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Science | The Guardian
Super blue blood moon: where and when to see rare lunar eclipseBlue moon, super moon and blood moon will all coincide in 2018 for the first time since 1866 Share your ‘super blue blood moon’ photographs People from Moscow, via Sydney, to Washington DC will be given a rare celestial treat on Wednesday as three lunar phenomena coincide. Weather permitting, of course. A blue moon (a second full moon in a calendar month), a super moon (when the moon is unusually
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Popular Science
All the science that made it into the State of the UnionScience Topics included the opioid crisis, nuclear weapons, and "beautiful clean coal." Trump touched on his favorite topics, including tax reform, border control, and police heroism. He also touched on science.
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Augmented Reality helps surgeons to 'see through' tissue and reconnect blood vesselsUsing augmented reality in the operating theatre could help surgeons to improve the outcome of reconstructive surgery for patients.
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BBC News - Science & Environment
Super blue blood moon: Get ready for a rare celestial showA lunar eclipse, supermoon and blue moon are about to happen at once. Here's what you need to know.
14min
Ingeniøren
Nordea om blockchain: »Vi skal have et indblik i, hvor pengene kommer fra«Nordea ser stort potentiale i blockchain-teknologien, men mener at kryptovalutamarkedet er for ureguleret. Samtidigt står bankens kryptovalutaforbud meget alene på listen af ting, medarbejderne ikke må investere i.
24min
Science | The Guardian
Stronger cannabis linked to rise in demand for drug treatment programmesStudy drawing on data from the Netherlands is the first to show how admissions to treatment centres rise and fall in line with cannabis strength Researchers have found fresh evidence to suggest that more potent strains of cannabis are at least partly to blame for the number of people seeking help from drug treatment programmes. Scientists at King’s College London drew on data from the Netherlands
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Science | The Guardian
Folic acid: new research is a 'game-changer' in push to fortify British foodsStudy concludes there is no need for an upper limit on folate, removing a further barrier to mandatory fortification that would prevent birth defects Bread and flour should be fortified with folic acid in the UK to help prevent babies from being born with neural tube defects such as spina bifida , according to new research. A study by Queen Mary University of London and the School of Advanced Stu
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The Atlantic
Is Trump Preparing for War With North Korea?The more closely you read Donald Trump’s comments about North Korea in his State of the Union address, the more plausible it becomes that he is preparing for war. First, there’s the sheer emphasis he placed on the subject. In his speech, Trump devoted a mere sentence to Russia and China. He devoted 23 words to Israel, 34 to Afghanistan, and 48 to Iran. Even the war against ISIS, which Trump cites
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Small molecule plays a big role in reducing cancer's spreadOne small molecule that helps regulate gene expression plays a big role in keeping us safe from the machinations of cancer, scientists report. In human lung cancer cells, they have shown low levels of the microRNA, miR-125a-5p, which enables the death of aberrant cells like cancer cells, correlates with high levels of the protein TIMP-1, which is already associated with a poor prognosis in patient
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Dating partners more violent and account for more domestic violence than spousesMore than 80 percent of intimate partner violence reported to local police involves current and former boyfriends and girlfriends, according to research from Susan B. Sorenson of the University of Pennsylvania. That's much higher than married partners: Current and ex-spouses account for less than 15 percent and 4 percent, respectively.
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Living too far from advanced cardiac care decreases your odds of survivalA new study published in the Canadian Journal of Cardiology determined that patients with acute cardiac syndrome (ACS) and cardiogenic shock (CS), who live far from the only cardiac catheterization facility in Nova Scotia, Canada, have a survival rate about half that of patients with more direct access.
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New on MIT Technology Review
A fast-evolving new botnet could take gadgets in your home to the dark sideSatori is built to turn routers, thermostats, and other household devices into zombies.
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Ingeniøren
Byggeskandale kan koste københavnere 40-45 mio. kr.Kun 14 kommunale byggerier i København havde fugtsugende MgO-plader i facaden. Derfor ser skatteydernes regning oven på MgO-skandalen ud til at kunne ‘holdes nede’ på 40-45 mio. kr.
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The Atlantic
The State of the Union Is UnrecognizableThe strangest thing about watching President Donald Trump deliver a State of the Union address was how normal it seemed. Tuesday night, in his first State of the Union, the president offered a workmanlike speech that seemed worlds away from the tumultuous, gridlocked lived reality of American politics over the past year—and the likely reality in the year to come. Looking back to his speech to a j
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The Atlantic
The Transcript of Trump’s State of the Union AddressOn Tuesday night, President Trump delivered his first State of the Union address before a joint session of Congress. Here, a full transcript of the president’s remarks, as delivered. Mr. Speaker, Mr. Vice President, members of Congress, the first lady of the United States, and my fellow Americans: Less than one year has passed since I first stood at this podium, in this majestic chamber, to speak
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The Atlantic
16 Years of Presidents Talking About the War in AfghanistanPresident Trump said Tuesday the U.S. military would not be hamstrung by “artificial timelines” in Afghanistan, an acknowledgment of the deteriorating security situation there by a leader who previously called for a withdrawal of the American military from the country. “Our warriors in Afghanistan also have new rules of engagement,” Trump said in his State of the Union address. “Along with their
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Big Think
New conspiracy theories embroil the New England PatriotsThe New England Patriots are a magnet for conspiracy theories, spawning a new one right before the Super Bowl LII. Read More
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Big Think
E-cigs shown to be healthier than cigarettes—but still not healthyA new meta-analysis of over 800 studies shows that e-cigs are healthier than cigarettes. But the authors don't give them a clean bill of health. Read More
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Science | The Guardian
Hunky Tory? Attractive people more likely to be rightwing, study findsGood-looking people also get treated better and therefore feel the world is just and fair, leading to ‘blind spot’ when trying to understand hardships of others It is a finding unlikely to prove popular with Guardian readers, but a study has concluded that attractive people are more likely to be rightwing. Previous research has found that those who are good-looking are generally treated better, a
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
Bacterial diversity's shelf life longer than previously expectedScientists have published a study showing that bacterial diversity may stick around millions of years longer than previously thought.
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Popular Science
How to take a picture of the moon that doesn’t look like a tiny, white blobInstagram Feature PostsDIY Taking a good picture of our little satellite pal is harder than it seems, but a little prep makes a big difference. Get the best possible shot of the moon with a few photographic tips and a little preparation.
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BBC News - Science & Environment
Lobsters and crabs should not be boiled alive, say campaignersLobsters and crabs are sentient organisms that feel pain and need more protection, say campaigners.
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The Atlantic
The Atlantic Daily: When Trump Takes the PodiumWhat We’re Following Investigation Intrigue: The House Intelligence Committee voted Monday night to release a controversial memo, drafted by Republican staffers, alleging that Justice Department officials carried out surveillance abuses while investigating Russian involvement in the 2016 presidential election. Though the DOJ says releasing the memo would be reckless, President Trump supports the
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The Atlantic
Trump's First State of the UnionPresident Trump delivered his first State of the Union before a joint session of Congress on Tuesday night. These addresses are typically opportunities for American presidents to highlight their achievements and provide a vision for the country going forward. To that end, Trump pitched a framework for immigration reform that was released by the White House last week and touted his recent record o
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Upper limit for intake of folate is invalid -- government urged to fortify flour with folic acidThere is no need for an upper limit of folate intake, according to a study by Queen Mary University of London and the School of Advanced Study, University of London.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
For children with respiratory infections, antibiotics with narrower targets are betterWhen doctors prescribe antibiotics for children with common respiratory infections, a more selective approach is better. A study of 30,000 children with earaches, strep throat and other common infections found that narrow-spectrum antibiotics, which act against a smaller range of bacteria, had fewer adverse effects than broad-spectrum antibiotics, which target a broader variety of bacteria. For bo
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New on MIT Technology Review
US financial regulators are cracking down on shady cryptocurrency trading
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
UK chalk-stream salmon genetically uniqueSalmon from the chalk streams of southern England are genetically unique, researchers have discovered.
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Potential new target for reducing osteoporosis risk in menResearchers have identified a new regulator of vitamin D metabolism that could be targeted to reduce the risk of osteoporosis in men undergoing prostate cancer therapy, according to a study published in the Journal of Molecular Endocrinology. This study has identified a previously unknown link between male sex hormone levels and vitamin D that may have future therapeutic value for treating related
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Latest Headlines | Science News
A killer whale gives a raspberry and says ‘hello’Tests of imitating sounds finds that orcas can sort of mimic humans.
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Science | The Guardian
Orcas can imitate human speech, research revealsKiller whales able to copy words such as “hello” and “bye bye” as well as sounds from other orcas, study shows High-pitched, eerie and yet distinct, the sound of a voice calling the name “Amy” is unmistakable. But this isn’t a human cry – it’s the voice of a killer whale called Wikie. New research reveals that orcas are able to imitate human speech, in some cases at the first attempt, saying word
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Futurity.org
Theory: Mystery molecules in black hole winds were born thereMolecules found in winds powered by supermassive black holes at the centers of galaxies may be brand new, rather than older molecules somehow adapting to survive the inhospitable area, according to a new theory. The existence of large numbers of the molecules in black hole winds has puzzled astronomers since their discovery more than a decade ago. Molecules trace the coldest parts of space, and b
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Futurity.org
For better patient care, take care of nurses“Compassion practices”—relatively conventional organizational practices that reward and recognize caregiving work and include job-related resources to cope with stress and provide pastoral care—can have a positive effect on nurses’ work and well-being, a new study suggests. “We know there is a burnout epidemic among nurses.” Nursing is among the top 10 fastest-growing occupations in the United St
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Futurity.org
Would more reflective surfaces beat heat waves?Unploughed fields and brighter cities could help lower extreme temperatures during periods of hot weather, particularly in important agricultural regions and densely populated areas of Europe and North America, new research suggests. “Even this climate technique is no silver bullet…” Climate change will make heatwaves more common, and continental areas and urban regions that become significantly
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BBC News - Science & Environment
The killer whale that can say 'hello' and 'bye bye'A killer whale that can mimic words such as "hello" is thought to be the first of its kind to copy human speech.
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Science | The Guardian
Listen to killer whales mimicking human voices – audioOrcas have been heard mimicking human speech. A study found that when prompted the marine mammal could replicate the sounds. In some instances the animal can be heard sounding the words “hello” “Amy” and even blowing a raspberry. The research aims to understand how different pods of killer whale have distinct dialects Orcas can imitate human speech, research reveals Continue reading...
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Big Think
Can scientists agree on a code of ethics?Can scientists agree on a code of ethics? The World Economic Forum Young Scientists community just proposed a Code of Ethics, which was a topic of discussion at the recent World Economic Forum's meeting in Davos, Switzerland. Read More
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
UK chalk-stream salmon genetically uniqueSalmon from the chalk streams of southern England are genetically unique, researchers have discovered.
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Futurity.org
We share some spine-healing genes with lampreysMany of the same genes that lampreys have that allow for natural repair of injured spinal cords are also active in the repair of the peripheral nervous system in mammals, including humans, a new study indicates. The findings are consistent with the possibility that in the long term, the same or similar genes may be harnessed to improve spinal cord injury treatments in people. “We found a large ov
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Futurity.org
This 3D printing method makes a better noseCombining two different polymer forms allows 3D printing of complex geometries with better mechanical characteristics and better biological adhesion, according to research. That’s compared with manufacturing silicone parts from molding, casing, and spin coating of simple forms. “So far, PDMS (polydimethylsiloxane, or silicone) has limitations in formability and manufacturing of devices,” says Ibr
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Big Think
Why hiring the ‘best’ people produces the least creative resultsComplex problems undermine the very principle of meritocracy: the idea that the ‘best person’ should be hired. There is no best person. Read More
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Scientific American Content: Global
Wildfires Spike Wine with Smoky NotesChemists are working on ways for wildfire-affected winemakers to avoid creating smoky wines. Christopher Intagliata reports. -- Read more on ScientificAmerican.com
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Futurity.org
Contracts with landowners could prevent deforestationForest owners at greater risk of illegally cutting trees on their land prefer to join conservation programs that allow sustainable timber harvesting, a new study suggests. The findings could be used to craft conservation contracts that are more likely to be accepted by forest owners and might succeed in preventing deforestation and forest degradation. Ecuador contains approximately two percent of
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Futurity.org
Pricey heritage turkeys prefer these natural foodsTo meet increasing demand for heritage-breed turkeys, researchers in Penn State’s College of Agricultural Sciences are studying methods producers can use to raise the historical birds. Heritage turkeys have more in common with wild turkeys than the birds for sale in grocery stores. And while the average store-bought turkey costs about $1 per pound, heritage turkeys run between $4 and $6 per pound
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Unique research approach finds FDA-approved drug shuts down Ewing sarcoma cells in labBased on a novel approach to drug discovery, researchers at Georgetown Lombardi Comprehensive Cancer Center say an agent approved to treat a type of leukemia might also help young people with a much rarer and aggressive form of cancer, Ewing sarcoma.
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Popular Science
Google wants to use naked mole rats to conquer deathAnimals They're ugly as sin, but they could help us live longer. Naked mole rats have unusually long life spans in and out of the lab, but we don't know why—yet.
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Feed: All Latest
Cryptocurrency Scams Like Prodeum Are Just Straight-Up Trolling at This PointUS regulators and Facebook are finally coming for bogus ICOs.
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The Atlantic
The Atlantic Politics & Policy Daily: Going Up on a TuesdayToday in 5 Lines President Trump will deliver his first State of the Union address before a joint session of Congress at 9 p.m. ET. We’ll be covering the event live here . Amazon, Berkshire Hathaway, and JP Morgan announced plans to create a joint health-care company for their employees. The Federal Communications Commission said the employee who sent a false missile alert to Hawaiians on January
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Popular Science
What we know about Chronicle, Alphabet's mysterious new companyTechnology It focuses on cybersecurity and uses machine learning. Chronicle is an intriguing new player on the cybersecurity block. Here's what we know about how it could be using AI to fight cyber attacks.
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Live Science
It Looks Like the Flu, But Isn't: What Is Adenovirus?The flu isn't the only virus that could leave you feeling feverish and generally miserable this winter.
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Bringing water to the fountain of youthA new study of the European common frog, Rana temporaria, published in the advanced online edition of the journal Molecular Biology and Evolution, offers some fresh clues that challenge the conventional scientific wisdom on sex-chromosome evolution.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
Scientists identify brain region in mice that keeps the body from losing its balanceNew research reveals how a small part of the brain singlehandedly steadies the body if it is thrown off balance. The study in mice found that this region accomplishes this by moving muscles in a two-step response that first widens the animal's center of gravity, and then strengthens and stabilizes its limb muscles and joints. These findings offer insight into the mechanics of how animals stay upri
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Science : NPR
Wednesday's Rare Super Blue Blood Moon: How To See It And What We Can LearnEarly Wednesday morning, there's a lunar event that hasn't been seen since 1866. And scientists say data gathered during the event could help them figure out where to land a rover on the moon. (Image credit: Geert Vanden Wijngaert/AP)
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Planting a park on the Cross-Bronx expressway would save money and livesResearchers at Columbia University's Mailman School of Public Health explored the cost-effectiveness of placing a deck park on top of the Cross-Bronx Expressway, finding the plan would save money and lives. The results are published in the American Journal of Public Health.
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Complications of reconstruction surgery differ for transgender patientsThe risks of penile reconstruction surgery (phalloplasty) appear higher in female-to-male transgender (transmale) patients undergoing gender confirmation surgery, compared to native male (cismale) patients undergoing phalloplasty for other reasons, reports a study in the February issue of Plastic and Reconstructive Surgery®, the official medical journal of the American Society of Plastic Surgeons
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
How new evidence of sex reversals helps show how sex chromosomes are maintained over evolutionary timeWhen it comes to sex, frogs, just like in people, exhibit a similar XX (female) and XY (male) sex chromosome pattern of inheritance.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
Running away from carbon dioxide: The terminal connectionLike us, fish need oxygen, and swimming through a patch of carbon dioxide turns out not to be a pleasant experience. Instead, they prefer to avoid carbon dioxide altogether. Researchers have discovered a neuronal pathway that makes this behavior possible.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
Inappropriate antibiotic prescribing differs by patient age, insurance, raceA patient's age and race are associated with risk of receiving an unneeded antibiotic prescription for upper respiratory conditions caused by viruses, according to a new study. Additionally, the study found that advanced practice providers, such as nurse practitioners and physician assistants, are 15 percent more likely than physician providers to prescribe antibiotics to adults.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
Applying machine learning to the universe's mysteriesPhysicists have demonstrated that computers are ready to tackle the universe's greatest mysteries -- they used neural networks to perform a deep dive into data simulating the subatomic particle soup that may have existed just microseconds after the big bang.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
No definitive causal link between sunbed use and malignant melanomaA careful review of the currently available medical data shows that there is no proven causal relationship between moderate solarium use and increased melanoma risk.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
Pancreatic cancer: Gene duplication explains tumor aggressivenessPancreatic cancer is a form of cancer associated with the highest mortality rates in the world. Genetic changes that could explain his aggressiveness and early metastasis had not been found yet. A team has now shown that those characteristics can be explained by specific gene amplifications which occur along various evolutionary pathways of the cancer. Based on this discovery, they have derived ba
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Blog » Languages » English
Dig Sector 9 is complete!Aw yeah. Sector 9 of The Dig is complete as of 1/30/2018! In this sector we uncovered 144 cells, and as usual we are most pleased. To celebrate, we’re hosting a 144 minute Happy Hour tomorrow, 1/31, starting at 2:00 PM EST. Regular HH bonuses apply. Then we’ll be continuing along the top of the Dig grid, and who knows, perhaps Sector 10 will be done before spring. Celebraaaate!
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Big Think
Why smart men make better partnersIntelligence of the male partner affects the strength and longevity of the relationship, find researchers. Read More
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Direct-to-implant breast reconstruction provides good results in older womenFor older women undergoing mastectomy for breast cancer, direct-to-implant (DTI) breast reconstruction provides good outcomes in a single-step procedure, while avoiding some of the inconvenience and risks of staged approaches to breast reconstruction, reports a study in the February issue of Plastic and Reconstructive Surgery®, the official medical journal of the American Society of Plastic Surgeo
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
A crystal methodUCSB researchers unlock another piece of the puzzle that is crystal growth.
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Scientific American Content: Global
Bill Nye and the State of the UnionHis decision to attend the address as the guest of Trump's controversial NASA Administrator nominee, explained -- Read more on ScientificAmerican.com
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
An outdoor cat can damage your sustainability credIf you install solar panels on your roof and avoid dousing your lawn with chemicals and pesticides, your online peers may consider you to be environmentally friendly. But this street cred can all be erased if you let your cat roam around outdoors.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
Vitamin D3 could help heal or prevent cardiovascular damageA new study shows that Vitamin D3 could help restore damage to the cardiovascular system caused by diseases like hypertension and diabetes.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
Safeguarding children when sentencing mothersExperts are creating new resources, including films and briefings, to help criminal justice professionals improve their understanding of the impacts of maternal imprisonment. It is estimated that 17,000 children every year are affected by maternal imprisonment in England and Wales.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
Bacteria in milk and beef linked to rheumatoid arthritisA strain of bacteria commonly found in milk and beef may be a trigger for developing rheumatoid arthritis in people who are genetically at risk, according to a new study.
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
UM researchers: Bacterial diversity's shelf life longer than previously expectedUniversity of Montana scientists have published a study showing that bacterial diversity may stick around millions of years longer than previously thought.
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BBC News - Science & Environment
The make-up artist making designs with dead insectsJasmine Ahumada, from California, attaches spiders and bees to her face to create her distinctive looks.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
It's not how you play the game, but how the dice were madeOver time, dice used in playing games have changed in shape and size and evolved with considerations about fairness, chance and probability.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
Viruses prefer cultivated areas to natural areasCultivated areas are more affected by viral epidemics than non-cultivated areas.
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Quanta Magazine
Solution: ‘Triangulation and Motion Sickness’This month’s Insights puzzle was inspired by a new way to determine the value of the Hubble constant, which quantifies how rapidly the universe is expanding by measuring the distance to a pair of colliding neutron stars . This method opens up the possibility of significantly improving the accuracy of distance measurements to faraway astronomical objects. We recalled that, for centuries, surveyors
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Inside Science
Pulsating Stars Link Two Astronomers Across Almost a CenturyPulsating Stars Link Two Astronomers Across Almost a Century About 100 years ago Henrietta Swan Leavitt helped prove the existence of other galaxies. She is still inspiring astronomers today (infographic). leavittcomic_topnteaser.jpg Image credits: Abigail Malate, Staff Illustrator Rights information: Copyright American Institute of Physics ( reprinting information ) Space Tuesday, January 30, 20
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TED Talks Daily (SD video)
Could the social lives of fish help us save coral reefs? | Mike GilMike Gil spies on fish: using novel multi-camera systems and computer vision technology, the TED Fellow and his colleagues explore how coral reef fish behave, socialize and affect their ecosystems. Learn more about how fish of different species communicate via social networks -- and what disrupting these networks might mean to the delicate ecology of reefs, which help feed millions of us and suppo
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Latest Headlines | Science News
Babies’ kicks in the womb are good for their bonesA new study adds to the evidence that fetal workouts are important for strong bodies.
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The Atlantic
The Republican Party Turns Against the FBINot long ago, the standoff now consuming Washington would have been unthinkable. The Trump White House and Justice Department are sharply at odds over releasing a memo prepared by Representative Devin Nunes, alleging misconduct by the FBI and Justice Department. The president seems poised to approve the release of the document in order to seek his own vindication. The House Intelligence Committee
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BBC News - Science & Environment
RSPB Minsmere winter starling murmurationStarlings take to the skies to create a spectacular aerial ballet before settling on roost.
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New on MIT Technology Review
Chinese satellite uses quantum cryptography for secure video conference between continentsQuantum cryptography has never been possible over long distances. But the first quantum communications satellite is rewriting the record books.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
TBI is associated with increased dementia risk for decades after injuryTraumatic brain injuries increase the risk of a dementia diagnosis for more than 30 years after a trauma, though the risk of dementia decreases over time, according to a new study.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
Stellar embryos in nearby dwarf galaxy contain surprisingly complex organic moleculesThe nearby dwarf galaxy known as the Large Magellanic Cloud (LMC) is a chemically primitive place. Unlike the Milky Way, this semi-spiral collection of a few tens-of-billions of stars lacks our galaxy's rich abundance of heavy elements, like carbon, oxygen, and nitrogen. With such a dearth of heavy elements, astronomers predict that the LMC should contain a comparatively paltry amount of complex c
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
Stellar magnetism: What's behind the most brilliant lights in the sky?Space physicists have just released unprecedented detail on a bizarre phenomenon that powers the northern lights, solar flares and coronal mass ejections (the biggest explosions in our solar system).
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Big Think
Facebook bans bitcoin and other cryptocurrency ads in broad move to curb scamsFacebook Cryptocurrencies ICOsIn a move that will have far-reaching consequences for legitimate and illegitimate businesses alike, Facebook has effectively banned any and all Bitcoin advertising. Read More
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Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences current issue
Giving decision-makers nondiagnostic person information promotes trust within and across nations [Social Sciences]Humans trust others, enabling them to negotiate agreement and to create long-term bonds (1). However, because trusting others makes people vulnerable to exploitation, it is difficult to see how indiscriminate trust could have evolved (2–4). Romano et al. (2) suggest a solution to this conundrum. Fitting evolutionary theory (3, 4),...
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Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences current issue
Reply to De Dreu: Shared partner nationality promotes ingroup favoritism in cooperation [Social Sciences]In Romano et al. (1), we report an experimental study conducted across 17 societies that found that individuals gave more in the trust game to ingroup members (partner from own nationality), compared with outgroup members (partner from one of the other 16 nationalities) and strangers (partner with unknown nationality). This...
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Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences current issue
Influence of water and enzyme SpnF on the dynamics and energetics of the ambimodal [6+4]/[4+2] cycloaddition [Chemistry]SpnF is the first monofunctional Diels–Alder/[6+4]-ase that catalyzes a reaction leading to both Diels–Alder and [6+4] adducts through a single transition state. The environment-perturbed transition-state sampling method has been developed to calculate free energies, kinetic isotope effects, and quasi-classical reaction trajectories of enzyme-catalyzed reactions and the uncatalyzed reaction in wat
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Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences current issue
Structural basis of sterol recognition and nonvesicular transport by lipid transfer proteins anchored at membrane contact sites [Biochemistry]Membrane contact sites (MCSs) in eukaryotic cells are hotspots for lipid exchange, which is essential for many biological functions, including regulation of membrane properties and protein trafficking. Lipid transfer proteins anchored at membrane contact sites (LAMs) contain sterol-specific lipid transfer domains [StARkin domain (SD)] and multiple targeting modules to specific...
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Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences current issue
Molecular characterization of latent GDF8 reveals mechanisms of activation [Biochemistry]Growth/differentiation factor 8 (GDF8), or myostatin, negatively regulates muscle mass. GDF8 is held in a latent state through interactions with its N-terminal prodomain, much like TGF-β. Using a combination of small-angle X-ray scattering and mutagenesis, we characterized the interactions of GDF8 with its prodomain. Our results show that the prodomain:GDF8...
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Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences current issue
HELLS and CDCA7 comprise a bipartite nucleosome remodeling complex defective in ICF syndrome [Biochemistry]Mutations in CDCA7, the SNF2 family protein HELLS (LSH), or the DNA methyltransferase DNMT3b cause immunodeficiency–centromeric instability–facial anomalies (ICF) syndrome. While it has been speculated that DNA methylation defects cause this disease, little is known about the molecular function of CDCA7 and its functional relationship to HELLS and DNMT3b. Systematic...
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Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences current issue
Iterative optimization yields Mcl-1-targeting stapled peptides with selective cytotoxicity to Mcl-1-dependent cancer cells [Biochemistry]Bcl-2 family proteins regulate apoptosis, and aberrant interactions of overexpressed antiapoptotic family members such as Mcl-1 promote cell transformation, cancer survival, and resistance to chemotherapy. Discovering potent and selective Mcl-1 inhibitors that can relieve apoptotic blockades is thus a high priority for cancer research. An attractive strategy for disabling Mcl-1...
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Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences current issue
Crystal structure of the mammalian lipopolysaccharide detoxifier [Biochemistry]LPS is a potent bacterial endotoxin that triggers the innate immune system. Proper recognition of LPS by pattern-recognition receptors requires a full complement of typically six acyl chains in the lipid portion. Acyloxyacyl hydrolase (AOAH) is a host enzyme that removes secondary (acyloxyacyl-linked) fatty acids from LPS, rendering it immunologically...
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Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences current issue
Protein aggregation of the p63 transcription factor underlies severe skin fragility in AEC syndrome [Biochemistry]The p63 gene encodes a master regulator of epidermal commitment, development, and differentiation. Heterozygous mutations in the C-terminal domain of the p63 gene can cause ankyloblepharon-ectodermal defects-cleft lip/palate (AEC) syndrome, a life-threatening disorder characterized by skin fragility and severe, long-lasting skin erosions. Despite deep knowledge of p63 functions, little is...
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Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences current issue
Nonenzymatic release of N7-methylguanine channels repair of abasic sites into an AP endonuclease-independent pathway in Arabidopsis [Biochemistry]Abasic (apurinic/apyrimidinic, AP) sites in DNA arise from spontaneous base loss or by enzymatic removal during base excision repair. It is commonly accepted that both classes of AP site have analogous biochemical properties and are equivalent substrates for AP endonucleases and AP lyases, although the relative roles of these two...
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Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences current issue
Streamlined circular proximity ligation assay provides high stringency and compatibility with low-affinity antibodies [Biochemistry]Proximity ligation assay (PLA) is a powerful tool for quantitative detection of protein biomarkers in biological fluids and tissues. Here, we present the circular proximity ligation assay (c-PLA), a highly specific protein detection method that outperforms traditional PLA in stringency, ease of use, and compatibility with low-affinity reagents. In c-PLA,...
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Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences current issue
The Bardet-Biedl syndrome protein complex is an adapter expanding the cargo range of intraflagellar transport trains for ciliary export [Cell Biology]Bardet–Biedl syndrome (BBS) is a ciliopathy resulting from defects in the BBSome, a conserved protein complex. BBSome mutations affect ciliary membrane composition, impairing cilia-based signaling. The mechanism by which the BBSome regulates ciliary membrane content remains unknown. Chlamydomonas bbs mutants lack phototaxis and accumulate phospholipase D (PLD) in the ciliary...
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Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences current issue
Effect of beta-agonists on LAM progression and treatment [Cell Biology]Lymphangioleiomyomatosis (LAM), a rare disease of women, is associated with cystic lung destruction resulting from the proliferation of abnormal smooth muscle-like LAM cells with mutations in the tuberous sclerosis complex (TSC) genes TSC1 and/or TSC2. The mutant genes and encoded proteins are responsible for activation of the mechanistic target of...
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Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences current issue
Tumor suppressor APC is an attenuator of spindle-pulling forces during C. elegans asymmetric cell division [Developmental Biology]The adenomatous polyposis coli (APC) tumor suppressor has dual functions in Wnt/β-catenin signaling and accurate chromosome segregation and is frequently mutated in colorectal cancers. Although APC contributes to proper cell division, the underlying mechanisms remain poorly understood. Here we show that Caenorhabditis elegans APR-1/APC is an attenuator of the pulling...
10h
Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences current issue
Complement pathway gene activation and rising circulating immune complexes characterize early disease in HIV-associated tuberculosis [Immunology and Inflammation]The transition between latent and active tuberculosis (TB) occurs before symptom onset. Better understanding of the early events in subclinical disease will facilitate the development of diagnostics and interventions that improve TB control. This is particularly relevant in the context of HIV-1 coinfection where progression of TB is more likely....
10h
Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences current issue
Human airway branch variation and chronic obstructive pulmonary disease [Medical Sciences]Susceptibility to chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) beyond cigarette smoking is incompletely understood, although several genetic variants associated with COPD are known to regulate airway branch development. We demonstrate that in vivo central airway branch variants are present in 26.5% of the general population, are unchanged over 10 y, and...
10h
Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences current issue
PAR1 agonists stimulate APC-like endothelial cytoprotection and confer resistance to thromboinflammatory injury [Medical Sciences]Stimulation of protease-activated receptor 1 (PAR1) on endothelium by activated protein C (APC) is protective in several animal models of disease, and APC has been used clinically in severe sepsis and wound healing. Clinical use of APC, however, is limited by its immunogenicity and its anticoagulant activity. We show that...
10h
Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences current issue
HIF signaling in osteoblast-lineage cells promotes systemic breast cancer growth and metastasis in mice [Medical Sciences]Bone metastasis involves dynamic interplay between tumor cells and the local stromal environment. In bones, local hypoxia and activation of the hypoxia-inducible factor (HIF)-1α in osteoblasts are essential to maintain skeletal homeostasis. However, the role of osteoblast-specific HIF signaling in cancer metastasis is unknown. Here, we show that osteoprogenitor cells...
10h
Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences current issue
Identification of genes required for Mycobacterium abscessus growth in vivo with a prominent role of the ESX-4 locus [Microbiology]Mycobacterium abscessus, a rapidly growing mycobacterium (RGM) and an opportunistic human pathogen, is responsible for a wide spectrum of clinical manifestations ranging from pulmonary to skin and soft tissue infections. This intracellular organism can resist the bactericidal defense mechanisms of amoebae and macrophages, an ability that has not been observed...
10h
Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences current issue
MERS-CoV and H5N1 influenza virus antagonize antigen presentation by altering the epigenetic landscape [Microbiology]Convergent evolution dictates that diverse groups of viruses will target both similar and distinct host pathways to manipulate the immune response and improve infection. In this study, we sought to leverage this uneven viral antagonism to identify critical host factors that govern disease outcome. Utilizing a systems-based approach, we examined...
10h
Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences current issue
Neural preservation underlies speech improvement from auditory deprivation in young cochlear implant recipients [Neuroscience]Although cochlear implantation enables some children to attain age-appropriate speech and language development, communicative delays persist in others, and outcomes are quite variable and difficult to predict, even for children implanted early in life. To understand the neurobiological basis of this variability, we used presurgical neural morphological data obtained from...
10h
Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences current issue
Linked networks for learning and expressing location-specific threat [Neuroscience]Learning locations of danger within our environment is a vital adaptive ability whose neural bases are only partially understood. We examined fMRI brain activity while participants navigated a virtual environment in which flowers appeared and were “picked.” Picking flowers in the danger zone (one-half of the environment) predicted an electric...
10h
Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences current issue
Targeted knockout of a chemokine-like gene increases anxiety and fear responses [Neuroscience]Emotional responses, such as fear and anxiety, are fundamentally important behavioral phenomena with strong fitness components in most animal species. Anxiety-related disorders continue to represent a major unmet medical need in our society, mostly because we still do not fully understand the mechanisms of these diseases. Animal models may speed...
10h
Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences current issue
Single-cell transcriptomics of the developing lateral geniculate nucleus reveals insights into circuit assembly and refinement [Neuroscience]Coordinated changes in gene expression underlie the early patterning and cell-type specification of the central nervous system. However, much less is known about how such changes contribute to later stages of circuit assembly and refinement. In this study, we employ single-cell RNA sequencing to develop a detailed, whole-transcriptome resource of...
10h
Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences current issue
Detergent-extracted Volvox model exhibits an anterior-posterior gradient in flagellar Ca2+ sensitivity [Plant Biology]Volvox rousseletii is a multicellular spheroidal green alga containing ∼5,000 cells, each equipped with two flagella (cilia). This organism shows striking photobehavior without any known intercellular communication. To help understand how the behavior of flagella is regulated, we developed a method to extract the whole organism with detergent and reactivate...
10h
Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences current issue
Large-scale comparative epigenomics reveals hierarchical regulation of non-CG methylation in Arabidopsis [Plant Biology]Genome-wide characterization by next-generation sequencing has greatly improved our understanding of the landscape of epigenetic modifications. Since 2008, whole-genome bisulfite sequencing (WGBS) has become the gold standard for DNA methylation analysis, and a tremendous amount of WGBS data has been generated by the research community. However, the systematic comparison of...
10h
Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences current issue
Kinase-independent function of E-type cyclins in liver cancer [Genetics]E-type cyclins (cyclins E1 and E2) are components of the core cell cycle machinery and are overexpressed in many human tumor types. E cyclins are thought to drive tumor cell proliferation by activating the cyclin-dependent kinase 2 (CDK2). The cyclin E1 gene represents the site of recurrent integration of the...
10h
Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences current issue
Enhancer adoption caused by genomic insertion elicits interdigital Shh expression and syndactyly in mouse [Genetics]Acquisition of new cis-regulatory elements (CREs) can cause alteration of developmental gene regulation and may introduce morphological novelty in evolution. Although structural variation in the genome generated by chromosomal rearrangement is one possible source of new CREs, only a few examples are known, except for cases of retrotransposition. In this...
10h
Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences current issue
MAFA missense mutation causes familial insulinomatosis and diabetes mellitus [Genetics]The β-cell–enriched MAFA transcription factor plays a central role in regulating glucose-stimulated insulin secretion while also demonstrating oncogenic transformation potential in vitro. No disease-causing MAFA variants have been previously described. We investigated a large pedigree with autosomal dominant inheritance of diabetes mellitus or insulinomatosis, an adult-onset condition of recurrent
10h
Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences current issue
Thymic stromal lymphopoietin drives the development of IL-13+ Th2 cells [Immunology and Inflammation]T helper 2 (Th2) cells are pivotal in the development of allergy. Allergen exposure primes IL-4+ Th2 cells in lymph node, but production of effector cytokines including IL-5 and IL-13 is thought to require additional signals from antigen and the environment. Here we report that a substantial proportion of naive...
10h
Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences current issue
Heteromeric interactions regulate butyrophilin (BTN) and BTN-like molecules governing {gamma}{delta} T cell biology [Immunology and Inflammation]The long-held view that gamma delta (γδ) T cells in mice and humans are fundamentally dissimilar, as are γδ cells in blood and peripheral tissues, has been challenged by emerging evidence of the cells’ regulation by butyrophilin (BTN) and butyrophilin-like (BTNL) molecules. Thus, murine Btnl1 and the related gene, Skint1,...
10h
Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences current issue
Identification of thioredoxin-interacting protein (TXNIP) as a downstream target for IGF1 action [Medical Sciences]Laron syndrome (LS), or primary growth hormone (GH) insensitivity, is the best-characterized entity among the congenital insulin-like growth factor 1 (IGF1) deficiencies. Life-long exposure to minute endogenous IGF1 levels is linked to low stature as well as a number of endocrine and metabolic abnormalities. While elevated IGF1 is correlated with...
10h
Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences current issue
Molecular epidemiology reveals the role of war in the spread of HIV in Ukraine [Medical Sciences]Ukraine has one of the largest HIV epidemics in Europe, historically driven by people who inject drugs (PWID). The epidemic showed signs of stabilization in 2012, but the recent war in eastern Ukraine may be reigniting virus spread. We investigated the movement of HIV-infected people within Ukraine before and during...
10h
Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences current issue
Elevated d-2-hydroxyglutarate during colitis drives progression to colorectal cancer [Medical Sciences]d-2-hydroxyglutarate (D2HG) is produced in the tricarboxylic acid cycle and is quickly converted to α-ketoglutarate by d-2-hydroxyglutarate dehydrogenase (D2HGDH). In a mouse model of colitis-associated colon cancer (CAC), urine level of D2HG during colitis correlates positively with subsequent polyp counts and severity of dysplasia. The i.p. injection of D2HG results...
10h
Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences current issue
Infected erythrocytes expressing DC13 PfEMP1 differ from recombinant proteins in EPCR-binding function [Microbiology]Recent advances have identified a new paradigm for cerebral malaria pathogenesis in which endothelial protein C receptor (EPCR) is a major host receptor for sequestration of Plasmodium falciparum-infected erythrocytes (IEs) in the brain and other vital organs. The parasite adhesins that bind EPCR are members of the IE variant surface...
10h
Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences current issue
miRNA-mediated targeting of human cytomegalovirus reveals biological host and viral targets of IE2 [Microbiology]Human cytomegalovirus (HCMV) impacts more than one-half of the human population owing to its capacity to manipulate the cell and create latent reservoirs in the host. Despite an extensive understanding of HCMV biology during acute infection in fibroblasts, the molecular basis for latency in myeloid cells remains incomplete. This knowledge...
10h
Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences current issue
Ebola virus proteins NP, VP35, and VP24 are essential and sufficient to mediate nucleocapsid transport [Microbiology]The intracytoplasmic movement of nucleocapsids is a crucial step in the life cycle of enveloped viruses. Determination of the viral components necessary for viral nucleocapsid transport competency is complicated by the dynamic and complex nature of nucleocapsid assembly and the lack of appropriate model systems. Here, we established a live-cell...
10h
Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences current issue
Infectious virus in exhaled breath of symptomatic seasonal influenza cases from a college community [Microbiology]Little is known about the amount and infectiousness of influenza virus shed into exhaled breath. This contributes to uncertainty about the importance of airborne influenza transmission. We screened 355 symptomatic volunteers with acute respiratory illness and report 142 cases with confirmed influenza infection who provided 218 paired nasopharyngeal (NP) and...
10h
Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences current issue
Coding of episodic memory in the human hippocampus [Neuroscience]Neurocomputational models have long posited that episodic memories in the human hippocampus are represented by sparse, stimulus-specific neural codes. A concomitant proposal is that when sparse-distributed neural assemblies become active, they suppress the activity of competing neurons (neural sharpening). We investigated episodic memory coding in the hippocampus and amygdala by...
10h
Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences current issue
Repetitive aggressive encounters generate a long-lasting internal state in Drosophila melanogaster males [Neuroscience]Multiple studies have investigated the mechanisms of aggressive behavior in Drosophila; however, little is known about the effects of chronic fighting experience. Here, we investigated if repeated fighting encounters would induce an internal state that could affect the expression of subsequent behavior. We trained wild-type males to become winners or...
10h
Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences current issue
Learning to make external sensory stimulus predictions using internal correlations in populations of neurons [Neuroscience]To compensate for sensory processing delays, the visual system must make predictions to ensure timely and appropriate behaviors. Recent work has found predictive information about the stimulus in neural populations early in vision processing, starting in the retina. However, to utilize this information, cells downstream must be able to read...
10h
Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences current issue
Cell-type-specific role for nucleus accumbens neuroligin-2 in depression and stress susceptibility [Neuroscience]Behavioral coping strategies are critical for active resilience to stress and depression; here we describe a role for neuroligin-2 (NLGN-2) in the nucleus accumbens (NAc). Neuroligins (NLGN) are a family of neuronal postsynaptic cell adhesion proteins that are constituents of the excitatory and inhibitory synapse. Importantly, NLGN-3 and NLGN-4 mutations...
10h
Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences current issue
Laminar recordings in frontal cortex suggest distinct layers for maintenance and control of working memory [Neuroscience]All of the cerebral cortex has some degree of laminar organization. These different layers are composed of neurons with distinct connectivity patterns, embryonic origins, and molecular profiles. There are little data on the laminar specificity of cognitive functions in the frontal cortex, however. We recorded neuronal spiking/local field potentials (LFPs)...
10h
Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences current issue
Regulation of the stability of RGF1 receptor by the ubiquitin-specific proteases UBP12/UBP13 is critical for root meristem maintenance [Plant Biology]ROOT MERISTEM GROWTH FACTOR (RGF) 1 is an important peptide hormone that regulates root growth. Upon binding to its receptor, RGFR1, RGF1 regulates the expression of two transcription factors, PLETHORA 1 and 2 (PLT1/2), to influence root meristem development. Here, we show that the ubiquitin-specific proteases UBP12 and UBP13 are...
10h
Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences current issue
Robust prediction of individual creative ability from brain functional connectivity [Psychological and Cognitive Sciences]People’s ability to think creatively is a primary means of technological and cultural progress, yet the neural architecture of the highly creative brain remains largely undefined. Here, we employed a recently developed method in functional brain imaging analysis—connectome-based predictive modeling—to identify a brain network associated with high-creative ability, using functional...
10h
Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences current issue
Correction for Droog et al., Estrogen receptor {alpha} wields treatment-specific enhancers between morphologically similar endometrial tumors [Corrections]APPLIED BIOLOGICAL SCIENCES Correction for “Estrogen receptor α wields treatment-specific enhancers between morphologically similar endometrial tumors,” by Marjolein Droog, Ekaterina Nevedomskaya, Gwen M. Dackus, Renske Fles, Yongsoo Kim, Harry Hollema, Marian Mourits, Petra M. Nederlof, Hester H. van Boven, Sabine C. Linn, Flora E. van Leeuwen, Lodewyk F. A. Wessels,...
10h
Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences current issue
In This Issue [This Week in PNAS]Transition from blood feeding to nonbiting mosquitoes Pitcher plant mosquitoes hovering above a water-filled leaf. When mosquitoes feed on blood, they can spread pathogens, such as those responsible for malaria, West Nile virus, and Zika, but certain nonbiting species never take a blood meal. Identifying genes associated with blood feeding...
10h
Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences current issue
Q&As with Marsha I. Lester [QnAs]Evidence of Earth’s changing environment is abundant, from diminished polar ice caps to increased frequency of catastrophic storms. However, the chemical reactions in our atmosphere that can contribute to a changing climate are less well known. A physical chemist at the University of Pennsylvania who studies the troposphere, Marsha I....
10h
Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences current issue
Greening up the mountain [Ecology]The progression of key plant life-history events, such as spring leaf-out and flowering, along bioclimatic gradients in elevation and latitude is one of the more conspicuous patterns in nature, and, as such, it has served as a source of opportunity, industry, inspiration, and wonder for farmers, natural scientists, and artists...
10h
Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences current issue
Molecular pathways to nonbiting mosquitoes [Evolution]Mosquitoes are often referred to as the deadliest animals on Earth because of the devastating pathogens they are able to transmit when females bite and then feed on blood from human hosts (male mosquitoes don’t bite). In 2015 alone there were an estimated 212 million cases of malaria, resulting in...
10h
Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences current issue
Large genomic insertion at the Shh locus results in hammer toes through enhancer adoption [Genetics]Enhancers are cis-regulatory elements which control the expression of genes in a defined spatiotemporal pattern, enabling the normal morphogenesis of organs and structures during embryogenesis. Enhancers control their target genes independently of their orientation or distance through chromosomal looping and are thought to evolve through various mutational mechanisms (1). A...
10h
Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences current issue
Ultrafast imaging of cell elasticity with optical microelastography [Applied Biological Sciences]Elasticity is a fundamental cellular property that is related to the anatomy, functionality, and pathological state of cells and tissues. However, current techniques based on cell deformation, atomic force microscopy, or Brillouin scattering are rather slow and do not always accurately represent cell elasticity. Here, we have developed an alternative...
10h
Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences current issue
Rogue waves and large deviations in deep sea [Applied Mathematics]The appearance of rogue waves in deep sea is investigated by using the modified nonlinear Schrödinger (MNLS) equation in one spatial dimension with random initial conditions that are assumed to be normally distributed, with a spectrum approximating realistic conditions of a unidirectional sea state. It is shown that one can...
10h
Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences current issue
Supercritical CO2 uptake by nonswelling phyllosilicates [Applied Physical Sciences]Interactions between supercritical (sc) CO2 and minerals are important when CO2 is injected into geologic formations for storage and as working fluids for enhanced oil recovery, hydraulic fracturing, and geothermal energy extraction. It has previously been shown that at the elevated pressures and temperatures of the deep subsurface, scCO2 alters...
10h
Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences current issue
Electron mean-free-path filtering in Dirac material for improved thermoelectric performance [Applied Physical Sciences]Recent advancements in thermoelectric materials have largely benefited from various approaches, including band engineering and defect optimization, among which the nanostructuring technique presents a promising way to improve the thermoelectric figure of merit (zT) by means of reducing the characteristic length of the nanostructure, which relies on the belief that...
10h
Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences current issue
Strongly enhanced bacterial bioluminescence with the ilux operon for single-cell imaging [Applied Physical Sciences]Bioluminescence imaging of single cells is often complicated by the requirement of exogenous luciferins that can be poorly cell-permeable or produce high background signal. Bacterial bioluminescence is unique in that it uses reduced flavin mononucleotide as a luciferin, which is abundant in all cells, making this system purely genetically encodable...
10h
Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences current issue
Evidence for convergent evolution of SINE-directed Staufen-mediated mRNA decay [Biochemistry]Primate-specific Alu short interspersed elements (SINEs) as well as rodent-specific B and ID (B/ID) SINEs can promote Staufen-mediated decay (SMD) when present in mRNA 3′-untranslated regions (3′-UTRs). The transposable nature of SINEs, their presence in long noncoding RNAs, their interactions with Staufen, and their rapid divergence in different evolutionary lineages...
10h
Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences current issue
Pyridoxal-5'-phosphate as an oxygenase cofactor: Discovery of a carboxamide-forming, {alpha}-amino acid monooxygenase-decarboxylase [Biochemistry]Capuramycins are antimycobacterial antibiotics that consist of a modified nucleoside named uridine-5′-carboxamide (CarU). Previous biochemical studies have revealed that CarU is derived from UMP, which is first converted to uridine-5′-aldehyde in a reaction catalyzed by the dioxygenase CapA and subsequently to 5′-C-glycyluridine (GlyU), an unusual β–hydroxy-α-amino acid, in a reaction...
10h
Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences current issue
DNA synthesis from diphosphate substrates by DNA polymerases [Biochemistry]The activity of DNA polymerase underlies numerous biotechnologies, cell division, and therapeutics, yet the enzyme remains incompletely understood. We demonstrate that both thermostable and mesophilic DNA polymerases readily utilize deoxyribonucleoside diphosphates (dNDPs) for DNA synthesis and inorganic phosphate for the reverse reaction, that is, phosphorolysis of DNA. For Taq DNA...
10h
Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences current issue
Probabilistic switching circuits in DNA [Biophysics and Computational Biology]A natural feature of molecular systems is their inherent stochastic behavior. A fundamental challenge related to the programming of molecular information processing systems is to develop a circuit architecture that controls the stochastic states of individual molecular events. Here we present a systematic implementation of probabilistic switching circuits, using DNA...
10h
Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences current issue
Global spectral clustering in dynamic networks [Biophysics and Computational Biology]Community detection is challenging when the network structure is estimated with uncertainty. Dynamic networks present additional challenges but also add information across time periods. We propose a global community detection method, persistent communities by eigenvector smoothing (PisCES), that combines information across a series of networks, longitudinally, to strengthen the inference...
10h
Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences current issue
Role of boundary conditions in determining cell alignment in response to stretch [Biophysics and Computational Biology]The ability of cells to orient in response to mechanical stimuli is essential to embryonic development, cell migration, mechanotransduction, and other critical physiologic functions in a range of organs. Endothelial cells, fibroblasts, mesenchymal stem cells, and osteoblasts all orient perpendicular to an applied cyclic stretch when plated on stretchable elastic...
10h
Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences current issue
Mechanogenetics for the remote and noninvasive control of cancer immunotherapy [Cell Biology]While cell-based immunotherapy, especially chimeric antigen receptor (CAR)-expressing T cells, is becoming a paradigm-shifting therapeutic approach for cancer treatment, there is a lack of general methods to remotely and noninvasively regulate genetics in live mammalian cells and animals for cancer immunotherapy within confined local tissue space. To address this limitation,...
10h
Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences current issue
Degradation of FBXO31 by APC/C is regulated by AKT- and ATM-mediated phosphorylation [Cell Biology]The F-box protein FBXO31 is a tumor suppressor that is encoded in 16q24.3, for which there is loss of heterozygosity in various solid tumors. FBXO31 serves as the substrate-recognition component of the SKP/Cullin/F-box protein class of E3 ubiquitin ligases and has been shown to direct degradation of pivotal cell-cycle regulatory...
10h
Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences current issue
Artificial intelligence exploration of unstable protocells leads to predictable properties and discovery of collective behavior [Chemistry]Protocell models are used to investigate how cells might have first assembled on Earth. Some, like oil-in-water droplets, can be seemingly simple models, while able to exhibit complex and unpredictable behaviors. How such simple oil-in-water systems can come together to yield complex and life-like behaviors remains a key question. Herein,...
10h
Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences current issue
Uncovering the role of the East Asian jet stream and heterogeneities in atmospheric rivers affecting the western United States [Earth, Atmospheric, and Planetary Sciences]Atmospheric rivers (ARs) exert major socioeconomic repercussions along the US West Coast by inducing heavy rainfall, flooding, strong winds, and storm surge. Despite the significant societal and economic repercussions of these storms, our understanding of the physical drivers responsible for their interannual variability is limited, with different climate modes identified...
10h
Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences current issue
Pulsating dissolution of crystalline matter [Earth, Atmospheric, and Planetary Sciences]Fluid–solid reactions result in material flux from or to the solid surface. The prediction of the flux, its variations, and changes with time are of interest to a wide array of disciplines, ranging from the material and earth sciences to pharmaceutical sciences. Reaction rate maps that are derived from sequences...
10h
Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences current issue
Global warming leads to more uniform spring phenology across elevations [Ecology]One hundred years ago, Andrew D. Hopkins estimated the progressive delay in tree leaf-out with increasing latitude, longitude, and elevation, referred to as “Hopkins’ bioclimatic law.” What if global warming is altering this well-known law? Here, based on ∼20,000 observations of the leaf-out date of four common temperate tree species...
10h
Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences current issue
Communication in context: Interpreting promises in an experiment on competition and trust [Economic Sciences]How much do people lie, and how much do people trust communication when lying is possible? An important step toward answering these questions is understanding how communication is interpreted. This paper establishes in a canonical experiment that competition can alter the shared communication code: the commonly understood meaning of messages....
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Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences current issue
Biodegradable Piezoelectric Force Sensor [Engineering]Measuring vital physiological pressures is important for monitoring health status, preventing the buildup of dangerous internal forces in impaired organs, and enabling novel approaches of using mechanical stimulation for tissue regeneration. Pressure sensors are often required to be implanted and directly integrated with native soft biological systems. Therefore, the devices...
10h
Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences current issue
Cooperation, clustering, and assortative mixing in dynamic networks [Evolution]Humans’ propensity to cooperate is driven by our embeddedness in social networks. A key mechanism through which networks promote cooperation is clustering. Within clusters, conditional cooperators are insulated from exploitation by noncooperators, allowing them to reap the benefits of cooperation. Dynamic networks, where ties can be shed and new ties...
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Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences current issue
Evolutionary transition from blood feeding to obligate nonbiting in a mosquito [Evolution]The spread of blood-borne pathogens by mosquitoes relies on their taking a blood meal; if there is no bite, there is no disease transmission. Although many species of mosquitoes never take a blood meal, identifying genes that distinguish blood feeding from obligate nonbiting is hampered by the fact that these...
10h
Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences current issue
Science and Culture: Cancer researcher looks to artists for inspiration [Medical Sciences]By day, Dhruba Deb studies lung cancer. A postdoctoral researcher at the UT Southwestern Medical Center in Dallas, Deb puzzles over disease-causing genes and the scores of signaling pathways in which they act. Searching through this sea of data, he often has trouble deciding where to focus or how to...
10h
Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences current issue
The role of obesity in exceptionally slow US mortality improvement [Medical Sciences]Recent studies have described a reduction in the rate of improvement in American mortality. The pace of improvement is also slow by international standards. This paper attempts to identify the extent to which rising body mass index (BMI) is responsible for reductions in the rate of mortality improvement in the...
10h
Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences current issue
Origins of low-symmetry phases in asymmetric diblock copolymer melts [Physics]Cooling disordered compositionally asymmetric diblock copolymers leads to the formation of nearly spherical particles, each containing hundreds of molecules, which crystallize upon cooling below the order–disorder transition temperature (TODT). Self-consistent field theory (SCFT) reveals that dispersity in the block degrees of polymerization stabilizes various Frank–Kasper phases, including the C1
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Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences current issue
Emergent chirality in the electric polarization texture of titanate superlattices [Physics]Chirality is a geometrical property by which an object is not superimposable onto its mirror image, thereby imparting a handedness. Chirality determines many important properties in nature—from the strength of the weak interactions according to the electroweak theory in particle physics to the binding of enzymes with naturally occurring amino...
10h
Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences current issue
Topological transformations of Hopf solitons in chiral ferromagnets and liquid crystals [Physics]Liquid crystals are widely known for their facile responses to external fields, which forms a basis of the modern information display technology. However, switching of molecular alignment field configurations typically involves topologically trivial structures, although singular line and point defects often appear as short-lived transient states. Here, we demonstrate electric...
10h
Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences current issue
A randomized controlled design reveals barriers to citizenship for low-income immigrants [Political Sciences]Citizenship endows legal protections and is associated with economic and social gains for immigrants and their communities. In the United States, however, naturalization rates are relatively low. Yet we lack reliable knowledge as to what constrains immigrants from applying. Drawing on data from a public/private naturalization program in New York,...
10h
Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences current issue
Flexibility of thought in high creative individuals represented by percolation analysis [Psychological and Cognitive Sciences]Flexibility of thought is theorized to play a critical role in the ability of high creative individuals to generate novel and innovative ideas. However, this has been examined only through indirect behavioral measures. Here we use network percolation analysis (removal of links in a network whose strength is below an...
10h
Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences current issue
Local policy proposals can bridge Latino and (most) white Americans’ response to immigration [Psychological and Cognitive Sciences]In the past 15 years, the adoption of subnational immigration policies in the United States, such as those established by individual states, has gone from nearly zero to over 300 per year. These include welcoming policies aimed at attracting and incorporating immigrants, as well as unwelcoming policies directed at denying...
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Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences current issue
Inner Workings: Smart-sensor network keeps close eye on lake ecosystem [Sustainability Science]New York’s Lake George may be the most high-tech lake in the world. By year’s end, a network of 41 sensor platforms will monitor the 32-mile long body of water. Its tributary stations and vertical profilers measure the chemical and physical properties of water at varying depths. Acoustic sensors measure...
10h
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Why Tether's Collapse Would Be Bad for CryptocurrenciesTether, a so-called "stablecoin," is in trouble. Its collapse could trigger a crypto version of a bank run, potentially toppling exchanges and cratering the price of bitcoin and other cryptocurrencies
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Truck damages Peru's ancient Nazca linesPeru's ancient Nazca lines were damaged when a driver accidentally plowed his cargo truck into the fragile archaeological site in the desert, officials said Tuesday.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Stellar magnetism: What's behind the most brilliant lights in the sky?Space physicists at University of Wisconsin-Madison have just released unprecedented detail on a bizarre phenomenon that powers the northern lights, solar flares and coronal mass ejections (the biggest explosions in our solar system).
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Live Science
Why Does the Moon Turn Red During a Total Lunar Eclipse?During the so-called Super Blue Blood Moon lunar eclipse, the face of the moon will turn a brick-red hue. Here's why.
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Science : NPR
EPA Chief Worried Trump Would Be 'Abusive To The Constitution'In comments to a Tulsa radio host in February 2016, then-Oklahoma Attorney General Scott Pruitt said he feared President Trump would use executive orders unconstitutionally if he were elected. (Image credit: Pablo Martinez Monsivais/AP)
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Stellar magnetism: What's behind the most brilliant lights in the sky?Space physicists at University of Wisconsin-Madison have just released unprecedented detail on a bizarre phenomenon that powers the northern lights, solar flares and coronal mass ejections (the biggest explosions in our solar system).
10h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News
For children with respiratory infections, antibiotics with narrower targets are betterWhen doctors prescribe antibiotics for children with common respiratory infections, a more selective approach is better. A study of 30,000 children with earaches, strep throat and other common infections found that narrow-spectrum antibiotics, which act against a smaller range of bacteria, had fewer adverse effects than broad-spectrum antibiotics, which target a broader variety of bacteria. For bo
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Popular Science
China might be winning the CRISPR race, but we have the FDAHealth Without the FDA, we wouldn't know if a drug was safe or effective The FDA is an arduous process, but it's also really important.
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Can Our Phones Save Us From Our Phones?Instagram Feature PostsMobile apps and internet interfaces can make us distractible. But digital tools could also counteract those bad habits.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
NASA's small spacecraft produces first 883-gigahertz global ice-cloud mapA bread loaf-sized satellite has produced the world's first map of the global distribution of atmospheric ice in the 883-Gigahertz band, an important frequency in the submillimeter wavelength for studying cloud ice and its effect on Earth's climate.
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The Atlantic
Photos From a Slowly Modernizing BhutanThe Kingdom of Bhutan, nestled between China and India, is a deeply traditional nation, and has been slow to adopt modern development. A country-wide ban on television and the internet was only lifted in 1999, and only after the previous king abdicated power in 2006 did the nation have its first parliamentary elections. Today, some aspects of the 21st century, like mobile phones, are becoming pre
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The Atlantic
Astrologer Who Coined the Term 'Supermoon' Is 'Delighted' Everyone Uses It“A super blue blood moon eclipse is coming .” “Something the United States hasn’t seen since 1866 .” “Watch the moon turn blood-red in the sky.” Reading some headlines this week, you might think the world is headed for some kind of apocalyptic event. What on Earth, er, what on the moon is a “super blue blood moon”? The super blue blood moon is, in short, a really cool celestial event, a mix of ph
11h
The Atlantic
The Link Between Opioid Overdoses and Amnesia Is Only Getting StrongerJust over five years ago, a man suffering from amnesia following a suspected drug overdose appeared at Lahey Hospital and Medical Center in Burlington, Massachusetts, a Boston suburb. He was 22, and had injected what he believed to be heroin. When he woke up the next morning, he was extremely confused, repeatedly asking the same questions and telling the same stories. Doctors at Lahey quickly dia
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The Atlantic
The Eerie Horrors of The Perfect NannyIn late 2012, news broke around the world that a nanny on the Upper West Side of Manhattan was accused of fatally stabbing two young children in her care. Paris Match deemed the perpetrator of this “inexplicable” act “ la nounou de l’horreur ”—the nanny of horror. As the children bled in the bathtub, reports said, the nanny—who was so close with her well-to-do employers that they had earlier that
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
Benefits of smoking cessation medications diminish over timeA new study finds that only eight out of 100 smokers who take smoking cessation medications will have benefited from taking smoking medications after one year's time.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
Language is learned in brain circuits that predate humansIt has often been claimed that humans learn language using brain components that are specifically dedicated to this purpose. Now, new evidence strongly suggests that language is in fact learned in brain systems that are also used for many other purposes and even pre-existed humans.
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Stellar embryos in nearby dwarf galaxy contain surprisingly complex organic moleculesNew observations ALMA have uncovered the surprisingly clear chemical 'fingerprints' of the complex organic molecules methanol, dimethyl ether, and methyl formate. Though previous observations found hints of methanol in the LMC, the latter two are unprecedented findings and stand as the most complex molecules ever conclusively detected outside of our galaxy.
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
TBI is associated with increased dementia risk for decades after injuryTraumatic brain injuries increase the risk of a dementia diagnosis for more than 30 years after a trauma, though the risk of dementia decreases over time, according to a new study published this week in PLOS Medicine by Anna Nordström and Peter Nordström of Umeå University in Sweden.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Stellar embryos in nearby dwarf galaxy contain surprisingly complex organic moleculesThe nearby dwarf galaxy known as the Large Magellanic Cloud (LMC) is a chemically primitive place.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Tesla seeks its own Wisconsin dealerships to teach customersTesla officials pressed Wisconsin legislators Tuesday to let them to establish their own dealerships in the state, saying the company needs direct contact with customers to teach them about the electric vehicles' technology.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
It's not how you play the game, but how the dice were madeWhether at a casino playing craps or engaging with family in a simple board game at home, rolling the dice introduces a bit of chance or "luck" into every game. We expect dice to be fair, where every number has equal probability of being rolled.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
An outdoor cat can damage your sustainability credIf you install solar panels on your roof and avoid dousing your lawn with chemicals and pesticides, your online peers may consider you to be environmentally friendly. But this street cred can all be erased if you let your cat roam around outdoors.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
The fight against tooth decay gets help with a new smart materialWhen patients go to the dentist to fill a cavity, they're trying to solve a problem -- not create a new one. But many dental patients get some bad news: bacteria can dig under their tooth-colored fillings and cause new cavities, called recurrent caries. U of T researchers designed a novel solution: a filling material with tiny particles containing antimicrobial drugs, designed to stop bacteria in
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
Specific bacteria may change the cervix of a pregnant woman and lead to preterm birthNew findings demonstrate that the byproducts of certain bacteria induce cervical changes which may lead to preterm birth.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
E-cigarette flavors are toxic to white blood cells, warn scientistsA new study adds to growing evidence on the harmful health effects of e-cigarettes. The study finds that exposure to commonly used e-cigarette flavoring chemicals and liquids can cause significant inflammation to monocytes, a type of white blood cell. Moreover, many flavoring compounds are toxic, with cinnamon, vanilla and buttery flavors among the worst. It also finds that mixing e-cigarette flav
11h
Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
New computational method reveals chemoresistance drug targetsThe methylation of deoxycytosine to form 5-methylcytosine (5mC) is an important feature of cancer. Extensive DNA methylation and transcription analyses have provided large quantities of data, but it is challenging to identify critical genes related to cancer development from these data. Researchers in Japan have developed a new mathematical method to extract appropriate information from the data,
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
UK regional weather forecasts could be improved using jet stream dataWeather forecasters could be able to better predict regional rainfall and temperatures by using North Atlantic jet stream data, according to new research. Climate scientists examined the relationship between changes in North Atlantic atmospheric circulation -- or jet stream -- and UK regional weather variations during summer and winter months over the past 65 years, and found that the jet stream c
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
Long-term opioid use has dropped among US military veteransA new study in the Journal of General Internal Medicine, published by Springer, shows that opioid prescribing has dropped after a peak in 2012. Lead author Katherine Hadlandsmyth of the Iowa City VA Healthcare System and the University of Iowa in the US further noted that the decline was mostly due to decreases in long-term opioid prescribing, which carries much greater risk for harmful side effec
11h
Big Think
Jeff Bezos, Jamie Dimon, and Warren Buffett unite to disrupt healthcare's profit motiveAmazon Healthcare JPMorgan ChaseThe three behemoth companies are teaming up to disrupt the U.S. health care industry, a move that spooked the markets on the morning of the announcement. Read More
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Ohio University study shows Vitamin D3 could help heal or prevent cardiovascular damageOhio University study shows that Vitamin D3 could help restore damage to the cardiovascular system caused by diseases like hypertension and diabetes.
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
It's not how you play the game, but how the dice were madeOver time, dice used in playing games have changed in shape and size and evolved with considerations about fairness, chance and probability.
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
An outdoor cat can damage your sustainability credIf you install solar panels on your roof and avoid dousing your lawn with chemicals and pesticides, your online peers may consider you to be environmentally friendly. But this street cred can all be erased if you let your cat roam around outdoors.
11h
The Atlantic
African Deportations Are Creating a Religious Controversy in IsraelTEL AVIV—Around 9:30 p.m. on a recent weekday night, four men sat waiting on the sidewalk outside Israel’s Population and Immigration Authority office. In a broken mix of Hebrew, English, and Arabic, they told me they were waiting for it to open so they could turn in their applications for refugee status—the next morning. According to local activists, the office only processes a handful of these
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Viden
Lyserød, æggeformet eller to solopgange: Besøg 5 sære planeterRumteleskopet Kepler har fundet flere tusinde planeter uden for vores eget solsystem - nogle mere bizarre end andre.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
Customizable, fabric-like power source for wearable electronicsScientists have created a customizable, fabric-like power source that can be cut, folded or stretched without losing its function. Being highly stretchable, these flexible power sources are promising next-generation 'fabric' energy storage devices that could be integrated into wearable electronics.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
Patient exposure to X-rays depends on how dentists are paidDentists’ calculation of the benefits vs the risks of X-rays is being distorted by financial incentives.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
Giant earthquakes: Not as random as thoughtBy analyzing sediment cores from Chilean lakes, an international team of scientists discovered that giant earthquakes reoccur with relatively regular intervals. When also taking into account smaller earthquakes, the repeat interval becomes increasingly more irregular to a level where earthquakes happen randomly in time.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
Study proves ‘muscle memory’ exists at a DNA levelA study has shown for the first time that human muscles possess a ‘memory’ of earlier growth - at the DNA level.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
Northern European population history revealed by ancient human genomesScientists analyzed ancient human genomes from 38 northern Europeans dating from approximately 7,500 to 500 BCE. The study found that Scandinavia was initially settled via a southern and a northern route and that the arrival of agriculture in northern Europe was facilitated by movements of farmers and pastoralists into the region.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
Breastfeeding reduces hypertension riskA new study indicates that women who breastfeed more children, and for longer periods of time, are less likely to suffer from hypertension after they reach menopause. This is less true of obese women, however.
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Live Science
How to Watch the Super Blue Blood Moon Lunar EclipseA whole bunch of lunar stuff is happening this Wednesday. Don't miss it.
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The Atlantic
The Ancient Origins of DietingDiet dreams are splashed across magazine covers and blare from the TV, offering tips and tricks, that will, readers and viewers are promised, make weight loss easy and fast. Diet books making similar claims can be found at the top of the best-seller list without fail, every January. But where does this obsession with losing weight to reach some kind of idealized body type come from? How long have
12h
New on MIT Technology Review
Russia’s startup-style approach to cyberwarfare is why it’s so good at fake news
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
Research finds early childhood program linked to degree completion at age 35Participating in an intensive early childhood education program from preschool to third grade is linked to higher educational attainment in mid-life, according to a new study.
12h
Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
Newborns or survivors? The unexpected matter found in hostile black hole windsThe existence of large numbers of molecules in winds powered by supermassive black holes at the centers of galaxies has puzzled astronomers since they were discovered more than a decade ago. Molecules trace the coldest parts of space, and black holes are the most energetic phenomena in the universe, so finding molecules in black hole winds was like discovering ice in a furnace. A new theory predic
12h
Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
Your brain reveals who your friends areYou may perceive the world the way your friends do, according to a new study finding that friends have similar neural responses to real-world stimuli and these similarities can be used to predict who your friends are.
12h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Viruses prefer cultivated areas to natural areasCultivated areas are more affected by viral epidemics than non-cultivated areas. This is the finding of an international study carried out as part of a France-South Africa collaboration in floristic areas from the Western Cape and Camargue regions. These results were published in January 2018 in The ISME Journal, a journal of microbial ecology.
12h
The Atlantic
Amazon, Berkshire Hathaway, and JPMorgan Are Going to Fix Health Care—SomehowAmazon JPMorgan Chase HealthAmazon, JPMorgan Chase, and Berkshire Hathaway announced on Tuesday that they intend to form a new company that manages health care for their hundreds of thousands of U.S. employees, the idea being that a unified, not-for-profit entity can reduce workers’ expenses. The surprising trio of the nation’s largest online retailer, largest bank by assets, and most famous investor (Warren Buffett, the ch
12h
Quanta Magazine
In Birds’ Songs, Brains and Genes, He Finds Clues to SpeechWhen Erich Jarvis, a neuroscientist at the Rockefeller University in New York, won the Ernest Everett Just Award from the American Society for Cell Biology in 2015, he wrote an essay describing the path that led him there, “ Surviving as an Underrepresented Minority Scientist in a Majority Environment .” “I believe the evidence will show that the science we conduct and discoveries we make are inf
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
This is your brain: This is your brain outdoorsThe brain acts much differently when we're outdoors compared to when we're inside the lab, a new study has found.
12h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Declining species of shark added to endangered species listThe federal government says the oceanic whitetip shark will be listed as threatened under the Endangered Species Act to help the species recover.
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Viden
Jorden og Månen hænger sammen som glasur og kageScroll en tur gennem Månens faser og bliv klogere på vores nære, kosmiske partner.
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Big Think
How stem cell treatment might replace root canalsFor people who really don’t want to get those wonderfully torturous root canals anymore, there’s a new breakthrough involving stem cells that could eliminate the need for them entirely. Read More
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
Blood vessels-on-a-chip show anti-cancer drug effects in human cellsResearchers report new organ-on-a-chip technology to observe sprouting angiogenesis from a single blood vessel. VEGF stimulated new capillaries from the single vessel by activating NOTCH signaling, recapitulating biochemical events of the human angiogenesis. The chip also confirmed the effects of two FDA-approved anti-angiogenic drugs, demonstrating its applicability to drug discovery.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
NASA sees powerful storms around Cebile's EyeWhen NASA's Aqua satellite passed over Tropical Cyclone Cebile it measured cloud top temperatures and saw its eye circled by an impressive ring of powerful thunderstorms just before it went through eyewall replacement.
12h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
GPM satellite analyzes Tropical Cyclone Fehi's rainfallThe Global Precipitation Measurement mission or GPM core satellite passed over Tropical Cyclone Fehi in the Southern Pacific Ocean season and identified heavy rainfall in the system.
12h
Big Think
For the first time ever, Facebook has revealed its privacy guidelinesFacebook News FeedNew privacy tools and transparency are all part of continuing changes to the largest social network in the world. Read More
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Newborns or survivors? The unexpected matter found in hostile black hole windsThe existence of large numbers of molecules in winds powered by supermassive black holes at the centers of galaxies has puzzled astronomers since they were discovered more than a decade ago. Molecules trace the coldest parts of space, and black holes are the most energetic phenomena in the universe, so finding molecules in black hole winds was like discovering ice in a furnace.
12h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News
NASA sees powerful storms around Cebile's EyeWhen NASA's Aqua satellite passed over Tropical Cyclone Cebile it measured cloud top temperatures and saw its eye circled by an impressive ring of powerful thunderstorms just before it went through eyewall replacement.
12h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News
GPM satellite analyzes Tropical Cyclone Fehi's rainfallThe Global Precipitation Measurement mission or GPM core satellite passed over Tropical Cyclone Fehi in the Southern Pacific Ocean season and identified heavy rainfall in the system.
12h
Live Science
Meet Erica, Japan's Next Robot News AnchorThis uncanny android has a job — and some say "a soul."
13h
The Atlantic
When Nuclear Deterrence Is Your JobIt was once my job to help protect the United States from a nuclear attack. From 2009 to 2012, I was stationed at Tinker Air Force Base in Oklahoma City, serving as a flight officer aboard the E-6B Mercury. The plane can act as an airborne command post in case of a nuclear attack, and its crew members can relay orders to launch nuclear weapons. Our mission was nuclear deterrence—preventing a stat
13h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Urban foxes and coyotes learn to set aside their differences and coexistDiverging from centuries of established behavioral norms, red fox and coyote have gone against their wild instincts and learned to coexist in the urban environment of Madison and the University of Wisconsin-Madison campus, according to a recently published study in the journal PLOS One.
13h
Live Science
Brain 'Pacemaker' for Alzheimer's Shows Promise In Slowing DeclineImplanting a pacemaker-like device in the brains of people with Alzheimer's disease could help slow the decline of decision-making and problem-solving skills.
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NYT > Science
Scott Pruitt, the E.P.A. Chief, Assailed Trump in a 2016 InterviewSpeaking on a radio show in 2016, Mr. Pruitt said that Donald Trump, if elected, would act in a way that is “truly unconstitutional.”
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NYT > Science
Volkswagen Suspends Top Lobbyist Amid Inquiry Into Diesel Tests on MonkeysThomas Steg, a former top aide to Chancellor Angela Merkel of Germany, exemplified what critics say are the cozy ties between her government and the country’s carmakers.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Microcapsules gain a new power—scavenging reactive oxygen speciesStable, biocompatible microcapsules from the lab of Eugenia Kharlampieva, Ph.D., have gained a new power—the ability to scavenge reactive oxygen species.
13h
New on MIT Technology Review
This autonomous van could move lots of goods—but not a single person
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Scientific American Content: Global
Bill Nye Does Not Speak for Us and He Does Not Speak for ScienceBy attending the State of the Union with NASA administrator nominee Jim Bridenstine, the Science Guy tacitly endorses climate denial, intolerance and attacks on science -- Read more on ScientificAmerican.com
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Newborns or survivors? The unexpected matter found in hostile black hole windsA new theory from researchers at Northwestern University predicts the molecules are born in the winds with unique properties that enable them to adapt to and thrive in the hostile environment.
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Interactive tool improves patient knowledge of breast cancer treatment optionsBreast cancer patients who used an interactive website were more informed about options and felt better prepared to make a treatment choice.
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Epigenetic alteration of a vitamin B12 gene shines new light on our understanding of rare diseasesFrench and Canadian scientists discovered a new cause of a rare condition known as cblC, that they named 'epi-cblC,' resulting from a mutation on a single copy of the gene and the silencing of the second copy by a gene modification referred to as epimutation. Their findings may have an impact on diagnosis, and genetic counselling in families with genetic diseases, as well as in the development of
13h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News
The first step in generating an artificial adrenal glandIn a new study, published in Cell Reports, researchers from the William Harvey Research Institute at Queen Mary University of London used cells derived from urine to take the first step in generating an artificial adrenal gland.
13h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Ohio State study of brain pacemaker shows promise in slowing decline of Alzheimer'sResearchers at The Ohio State University Wexner Medical Center studied how using an implant -- likened to a pacemaker for the brain -- could help Alzheimer's patients to retain cognitive, behavioral and functional abilities longer while also improving quality of life.
13h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Running away from carbon dioxide: The terminal connectionLike us, fish need oxygen, and swimming through a patch of carbon dioxide turns out not to be a pleasant experience. Instead, they prefer to avoid carbon dioxide altogether. In experiments published in Cell Reports on Jan. 30, researchers at the RIKEN Brain Science Institute in Japan have discovered a neuronal pathway that makes this behavior possible.
13h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Scientists identify brain region in mice that keeps the body from losing its balanceNew research reveals how a small part of the brain singlehandedly steadies the body if it is thrown off balance. The study in mice found that this region accomplishes this by moving muscles in a two-step response that first widens the animal's center of gravity, and then strengthens and stabilizes its limb muscles and joints. These findings offer insight into the mechanics of how animals stay upri
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New Scientist - News
Can a brain implant treat Alzheimer’s? It might just be placeboAlzheimer’s disease may have been slowed in two people given implants that stimulate the brain with electricity, but this may just have been the placebo effect
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New Scientist - News
A more humane way of slaughtering chickens might get EU approvalA new system that apparently kills chickens without distress by lowering the air pressure could soon be approved in Europe, offering a humane death for billions of birds
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New Scientist - News
Renewables made more electricity than coal in Europe in 2017The amount of electricity generated by renewables in Europe has for the first time outpaced that coming from coal sources, according to new analysis of official figures
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Big Think
Major report warns that a "meat tax" is comingAfter tobacco, carbon, and sugar, meat may be next on the list to be taxed by governments in their efforts to comply with health and environmental policies. Read More
13h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Applying machine learning to the universe's mysteriesComputers can beat chess champions, simulate star explosions, and forecast global climate. We are even teaching them to be infallible problem-solvers and fast learners.
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New Scientist - News
A brain scan can reveal which people you’re friends withFriends have more similar brain activity than people who don't know each other, particularly in regions involved in attention, emotion and language
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New Scientist - News
London has already reached air pollution limits for 2018It has taken the capital longer to break the air pollution limit this year than last, when legal levels were passed less than a week into January
13h
Live Science
Why Pot Smokers Scored Higher Than Nonsmokers on This Memory TestCan weed improve your memo— wait, what were we talking about?
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Science | The Guardian
Jodrell Bank nominated as Unesco world heritage siteGovernment puts forward earliest surviving radio astronomy observatory for 2019 honour The giant telescopes of Jodrell Bank, and the scruffy buildings surrounding them in which discoveries were made that helped change the understanding of the universe, have been nominated by the British government as a Unesco world heritage site. The observatory, part of the University of Manchester, was founded
13h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Urban foxes and coyotes learn to set aside their differences and coexistDiverging from centuries of established behavioral norms, red fox and coyote have gone against their wild instincts and learned to coexist in the urban environment of Madison and the University of Wisconsin-Madison campus, according to a recently published study in the journal PLOS ONE.
13h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News
New tool for tracking 'kiss-and-run' communication between cellsVirtually all aspects of life and disease depend of brief exchanges between cells. A new technique to study cell-to-cell contacts lets interacting cells 'smear' one another with the biological equivalent of lipstick.
13h
Big Think
A glittering sculpture is now in orbit and astronomers are furiousA rocket company launches an orbiting artwork for all the world to see, whether they want to or not. Read More
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Scientific American Content: Global
Ghost Cat Gone: Eastern Cougar Officially Declared ExtinctThe subspecies has now been removed from the Endangered Species Act, 80 years after its last sighting -- Read more on ScientificAmerican.com
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Science : NPR
Why Males Are Biology's Riskier SexNew data have confirmed major differences in mutation rates between the sexes — showing that children inherit more mutations from their dads than from their moms, says guest commentator Robert Martin. (Image credit: Tuan Tran/Getty Images)
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Research finds early childhood program linked to degree completion at age 35Participating in an intensive early childhood education program from preschool to third grade is linked to higher educational attainment in mid-life, according to a new study by University of Minnesota researchers.
14h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Expert panel issues new guidelines for lung cancer molecular testingGuidelines add ROS1 to list of tests matching lung cancer with targeted treatments, among other updated recommendations.
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Researchers find pathway to give advanced notice for hailstormsA new study identifies a method for predicting the likelihood of damaging hailstorms in the United States--up to three weeks in advance.
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Live Science
Airstrikes Blast 3,000-Year-Old Temple in SyriaThe early Iron Age temple, Ain Dara, was known for its intricate architectural carvings.
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Live Science
Photos: Destruction at Syria's Temple of Ain DaraThe early Iron Age temple is known for its intricate carvings, some of which were blasted to bits in recent airstrikes.
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Viden
Koralrev bliver syge af plastikBakterier spreder sig med plastikken i koralrevene. Det gør korallerne syge, viser nyt studie.
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Microcapsules gain a new power -- scavenging reactive oxygen speciesStable, biocompatible microcapsules have gained a new power -- the ability to scavenge reactive oxygen species. This may aid microcapsule survival in the body as the tiny polymer capsules carry a drug or other biomolecules. The microcapsules may also find use in antioxidant therapy or in industrial applications where scavenging of free radicals is needed.
14h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News
E-cigarette flavors are toxic to white blood cells, warn scientistsA new study adds to growing evidence on the harmful health effects of e-cigarettes. The study finds that exposure to commonly used e-cigarette flavoring chemicals and liquids can cause significant inflammation to monocytes, a type of white blood cell. Moreover, many flavoring compounds are toxic, with cinnamon, vanilla and buttery flavors among the worst. It also finds that mixing e-cigarette flav
14h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Better-educated men = healthier women and mothers in the developing worldIn much of Africa and Asia, the more schooling a man has, the more likely his partner will take birth control or seek medical help in pregnancy, according to Canadian researchers.
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Applying machine learning to the universe's mysteriesBerkeley Lab physicists and their collaborators have demonstrated that computers are ready to tackle the universe's greatest mysteries -- they used neural networks to perform a deep dive into data simulating the subatomic particle soup that may have existed just microseconds after the big bang.
14h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Your brain reveals who your friends areYou may perceive the world the way your friends do, according to a Dartmouth study finding that friends have similar neural responses to real-world stimuli and these similarities can be used to predict who your friends are.
14h
Popular Science
Lefties, you should feel very specialScience Only 1 in 10 humans are left handed. So why does it happen at all? Globally, about 90 percent of people are righties. But why?
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The Atlantic
The Obstacles for Women Who 'Step Up' in MusicDealing with sexual harassment by Russell Simmons “was a full-time job,” Drew Dixon, a former executive at the record company Def Jam, told The New York Times recently. Simmons, the label boss, would so frequently expose himself to Dixon, she alleged, that she gave a spare key to her office to another coworker so that they could intervene whenever Simmons entered her workspace and unzipped. “It w
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The Atlantic
The Men Behind the Nunes MemoRepublicans on the House Intelligence Committee voted on Monday to release a classified memo drafted by the panel’s chairman, Devin Nunes, outlining alleged surveillance abuses carried out by top officials at the Justice Department. The committee’s ranking member, Adam Schiff, called the decision to release the memo “transparently cynical and destructive” in a tweet on Monday night. The Departmen
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Safeguarding children when sentencing mothersIt is estimated that 17,000 children every year are affected by maternal imprisonment in England and Wales. 95 per cent (16,000) of these children are forced to leave their homes as their mother's imprisonment leaves them without an adult to take care of them.
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Live Science
Cocktails to Make You Swoon Over the Super Blue Blood Moon of Jan. 31Celebrate this week's Super Blue Blood Moon — which includes a total lunar eclipse — with some moony cocktails.
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Study finds bacteria in milk linked to rheumatoid arthritisA strain of bacteria commonly found in milk and beef may be a trigger for developing rheumatoid arthritis in people who are genetically at risk, according to a new study from the University of Central Florida.
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
New study shows severe toxicity with high-dose AAV9-based gene therapy in animal modelsResearchers have described severe, life-threatening toxicity in monkeys and piglets given high doses of gene therapy delivered using an adeno-associated virus (AAV9) vector capable of accessing spinal cord neurons.
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
This is your brain-- this is your brain outdoorsThe brain acts much differently when we're outdoors compared to when we're inside the lab, a new study has found.'It happens when we're doing normal, everyday activities, like riding a bike,' explained Kyle Mathewson, a neuroscientist in UAlberta's Department of Psychology.
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Mindfulness may help reduce cravings for food and drugs, says reviewMindfulness strategies may help prevent or interrupt cravings for food and drugs, such as cigarettes and alcohol, by occupying short term memory, according to a new review from City, University of London.
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
What factors make 'age-friendly environments' effective?A new study, published in the journal Systematic Reviews, conducted by researchers at the University of Liverpool and Newcastle University has identified the most effective initiatives for promoting respect and social inclusion for older people living in the community.
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Safeguarding children when sentencing mothersOxford University have collaborated with the Prison Reform Trust to create new resources, including films and briefings, to help criminal justice professionals improve their understanding of the impacts of maternal imprisonment.It is estimated that 17,000 children every year are affected by maternal imprisonment in England and Wales.
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Futurity.org
To control RNA, hide it under a ‘blanket’Researchers have developed a new tool could help uncover some of the secrets of RNA, essentially by hiding its molecules from the world. What this new tool reveals about RNA could help biologists better understand the inner workings of our cells in both sickness and health. Biologists used to think they knew DNA’s less famous cousin, RNA, but in the last two decades it’s become clear the molecule
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
AI researcher Ng launches $175 million investment fundThe artificial intelligence researcher who has said he wants to free humanity from repetitive mental drudgery also wants to save AI entrepreneurs time spent raising funds.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Aussie military says tracking app doesn't breach securityAustralia's military said on Tuesday that a fitness tracking application did not breach security despite revelations that an interactive, online map using its data can show troop locations around the world.
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Futurity.org
Icelanders are super creative. Here’s whyNew research examines what makes the people of Iceland so creative—and how the United States could adopt some of those factors. By many international measures, Iceland is a leader in innovation and creativity in a number of fields, including design, music, art, and literature. Icelanders strongly dislike the idea that their unique natural environment is the source of creative inspiration. Existin
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Live Science
Why Wednesday's Super Blue Blood Moon Eclipse Is So SpecialImagine going to a drive-thru and ordering the following: a blue moon, a supermoon, a blood moon and a total lunar eclipse. Although such a request is impossible (if only!), all four events are actually happening tomorrow (Jan. 31).
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Waymo ramps up self-driving fleet with 'thousands' of carsFormer Google car unit Waymo said Tuesday it was ordering "thousands" of vehicles from Fiat Chrysler for the expansion of its autonomous ride-hailing service across several US cities.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Venture fund invests in startups to improve labor practicesCompanies like Apple and Walt Disney as well as Walmart's philanthropic foundation are investors in a $23 million venture fund aiming to use tools like artificial intelligence and blockchain technology to improve global labor practices.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Unusual properties within the grass genus DiplachneThe grass genus Diplachne only includes two species, but it the does not fall short when it comes to remarkable features. It was precisely this affinity to the unusual displayed by the nearly worldwide genus that inspired Dr Neil Snow and his co-authors to delve deeper in a dedicated monograph published in the open access journal PhytoKeys.
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Moffitt researchers discover new approach to stimulate an immune response against tumor cellsA team of Moffitt Cancer Center researchers is trying to find new ways to further enhance the activity of the immune system against cancer. In an article published in the January issue of Cancer Cell, the researchers describe how a new type of immunotherapy drug targeting the protein TIM-3 works to stimulate the immune system.
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Researchers advance the understanding of preterm birthOn Feb. 1, at The Pregnancy Meeting™, researchers will unveil findings that demonstrate that the byproducts of certain bacteria induce cervical changes which may lead to preterm birth.
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Industry leaders align on the future of precision medicineAs a panel of judges at the Precision Medicine World Conference (PMWC) 2018 reach agreement, panel judge and Biogerontology Research Foundation Managing Trustee Dmitry Kaminskiy's favoured contenders for the title of Most Promising Company 2018 emerged as semi-finalists.
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Unusual properties within the grass genus DiplachneThe grass genus Diplachne includes only two species, but it the does not fall short when it comes to some remarkable features. It was precisely this affinity to the unusual displayed by the nearly worldwide genus that inspired Dr. Neil Snow and his co-authors to delve deeper in a dedicated monograph published in the open-access journal PhytoKeys.
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
No definitive causal link between sunbed use and malignant melanomaA careful review of the currently available medical data shows that there is no proven causal relationship between moderate solarium use and increased melanoma risk. This is the conclusion reached by an international group of researchers headed by Professor Dr. Jörg Reichrath, Deputy Director of the Department of Dermatology, Venereology and Allergology at Saarland University Hospital in Homburg/S
14h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News
The fight against tooth decay gets help with a new smart material from U of T researchersWhen patients go to the dentist to fill a cavity, they're trying to solve a problem -- not create a new one. But many dental patients get some bad news: bacteria can dig under their tooth-colored fillings and cause new cavities, called recurrent caries. U of T researchers designed a novel solution: a filling material with tiny particles containing antimicrobial drugs, designed to stop bacteria in
14h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Benefits of smoking cessation medications diminish over timeA new Tel Aviv University study published in Addiction finds that only eight out of 100 smokers who take smoking cessation medications will have benefited from taking smoking medications after one year's time.
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Simultaneous determination of Substance P and CGRP in rat brainstem tissueSubstance P and CGRP are neuropeptides that belong to the thachykinin and calcitonin family, respectively. They play an important role in neuropathic pain development and regulation. In this study, simultaneous analysis of Substance P and CGRP in rat brainstem tissue was conducted by using LC-ESI-MS/MS method.
14h
New on MIT Technology Review
Andrew Ng’s latest venture is a $175 million fund for AI startups
15h
Scientific American Content: Global
Warming Threatens Reptiles More Than Birds and MammalsOver planetary history, warm-blood animals have outperformed cold-blooded animals in adapting to changing temperatures -- Read more on ScientificAmerican.com
15h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
The fight against tooth decay gets help with a new smart materialWhen patients go to the dentist to fill a cavity, they're trying to solve a problem—not create a new one. But many dental patients get some bad news: bacteria can dig under their tooth-coloured fillings and cause new cavities, called recurrent caries. These recurrent caries affect 100 million patients every year and cost an additional US$34 billion to treat.
15h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Warming climate shrinks British Columbia beetlesSome of B.C.'s beetles are shrinking as their habitats get warmer, according to new UBC research. The study provides evidence that climate change is affecting the size of organisms.
15h
Science | The Guardian
What is the super blue blood moon? - videoThe super blue blood moon will grace our skies on Wednesday. This rare celestial event, when a blue moon and lunar eclipse combine with the moon being at its closest point to Earth, has not been seen for more than 150 years 'Super blue blood moon': stargazers prepare for rare celestial event Continue reading...
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Ingeniøren
Åbne vejrdata vil give boost til dansk forskningDMI frigiver kostbare vejr- og klimadata i de kommende år. Det kan sætte skub i brugen af åbne data i Danmark lyder det fra forskere og Ingeniøren-læsere, der har masser af ideer.
15h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Video: Gallium and the history of the periodic tableSome chemists might see the periodic table of elements as a holy testament to the power of science.
15h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
UK regional weather forecasts could be improved using jet stream dataWeather forecasters could be able to better predict regional rainfall and temperatures across the UK by using North Atlantic jet stream data, according to new research.
15h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News
MSU biologists: Bryozoans, brachiopods, and phoronida originate from the common ancestorAn associate of the Faculty of Biology of Lomonosov Moscow State University studied the nervous system of adult phoronida using modern methods and presented new facts in the long-lasting discussion about the taxonomy of invertebrates proving that phoronids, barchiopods, and bryozoans are relatives despite earlier arguments. The results of the work were published in Scientific Reports. The study wa
15h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Research paves the way for the development of vaccines for emerging virusesIn studying the West Nile virus, which caused outbreaks in North America this century, scientists from Brazil and Senegal identified the gene responsible for the diminished virulence of the lineage known for causing mild effects.
15h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Pancreatic cancer: Gene duplication explains tumor aggressivenessPancreatic cancer is a form of cancer associated with the highest mortality rates in the world. Genetic changes that could explain his aggressiveness and early metastasis had not been found yet. A team at Technical University of Munich has now shown that those characteristics can be explained by specific gene amplifications which occur along various evolutionary pathways of the cancer. Based on th
15h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Gallium and the history of the periodic table (video)Some chemists might see the periodic table of elements as a holy testament to the power of science. However, when it first debuted, it was a different kind of holey, and its journey to classroom walls everywhere had a whole lot of bumps. Watch as Reactions digs into the history of the periodic table with the help of a vanishing spoon, a man named after a rooster, and a bearded Russian.
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
How does living in a big city increase life expectancy?Inhabitants of Moscow and St Petersburg live significantly longer than people living in other regions of Russia, according to a recent study carried out by researchers at the Higher School of Economics.
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Reflective surfaces alleviate heatwavesUnploughed fields and brighter cities could help to noticeably lower extreme temperatures during periods of hot weather, particularly in important agricultural regions and densely populated areas of Europe and North America.
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Study shows inappropriate antibiotic prescribing differs by patient age, insurance, raceA patient's age and race are associated with risk of receiving an unneeded antibiotic prescription for upper respiratory conditions caused by viruses, according to a study published today in Infection Control & Hospital Epidemiology, the journal of the Society for Healthcare Epidemiology of America. Additionally, the study found that advanced practice providers, such as nurse practitioners and phy
15h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Warming climate shrinks British Columbia beetlesSome of B.C.'s beetles are shrinking as their habitats get warmer, according to new UBC research. The study provides evidence that climate change is affecting the size of organisms.
15h
Science | The Guardian
Gone fishin': decorator crabs use other species as fishing rods, study revealsA researcher’s diving holiday lead to a startling discovery of never-before-seen behaviour: crabs using hydrozoans as fishing hooks Every night as the sun goes down, on the coral reefs of the Red Sea small, delicate and slightly fuzzy-looking crabs work their way through the maze of coral. They take up stations atop the corals’ outermost structures, exposing themselves to the current in the plank
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Why buy social bots? For 'illusion of popularity,' researcher saysOn Saturday, the New York Times published an article detailing its investigation into Devumi, a company that sells Twitter followers to celebrities, influencers, and anyone else willing to pay for online popularity. The purchased followers are automated social bots—fake Twitter accounts that exist solely to boost a user's follower count or perform simple tasks like retweeting. The Times reported t
15h
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'Monster Hunter World' Review: It's More Than a Sequel, It's a ResurgenceThe newest in Capcom's franchise is also the latest Japanese title to lead a charge for a revitalized middle tier of gaming.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
The balance of marine bacteria in the Baltic SeaCarina Bunse has written a thesis on marine bacteria and how they respond to the changes in their environment. Bacteria affect nutrient turnover in the Baltic Sea and with it the balance of the sea. As they are invisible, our knowledge of marine bacteria is still limited. By studying these microbes and their genes, we can learn more about how the ocean will behave in the future.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Conforming to standards could improve Sri Lankan urban quality of lifeStandards such as well-managed parking, clean drinking water, affordable housing, proper street lighting, green environment, robust information technology connectivity and many are important for cities to function well, according to research from Sri Lanka. A number of plans and projects to build "Smart cities" are currently underway in Sri Lankan urban development policy framework.
15h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Bananas are some of the worst food waste culpritsA study done at Karlstad University shows that seven products account for almost half the fruit and vegetables wasted by retailers. Potentially, food waste can be drastically limited by focusing on these products.
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Futurity.org
Head ‘twins’ could safeguard football playersFootball players may soon have “digital twins” of their heads to help doctors predict where injuries might occur and diagnose them when they do. The computer models would begin with baseline MRI scans of players’ skulls, blood vessel systems, and brains, taken in high school, says the engineer leading the project. Ideally, athletes would then update them every few years. Because each individual’s
15h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
New ecological maps show a wider range of functional diversityTogether with a large international team of scientists, researchers Peter van Bodegom and Nadia Soudzilovskaia of the Leiden Institute of Environmental Sciences (CML) have created maps of variability in plant trait distribution across the globe. The new maps have been published in Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences in December 2017.
15h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
California's other drought—a major earthquake is overdueCalifornia earthquakes are a geologic inevitability. The state straddles the North American and Pacific tectonic plates and is crisscrossed by the San Andreas and other active fault systems. The magnitude 7.9 earthquake that struck off Alaska's Kodiak Island on Jan. 23, 2018 was just the latest reminder of major seismic activity along the Pacific Rim.
15h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Coral reefs are in trouble—how can people adapt?An international team of scientists has developed a strategy to boost people's ability to adapt to climate change, revealed in a new study published in Nature Climate Change.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Why roosters don't go deaf from their own loud crowingA team of researchers with the University of Antwerp and the University of Ghent, both in Belgium, has uncovered the means by which roosters prevent themselves from going deaf due to their own loud crowing. In their paper published in the journal Zoology, the group outlines their study of the birds and what they found.
15h
Inside Science
Sleepwalkers Multitask Better Than the Rest of Us, Even When AwakeSleepwalkers Multitask Better Than the Rest of Us, Even When Awake A study that compares the multitasking abilities of awake sleepwalkers and non-sleepwalkers provides insights into the nature of awareness. Sleepwalking_topNteaser.jpg Image credits: Internet Archive Book Images via flickr Human Tuesday, January 30, 2018 - 08:45 Peter Gwynne, Contributor (Inside Science) -- Writers over the centur
15h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Patient exposure to X-rays depends on how dentists are paidA major study looking into how financial arrangements with dentists affect what goes on in the dentist's chair has found a marked increase in the number of X-rays when dentists receive payment for them.
15h
New on MIT Technology Review
Why sidewalk delivery robots still need safety drivers
15h
Scientific American Content: Global
How Responsible are Killers with Brain Damage?Cases of criminal behavior after brain injury raise profound questions about the neuroscience of free will. -- Read more on ScientificAmerican.com
15h
Ingeniøren
DSB splitter gamle lokomotiver ad: Først til marts kommer alle på skinnerne igenHjulsættene fra de gamle ME-lokomotiver bliver sendt til Aarhus, hvor DSB forsøger at finde ud af, om der er revner i trækakslerne. De kan dog ikke ses med det blotte øje, og endnu kan værkstedet ikke regne på betydningen for styrken.
15h
Popular Science
Why pay for Office and Photoshop when you can get these alternatives for free?DIY Top-quality software that costs nothing. You don't need to rely on expensive software like the Microsoft Office suite or Adobe Photoshop. These 10 applications offer similar features for free.
15h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Long-term opioid use has dropped among US military veteransA new study in the Journal of General Internal Medicine, published by Springer, shows that opioid prescribing has dropped after a peak in 2012. Lead author Katherine Hadlandsmyth of the Iowa City VA Healthcare System and the University of Iowa in the US further noted that the decline was mostly due to decreases in long-term opioid prescribing, which carries much greater risk for harmful side effec
16h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News
New computational method reveals chemoresistance drug targetsThe methylation of deoxycytosine to form 5-methylcytosine (5mC) is an important feature of cancer. Extensive DNA methylation and transcription analyses have provided large quantities of data, but it is challenging to identify critical genes related to cancer development from these data. Osaka University researchers developed a new mathematical method to extract appropriate information from the dat
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
Women beat expectations when playing chess against menData from 160,000 ranked chess players and more than 5 million chess matches suggest that women playing against men perform better than expected based on their official chess ratings, according to new findings. The study results indicate that women players are not affected by negative stereotypes about women's chess abilities during competition games, in contrast with previous research.
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Viden
Eksperter: Facebooks charmeoffensiv er ren forretningDet er ren økonomi når Mark Zuckerberg vil opprioritere lokale nyheder for at skabe større sammenhængskraft i samfundet, vurderer eksperter.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Did water-based life originate without water?When trying to understand the origins of life on Earth, researchers run into a paradox: while water is an indispensable solvent for all known life forms that exist today, water also inhibits the formation of string-like chains of nucleic acid polymers such as RNA that were likely precursors of life. This raises the question: how could the nucleic acids have formed in the first place? One solution
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Dagens Medicin
Vi er stærkest, når vi spiller på flere strengeRørbæk Madsen og jeg var enige om, at det ville være stærkest at jeg også var tilstede på pressemødet på OUH. Både for at vise Lægeforeningens opbakning, men også for at markere, at Lægeforeningen tager den videre forhandling med minister, folketing og styrelse.
16h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News
UK regional weather forecasts could be improved using jet stream dataWeather forecasters could be able to better predict regional rainfall and temperatures by using North Atlantic jet stream data, according to new research. Climate scientists examined the relationship between changes in North Atlantic atmospheric circulation -- or jet stream -- and UK regional weather variations during summer and winter months over the past 65 years, and found that the jet stream c
16h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News
NTU scientists create customizable, fabric-like power source for wearable electronicsScientists at Nanyang Technological University, Singapore (NTU Singapore) have created a customizable, fabric-like power source that can be cut, folded or stretched without losing its function. Being highly stretchable, these flexible power sources are promising next-generation 'fabric' energy storage devices that could be integrated into wearable electronics. The team's findings have been publish
16h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Blood vessel-on-a-chips show anti-cancer drug effects in human cellsResearchers at the Institute of Industrial Science, the University of Tokyo, and LIMMS/CNRS-IIS a joint French - Japanese research laboratory between the CNRS and the University of Tokyo, report new organ-on-a-chip technology to observe sprouting angiogenesis from a single blood vessel. VEGF stimulated new capillaries from the single vessel by activating NOTCH signaling, recapitulating biochemical
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Arts and humanities in medical school promote empathy and inoculate against burnoutMedical students who spend more time engaging in the arts may also be bolstering the qualities that improve their bedside manner with patients, according to new research from Tulane and Thomas Jefferson universities. The study finds that students who devoted more time to the humanities during medical school had significantly higher levels of positive physician attributes like empathy, tolerance of
16h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Mind your speed: A magnetic brake on proton accelerationAn international research team led by Osaka University studied high-energy protons emitted from laser-bombarded solids. Recent studies found that higher laser intensities failed to boost the proton energies as much as predicted. By experiment and simulation, the researchers showed that magnetic fields, generated by electrons ejected from the target, inhibited the electric fields responsible for pr
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
NUS researchers develop wireless light switch for targeted cancer therapyA team of scientists from the National University of Singapore has developed a way to wirelessly deliver light into deep regions of the body to activate light-sensitive drugs for photodynamic therapy (PDT). This technology could potentially enable PDT to be used to treat a wider range of cancers, such as brain and liver cancer.
16h
New on MIT Technology Review
Kids are getting replacement ears made from their own cells
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The Scientist RSS
Children Receive Bespoke, Lab-Grown EarsThe tissue, grown on a 3-D scaffold and seeded from the kids' own cells, was transplanted to correct deformities in their cartilage.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Lots of sexting can wreck a romanceSexting—sharing sexual messages and images by cellphone or other web-connected devices—can spice up your sex life, but it may be at the expense of other important aspects of your relationship, says a new study led by the University of Alberta.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Mega-herbivores were displaced by humans who partly took their placeSenckenberg scientist Hervé Bocherens has studied the extinction of mega-herbivores – plant-eating animals that weighed more than one ton – that occurred approx. 12,000 years ago. The scientist from Tübingen reached the conclusion that, on the one hand, modern man was the cause of these giant terrestrial animals' extinction, and on the other hand, humans took over part of the animals' ecosystem fu
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Dagens Medicin
Overlæge på Holbæk Sygehus: Risiko for fejl i øjeblikketPersonalet på Holbæk Sygehus har så travlt, at der er risiko for fejl til skade for patienterne, påpeger overlæge. SF tager sagen op med sundhedsministeren.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Particle physics on the brainUnderstanding the fundamental constituents of the universe is tough. Making sense of the brain is another challenge entirely. Each cubic millimetre of human brain contains around 4 km of neuronal "wires" carrying millivolt-level signals, connecting innumerable cells that define everything we are and do. The ancient Egyptians already knew that different parts of the brain govern different physical
16h
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Steelcase Silq: Price, Specs, Release DateSteelcase's engineers have developed the new Silq chair made from a polymer that closely mimics the structural properties of carbon fiber at a much lower price.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Why scientists should open up coral reef data to protect habitatsCoral reefs are critically important to the world but despite the ongoing efforts of scientists and campaigners, these stunningly beautiful ecosystems still face a variety of threats. The most pervasive is, of course, climate change, which is putting their very future in jeopardy.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Deuterated formaldehyde detected in protostar HH 212Using the Atacama Large Millimeter Array (ALMA) in Chile, a team of researchers has detected the emission of deuterated formaldehyde (HDCO) from the hot inner region of the protostar HH 212. The finding, reported January 20 in a paper published on the arXiv.org pre-print repository, could be helpful in our understanding of chemical processes in this protostar and in similar objects.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
China directs users to approved VPNs as firewall tightensChina vowed Tuesday to force both local and foreign companies and individuals to use only government-approved software to access the global internet, as overseas firms fear losing unrestricted online services under an impending deadline.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
How algae survive the harsh world of sea iceNew research from the University of East Anglia has revealed new clues into how algae survive within polar sea ice.
16h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Coral reefs are in trouble -- how can people adapt?An international team of scientists has developed a strategy to boost people's ability to adapt to climate change.
16h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Silencing is golden: Scientists image molecules vital for gene regulationLab scientists use cryo-electron microscopy to gain a deeper understanding of the structure of a regulatory complex. Their research could open up new possibilities for cancer therapies.
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Futurity.org
Why we trust some strangers more than othersWhether or not we trust a stranger may depend on their resemblance to other people we’ve previously known, a new study suggests. The results show that we trust strangers resembling individuals we believe to be trustworthy more; by contrast, we trust those similar to others we believe to be untrustworthy less. “We make decisions about a stranger’s reputation without any direct or explicit informat
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Futurity.org
Marijuana doesn’t affect odds of getting pregnantMarijuana use—by either men or women—does not appear to lower a couple’s chances of getting pregnant, according to a new study. About 15 percent of couples experience infertility. Infertility costs the US healthcare system more than $5 billion per year, and thus identifying modifiable risk factors for infertility, including recreational drug use, is of public health importance. Marijuana is one o
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Protecting cassava from disease? There's an app for thatCassava is one of the developing world's most important crops. Its starchy roots and leaves are a staple food for more than 500 million people in Africa each day. And Africa produces half of the world's total cassava output; the continent's main growers are the Congo, Côte d'lvoire, Ghana, Nigeria, Tanzania and Uganda.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Earth's mid-life crisis – new research backs 'lull' in the geologic recordNew research backing claims that the Earth experienced a 'geological lull' in its development around 2.3 to 2.2 billion years ago has just been released by Curtin University.
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Futurity.org
Trusting equity analysts can cost IPO investorsWhen equity analysts are more involved in a company’s initial public offering (IPO), investors who buy stock based on analyst reports lose more than three percent of their investment, according to a new study. But not everyone loses when analysts are more involved in IPOs. “If these JOBS Act provisions are extended, we may see more overly optimistic research that further tilts the playing field…”
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Researchers find way to give advanced notice for hailstormsA new study identifies a method for predicting the likelihood of damaging hailstorms in the United States—up to three weeks in advance.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Child experts: Just say 'no' to Facebook's kids appFacebook News AdsChild development experts and advocates are urging Facebook to pull the plug on its new messaging app aimed at kids.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Dutch have run human, animal diesel tests 'for years': reportThe Dutch have been performing tests "for years" on humans and animals to study the effects of diesel fumes, scientists told Dutch media Tuesday, amid an outcry in Germany over similar experiments.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Volkswagen suspends executive over monkey trialsAutomaker Volkswagen has suspended its head of external relations and sustainability in response to the controversy over experiments in which monkeys were exposed to diesel exhaust.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Peru ends era of 'roadless wilderness' in its Amazon rainforestsBiodiversity reaches its zenith in south-east Peru. This vast wilderness of 2m square km of rainforests and savannahs is formed of the headwaters of three major river basins, the Juruá, Purús, and Madeira. Nowhere on Earth can you find more species of animals and plants than in this corner of the Amazon that rubs up against the feet of the towering Andean mountains. These forests are also home to
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Naked mole rat found to defy Gompertz's mortality lawA team of researchers at Google-owned Calico Life Sciences LLC has found that the naked mole rat defies Gompertz's mortality law. In their paper published in eLife, the group describes their study of the unusual-looking rodent and describe some of its unusual traits.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Empowering the powerless—let's end energy poverty"Power to the people," the activists chanted in the 1960s.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
A novel approach could help manage the impact of invasive speciesSome species of plants and animals can cause harm when introduced to areas where they aren't found naturally. They can affect biodiversity, ecosystems, health and livelihoods. On the other hand many newcomer species are harmless. The number of introduced species is growing fast worldwide and there are now too many to control. To decide which ones to focus on, scientists and managers need to compar
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
We can sustainably manage the environment—but we need to work at itThis past week, Veronique Greenwood filed an important report in the New York Times on plastic pollution in our coral reefs. She summarized some of the work of Cornell professor Joleah Lamb and her colleagues, which estimated plastic pollution in the Asia-Pacific region. Lamb's research catalogues plastics on "159 reefs in Australia, Indonesia, Myanmar and Thailand. In a paper released in the jour
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Tracking microbial diversity through the terrestrial subsurfaceDeep underground, the earth beneath our feet is teeming with microbial life, the majority of which has yet to be characterized. Cut off from sunlight, these enigmatic organisms must obtain life-sustaining energy and carbon, which all living cells need, through other means.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Forest conservation can have greater ecological impacts by allowing sustainable harvestingNew research at the University of Missouri has found that forest owners at greater risk of illegally cutting trees from their forests prefer to participate in conservation programs that allow sustainable timber harvesting. The findings of the study, conducted by Francisco Aguilar and Phillip Mohebalian, could be used to craft conservation contracts that are more likely to be accepted by forest own
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Scientists catch light squeezing and stretching next-gen data storage materialScientists at the Department of Energy's SLAC National Accelerator Laboratory have seen for the first time how atoms in iron-platinum nanoparticles – a next-generation material for magnetic data storage devices – respond extremely rapidly to brief laser flashes. Understanding these fundamental motions could potentially lead to new ways of manipulating and controlling such devices with light.
17h
Dagens Medicin
Danmarks sundhedsvæsen får bronzeSundhedsvæsenet i Danmark er netop kåret som det tredjebedste i Europa, viser ny undersøgelse. Danske Patienter er skeptisk over opgørelsen.
17h
Ingeniøren
Kronik: Op ad bakke at flytte forbruget med variable elpriser
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Giant earthquakes: not as random as thoughtBy analyzing sediment cores from Chilean lakes, an international team of scientists discovered that giant earthquakes reoccur with relatively regular intervals. When also taking into account smaller earthquakes, the repeat interval becomes increasingly more irregular to a level where earthquakes happen randomly in time.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
A magnetic brake on proton accelerationShine a powerful laser onto a solid, and you get a beam of high-energy protons. Far from being a curiosity, this phenomenon has important applications, such as in neutron-generation research. Theoretically, the more intense the laser, the faster (in other words, more energetic) the resulting protons. However, we recently seem to have hit a wall, with stronger lasers failing to yield the expected b
17h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Cluster measures turbulence in Earth's magnetic environmentFor the first time, scientists have estimated how much energy is transferred from large to small scales within the magnetosheath, the boundary region between the solar wind and the magnetic bubble that protects our planet. Based on data collected by ESA's Cluster and NASA's THEMIS missions over several years, the study revealed that turbulence is the key, making this process a hundred times more e
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Sanchi oil tanker disaster—how spills and accidents can make ships saferThe Sanchi tanker was carrying 136,000 tonnes of oil from Iran to South Korea when it collided with the Hong Kong-flagged cargo ship CF Crystal, 160 nautical miles off the coast of Shanghai, China. The collision on January 6, 2018 caused a serious fire, and the oil tanker eventually sank eight days later. All 30 Iranian and two Bangladeshi seafarers died in the accident. The other vessel, CF Cryst
17h
Popular Science
How bad this flu season really is—and what you should do about itHealth This year is a nasty one, but it's not (yet) unprecedented. People are officially starting to freak out about this flu season. Here's what you need to know.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Cyber peacekeeping is integral in an era of cyberwar – here's whyCyber warfare is upon us, from interference in elections to a leak of cyber weapons from a national stockpile. And, as with most evolutions in warfare, the world is largely unprepared. Cyber peacekeeping presents significant challenges, which we explore in our research.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Climate scientists explore hidden ocean beneath Antarctica's largest ice shelfAntarctica's Ross Ice Shelf is the world's largest floating slab of ice: it's about the size of Spain, and nearly a kilometre thick.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Little genetic difference among Dungeness crab from California to WashingtonA new study of Dungeness crab along the West Coast found strong genetic diversity throughout various sampling sites, with little genetic "differentiation" between them, meaning that crab found off the California coast are similar to those found off Oregon and Washington.
17h
The Scientist RSS
Image of the Day: Mouse CorneaResearchers discover a genetic link in mice between thinner corneas and an increased risk of developing glaucoma.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Morphing time—plant chloroplasts wake up before they go goNew research published this week in Nature Plants by University of Sheffield scientists explains how plants switch from photoprotection to photosynthesis when transitioning from darkness to daylight.
17h
The Atlantic
All Followers Are Fake FollowersIn the summer of 2015, the game designer Bennett Foddy and I were sloshing down cocktails while waiting for prime dry-aged rib-eye steaks in Midtown Manhattan. We weren’t living large, exactly, but we did pause to assess our rising professional fortunes. Among them, both of us seemed to be blowing up on Twitter. “Where did all these followers come from?” I asked. We’d both added tens of thousands
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The Atlantic
The Shallowness of Google TranslateOne Sunday, at one of our weekly salsa sessions, my friend Frank brought along a Danish guest. I knew Frank spoke Danish well, since his mother was Danish, and he, as a child, had lived in Denmark. As for his friend, her English was fluent, as is standard for Scandinavians. However, to my surprise, during the evening’s chitchat it emerged that the two friends habitually exchanged emails using Goo
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The Atlantic
How to Talk Like TrumpA s soon as Donald Trump announced his presidential candidacy, people noted a few of his linguistic quirks, such as the extended, supervowel pronunciation of huge and the references to himself in the third person. But beyond those, the version of English he speaks amounts to its own patois, with a special vocabulary and syntax and psychological substrate. A year ago Alec Baldwin and I decided to
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Facebook Wants to Fix Itself. Here's a Better Solution.Opinion: The only way to clean up tech's biggest platforms is stronger, smarter government regulation.
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How Long Beach Is Trying to Cool DownTemperatures have soared in the Southern California city in recent years, but taming them presents its own set of challenges.
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How US Security Services Will Protect the Winter OlympicsYou may not know the Diplomatic Security Service, but you'll be glad its agents started preparing for these Games years ago.
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Science : NPR
A Century-Old Dairy Ditches Cows For High-Tech Plant MilkAmerican aren't drinking as much milk. One long-established dairy is spurring business by replacing cows with nuts and grains, and using new technology to make alternative "milk" sources. (Image credit: Courtesy of Elmhurst Milked)
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New Scientist - News
Disease mapper shows you what infections are hitting your areaTracking local diseases, like flu or the common cold, could be as easy as checking the weather with a new app called Doctors Report
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Scientific American Content: Global
Trump Administration Idea for Nationalized 5G Falls FlatCritics pan National Security Council call for the government to build its own high-speed wireless network -- Read more on ScientificAmerican.com
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Big Think
Will 2018 bring a new war? Experts at Davos make predictionsExperts discuss the security challenges facing the world in 2018 at a panel of the World Economic Forum in Davos, Switzerland. Read More
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Image: Tropical Cyclone CebileNASA-NOAA's Suomi NPP satellite passed over the Southern Indian Ocean and captured a visible image of Tropical Cyclone Cebille. Cebille is hurricane-strength and looks like a pinwheel with a small eye surrounded by powerful bands of thunderstorms wrapped around the 5 nautical-mile-wide eye.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Light-controlled tool can be used to reveal secrets of protein functionUC San Francisco scientists have invented a technique that lets them precisely and reversibly disrupt the action of specific cellular proteins at a microscopic scale by making them split apart when illuminated with blue light. The researchers envision a vast number of applications for the technique in the study of cell biology.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Image: Eroded Layers in Shalbatana VallesLayers, probably sedimentary in origin, have undergone extensive erosion in this image from NASA's Mars Reconnaissance Orbiter (MRO) of Shalbatana Valles, a prominent channel that cuts through Xanthe Terra.
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Live Science
Weird: Naked Mole Rats Don't Die of Old AgeNaked mole rats are as likely to die at 3 as at 90.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
New research explains how native trees sweat out heat wavesWe know that the heat is uncomfortable for humans and animals, but how does our native flora fare? New Western Sydney University research has offered a glimpse of whether our trees will cope with ever-rising average temperatures and extreme, prolonged heatwaves.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Can we generate clean energy by using sunlight to superheat fluids?Ever used a magnifying glass to focus sunlight on your hand?
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Dagens Medicin
Regionsrådsformand: Almenmedicinere skal ikke tvinges ud i praksis770 læger uddannet i almen medicin arbejder ikke som praktiserende læger. Men løsningen på lægemanglen i almen praksis er ikke at afvise almenmedicinere på sygehusene, mener regionsrådsformænd.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Putting everyday computer parts to space radiation testESA's next mission, the miniature GomX-4B, includes a piggyback experiment to test how well everyday commercial computer memories perform in the radiation-soaked environment of space.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Image: Obscured Sirius reveals Gaia 1 clusterIf you gazed at the night sky over the past few weeks, it is possible that you stumbled upon a very bright star near the Orion constellation. This is Sirius, the brightest star of the entire night sky, which is visible from almost everywhere on Earth except the northernmost regions. It is, in fact, a binary stellar system, and one of the nearest to our Sun – only eight light-years away.
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Science : NPR
Amateur Astronomer Finds NASA Satellite Long Given Up For DeadScott Tilley was searching for a secret U.S. spy satellite when he found the spacecraft. "The odds are extremely good that it's alive," said a mission co-investigator. (Image credit: NASA)
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Plotting the path of plant pathogensIn a sneak attack, some pathogenic microbes manipulate plant hormones to gain access to their hosts undetected. Biologists at Washington University in St. Louis have exposed one such interloper by characterizing the unique biochemical pathway it uses to synthesize auxin, a central hormone in plant development.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Three critically endangered red-headed vulture nests discovered in Cambodia's Chhep Wildlife SanctuaryThree nests of the critically endangered red-headed vulture were found in January in Cambodia's Chhep Wildlife Sanctuary by conservationists from the Ministry of Environment (MoE), Wildlife Conservation Society (WCS) and local communities. The population of this species in Cambodia is possibly less than 50 individuals. These nest discoveries give hope that conservation efforts may save this specie
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Scientists image molecules vital for gene regulationAll the trillions of cells in our body share the same genetic information and are derived from a single, fertilized egg. When this initial cell multiplies during fetal development, its daughter cells become more and more specialized. This process, called cell differentiation, gives rise to all the various cell types, such as nerve, muscle, or blood cells, which are diverse in shape and function an
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Viden
Send dine fotos på charmetur i rummetIntelligent liv i rummet får nu chancen for at beundre dine selvportrætter og familiefotos. DR1 beder alle danskere om at sende billeder ind til Rumrejsen 2018.
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Live Science
Will the Next Cold War Be Powered by Artificial Intelligence?As tensions between the U.S. and Russia escalate, both sides are developing technological capabilities, including artificial intelligence that could be used in conflict.
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Live Science
Are We Living in a Hologram?In the late 1990s, theoretical physicists uncovered a remarkable connection between two seemingly unrelated concepts in theoretical physics.
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Ingeniøren
Nordmænd fyrer konkurstruet Storstrøms-entreprenørDen italienske entreprenør Condotte, der er med i det konsortium, der har vundet opgaven med at bygge en ny bro over Storstrømmen, er blevet fyret af den norske pendant til Banedanmark, fordi den konkurstruede entreprenør ikke har betalt regningerne til firmaets underentreprenører
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
A ski jacket that actively gets rid of sweatTo keep the body warm and dry during winter sports, high-performance clothing is a must. The demands on these textiles are high, as a person sweats up to one liter per hour on his upper body alone when skiing. A new technology, co-developed by a team of Empa scientists, helps athletes sweating by actively transporting moisture away from the body and to the outside. This is possible because ultra-t
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Future bobsled competitions may be sliding toward plastic iceA Purdue University professor's research suggests the Winter Olympics' icy bobsled tracks could be replaced with a lubricated plastic surface.
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Live Science
Oldest Fossil of 'Missing Link' Dinosaur Discovered in GermanyA fossil hunter in Germany found what may be the oldest specimen of the bird-like dinosaur Archaeopteryx.
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Scientific American Content: Global
Trump's Tax Bill Seen as a "Poke in the Eye" to America's Solar FutureAre tariffs on solar panels and cuts to energy research preparing the U.S. for the inevitable growth in renewables? -- Read more on ScientificAmerican.com
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Dagens Medicin
Sygeplejerske erkender sig skyldig i Odense-sagMens en overlæge fra Odense Universitetshospital nægter sig skyldig i forbindelse med en patients død, har sygeplejersken, som også var tiltalt, erklæret sig skyldig.
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Latest Headlines | Science News
Universes with no weak force might still have stars and lifeAn alternate universe that lacks one of the four fundamental forces might still have galaxies, stars, planets and perhaps life, a new study suggests.
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Feed: All Latest
Meet the Company Trying to Democratize Clinical Trials With AIIt practically takes a medical degree to find the right clinical trial. But new tools powered by machine learning could make them more accessible.
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Feed: All Latest
Chrome Extension Malware Has EvolvedWhile helpful and creative, Chrome extensions have also become a new playground for hackers intent on stealing your data.
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Feed: All Latest
Fitness Apps Like Strava Erode Your Privacy. Here's How to Protect ItIf you don't want your digital running group to know where you live, it might be time to revisit some of your app's settings.
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Scientific American Content: Global
Racial Differences in Addiction and Other Disorders Aren't Mostly GeneticThe assumption that health disparities are caused by race rather than racism permeates many organizations, including the NIH -- Read more on ScientificAmerican.com
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Scientists create new material for nuclear reactorsResearchers from the National Research Nuclear University MEPhI (Russia) have conducted a study on the use of isotopically modified molybdenum as an alternative to zirconium alloys from which nuclear fuel-element casings are created. They have proved that this can enhance the safety of nuclear reactors. The study is published in the scientific journal Chemical Engineering Research and Design.
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TED Talks Daily (SD video)
The gift and power of emotional courage | Susan DavidPsychologist Susan David shares how the way we deal with our emotions shapes everything that matters: our actions, careers, relationships, health and happiness. In this deeply moving, humorous and potentially life-changing talk, she challenges a culture that prizes positivity over emotional truth and discusses the powerful strategies of emotional agility. A talk to share.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Epidemics: The end of containment measures?When an epidemic outbreak such H1N1, Zika or SARS viruses occurs, containment measures may seem to be the most reasonable solution. However, an EPFL study casts doubt on that idea, showing that such measures make a society less resilient and less able to return tor pre-epidemic economic and social conditions. The study, published in Nature Scientific Reports, coincides with another publication on
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Researchers find basic mechanisms for root growth and cell replenishmentUnderstanding the functioning of root biology is crucial to understand how plants adapt to adverse environmental conditions like droughts. Two recent studies describe these kinds of mechanisms. One, published in the journal Molecular Systems Biology, describes the process through which cells stop growing due cell differentiation; the second one, published in Journal of Cell Science, describes plan
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Scientific American Content: Global
Where Plastic Goes, Coral Disease FollowsAn onslaught of bottles, bags and other litter makes reefs 20 times more likely to get sick. Scientists are scrambling to learn why -- Read more on ScientificAmerican.com
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BBC News - Science & Environment
Scrutiny over wood and coal fires in UK homesBurning wood and coal in people's homes will come under scrutiny as part of a government drive to improve air pollution.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Astrochemists reveal the magnetic secrets of methanolA team of scientists, led by Boy Lankhaar at Chalmers University of Technology, has solved an important puzzle in astrochemistry—how to measure magnetic fields in space using methanol, the simplest form of alcohol. Their results, published in the journal Nature Astronomy, give astronomers a new way of investigating how massive stars are born.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Interstellar fullerenes may help find solutions for earthly mattersFullerenes were first discovered by Harry Kroto in the 1970s, for which he and his colleagues received a Nobel Prize in Chemistry. Recently, fullerenes have been detected in the stellar winds of red giants and in the interstellar medium.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Rapid tests for early heart attack diagnosis and sepsis identificationNUST MISIS scientists have developed a new type of membrane test strip for a quantitative immunochromatographic rapid test for early diagnosis of acute myocardial infarction via disease markers in blood, as well as to identify such conditions as sepsis, pregnancy, and viral and bacterial infections.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Team realizes strong indirect coupling in distant nanomechanical resonatorsResearchers at the University of Science and Technology of China have achieved strong indirect coupling between distant phonon modes by introducing a third resonator as a phonon cavity mode. Varying the resonant frequency of the phonon cavity mode, the coupling strength between distant phonon modes can be continuously tuned. The researchers have published an article titled "Strong indirect couplin
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Vertical micro-LEDs used to control mouse behavior via optogenetic stimulationA KAIST research team has developed flexible vertical micro LEDs (f-VLEDs) using anisotropic conductive film (ACF)-based transfer and interconnection technology. The team also succeeded in controlling animal behavior via optogenetic stimulation of the f-VLEDs.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Model predicts scenarios for power generation using nuclear fusionNuclear fusion for the controlled and regular generation of electric power by converting hydrogen into helium and reproducing on a small scale what happens within stars is one of the foremost technological promises for coming decades. So far, only limited results have been achieved in laboratory experiments. Now, a prototype reactor called ITER is under construction in southern France. Its design
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Science | The Guardian
Vaginal mesh review to investigate true scale of complicationsAudit of NHS data to establish how many women have experienced problems following implant surgery A full retrospective audit of women who have undergone vaginal mesh surgery has been launched by the government to establish how many have experienced complications following the procedure. In the past decade, more than 100,000 women have had vaginal mesh surgery to treat urinary incontinence, which
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Feed: All Latest
Nuro's Self-Driving R-1 Doesn't Drive You. It Drives Stuff.The autonomous vehicle startup has impressive founders and a clever business model.
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Ingeniøren
Medie: Trump-regering overvejer et statsejet 5G-netværkFor at beskytte sig mod kinesisk indflydelse overvejer Trump-regeringen i USA et statsejet 5G-netværk, afslører hemmeligtstemplede dokumenter. Trump-regeringen afviser, at planen er aktuel.
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The Atlantic
How the Swamp Drained TrumpO n a drizzly January afternoon one year ago, a newly sworn in President Donald J. Trump stood on the steps of the United States Capitol, doing his best to terrify America’s ruling class. “Today, we are not merely transferring power from one administration to another, or from one party to another,” Trump declared, peering out at a sea of supporters, “but we are transferring power from Washington,
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The Atlantic
A Very Familiar State of the UnionPresident Trump on Tuesday night will call for a $1 trillion infrastructure program, “fair” trade policies, a wall along the Southern border, a shift to merit-based immigration, a dramatic increase in military spending, and action to combat the national drug epidemic. If that all sounds a bit familiar, it’s because it is: Trump issued each of those exact proposals in his first speech to a joint s
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The Atlantic
There's No Way Mueller Will Indict TrumpDonald Trump R. MuellerThe latest revelations about President Trump have, once again, excited the interest of the public, leading to speculation that Special Counsel Robert Mueller may have amassed sufficient evidence to charge the president with obstruction of justice. Trump’s attempt to fire Mueller (which happened last June, but is only now being publicly reported) is, under this line of thinking, the final straw. C
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Ingeniøren
Facebook får ingen straf: Politi bad dem aldrig slette videoFacebook kunne stilles til medansvar for deling af børneporno, hvis politiet kunne bevise, at Facebook kendte til sagen. Problemet er, at politiet aldrig fortalte det sociale medie om videoen, der blev delt flere tusinde gange.
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Ingeniøren
Åbenmundet Google-ansat stopper: De er ved at løbe tør for gode ideerGoogle formår ikke længere at innovere, mener tidligere ansat – og det til trods for at selskabet har rigelige mængder meget dygtige ingeniører i deres stald.
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Science | The Guardian
Communicating the science is the next step in the evolution of the UN climate panel | Adam CornerThe IPCC is taking guidance on how to communicate its crucial findings beyond speciality scientific and policy circles The remit of the Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change ( IPCC ) is one of the more complicated jigsaw puzzles in the world. Since 1988, it has overseen thousands of scientists pulling together tens of thousands of academic papers on atmospheric physics, meteorology, geography
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Ingeniøren
Åbningsstadion til vinter-OL skal bruges fire gange - og så rives nedVinter-OL i Sydkorea ser ud til at blive en dyr oplevelse for arrangørerne, fordi landet ikke kan bruge flere af de nyopførte stadioner og sportsfaciliteter efterfølgende.
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NYT > Science
Do ‘Fast and Furious’ Movies Cause a Rise in Speeding?Evidence suggests you may want to be more cautious near theaters in April 2020, when “Fast and Furious 9” is expected to arrive.
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New Scientist - News
Veganism should be an informed and evidence-based choiceIt is possible to get all the nourishment we need from a vegan diet, but without knowledge and discipline it is also possible to sleepwalk into nutritional deficiency
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Northern European population history revealed by ancient human genomesAn international team of scientists, led by researchers from the Max Planck Institute for the Science of Human History, analyzed ancient human genomes from 38 northern Europeans dating from approximately 7,500 to 500 BCE. The study, published today in Nature Communications, found that Scandinavia was initially settled via a southern and a northern route and that the arrival of agriculture in north
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Epidemics: The end of containment measures?Limiting population movements during an epidemic outbreak may not always be the best approach. This type of response may adversely affect a society's ability to resume functioning normally, according to an EPFL study.
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Scientists discover how gene mutation triggers immune diseaseScientists discovered how a gene mutation affects T cell function to promote immune disorders and then tested a treatment based on the discovery--successfully fixing donated immune cells from a 16-year-old boy with an abnormally low level of white blood cells called lymphopenia. Researchers report their findings Jan. 30 in Nature Communications.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
New, low cost alternative for ethylene productionThe increased supply and optimized cost of natural gas have pushed chemical industries to seek new ways of converting methane, the main constituent of natural gas, to ethylene, a hydrocarbon widely used in chemical products such as plastic. Oxidative coupling of methane (OCM) is of high interest as a potentially efficient method, but is still impractical for commercial applications—for example, th
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Science : NPR
Can Seagrass Save Shellfish From Climate Change?Warming oceans are hurting the shellfish industry. Scientists are hoping that seagrasses, like seaweed, can help soak up extra carbon in the water. (Image credit: Lauren Sommer/KQED)
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Science : NPR
Why Dogs Have Floppy Ears: An Animated TaleWhy do dogs look different from wolves? The question bedeviled Charles Darwin. Now scientists have a fascinating theory that links droopy ears and splotchy coats with domestication. (Image credit: Adam Cole/NPR's Skunk Bear)
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Northern European population history revealed by ancient human genomesAn international team of scientists, led by researchers from the Max Planck Institute for the Science of Human History, analyzed ancient human genomes from 38 northern Europeans dating from approximately 7,500 to 500 BCE. The study, published today in Nature Communications, found that Scandinavia was initially settled via a southern and a northern route and that the arrival of agriculture in north
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Ingeniøren
Kommentar: Hvad styrer statens udbud af nye skibe?
21h
Nyheder - Forskning - Videnskab
Prorektor bliver forskningsdirektør i Villum FondenProrektor Thomas Bjørnholm forlader Københavns Universitet 1. marts for at blive forskningsdirektør...
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Ingeniøren
Alle modeller fra Mercedes kommer i el-versionElbilsstrategien er klar, og Mercedes investerer nu 82 mia. kroner i seks nye fabrikker på tre kontinenter.
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BBC News - Science & Environment
Handheld device sequences human genomeReading human DNA used to take laboratories, a pile of cash and a long time.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Philips says profits soar 25% in 2017Dutch electronics giant Philips on Tuesday posted soaring profits of 1.87 billion euros ($2.3 billion) in 2017, as it increasingly focuses its business on health technology.
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Science | The Guardian
Share your 'super blue blood moon' photographsWe’d like to see your images as parts of the world experience rare celestial event where super moon, blue moon and blood moon coincide Click here to see supermoon images you shared in 2017 People around the world are hoping for clear skies through which to enjoy a rare celestial event being called a “super blue blood moon” . Related: 'Super blue blood moon': stargazers prepare for rare celestial
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Pendjari park hopes to be new elephant sanctuary in West AfricaMatthieu Yoa smiles at a job well done. The ranger and his colleagues have just put a satellite tracking collar on an elephant in the Pendjari National Park in northern Benin.
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
CNIO researchers cure lung fibrosis in mice with a gene therapy that lengthens telomeresIdiopathic pulmonary fibrosis is a potentially lethal disease associated with the presence of critically short telomeres, currently lacking effective treatment. The Telomere and Telomerase Group at the Spanish National Cancer Research Centre (CNIO) has succeeded in curing this disease in mice using a gene therapy that lengthens the telomeres. This work constitutes a 'proof of concept that telomera
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Significant ash falls near erupting Philippine volcanoA significant amount of ash has fallen on towns near the Philippines' most active volcano after energetic eruptions of lava from the crater.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
EU summons France, Germany, UK to 'final chance' pollution talksThe EU summoned ministers from France, Germany, Britain and six other polluting member states for a "final chance" on Tuesday to comply with air quality standards.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Rare Picasso painting in Hong Kong ahead of historic auctionA rare Picasso painting on auction for the first time made its debut in Hong Kong at the start of a global tour on Tuesday and is expected to fetch $50 million, auction house Sotheby's said.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
India's Ola enters Australia as it battles UberIndian ride-hailing company Ola is launching in Australia, it announced Tuesday, making its first foray abroad as it steps up a battle with rival Uber.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Amazon opens plant-filled "The Spheres" buildingsInternet giant Amazon on Monday opened its plant-packed "The Spheres" buildings in its home city of Seattle.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Facebook to deliver more local news to US usersFacebook said Monday it has decided to deliver more local news to US users, in its latest effort to manage the flow of information on the enormously-influential social network.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Wanda stock skyrockets after $5.4bn Tencent tie-upHong Kong shares linked to troubled Chinese conglomerate Wanda surged 52 percent Tuesday after the company announced a $5.4-billion stake sale and retail tie-up with investors including internet giant Tencent.
22h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Erupting volcano sparks Philippine tourism boomWith chili-flavoured "lava ice cream" in demand and awestruck tourists packing onto viewing decks, the erupting Mayon volcano is sparking a local business boom in an impoverished region of the Philippines where tens of thousands of others have fled for their lives.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Ethics quandary? Women in PR more apt to seek allies before giving execs adviceWomen in public relations are more likely than men to seek allies and form coalitions before they give ethics counsel to senior leaders, while men are more likely to rely on presenting research, according to a Baylor University study.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Regional adaptions can cool heat extremes by up to 2-3 CNew research published today in Nature Geoscience has found that climate engineering that modifies the properties of the land surface in highly populated areas and agricultural areas over North American, Europe and Asia could reduce extreme temperatures there by up to 2-3°C.
22h
Science-Based Medicine
Broken BrainIn his new video series, Dr. Mark Hyman says your brain is broken and functional medicine can fix it. He mixes conventional healthy lifestyle advice with highly questionable claims and recommendations based on speculation rather than on evidence.
22h
Ingeniøren
Programmør: Kodning som skolefag er helt misforståetDem, der foreslår kodning som skolefag, ved ikke, hvad de taler om, siger norsk programmør.
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Ingeniøren
Hospitals-CEO: Leverandør af Sundhedsplatformen skader innovationEpic værner om sin intellektuelle ejendom i en grad, der skader innovationen, mener amerikansk hospitals-direktør.
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Ethics quandary? Women in PR more apt to seek allies before giving execs adviceWomen in public relations are more likely than men to seek allies and form coalitions before they give ethics counsel to senior leaders, while men are more likely to rely on presenting research, according to a Baylor University study.
1d
EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Women beat expectations when playing chess against menData from 160,000 ranked chess players and more than 5 million chess matches suggest that women playing against men perform better than expected based on their official chess ratings, according to new findings published in Psychological Science. The study results indicate that women players are not affected by negative stereotypes about women's chess abilities during competition games, in contrast
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Breastfeeding reduces hypertension riskA study published in the American Journal of Hypertension indicates that women who breastfeed more children, and for longer periods of time, are less likely to suffer from hypertension after they reach menopause. This is less true of obese women, however.
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Women beat expectations when playing chess against men, according to new researchData from 160,000 ranked chess players and more than five million chess matches suggests that women playing against men perform better than expected based on their official chess ratings, according to a new study by the University of Sheffield.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Women beat expectations when playing chess against men, according to new researchData from 160,000 ranked chess players and more than five million chess matches suggests that women playing against men perform better than expected based on their official chess ratings, according to a new study by the University of Sheffield.
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Feed: All Latest
Waymo Gets Ready to Deploy Thousands of Self-Driving MinivansThe Alphabet spinoff is in a rush, so it’s buying thousands more “driverless” cars from Fiat-Chrysler.
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Feed: All Latest
Health Experts Ask Facebook to Shut Down Messenger KidsA coalition wants Facebook to discontinue the app aimed at 6- to 12-year-olds, citing studies on the harms of social media and digital devices.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
Silencing is golden: Scientists image molecules vital for gene regulationLab scientists use cryo-electron microscopy to gain a deeper understanding of the structure of a regulatory complex. Their research could open up new possibilities for cancer therapies.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
British austerity policies lie at heart of soaring homelessness and related health harms, argue expertsAusterity policies lie at the heart of soaring homelessness across England, with serious health implications for those affected, argue experts.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
Mediterranean diet may help women receiving IVF to achieve successful pregnanciesNew research has found that women who follow a 'Mediterranean' diet in the six months before assisted reproductive treatment have a significantly better chance of becoming pregnant and giving birth to a live baby than women who did not.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
What makes kids with autism less social than their typically developing peers?Scientists have looked closely at electrical activity in the brains of children with autism spectrum disorder, or ASD, and typical development, or TD, to discern differences in the respective groups' reward systems. Recent findings provide support for two popular, competing theories used to explain why children with ASD tend to be less social than their TD peers: the social motivation hypothesis a
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Ingeniøren
Forsvaret dropper udbud af nye miljøskibeTo udtjente miljøskibe skulle have været erstattet af et stort og tre mindre nye. Men nu har parterne bag det nye forsvarsforlig annulleret udbuddet. I stedet overvejes det, om nye militære skibe kunne løse opgaven.
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Big Think
What the U.S.-Mexico border wall would look like in EuropeThe size of the U.S.-Mexico border wall proposed by the Trump administration seems shockingly ambitious when overlaid onto a map of Europe. Read More
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Big Think
Super Bowl LII: Are supersized linemen risking their health?As NFL linemen keep getting bigger, are they also risking their health? Here's how the offensive lines of the New England Patriots and Philadelphia Eagles stack up. Read More
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cognitive science
New study reveals how brain waves control working memorysubmitted by /u/burtzev [link] [comments]
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Ingeniøren
Tre tip til at redde dine dårlige ideerDe fleste oplever at skyde mindre gode ideer af sted, når de er på arbejde. Derfor er det nyttigt at vide, hvordan man reagerer, når det sker. Den rette reaktion kan endda styrke dit image.
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NYT > Science
Trilobites: The Super Blue Blood Moon Will Rise Early. Watch It Before You Go to Work.On Wednesday, Earth will cast its shadow over the second full moon of January, making it turn red in a lunar eclipse. Here’s when and where you can see it.
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
What makes kids with autism less social than their typically developing peers?Katherine Stavropoulos of the University of California, Riverside, looks closely at electrical activity in the brains of children with autism spectrum disorder, or ASD, and typical development, or TD, to discern differences in the respective groups' reward systems. Her recent findings provide support for two popular, competing theories used to explain why children with ASD tend to be less social t
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The Scientist RSS
German Carmakers Funded Tests of Diesel Fumes on Monkeys and HumansNews reports reveal that Volkswagen, Daimler, and BMW funded the organization that conducted the studies.
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The Scientist RSS
Pocket-Size Nanopore Device Sequences Entire Human GenomeMinION achieved the longest reads of DNA sequences to date.
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NYT > Science
New Jersey Embraces an Idea It Once Rejected: Make Utilities Pay to Emit CarbonDemocratic governors nationwide are taking steps to tax or price emissions within their own borders, even as Trump dismantles federal climate policy.
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Mediterranean diet may help women receiving IVF to achieve successful pregnanciesNew research has found that women who follow a 'Mediterranean' diet in the six months before assisted reproductive treatment have a significantly better chance of becoming pregnant and giving birth to a live baby than women who did not. The study is published in Human Reproduction.
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Futurity.org
This is the most nutritious plant-based milkSoy milk is the clear winner in a new comparison of the nutritional value of cow milk substitutes. While plant-based milk beverages like soy milk have been on the market for a couple of decades and are advertised as being healthy and wholesome for those who are lactose-intolerant, little research has compared the benefits and drawbacks of the various kinds of plant-based milk. A new study looks a
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New Scientist - News
Mediterranean diet linked to higher chance of successful IVFA study of nearly 250 women in Greece suggests that a Mediterranean diet might increase the chances of successfully having a baby via IVF fertility treatment
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Feed: All Latest
Strava Data Heat Maps Expose Military Base Locations Around the WorldThe US military is reexamining security policies after fitness tracker data shared on social media revealed bases and patrol routes
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Futurity.org
These glaciers may team up and cause faster meltingA large and potentially unstable Antarctic glacier may be melting farther inland than previously thought, according to new research. This melting could affect the stability of another large glacier nearby—an important finding for understanding and projecting ice sheet contributions to sea-level rise. The findings come from radar data collected at the same locations in 2004, 2012, and 2014, each r
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Popular Science
Here's how to watch the Super Bowl without cableTechnology Millions of people cut the cord, but the Super Bowl broadcast is still well within your reach. Watching the Super Bowl used to be as simple as flipping to the correct channel. Now, you just need to know where to look.
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The Atlantic
The Atlantic Daily: McCabe's Departure, Manafort's Past, Grammy HonorsWhat We’re Following Administration Mysteries: FBI Deputy Director Andrew McCabe is stepping down several weeks ahead of his planned retirement, which was expected in March. Though it’s not yet clear what prompted the change, it may come as welcome news to President Trump, who has attacked McCabe on Twitter and indicated that he distrusts him. The abrupt exit comes in the midst of heated controve
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Futurity.org
Watch: Plastic trash makes diseases worse for coralsPlastic trash—widespread throughout the world’s oceans—intensifies disease for coral and so puts reefs in peril, a new study suggests. “Plastic debris acts like a marine motor home for microbes,” says the study’s lead author Joleah Lamb, a postdoctoral research fellow at Cornell University who began collecting this data as a doctoral candidate at James Cook University in Australia. “Plastics make
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Futurity.org
Huntington’s ‘first domino’ may fall before birthThe symptoms of Huntington’s disease may actually be a late manifestation of a disease that originates much earlier—in the first steps of embryonic development. One in 10,000 Americans suffer from Huntington’s disease, and most begin to show symptoms in middle age as they develop jerky movements—and as these patients increasingly lose brain neurons, they slide into dementia. Researchers developed
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
Psychiatric medications are not overprescribed for kids, finds studyA new study challenges the popular notion that psychiatric medications are overprescribed in children and adolescents in the US. When the researchers compared prescribing rates with prevalence rates for the most common psychiatric disorders in children, they discovered that some of these medications may be underprescribed.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
Microbubbles make breast cancer more susceptible to radiation therapyBursting oxygen-filled microbubbles in breast cancer makes tumors three times more sensitive to radiation therapy in preliminary tests with animal models of the disease
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
Three critically endangered red-headed vulture nests discovered in Cambodia’s Chhep Wildlife SanctuaryThree nests of the Critically Endangered Red-headed vulture were found in January in Chhep Wildlife Sanctuary by conservationists. The population of this species in Cambodia is possibly less than 50 individuals. These nest discoveries give hope that conservation efforts may save this species from extinction.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
Vitamin deficiency 'puts cancer cells into hibernation'A new potential therapeutic agent called DPI effectively switches off cancer stem cells, preventing their proliferation, according to new research.
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
'Friends and family test' should no longer be compulsory, argue expertsThe friends and family test should no longer be mandatory, argue experts in The BMJ today.
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Austerity policies lie at heart of soaring homelessness and related health harms, argue expertsAusterity policies lie at the heart of soaring homelessness across England, with serious health implications for those affected, argue experts in The BMJ today.
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