the links
23h
Futurity.org
Opioids and these factors mix for ‘deaths of despair’The overprescribing of opioid-based painkillers may be the main, but not sole, driver of the increased abuse of opioids in rural America. Economists say that other factors, including declining farm income, extreme weather, and other natural disasters, may affect this crisis that is killing thousands of citizens and costing the country billions of dollars. In a study of relationships among socioec
23h

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