Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Speed of light drops to zero at 'exceptional points'Light, which travels at a speed of 300,000 km/sec in a vacuum, can be slowed down and even stopped completely by methods that involve trapping the light inside crystals or ultracold clouds of atoms. Now in a new study, researchers have theoretically demonstrated a new way to bring light to a standstill: they show that light stops at "exceptional points," which are points at which two light modes c
9h
BBC News - Science & Environment
Hong Kong bans ivory trade in 'historic' voteThe move by Hong Kong's lawmakers is hailed by campaigners as "a lifeline for elephants".
8h
Ingeniøren
Norske 'intelligente' hjem gik amok: Lysene blinkede, og persienner og kontakter slukkede»Jeg ville gerne have betalt for at få et gammeldags elsystem,« siger en beboer i Hurdal Økolandsby.
12h
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Study reveals substantial impact of chronic diseases on cancer riskSeveral common chronic diseases together account for more than a fifth of new cancer cases and more than a third of cancer deaths, finds a study published by The BMJ today.
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Migraine linked to increased risk of cardiovascular problemsMigraine is associated with increased risks of cardiovascular problems (conditions affecting the heart and blood vessels) including heart attacks, stroke, blood clots and an irregular heart rate, say researchers in a study published by The BMJ today.
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Science : NPR
Whale Hello: Orcas Can Imitate Human Speech, Researchers FindA killer whale attempting to say "hello" or "Amy" did not sound as clear as, say, a parrot. But scientists found that the whales could repeat human vocalizations with some success. (Image credit: Valery Hache/AFP/Getty Images)
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Futurity.org
Speedy electrons may reveal shortcut to quantum computingWhile tracking electrons moving through exotic materials, researchers have discovered intriguing properties not found in conventional, silicon-based semiconductors. Unlike current silicon-based electronics, which shed most of the energy they consume as waste heat, the future is all about low-power computing. Known as spintronics, this technology relies on a quantum physical property of electrons—
11min
Science : NPR
Discovery In India Suggests An Early Global Spread Of Stone Age TechnologyScientists have found stone tools in India dating back to 385,000 years ago. The sharp tools were made with a Stone Age technique thought to have originated in Africa and Europe. (Image credit: Sharma Centre for Heritage Education, India/Nature)
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
NETs will not compensate for inadequate climate change mitigation efforts: EASAC reportA new report confirms that negative emission technologies (NETs) offer only 'limited realistic potential' to remove large amounts of carbon dioxide from the atmosphere and not at the scale envisaged in some climate scenarios.
21min
EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Standing several hours a day could help you lose weight, Mayo Clinic research findsStanding instead of sitting for six hours a day could help people lose weight over the long term, according to a Mayo Clinic study published in the European Journal of Preventive Cardiology.
21min
EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Stand up -- it could help you lose weightYou might want to read this on your feet. A new study published today in the European Journal of Preventive Cardiology found that standing instead of sitting for six hours a day could prevent weight gain and help people to actually lose weight.
21min
Live Science
Does Coffee Contain a Carcinogen? Here's What the Science SaysIf a lawsuit in California is successful, Golden State stores that sell coffee will have to warn customers that drinking a cup of joe may be a cancer risk, according to news reports.
22min
Popular Science
Is butter a carb?Fat Month Everything worth knowing about macronutrients. Let’s take a hard look at what carbohydrates, fats, and proteins actually are—and how they keep you healthy.
25min
New on MIT Technology Review
China and the US are bracing for an AI showdown—in the cloudAlibaba, Amazon, and others are adding ever more capable AI services to their cloud platforms.
26min
Popular Science
A look at the engineering and architecture in this year's Super Bowl stadiumTechnology U.S. Bank Stadium in Minnesota has interesting tech from its huge doors to its glass ceiling. U.S. Bank Stadium, home of the Minnesota Vikings and host of Super Bowl LI, is a record-breaking design straight from the future.
39min
The Scientist RSS
Severe Toxicity Reported in High-Dose AAV Gene Therapy in AnimalsBiotech stocks fell in response to the news.
50min
The Atlantic
Waymo Maintains Lead in Self-Driving Car RaceThere is a lot of smoke, many mirrors, and a ton of investment dollars in self-driving cars right now. Everyone has a story to tell about their technology or data or approach. But the only hard numbers, required by regulation, come from the California Department of Motor Vehicles, which asks that any company driving autonomously report how many miles they’ve driven and how many times a human had
51min
Latest Headlines | Science News
Grapevines are more drought-tolerant than thoughtGrapevines handle drought better than previously thought. This could inform irrigation management.
1h
The Atlantic
The Atlantic Politics & Policy Daily: Go Your Own TreyToday in 5 Lines A train carrying Republican lawmakers, family members, and staff to the GOP retreat in West Virginia collided with a dump truck, killing one person inside the truck and injuring others. Representative Trey Gowdy of South Carolina, the chairman of the House Oversight and Government Reform Committee, announced he will not seek another term in November. CNN reported that President T
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Popular Science
12 Valentine's Day gifts that are actually interestingGadgets From space-scented candles to huggable bouquets. PopSci's 2018 out of this world Valentine's Day gift guide. From romantic space candles to huggable bouquets.
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Landmark international study: CAR T-cell therapy safe and effective in youth with leukemiaResults of the global, multicenter, pivotal phase 2 study that led to the first FDA approval of a gene therapy/cell therapy approach known as CAR T-cell therapy, were published today in the New England Journal of Medicine. Senior authors on the study include Stephen A. Grupp, of Children's Hospital of Philadelphia and Michael A. Pulsipher, M.D., of Children's Hospital Los Angeles (CHLA).
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
T cell therapy shows persistent benefits in young leukemia patientsUpdated results from a global clinical trial of the CAR T-cell therapy, tisagenlecleucel, a landmark personalized treatment for a high-risk form of acute lymphoblastic leukemia (ALL), reveal that children and young adults continued to show high rates of durable, complete remission of their disease. Most side effects were short-lived and reversible.
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Catheter ablation better than pharmacological atrial fibrillation therapiesA new study revealed patients receiving radiofrequency catheter ablation compared to traditional drug therapies for atrial fibrillation (AF), a contributing factor to heart failure, had significantly lower hospitalization and mortality rates. The findings are published in the Feb. 1 issue of the New England Journal of Medicine.
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BBC News - Science & Environment
Luxembourg PM watches GovSat-1 space launchXavier Bettel is at Cape Canaveral in Florida to see his nation's latest space project go into orbit.
1h
Live Science
Wearable Cameras Show Animals' Worlds Like Never Before"Animals with Cameras" presents wildlife habits that have never been seen by humans.
1h
Big Think
This could be the beginning of the end for annoying allergy symptomsScientists discover an antibody that blocks the triggering of allergic reactions. Read More
1h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Coastal water absorbing more carbon dioxideNew research by a University of Delaware oceanographer and colleagues at other universities reveals that the water over the continental shelves is shouldering a larger than expected portion of atmospheric carbon dioxide. The findings may have important implications for scientists focused on understanding how much carbon dioxide can be released into the atmosphere while still keeping warming limite
1h
Quanta Magazine
How the Universe Got Its Bounce BackHumans have always entertained two basic theories about the origin of the universe. “In one of them, the universe emerges in a single instant of creation (as in the Jewish-Christian and the Brazilian Carajás cosmogonies),” the cosmologists Mario Novello and Santiago Perez-Bergliaffa noted in 2008 . In the other, “the universe is eternal, consisting of an infinite series of cycles (as in the cosmo
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
Cells rockin' in their DNAResearcher find that some mechanosensitive genes are suppressed when subjected to audible sound.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
Small molecule plays a big role in reducing cancer's spreadOne small molecule that helps regulate gene expression plays a big role in keeping us safe from the machinations of cancer, scientists report. In human lung cancer cells, they have shown low levels of the microRNA, miR-125a-5p, which enables the death of aberrant cells like cancer cells, correlates with high levels of the protein TIMP-1, which is already associated with a poor prognosis in patient
1h
Inside Science
January's Stellar Space PhotosJanuary's Stellar Space Photos We start the year with a selection of images that look toward distant stars. STSCI-H-p1801a-z-1000x846_crop2.jpg A stunning image of the Milky Way bulge, studded with glittering stars of all different sizes. Image credits: NASA/ESA/T. Brown (STScI) Space Wednesday, January 31, 2018 - 15:30 Abigail Malate, Staff Illustrator (Inside Science) – In this month’s slidesho
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
Maternal age over 40 is associated with an increased risk of preterm birthPregnant mothers aged 40 and over may have an increased risk for preterm birth, regardless of confounding factors, according to a new study.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
Materials research team lights the way for more efficient LEDsPhysicists show that cesium lead halide perovskites nanocrystals emit light much faster than conventional light emitting materials, enabling more efficient lasers and LEDs.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
Pulling an all-nighter impairs working memory in womenOver the last few decades, a wealth of evidence has accumulated to suggest that a lack of sleep is bad for mind and body. Working memory is important for keeping things in mind for briefer periods of time, which thereby facilitates reasoning and planning. A team of sleep scientists now demonstrates that acute sleep loss impacts working memory differently in women and men.
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The Atlantic
2,000 Days on Mars With the Curiosity RoverIt has now been just more than 2,000 days since NASA ’s Curiosity rover landed on the surface of Mars. In the days (or “sols,” as they are called on Mars) since its complex sky-crane touchdown, Curiosity has made countless discoveries with multiple instruments, including drills, lasers, and an array of imaging instruments that so far have sent 468,926 images back to Earth. Gathered here are a few
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The Atlantic
Trump Wants Little to Do With His Own Foreign PolicyIn recent months, the Trump administration has called for a dramatic shift in the direction of American foreign policy. How drastic of a shift? As the administration’s National Defense Strategy pithily put it: “Inter-state strategic competition, not terrorism, is now the primary concern in U.S. national security.” This means that when it comes to investing in new capabilities and planning for the
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Facebook profit up 20 percent to $4.26 bnFacebook Mark ZuckerbergFacebook on Wednesday reported that its profit in the final three months of last year climbed 20 percent to $4.26 billion as ad revenue and ranks of members grew.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Court rejects lawsuit against Twitter over IS attackA federal appeals court on Wednesday rejected a lawsuit that sought to hold Twitter liable for the deaths of two U.S. contractors in Jordan three years ago in an attack for which the Islamic State group claimed responsibility.
2h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Experts warn of risk of sinkhole in popular New Mexico areaExperts are painting a dire picture about the impending collapse of a giant cavern under a highway interchange that serves as a gateway to two national parks and the heart of New Mexico's oil and gas country.
2h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
NASA confirms re-discovered IMAGE satelliteThe identity of the satellite re-discovered on Jan. 20, 2018, has been confirmed as NASA's IMAGE satellite.
2h
New on MIT Technology Review
A small-scale demonstration shows how quantum computing could revolutionize data analysisChinese researchers use a powerful new technique to describe mathematical features of a network.
2h
Live Science
'Exceptional Points' Could Stop Light Waves in their TracksIn a new paper, a team of researchers showed that light might be made to come to an absolute stop at certain "exceptional points."
2h
Live Science
Giving a Hoot for Mideast Peace: Conservation Project Using Owls Proves UnifyingA conservation initiative using barn owls to control agricultural pests has nurtured a long-term collaboration between Israeli, Palestinian and Jordanian scientists.
2h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Balance exercises may help people with multiple sclerosisMINNEAPOLIS - A special program that involves balance and eye movement exercises may help people with multiple sclerosis (MS) with their balance problems and fatigue, according to a study published in the Jan. 31, 2018, online issue of Neurology®, the medical journal of the American Academy of Neurology.
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
In-person license renewal tied to fewer crash hospitalizations of drivers with dementiaRequiring physicians to report patients with dementia to state driver's licensing authorities is not associated with fewer hospitalizations from motor vehicle crashes. However, in-person license renewal laws and vision testing dramatically cut crashes involving drivers with dementia.
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Science | The Guardian
Met Office warns of global temperature rise exceeding 1.5C limitIn next five years greenhouse gases may push global warming past threshold set by Paris deal Global temperatures could break through the internationally agreed upper 1.5C limit within the next five years, according to a forecast by British scientists that raises fresh questions about the world’s efforts to tackle climate change. The Met Office forecasting service said that in the period from 2018
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Big Think
Study finds the brains of jazz musicians have superior flexibilityDoes what kind of music you play alter the benefits you get by playing it? Read More
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
University of Minnesota study shows wetlands provide landscape-scale reduction in nitrate pollutionA study by University of Minnesota researchers provides new insights to demonstrate that multiple wetlands or 'wetland complexes' within a watershed are extremely effective at reducing harmful nitrate in rivers and streams.
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The Atlantic
What Trump Didn't Say About EducationSometimes what’s not said in a State of the Union address is just as relevant as what’s said. That’s what some in the education world are thinking, at least, about Trump’s lack of mention of their topic in last night’s address. Despite being the third-longest State of the Union in the past 50 years, Trump’s speech barely mentioned schools, students, or learning. Trump’s only clear mention of the
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
Structural insight into molecular mechanism of PET degradationA metabolic engineering research team has newly suggested a molecular mechanism showing superior degradability of poly ethylene terephthalate (PET). This is the first report to simultaneously determine the 3-D crystal structure of Ideonella sakaiensis PETase and develop the new variant with enhanced PET degradation.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
ID'ing features of flu virus genome may help target surveillance for pandemic fluResearchers have identified features of the influenza virus genome that affect how well the virus multiplies. These features are similar but not identical across viral strains. It's possible that the extent of similarity between strains influences whether two flu viruses can mix their genetic material to make a hybrid virus with the potential to explode into pandemic flu.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
Body movements just need a 'puff' of dopamine to get startedA new study in mice suggests that a burst of dopamine levels at the beginning of a movement only, as opposed to all the time, is what gets us going. This may have important implications for treating Parkinson's disease.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
Dinosaur age meets the space ageA slab of sandstone found on the campus of NASA's Goddard Space Flight Center in Maryland may help scientists rewrite the history of mammal and dinosaur co-existence during the Cretaceous era.
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
NASA confirms re-discovered IMAGE satelliteThe identity of the satellite re-discovered on Jan. 20, 2018, has been confirmed as NASA's IMAGE satellite.
2h
Ingeniøren
Økonomerne har talt: »Flere ingeniører, tak«Alt andet lige er færre humanister og flere ingeniører til gavn for alle i samfundet – undtaget snævert set ingeniørerne selv.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
Hardening of the arteriesA team of researchers has advanced the scientific understanding of abnormal mineral accumulation in arteries, a complication often seen in patients with chronic kidney disease and diabetes. Mineralized arteries may affect heart functions, leading to death in some instances.
3h
Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
'Anxiety cells' identified in the brain's hippocampusResearchers have identified cells in the brains of mice that indicate when the animal is anxious.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
Evolution of China's flowering plants shows East-West divide between old, new lineagesAn international team of scientists has mapped the evolutionary relationships between China's 30,000 flowering plant species, uncovering a distinct regional pattern in biodiversity. Eastern China is a floral 'museum' with a rich array of ancient lineages and distant relatives while the western provinces are an evolutionary 'cradle' for newer and more closely related species.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
Engineers explore microfluidics with LEGO bricksThe field of microfluidics involves minute devices that precisely manipulate fluids at submillimeter scales. Such devices typically take the form of flat, two-dimensional chips, etched with tiny channels and ports that are arranged to perform various operations, such as mixing, sorting, pumping, and storing fluids as they flow. Now scientists, looking beyond such lab-on-a-chip designs, have found
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
The amazing flexibility of red blood cellsRed blood cells must be flexible to squeeze through tiny capillaries to deliver oxygen. Chemists have now discovered the secret of this flexibility: a 2-D triangular mesh, like a geodesic dome, underlies the membrane, each strut made of the protein spectrin, which is like a spring allowing the mesh and membrane to bend and flex. Super-resolution microscopy revealed fine detail of the mesh and stru
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The Atlantic
Bob Menendez Is Off the HookSenator Bob Menendez won a major victory in November, when a judge declared a mistrial in the corruption case against him, and on Wednesday, the New Jersey Democrat won another: The Justice Department filed to dismiss the corruption charges against him, effectively closing his case—and highlighting the growing difficulty of successfully convicting public officials of corruption. Menendez’s weeks-
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
NOAA launching investigation into minke whale deathsAn investigation will be conducted into a spate of deaths among minke whales along the East Coast last year, the federal government announced on Wednesday.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Field Museum scientists in Chicago studying Michigan meteorScientists at Chicago's Field Museum are studying a piece of the meteor that broke apart earlier this month over Michigan.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Mexico auctions six of nine major deep-water oil blocksMexico on Wednesday auctioned off six deep-water oil blocks located in the Gulf of Mexico, the largest such auction since the country's government opened the sector to private industry.
3h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
GPM probes Category 4 Tropical Cyclone CebileNASA analyzed a major tropical cyclone spinning in the Southwestern Indian Ocean and measured its rainfall.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
NASA finds Extra-Tropical Cyclone Fehi shearedTropical Cyclone Fehi has transitioned into an extra-tropical cyclone was wind shear pushed the bulk of clouds and thunderstorms south of its center. NASA's Terra satellite and the NASA and Japan Aerospace Exploration Agency's GPM satellite confirmed the effect of wind shear as the storm triggered warnings in New Zealand.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Most of last 11,000 years cooler than past decade in North America, EuropeUniversity of Wyoming researchers led a climate study that determined recent temperatures across Europe and North America appear to have few, if any, precedent in the past 11,000 years.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Reconstructing an ancient lethal weaponArchaeologists are a little like forensic investigators: They scour the remains of past societies, looking for clues in pottery, tools and bones about how people lived, and how they died.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Research gives optical switches the 'contrast' of electronic transistorsCurrent computer systems represent bits of information, the 1's and 0's of binary code, with electricity. Circuit elements, such as transistors, operate on these electric signals, producing outputs that are dependent on their inputs.
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Machine learning techniques generate clinical labels of medical scansResearchers used machine learning techniques, including natural language processing algorithms, to identify clinical concepts in radiologist reports for CT scans.
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
NASA's GPM probes Category 4 Tropical Cyclone CebileNASA's GPM Probes Category 4 Tropical Cyclone CebileNASA analyzed a major tropical cyclone spinning in the Southwestern Indian Ocean and measured its rainfall.
3h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Chlorinated lipids predict lung injury and death in sepsis patientsResearchers studied blood samples taken from patients diagnosed with sepsis and found that elevated chlorinated lipids predicted whether a patient would go on to suffer acute respiratory distress symptom (ARDS) and die within 30 days from a lung injury.
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Biomarker tests could someday help improve outcomes for organ transplant patientsOrgan transplants save lives, but the story doesn't end when a patient emerges from the operating room. Rejection episodes, in which the immune system rallies against the new organ, can occur. According to an article in Chemical & Engineering News (C&EN), the weekly newsmagazine of the American Chemical Society, researchers are turning to biomarkers to help them get a better idea of which patients
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
Reconstructing an ancient lethal weaponResearchers have reconstructed prehistoric projectiles and points from ancient sites in what is now Alaska and studied the qualities that would make for a lethal hunting weapon. By examining and testing different projectile points, the team has come to a new understanding about the technological choices people made in ancient times.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
HPV may lurk in your throatResearchers found human papilloma virus (HPV), the culprit behind cervical and head and neck cancers, hiding in small pockets on the surface of tonsils. They believe HPV may evade the immune system in this hiding place, allowing the virus to lay in wait for an opportunity to reinstate an infection or invade the tonsil tissue to develop cancer.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
Spinal cord injury research: Bonus benefit to activity-based trainingResearchers have discovered that the training, designed to help individuals with SCI improve motor function, also leads to improved bladder and bowel function and increased sexual desire.
3h
Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
Most of last 11,000 years cooler than past decade in North America, EuropeNatural fluctuations in climate have occurred over past millennia, which would have naturally led to climatic cooling today in the absence of human activity.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
Brain's insular cortex mediates approach and avoidance responses to others in distressSearching for clues to complex social behaviors, experiments found that laboratory rats - much like humans - will approach distressed juveniles but avoid distressed adults -- responses known as social affective behaviors, researchers report. Additionally, the brain's insular cortex region is required for proper reactions to others in distress. Further, changes in insular cortex excitability, cause
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
Trust is good, quantum trickery is betterScientists prove, for the first time, the security of so-called device-independent quantum cryptography in a regime that is attainable with state-of-the-art quantum technology, thus paving the way to practical realization of such schemes in which users don not have to worry whether their devices can be trusted or not.
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Inside Science
Preventing Preterm BirthsPreventing Preterm Births Researchers are working on new ways to help babies who are born too soon. Preventing Preterm Births Video of Preventing Preterm Births Human Wednesday, January 31, 2018 - 13:45 Jason Socrates Bardi, Editor (Inside Science) -- Life is a journey, long and rich for some. But for some babies born too soon, the journey can be harsh and short. Every year, more than 15 million
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Penn engineering research gives optical switches the 'contrast' of electronic transistorsPenn Engineers have taken an important step toward the creation of a working optical transistor: precisely controlling the mixing of optical signals via tailored electric fields, and obtaining outputs with a near perfect contrast and extremely large on/off ratios.
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Scientific American Content: Global
Groundhogs Don't Have a ClueThe chubby rodents are infamously bad at forecasting the end of winter—but birds, on the other hand, are pretty good -- Read more on ScientificAmerican.com
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The Scientist RSS
Viruses Related to Zika May Also Harm FetusesStudies in mice suggest that other flaviviruses, such as West Nile virus and Powassan virus, may cause birth defects, too.
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The Scientist RSS
CDC Director Resigns Over Unresolved Conflicts of InterestBrenda Fitzgerald had drawn criticism for tobacco-related investments, among others.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
From fungi to humans, 'smart valves' assist communication within, between cellsGoogling 'SNARE proteins,' a neuroscientist got a screenful of images showing corkscrew-shaped molecules, intertwined as they seize the outer membranes of two cells. Now, these images will need to be changed.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
Falling IQ scores in childhood may signal psychotic disorders in later lifeNew research shows adults who develop psychotic disorders experience declines in IQ during childhood and adolescence, falling progressively further behind their peers across a range of cognitive abilities. The researchers found falls in IQ start in early childhood, and suggest educational interventions could potentially delay the onset of mental illness.
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The Atlantic
The Problem With ‘Asians Are Good at Science’It’s a familiar stereotype: Asian people are good at math and science. This belief has pervaded American pop culture and media for decades, perhaps best exemplified in a now-infamous 1987 Time magazine cover that showed six young students, sitting behind a computer and books, with the caption “Those Asian American Whiz Kids.” Since the stereotype ostensibly is a compliment, there’s a temptation t
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The Atlantic
Trump Is Making 2018 Much Harder for RepublicansLike colliding storm systems, the three central dynamics shaping the 2018 electoral battlefield converged in President Trump’s first State of the Union address on Tuesday. And control of Congress may turn on which one of these forces voters weigh most heavily. The first dynamic is the buoyant state of the economy, which the president touted in triumphal tones. Almost without exception, Republican
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Live Science
Do Omega-3 Supplements Really Cut Heart Attack Risk?A new review looks at whether omega-3 fatty acid supplements really benefit people with heart disease.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
Lone star ticks not guilty in spread of Lyme diseaseThe bacteria that cause Lyme disease are transmitted to humans primarily by the blacklegged tick (Ixodes scapularis). Often presumed guilty by association is the lone star tick (Amblyomma americanum). However, a new review of three decades' worth of research concludes the latter should be exonerated: While lone star ticks are guilty of transmitting bacteria that cause several human illnesses, the
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
Who's still smoking: Report highlights populations still at riskAlthough tobacco control measures have reduced overall smoking rates in the United States, a new report says several vulnerable subpopulations continue to smoke at high rates.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
An elastic skin-like liquid bandage wins fda approvalA biomedical start-up company has won FDA approval for its first product, a biopolymer liquid bandage.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
What time is it? The Arctic charr’s inner clock meets the midnight sunBelow ice and snow, in pitch dark, Arctic charr’s circadian clock still ticks with precision. The exception comes during the darkest and brightest weeks of the year, when daily activity rhythms break down.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
Dishonest individuals perceived as less capableIf you saw someone steal an expensive item from a department store, would you think he is less capable at his job? Most people would think that, according to new research.
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New Scientist - News
People are using mosquito nets for fishing and that’s a bad ideaIn many tropical countries mosquito nets are handed out to help stop the spread of malaria, but it seems they are often being repurposed as fishing nets
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New Scientist - News
Depriving the brain of a sense may improve stroke recoveryTrimming the whiskers of mice suggests that blocking off some functions of the brain can help it rewire itself around stroke damage, speeding up recovery
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Scientific American Content: Global
Stone Tools from India Fan Debate over Origins of Cultural ComplexityThe tools could suggest that Homo sapiens reached South Asia far earlier than previously thought, but critics disagree -- Read more on ScientificAmerican.com
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New on MIT Technology Review
The doctor responsible for gene therapy’s greatest setback is sounding a new alarmToxic effects seen in animals raise questions about new gene therapies for children.
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Latest Headlines | Science News
Zika may not be the only virus of its kind that can damage a fetusZika may not be alone among flaviviruses in its ability to harm a developing fetus, a new study in mice finds.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
Interstellar molecules inspire new transformationsWhen illuminating with LED light, chemists have generated carbynes, a highly reactive chemical species that allowed them to modify drugs like anticancer paclitaxel, antidepressant duloxetine and NSAID ibuprofen.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
A mutational timer is built into the chemistry of DNAScientists have discovered that DNA contains a kind of built-in timer that clocks the frequency with which mutations occur. They show that DNA bases can shape-shift for a thousandth of a second, transiently morphing into alternative states that allow the molecule's replication machinery to incorporate the wrong base pairs into its double helix. Such mismatches, though rare, serve as the basis of g
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
Engineers develop flexible lithium battery for wearable electronicsEngineering researchers have developed a prototype of a high-performance flexible lithium-ion battery that demonstrates -- concurrently -- both good flexibility and high energy density. The battery is shaped like the human spine and allows remarkable flexibility, high energy density, and stable voltage no matter how it is flexed or twisted. The device could help advance applications for wearable e
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
Prostate cancer: Poor prognosis in men with diabetesMen with type 2 diabetes are less likely to develop prostate cancer than patients without diabetes. However, the mortality rate is higher. Researchers were able to show that in the affected individuals the androgen receptor and the mitogenic forms of the insulin receptor were more strongly expressed. This could explain why patients with diabetes have a poorer prognosis for prostate cancer.
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Trust is good, quantum trickery is betterAn international team of scientists prove, for the first time, the security of so-called device-independent quantum cryptography in a regime that is attainable with state-of-the-art quantum technology, thus paving the way to practical realization of such schemes in which users don not have to worry whether their devices can be trusted or not.
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
America's child poverty rate remains stubbornly high despite important progressWhile many American families have experienced economic gains, children are still most likely to live in households too poor to cover their basic needs. Children make up around a quarter of the US population, but represent more than a third of the nation's poorest residents. Some 41 percent (29.8 million) of America's children were living on the brink of poverty in 2016 -- including more than 5 mil
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Most of last 11,000 years cooler than past decade in North America, EuropeNatural fluctuations in climate have occurred over past millennia, which would have naturally led to climatic cooling today in the absence of human activity.
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Spinal cord injury research: Bonus benefit to activity-based trainingResearchers in the Kentucky Spinal Cord Injury Research Center (KSCIRC) at the University of Louisville have discovered that the training, designed to help individuals with SCI improve motor function, also leads to improved bladder and bowel function and increased sexual desire.
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Kids born later in the year can still excel in sportA child's birth month shouldn't affect their long-term prospects in high-level sport and those who hold off on specialising until later years may be the most successful, according to new research from the University of Sydney.
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Cancer 'vaccine' eliminates tumors in mice, Stanford researchers findInjecting minute amounts of two immune-stimulating agents directly into solid tumors in mice can eliminate all traces of cancer in the animals, including distant, untreated metastases, according to a study by researchers at the Stanford University School of Medicine.
4h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Like Zika, West Nile virus causes fetal brain damage, death in miceTwo viruses closely related to Zika -- West Nile and Powassan -- can spread from an infected pregnant mouse to her fetuses, causing brain damage and fetal death, according to a new study from Washington University School of Medicine in St. Louis. The findings suggest that Zika may not be unique in its ability to cause miscarriages and birth defects.
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Stroke recovery improved by sensory deprivation, mouse study showsMice that had experienced strokes were more likely to recover the ability to use a front paw if their whiskers were clipped following a stroke. Trimming the whiskers deprives an area of the mouse's brain from receiving sensory signals from the animals' whiskers. And it leaves that area of the brain more plastic -- or receptive to rewiring to take on new tasks.
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
All in the family: Relatives of Zika virus may cause birth defectsRelatives of Zika virus can damage developing fetuses in mice and were able to replicate in human maternal and fetal tissues, researchers report.
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
The influence of hydropower dams on river connectivity in the Andes AmazonHydropower dams in the Andes Amazon significantly disturb river connectivity in this region, and consequently, the many natural and human systems these rivers support, according a new study.
4h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Smog-forming soilsA previously unrecognized source of nitrogen oxide is contributing up to about 40 percent of the NOx emissions in California, according to a study led by the University of California, Davis. The study traces the emissions to fertilized soils in the Central Valley region.
4h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Prenatal famine drives DNA methylation and adult health six decades laterEpigenetic fine-tuning of genes involved in development and metabolism plays a key role in the link between prenatal famine exposure and adult metabolic health. While earlier studies using animal models have illustrated the potential of epigenetic programming to influence health over the short run, this study in humans shows that the impact of a nutrition shock on epigenetic markers in early life
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Maternal age over 40 is associated with an increased risk of preterm birthPregnant mothers aged 40 and over may have an increased risk for preterm birth, regardless of confounding factors, according to a study published Jan. 31, 2018, in the open-access journal PLOS ONE by Florent Fuchs from CHU Sainte Justine, Canada and colleagues.
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Cells rockin' in their DNAKyoto University Researcher find that some mechanosensitive genes are suppressed when subjected to audible sound.
4h
Latest Headlines | Science News
Gassy farm soils are a shockingly large source of these air pollutantsCalifornia’s farm soils produce a surprisingly large amount of smog-causing air pollutants.
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NYT > Science
Trilobites: How to Get a Killer Whale to Say ‘Hello’Human Orca SoundsResearchers trained an orca to mimic human sounds like, “hello,” “Amy” and “bye-bye,” which could contribute to understanding of the behavior and culture of killer whales in the wild.
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NYT > Science
Matter: The Famine Ended 70 Years Ago, but Dutch Genes Still Bear ScarsBabies born during the Dutch Hunger Winter became adults with higher rates of health problems. Now researchers may have found the genetic switches that made it happen.
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Live Science
Watch SpaceX's Elon Musk Play with a Flamethrower (Video)Billionaire entrepreneur and SpaceX and Tesla CEO Elon Musk unveiled a new line of flamethrowers for his tunneling project, The Boring Company, with a wild Instagram video.
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Science | The Guardian
Mothers in early 30s have lowest risk of premature birth, study findsWomen in their early thirties have a 1% chance of early birth, with the risk rising to 1.2% for those over 40, analysis shows Mothers in their early 30s have the lowest chance of having a premature baby, new research has found, with the risk rising significantly once the mother passes 40. Records of more than 165,000 pregnant women were analysed, showing that the likelihood of having a baby more
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Big Think
In a world first, scientists grow new ears for children with microtiaIn a landmark study for the tissue engineering community, scientists have successfully grown and reconstructed new ears for children born with a birth defect. Read More
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Central Valley soil emissions a large source of state's nitrogen oxide pollutionA previously unrecognized source of nitrogen oxide is contributing up to about 40 percent of the NOx emissions in California, according to a study led by the University of California, Davis. The study traces the emissions to fertilized soils in the Central Valley region.
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Science : NPR
Ancient Turkey Bones In Mexico Reveal A Strange Relationship With HumansNew tests reveal humans have long raised the birds, and not just for food. Ancient Mesoamericans were buried with turkeys, perhaps as snacks, companions or status symbols. There was even a turkey god. (Image credit: Wolfgang Kaehler/LightRocket via Getty Images)
4h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News
New and highly sensitive ELISA technique for bioanalysis of bevacizumabBevacizumab is an anti-growth factor vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF) monoclonal antibody, it is the antiangiogenic agent at the most advanced stage of development in the treatment of NSCLC.This drug was selected because of its inter individual differences in clinical response, its therapeutic importance in the treatment of non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC).
4h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News
HPV may lurk in your throatURMC researchers found human papilloma virus (HPV), the culprit behind cervical and head and neck cancers, hiding in small pockets on the surface of tonsils. They believe HPV may evade the immune system in this hiding place, allowing the virus to lay in wait for an opportunity to reinstate an infection or invade the tonsil tissue to develop cancer.
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
NASA finds Extra-Tropical Cyclone Fehi shearedTropical Cyclone Fehi has transitioned into an extra-tropical cyclone was wind shear pushed the bulk of clouds and thunderstorms south of its center. NASA's Terra satellite and the NASA and Japan Aerospace Exploration Agency's GPM satellite confirmed the effect of wind shear as the storm triggered warnings in New Zealand.
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Brain's insular cortex mediates approach and avoidance responses to others in distressSearching for clues to complex social behaviors, experiments found that laboratory rats - much like humans -- will approach distressed juveniles but avoid distressed adults -- responses known as social affective behaviors, Boston College researchers report in Nature Neuroscience. Additionally, the brain's insular cortex region is required for proper reactions to others in distress. Further, change
4h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Reconstructing an ancient lethal weaponUniversity of Washington researchers reconstructed prehistoric projectiles and points from ancient sites in what is now Alaska and studied the qualities that would make for a lethal hunting weapon. By examining and testing different projectile points, the team has come to a new understanding about the technological choices people made in ancient times.
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Viden
RUMREJSEN 2018 Se eksperternes svar på alle jeres spørgsmål om Mars, Månen og MælkevejenVerdens førende rumeksperter sad klar til at gøre dr.dk's brugere klogere på det enorme univers.
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Viden
Rumrejsen 2018: Rejs med fra Jorden og langt ud i universetLivebloggen fulgte DR1-programmet om verdensrummet. Her finder du alle links og artikler, der blev delt under programmet.
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NYT > Science
The Super Blue Blood Moon: Pictures From an Astronomical Hat TrickAround the world, people woke up early or stayed up late to take in the cosmic coincidence of a blue moon, a supermoon and a lunar eclipse.
4h
Live Science
Ancient Ale: Oldest Beer in Greece Dates to Bronze AgeThe ancient Greeks may have liberally indulged in wine, but that's not the only alcoholic beverage they imbibed, according to a new study that describes the discovery of two potential Bronze Age breweries.
4h
iBiology (uploads) on YouTube
Dorothee Kern (Brandeis, HHMI) 2: Using Evolution to Reveal a Cancer Drug’s MechanismDorothee Kern explains how visualizing protein dynamics (i.e. watching proteins in action) allows us to better understand protein function and optimize drug design. https://www.ibiology.org/biophysics/protein-dynamics/ Talk Overview: Proteins such as signaling molecules, catalytic enzymes and membrane transporters, are not static but are in a state of constant motion for function. In her first ta
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iBiology (uploads) on YouTube
Dorothee Kern (Brandeis, HHMI) 1: Visualizing Protein DynamicsDorothee Kern explains how visualizing protein dynamics (i.e. watching proteins in action) allows us to better understand protein function and optimize drug design. https://www.ibiology.org/biophysics/protein-dynamics/ Talk Overview: Proteins such as signaling molecules, catalytic enzymes and membrane transporters, are not static but are in a state of constant motion for function. In her first ta
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
New parasitoid wasp likely uses unique saw-like spines to break out of its host bodyA newly discovered parasitoid wasp species from Costa Rica might be only slightly larger than a sesame seed, yet it has quite vicious ways when it comes to its life as an insect developing inside the body of another. Most likely, it uses its unique saw-like row of spines on its back to cut its way out of its host.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
Engineers 3-D print shape-shifting smart gelEngineers have invented a '4-D printing' method for a smart gel that could lead to the development of 'living' structures in human organs and tissues, soft robots and targeted drug delivery.
4h
The Atlantic
Why a North Korea Hawk Couldn't Find a Home in the Trump AdministrationJust hours before Donald Trump pledged in his State of the Union address to counter the nuclear threat from North Korea with “maximum pressure” and “American resolve,” the man who was once poised to be the U.S. envoy to South Korea issued a dire warning about what might be behind the president’s words. For weeks now , speculation has swirled that the Trump administration is seriously thinking abo
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The Atlantic
A Train Carrying Republican Lawmakers Is Involved in a Fatal CrashOn Wednesday at 11:20 AM in Crozet, Virginia, a train carrying Republican members of Congress, their families, and staff to a GOP retreat in West Virginia collided with a dump truck on the tracks, according to an Amtrak spokesperson. One aide described the feeling from inside the train as a “massive lurch forward” that “launched everyone into the seats in front of them.” According to two members
4h
Popular Science
Got a good feeling about someone? You probably just like the way they look.Animals Humans have a surprisingly primitive way of sizing up strangers Like Pavlov's dogs, we unconsciously use our past experiences to guide our future decisions. Sometimes, the results are dangerous.
5h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Carnegie Mellon Power Sector Index sees renewables with highest growth rateOn January 9th, Carnegie Mellon University, supported by Mitsubishi Hitachi Power Systems (MHPS), announced the release of the Power Sector Carbon Index's third quarter update, measuring the carbon dioxide emissions intensity from the U.S. electrical power generation sector. In comparing the third quarter of 2017 to the third quarter of 2016, the index found that the U.S. power plant emissions ave
5h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Apple to respond to US probes into slowdown of old iPhonesApple is cooperating with U.S. government inquiries into its secret slowdown of older iPhones, further complicating its efforts to move past an issue that irked customers whose devices bogged down.
5h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Stone tools in India suggest earlier human exit from AfricaJust a week after scientists reported evidence that our species left Africa earlier than we thought, another discovery is suggesting the date might be pushed back further.
5h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News
The amazing flexibility of red blood cellsRed blood cells must be flexible to squeeze through tiny capillaries to deliver oxygen. UC Berkeley chemists have now discovered the secret of this flexibility: a 2-D triangular mesh, like a geodesic dome, underlies the membrane, each strut made of the protein spectrin, which is like a spring allowing the mesh and membrane to bend and flex. Super-resolution microscopy revealed fine detail of the m
5h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Evolution of China's flowering plants shows East-West divide between old, new lineagesAn international team of scientists has mapped the evolutionary relationships between China's 30,000 flowering plant species, uncovering a distinct regional pattern in biodiversity. Eastern China is a floral 'museum' with a rich array of ancient lineages and distant relatives while the western provinces are an evolutionary 'cradle' for newer and more closely related species.
5h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News
A mutational timer is built into the chemistry of DNAScientists have discovered that DNA contains a kind of built-in timer that clocks the frequency with which mutations occur. They show that DNA bases can shape-shift for a thousandth of a second, transiently morphing into alternative states that allow the molecule's replication machinery to incorporate the wrong base pairs into its double helix. Such mismatches, though rare, serve as the basis of g
5h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Interstellar molecules inspire new transformationsWhen illuminating with LED light, chemists at ICIQ generated carbynes, a highly reactive chemical species that allowed them to modify drugs like anticancer paclitaxel, antidepressant duloxetine and NSAID ibuprofen. The study, led by young chemist Marcos García-Suero, just published in Nature.
5h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News
From fungi to humans, 'smart valves' assist communication within, between cellsGoogling 'SNARE proteins,' neuroscientist Edward Chapman gets a screenful of images showing corkscrew-shaped molecules, intertwined as they seize the outer membranes of two cells. 'They did not give us credit at Wikipedia, but we drew that cartoon,' he says, with delicious irony. 'And now we've proven that this model is wrong,' he says. 'The textbooks need to be adjusted.'
5h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Body movements just need a 'puff' of dopamine to get startedA new study in mice suggests that a burst of dopamine levels at the beginning of a movement only, as opposed to all the time, is what gets us going. This may have important implications for treating Parkinson's disease.
5h
The Atlantic
An Urban Legend Is Born, Exposing the Power of Subjective TruthIn 1996 in Niagara, a tornado tore through a drive-in theater, ripping apart the movie screen—just as it played the scene in Twister in which a tornado demolishes a drive-in movie theater. “It seemed like the screen was coming alive,” remembers one witness. Another: “We’re watching Twister , and my god, we had a twister!” It’s an incredible story, as its many witnesses will readily attest. But di
5h
The Atlantic
The Atlantic Daily: Here's What to Read After Trump's First State of the Union AddressWhat We’re Following The State of the Union: On the surface, President Trump’s first official rendition of the annual address presented an optimistic vision of a unified America. Yet that image—as well as the president’s delivery— contrasted sharply with many listeners’ tumultuous experience over the past year. What’s more, the speech had an undercurrent of dark and violent imagery that recalled
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New Scientist - News
Trump’s 90-day plan for opioids has failed – here’s a better oneDeaths caused by accidental drug overdoses in the US now exceed those from motor vehicle incidents and guns. The government has been all talk and little action
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New Scientist - News
Someone made advanced stone tools in India 172,000 years agoA cache of stone tools found in south India reveals that the hominins living there over 170,000 years ago already had advanced tool-making skills
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New Scientist - News
‘Speaking’ orca is further proof they shouldn’t be kept captiveHuman Orca SoundsAn orca called Wikie who learned to mimic human speech could teach us a lot about killer whale culture – but that’s no reason to keep orcas in captivity
5h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Silk fibers could be high-tech 'natural metamaterials'New research has demonstrated how the nano-architecture of a silkworm's fiber causes "Anderson localization of light," a discovery that could lead to various innovations and a better understanding of light transport and heat transfer.
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Latest Headlines | Science News
Sharp stones found in India signal surprisingly early toolmaking advancesToolmaking revolution reached what’s now India before Homo sapiens did, a new study suggests.
5h
The Atlantic
Trump's Dark, Bloody-Minded State of the UnionHidden just slightly beneath the surface of Donald Trump’s rather dull first State of the Union speech was another, darker speech—unusually dark for a peacetime address of its type. As I wrote in an analysis Tuesday night, the speech was long and fairly conventional, especially for an unconventional president. Trump went through the motions of calling for bipartisanship, but the moments when he r
5h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Forest conservation can have greater ecological impacts by allowing sustainable harvestingNew research at the University of Missouri has found that forest owners at greater risk of illegally cutting trees from their forests prefer to participate in conservation programs that allow sustainable timber harvesting. The findings of the study, conducted by Francisco Aguilar and Phillip Mohebalian, could be used to craft conservation contracts that are more likely to be accepted by forest own
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
ID'ing features of flu virus genome may help target surveillance for pandemic fluResearchers at Washington University School of Medicine in St. Louis have identified features of the influenza virus genome that affect how well the virus multiplies. These features are similar but not identical across viral strains. It's possible that the extent of similarity between strains influences whether two flu viruses can mix their genetic material to make a hybrid virus with the potentia
5h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News
MIT engineers explore microfluidics with LEGO bricksThe field of microfluidics involves minute devices that precisely manipulate fluids at submillimeter scales. Such devices typically take the form of flat, two-dimensional chips, etched with tiny channels and ports that are arranged to perform various operations, such as mixing, sorting, pumping, and storing fluids as they flow. Now the MIT team, looking beyond such lab-on-a-chip designs, has found
5h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News
ColoradoSPH research uncovers risk factors for mysterious kidney disease in farm workersPrevious studies have identified an illness called 'Mesoamerican Nephropathy,' also referred to as Chronic Kidney Disease of Unknown Origin (CKDu). Notably, this new study shows that when a workforce has access to water, rest, and shade, the rates of CKDu onset and kidney injury are lower, and the injury is less severe than that seen in previous studies.
5h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
From fungi to humans, 'smart valves' assist communication within, between cellsGoogling "SNARE proteins," neuroscientist Edward Chapman gets a screenful of images showing corkscrew-shaped molecules, intertwined as they seize the outer membranes of two cells. "They did not give us credit at Wikipedia, but we drew that cartoon," he says, with delicious irony.
5h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
A mutational timer is built into the chemistry of DNAIf you had to copy billions of letters from one sheet of paper to another, you'd probably make a few mistakes. So it might not come as a surprise that when DNA makes a copy of its three-billion-base genetic code, it can slip up too.
5h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Evolution of China's flowering plants shows East-West divide between old, new lineagesAn international team of scientists has mapped the evolutionary relationships between China's 30,000 flowering plant species, uncovering a distinct regional pattern in biodiversity. Eastern China is a floral "museum" with a rich array of ancient lineages and distant relatives while the western provinces are an evolutionary "cradle" for newer and more closely related species.
5h
Big Think
10 philosophers who were hopeless romanticsPhilosophers aren't known for their love lives, but a few have managed to be tragic romantics anyway. Read More
5h
Big Think
A.I. researchers develop neural networks to predict government corruptionScientists devise neural networks that can spot likely government corruption. Read More
5h
Scientific American Content: Global
A Big Step toward a Blood Test for Alzheimer'sA simple technique to gauge brain levels of a toxic protein could improve diagnosis and drug trials -- Read more on ScientificAmerican.com
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Big Think
You had me at 'hello!': How killer whales mimic human speechAlas, much like parrots, they don’t know what they’re saying … it’s just that they can do it, which is still pretty remarkable. Read More
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Artificial intelligence sparks hope—and fear, US poll showsAmericans are torn over the promise of artificial intelligence, a new poll showed Wednesday, expressing broad optimism about the emerging technologies but also fearing their negative impacts—including job losses, a poll showed Wednesday.
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The Atlantic
Why Don't Republicans Fret About the Debt Anymore?ISIS, tax cuts, public trust. Race, immigration, the Empire State Building. Civil-service reform, North Korea, manufacturing. President Donald Trump’s State of the Union speech addressed a broad sweep of issues. But one central economic topic went notably missing: the country’s growing annual deficits and its increasing burden of debt. The omission was a sign of the remarkable volte-face the Repu
6h
The Atlantic
North Korea Is Not the Threat Trump Would Have You BelieveDuring his State of the Union address on Tuesday, President Donald Trump spent several minutes speaking about two men who suffered horrifically in North Korea. Trump told the well-known, tragic story of Otto Warmbier, a University of Virginia student arrested in January 2016 in North Korea for allegedly stealing a propaganda poster. Not long after Pyongyang sentenced him to 15 years of hard labor
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Viden
Jorden kalder: Er der liv derude?Tror du, at vi er alene i universet, eller er der andre derude? Hvordan ser de(t) i så fald ud? Og hvordan finder vi overhovedet ? Tre eksperter giver deres bud.
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BBC News - Science & Environment
The 'super blue blood Moon' across the worldEyes around the globe have been turning to the skies to view the lunar event.
6h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
A glimpse in the flora of Southeast Asia puts a spotlight on its conservationCovering only 3 % of Earth's total land area, four overlapping biodiversity hotspots in South East China - Indo-Burma, Philippines, Sundaland and Wallacea - are estimated to be the home of the astonishing 20 to 25 % of higher plant species in the area. While offering an insight into this extraordinary flora, a new special issue published in the open access journal PhytoKeys, contributes to the tot
6h
New on MIT Technology Review
Samsung is now making cryptocurrency chips, while Intel looks on
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
Colorado potato beetle genome gives insight into major agricultural pestScientists have sequenced the Colorado potato beetle's genome, probing its genes for clues to its surprising adaptability to new environments and insecticides. The new information sheds light on how this insect jumps to new plant hosts and handles toxins, and it will help researchers explore more ways to control the beetle.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
Stealth virus for cancer therapyScientists have redesigned an adenovirus for use in cancer therapy. To achieve this they developed a new protein shield that hides the virus and protects it from being eliminated. Adapters on the surface of the virus enable the reconstructed virus to specifically infect tumor cells.
6h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Tasty and pink, sea urchin species may be a climate-tolerant food sourceSea urchin is a delicacy in Asia, South America, Europe, and increasingly in California, where the uniquely flavored roe, or uni, is used in sushi, gourmet cuisine, and products such as sauces and flavorings. But the urchin species currently harvested off the California coast are vulnerable to increased water temperatures and ocean acidification.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Taking the long view: US scientists affirm value of long term researchFor many years, long-term research has played a key role in revealing the planet's complex ecological and evolutionary dynamics. But some scientists argue that there's a need to revise strategies for long-term research to fill gaps in research, better examine underrepresented fields, and address limits in design and data collection.
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The Atlantic
From Crack Addict to America's Most Celebrated ChefMichael Solomonov, the winner of the 2017 James Beard Award for outstanding American chef, should probably not, by his own reckoning, be alive. For many years, this celebrated cook and restauranteur was addicted to crack cocaine. “I didn’t think I was a drug addict,” Solomonov told The Atlantic ’s Jeffrey Goldberg in a recent podcast episode of The Atlantic Interview . Even after he dropped out o
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
Molecular secrets revealed: Antipsychotic docked in its receptorScientists have deciphered the molecular structure of a widely prescribed antipsychotic docked in its key receptor. They are hopeful that this discovery may hold secrets to designing better treatments for schizophrenia, bipolar disorder, and other mental illnesses.
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
0.5 percent of the population suffer from severe psychological traumaTrauma-related disorders were previously classified under one single diagnosis -- post-traumatic stress disorder. Now, a representative survey carried out by a UZH psychopathologist has shown for the first time how often such disorders are present in a more severe form. According to the findings, more than 0.5 percent of people in Germany suffer from complex post-traumatic stress disorder.
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
'Anxiety cells' identified in the brain's hippocampusResearchers have identified cells in the brains of mice that indicate when the animal is anxious.
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Columbia engineers develop flexible lithium battery for wearable electronicsColumbia Engineering researchers have developed a prototype of a high-performance flexible lithium-ion battery that demonstrates?concurrently?both good flexibility and high energy density. The battery is shaped like the human spine and allows remarkable flexibility, high energy density, and stable voltage no matter how it is flexed or twisted. The device could help advance applications for wearabl
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Biomarker tests could someday help improve outcomes for organ transplant patientsOrgan transplants save lives, but the story doesn't end when a patient emerges from the operating room. Rejection episodes, in which the immune system rallies against the new organ, can occur. According to an article in Chemical & Engineering News (C&EN), the weekly newsmagazine of the American Chemical Society, researchers are turning to biomarkers to help them get a better idea of which patients
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
The science behind the fizz: How the bubbles make the beverageFrom popping a bottle of champagne for a celebration to cracking open a soda while watching the Super Bowl, everyone is familiar with fizz. But little is known about the chemistry behind the bubbles. Now, one group sheds some light on how carbonation can affect the creaminess and smoothness of beverages, as reported in ACS' The Journal of Physical Chemistry B.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Getting ready for the summer sun with 'green' sunscreensAlthough it's been a tough winter for many people in the U.S., summer is coming. And that means backyard barbeques, fun on the beach and, of course, slathering on sunscreen. But one particular environmentally friendly sunscreen ingredient has been difficult to obtain—that ingredient, shinorine, could only be harvested from nature. Scientists now report in ACS Synthetic Biology the laboratory produ
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Science | The Guardian
A future of better pain management without codeine awaits Australia | Malcolm HoggCodeine is old hat yet still widely used in the community. We need better informed consumers with better educated and supported GPs and pharmacists Codeine restriction is in keeping with our evolving understanding of pain and its best management. My earliest memory of pain relates to Bex powders, which sat on our windowsill above the kitchen sink and were used daily to help with headaches, fevers
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Science : NPR
Researchers Discover 'Anxiety Cells' In The BrainScientists who identified specific brain cells in mice that control anxiety say the discovery could provide insights that might eventually help people with panic disorder and social phobia. (Image credit: SPL/Science Source)
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Following ISIS captivity, Yazidi women suffering from high percentage of C-PTSDFrom what long-term psychological effects are Yazidi women suffering after being captured, raped, beaten, and locked away by ISIS? A comprehensive study led by Bar-Ilan University researchers has shown that a very high percentage of these women were suffering from C-PTSD in addition to others with PTSD. Furthermore, victims with C-PTSD showed greater sensitivity to post-ISIS conditions. The team i
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Prostate cancer: Poor prognosis in men with diabetesMen with type 2 diabetes are less likely to develop prostate cancer than patients without diabetes. However, the mortality rate is higher. Researchers were able to show that in the affected individuals the androgen receptor and the mitogenic forms of the insulin receptor were more strongly expressed. This could explain why patients with diabetes have a poorer prognosis for prostate cancer.
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Scientific American Content: Global
Protecting Cassava from Disease? There's an App for ThatAn image-recognition smartphone app uses AI to help farmers in sub-Saharan Africa identify up to five different diseases -- Read more on ScientificAmerican.com
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The Atlantic
How Not to Design Russia SanctionsFor months, Moscow waited for this report , churning with a mix of fear and preemptive righteous anger. The political and business elite knew that, on January 29, in order to comply with a sanctions bill Congress passed almost unanimously last July, the Trump administration would have to deliver to Congress a list of Russia’s “most significant senior foreign political figures and oligarchs … as d
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The Atlantic
The Upside-Down Logic of Stormy DanielsThe American philosopher Hilary Putnam, who died in 2016, was known during his life for his work in mathematical logic, his contributions to philosophy of mind, and, most significantly, his understanding of realism. Continually scrutinizing his own work and the work of others, Putnam deduced that there is such a thing as objective truth that exists outside of human interpretation. Putnam was, sad
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Big Think
Should you wear long johns? There's a map for thatMapping your daily long john needs since 2011 (Canada only) Read More
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
Potential impact of hydraulic fracturing on streams, downstream recreation, drinking waterConcerns over hydraulic fracturing, an oil and gas extraction method that injects millions of gallons of freshwater and chemicals into shale, have largely focused on potential impacts on water quality. But, as scientists now report, 'fracking' operations could have impacts on water quantity because they are withdrawing these large amounts of water from nearby streams, which house aquatic ecosystem
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
Discovery could improve HD TVScientists have been working to develop a new process, which could lead to a new generation of high-definition (HD), paving the way for brighter, lighter and more energy efficient TVs and smart devices.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
Sports drinks are not solutions for illness-related dehydrationHospitals across the nation have been hit by a double whammy: an alarming flu season combined with a shortage of intravenous fluids. Hurricane Maria’s devastating effects on Puerto Rico, a critical manufacturing hub for American medical supplies, have caused the supply chain disruption.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
Chemists follow molecules down 'nanowells,' track catalytic reactions in nanoconfinementChemists have measured the effects of nanoconfinement on catalytic reactions by developing experimental techniques capable of tracking single molecules. Understanding such reactions could help chemists design high-performance catalysts.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
Upper limit for intake of folate is invalid: Government urged to fortify flour with folic acidThere is no need for an upper limit of folate intake, according to a study by Queen Mary University of London and the School of Advanced Study, University of London.
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Scientific American Content: Global
Trump Endorses "Right to Try" for Terminally Ill PatientsMore than 30 states already have laws that allow access to experimental treatments -- Read more on ScientificAmerican.com
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
McGill research team studies how calcium compounds accumulate in the arteriesMcGill research team studies how calcium compounds accumulate.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
Modern humans vs. giant animals: Mega-herbivores were displaced by humans who partly took their placeScientists have studied the extinction of mega-herbivores -- plant-eating animals that weighed more than one ton -- that occurred approx. 12,000 years ago. The scientists reached the conclusion that, on the one hand, modern man was the cause of these giant terrestrial animals' extinction, and on the other hand, humans took over part of the animals' ecosystem functions.
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
New report evaluates the VA's mental health services, finds substantial unmet needWhile the US Department of Veterans Affairs (VA) provides mental health care of comparable or superior quality to care provided in private and non-VA public sectors, accessibility and quality of services vary across the VA health system, leaving a substantial unmet need for mental health services among veterans of the recent wars in Afghanistan and Iraq, says a new congressionally mandated report
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Tasty and pink, sea urchin species may be a climate-tolerant food sourceA hardy urchin species shows potential to relieve pressure on more vulnerable species, according to new research by California Sea Grant-funded scientists.
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Vitiligo treated successfully with arthritis drug and light therapyBuilding on prior research that examined the use of an arthritis medication to treat vitiligo, a team of Yale dermatologists has successfully applied a novel combination therapy -- the medication and light -- to restore skin color in patients.
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
MD Anderson study evaluates need for biopsies during follow-up care in women with early breast cancerIn an analysis of more than 120,000 women diagnosed with and treated for early-stage breast cancer, researchers from The University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center determined the rate of additional breast biopsies needed for these patients during their follow-up care. The findings, reported in JAMA Surgery, are the first comprehensive nationwide population-based study regarding the need for bre
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Falling IQ scores in childhood may signal psychotic disorders in later lifeNew research shows adults who develop psychotic disorders experience declines in IQ during childhood and adolescence, falling progressively further behind their peers across a range of cognitive abilities. The researchers from King's College London's Institute of Psychiatry, Psychology & Neuroscience (IoPPN) and Icahn School of Medicine at Mount Sinai in the United States found falls in IQ start i
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Kids' well visits linked to lower appendicitis complicationsThe study suggests that families with an established relationship with their primary care doctor are more likely to seek emergency care promptly when a child is experiencing painful symptoms.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
Skin-inspired coating that's as hard as teeth and can heal itselfSelf-healing smart coatings could someday make scratches on cell phones a thing of the past. But researchers often have to compromise between strength and the ability to self-repair when developing these materials. Now, one group reports the development of a smart coating that is as hard as tooth enamel on the outside but can heal itself like skin can.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
BA or DA? Decoding syllables to show the limits of artificial intelligenceBy recording brain activity during a simple task, neuroscientists show that the brain does not necessarily use the regions of the brain identified by machine learning to perform a task. Above all, these regions reflect the mental associations related to this task. While machine learning is thus effective for decoding mental activity, it is not necessarily effective for understanding the specific i
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
Precisely tailoring the dynamics of upconversion luminescenceResearchers have significantly improved the fundamental understanding of photon upconversion in nanoparticles. Through the collaborative approach of advanced spectroscopy and theoretical modelling they were able to establish that the migration of excitation energy greatly affects the upconversion dynamics. The researchers describe how 'dopant ions spatially separated' (DISS) nanostructures can be
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
Long-term consumption of sunflower and fish oils may damage the liverAn international group of scientists has demonstrated that the long-term intake of sunflower or fish oils damages the liver and can cause a series of alterations in it, giving rise to non-alcoholic steatohepatitis (NASH).
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NYT > Science
Dr. Brenda Fitzgerald, C.D.C. Director, Resigns Over Tobacco and Other InvestmentsDr. Fitzgerald abruptly left the agency in the middle of a flu epidemic, following disclosures that she had recent investments in tobacco and health stocks.
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Viden
Nettet og mobilen kan sende dig på rumrejse fra sofaenUdforsk Mars, kig mod stjernerne eller hold styr på satellitter og rumskrot med mobilen og computeren.
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Live Science
Brain Scans Can Reveal Who Your True Friends AreGreat minds really do think alike (and fools seldom differ).
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TED Talks Daily (SD video)
My failed mission to find God -- and what I found instead | Anjali KumarAnjali Kumar went looking for God and ended up finding something else entirely. In an uplifting, funny talk about our shared humanity, she takes us on a spiritual pilgrimage to meet witches in New York, a shaman in Peru, an infamous "healer" in Brazil and others, sharing an important lesson: what binds us together is far stronger than what separates us, and our differences are not insurmountable.
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New on MIT Technology Review
A few months into deploying robots, Walmart reports employees love them and customers ignore themBossa Nova is creating robotic coworkers for the retail world.
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
A glimpse in the flora of Southeast Asia puts a spotlight on its conservationCovering only 3 percent of Earth's total land area, four overlapping biodiversity hotspots in South East China -- Indo-Burma, Philippines, Sundaland and Wallacea -- are estimated to be the home of the astonishing 20 to 25 percent of higher plant species in the area. While offering an insight into this extraordinary flora, a new special issue published in the open access journal PhytoKeys, contribu
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Scientific American Content: Global
Orca Quickly Learns to Mimic Human SpeechA killer whale picks up words like “hello” and “bye-bye,” some on the first attempt -- Read more on ScientificAmerican.com
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New on MIT Technology Review
Uber is trying its hand at bike sharing
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The Atlantic
America Wins the Gulf CrisisTuesday wasn’t a good day for the Arab states that imposed an embargo on Qatar last summer. Saudi Arabia, the United Arab Emirates, and others had spent nearly the past eight months trying to persuade the world of Qatar’s perfidy, its alleged support of terrorist groups, and its interference in their internal affairs. Instead, they found senior Qatari officials at a strategic dialogue at the U.S.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
Discovery of molecular nets inside heart muscles hold promise for new treatmentLocal researchers have discovered that a group of molecules, called chondroitin sulfate, normally found only in connective tissues such as the cartilage, accumulates and causes inflammation in the hearts of patients with heart failure.
7h
Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
Emission from the center of a galaxy has a serpentine shapeAn international group of scientists has discovered a peculiar spiral jet with many twists.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
Teens need vigorous physical activity and fitness to cut heart riskGuidelines for teenagers should stress the importance of vigorous physical activity and fitness to cut the risk of heart disease, new research suggests.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
Which microbes matter most?Scientists have recently announced a major achievement in ecosystem science. Their research illustrates a powerful new technique to simultaneously measure the growth rates of hundreds of individual bacterial taxa in any given soil sample.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
Playing billiards with a laser beamPhysicists have reported a significant advance in laser-driven particle acceleration. Using tiny plastic beads as targets, they have produced proton bunches that possess unique features, opening up new opportunities for future studies.
7h
Ingeniøren
Kunstinstallation i kredsløb vækker harme hos astronomerEt newzealandsk firma har sat en 65-kantet designerstjerne i kredsløb om Jorden, hvor den skal lyse på himlen de næste ni måneder. Opsendelsen vækker harme hos astronomer, der kalder opfindelsen for forurenende rumskrot.
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Getting ready for the summer sun with 'green' sunscreensAlthough it's been a tough winter for many people in the US, summer is coming. And that means backyard barbecues, fun on the beach and, of course, slathering on sunscreen. But one particular environmentally friendly sunscreen ingredient has been difficult to obtain -- that ingredient, shinorine, could only be harvested from nature. Scientists now report in ACS Synthetic Biology the laboratory prod
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Pulling an all-nighter impairs working memory in womenOver the last few decades, a wealth of evidence has accumulated to suggest that a lack of sleep is bad for mind and body. Working memory is important for keeping things in mind for briefer periods of time, which thereby facilitates reasoning and planning. A team of sleep scientists from Uppsala University now demonstrates that acute sleep loss impacts working memory differently in women and men.
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Taking the long view: US scientists affirm value of long term researchA new Yale-led study provides a detailed glimpse into how the US ecological community views the direction of long-term research, its critical role in the advancement of knowledge, and research areas that scientists believe should be prioritized in the future.
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Overabundance of massive stars in the Tarantula NebulaAn international team of astronomers with participation of researchers at the Instituto de Astrofísica de Canarias (IAC) and the University of La Laguna (ULL) has revealed an 'astonishing' overabundance of massive stars in a neighbouring galaxy. The discovery, made in a gigantic star-forming region of the Large Magellanic Cloud galaxy, has 'far-reaching' consequences for our understanding of how s
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
News about Tabby's star, the most mysterious star of 2017Several telescopes of the Canary Island Observatories are studying this controversial star in a coordinated campaign involving over a hundred professional and amateur astronomers throughout the world, among them researchers at the Instituto de Astrofísica de Canarias (IAC) and the University of La Laguna (ULL).
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
The science behind the fizz: How the bubbles make the beverageFrom popping a bottle of champagne for a celebration to cracking open a soda while watching the Super Bowl, everyone is familiar with fizz. But little is known about the chemistry behind the bubbles. Now, one group sheds some light on how carbonation can affect the creaminess and smoothness of beverages, as reported in ACS' The Journal of Physical Chemistry B.
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Big Think
Steven Pinker at Davos: excessive political correctness feeds radical ideasHarvard's Steven Pinker makes the case that excessive political correctness can be damaging to society and lead to the growth of radical opinions. Read More
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
Human skin flakes lead to bad smell in air-conditioning systemsSkin squames are a source of food for the bacteria found in air-cooling units, which produce odors even in a dust-free air-conditioning system, a research revealed.
8h
Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
Lab-on-a-chip for tracking single bacterial cellsResearchers have set up a novel lab-on-a-chip with accompanying automatic analysis software. This integrated setup can be used to study gene regulation in single bacterial cells in response to dynamically controlled environmental changes.
8h
Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
Astronomers find one of the first stars formed in the Milky WayResearchers have identified a star which is a key to the formation of the first chemical elements in the Galaxy.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
Certain bacteria produce tiny gold nuggets by digesting toxic metalsHigh concentrations of heavy metals, like copper and gold, are toxic for most living creatures. This is not the case for the bacterium C. metallidurans, which has found a way to extract valuable trace elements from a compound of heavy metals without poisoning itself. One interesting side-effect: the formation of tiny gold nuggets.
8h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Health care just the latest industry Amazon seeks to upendWhen Amazon sets its sights on a new industry, corporate America shudders.
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Popular Science
Finally, an excuse to cancel all your plans: staying in is good for the environmentNexus Media News Americans are spending more time indoors and saving energy in the process. Americans are spending more time indoors, leading to a reduction in energy consumption outside of the home.
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Dinosaur age meets the space age at NASA GoddardA slab of sandstone found on the campus of NASA's Goddard Space Flight Center in Maryland may help scientists rewrite the history of mammal and dinosaur co-existence during the Cretaceous era.
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
How can students with autism be supported through college?Thirty years ago it was rare for a student with ASD to enter college. But over the past decades, there has been much improvement in the detection and awareness of ASD in children. Now, with the provision of effective treatments, those with average or above average intellectual abilities are enrolling at universities. Now a special issue addressing the experiences of ASD students has been published
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
CALIFA renews the classification of galaxiesThis project, in which the Instituto de Astrofísica de Canarias (IAC) is collaborating, has made a map with 300 galaxies close to the Milky Way, which they have classified on the basis of the way the stars are moving, rather than using the morphological classification used until now.
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Galaxies that feed on other galaxiesAn international team of astronomers led by Giuseppina Battaglia, researcher at the Instituto de Astrofísica de Canarias (IAC), finds signs that the outer halo of the Milky Way contains stellar remains of massive dwarf galaxies that were devoured by our own.
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Eye and heart complications are tightly linked in type 1 diabetesPeople with chronic kidney disease have much higher risk of cardiovascular disease, the leading cause of death for those with type 1 diabetes. In a paper published in Diabetes Care, the Joslin team demonstrated that the eye condition known as proliferative diabetic retinopathy also is independently associated with cardiovascular disease.
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Who's still smoking: Report highlights populations still at riskAlthough tobacco control measures have reduced overall smoking rates in the United States, a new report says several vulnerable subpopulations continue to smoke at high rates.
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Diabetes management improved in high-risk population through community programAn ethnic population at high risk for Type 2 diabetes achieved significant control of the disease through participation in community-based health programs, according to a randomized controlled trial published Jan. 31 by researchers at NYU School of Medicine's Department of Population Health in the journal Clinical Diabetes.
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Lone star ticks not guilty in spread of Lyme diseaseThe bacteria that cause Lyme disease are transmitted to humans primarily by the blacklegged tick (Ixodes scapularis). Often presumed guilty by association is the lone star tick (Amblyomma americanum). However, a new review of three decades' worth of research concludes the latter should be exonerated: While lone star ticks are guilty of transmitting bacteria that cause several human illnesses, the
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Dinosaur age meets the space ageA slab of sandstone discovered at NASA's Goddard Space Flight Center contains at least 70 mammal and dinosaur tracks from more than 100 million years ago, according to a new paper published Jan. 31 in the journal Scientific Reports. The find provides a rare glimpse of mammals and dinosaurs interacting.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
Letting molecular robots swarm like birdsA team of researchers has developed DNA-assisted molecular robots that autonomously swarm in response to chemical and physical signals, paving the way for developing future nano-machines.
8h
The Atlantic
The Epic Grift of Dirty MoneyIn 1980, when he was 34 years old, Donald Trump taped an interview with Rona Barrett, the gossip columnist and broadcaster. At that time, Trump had only recently started investing in Manhattan real estate, and the first Trump Tower in midtown was three years from completion. But he was already telling anyone who’d listen—including Barrett—that he was a billionaire. In the interview, which never a
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
VW hid 'devastating' result from diesel exhaust tests on monkeysGerman auto giant Volkswagen tried to keep secret the results of a diesel emissions test on monkeys because it showed a worse health impact than expected, a news report said Wednesday.
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Science : NPR
How To Drive Down Smoking In Groups That Still Light UpOnly around 15 percent of adults in America smoke — but that still leaves 40 million people who smoke cigarettes, and many of them belong to the most vulnerable population groups. (Image credit: Luis Diaz Devesa/Getty Images)
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Science : NPR
The Microbial Eve: Our Oldest Ancestors Were Single-Celled OrganismsConsider this: Evidence points to a microbial Eve as our first ancestor — a tough, underwater organism withstanding extremes that became every other creature to ever live, says Marcelo Gleiser. (Image credit: Danita Delimont/Getty Images/Gallo Images)
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Futurity.org
Mutant ‘neighbor’ gene causes rare inability to process B12Researchers have discovered a new cause of a rare condition known as cblC, in which patients can’t process vitamin B12, leading to severe health problems. They report the condition, which they named “epi-cblC,” in patients from Europe and the United States. Vitamin B12, or cobalamin (cbl), is essential for healthy functioning of the human nervous system and red blood cell synthesis. Unable to pro
8h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Materials research team lights the way for more efficient LEDsNRL researchers, working with an international team of physicists, show that cesium lead halide perovskites nanocrystals emit light much faster than conventional light emitting materials, enabling more efficient lasers and LEDs.
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Confirmed: Black holes regulate star formation in massive galaxiesAn International team with participation by researchers with close links to the IAC, obtains the first clear observational evidence that the mass of the supermassive central black hole in a massive galaxy affects the formation of new stars during its lifetime.
8h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News
The same psychological mechanism explains violence among Muslim and Western extremistsWhy do some Westerners attack Muslim minorities and asylum seekers and why do some Muslims support and engage in terror against the West? New research suggests that the reasons for such extreme behaviour might be the same in both groups. The results have now been published in the European Journal of Social Psychology.
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Teens need vigorous physical activity and fitness to cut heart riskGuidelines for teenagers should stress the importance of vigorous physical activity and fitness to cut the risk of heart disease, new research suggests.
8h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Early benefit assessments: 220th dossier assessment completed by the turn of the yearA host of dossiers assessed by IQWiG to date have addressed oncology drugs. Despite their significance, other diseases, e.g. Alzheimer's dementia, are underrepresented.
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
IAC astronomers find one of the first stars formed in the Milky WayResearchers at the Instituto de Astrofísica de Canarias (IAC) have identified, using the Gran Telescopio de Canarias (GTC) a star which is a key to the formation of the first chemical elements in the Galaxy. The results of this research are published today in the scientific journal The Astrophysical Journal Letters.
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Viden
Interstellar: 4 bud på hvordan vi kommer til Alfa CentauriRummet er ufatteligt stort og afstandene helt umulige. Så hvordan kommer vi nogensinde ud af vores solsystem?
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
The same psychological mechanism explains violence among Muslim and Western extremistsWhy do some Westerners attack Muslim minorities and asylum seekers and why do some Muslims support and engage in terror against the West? New research suggests that the reasons for such extreme behaviour might be the same in both groups. The results have now been published in the European Journal of Social Psychology.
8h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Lunar Showstopper: 1st super blue blood moon in 35 yearsThe moon put on a rare cosmic show Wednesday: a red blue moon, super big and super bright.
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Ingeniøren
Konkurstruet italiensk entreprenør ude af kontrakt på ny StorstrømsbroDen konkurstruede italienske entreprenør Condotte kunne ikke overtale en italiensk dommer til at give selskabet lov til at underskrive kontrakten på den nye Storstrømsbro. Nu vil Vejdirektoratet underskrive kontrakt med de to øvrige spillere i konsortiet.
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Dagens Medicin
Lægegruppe vil have konkret handling fra ministerSundhedsministerens otte initiativer, der skal styrke retssikkerheden for læger, er positive, men der skal handling bag, mener lægegruppen ‘Læger for et bedre Sundhedsvæsen’.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Gasps and awe as supermoon rises over erupting Philippine volcanoFilipinos sheltering from the erupting Mayon volcano gasped in delight as an orange full-moon eclipse shone above the mountain's smouldering crater Wednesday in what was both a once-in-a-lifetime double spectacle and a rare moment of relief.
8h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Scientists come up with new process that could improve HD TVScientists at Queen's University Belfast have been working as part of an international team to develop a new process, which could lead to a new generation of high-definition (HD), paving the way for brighter, lighter and more energy efficient TVs and smart devices.
8h
The Atlantic
The Cataclysm That Would Follow a 'Bloody Nose' Strike in North KoreaSince last summer, National Security Advisor H.R. McMaster has been building a case for the use of preventive force against North Korea. In interviews and public statements , he has called Kim Jong Un, the leader of North Korea, irrational and undeterrable. The implications of such a characterization are important: If a leader is irrational, he is, by definition, incapable of making the cost-bene
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
New parasitoid wasp likely uses unique saw-like spines to break out of its host bodyAbout the size of a sesame seed, a new species of wasp from Costa Rica, named Dendrocerus scutellaris, has elaborate branched antennae that could be used for finding mates. Or hosts.
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Futurity.org
In terrible times, there’s an advantage to being femaleWomen outlive men in normal times, as well as during the worst of circumstances, three centuries of historical records show. Most of the life expectancy gap was due to a female survival advantage in infancy rather than adulthood, the researchers found. In times of adversity, such as famines and epidemics, newborn girls are more likely to survive. The fact that women have an edge in infancy, when
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Are some cultures less trusting than others?Nobel laureate Kenneth Arrow once described trust as a "lubricant of a social system". Economic exchange, in particular, is virtually impossible without at least some level of trust. While markets, shops and online traders attempt to reduce uncertainty through customer reviews or free returns policies, consumers have to decide for themselves whether to trust unknown trading partners calling themse
9h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Interventions increase attendance for diabetic retinopathy screening, says studyTargeted interventions can significantly improve screening for diabetic retinopathy, a complication of diabetes and the leading cause of vision loss amongst working-age adults in the Western word, according to a new Cochrane Systematic Review.
9h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Emission from the center of a galaxy has a serpentine shapeAn international group of scientists led by members of the National Instituto of Astrophysics (Osservatorio Astronomico di Torino (INAF-OATo) with participation by researchers from the Instituto de Astrofísica de Canarias (IAC) and the La Laguna University (ULL) has discovered a peculiar spiral jet with many twists. The results of these observations are published today in Nature magazine.
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Discovery of molecular nets inside heart muscles hold promise for new treatmentLocal researchers have discovered that a group of molecules, called chondroitin sulfate, normally found only in connective tissues such as the cartilage, accumulates and causes inflammation in the hearts of patients with heart failure. The discovery was made jointly by the National University Health System (NUHS), A*STAR's Genome Institute of Singapore (GIS) and the National University of Singapor
9h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Lab-on-a-chip for tracking single bacterial cellsResearchers at the Biozentrum of the University of Basel, together with researchers from the Max Planck Institute in Dresden, have set up a novel lab-on-a-chip with accompanying automatic analysis software. As they report in Nature Communications, this integrated setup can be used to study gene regulation in single bacterial cells in response to dynamically controlled environmental changes.
9h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News
BA or DA? Decoding syllables to show the limits of artificial intelligenceBy recording brain activity during a simple task, neuroscientists from UNIGE and ENS show that the brain does not necessarily use the regions of the brain identified by machine learning to perform a task. Above all, these regions reflect the mental associations related to this task. While machine learning is thus effective for decoding mental activity, it is not necessarily effective for understan
9h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Scientists join international research team in discovery that could improve HD TVScientists at Queen's University Belfast have been working as part of an international team to develop a new process, which could lead to a new generation of high-definition (HD), paving the way for brighter, lighter and more energy efficient TVs and smart devices.
9h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News
HKBU study reveals human skin flakes lead to bad smell in air-conditioning systemsSkin squames are a source of food for the bacteria found in air-cooling units, which produce odours even in a dust-free air-conditioning system, a research by Hong Kong Baptist University scholars revealed.
9h
Dagens Medicin
Otte initiativer skal genskabe lægernes tillid til Styrelsen for PatientsikkerhedDen herskende mistillid i sundhedsvæsenet er ifølge sundhedsministeren bekymrende. Hun vil derfor søsætter otte initiativer for at styrke sundhedspersonalets retssikkerhed og genskabe tilliden til Styrelsen for Patientsikkerhed.
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New on MIT Technology Review
Here are the tech truths about Trump’s State of the Union address
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Playing billiards with a laser beamA research team led by physicists at LMU Munich reports a significant advance in laser-driven particle acceleration. Using tiny plastic beads as targets, they have produced proton bunches that possess unique features, opening up new opportunities for future studies.
9h
Dagens Medicin
Sundhedsplatformen – et system fra helvede eller fremtiden?Spørgsmålet er, om vi ville have valgt Sundhedsplatformen i dag, hvis vi havde vidst, hvor store problemer, der var i implementeringen af det. Men det løb er efter min overbevisning kørt.
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Dagens Medicin
Sådan vil sundhedsministeren genskabe lægers tillid til styrelseSundhedsminister Ellen Trane Nørby (V) vil tage en række tiltag for at genskabe et tillidsfuldt samarbejde mellem sundhedsvæsenet og Styrelsen for Patientsikkerhed.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Thermal imaging can detect how animals are coping with their environment, avoiding the need for capture, accordingThermal imaging can detect how animals are coping with their environment, avoiding the need for capture, according to new research.
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The Atlantic
The Surprising Ease of Buying Fentanyl OnlineFive or six times a day, a man from Texas injects a dose of carefully measured fentanyl. He does it when he wakes up and before he goes to work, and sometimes on breaks. It makes him drowsy, but he says people can’t usually tell he just used. He gets his supply the way other people buy books and Bluetooth speakers: He orders it online, then waits for it to come in the U.S. mail. (I was connected
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Ingeniøren
Selvkørende robotter leverer din pakke lige til dørenPakkerobotterne er ved at indtage veje og fortove. Teknologien er snart klar, så nu er spørgsmålet blot, om folk vil dele deres fortov med robotterne.
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Science | The Guardian
Super blue blood moon - in picturesMany parts of the globe may on Wednesday catch a glimpse of the moon as a giant crimson globe, thanks to a rare lunar trifecta that combines a total eclipse with a blue moon and super moon. The spectacle, which Nasa has coined a “super blue blood moon,” will grace the pre-dawn skies in the western US as the moon crosses into the shadow of the Earth and turns blood red. What is the super blue bloo
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Improving the sensitivity for ionic solutes analysisJapanese researchers have found that using electrodialytic ion transfer to enrich ionic solutes in aqueous sample before detection is a highly effective method to improve the sensitivity of analytical systems. The method enriches solutes within seconds and allows for the measurement of trace ionic solutes that could not be detected without it.
9h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News
These bacteria produce gold by digesting toxic metalsHigh concentrations of heavy metals, like copper and gold, are toxic for most living creatures. This is not the case for the bacterium C. metallidurans, which has found a way to extract valuable trace elements from a compound of heavy metals without poisoning itself. One interesting side-effect: the formation of tiny gold nuggets. A team of researchers led by Martin Luther University Halle-Wittenb
9h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Letting molecular robots swarm like birdsA team of researchers from Hokkaido University and Kansai University has developed DNA-assisted molecular robots that autonomously swarm in response to chemical and physical signals, paving the way for developing future nano-machines.
9h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Development of egg white-based strong hydrogel via ordered protein condensationHow to Cook Egg to Tough Material: Egg white-based strong hydrogel was created. The fluid material containing orderly condensed egg white proteins at regular intervals was produced by the mixing of both anionic and cationic surfactant to unpurified egg white proteins. This fluid material was gelled by heating and showed high mechanical properties. The maximum compressive fracture strength was <150
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Cancer patients: Web-based help improves quality of lifeA diagnosis of cancer causes huge psychological stress, but many patients do not receive any psychological support. An online stress management program can significantly improve their quality of life, as shown by a study conducted by researchers from the University of Basel and University Hospital Basel, and published in the Journal of Clinical Oncology.
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
New parasitoid wasp likely uses unique saw-like spines to break out of its host bodyA newly discovered parasitoid wasp species from Costa Rica might be only slightly larger than a sesame seed, yet it has quite vicious ways when it comes to its life as an insect developing inside the body of another. Most likely, it uses its unique saw-like row of spines on its back to cut its way out of its host. The study is published in the open access Biodiversity Data Journal.
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Dishonest individuals perceived as less capableIf you saw someone steal an expensive item from a department store, would you think he is less capable at his job? Most people would think that, according to research published by the American Psychological Association.
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Structural insight into the molecular mechanism of PET degradationA KAIST metabolic engineering research team has newly suggested a molecular mechanism showing superior degradability of poly ethylene terephthalate (PET).This is the first report to simultaneously determine the 3-D crystal structure of Ideonella sakaiensis PETase and develop the new variant with enhanced PET degradation.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Letting molecular robots swarm like birdsThe world's smallest "swarm robot" measures 25 nanometers in diameter and 5 micrometers in length, and exhibits swarming behavior resembling motile organisms such as fish, ants and birds.
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Live Science
See Gorgeous Pics of the #SuperBlueBloodMoon EclipseAmateur photographers are posting amazing shots of the rare lunar event. Check them out.
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The Atlantic
Trump Doesn't Mention Climate Change in His State of the UnionPresident Donald Trump didn’t mention climate change or global warming in his State of the Union address on Tuesday night. This is, on one hand, the most predictable thing in the world. Throughout his political career, Trump has rarely seemed interested in understanding the science of Earth’s climate. Last week, he misspoke about the climate again , claiming “it was getting too cold all over the
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
12-year study looks at effects of universal basic incomeFor the next 12 years, MIT Sloan associate professor Tavneet Suri will be part of a team collaborating with the nonprofit Give Directly to study the effects of implementing a universal basic income in Kenya.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Germany probes Bosch workers in US over diesel emissionsProsecutors in the German city of Stuttgart are investigating two employees of auto components and technology firm Robert Bosch LLC in the U.S. on suspicion of being accessories to fraud in connection with manipulated diesel emissions in Fiat Chrysler vehicles.
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
New explanation for why airways close in asthma holds promise for future class of drugsHouston Methodist researchers have a new explanation for what causes the lungs' airways to close during asthma attacks that could change the lives of the 300 million people worldwide who suffer from asthma. The discovery holds promise for developing a new class of drugs that is radically different from the steroids currently used to treat it. The NIH-funded study is in the Feb. 5 issue of the Jour
9h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Indigenous people face higher risk of transportation injuries in British ColumbiaIndigenous people in British Columbia suffered transportation-related injuries at a rate 1.89 times higher than the province's total population between 1991 and 2010, a new University of BC study has found.
9h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Research describes how ions play key roles in controlling mucosal surfacesTwo recent papers from Keck Graduate Institute (KGI) Professor James Sterling and Shenda Baker, President and COO at Synedgen, describe how ions interact with the mucosal surface glycans to ensure health.
9h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Molecular secrets revealed: Antipsychotic docked in its receptorAntipsychotic drugs—which transformed mental health care following their chance discovery in the mid-20th Century—may finally be poised for a long-overdue makeover incorporating structure-based design. Scientists funded by the National Institutes of Health have achieved a landmark of psychiatric neuropharmacology: deciphering the molecular structure of a widely prescribed antipsychotic docked in i
9h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Smart furniture transforms spaces in tiny apartments into bedrooms, work spaces, or closetsImagine living in a cramped studio apartment in a large city—but being able to summon your bed or closet through a mobile app, call forth your desk using voice command, or have everything retract at the push of a button.
9h
BBC News - Science & Environment
Killer whale says 'hello'A killer whale is taught to mimic words such as "hello" and "bye bye" in a scientific experiment.
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Dagens Medicin
535 læger vil køre sygebesøg for kollegaer535 lægepraksis har registreret sig som stedlige læger. Det fremgår af et Danmarkskort, som PLO har udarbejdet over læger, der vil bistå kolleger med at køre sygebesøg.
9h
The Atlantic
The Unpersuasive President“Presidential power is the power to persuade.” So wrote the famous student of presidential power, Richard Neustadt, in 1960. This is one power that Donald Trump has never appreciated. President Trump uses words often and uses them spectacularly: to mobilize his core followership, to bully and belittle opponents, to tweet his hurts and grievances. What he does not do is argue a case to change mind
9h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
A newly discovered prime number makes its debutOn December 26, 2017, J. Pace, G. Woltman, S. Kurowski, A. Blosser, and their co-authors announced the discovery of a new prime number: 2⁷⁷²³²⁹¹⁷-1. It's an excellent opportunity to take a small tour through the wonderful world of prime numbers to see how this result was achieved and why it is so interesting.
9h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Molecular secrets revealed: Antipsychotic docked in its receptorScientists have deciphered the molecular structure of a widely prescribed antipsychotic docked in its key receptor. They are hopeful that this discovery may hold secrets to designing better treatments for schizophrenia, bipolar disorder, and other mental illnesses.
9h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Chemists follow molecules down 'nanowells,' track catalytic reactions in nanoconfinementChemists affiliated with Iowa State University, the US Department of Energy's Ames Laboratory and Georgia State University have measured the effects of nanoconfinement on catalytic reactions by developing experimental techniques capable of tracking single molecules. Understanding such reactions could help chemists design high-performance catalysts.
9h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Reasoning behind campus sexual assault policies challenged by psychologistsA comprehensive analysis of policies related to sexual assaults -- known as mandatory reporting or compelled disclosure -- at 150 universities has raised questions about their effectiveness and their impacts on victims.
9h
Dagens Medicin
Tre markante almenmedicinere: Derfor kommer det lægelige oprør nuFlere års frustrationer er blevet for meget for tusindvis af læger, der vil gøre op med den stigende mistillid, de oplever fra politikere og myndigheder. Sådan lyder vurderingen fra tre almenmedicinere.
9h
The Scientist RSS
Image of the Day: Dog-Faced BatsThe discovery of two new species within the Cynomops genus has expanded the total known number of dog-faced bat species to eight.
9h
The Scientist RSS
Study: Vaping Causes DNA Damage in Human Cells and MiceNew findings suggest that nicotine inhaled from e-cigarettes could contribute to cancer and heart disease, but critics warn that the data are too preliminary to draw such conclusions.
9h
The Scientist RSS
Father of Pharmacogenetics DiesArno Motulsky, a former refugee from Nazi Germany and a pioneering medical geneticist at the University of Washington, has died at age 94.
9h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Scientists develop technique for measuring bacterial growth ratesEcological research focuses on understanding how population-level dynamics—such as the growth rate of a particular population of microbes—contribute to ecosystem-level processes. Ecosystem scientists researching climate change often study the role of microbes in the carbon cycle, for example, so knowing how quickly they grow is a fundamental metric to reaching that understanding.
10h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Study identifies metallic antiferromagnet with potential for memory devicesAntiferromagnets have generated significant interest for future computing technologies due to their fast dynamics, their ability to generate and detect spin-polarized electric currents, and their robustness against external magnetic fields. Despite these bright prospects, the vanishing total magnetization in antiferromagnets makes it difficult to evaluate their internal magnetic structure compared
10h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Strange orange cave dwelling African dwarf crocodiles could be evolving into a new speciesA team of researchers with affiliations to institutions in the U.S., France, Cameroon and Gabon has found evidence that suggests that orange dwarf crocodiles living in caves in Gabon might be evolving into a new species. In their paper published in the African Journal of Ecology, the group describes their study of the unique crocodiles and their attempts to compare them with similar crocodiles liv
10h
Dagens Medicin
Lægeformanden er for unuanceretAndreas Rudkjøbing glemmer, at de manglende læger i 1813 skyldes, at Praktiserende Lægers Organisation har frarådet lægerne at tage vagterne på 1813.
10h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Global rainfall pattern could offer weather prediction three weeks outEarth's atmosphere is chaotic, making it difficult for forecasters to predict weather more than 10-13 days in advance. However, research has increasingly shown that large-scale patterns of variability and relationships between states of the atmosphere in two faraway locations, called "teleconnections," can help extend prediction skill beyond this limit.
10h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Chemicals in brain that make honeybees more likely to sting discoveredA team of researchers from France and Australia has identified the neurological mechanism that underlies honeybee aggression in response to threats. In their paper published in Proceedings of the Royal Society B, the group describes their study of honeybees and what they found.
10h
Science-Based Medicine
Vision Therapy QuackeryBehavioral optometry claims to treat a wide range of disorders, including learning difficulty and attention problems. But these claims are not based on solid scientific ground, and are not supported by rigorous evidence.
10h
Ingeniøren
Statslige hackere angriber industriens kontrolsystemerÆldre industrielle kontrolsystemer er ofte ikke designet til at blive koblet på internettet, og giver derfor hackere og fremmede statsmagter adgang til samfundskritisk infrastruktur
10h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Faculty research describes how ions play key roles in controlling mucosal surfacesTwo recent papers from KGI Professor James Sterling and Shenda Baker, President and COO at Synedgen, describe how ions interact with the mucosal surface glycans to ensure health. The paper 'A Continuum Model of Mucosa with Glycan-Ion Pairing,' was published Jan. 15 in the journal Macromolecular Theory and Simulations. This work follows a 2017 publication by Drs. Baker and Sterling in Colloid and I
10h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Skin-inspired coating that's as hard as teeth and can heal itselfSelf-healing smart coatings could someday make scratches on cell phones a thing of the past. But researchers often have to compromise between strength and the ability to self-repair when developing these materials. Now, one group reports in ACS Nano the development of a smart coating that is as hard as tooth enamel on the outside but can heal itself like skin can.
10h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News
The potential impact of hydraulic fracturing on streamsConcerns over hydraulic fracturing, an oil and gas extraction method that injects millions of gallons of freshwater and chemicals into shale, have largely focused on potential impacts on water quality. But, as scientists report in ACS' journal Environmental Science & Technology, 'fracking' operations could have impacts on water quantity because they are withdrawing these large amounts of water fro
10h
Science | The Guardian
Palaeontologists on the books and toys that inspired a lifelong love of dinosaursPlaythings or formative figures? A closer look at the children’s books, films and plastic tat that kickstarted palaeontology careers I remember watching an episode of Noel’s House Party , a Saturday night prime time family friendly TV show with an elaborate set based in the fictional village of Crinkley Bottom. Part variety show, pantomime, talk show, game show with puppets and candid camera skit
10h
New Scientist - News
Time for the UK to stop dithering and add folic acid to breadWith yet more evidence in favour of fortifying flour with folic acid to help avoid serious birth defects, it's time the government acted, says Geoffrey Webb
10h
New Scientist - News
Art history AI sees links between hundreds of years of paintingsA machine learning system that can spot connections between painting styles from the last several hundred years could teach art historians something new
10h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Lab-on-a-chip for tracking single bacterial cellsResearchers at the Biozentrum of the University of Basel, together with researchers from the Max Planck Institute in Dresden, have set up a novel lab-on-a-chip with accompanying automatic analysis software. As they report in Nature Communications, this integrated setup can be used to study gene regulation in single bacterial cells in response to dynamically controlled environmental changes.
10h
Popular Science
Listen to this orca saying ‘hello’—for science!Animals Yes, scientists taught killer whales to speak English. Sort of. Wikie the killer whale shouldn’t know how to say “Amy.” English isn’t exactly her first language. And yet, Wikie’s trainers taught her to say it.
10h
The Atlantic
The Problem With Annihilation’s Messy ReleaseWhen Paramount released the Amy Adams–starring Arrival in November 2016, it was one of the biggest hits of the year for the studio. It grossed $203 million worldwide, was critically acclaimed, and netted eight Oscar nominations, including Best Picture and Best Director for Denis Villeneuve. On paper, the upcoming sci-fi drama Annihilation looks like a similar project for the studio. It’s from an
10h
Scientific American Content: Global
What Is Seitan?Get the 411 on seitan and its surprising secret ingredient. Is this meat substitute one to try or one to skip? -- Read more on ScientificAmerican.com
10h
Scientific American Content: Global
Shooting for the Moon--This Time to StayAfter almost a half-century hiatus, lunar missions are once again becoming the next big thing in space science and exploration -- Read more on ScientificAmerican.com
10h
Scientific American Content: Global
Last Night Proved We Need More Scientists In Public OfficeThe President’s hostility to evidence-based policy has not made the state of the union stronger, safer or prouder -- Read more on ScientificAmerican.com
10h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Skin-inspired coating that's as hard as teeth and can heal itselfSelf-healing smart coatings could someday make scratches on cell phones a thing of the past. But researchers often have to compromise between strength and the ability to self-repair when developing these materials. Now, one group reports in ACS Nano the development of a smart coating that is as hard as tooth enamel on the outside but can heal itself like skin can.
10h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
The potential impact of hydraulic fracturing on streamsConcerns over hydraulic fracturing, an oil and gas extraction method that injects millions of gallons of freshwater and chemicals into shale, have largely focused on potential impacts on water quality. But, as scientists report in ACS' journal Environmental Science & Technology, "fracking" operations could have impacts on water quantity because they are withdrawing these large amounts of water fro
10h
Dagens Medicin
Nordjylland kan nu tilbyde læger sammenhængende uddannelsesforløbSundheds- og Ældreministeriet har givet Region Nordjylland lov til at sætte et pilotforsøg i gang, der skal tiltrække læger under uddannelse til speciallæge.
10h
Viden
Rummet er virkelig, virkelig, (virkelig!) stort!Scroll dig en tur gennem universet og se de enorme afstande.
10h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Lab-on-a-disc technology promises to speed up, simplify on-site DNA analysisSmaller, faster, lighter, cheaper" – that's the mantra of University of Virginia biochemist and fledgling engineer James Landers.
10h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
How do deer survive harsh winter weather?White-tailed deer, the kind found in Massachusetts and across most of the United States, are the widest-ranging ungulate in the Americas, from as far south as Bolivia to as far north as southern Canada. To cover such diverse territory and climates, white-tailed deer have a variety of adaptations and behaviors, including those that allow them to survive harsh winter weather that is common in New En
10h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Australia has 2,000 missing persons and 500 unidentified human remains – a dedicated lab could find matchesIt's been 52 years since the Beaumont children disappeared from Glenelg beach, Adelaide on Australia Day 1966.
10h
Nyheder - Forskning - Videnskab
Mere forskning i droner, hightech-våben og risiko for cyberangrebMed en øget bevilling vil KU’s Center for Militære Studier øge forskningen...
10h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
In impoverished communities, health care awareness as important as access, affordabilityThe charitable efforts of international not-for-profit organizations that provide health care in underserved communities around the globe are well-known and rightfully lauded, but little attention has been paid to the long-term viability of that care.
11h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
New technology heralds easy and innovative ways to catch raysIn a new study, Erik Johansson's research team at the Department of Chemistry at Ångström Laboratory in Uppsala has shown that a new technology using quantum dots can be used to produce a new type of extremely lightweight, flexible and environmentally friendly solar cells.
11h
Dagens Medicin
Muskelsvindfonden: Nej til Spinraza kan få konsekvenser for alle med sjældne sygdomMedicinalvirksomheder mister interessen i at udvikle medicin til små diagnosegrupper, når myndighederne ikke vil betale for den, mener formand for Muskelsvindfonden.
11h
Dagens Medicin
Ny formand for fagudvalg for æggestokkræft er fundet
11h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Study finds strategies to encourage 50 percent tax-refund savingThe W-2s are arriving, and taxpayers are preparing to file their 2017 federal income taxes. For low- and moderate-income taxpayers, the possibility of a modest windfall looms: Will they receive a refund?
11h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Chemists follow molecules down 'nanowells,' track catalytic reactions in nanoconfinementChemists have measured the effects of nanoconfinement in catalysis by tracking single molecules as they dive down "nanowells" and react with catalysts at the bottom.
11h
Dagens Medicin
Medicinrådet siger fortsat nej til SpinrazaNyt tilbud fra Biogen frister ikke Medicinrådet, der fastholder, at prisen på Spinraza er for høj i forhold til den dokumenterede effekt.
11h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Clues from an endangered blue whale populationClues in the DNA of endangered blue whales – the largest living animal – has shown that Australia is home to one population that likely travels widely and is adapted to a range of environmental conditions.
11h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Disclosing weaknesses can undermine some workplace relationshipsSharing personal information with friends and family has long been held by researchers as a way to build rapport and healthy relationships. But between coworkers, that's not always true.
11h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
New Australian marine tracking system maps a decade of widespread movements of our iconic sea speciesA new study led by researchers at the Integrated Marine Observing System (IMOS) and Macquarie University, and published in Scientific Data, has tracked the whereabouts of 117 marine species, ranging from sharks and saltwater crocs all the way to sea turtles and sea cows (dugongs), off the shores of Australia. The data is helping to unravel the widespread movements of Australian marine species, the
11h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Melting ice is forcing polar bears to swim more, at high energy costOne result of melting Arctic ice is that polar bears are forced to swim more often and further than ever to forage for food.
11h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
The high cost of short-term rentals in New York CityA new report from McGill Urban Planning professor David Wachsmuth and his team provides an analysis of Airbnb activity in New York City and the surrounding region in the last three years (September 2014 - August 2017). Relying on new methodologies to analyze big data, here are some of the findings:
11h
NYT > Science
Where NASA Put a Parking Lot, Dinosaurs and Mammals Once Crossed PathsAn 8.5-foot-long slab found in Maryland preserved tracks left by prehistoric creatures. The site was almost obliterated before the rock was unearthed.
11h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Corralling xenon gas out of waste streamsFrom space propulsion to lighting to surgical anesthesia, the applications and needs for xenon gas are growing. And the good news is that researchers are advancing the science to more easily remove xenon from waste streams and collect the low amounts of it found in the atmosphere.
11h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Designing greenways for diverse usersWith greenways taking root in urban areas across the country, understanding who visits – and why – can help improve trail planning and design. A new study of greenways in Atlanta and San Antonio, Texas, offers insights for urban planners, park designers, neighborhood groups and local residents.
11h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
New method calculates equilibrium constant at the small scaleComputational chemists and mathematicians have developed a new, fast method to calculate equilibrium constants using small-scale simulations—even when the Law of Mass Action does not apply.
11h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
There's a 'super blue blood Moon' on the rise (Update)Stargazers across large swaths of the globe—from the streets of Los Angeles to the slopes of a smoldering Philippine volcano—had the chance to witness a rare "super blue blood Moon" Wednesday, when Earth's shadow bathed our satellite in a coppery hue.
11h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Hong Kong bans ivory sales in landmark voteHong Kong voted to ban ivory sales in a landmark move Wednesday to end the infamous trade in the city.
11h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Volvo profits rev higher on record salesSwedish truck maker Volvo said Wednesday that its net profit sped ahead by 60 percent rise in 2017, as strong global demand for heavy goods vehicles drove up sales to a new record.
11h
The Atlantic
How Should Atheism Be Taught?Louis J. Appignani, an 84-year-old living in Florida, tells a compelling story about his conversion to atheism. Despite attending Catholic schools from a young age and through his teens, he didn’t really question belief in God growing up; people in his world, he said, sort of took faith for granted. Then he got to college and started reading the philosopher Bertrand Russell, who argued against tr
11h
Scientific American Content: Global
Painting New Lines: Maximizing Color Difference in Metro Maps-- Read more on ScientificAmerican.com
11h
Scientific American Content: Global
Can Crowdsourcing and Collaboration Improve the Future of Human Health?A new program will use the wisdom of the crowd to try improving on the 80-year-old "Baby Box," a Finnish institution -- Read more on ScientificAmerican.com
11h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Super-resolution microscopy reveals fine detail of cellular meshOne of today's sharpest imaging tools, super-resolution microscopy, produces sparkling images of what until now has been the blurry interior of cells, detailing not only the cell's internal organs and skeleton, but also providing insights into cells' amazing flexibility.
11h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Summer heat waves impede animal reproductionAs we swelter through the hot Australian summer, Western Sydney University researchers have provided an insight into the broad ranging physiological effects of summer heatwaves on animals.
11h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Engineers make microfluidics modular using the popular interlocking blocksMIT engineers have just introduced an element of fun into microfluidics.
11h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Fossil evidence shows bats colonized from islands to continentsPlants and animals are generally thought to colonize from continents to islands, over time leading to the evolution of separate island species. Scientists have theorized that the reverse – colonizing from islands to continents – seems unlikely, mainly because the few competitors on islands make thriving on the mainland difficult for island specialists. But a new study published in the Journal of B
11h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Vista from Mars rover looks back over journey so farA panoramic image that NASA's Curiosity Mars rover took from a mountainside ridge provides a sweeping vista of key sites visited since the rover's 2012 landing, and the towering surroundings.
11h
Live Science
Will Astronauts Someday Feast on Poop-Grown Microbes?It's an extreme version of trash into treasure: New research finds that microbes can transform poop into fuel for edible bacteria.
11h
Live Science
Killer Impression: Orca Mimics 'Hello' and 'Bye-Bye'Say what? Orcas can mimic human speech — a few words of it, anyway.
11h
Scientific American Content: Global
Rewetting the Swamp: Indonesia's Bold PlanA controversial project to restore 2.5 million hectares of tropical peatland hinges on sustainable farming -- Read more on ScientificAmerican.com
11h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Viruses prefer cultivated areas to natural areasAgricultural areas are more affected by viral epidemics than non-agricultural areas. This is the finding of an international study carried out as part of a France-South Africa collaboration in floristic areas from the Western Cape and Camargue regions. These results were published in January 2018 in the ISME Journal, a journal of microbial ecology.
12h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Fish repelled by underwater carbon dioxideSwimming through patches of underwater carbon dioxide turns out to be an unpleasant experience for fish, which will alter course to escape them. In experiments published in Cell Reports on Jan. 30, researchers at the RIKEN Brain Science Institute in Japan have discovered a neuronal pathway that makes this avoidance behavior possible.
12h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Bryozoans, brachiopods, and phoronida originate from the common ancestorA biologist from Lomonosov Moscow State University has studied the nervous system of the adult phoronida using modern methods and presented new facts regarding the taxonomy of invertebrates, proving that phoronids, barchiopods and bryozoans are relatives contrary to earlier conclusions. The results of the work were published in Scientific Reports.
12h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
If Australia wants to boost defence exports, it should start with its natural strength: cyber securityAustralia's "national security" government has found yet another credential to add to its claim that it's protecting the country's future. Prime Minister Malcolm Turnbull launched a new Defence Export Strategy this week to catapult Australia into the top 10 defence exporting countries in the world by 2028.
12h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Glory from gloomA dark cloud of cosmic dust snakes across this spectacular wide field image, illuminated by the brilliant light of new stars. This dense cloud is a star-forming region called Lupus 3, where dazzlingly hot stars are born from collapsing masses of gas and dust. This image was created from images taken using the VLT Survey Telescope and the MPG/ESO 2.2-meter telescope and is the most detailed image t
12h
The Atlantic
Trump's Immigration Plan Receives a Chilly ReceptionOn Tuesday evening, in a State of the Union address billed as “optimistic, heartfelt, and bipartisan,” President Donald Trump revealed just how fractured Congress is on the issue that swept him into the White House: immigration. Lawmakers on both sides of the aisle have been scrambling to piece together legislation that would address the fate of undocumented immigrants brought to the U.S. as chil
12h
The Atlantic
The Case Against Tom BradyPerhaps the sight of Tom Brady’s chin dimple doesn’t blind you with seething rage. I guess you don’t have eyeballs. Or maybe you’re not from Philadelphia. Eagles fans have recently been prevented from realizing a beloved postseason pastime—the city’s so-called “Crisco Cops” greased up downtown lamp posts to stop rowdy Philadelphians from scaling them. Perhaps now they can instead relish another c
12h
Science | The Guardian
The Beautiful Cure by Daniel M Davis review – how our immune system has shaped world historyA terrific book by a consummate storyteller and scientific expert considers the past and future of the body’s ability to fight disease and heal itself Nature wants to destroy you. Evolution has been driven by aggressive forces in which organisms will enact their livelihood at the expense of yours. Any top 10 list of the greatest killers in human history will not include war or famine, or guns or
12h
Ingeniøren
Stadig mere malware kaprer computerens CPURansomware og malwertising rammer fortsat organisationer over hele kloden, mens malware til krypto-mining er stødt stigende.
12h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Glory from gloomA dark cloud of cosmic dust snakes across this spectacular wide field image, illuminated by the brilliant light of new stars. This dense cloud is a star-forming region called Lupus 3, where dazzlingly hot stars are born from collapsing masses of gas and dust. This image was created from images taken using the VLT Survey Telescope and the MPG/ESO 2.2-metre telescope and is the most detailed image t
12h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Alaska Airlines, Bill Gates team up with Code.org to teach how computers workSeat-back video screens on Alaska Airlines flights will now offer a bit more than HGTV reruns or the chance to see a semi-new-release movie.
12h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Google will let you mute 'reminder ads' that follow you around the internetYou browse a store online for an item but don't make a purchase. Then advertisements begin appearing on websites and apps you visit, reminding you of that item.
13h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Indonesia traffickers sold crocs, pythons on social media: policeA group of suspected animal traffickers have been arrested in Indonesia for selling crocodiles, pythons and other protected species through Facebook and the messaging service WhatsApp, police said Wednesday.
13h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Engineers 3-D print shape-shifting smart gelRutgers engineers have invented a "4D printing" method for a smart gel that could lead to the development of "living" structures in human organs and tissues, soft robots and targeted drug delivery.
13h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Colorado potato beetle genome gives insight into major agricultural pestThe Colorado potato beetle is notorious for its role in starting the pesticide industry - and for its ability to resist the insecticides developed to stop it.
13h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Online observatory aims to combat energy povertyIf you have ever run up arrears on your bills or shivered without turning on the heat at home during winter because you are concerned about the cost, then you may be experiencing energy poverty.
13h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Google expands Howard West to train more black codersLast summer Howard University dispatched 26 students to Google's Mountain View, Calif., campus for an intensive twelve-week course on coding.
13h
Ingeniøren
GRAFIK: Lynhurtige partikler laver 3D-billederPartikler i bevægelse kan snyde øjet til at tro, at det ser 3D-objekter af lys, har amerikanske forskere opdaget. Indtil videre er billederne imidlertid meget små.
13h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Stealth virus for cancer therapyScientists from the University of Zurich have redesigned an adenovirus for use in cancer therapy. To achieve this they developed a new protein shield that hides the virus and protects it from being eliminated. Adapters on the surface of the virus enable the reconstructed virus to specifically infect tumor cells.
13h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Rutgers engineers 3-D print shape-shifting smart gelRutgers engineers have invented a '4-D printing' method for a smart gel that could lead to the development of 'living' structures in human organs and tissues, soft robots and targeted drug delivery.
13h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Colorado potato beetle genome gives insight into major agricultural pestA team of scientists led by University of Wisconsin-Madison entomologist Sean Schoville sequenced the Colorado potato beetle's genome, probing its genes for clues to its surprising adaptability to new environments and insecticides. The new information sheds light on how this insect jumps to new plant hosts and handles toxins, and it will help researchers explore more ways to control the beetle.
13h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Lake Michigan has become much clearer in 20 years, but at great costDecades ago, Lake Michigan teemed with nutrients and green algae, casting a brownish-green hue that resembled the mouth of an inland river rather than a vast, open-water lake.
13h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Ericsson rings up huge losses in 2017Swedish telecoms giant Ericsson said Wednesday that it rang up huge losses last year as network competition, restructuring costs and investment in lightning-fast 5G technology pushed it deeply into the red.
13h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Researchers develop wireless light switch for targeted cancer therapyA team of scientists from the National University of Singapore (NUS) has developed a way to wirelessly deliver light into deep regions of the body to activate light-sensitive drugs for photodynamic therapy (PDT).
13h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Scientists create customizable, fabric-like power source for wearable electronicsScientists at Nanyang Technological University, Singapore, have created a customizable, fabric-like power source that can be cut, folded or stretched without losing its function.
13h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Kuwait to spend $500 bn on oil projects by 2040OPEC member Kuwait plans to spend more than half a trillion dollars by 2040 to boost its oil and gas output and refining capacity, a top executive said on Wednesday.
13h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Gadgets: Device lets you pour the wine without removing the corkWhen you hear about the Coravin wine bottle opener, you might think it's just another gimmicky gadget. I think it's something you must see to believe. A few weeks ago, I saw it, I believed it, and I even had a drink out of it to prove it.
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The Atlantic
When Donald Rumsfeld Asks You to 'Solve Pakistan'To all those struggling to please their boss—to decipher what exactly needs to be “FIXED ASAP” or why exactly the TPS reports need cover sheets at all—allow me to introduce you to Douglas Feith. Feith is best known as the top policy adviser to Defense Secretary Donald Rumsfeld during George W. Bush’s administration, and a divisive architect of the Iraq War and war on terrorism. But he is also the
13h
The Atlantic
Another Brexit Referendum?Nearly two years after Britons voted in favor of the U.K. leaving the European Union, some are calling for a second Brexit referendum. This time, however, the question isn’t whether the U.K. should leave the bloc, but how . Concern over what kind of final deal the U.K. will get out of its negotiations with the EU has fueled the recent interest in a second referendum. A survey published Friday by
13h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Apple iPhone users will be able to see their medical records on Health appSmartphone users checking medical records on their devices have been wading through a balkanized landscape of apps and websites for each health care provider or hospital.
13h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Google: Using your health records to predict whether you'll live or dieDr. Google may not have much of a bedside manner—she's an algorithm, after all—but if she says you're soon to be "expired," she claims to be about 95 percent accurate, and you might want to start planning that last meal.
13h
Ingeniøren
20.000 borgeres data om sygefravær slettet i KMD-systemFejl i jobcentersystem har givet a-kasser ekstraarbejde med at kontrollere, om beregninger af dagpengesats, karens og forbrug af dagpenge har været korrekt.
13h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Siemens says profits up on global upturnGerman engineering giant Siemens said Wednesday that profits jumped in the first quarter, driven by rising demand for its products in areas ranging from renewable energy and trains to industrial robots.
13h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
AI in the court: When algorithms rule on jail timeThe centuries-old process of releasing defendants on bail, long the province of judicial discretion, is getting a major assist ... courtesy of artificial intelligence.
13h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Brain scans reveal that friends really are on the same wavelengthWhat can an astronaut, baby sloths, a sentimental music video and an MRI scanner reveal about your friends? Quite a lot, a new study reveals.
13h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Facebook to launch privacy center ahead of EU regulationsFacebook says it will launch a new privacy center to help people understand what it does with their data as the giant social network prepares for sweeping new data protection rules in Europe designed to rein in the growing power of major U.S. technology companies.
14h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Facebook bans ads for cryptocurrenciesFacebook Mark ZuckerbergFacebook says it is banning all ads related to cryptocurrencies in an effort to fight scams.
14h
Ingeniøren
Danfoss-leder: Vi skal op i gearFor Danfoss ligger nøglen til digital succes i at prioritere indsatsområderne benhårdt, ensrette it-infrastrukturen og være åben for samarbejder med de store tech-giganter. Topleder Lars Tveen gav gode råd på Industri 4.0-konference hos IDA i sidste uge.
14h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Florida offshore oil drilling may be back on tableFlorida is still under consideration for offshore oil drilling, a top Interior Department official said Friday, contradicting an announcement last week from Interior Secretary Ryan Zinke that energy exploration off the coast of Florida was "off the table."
14h
Ingeniøren
Ekspert: Danske virksomheder risikerer at tabe IoT-eventyr på gulvetStor mangel på softwareingeniører kan få konsekvenser for danske virksomheder og et potentielt IoT-eventyr. Det underbygger forfatter med bog om problemet.
14h
Ingeniøren
SMV’er skal have et digitalt løftØget digitalisering hos de små og mellemstore virksomheder er ét af indsatsområderne i regeringens udspil til digital vækst. Det er tiltrængt, mener SMV’ernes interesseorganisation, der roser udspillet for dets bredde og håber, at ambitionerne bliver ført ud i livet.
14h
Ingeniøren
Trecifret milliondonation: Nu skal DTU uddanne og forske i gæringDTU udvider nu med forskning og et nyt uddannelsesspor i gæringsteknologi. Det skal lukke et kompetencehul i energi-, fødevare- og medicinalindustrien.
14h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Popular Line messaging app starts crypto trading spinoffJapan's biggest messaging app Line said Wednesday it was launching a financial services spinoff to allow users to exchange and trade virtual currencies.
15h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Sexual harassment in the workplace: how organizational policies can make a differenceEmployees are more likely to report sexual harassment they witness at work when there is a zero-tolerance policy in place, according to a new study by Florida International University researchers.
15h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Rare lunar eclipse offers glimpse of 'super blue blood moon'Many parts of the globe may catch a glimpse Wednesday of a giant crimson moon, thanks to a rare lunar trifecta that combines a blue moon, a super moon and a total eclipse.
15h
Science | The Guardian
Australian trees 'sweat' to survive extreme heatwaves, researchers revealClimate experiment shows trees release water but stop absorbing carbon in extreme heat Australian researchers growing trees in climate change conditions have found the leaves “sweat” to survive extreme heatwaves. The year-long experiment showed that trees continue to release water through their leaves as an evaporative cooling system during periods of extreme heat, despite the carbon-fixing proce
15h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Nintendo ups profit forecast on strong Switch salesNintendo Wii SalesNintendo hiked its annual net profit forecast by more than 40 percent Wednesday after its popular Switch console flew off shelves during the holiday season, fuelled by a cheaper yen.
15h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Robots could descend into old mines to prevent toxic spillsCrumbling mine tunnels awash with polluted waters perforate the Colorado mountains, and scientists may one day send robots creeping through the pitch-black passages to study the mysterious currents that sometimes burst to the surface with devastating effects.
15h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Mexico to hold major deep-water oil auctionMexican authorities will hold a deep-water oil auction Wednesday, the largest since the country's government opened the sector to private industry.
15h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Samsung Electronics reports record Q4 and full year profitsSamsung Electronics reported a 73 percent jump in its fourth quarter net profit on Wednesday, setting a record for any three-month period, mainly driven by demand for its memory chips and display panels.
16h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
A whale with words: Orca mimics human speechHuman Orca SoundsHer head above water, Wikie the killer whale looks at the human trainer next to her pool, listens, then loudly vocalises: "Hello."
16h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
New York expands police cameras to all patrol officersThe New York Police Department, the largest city police force in the United States, announced Tuesday that all patrol officers and detectives would be equipped with body cameras by the end of 2018.
16h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
US investigating iPhone slowing Apple software: reportApple's move to slow down older iPhones as batteries weaken is under scrutiny by US prosecutors and stock market regulators, according to a report Tuesday by Bloomberg.
16h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Russian, Chinese smugglers arrested with tonne of bear paws: NGOA group of Russian and Chinese smugglers have been arrested near the border between the two countries in possession of a tonne of bear paws as well as tiger, deer and frog parts, an animal protection group said Tuesday.
16h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Investment in UK automotive sector plunges by a thirdInvestment in the British automotive industry fell by a third in 2017, its trade association said Wednesday as it called for a swift agreement on the Brexit transition period.
16h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Regulators vote to protect more corals in Atlantic OceanFederal fishing regulators on Tuesday approved a compromise they said would expand the amount of coral habitat preserved in the Atlantic Ocean while also protecting fishing interests.
16h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Fujifilm says to slash 10,000 jobs at Fuji Xerox subsidiaryJapanese technology firm Fujifilm on Wednesday announced 10,000 job cuts by March 2020 in its Fuji Xerox subsidiary, which it said was facing an "increasingly severe" market environment.
16h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Bacterial diversity's shelf life longer than previously expectedUniversity of Montana scientists have published a study in the journal Nature Ecology and Evolution showing that bacterial diversity may stick around millions of years longer than previously thought. The researchers, in UM's Division of Biological Sciences, were led by Associate Professor Scott Miller.
16h
BBC News - Science & Environment
Skywatchers see 'super blue blood Moon'A blue blood supermoon and lunar eclipse across Asia heralds a year of lunar science milestones, say scientists.
16h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Researchers unlock another piece of the puzzle that is crystal growthFrom Mother Nature to our must-have devices, we're surrounded by crystals. Those courtesy of the former, such as ice and snow, can form spontaneously and symmetrically. But the silicon-based or gallium nitride crystals found in LEDs and other electronics require a bit of coaxing to attain their ideal shapes and alignments.
16h

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