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EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Patients get faster life-saving treatment in states with policies allowing direct transport to specialized heart attack care hospitalsPeople having heart attacks get faster life-saving treatment if they live in states that allow EMS to bypass closer hospitals that don't offer the specialized treatment, taking patients directly to those that do. Reducing the time from first medical contact to treatment that restores blood flow to the heart is the most critical factor in improving patient survival.
12h
NYT > Science

Global Health: Tick and Mosquito Infections Spreading Rapidly, C.D.C. FindsRates of Lyme, Zika and exotic new diseases are soaring. Federal officials blame hotter weather, jet travel, forested suburbs and slow vaccine development.
4h
Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

EEG signals accurately predict autism as early as 3 months of ageAutism is challenging to diagnose, especially early in life. A new study shows that inexpensive EEGs, which measure brain electrical activity, accurately predict or rule out autism spectrum disorder in infants, even in some as young as three months.
8h
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

Study challenges 'shock and kill' approach to eliminating HIVResearchers have provided new insight into the cellular processes behind the 'shock and kill' approach to curing HIV, which they say challenges the effectiveness of the treatment.
2min
Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

New lab study reveals how breast cancer drug can accelerate cancer cell growthThe breast cancer drug lapatinib which is designed to shrink tumors can sometimes cause them to grow in the lab, according to a new study. By understanding the molecular basis of this phenomenon, scientists hope that their findings will lead to safer treatment decision-making and drug design in the future.
2min
Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

Malaria-carrying parasites spread more when they can jump into multiple birdsA study found that blood parasites that cause malaria spread more widely if they can use many different kinds of birds as hosts. But even those 'generalist' parasites are limited.
2min
Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

US gains in air quality are slowing downA detailed analysis of satellite observations shows that US progress in reducing levels of two key air pollutants has slowed significantly in recent years. The new study indicates that it may be more difficult than previously realized for the nation to achieve its goal of decreased ozone pollution.
2min
The Atlantic

The Atlantic Politics & Policy Daily: Doctor Estranged-Written by Elaine Godfrey ( @elainejgodfrey ) Today in 5 Lines President Trump’s longtime personal physician, Harold Bornstein, told NBC News that Trump’s bodyguard and lawyer “raided” his office in February 2017 and took medical files. White House Press Secretary Sarah Huckabee Sanders called the move “standard operating procedure” and said records were being transferred “as requested.” Trump l
3min
Popular Science

Watch water droplets dance across a surface using electricityTechnology Cool things happen when you control water with a computer. Researchers at MIT have created a system by which droplets on a horizontal device follow a computer’s instructions.
3min
Live Science

Say Goodbye to the World's Oldest Spider, Dead at 43"Number 16," a recently deceased trapdoor spider, was the oldest known spider in the world.
8min
Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

Ultrafast compression offers new way to get macromolecules into cellsBy treating living cells like tiny absorbent sponges, researchers have developed a potentially new way to introduce molecules and therapeutic genes into human cells.
16min
EurekAlert! - Breaking News

New research ranks the effectiveness of nonsurgical treatments for knee osteoarthritisAn estimated 45 percent of people are at risk of developing knee osteoarthritis (OA) in their lifetime. According to a network meta-analysis research article published in the May 1, 2018 issue of the Journal of the American Academy of Orthopaedic Surgeons (JAAOS), the nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drug (NSAID) naproxen was ranked most effective in individual knee OA treatment for improving both p
26min
Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

Deer fawns more likely to survive in agricultural landscapes than forestThe cruel truth is that throughout the white-tailed deer's range only about half of all fawns live to see their first birthday -- most are killed by predators. However, they have a much better chance of surviving if they are born in farmland rather than in forest, according to researchers.
30min
Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

Taking the guesswork out of discovering new high-entropy alloysScientists have developed a method of computational analysis that can help predict the composition and properties of as-yet unmade high performance alloys.
30min
Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

Single injection treats hemophilia B for life, in proof-of-concept studyResearchers have demonstrated in mice that hemophilia B can be treated for life with one single injection containing disease-free liver cells that can produce their missing clotting factor.
30min
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Storage plan for spent fuel adds to US nuclear debateA plan to temporarily store tons of spent fuel from U.S. commercial nuclear reactors in New Mexico is drawing fire from critics who say the federal government needs to consider more alternatives.
33min
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Apple's tax break yields big dividend boost, stock buybacksApple's tax break on its overseas profits is turning into a big boon for its shareholders.
33min
New on MIT Technology Review

This year, the US government plans to start collecting genetic data from 1 million people
33min
Big Think

This plastic-free water bottle dissolves into nothing in less than 3 weeksA Scottish inventor has created a water bottle that could save ocean life the world over. But will the plastic industry let it happen? Read More
35min
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

New evidence pertaining to expansion of the kingdom of David and Solomon uncoveredOver the last 25 years many scholars have questioned the existence of the kingdom of David and Solomon, which was supposed to have existed in the 10th century BCE. This was based to a large extent on the lack of evidence of royal construction at the heart of the region in which the kingdom supposedly existed. As a result, it was assumed that the rulers at the time were just local chiefs who ruled
39min
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Researchers study how to improve southern sea otter survivalUniversity of Wyoming researchers have been studying how best to bolster the southern sea otter population, which suffers from low genetic diversity and has been further ravaged by Toxoplasma brain disease and others, shark attacks and illegal shootings by fishermen.
45min
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Army neuroscientists foresee intelligent agents on the battlefieldThe battlefield of the future will be complex, with mountains of data moving rapidly between commanders, operations centers and the joint warfighter. In this multi-faceted environment, Army researchers and their partners are seeking solutions.
45min
Wired

Everything Facebook Announced Today at F8Oculus Go, Facebook for dating, and a suite of new features for Instagram and WhatsApp.
45min
The Atlantic

'These Are Very Dangerous Questions for the President'A leaked list of potential questions Special Counsel Robert Mueller wants to ask President Trump in a potential interview highlights the risks faced by both Trump and his inner circle. “The odds are so huge that the president will make a misstatement or an implausible statement that looks like a lie, or that he will answer evasively in a manner that looks like an effort to obstruct the investigat
45min
Blog » Languages » English

Monthly Stats for Eyewire: April 2018New Scouts: New Scythes: New Moderators: New Mentors: New Millionaire Milestones: 45M 40M 35M 30M 25M 20M 15M 10M 5M 2.5M 1M Top 10 Players (Points): 1. 2. 3. 4. 5. 6. 7. 8. 9. 10. Top 10 Players (Cubes): 1. 2. 3. 4. 5. 6. 7. 8. 9. 10. Total Cubes: New Registered Users: Countries Represented: Top 10 Countries (Cubes): 1. 2. 3. 4. 5. 6. 7. 8. 9. 10. Total Points & Top 10 Countries (Points): See @K
45min
EurekAlert! - Breaking News

New evidence pertaining to expansion of the kingdom of David and Solomon uncoveredOver the last 25 years many scholars have questioned the existence of the kingdom of David and Solomon, which was supposed to have existed in the 10th century BCE. Now researchers from Bar-Ilan University in Israel have uncovered new evidence that supports the existence of Israel's united monarchy and indicate that the Kingdom extended beyond Jerusalem's vicinity.
47min
EurekAlert! - Breaking News

UCI participates in NIH’s landmark precision medicine researchThe University of California, Irvine and nationwide partners are launching a landmark $1.5 billion National Institutes of Health-led precisions medicine initiative to gather genetic, biological, environmental, health and lifestyle data from 1 million or more volunteer participants living in the United States.
47min
EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Strategy prevents blindness in mice with retinal degenerationNew research published in Nature Communications outlines a strategy that in mouse models significantly delayed the onset of blindness from inherited retinal degeneration such as retinitis pigmentosa.
47min
EurekAlert! - Breaking News

For high school baseball pitchers, extra throws on game day add up but go uncountedFor high school baseball pitchers, limiting throws during a game helps to prevent fatigue and injuries. But nearly half the number of pitches -- ones thrown during warm-ups and in the bullpen -- are typically not counted, adding significantly to a pitcher's risk of injury, new findings by University of Florida Health researchers show.
47min
Science : NPR

Experimental Lung Treatment Could Make Breathing EasierLung surfactant coats tiny air sacs in the lung. Without it, every breath is a struggle, like blowing up millions of little balloons. With surfactant, breathing is as easy as blowing soap bubbles. (Image credit: SPL/Science Source)
53min
New on MIT Technology Review

“Safety,” yes; “sorry,” no: What Mark Zuckerberg did—and didn’t—say in his F8 keynoteFacebook Mark ZuckerbergAt Facebook’s annual developer conference, the social network’s CEO used a lot of familiar words to share a few new things.
54min
Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

Dehydration prompts more blood feeding by mosquitoesBiologists have found that dry conditions prompted house mosquitoes to seek a blood meal. This could explain why researchers have found higher rates of disease transmission during droughts.
59min
Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

A reimagined future for sustainable nanomaterialsEngineered nanomaterials hold great promise for medicine, electronics, water treatment, and other fields. But when the materials are designed without critical information about environmental impacts at the start of the process, their long-term effects could undermine those advances. A team of researchers hopes to change that.
59min
The Atlantic

Emmanuel Macron and the Ghosts of 1968PARIS—May Day, the traditional May 1 Labor Day holiday, has been particularly charged in France this year. It marks the 50th anniversary of the May 1968 student and worker uprisings that convulsed France, transforming the country and the world. It was a dramatic, romantic moment, one that shaped a generation. Not the generation of President Emmanuel Macron. The first French head of state to come
1h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Traffic-related pollution linked to risk of asthma in childrenNew research led by scientists at Beth Israel Deaconess Medical Center (BIDMC) and the Harvard T.H. Chan School of Public Health suggest that long-term exposure to traffic-related pollution significantly increases the risk of pediatric asthma, especially in early childhood. Their findings were published today in a Letter to the Editor in the Journal of Allergy and Clinical Immunology.
1h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Researchers study how to improve southern sea otter survivalAnalysis of 13 years of demographic and genetic data from 1,006 sea otters to assess multiple effective population size estimators, as well as temporal trends in genetic diversity and population genetic structure, show a need for development of new delisting criteria for the southern sea otter.
1h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News

To improve future relationship with your kids, turn up the musicChildren who grow up listening to music with their parents report having better quality relationships with their moms and dads when they reach young adulthood, researchers found.
1h
Science : NPR

World's Oldest Spider Dies At 43Australian scientists have reported that a spider — assumed to be the world's oldest — has died at 43, outliving its nearest rival by 15 years. The arachnid is believed to have survived for so long by sticking to one protected burrow its entire life and expending minimal energy.
1h
Science : NPR

'On Fire For God's Work': How Scott Pruitt's Faith Drives His PoliticsBefore Scott Pruitt became the Administrator of the Environmental Protection Agency, his political career was guided in large part by his Southern Baptist faith and a faith-based agenda. (Image credit: Screenshot by NPR/Internet Archive)
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Science | The Guardian

Terrawatch: rocks could have a role in combatting climate changeGerman scientists propose using basalt and dunite to soak up carbon from the atmosphere They might seem solid, but rocks gradually erode. Wind, rain, ice and snow all contribute to weathering; nibbling away at mountains, sea cliffs, limestone pavements and even solid granite tors. Freshly exposed rock surfaces react with carbon dioxide in the atmosphere to make bicarbonate ions, which flow down t
1h
Latest Headlines | Science News

Synthetic opioids involved in more deaths than prescription opioidsWinning a ghastly contest, synthetic opioids become most common drug involved in U.S. overdose deaths, bypassing prescription opioids in 2016.
1h
Live Science

Tickborne Diseases Are On the Rise. Is Climate Change to Blame?The number of illnesses from mosquito, tick and flea bites more than tripled over a 13-year period, according to a new report.
1h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Scientists discover balance of thermal energy and low climate stress drive coral species diversityMarine scientists from WCS (Wildlife Conservation Society), University of Warwick, and University of Queensland have identified two key factors that create the ideal conditions needed for high species diversity in coral reefs: thermal energy in the form of warm water and low climate stress.
1h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Opioids over-prescribed after hiatal hernia surgeryThe increase in opioid deaths in the last 20 years led a medical student at the University of Michigan Medical School and colleagues to look at excessive opioids prescribed to treat acute surgical pain following various procedures. Alyssa A. Mazurek presented a study during the American Association for Thoracic Surgery's 98th Annual Meeting that assessed patterns of opioid prescribing for open and
1h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Scientists discover balance of thermal energy and low climate stress drive coral species diversityMarine scientists from WCS (Wildlife Conservation Society), University of Warwick, and University of Queensland have identified two key factors that create the ideal conditions needed for high species diversity in coral reefs: thermal energy in the form of warm water and low climate stress.
1h
Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

Climate change study finds New Hampshire's warmer weather will bring warmer streamsAir temperature increases from climate change will make New Hampshire's streams warmer. A new study examined the extent to which stream waters are warming, which has implications for freshwater ecosystems across the nation given that many species depend on cold water to survive.
1h
Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

Measuring sweat in wearable biosensing devicesWhen people sweat, they unknowingly release a wide range of chemicals that can noninvasively inform clinicians on anything from stress hormone levels to glucose. An international team of researchers recently developed a new membrane that mitigates both issues that arise from direct dermal contact and sweat dilution for sweat biosensors. The membrane performs hundreds of times better than other met
1h
Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

A search for cleft palate's cause reveals a map of the facial genomeOnce upon a time in Europe, pregnant women avoided rabbits to prevent their babies from being born with a 'harelip.' But, that isn't the only misconception about the condition now known as cleft lip. Researchers report the popular modern belief that the condition is caused by a gene is wrong. Their research could transform how we understand the formation of the face.
1h
Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

Study exposes key tactic used by deadly fungusScientists have found that a lethal fungus destroys the immune cell that would ordinarily kill it, by stealing its source of nutrients. Candida albicans is a microscopic fungus commonly found in the body but which can become a dangerous infection in vulnerable hospital patients. The study demonstrated that the fungus competes with disease-fighting macrophages by rapidly consuming glucose and causi
1h
Popular Science

How Popular Science covered the Empire State Building's 1931 openingTechnology 'Robot Elevators to Serve 85,000' Governed by complex electrical brains, through miles of copper-wire nerves, this fleet of automatic elevators in the Empire State Building is expected to handle an…
1h
New Scientist - News

We’ve mapped 90 per cent of the stars in our bit of the galaxyWe have plotted almost all the stars near Earth, and the majority are peaceful enough that life on the planets around them could be possible
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New Scientist - News

A male pill will be a breakthrough for science but not for womenResearch is closing in on the elusive male contraceptive pill. But will it really lead to men taking more responsibility for birth control, wonders Lara Williams
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Zuckerberg unveils plans for Facebook dating service (Update)Facebook Mark ZuckerbergFacebook chief Mark Zuckerberg announced Tuesday the world's largest social network will soon include a new dating feature—while vowing to make privacy protection its top priority in the wake of the Cambridge Analytica scandal.
1h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Zuckerberg kicks off Facebook conference, offers no apologyMark Zuckerberg F8Facebook CEO Mark Zuckerberg kicked off his company's annual developer conference acknowledging that 2018 has been an "intense year" so far, but offered no apology for the company's big privacy scandal.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Facebook messaging app adds real time translationsMessenger FacebookFacebook on Tuesday gave its popular Messenger app the ability to translate missives in real time, deploying artificial intelligence to enable text conversations between people using different languages.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

West Virginia reaches $2.65M settlement with VolkswagenWest Virginia has reached a $2.65 million settlement with Volkswagen AG and two of its affiliates in a lawsuit over the automaker's emissions-rigging scandal, state Attorney General Patrick Morrisey announced Tuesday.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Study: Invasive fist-sized treefrogs in New OrleansInvasive, noxious Cuban treefrogs that eat smaller frogs and grow as big as a human fist have established a population in New Orleans, and officials say they could soon pose a threat to native frogs across the Mississippi River.
1h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

'Institution shocks' spotlight effects of changing economic institutionsIn recent years economists have joined historians and others in thinking that institutions, like governments, markets, and firms, are the key to understanding how economies work. From a research standpoint, the challenge is how to study what happens when institutions change.
1h
TED Talks Daily (SD video)

How a male contraceptive pill could work | John AmoryAndrologist John Amory is developing innovative male contraception that gives men a new option for taking responsibility to prevent unintended pregnancy. He details the science in development -- and why the world needs a male pill.
1h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News

'Institution shocks' spotlight effects of changing economic institutionsResearchers analyzed new data on the Chilean elections of the 1970s to understand how economies react to institutional change.
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Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences current issue

Horizontal transfer of retrotransposons between bivalves and other aquatic species of multiple phyla [Evolution]The LTR retrotransposon Steamer is a selfish endogenous element in the soft-shell clam genome that was first detected because of its dramatic amplification in bivalve transmissible neoplasia afflicting the species. We amplified and sequenced related retrotransposons from the genomic DNA of many other bivalve species, finding evidence of horizontal transfer...
1h
Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences current issue

MK2 contributes to tumor progression by promoting M2 macrophage polarization and tumor angiogenesis [Immunology and Inflammation]Chronic inflammation is a major risk factor for colorectal cancer. The p38/MAPKAP Kinase 2 (MK2) kinase axis controls the synthesis of proinflammatory cytokines that mediate both chronic inflammation and tumor progression. Blockade of this pathway has been previously reported to suppress inflammation and to prevent colorectal tumorigenesis in a mouse...
1h
Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences current issue

Endoplasmic reticulum stress activates SRC, relocating chaperones to the cell surface where GRP78/CD109 blocks TGF-{beta} signaling [Medical Sciences]The discovery that endoplasmic reticulum (ER) luminal chaperones such as GRP78/BiP can escape to the cell surface upon ER stress where they regulate cell signaling, proliferation, apoptosis, and immunity represents a paradigm shift. Toward deciphering the mechanisms, we report here that, upon ER stress, IRE1α binds to and triggers tyrosine...
1h
Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences current issue

Discovery of recombinases enables genome mining of cryptic biosynthetic gene clusters in Burkholderiales species [Microbiology]Bacterial genomes encode numerous cryptic biosynthetic gene clusters (BGCs) that represent a largely untapped source of drugs or pesticides. Mining of the cryptic products is limited by the unavailability of streamlined genetic tools in native producers. Precise genome engineering using bacteriophage recombinases is particularly useful for genome mining. However, recombinases...
1h
Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences current issue

Polysialic acid is a cellular receptor for human adenovirus 52 [Microbiology]Human adenovirus 52 (HAdV-52) is one of only three known HAdVs equipped with both a long and a short fiber protein. While the long fiber binds to the coxsackie and adenovirus receptor, the function of the short fiber in the virus life cycle is poorly understood. Here, we show, by...
1h
Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences current issue

Desynchronization of slow oscillations in the basal ganglia during natural sleep [Neuroscience]Slow oscillations of neuronal activity alternating between firing and silence are a hallmark of slow-wave sleep (SWS). These oscillations reflect the default activity present in all mammalian species, and are ubiquitous to anesthesia, brain slice preparations, and neuronal cultures. In all these cases, neuronal firing is highly synchronous within local...
1h
Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences current issue

Drought delays development of the sorghum root microbiome and enriches for monoderm bacteria [Plant Biology]Drought stress is a major obstacle to crop productivity, and the severity and frequency of drought are expected to increase in the coming century. Certain root-associated bacteria have been shown to mitigate the negative effects of drought stress on plant growth, and manipulation of the crop microbiome is an emerging...
1h
Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences current issue

DRUG-NEM: Optimizing drug combinations using single-cell perturbation response to account for intratumoral heterogeneity [Systems Biology]An individual malignant tumor is composed of a heterogeneous collection of single cells with distinct molecular and phenotypic features, a phenomenon termed intratumoral heterogeneity. Intratumoral heterogeneity poses challenges for cancer treatment, motivating the need for combination therapies. Single-cell technologies are now available to guide effective drug combinations by accounting for...
1h
Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences current issue

Deep learning improves prediction of drug-drug and drug-food interactions [Systems Biology]Drug interactions, including drug–drug interactions (DDIs) and drug–food constituent interactions (DFIs), can trigger unexpected pharmacological effects, including adverse drug events (ADEs), with causal mechanisms often unknown. Several computational methods have been developed to better understand drug interactions, especially for DDIs. However, these methods do not provide sufficient details be
1h
Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences current issue

Correction for Alder et al., Diagnostic utility of telomere length testing in a hospital-based setting [Correction]MEDICAL SCIENCES Correction for “Diagnostic utility of telomere length testing in a hospital-based setting,” by Jonathan K. Alder, Vidya Sagar Hanumanthu, Margaret A. Strong, Amy E. DeZern, Susan E. Stanley, Clifford M. Takemoto, Ludmilla Danilova, Carolyn D. Applegate, Stephen G. Bolton, David W. Mohr, Robert A. Brodsky, James F. Casella,...
1h
Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences current issue

Correction for Haȷ-Dahman et al,. Fatty-acid-binding protein 5 controls retrograde endocannabinoid signaling at central glutamate synapses [Correction]NEUROSCIENCE Correction for “Fatty-acid–binding protein 5 controls retrograde endocannabinoid signaling at central glutamate synapses,” by Samir Haj-Dahmane, Roh-Yu Shen, Matthew W. Elmes, Keith Studholme, Martha P. Kanjiya, Diane Bogdan, Panayotis K. Thanos, Jeremy T. Miyauchi, Stella E. Tsirka, Dale G. Deutsch, and Martin Kaczocha, which was first published March 12,...
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Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences current issue

In This Issue [This Week in PNAS]Gene drive to control a major crop pest D. suzukii on a strawberry. Between 2009 and 2014, spotted wing fruit flies (Drosophila suzukii), virtually ubiquitous invasive crop pests from Japan that attack a variety of soft-skinned fruits, accounted for an estimated $39.8 million revenue loss in California raspberry farms. Anna...
1h
Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences current issue

How the manakin got its crown: A novel trait that is unlikely to cause speciation [Biological Sciences]In a fascinating study, Barrera-Guzmán et al. (1) demonstrate a hybrid origin for the golden-crowned manakin and describe a sexually dimorphic plumage trait derived in the hybrid lineage. However, their work stops short of showing that “the evolution of this unique crown-color signal likely culminated in premating isolation of the...
1h
Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences current issue

Reply to Rosenthal et al.: Both premating and postmating isolation likely contributed to manakin hybrid speciation [Biological Sciences]In a recent letter to the editor, Rosenthal et al. (1) object to our proposal (2) that evolution of a unique male crown color in the avian hybrid species Lepidothrix vilasboasi might generate premating reproductive isolation from its parental species. Rosenthal et al.’s (1) key argument, derived from a narrow...
1h
Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences current issue

Iron status as a confounder in the gender gap in survival under extreme conditions [Biological Sciences]Zarulli et al. (1) report on male–female survival differences in populations of slaves and populations exposed to severe famines and epidemics. Although the facts are clear and convincing, attention should be paid to the role of iron as a confounder in explaining the gender-based mortality differences. Because iron is scanty...
1h
Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences current issue

Reply to Delanghe et al.: Iron status is not likely to play a key role in the gender survival gap under extreme conditions [Biological Sciences]Females survive better than males in populations under stressful conditions, such as famines, epidemics, and slavery (1). Delanghe et al. (2) identify a biological mechanism that might partly explain this finding. They emphasize that women generally have smaller body iron stores than men, and therefore are less prone to develop...
1h
Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences current issue

QnAs with Donald Geman [QnAs]With the proliferation of “omics” technologies, personalized medicine—which tailors treatment to an individual’s genomic profile—promised a revolution in care. That revolution, says applied mathematician Donald Geman, has been slow to arrive. Geman has spent nearly four decades devising statistical methods for a variety of applications. He recently teamed up with...
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Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences current issue

LSD1: A single target to combat lineage plasticity in lethal prostate cancer [Cell Biology]Prostate cancer initiation and progression to a lethal metastatic castration-resistant (mCRPC) phenotype remains largely dependent on the function of the androgen receptor (AR) (1). Recently, however, more potent androgen-deprivation therapy (ADT) regimens that target the AR and the androgen biosynthesis pathways have led to the emergence, in a subset of...
1h
Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences current issue

Sizing up a supercharged ferryl [Chemistry]Terminal transition metal-oxo (oxo = O2−) intermediates enjoy storied status in inorganic chemistry. The elucidation of the vanadyl (VO2+) electronic structure by Ballhausen and Gray (1) helped usher in the era of molecular orbital depictions of bonding in transition metal chemistry. Since then, metal-oxo species have been implicated in vital...
1h
Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences current issue

PDCD5 says no to NO [Cell Biology]Blood vessels are more than mere conduits, and their dynamic function is regulated to a large extent by their inner layer, the endothelium. Endothelial cell-derived nitric oxide (NO), a product of endothelial NO synthase (eNOS), is important for normal endothelial function and vascular health. Programmed cell death 5 (PDCD5) is...
1h
Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences current issue

Draft genome sequence of Camellia sinensis var. sinensis provides insights into the evolution of the tea genome and tea quality [Agricultural Sciences]Tea, one of the world’s most important beverage crops, provides numerous secondary metabolites that account for its rich taste and health benefits. Here we present a high-quality sequence of the genome of tea, Camellia sinensis var. sinensis (CSS), using both Illumina and PacBio sequencing technologies. At least 64% of the...
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Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences current issue

eIF1 Loop 2 interactions with Met-tRNAi control the accuracy of start codon selection by the scanning preinitiation complex [Biochemistry]The eukaryotic 43S preinitiation complex (PIC), bearing initiator methionyl transfer RNA (Met-tRNAi) in a ternary complex (TC) with eukaryotic initiation factor 2 (eIF2)-GTP, scans the mRNA leader for an AUG codon in favorable context. AUG recognition evokes rearrangement from an open PIC conformation with TC in a “POUT” state to...
1h
Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences current issue

Study of protein folding under native conditions by rapidly switching the hydrostatic pressure inside an NMR sample cell [Biophysics and Computational Biology]In general, small proteins rapidly fold on the timescale of milliseconds or less. For proteins with a substantial volume difference between the folded and unfolded states, their thermodynamic equilibrium can be altered by varying the hydrostatic pressure. Using a pressure-sensitized mutant of ubiquitin, we demonstrate that rapidly switching the pressure...
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Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences current issue

LSD1 activates a lethal prostate cancer gene network independently of its demethylase function [Cell Biology]Medical castration that interferes with androgen receptor (AR) function is the principal treatment for advanced prostate cancer. However, clinical progression is universal, and tumors with AR-independent resistance mechanisms appear to be increasing in frequency. Consequently, there is an urgent need to develop new treatments targeting molecular pathways enriched in lethal...
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Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences current issue

DNA methylation and transcriptome aberrations mediated by ER{alpha} in mouse seminal vesicles following developmental DES exposure [Cell Biology]Early transient developmental exposure to an endocrine active compound, diethylstilbestrol (DES), a synthetic estrogen, causes late-stage effects in the reproductive tract of adult mice. Estrogen receptor alpha (ERα) plays a role in mediating these developmental effects. However, the developmental mechanism is not well known in male tissues. Here, we present...
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Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences current issue

Nuclear export of ubiquitinated proteins via the UBIN-POST system [Cell Biology]Although mechanisms for protein homeostasis in the cytosol have been studied extensively, those in the nucleus remain largely unknown. Here, we identified that a protein complex mediates export of polyubiquitinated proteins from the nucleus to the cytosol. UBIN, a ubiquitin-associated (UBA) domain-containing protein, shuttled between the nucleus and the cytosol...
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Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences current issue

Plasmodium-associated changes in human odor attract mosquitoes [Ecology]Malaria parasites (Plasmodium) can change the attractiveness of their vertebrate hosts to Anopheles vectors, leading to a greater number of vector–host contacts and increased transmission. Indeed, naturally Plasmodium-infected children have been shown to attract more mosquitoes than parasite-free children. Here, we demonstrate Plasmodium-induced increases in the attractiveness of skin odor...
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Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences current issue

Integrating effects of species composition and soil properties to predict shifts in montane forest carbon-water relations [Environmental Sciences]This study was designed to address a major source of uncertainty pertaining to coupled carbon–water cycles in montane forest ecosystems. The Sierra Nevada of California was used as a model system to investigate connections between the physiological performance of trees and landscape patterns of forest carbon and water use. The...
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Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences current issue

A call for more science in forensic science [Political Sciences]Forensic science is critical to the administration of justice. The discipline of forensic science is remarkably complex and includes methodologies ranging from DNA analysis to chemical composition to pattern recognition. Many forensic practices developed under the auspices of law enforcement and were vetted primarily by the legal system rather than...
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Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences current issue

Hominin skeletal part abundances and claims of deliberate disposal of corpses in the Middle Pleistocene [Anthropology]Humans are set apart from other organisms by the realization of their own mortality. Thus, determining the prehistoric emergence of this capacity is of significant interest to understanding the uniqueness of the human animal. Tracing that capacity chronologically is possible through archaeological investigations that focus on physical markers that reflect...
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Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences current issue

Rapid selection of a pyrethroid metabolic enzyme CYP9K1 by operational malaria control activities [Applied Biological Sciences]Since 2004, indoor residual spraying (IRS) and long-lasting insecticide-impregnated bednets (LLINs) have reduced the malaria parasite prevalence in children on Bioko Island, Equatorial Guinea, from 45% to 12%. After target site-based (knockdown resistance; kdr) pyrethroid resistance was detected in 2004 in Anopheles coluzzii (formerly known as the M form of...
1h
Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences current issue

Developmentally inspired programming of adult human mesenchymal stromal cells toward stable chondrogenesis [Applied Biological Sciences]It is generally accepted that adult human bone marrow-derived mesenchymal stromal cells (hMSCs) are default committed toward osteogenesis. Even when induced to chondrogenesis, hMSCs typically form hypertrophic cartilage that undergoes endochondral ossification. Because embryonic mesenchyme is obviously competent to generate phenotypically stable cartilage, it is questioned whether there is a...
1h
Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences current issue

Biomaterial surface energy-driven ligand assembly strongly regulates stem cell mechanosensitivity and fate on very soft substrates [Applied Biological Sciences]Although mechanisms of cell–material interaction and cellular mechanotransduction are increasingly understood, the mechanical insensitivity of mesenchymal cells to certain soft amorphous biomaterial substrates has remained largely unexplained. We reveal that surface energy-driven supramolecular ligand assembly can regulate mesenchymal stem cell (MSC) sensing of substrate mechanical compliance and
1h
Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences current issue

Human N-acetylglucosaminyltransferase II substrate recognition uses a modular architecture that includes a convergent exosite [Biochemistry]Asn-linked oligosaccharides are extensively modified during transit through the secretory pathway, first by trimming of the nascent glycan chains and subsequently by initiating and extending multiple oligosaccharide branches from the trimannosyl glycan core. Trimming and branching pathway steps are highly ordered and hierarchal based on the precise substrate specificities of...
1h
Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences current issue

Disparate binding kinetics by an intrinsically disordered domain enables temporal regulation of transcriptional complex formation [Biochemistry]Intrinsically disordered regions are highly represented among mammalian transcription factors, where they often contribute to the formation of multiprotein complexes that regulate gene expression. An example of this occurs with LIM-homeodomain (LIM-HD) proteins in the developing spinal cord. The LIM-HD protein LHX3 and the LIM-HD cofactor LDB1 form a binary...
1h
Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences current issue

Complementary charge-based interaction between the ribosomal-stalk protein L7/12 and IF2 is the key to rapid subunit association [Biochemistry]The interaction between the ribosomal-stalk protein L7/12 (L12) and initiation factor 2 (IF2) is essential for rapid subunit association, but the underlying mechanism is unknown. Here, we have characterized the L12–IF2 interaction on Escherichia coli ribosomes using site-directed mutagenesis, fast kinetics, and molecular dynamics (MD) simulations. Fifteen individual point mutations...
1h
Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences current issue

Digitizing omics profiles by divergence from a baseline [Biophysics and Computational Biology]Data collected from omics technologies have revealed pervasive heterogeneity and stochasticity of molecular states within and between phenotypes. A prominent example of such heterogeneity occurs between genome-wide mRNA, microRNA, and methylation profiles from one individual tumor to another, even within a cancer subtype. However, current methods in bioinformatics, such as...
1h
Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences current issue

MinE conformational switching confers robustness on self-organized Min protein patterns [Biophysics and Computational Biology]Protein patterning is vital for many fundamental cellular processes. This raises two intriguing questions: Can such intrinsically complex processes be reduced to certain core principles and, if so, what roles do the molecular details play in individual systems? A prototypical example for protein patterning is the bacterial Min system, in...
1h
Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences current issue

Dynamic activation and regulation of the mitogen-activated protein kinase p38 [Biophysics and Computational Biology]Mitogen-activated protein kinases, which include p38, are essential for cell differentiation and autophagy. The current model for p38 activation involves activation-loop phosphorylation with subsequent substrate binding leading to substrate phosphorylation. Despite extensive efforts, the molecular mechanism of activation remains unclear. Here, using NMR spectroscopy, we show how the modulation of.
1h
Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences current issue

Large SOD1 aggregates, unlike trimeric SOD1, do not impact cell viability in a model of amyotrophic lateral sclerosis [Biophysics and Computational Biology]Aberrant accumulation of misfolded Cu, Zn superoxide dismutase (SOD1) is a hallmark of SOD1-associated amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS), an invariably fatal neurodegenerative disease. While recent discovery of nonnative trimeric SOD1-associated neurotoxicity has suggested a potential pathway for motor neuron impairment, it is yet unknown whether large, insoluble aggregates are cytotoxic....
1h
Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences current issue

A folding nucleus and minimal ATP binding domain of Hsp70 identified by single-molecule force spectroscopy [Biophysics and Computational Biology]The folding pathways of large proteins are complex, with many of them requiring the aid of chaperones and others folding spontaneously. Along the folding pathways, partially folded intermediates are frequently populated; their role in the driving of the folding process is unclear. The structures of these intermediates are generally not...
1h
Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences current issue

Programmed cell death 5 suppresses AKT-mediated cytoprotection of endothelium [Cell Biology]Programmed cell death 5 (PDCD5) has been associated with human cancers as a regulator of cell death; however, the role of PDCD5 in the endothelium has not been revealed. Thus, we investigated whether PDCD5 regulates protein kinase B (PKB/AKT)-endothelial nitric oxide synthase (eNOS)–dependent signal transduction in the endothelium and affects...
1h
Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences current issue

Deubiquitylation and stabilization of p21 by USP11 is critical for cell-cycle progression and DNA damage responses [Cell Biology]p21WAF1/CIP1 is a broad-acting cyclin-dependent kinase inhibitor. Its stability is essential for proper cell-cycle progression and cell fate decision. Ubiquitylation by the multiple E3 ubiquitin ligase complexes is the major regulatory mechanism of p21, which induces p21 degradation. However, it is unclear whether ubiquitylated p21 can be recycled. In this...
1h
Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences current issue

Control of vacuole membrane homeostasis by a resident PI-3,5-kinase inhibitor [Cell Biology]Lysosomes have an important role in cellular protein and organelle quality control, metabolism, and signaling. On the surface of lysosomes, the PIKfyve/Fab1 complex generates phosphatidylinositol 3,5-bisphosphate, PI-3,5-P2, which is critical for lysosomal membrane homeostasis during acute osmotic stress and for lysosomal signaling. Here, we identify the inverted BAR protein Ivy1...
1h
Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences current issue

Structural characterization of a non-heme iron active site in zeolites that hydroxylates methane [Chemistry]Iron-containing zeolites exhibit unprecedented reactivity in the low-temperature hydroxylation of methane to form methanol. Reactivity occurs at a mononuclear ferrous active site, α-Fe(II), that is activated by N2O to form the reactive intermediate α-O. This has been defined as an Fe(IV)=O species. Using nuclear resonance vibrational spectroscopy coupled to X-ray...
1h
Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences current issue

Vibrations of a molecule in an external force field [Chemistry]The oscillation frequencies of a molecule on a surface are determined by the mass distribution in the molecule and the restoring forces that occur when the molecule bends. The restoring force originates from the atomic-scale interaction within the molecule and with the surface, which plays an essential role in the...
1h
Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences current issue

An explainable deep machine vision framework for plant stress phenotyping [Computer Sciences]Current approaches for accurate identification, classification, and quantification of biotic and abiotic stresses in crop research and production are predominantly visual and require specialized training. However, such techniques are hindered by subjectivity resulting from inter- and intrarater cognitive variability. This translates to erroneous decisions and a significant waste of resources....
1h
Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences current issue

Formate rescues neural tube defects caused by mutations in Slc25a32 [Developmental Biology]Periconceptional folic acid (FA) supplementation significantly reduces the prevalence of neural tube defects (NTDs). Unfortunately, some NTDs are FA resistant, and as such, NTDs remain a global public health concern. Previous studies have identified SLC25A32 as a mitochondrial folate transporter (MFT), which is capable of transferring tetrahydrofolate (THF) from cellular...
1h
Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences current issue

Muscularis macrophage development in the absence of an enteric nervous system [Developmental Biology]The nervous system of the bowel regulates the inflammatory phenotype of tissue resident muscularis macrophages (MM), and in adult mice, enteric neurons are the main local source of colony stimulating factor 1 (CSF1), a protein required for MM survival. Surprisingly, we find that during development MM colonize the bowel before...
1h
Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences current issue

Inner Workings: A new crop of landers and rovers seeks to answer key questions about Venus—and, by extension, Earth [Earth, Atmospheric, and Planetary Sciences]Earth benefitted from a dose of cosmic good luck. While it became balmy and habitable, next-door neighbor Venus ended up hellish and inhospitable. And yet, in terms of size, composition, and approximate distance from our host star, Venus could be Earth’s twin—as Earth-like as any extrasolar planet observed so far....
1h
Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences current issue

GoAmazon2014/5 campaign points to deep-inflow approach to deep convection across scales [Earth, Atmospheric, and Planetary Sciences]A substantial fraction of precipitation is associated with mesoscale convective systems (MCSs), which are currently poorly represented in climate models. Convective parameterizations are highly sensitive to the assumptions of an entraining plume model, in which high equivalent potential temperature air from the boundary layer is modified via turbulent entrainment. Here...
1h
Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences current issue

Temperature accelerates the rate fields become forests [Ecology]Secondary succession, the postdisturbance transition of herbaceous to woody-dominated ecosystems, occurs faster at lower latitudes with important ramifications for ecosystem processes. This pattern could be driven by the direct effect of temperature on tree growth; however, an alternative mechanism is tree–herb competition, which may be more intense in more fertile...
1h
Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences current issue

Thermally stable, highly efficient, ultraflexible organic photovoltaics [Engineering]Flexible photovoltaics with extreme mechanical compliance present appealing possibilities to power Internet of Things (IoT) sensors and wearable electronic devices. Although improvement in thermal stability is essential, simultaneous achievement of high power conversion efficiency (PCE) and thermal stability in flexible organic photovoltaics (OPVs) remains challenging due to the difficulties in...
1h
Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences current issue

Urbanization prolongs hantavirus epidemics in cities [Environmental Sciences]Urbanization and rural–urban migration are two factors driving global patterns of disease and mortality. There is significant concern about their potential impact on disease burden and the effectiveness of current control approaches. Few attempts have been made to increase our understanding of the relationship between urbanization and disease dynamics, although...
1h
Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences current issue

Multiple large-scale gene and genome duplications during the evolution of hexapods [Evolution]Polyploidy or whole genome duplication (WGD) is a major contributor to genome evolution and diversity. Although polyploidy is recognized as an important component of plant evolution, it is generally considered to play a relatively minor role in animal evolution. Ancient polyploidy is found in the ancestry of some animals, especially...
1h
Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences current issue

Next-generation CRISPR/Cas9 transcriptional activation in Drosophila using flySAM [Genetics]CRISPR/Cas9-based transcriptional activation (CRISPRa) has recently emerged as a powerful and scalable technique for systematic overexpression genetic analysis in Drosophila melanogaster. We present flySAM, a potent tool for in vivo CRISPRa, which offers major improvements over existing strategies in terms of effectiveness, scalability, and ease of use. flySAM outperforms existing...
1h
Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences current issue

Synthetically engineered Medea gene drive system in the worldwide crop pest Drosophila suzukii [Genetics]Synthetic gene drive systems possess enormous potential to replace, alter, or suppress wild populations of significant disease vectors and crop pests; however, their utility in diverse populations remains to be demonstrated. Here, we report the creation of a synthetic Medea gene drive system in a major worldwide crop pest, Drosophila...
1h
Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences current issue

O6-methylguanine-induced transcriptional mutagenesis reduces p53 tumor-suppressor function [Genetics]Altered protein function due to mutagenesis plays an important role in disease development. This is perhaps most evident in tumorigenesis and the associated loss or gain of function of tumor-suppressor genes and oncogenes. The extent to which lesion-induced transcriptional mutagenesis (TM) influences protein function and its contribution to the development...
1h
Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences current issue

Ribosomal DNA copy loss and repeat instability in ATRX-mutated cancers [Genetics]ATRX (alpha thalassemia/mental retardation X-linked) complexes with DAXX to deposit histone variant H3.3 into repetitive heterochromatin. Recent genome sequencing studies in cancers have revealed mutations in ATRX and their association with ALT (alternative lengthening of telomeres) activation. Here we report depletion of ATRX in mouse ES cells leads to selective...
1h
Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences current issue

Anti-HIV-1 B cell responses are dependent on B cell precursor frequency and antigen-binding affinity [Immunology and Inflammation]The discovery that humans can produce potent broadly neutralizing antibodies (bNAbs) to several different epitopes on the HIV-1 spike has reinvigorated efforts to develop an antibody-based HIV-1 vaccine. Antibody cloning from single cells revealed that nearly all bNAbs show unusual features that could help explain why it has not been...
1h
Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences current issue

Role of PD-1 during effector CD8 T cell differentiation [Immunology and Inflammation]PD-1 (programmed cell death-1) is the central inhibitory receptor regulating CD8 T cell exhaustion during chronic viral infection and cancer. Interestingly, PD-1 is also expressed transiently by activated CD8 T cells during acute viral infection, but the role of PD-1 in modulating T cell effector differentiation and function is not...
1h
Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences current issue

Shared epitope-aryl hydrocarbon receptor crosstalk underlies the mechanism of gene-environment interaction in autoimmune arthritis [Immunology and Inflammation]The susceptibility to autoimmune diseases is affected by genetic and environmental factors. In rheumatoid arthritis (RA), the shared epitope (SE), a five-amino acid sequence motif encoded by RA-associated HLA-DRB1 alleles, is the single most significant genetic risk factor. The risk conferred by the SE is increased in a multiplicative way...
1h
Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences current issue

Mechanisms of sampling interstitial fluid from skin using a microneedle patch [Medical Sciences]Although interstitial fluid (ISF) contains biomarkers of physiological significance and medical interest, sampling of ISF for clinical applications has made limited impact due to a lack of simple, clinically useful techniques that collect more than nanoliter volumes of ISF. This study describes experimental and theoretical analysis of ISF transport from...
1h
Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences current issue

Tunable cytotoxic aptamer-drug conȷugates for the treatment of prostate cancer [Medical Sciences]Therapies that can eliminate both local and metastatic prostate tumor lesions while sparing normal organ tissue are desperately needed. With the goal of developing an improved drug-targeting strategy, we turned to a new class of targeted anticancer therapeutics: aptamers conjugated to highly toxic chemotherapeutics. Cell selection for aptamers with prostate...
1h
Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences current issue

Mutations in the pancreatic secretory enzymes CPA1 and CPB1 are associated with pancreatic cancer [Medical Sciences]To evaluate whether germline variants in genes encoding pancreatic secretory enzymes contribute to pancreatic cancer susceptibility, we sequenced the coding regions of CPB1 and other genes encoding pancreatic secretory enzymes and known pancreatitis susceptibility genes (PRSS1, CPA1, CTRC, and SPINK1) in a hospital series of pancreatic cancer cases and controls....
1h
Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences current issue

Shewanella oneidensis as a living electrode for controlled radical polymerization [Microbiology]Metabolic engineering has facilitated the production of pharmaceuticals, fuels, and soft materials but is generally limited to optimizing well-defined metabolic pathways. We hypothesized that the reaction space available to metabolic engineering could be expanded by coupling extracellular electron transfer to the performance of an exogenous redox-active metal catalyst. Here we...
1h
Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences current issue

Origin, antigenicity, and function of a secreted form of ORF2 in hepatitis E virus infection [Microbiology]The enterically transmitted hepatitis E virus (HEV) adopts a unique strategy to exit cells by cloaking its capsid (encoded by the viral ORF2 gene) and circulating in the blood as “quasi-enveloped” particles. However, recent evidence suggests that the majority of the ORF2 protein present in the patient serum and supernatants...
1h
Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences current issue

Spatial determinants of quorum signaling in a Pseudomonas aeruginosa infection model [Microbiology]Quorum sensing (QS) is a bacterial communication system that involves production and sensing of extracellular signals. In laboratory models, QS allows bacteria to monitor and respond to their own cell density and is critical for fitness. However, how QS proceeds in natural, spatially structured bacterial communities is not well understood,...
1h
Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences current issue

Spatial and temporal heterogeneity of neural responses in human posteromedial cortex [Neuroscience]Neuroimaging evidence supports a role of the default mode network (DMN) in spontaneous thought and goal-driven internally oriented processes, such as recalling an autobiographical event, and has demonstrated its deactivation during focused, externally oriented attention. Recent work suggests that the DMN is not a homogeneous network but rather is composed...
1h
Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences current issue

Interaction instability of localization in quasiperiodic systems [Physics]Integrable models form pillars of theoretical physics because they allow for full analytical understanding. Despite being rare, many realistic systems can be described by models that are close to integrable. Therefore, an important question is how small perturbations influence the behavior of solvable models. This is particularly true for many-body...
1h
Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences current issue

Reduced vacuolar {beta}-1,3-glucan synthesis affects carbohydrate metabolism as well as plastid homeostasis and structure in Phaeodactylum tricornutum [Plant Biology]The β-1,3-glucan chrysolaminarin is the main storage polysaccharide of diatoms. In contrast to plants and green algae, diatoms and most other algal groups do not accumulate storage polysaccharides in their plastids. The diatom Phaeodactylum tricornutum possesses only a single gene encoding a putative β-1,3-glucan synthase (PtBGS). Here, we characterize this...
1h
Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences current issue

Individuals, institutions, and innovation in the debates of the French Revolution [Psychological and Cognitive Sciences]The French Revolution brought principles of “liberty, equality, fraternity” to bear on the day-to-day challenges of governing what was then the largest country in Europe. Its experiments provided a model for future revolutions and democracies across the globe, but this first modern revolution had no model to follow. Using reconstructed...
1h
Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences current issue

Science and Culture: Animal cognition research offers outreach opportunity [Sustainability Science]In a classroom in Thailand, groups of elementary school children are marching around large sheets of newspaper on the floor. Music plays. Each group of five kids has a newspaper sheet. When the music stops, the children rush to stand on their sheet. The first time, there’s room for all....
1h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

GPM satellite views Tropical Cyclone Flamboyan's rainfallTropical Cyclone Flamboyan was being battered by vertical wind shear when the Global Precipitation Measurement mission or GPM core satellite passed overhead and analyzed its rainfall rates.
1h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

One-dimensional material packs a powerful punch for next generation electronicsEngineers at the University of California, Riverside, have demonstrated prototype devices made of an exotic material that can conduct a current density 50 times greater than conventional copper interconnect technology.
1h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Gentrification draws more whites to minority neighborhoodsResidents and anti-gentrification activists tend to fear gentrification will lead to displacement by white residents while some experts believe it's an optimistic sign of an economic boom that would enable people to rise up economically.
1h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Study explores the down side of being dubbed 'class clown'Class clowns' off-task antics amuse and delight their classmates during first and second grades, making them the most sought-after playmates on the playground in early elementary school.
1h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Mercury rising: New evidence that volcanism triggered the late Devonian extinctionThe late Devonian extinction, about 370 million years ago, is one of the 'Big Five.' It killed up to 80 percent of species, obliterating the lavish Devonian coral reef ecosystem. The final pulse in this multi-step crisis, called the Frasnian-Famennian event, was its most devastating. But what, exactly, did the killing?
1h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Study shows sea turtle nesting beaches threatened by microplastic pollutionPlastic is famous for its unyielding durability, making it perfect for consumer products but a unique and persistent menace to the natural environment.
1h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

The secret lives of roots: Watching crops grow beneath the surface with portable MRINobody really knows what plant roots are doing when they're at home. Digging up a plant exposes the roots, but destroys the soil's natural fabric. Information is lost about the intact natural arrangement of the roots and soil. Ditto for studying the roots of plants in pots. In fact, there is no noninvasive field method of determining, in detail, how the root systems of crop plants change over time
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

NASA's new Dellingr spacecraft baselined for pathfinding CubeSat to Van Allen beltsGTOSat—will not only provide key observations of the environmentally forbidding radiation belts that encircle Earth, it will provide initial steps of a new technological vision.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

Acupuncture possible treatment for dental anxietyResearchers have found evidence that acupuncture could help people who experience dental anxiety.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

A rose is a rose is a rose: Mathematical model explains how two brains agree on smellsScientists have discovered why the brain's olfactory system is so remarkably consistent between individuals, even though the wiring of brain cells in this region differs greatly from person to person. To make sense of this apparent paradox, the researchers developed a computational model showing that two brains need not have previously sniffed the same exact set of odors in order to agree on a new
2h
Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

Brain's window for language learning open until adulthoodIt has long been known that children learn language more easily than adults, but determining exactly when that ability declines has been something of a mystery. Researchers now report that prime language learning years extend approximately a decade longer than previously thought -- until 17.4 years of age. The new findings hold implications for neuroscience, linguistics, developmental psychology a
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Popular Science

New eco-friendly microbeads could save oceans, rather than destroy themEnvironment Researchers are working on designs to help sop up pollutants. Microbeads have a pretty bad rap. The plastic ones we’re used to hearing about look like tiny specks, but have added up to a lot of pollution in our lakes and oceans.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

Small earthquakes caused by migrating gasses in the undergroundThe metropolitan area of Istanbul with around 15 million inhabitants is considered to be particularly earthquake-prone. In order to be able to assess the risk correctly, researchers must decipher the processes underground. Below the Marmara Sea, an international research team detected earthquakes that were not directly caused by tectonic stresses but by rising natural gas.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

Medical marijuana could reduce opioid use in older adultsA study shows up to 65 percent of older adults who use medical marijuana significantly reduced their chronic pain and dependence on opioid painkillers.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

Breakthrough for kinesiologists studying metabolic proteinResearchers have discovered a new method for analyzing an important metabolic protein in muscles.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

Physicists find properties of magnetic soliton of interest for brain-inspired computingA team of physicists has uncovered properties of a category of magnetic waves relevant to the development of neuromorphic computing -- an artificial intelligence system that seeks to mimic human-brain function.
2h
Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

Marmosets as the canary in the coal mine for ZikaNew research shows small, New World monkeys called marmosets may be an important animal model for emerging viruses with the potential for harmful effects on fetuses. Establishing animal models for emerging diseases, like Zika, is necessary for the development of vaccines, therapies and diagnostics.
2h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News

One-dimensional material packs a powerful punch for next generation electronicsEngineers at the University of California, Riverside, have demonstrated prototype devices made of an exotic material that can conduct a current density 50 times greater than conventional copper interconnect technology.
2h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Gentrification draws more whites to minority neighborhoodsA new national study indicates that the percentage of whites tends to increase among neighborhoods on the rise, indicating that minority neighborhoods experience racial change during gentrification.
2h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Study explores the down side of being dubbed 'class clown'Being dubbed the class clown by teachers and peers has negative social repercussions for third-grade boys that may portend developmental and academic consequences for them, University of Illinois recreation, sport and tourism professor Lynn A. Barnett found in a new study.
2h
Wired

Facebook's New 'Dating' Feature Could Crush Apps Like TinderFacebook Dating TinderMark Zuckerberg announced at Facebook's annual developer conference in California on Tuesday that the company is building a matchmaking service.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

Earth's magnetic field is not about to reverseA study of the most recent near-reversals of the Earth's magnetic field by an international team of researchers has found it is unlikely that such an event will take place anytime soon.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

Physics of a glacial 'slushy' reveal granular forces on a massive scaleNew findings describe the dynamics of the clog of icebergs -- known as an ice mélange -- in front of Greenland's Jakobshavn Glacier. The fast-moving glacier is considered a bellwether for the effects of climate change.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

Water-based battery stores solar and wind energyScientists have developed a manganese-hydrogen battery that could fill a missing piece in the nation's energy puzzle by storing wind and solar energy for when it is needed, lessening the need to burn carbon-emitting fossil fuels.
2h
Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

DNA adds twist to ancient story of a Native American groupNew findings draw from the first population-level nuclear DNA analysis of a Native American group from ancient to modern times.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

City upbringing, without pets, boosts vulnerability to mental illnessChildren raised in a rural environment, surrounded by animals and bacteria-laden dust, grow up to have more stress-resilient immune systems and might be at lower risk of mental illness than pet-free city dwellers, according to new research.
2h
New on MIT Technology Review

More gig workers in California are likely to soon qualify as employees
2h
Big Think

You Zuck'ed up: U.K. parliament calls Mark Zuckerberg to testify over Brexit data scandalMark Zuckerberg UKIs Mark Zuckerberg's libertarian data policy responsible for the single worst financial decision in the history of the United Kingdom? Parliament wants to know. Read More
2h
The Atlantic

A Slave Who Sued for Her FreedomIn November 1815, a slave known only as Anna jumped from the third-floor window of a tavern in Washington, D.C. The 24-year-old was then sold for $5 by interstate slave traders from Georgia and separated from her husband and four children. Though she broke her back, Anna survived. The story was reported widely at the time; in many instances, it was used as fodder for the abolitionist movement. Bu
2h
Popular Science

You’re almost certainly using the word 'allergies' wrongHealth No need to sniffle about it, though. The word allergy originated in 1906. In the intervening century, it’s come to mean a million different things to a million different people.
2h
Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

Back up: How worms travel in reverseA study of genetically diverse worms finds that the length of their backward movement is under the control of a small protein called a neuropeptide that fluctuates in response to food availability. The research demonstrates genetic and environmental influences on an animal's exploration of its environment.
3h
Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

Saving aging nerves from 'big eater' immune cellsImmune cells may contribute to weakness and mobility issues in the elderly by driving nerve degeneration, according to a study of aging mice and biopsies of human nerves. In mice, blocking a receptor necessary for the survival of these cells improved the structure of nerves and increased muscle strength.
3h
Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

Reef fish inherit tolerance to warming oceansThanks to mom and dad, baby reef fish may have what it takes to adjust to hotter oceans.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

Youth tackle football participation linked to earlier onset of cognitive and emotional symptomsStarting to play tackle football before age 12 could lead to earlier onset of cognitive and emotional symptoms among athletes who were diagnosed with CTE and other brain diseases postmortem, according to a new study.
3h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Novel theranostic approach for treating pancreatic cancer patients shows promiseGerman researchers have developed a novel diagnostic and therapeutic (theranostic) procedure for patients with ductal pancreatic adenocarcinoma, a deadly cancer with an extremely poor prognosis (five-year survival rate of less than 5 percent) and limited treatment options. The study is featured in the May issue of The Journal of Nuclear Medicine.
3h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News

A reimagined future for sustainable nanomaterialsEngineered nanomaterials hold great promise for medicine, electronics, water treatment, and other fields. But when the materials are designed without critical information about environmental impacts at the start of the process, their long-term effects could undermine those advances. A Yale-led team of researchers hopes to change that.
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Formate prevents most folic acid-resistant neural tube defects in miceA multi-institutional research team has developed a novel folic acid-resistant neural tube defect mouse model of the human condition by silencing the Slc25a32 gene, and, in most of the mutant mice, neural tube defects can be prevented by formate supplementation.
3h
Big Think

Flat-Earthers destroy Big Bang science, reveal ‘Pac-Man’ theory at U.K. conventionThe Flat Earth community revealed some of its newest theories and breakthroughs at its first convention in Birmingham, England last weekend. Read More
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Big Think

No surprise to those who’ve been there: Losing a pet can hurt more than losing a fellow humanResearch is proving that “just get over it” when it comes to losing a companion animal is simply not normal. So, if friends and family are telling you that … just ignore them. And if you're a friend or family member of someone who lost a pet, there are things you can do to help them through it. Read More
3h
The Atlantic

Images of Disappearing JobsOver the past couple of months, Agence France-Presse photographers have been finding and photographing people who hold job titles that are becoming very rare, such as lamp lighter, street clerk, rickshaw puller, plowman, or elevator attendant. On May Day, these portraits provide a glimpse of a wide array of jobs that are vanishing under the pressures of automation, inexpensive mass production, an
3h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Study shows sea turtle nesting beaches threatened by microplastic pollutionTiny pieces of plastic could be jeopardizing sensitive sea turtle nesting beaches.
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Apps for children should emphasize parent and child choice, researchers sayParents don't need to fear their children playing with iPads and other devices, researchers say. Mindful play with an adult, combined with thoughtful design features, can prove beneficial to young developing minds.New research shows that thoughtfully designed content that intentionally supports parent-child interactions facilitated the same kind of play and development as analog toys.
3h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Environmental impact of electric vehicles in China? It depends on how they are chargedElectric vehicles play a key role in China's plan to improve air quality and reduce CO2 emissions but, with the majority of China's electricity still coming from coal-fired power plants, many question just how effective this strategy will be. Now, researchers have found that how electric vehicles are charged -- whether in the low-energy slow mode or high-energy fast mode -- plays a significant rol
3h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Mercury Rising: New evidence that volcanism triggered the late Devonian extinctionThe late Devonian extinction, about 370 million years ago, is one of the 'Big Five.' It killed up to 80 percent of species, obliterating the lavish Devonian coral reef ecosystem. The final pulse in this multi-step crisis, called the Frasnian-Famennian event, was its most devastating. But what, exactly, did the killing?
3h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Nurse-led task shifting an effective strategy to control hypertension in Ghana, new study findsThe addition of a nurse-led intervention for hypertension management to health insurance coverage was more effective in lowering blood pressure (HPB) than the provision of health insurance alone in the Sub-Saharan country of Ghana, a region of Africa where HPB is rampant, according to a study publishing online on May 1 in the journal PLOS Medicine.
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News

New study improves monitoring of treatments for multiple sclerosis patientsNew study improves monitoring of treatments for multiple sclerosis patients.
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Tobacco company's understanding of addiction revealed by internal documentsAfter decades denying the role of nicotine dependence in smoking addiction, tobacco company Philip Morris (PM) publicly embraced nicotine as the main driver of smoking behavior in 2000. However, their internal understanding of smoking addiction was more complex, and the company simultaneously promoted nicotine reduction products alongside advertising and policy campaigns to promote smoking behavio
3h
Wired

A Robotics Startup Perishes, and It’s Got Tales to TellWith the demise of TickTock comes valuable insights into what the robotic home of the future may look like, and which company will end up conquering it.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

A surprising new superconductorA powerful new plated metal combination that superconducts at easily attained temperatures could pave the road for the next critical steps in the development of cutting-edge supercomputers.
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Blog » Languages » English

Ruby vs Python: Battle of the Coding LanguagesWhen you’re going to learn a coding language, there are many to choose from! But one thing’s for sure, when it comes to naming the languages with something fun, Ruby and Python certainly stand out. So which one do you prefer? Or if you don’t know anything about coding and just like snakes or gems, you can make your choice that way too! Ruby Ruby was created in 1995 by Yukihiro “Matz” Matsumoto. I
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Scientists identify two hormones that burn fat faster, prevent and reverse diabetes in miceUCLA geneticists have created a new technique to hunt for hormones that influence how organs and tissues communicate with each other. The method enabled them to find naturally occurring molecules that play major roles in Type 2 diabetes, obesity and cardiovascular disease.
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Single injection treats hemophilia B for life, in proof-of-concept studySalk researchers have demonstrated in mice that hemophilia B can be treated for life with one single injection containing disease-free liver cells that can produce their missing clotting factor.
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Viden

Dovenskab eller dumhed: Hvad skal robotten bestemme for dig?Det er svært at være menneske. Vi er irrationelle. Vi er drevet af følelser og hormoner, selvom vi tror, at vi er styret af logik.
3h
New on MIT Technology Review

If quantum computers threaten blockchains, quantum blockchains could be the defenseQuantum computers could break the cryptography that conventional blockchains rely on. Now physicists say a way of entangling the present with the past could foil this type of attack.
3h
The Atlantic

Benjamin Netanyahu: TV StarBenjamin Netanyahu’s breathless presentation on Monday about Iran’s nuclear program didn’t reveal anything particularly surprising about Iran’s nuclear program. Using a batch of stolen Iranian documents that detailed the program, the Israeli prime minister purportedly proved that Tehran pursued a nuclear-weapons program before 2003, and has been lying about it ever since. Which is what most exper
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Wired

Mark Zuckerberg Says It Will Take 3 Years to Fix FacebookMark Zuckerberg F8In an exclusive in-person interview, Zuckerberg discusses F8 and Facebook's trust issues.
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Study challenges 'shock and kill' approach to eliminating HIVResearchers have provided new insight into the cellular processes behind the 'shock and kill' approach to curing HIV, which they say challenges the effectiveness of the treatment.
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Wired

Oculus Go Review: Cordless VR Is Here and It's Pretty DopeWith the PC removed from the VR equation, the standalone headset from Oculus performs much better than you'd expect.
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Big Think

What are the psychological effects of losing your religion?For many, their religion is a core part of their identity, the meaning they find in life, and their social world. Changing this crucial aspect of themselves will have significant psychological consequences. Read More
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The Atlantic

Fly Me to the SunThis summer, a NASA spacecraft will launch into space from the coast of Florida, headed for the sun. After making several flybys of Venus to slow itself down, the Parker Solar Probe will come within 4 million miles of the sun’s scorching surface, closer than any spacecraft in history. N ASA is never one to miss an opportunity to drum up publicity for upcoming space missions, especially the less f
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Popular Science

Everything you need to know from Facebook's 2018 F8 developer conferenceTechnology Mark Zuckerberg takes the stage to talk about Facebook's post-Cambridge Analytica future. Facebook's annual developers' conference gives us a look into the social media network's big plans for the next year.
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Wired

Growlerwerks uKeg Review: Keeps Your Beer BubblyThis steampunk vessel might be the ultimate personal beer transportation device.
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Wired

April's Best Gear: Budget Phones, Snap Spectacles, and Wireless HeadphonesPlus: Hands-on with Nintendo Labo, Google's new tasks app, and our favorite wool-base hoodie.
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Wired

Q Acoustics Media 4 (M4) Review: A Great-Sounding, Affordable SoundbarYour ears might not have heard of Q Acoustics, but they'll love this soundbar.
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Viden

Facebook-topchef siger stop: Vil ikke snage i private beskederWhatsApp-milliardæren Jan Koum forlader Facebook, efter uenighed om beskyttelse af brugernes data og private beskeder.
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News

GPM satellite views Tropical Cyclone Flamboyan's rainfallTropical Cyclone Flamboyan was being battered by vertical wind shear when the Global Precipitation Measurement mission or GPM core satellite passed overhead and analyzed its rainfall rates.
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NYT > Science

Trilobites: Gaia’s Map of 1.3 Billion Stars Makes for a Milky Way in a BottleEuropean astronomers released a three-dimensional map of the Milky Way, the most detailed survey ever produced of our home galaxy.
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Wired

Facebook F8 Liveblog: All the News As It HappensFollow along with WIRED's staff as Mark Zuckerberg takes the stage after a scandal-filled year. The post Facebook F8 Liveblog: All the News As It Happens appeared first on WIRED .
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Wired

Don’t Feel Bad for Loving True Crime StoriesAuthor Mary Rickert's short story collection is influenced by real-life crime tales—and it's more intense because of it. The post Don't Feel Bad for Loving True Crime Stories appeared first on WIRED .
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Wired

Quite the SpectaclesThis week on the Gadget Lab podcast, we hear about Lauren and Arielle's adventures with Snap's new Spectacles. The post Quite the Spectacles appeared first on WIRED .
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Wired

What If Aliens Were Totally Obsessed With Us?Author Mercurio D. Rivera's extraterrestrials have a soft spot for humanity. The post What If Aliens Were Totally Obsessed With Us? appeared first on WIRED .
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Wired

Daily DriversThis week on the Gadget Lab podcast, we discuss the products and gadgets in our lives that mean the most to us. The post Daily Drivers appeared first on WIRED .
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Wired

Hollywood Should Make Movies That Grapple with Gamergate'Ready Player One' isn't that movie. The post Hollywood Should Make Movies That Grapple with Gamergate appeared first on WIRED .
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Wired

Our Yikes PhaseWe discuss Facebook's future relationship with its users, and with the governments who seek to regulate it. The post Our Yikes Phase appeared first on WIRED .
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Wired

The World Needs More Funny FantasyMost modern fantasy leans toward the "grimdark," Game of Thrones style. Author Craig Shaw Gardner has the antidote. The post The World Needs More Funny Fantasy appeared first on WIRED .
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Wired

The (Near) Future of PCsLaptops are getting mobile processors and behaving more like phones. How will that change the way we use them? The post The (Near) Future of PCs appeared first on WIRED .
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Wired

The Politics of ‘Black Panther’ Are What Make It GreatThe superhero flick's strength lies in the fact that it didn't shy away from addressing issues of black identity. The post The Politics of 'Black Panther' Are What Make It Great appeared first on WIRED .
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Science | The Guardian

Brain tumour research to get £18m injectionThe sum is part of a £25m boost in funding by Cancer Research UK for brain cancer over the next five years Brain tumour research is to get an £18 million injection of funding to aid projects ranging from exploring how such cancers begin to developing new ways to treat them. More than 250,000 people worldwide, including 11,400 people in the UK alone, are diagnosed with a brain tumour every year an
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

California sues over plan to scrap car emission standardsCalifornia and 16 other states sued the Trump administration Tuesday over its plan to scrap Obama-era auto-emissions standards that would require vehicles to get significantly higher gas mileage by 2025.
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Scientific American Content: Global

Telemedicine Opening Doors to Specialty Care for InmatesIn prisons, common services may include psychiatry and cardiology assistance -- Read more on ScientificAmerican.com
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Blacks, whites equally as likely to be prescribed opioids for painRacial disparities in pain management have been well-documented, with doctors historically more willing to prescribe opiates to whites than to other racial and ethnic groups.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Team takes the guesswork out of discovering new high-entropy alloysThe U.S. Department of Energy's Ames Laboratory has developed a method of computational analysis that can help predict the composition and properties of as-yet unmade high performance alloys.
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New Scientist - News

Laser-sticker contacts could let you shoot beams from your eyesFlexible lasers you can stick to anything can embed a security tag onto banknotes or contact lenses, and emit lasers when light shines on them
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Ames Lab takes the guesswork out of discovering new high-entropy alloysThe US Department of Energy's Ames Laboratory has developed a method of computational analysis that can help predict the composition and properties of as-yet unmade high performance alloys.
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Wired

CGI 'Influencers' LIke Lil Miquela Are About to Flood Your FeedLil Miquela may be fascinating in her own right, but the rise of digital humans in social media and elsewhere is just getting started.
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Live Science

A Washington Nurse May Have Exposed Thousands of Patients to Hepatitis CA hospital is offering free Hepatitis C testing for patients who may have been exposed through an infected nurse
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Mainstream media coverage of humanitarian crises falls short, new survey findsMainstream media coverage of humanitarian crises is "selective, sporadic, simplistic and partial", according to a new consumer survey.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Mosquitoes bite not just to lay eggs but also to quench their thirst during drought, study foundWhen it's hot and dry, mosquitoes like nothing more than the refreshing taste of you.
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Science | The Guardian

From planking to pizzas: the new rules for a successful meetingAmazon employees sit in silence – while Tesla boss Elon Musk advocates walking out if you aren’t adding value. But how can you stop wasting your life in pointless meetings? Here’s an expert guide Some human inventions flash into being, get a little polish and then are pretty much left alone, their users generally satisfied, or at least not so dissatisfied that they attempt to come up with an alte
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The Atlantic

When ‘Universal’ Child Care Isn’t Universally High-QualityIt was one of the more surprising presidential vetoes in U.S. history. Having passed Congress in 1971 with bipartisan support (and with input from the Nixon administration ), the Comprehensive Child Development Act arrived on President Richard Nixon’s desk with decent prospects. The country was poised to rebuild the national child-care system it had built during—and abandoned after—World War II.
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The Atlantic

Can Barbie Really Have It All?In 1965, four years before the moon landing, a great American went into space. Astronaut Barbie wore a silver metallic jumpsuit, moon boots, and a kicky white plastic helmet, all the better to breathe with in a vacuum. It didn’t matter that it would be another 18 years before the first American woman, Sally Ride, would actually set foot on the Challenger , or that Astronaut Barbie’s blue eyeshado
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Live Science

'Biohacker' Who Injected Himself with DIY Herpes Treatment Found DeadThe CEO of a biomedical startup who sparked controversy when he injected himself with an untested herpes treatment in front of a live audience in February has died, according to an email sent to Live Science.
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Mainstream media coverage of humanitarian crises falls short, new survey findsMainstream media coverage of humanitarian crises is 'selective, sporadic, simplistic and partial,' according to a new consumer survey. Respondents indicated widespread dissatisfaction with the quantity and quality of mainstream news coverage and highlighted a desire for more investigative reporting and scrutiny of the aid sector itself.
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Mosquitoes bite when thirsty, tooBiologists with the University of Cincinnati found that dry conditions prompted house mosquitoes to seek a blood meal. This could explain why researchers have found higher rates of disease transmission during droughts.
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Historical records help uncover new mechanism in deadly 1906 Taiwan quakeResearchers reexamining historical seismograms from the 1906 Meishan earthquake have uncovered a new mechanism for the quake, one of the deadliest to ever strike Taiwan.
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Analysis links US government global health R&D funding to jobs, economic benefits across statesThe Trump Administration's proposal to slash funding to fight global health threats like malaria, Ebola, and HIV/AIDS could cost states thousands of jobs and millions of dollars in economic investment and put the health of residents at risk, according to a new state-by-state analysis released today by the Global Health Technologies Coalition. This first-of-its-kind analysis quantifies how federal
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Siamab Therapeutics announces publication of new data on its ST1 lead program in the journal OncotargetSiamab Therapeutics Inc., a biopharmaceutical company developing novel glycan-targeted cancer therapeutics, today announced the publication of new preclinical data.
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New on MIT Technology Review

The US government may restrict Chinese researchers, and that would be a disaster
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Iconic American guitar maker Gibson files for bankruptcyGibson, maker of iconic guitars for the likes of John Lennon, Elvis Presley and BB King, filed for bankruptcy protection on Tuesday after facing mounting debt and other financial challenges.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Deer fawns more likely to survive in agricultural landscapes than forestThe cruel truth is that throughout the white-tailed deer's range only about half of all fawns live to see their first birthday—most are killed by predators. However, they have a much better chance of surviving if they are born in farmland rather than in forest, according to Penn State researchers, who collaborated with Pennsylvania Game Commission deer biologists.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Virus inhibits immune response of caterpillars and plantsIt is well known that certain wasps suppress the immune systems of their caterpillar hosts so they can successfully raise their young within those hosts. Now researchers at Penn State show that, in addition to suppressing caterpillar immune systems, wasps also suppress the defense mechanisms of the plants on which the caterpillars feed, which ensures that the caterpillars will continue to provide
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Wired

‘Avengers: Infinity War’: We Need to Talk About That EndingThat was intense, right?
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Scientific American Content: Global

Key Climate Satellite to Launch Later This MonthThe mission will continue work monitoring ice melt, groundwater storage and deep ocean currents -- Read more on ScientificAmerican.com
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Study shows one detector doesn't 'fit all' for smoke in spacecraftWhat had been a peaceful and productive mission for the six men aboard the Russian space station Mir, including U.S. astronaut Jerry Linenger, nearly became a tragic nightmare during the evening of Feb. 24, 1997. A lithium-perchlorate canister, designed to generate oxygen via a chemical reaction, suddenly burst into flames when activated. Although the fire was quickly subdued, a dense, life-threat
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

As consumers, how do we decide what's 'best' when it's not clear?Imagine you are choosing between two resorts for your island vacation. The factors driving your decision will be "quality" and "price," but "quality" can be more difficult to define. In the end, this will come to represent all factors beyond price, such as service, amenities, proximity to the ocean and other things that are important to you. So, how will you decide?
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Curves or angles? Shapes in businesses affect customer responseWhen you're waiting in a busy restaurant or doctor's office, it may matter whether the tables, light fixtures and other objects are round or square.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

'Exceptional' research points way toward quantum discoveriesScientists use nanotube films and polarized light to strongly couple light and matter progressively and on demand at room temperature. Their technique could help scientists who study data storage and the manipulation of light at quantum levels.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

Geometry is key to T-cell triggeringA new study reveals the geometric underpinnings of T-cell triggering through the precise engineering of T-cell receptor geometry in all three dimensions. The researchers used nanofabrication to create a biomimetic surface that simulates the key features of the APC, presenting T-cell receptor ligands in different geometric arrangements, with different inter-ligand spacings arranged in clusters of v
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Popular Science

These free apps will help you type fasterDIY Type faster from home row all the way up that tricky "Q." Boost your productivity by increasing your typing speed, using nothing but your web browser and these (mostly) free apps.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Historical records help uncover new mechanism in deadly 1906 Taiwan quakeResearchers reexamining historical seismograms from the 1906 Meishan earthquake have uncovered a new mechanism for the quake, one of the deadliest to ever strike Taiwan.
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News

NIST/NASA study shows one detector doesn't 'fit all' for smoke in spacecraftIn a new paper, a team of NASA and NIST researchers describe how they looked at the smoke particles produced by five materials commonly used aboard crewed spacecraft, defined their characteristics and evaluated how well they could be detected by two traditional smoke detection systems.
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Virus inhibits immune response of caterpillars and plantsIt is well known that certain wasps suppress the immune systems of their caterpillar hosts so they can successfully raise their young within those hosts. Now researchers at Penn State show that, in addition to suppressing caterpillar immune systems, wasps also suppress the defense mechanisms of the plants on which the caterpillars feed, which ensures that the caterpillars will continue to provide
5h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Deer fawns more likely to survive in agricultural landscapes than forestThe cruel truth is that throughout the white-tailed deer's range only about half of all fawns live to see their first birthday -- most are killed by predators. However, they have a much better chance of surviving if they are born in farmland rather than in forest, according to Penn State researchers, who collaborated with Pennsylvania Game Commission deer biologists.
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Study: Wearable fitness monitors useful in cancer treatmentWearable fitness trackers, such as Fitbits, that measure steps taken per day may be a useful tool to evaluate and help treat cancer patients, researchers at UT Southwestern's Simmons Cancer Center have shown.
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Food for thought: Ketogenic diets reduce athletes' anaerobic performanceThe Saint Louis University research team found that after following a ketogenic diet, study participants did not perform as well at anaerobic exercise tasks.
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NYT > Science

Vaping Products That Look Like Juice Boxes and Candy Are Target of CrackdownThe F.D.A. and the F.T.C. issued warning letters to makers of e-liquids with names like One Mad Hit Juice Box and Twirly Pop that may appeal to children.
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Ingeniøren

Kunstig tarm og bakteriofager skal afhjælpe overforbrug af antibiotika og zinkForskere på Københavns Universitet har udviklet en kunstig mave og tyndtarm, der kan bruge til forskning i probiotika og sygdomsbehandling. Første forsøg er gjort med bakteriebekæmpende virus.
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Big Think

Why more curious kids learn better, especially poorer onesWe all want to help our children learn and a new study shows that encouraging curiosity might be the best way to do it. Read More
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

Phytoplankton assemblages in coastal waters remain productive, despite variable environmental conditionsThey form the basis of the Arctic food web -- and are extremely tough: even when the water becomes more acidic and the available light or temperatures change, various phytoplankton assemblages in the Arctic demonstrate undiminished productivity and biodiversity.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

Double-bridged peptides bind any disease targetScientists have developed a new type of 'double-bridged peptide' that can be tailored to bind tightly to disease targets of interest. The peptides' highly efficient binding, combined with their small size and high stability make them ideal for drug therapies.
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The Atlantic

The 'Caravan' Migrants Have a Long Road Ahead of ThemAfter a weeks-long journey to the United States, more than 100 Central American migrants, part of a caravan that once consisted of 1,200 people, finally reached the southern border Sunday in hopes of applying for asylum. Upon arriving, they were faced with the first of what’s likely to be many obstacles toward being granted asylum in the United States: a port of entry too full to process them. Cu
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Gene therapy for lipoprotein lipase deficiency yields promising resultsDuring the first 18 months after treatment with alipogene tiparvovec, a gene therapy recently approved in Europe to treat lipoprotein lipase deficiency (LPLD), the first patient to receive the treatment had no abdominal pain or episodes of pancreatitis, following a history of 37 pancreatitis attacks.
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Curves or angles? Shapes in businesses affect customer responseWhen you're waiting in a busy restaurant or doctor's office, it may matter whether the tables, light fixtures and other objects are round or square. In a laboratory study, researchers found the shape of physical objects in a service business affected customer satisfaction, depending on how crowded the business was in the experimental scenarios.
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Use of ibuprofen and similar NSAIDs may shorten life of patientsIbuprofen, aspirin, and other non-steroidal anti-inflammatory medications are among the most commonly utilized medications in the United States. Primarily for treating pain, inflammation, and preventing cardiovascular disease, NSAIDs' promising anti-cancer properties have been highlighted by a growing body of data in recent years. However, a new study in the journal Kidney Cancer indicated that no
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Persistence pays off in discovery that could lead to improved treatment and survivability of patientGliomas are the most common type of central nervous system cancer but how these tumors develop is not fully understood. Sheri Holmen, Ph.D., a researcher at Huntsman Cancer Institute (HCI) and professor of surgery at the University of Utah, just published the results of her research on gliomas in Cell Reports. The work is focused on a mutated gene that is a critical piece of the puzzle for glioma
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Wired

Robert Mueller Likely Knows How the Trump Russia Investigation EndsNearly a year since his appointment as special counsel, Robert Mueller has accelerated the pace of his investigation.
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Science | The Guardian

Sajid Javid and the strange science behind power posesThe new home secretary was the latest politician to strike a power pose on Monday. But what does the science say about this odd stance? Standing like Wonder Woman doesn’t get you any actual superpowers, but various members of the British government are doing it anyway. The latest politician to join the ranks of the power stance team is Sajid Javid, whose promotion to home secretary was accompanie
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

Scientists create nanomaterials that reconfigure in response to biochemical signalsA newly published paper in Nature Chemistry details how a research team lead by scientists at the Advanced Science Research Center's Nanoscience Initiative are developing self-assembling electronic nanomaterials that can respond to biochemical signals for potential therapeutic use.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

Bacteria's appetite may be key to cleaning up antibiotic contaminationSome bacteria can not only withstand antibiotics, but turn them into food. Until now, scientists have understood little about how bacteria manage to consume antibiotics safely, but new research illuminates key steps in the process. The findings could lead to new ways to eliminate antibiotics from land and water, the researchers said. Environmental antibiotic contamination promotes drug resistance
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Scientific American Content: Global

New Hope for a Better Flu VaccineInfographic shows how an experimental approach might bring us closer to a universal vaccine -- Read more on ScientificAmerican.com
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Viden

Vincent Hendricks: Vi er flokdyr, der forsømmer egen dømmekraft for at ligne de andreMennesker ignorerer ofte egen overbevisning for at gøre det, vi tror, de andre gør. Mekanismen kaldes flertalmisforståelse, og gør os ofte apatiske og ligeglade. Eksempelvis med klimaet.
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Science | The Guardian

Relic claimed to be bone from St Clement rescued from the binFragment linked to pope martyred almost 2,000 years ago found after rubbish collection run in central London A small leather case containing a fragment of bone claimed to be a relic of St Clement, a pope who was martyred almost 2,000 years ago, has been found in rubbish collected from central London. The waste disposal firm is now appealing for suggestions from the public for a more suitable fina
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Ingeniøren

Uafgjort i 1. runde mellem stofposer og plastposerEt møde mellem kritikere og Miljøstyrelsen gav ikke mere klarhed om, hvorvidt plast- eller bomuldsposer er mest miljøvenlige. Miljøstyrelsen vil nu diskutere sagen med egne fagfolk.
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News

As consumers, how do we decide what's 'best' when it's not clear?Imagine you are choosing between two resorts for your island vacation. The factors driving your decision will be 'quality' and 'price,' with 'quality' representing all factors beyond price, such as service, amenities, proximity to the ocean and other things that are important to you. So, how will you decide? A new study in the INFORMS journal Marketing Science has found that as consumers we tend t
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News

New diagnostic technique picks up the S in visionA new technique that could help improve diagnosis of vision disorders has been successfully tested at the University of Bradford, UK.
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Hormone from fat boosts metabolism in both exercise and coldResearchers at Joslin Diabetes Center have uncovered a new kind of clue to an individual's variable response to exercise -- a hormone whose levels in the bloodstream rise sharply in exercise as well as in cold.
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Monash study exposes key tactic used by deadly fungusAssociate Professor Ana Traven, in collaboration with the Naderer lab, has found that a lethal fungus destroys the immune cell that would ordinarily kill it, by stealing its source of nutrients. Candida albicans is a microscopic fungus commonly found in the body but which can become a dangerous infection in vulnerable hospital patients. The study demonstrated that the fungus competes with disease-
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Blueprint for the skullOnce upon a time in Europe, pregnant women avoided rabbits to prevent their babies from being born with a 'harelip.' But, that isn't the only misconception about the condition now known as cleft lip.In the May 1 issue of Cell Reports, UConn Health researchers report the popular modern belief that the condition is caused by a gene is wrong.Their research could transform how we understand the format
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Sweating the small stuffWhen people sweat, they unknowingly release a wide range of chemicals that can noninvasively inform clinicians on anything from stress hormone levels to glucose. An international team of researchers recently developed a new membrane that mitigates both issues that arise from direct dermal contact and sweat dilution for sweat biosensors. As discussed in Biomicrofluidics, the membrane performs hundr
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Making individualized choices about breast cancer screeningThe authors note, that despite the fact that the United States Preventive Services Task Force (USPSTF) changed its recommendation in 2009 to mammograms every two years for women aged 50-74 instead of annual mammograms beginning at age 40, there has been little change in US screening practices.
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Study links 'good' brown fat and exerciseThe power of exercise to boost metabolism could arise from a fat molecule with an unexpected source. In a new study, a lipid released from fat, or lipokine, produced by brown fat was shown to surge in the bloodstream after exercise.
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News

'Smart' dresser prototype guides people with dementia in getting dressedA new study published in JMIR Medical Informatics describes how a 'smart home' prototype may help people with dementia dress themselves through automated assistance, enabling them to maintain independence and dignity and providing their caregivers with a much-needed respite.
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Rapid increase of synthetic opioids involved in drug overdose deathsSynthetic opioids (such as illicit fentanyl) overtook prescription opioids in 2016 as the most common drug class involved in overdose deaths in the United States.
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News

The macabre world of mind-controlling parasitesMany parasites can control the behavior of their hosts -- sometimes in very gruesome ways. A new article published today describes some of the sophisticated interactions between a variety of parasites and their hosts, and highlights how the new field of neuro-parasitology could provide insights into the neurological basis for behavior and decision-making.
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Shivering and exercise both trigger same fat-burning effectResearchers have identified a fat molecule that circulates in the blood after exercise. The study, appearing May 1 in the journal Cell Metabolism, suggests this lipid, released by so-called brown fat, may account for some of the beneficial metabolic changes linked to physical activity, and boosting it may help reduce triglyceride levels, improve cardiovascular health, and regulate weight. Research
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Scientists map key brain-to-spinal cord nerve connections for voluntary movementResearchers trying to help people suffering from paralysis after a spinal cord injury or stroke mapped critical brain-to-spinal cord nerve connections that drive voluntary movement in forelimbs, a development that scientists say allows them to start looking for specific repair strategies. The study is an important step toward one day rehabilitating motor circuits to help motor function recover aft
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Scientific American Content: Global

Scientists Downsize Bold Plan to Make Human Genome from ScratchGenetic construction project shifts focus to making virus-resistant human cells -- Read more on ScientificAmerican.com
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

Calcium-based MRI sensor enables more sensitive brain imagingNeuroscientists have developed an MRI sensor that lets them monitor neuron activity deep within the brain by tracking calcium ions. This type of sensing could allow researchers to link specific brain functions to their pattern of neuron activity, and to determine how distant brain regions communicate with each other during particular tasks.
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New Scientist - News

Smart people literally have bigger brain cells than the restFor the first time, IQ has been linked to neuron size and performance. The breakthrough could lead to new ways to enhance human intelligence
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Humans are Sumatran rhinoceros' biggest threat—and last hopeThe little-known and smallest member of the rhinoceros family, the Sumatran rhinoceros, is critically endangered. Today between 30 and 100 are isolated on the islands of Sumatra and Borneo in Southeast Asia. In a new study, researchers urge conservationists to translocate the two island groups—representing two subspecies of the Sumatran rhino—and to create a cell bank to preserve the genetic diver
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

New offices make us more image-consciousEmployees subconsciously act and dress differently in modern open-plan office environments, according to a new study published in the journal Gender, Work and Organization.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

A membrane with nanoscale pores allows controlled sweat stimulant releaseWhen people sweat, they unknowingly release a wide range of chemicals that can noninvasively inform clinicians on anything from stress hormone levels to glucose. But it's hard for researchers to glean this information—unless you sweat a lot. Emerging wearable devices using stimulant gels have provided a way to induce sweat locally on the body. However, sweat can dilute these gels, which degrades t
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Researchers outline new approach to predicting the release prices of Bordeaux winesA new report published by researchers M. Hakan Hekimoglu of Rensselaer Polytechnic Institute and Burak Kazaz of Syracuse University's Whitman School of Management outlines a new approach to predicting the release prices of Bordeaux wines (known as En Primeur prices) using weather information and the Liv-ex 100 index. According to their models, we can expect slight price increases this year, on ave
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

The gruesome new field of neuro-parasitology could provide insights into the neurological basis for behaviorImagine a parasite that makes an animal change its habits, guard the parasite's offspring or even commit suicide. While mind-control may sound like something out of a science fiction movie, the phenomenon is very real—and has spawned a new field, neuro-parasitology. As outlined in an article published today in Frontiers in Psychology, understanding how parasites "hack" their host's nervous system
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The Atlantic

There’s Nothing to Stop the 2018 Elections From Being HackedRussia’s successful interference in the 2016 election—when Moscow hacked both Democrats and Republicans—has spurred fears of a recurrence in 2018. But although congressional Democrats are pledging not to use stolen or hacked materials in their campaigns this fall, their Republican counterparts have so far declined to match that commitment. That partisan split could leave the November elections op
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

Editing brain activity with holographyThe goal of brain implants is to read neuron activity and respond by activating neurons to, for example, move prosthetics or simulate lost perceptions. Researchers have developed a device to do that, projecting a holographic image into the top layer of the brain to activate dozens of neurons hundreds of times a second to simulate real patterns of activity. Equipped with new, fast on/off optogeneti
6h
Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

Butterfly wings inspire light-manipulating surface for medical implantsNanostructures inspired by transparent butterfly wings help eye implants function better and safely avoid biofouling.
6h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Research team engineers a better plastic-degrading enzymeA breakthrough in enzyme research led by the US Department of Energy's National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL) and the United Kingdom's University of Portsmouth has led to an improved variant of an enzyme that can break down ubiquitous plastic bottles made of polyethylene terephthalate, or PET.
6h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News

New offices make us more image-consciousEmployees subconsciously act and dress differently in modern open-plan office environments, according to a new study published in the journal Gender, Work and Organization.
6h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Army's new find lowers accidental stockpile detonationScientists at two major national laboratories have demonstrated a new method for testing explosives stored in weapons stockpiles, a step they say will help reduce accidental detonation and ensure the weapons perform as expected.
6h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Humans are Sumatran rhinoceros' biggest threat -- and last hopeThe little-known and smallest member of the rhinoceros family, the Sumatran rhinoceros, is critically endangered. In a new study, researchers urge conservationists to translocate two island groups -- representing two subspecies of the Sumatran rhino -- and to create a cell bank to preserve the genetic diversity uncovered by this work.
6h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Researchers discover electroplated rhenium's unexpected superconductive characteristicsLast September, CIRES chemist and instrument designer Don David and colleagues Dave Pappas and Xian Wu at the National Institute of Standards and Technology discovered a powerful new plated metal combination that superconducts at easily attained temperatures—paving the road for the next critical steps in the development of cutting-edge supercomputers. David and his colleagues just published the ne
6h
Quanta Magazine

A Radically Conservative Solution for Cosmology’s Biggest MysteryCosmologists have wielded every tool at their disposal to measure exactly how fast the universe is expanding, a rate known as the Hubble constant. But these measurements have returned contradictory results. The conflicting measurements have vexed astrophysicists and inspired rampant speculation as to whether unknown physical processes might be causing the discrepancy. Maybe dark matter particles
6h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Army's new find lowers accidental stockpile detonationScientists at two major national laboratories have demonstrated a new method for testing explosives stored in weapons stockpiles, a step they say will help reduce accidental detonation and ensure the weapons perform as expected.
6h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

UK MPs pressure Zuckerberg to testify on Facebook data breachMark Zuckerberg UKBritish MPs threatened Tuesday to issue a formal summons to Facebook chief Mark Zuckerberg for him to testify over a major privacy row, after he declined to appear.
7h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News

A rose is a rose is a rose: Mathematical model explains how two brains agree on smellsColumbia scientists have discovered why the brain's olfactory system is so remarkably consistent between individuals, even though the wiring of brain cells in this region differs greatly from person to person. To make sense of this apparent paradox, the researchers developed a computational model showing that two brains need not have previously sniffed the same exact set of odors in order to agree
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News

A surprising new superconductorA powerful new plated metal combination that superconducts at easily attained temperatures could pave the road for the next critical steps in the development of cutting-edge supercomputers.
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Futurity.org

Vending machines boost kids’ reading in ‘book deserts’An innovative book distribution program that provides free children’s books in low-income neighborhoods, combined with supportive adults who encourage reading, can boost children’s literacy and learning opportunities, a new study shows. “Without access to books, one cannot read to children; without adult supports, children cannot be read to.” “Both physical and psychological proximity to books ma
7h
The Atlantic

A Witness to the Desegregation—and Resegregation—of America's SchoolsEditor’s Note: In the next five years, most of America’s most experienced teachers will retire. The Baby Boomers are leaving behind a nation of novice educators. In 1988, the average teacher had 15 years of experience. Less than three decades later, the average teacher had spent just five years leading a classroom. The Atlantic ’s On Teaching project is crisscrossing the country to talk to vetera
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Amazon expansion includes new office, 2K jobs in BostonAmazon unveiled plans on Tuesday for a major expansion in Boston's Seaport District, promising 2,000 new technology jobs even as the city remains in contention for the company's coveted second headquarters.
7h
TED Talks Daily (SD video)

Why tech needs the humanities | Eric BerridgeIf you want to build a team of innovative problem-solvers, you should value the humanities just as much as the sciences, says entrepreneur Eric Berridge. He shares why tech companies should look beyond STEM graduates for new hires -- and how people with backgrounds in the arts and humanities can bring creativity and insight to technical workplaces.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

World-first synthesis of globalization effects on people and planetResearchers have compiled a world-first conclusive synthesis of the environmental and social impacts of globalization -- using sophisticated computation to provide a bird's eye view of the displacement of wealth-driven consumption into offshore production -- highlighting effects such as child labor. The research reveals the extent developed countries are outsourcing burdensome production to poor c
7h
Big Think

The music people listen to when they're feeling happy, sad or angrySome of us can adjust our moods by listening to certain types of music we know will affect us. This survey looks at the music Americans turn to for mood modification. Read More
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News

High prevalence of atherosclerosis found in lower risk patientsResearchers using whole-body magnetic resonance angiography (MRA) have found a surprisingly high prevalence of atherosclerosis in people considered to be at low to intermediate risk for cardiovascular disease, according to a new study. Almost half of all study participants had at least one narrowed artery.
7h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Post-mortem CT angiography illuminates causes of deathCT angiography is a useful adjunct to autopsy that is likely to increase the quality of post-mortem diagnosis, according to a new study. Researchers said the findings could have important implications for criminal investigations and hospital quality control efforts.
7h
Viden

Professor: Hallucinerende stoffer giver hjernen et større repertoireNy forskning peger på, at lykke og nydelse måske kan findes med hjælp fra kontrollerede doser af hallucinerende stoffer.
7h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Facebook developer conference kicks off amid scandalA year ago , Facebook CEO Mark Zuckerberg was dazzling thousands of software developers with the prospect of augmented reality features that could let people spruce up apartments with digital art.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

Food industry should reduce food product portion sizes, experts urgeNew research highlights the benefits of the food industry changing food product portion sizes in order to make healthier eating more normal.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

Doubt cast on new theories of star formationThe birth of stars from dense clouds of gas and dust may be happening in a completely unexpected way in our own galaxy and beyond.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

Keep calm and carry on: Scientists make first serotonin measurements in humansScientists have begun to unravel how serotonin acts, based on data collected in a first-of-its-kind experiment that utilized electrochemical probes implanted into the brain of awake human beings.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

T cell biomarker predicts which CLL patients will respond to CAR T cell therapyResearchers may have found the reason why some patients with advanced chronic lymphocytic leukemia (CLL) don't respond to chimeric antigen receptor (CAR) T cell therapy, and the answer is tied to how primed patients' immune systems are before the therapy is administered.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

Stagediving with biomolecules improves optical microscopyPhysicists have developed a novel method for optical microscopy. Using biological motors and single quantum dots, they acquire ultra-high-resolution images.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

How smaller hospitals can effectively reduce antibiotic overuseResearchers completed a study identifying how community hospitals with fewer than 200 beds can develop antibiotic stewardship programs that work to prevent the growth of superbugs.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Metal-free metamaterial can be swiftly tuned to create changing electromagnetic effectsResearchers at Duke University have built the first metal-free, dynamically tunable metamaterial for controlling electromagnetic waves. The approach could form the basis for technologies ranging from improved security scanners to new types of visual displays.
7h
Dana Foundation

2018 Brain Awareness Video ContestThanks to a growing Brain Awareness Week partnership, we know there are many people out there who are passionate about educating the public about the brain. The Brain Awareness Video Contest, sponsored by the Society for Neuroscience (SfN), provides a wonderful opportunity to reach even more people, and to develop something unique and creative. Due June 14 , these videos must describe a neuroscie
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Vegan and traditional kimchi have same microbes, study findsGood news, vegans: A new study finds that kimchi made without fish products has the same type of bacteria as more traditionally made kimchi. That finding suggests that any "probiotic" benefits associated with traditional kimchi could be present in vegan versions as well.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Video: How airbags workNormally, something blowing up in your face is bad. But in the event of a vehicle accident, and in conjunction with a seatbelt, one particular explosion could very well save your life. It's the chemical reaction that inflates your airbags.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Posting, commenting and customizing on Facebook help involve, empower older adultsFacebook Users CH DataSocial networking sites, such as Facebook, offer tools and activities that may help older adults feel more empowered and less isolated, according to researchers.
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Latest Headlines | Science News

How a social lifestyle helped drive a river otter species to near extinctionA reconstruction of 20th-century hunting practices reveals why one species of Amazon river otters nearly went extinct while another persisted.
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Futurity.org

After spouse passes, death risk from ‘broken heart’ risesIn the three-month period following a spouse’s death, widows and widowers are more likely to exhibit risk factors linked to cardiovascular illness and death, according to a new study. This could make a bereaved spouse more likely to “die of a broken heart,” the researchers say. “In the first six months after the loss of a spouse, widows/widowers are at a 41% increased risk of mortality…” The stud
7h
The Atlantic

The Terror Is More Than a Chilling Monster ShowIn 1845, two ships under the command of Captain John Franklin set sail from Britain on a mission of exploration. Three years later, both disappeared in the Arctic. None of the 129 men on that expedition came back, and the battered wrecks of the HMS Erebus and HMS Terror were found in 2014 and 2016, respectively . Quite how Franklin and his crew died remains a mystery. Historians have only scatter
7h
The Atlantic

The Limits of Rags-to-Riches StardomIn the winter of 2008, Collin Ishaq traveled from Pakistan to the United Arab Emirates to work as an air-side operator at Dubai’s international airport. He moved into a shared room in an industrial dormitory, known as a labor camp, that was built to accommodate a wave of migrant workers coming from South Asia. His camp was on the outskirts; from there, even the Burj Khalifa, the tallest building
7h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News

How airbags work (video)Normally, something blowing up in your face is bad. But in the event of a vehicle accident, and in conjunction with a seatbelt, one particular explosion could very well save your life. It's the chemical reaction that inflates your airbags. In this episode of Reactions, learn about the past and present of vehicle airbags and the lifesaving chemistry and physics that make them work: https://youtu.be
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Can stress testing and biomarker studies predict cardiovascular event risk in older women?Mayo Clinic researchers, reporting results of the SMART study, have shown that abnormal results on a stress electrocardiogram are an independent predictor of cardiovascular events such as heart attack, heart failure, hospitalization for chest pain, and death in perimenopausal or menopausal women.
7h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Dielectric metamaterial is dynamically tuned by lightResearchers at Duke University have built the first metal-free, dynamically tunable metamaterial for controlling electromagnetic waves. The approach could form the basis for technologies ranging from improved security scanners to new types of visual displays. While previous metamaterials control electromagnetic waves through their electric properties, the new technology can also manipulate them th
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Disparities found in lung cancer care, survival in US versus EnglandDespite steady declines in death rates in recent years, lung cancer remains the leading cause of cancer deaths in wealthy countries. In a new study, Yale researchers collaborated with investigators in Europe to examine lung cancer care and survival rates for patients with one of the most common forms of the disease.
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News

New study finds pureed pork supports infant growthMeat, like pork, can be an important source of much-needed protein in an infant's diet during the transition to solid foods, according to new research in the American Journal of Clinical Nutrition. Meat is often overlooked during this time in an infant's life, yet researchers found meat-based complementary foods, such as pureed ham and beef, promoted an increase in length without increasing risk o
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Acupuncture possible treatment for dental anxietyResearchers have found evidence that acupuncture could help people who experience dental anxiety.
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Vegan and traditional kimchi have same microbes, study findsBrown University researchers have found that kimchi made without seafood products has the same 'probiotic' bacteria as more traditional kimchi.
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Soccer coaches are an untapped resource in assessing and developing player psychologySoccer coaches should be empowered to make reliable assessments of player psychological characteristics, propose sports researchers. Citing the extensive experience of coaches in working with many talented players as an untapped resource in sports psychology research, they suggest that coaches could provide unique insights into the psychological characteristics required for player success. Using c
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Futurity.org

This other immune system can crimp your love lifeActivating something called the behavioral immune system puts a damper on dating, new research shows. About a decade ago, evolutionary psychologists suggested that humans have evolved a first line of defense against disease: this behavioral immune system or BIS. The theory is that perceiving, rightly or wrongly, the threat of disease unconsciously activates this system. Although we cannot see mic
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

UNICEF 'muted' on tobacco control for childrenThe tobacco industry manipulated the renowned children's rights agency UNICEF for more than a dozen years, from 2003 until at least 2016, during which time UNICEF's focus on children's rights to a tobacco-free life was reduced, according to previously secret documents recently uncovered.
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Futurity.org

A pill may beat mammograms for spotting breast cancerAs many as one in three women treated for breast cancer undergo unnecessary procedures, but a new method for diagnosing it could do a better job distinguishing between benign and aggressive tumors. Researchers are developing a new pill that makes breast cancer tumors light up when exposed to infrared light. They’ve already demonstrated that the concept works in mice. Mammography is an imprecise t
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Ingeniøren

Avanceret gel vil kunne forudsige risikoen for tidlig fødselAarhus-ingeniører og læger samarbejder om en ny medicinsk billedteknologi for at mindske risikoen for, at kvinder føder før 37. graviditetsuge.
7h
Popular Science

Inside the high-tech, last-ditch effort to save the northern white rhinoAnimals An animal fertility expert takes on a particularly tricky patient. An animal fertility expert takes on the tricky business of endangered-species insemination. "I've always loved to solve problems other people cannot."…
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Story tips from the Department of Energy's Oak Ridge National Laboratory, May 2018ORNL studies how some trees respond and recover after heat waves; sensors collect data to uniquely identify vehicles; catalysis data calculations assist in overcoming limiting factor to break down olefins; ORNL tested NASA space probe instruments' ability to withstand sun's extreme heat; using neutrons, ORNL observed enzyme behavior to determine certain antibiotics' ineffectiveness.
8h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News

CAR-T immunotherapy eliminates metastatic colorectal cancer in miceA CAR-T-based immunotherapy successfully kills tumors and prevents metastatic growth, in final preclinical tests before human trials.
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Palliative care improves hospital care for seriously ill patientsPalliative care provided by specialist medical and nursing teams to patients with complex health needs significantly improves their experience of care, new research shows.
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Posting, commenting and customizing on Facebook help involve, empower older adultsSocial networking sites, such as Facebook, offer tools and activities that may help older adults feel more empowered and less isolated, according to researchers. In a study of Facebook use, older adults who posted a lot of personal stories on the social networking site felt a higher sense of community, and the more they customized their profiles, the more in control they felt.
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Communication difficulties linked to increased risk of self-harm and suicidal behaviorChildren who have difficulties with social communication have a higher risk of self-harm with suicidal intent by the age of 16 years compared to those without, reports a new study published in the May 2018 issue of the Journal of the American Academy of Child and Adolescent Psychiatry (JAACAP). The study was designed to understand whether characteristics of autism spectrum disorders in childhood a
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Researchers call for tougher standards for studies on obesity policiesWhen a new park is built, a tax is instituted on fast food or a ban put in place against soft drinks in a school, public health researchers must often rely on 'after the fact' observational studies to evaluate the impact of such efforts on rates of obesity in a particular population and try to clearly identify and measure the factors that worked or didn't.
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Distress in men following prostate cancer can be reducedA new web-based support program will help reduce the psychological stress that impacts men who are recovering from prostate cancer.
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Frozen embryo transfer versus fresh embryo transfer: What's riskier?Large for gestational age babies and congenital heart defects (CHD) are just two of several risks needing further examination in the emerging field of assisted reproductive technology, according to the editors of a special issue on in-vitro fertilization in Birth Defects Research. The special issue focuses on continued research regarding several aspects of the in-vitro fertilization (IVF) procedur
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Back to (nucleic) bases—Studying DNA aboard the International Space StationWhat do astronauts, microbes, and plants all have in common? Each relies on deoxyribonucleic acid (DNA) - essentially a computer code for living things - to grow and thrive.
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Dagens Medicin

De første læger er begyndt på uddannelse til akutmedicinereAkutafdelingen på Aarhus Universitetshospital bød i dag velkommen til fire læger der som de første i Danmark skal tage uddannelsen til speciallæge i det nye akutmedicinske speciale.
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Dagens Medicin

Aarhus Universitetshospital skærer 25 overlægestillinger350 stillinger nedlægges på Aarhus Universitetshospital, heriblandt 25 overlægestillinger. Formand for hospitalets overlægeråd er bekymret for højest specialiserede funktioner og kvaliteten.
8h
Big Think

5 free books on atheism you can read onlineSecular Web compiles a number of publications in atheism, nontheism, and science over the last few centuries. Read More
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Scientific American Content: Global

Can the U.S. Get 1 Million People to Volunteer Their Genomes?A massive biobank effort, first planned under the Obama administration, launches this week -- Read more on ScientificAmerican.com
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Viden

Skrottet månemission sår tvivl om, hvad NASA vil med MånenNASA skal tilbage til Månen, siger ledelsen, men aflyser samtidig den næste Månemission. Det giver ingen mening, siger dansk ekspert
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Lymphatic endothelial cells promote melanoma to spreadThe lymph vessel endothelial cells play an active role in the spread of melanoma, according to the new study conducted at the University of Helsinki. The researchers found that growing human melanoma cells in co-cultures with human primary lymphatic endothelial cells revealed crosstalk of cancer cells with the tumor microenvironment leading to the increased invasive growth of melanoma cells and di
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Real-time coverage of inside of the brain made possibleNagoya University-centered researchers developed a new system for in vivo real-time monitoring of metabolites in a living mouse brain. The system successfully monitored eight cerebrum metabolites related to central energy metabolism in real-time with a 20-second interval. No remarkable traumatic injury or edema was observed on the brain surface even after three hours of in vivo real-time monitorin
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Wired

Testosterone Ruling for Athletes Fuels Debate Over ‘Natural’ AbilityWomen with high levels of testosterone—like Olympic gold medalist Caster Semenya—must either compete against men or take medication.
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New Scientist - News

AI that deletes people from photos makes rewriting history easyUgly artefacts, photobombers, or people you’d rather forget from photos can all effortlessly be removed by AI, making it easy to rewrite history
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Your smartphone could help to speed up cancer research while you sleepA new research project aims to speed up the delivery of personalised cancer treatments by using smartphones to crunch data while their owners sleep.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Przybylski's star is an extremely slow rotator, study findsEuropean astronomers have conducted a study of Przybylski's star and found that it takes almost 200 years to fully rotate on its own axis. The finding, which could have implications for the understanding of chemically peculiar stars, is reported April 19 in a paper published on the arXiv pre-print repository.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Technology is better than ever – but thousands of Americans still die in car crashes every yearToday, driving is arguably safer than ever been before.
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cognitive science

Rice U. turns deep-learning AI loose on software development: "BAYOU learned to write code for programmers by studying billions of programs"submitted by /u/trot-trot [link] [comments]
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Plant relationships break down when they meet new fungiGijsbert Werner, Postdoctoral Fellow and Stuart West, Professor of Evolutionary Biology, both in the Department of Zoology, explain the process of plant cooperation, in relation to their new study published in PNAS, which has shed light on why cooperative relationships breakdown.
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Stem cells show long-term success in treating severe peripheral arterial diseaseA long-term study of patients who received stem cells to treat angiitis-induced critical limb ischemia (AICLI) shows the cells to be both safe and effective. The study, published in STEM CELLS Translational Medicine (SCTM), could lead to an option for those who suffer from this serious form of peripheral arterial disease (PAD).
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News

UC Davis researchers discover how antiepileptic drugs induce birth defectsUC Davis School of Medicine researchers identify mechanism by which a common drug for treating epileptic seizures can lead to birth defects if used during pregnancy.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Why blaming conflicts in Africa on climate change is misguidedThe role of water crises in conflicts in places like Syria, Nigeria and Iran often feature in media and policy outlets. Many believe that climate change could spark future conflicts. But research shows that most conflicts are driven by factors other than the effects of climate change.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

How tiny toads seize the day—and the weather conditions—for breedingRose's mountain toadlet is a very small amphibian – adults grow to just 2 centimetres in length. These little toads can be found scattered across the mountainous, fynbos-rich biodiversity hotspot on the Cape Peninsula near Cape Town, South Africa.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Swarms of low-resource sensors to probe the ionosphereNASA is sponsoring a team developing a new type of payload to collect ionospheric plasma data at multiple points near a suborbital main payload. These low-resource, easily reproducible payloads—called Bobs—were developed for the NASA Isinglass auroral sounding rocket mission (conducted in February 2017 at the Poker Flat Research Range in Alaska). Much of the current understanding of the ionospheri
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Radiocarbon based study suggests wheat introduced to eastern China around 2600 BCEA team of researchers from several institutions in Germany and China has found evidence of domesticated wheat in China around 2600 BCE (Before Common Era). In their paper published in the journal Nature Plants, the team describes their work and its possible implications. Guanghui Dong with Lanzhou University in China offers a New & Views piece on the study.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Navigating the AI maze is a challenge for governmentsNew developments in artificial intelligence are proceeding apace. As an economist who has researched the AI revolution, I see 2018 as similar to 1995 when the commercial internet was born. The technology is advancing rapidly, but most businesses are only just starting to figure out how to put it to work.
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The Scientist RSS

Image of the Day: Spammed by HydraA junk mail filter learned to pick out hydra's complete set of behaviors by analyzing hours of video footage.
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Futurity.org

Surprise discovery suggests new stomach cancer optionResearchers studying lupus discovered that treatments similar to those already in use to treat melanoma and lung cancer, including immunotherapy, show promise for stomach cancer and may even lead to preventative treatments. Usually the symptoms of stomach—or gastric—cancer are hard to pick up until it’s too late, making what is a relatively common cancer an often fatal one. Survival rates are low
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Fear of gender quotas is irrationalDanish companies lag behind their Nordic competitors when it comes to women's representation in leadership roles.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

How I tracked down the Frenchman who helped translate the King James Bible (and who didn't speak English)The King James Bible, often referred to as the "authorised version", is one of the most widely read and influential books in history. Published for the first time in 1611 at the behest of King James I of England, the translation was the work of more than 40 scholars, who started from the original Hebrew and Greek texts of the Bible.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

A theoretical analysis of sand mega-ripplesA team of researchers from several institutions in Germany and Israel has used theoretical analysis to explain the conditions under which mega-ripples form in areas where sand dunes rise. In their paper published in the journal Nature Physics, the group describes combining field measurements with theory to come up with an explanation for mega-ripples. N. M. Vriend and P. A. Jarvis with the Univers
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Scientific American Content: Global

1968: Lunar Orbiter photos; 1868: The Atmosphere as GreenhouseInnovation and discovery as chronicled in Scientific American -- Read more on ScientificAmerican.com
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Organ-chips model and predict thrombotic side effect caused by anti-CD154 antibody hu5c8Emulate published study co-authored with scientists at Janssen that demonstrates its Blood Vessel-Chip accurately modeled and predicted thrombosis induced by certain monoclonal antibody drugs. The researchers introduced an anti-CD154 therapeutic antibody (Hu5c8) into the Blood Vessel-Chip's living microenvironment, which features a vascular channel lined with human cells that comprises the endothe
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

How cops used a public genealogy database in the Golden State Killer caseDNA was credited for cracking the decades old cold case of the "Golden State Killer," a California serial murderer and rapist. But the detectives used a public database of genetic genealogy called GEDmatch, raising privacy concerns about publicly available DNA profiles.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

To create safer cities for everyone, we need to avoid security that threatensThe central role of public spaces in the social, cultural, political and economic life of cities makes it crucial that they're accessible to everyone. One of the most important qualities of accessible public spaces is safety. If people do not feel safe in a public space, they are less likely to use it, let alone linger in it.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Why you can't have free trade and save the planetWhen Donald Trump recently announced tariffs on steel and aluminium imports he was condemned by proponents of free trade across the world. His critics said the US president had not understood how protectionist policies would spell disaster for the world economy. Fair enough. But this is the same Trump whose decision to withdraw from the Paris climate agreement also met with massive disapproval.
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Popular Science

A pet’s death can hurt more than losing a fellow humanAnimals Social norms are wrecking your grief experience. The perfect coffin for a gerbil is a Celestial Seasonings tea box. With the tea bags removed, the white wax-paper bag inside is the ideal size funeral shroud for a tiny…
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Plan to bring back rocks from Mars is our best bet for finding clues of past lifeSitting with 200 people at the International Mars Sample Return Conference in Berlin recently to discuss the feasibility of bringing samples back from Mars to Earth, I remember the first such conference in Paris ten years ago. Many of the same people were present again, older and possibly wiser, but certainly more grey or bald. And they were just as enthusiastic as a decade ago. But one thing had
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Wired

Plantronics Wireless Headphone Sale: Voyager 8200, Backbeat Pro 2, FitThe Plantronics Voyager 8200 and Backbeat Pro 2 are amazing wireless headphones, and on sale at Amazon
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Science : NPR

This Is What That 'Salmon-Safe' Label Says About Your Wine Or EggsMany consumers don't yet understand the label, but grocery stores are now buying from "salmon-safe" farms, which help protect fish by banning pesticides and keeping manure out of the land's waterways. (Image credit: Eilis O'Neill/KUOW)
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The Atlantic

The University of California Stands Out Among Top Schools When It Comes to Serving Poor StudentsThe idea is clear, simple, and generally agreed upon: Colleges need to do more when it comes to enrolling and graduating low-income students. If college degrees are “the great equalizer”—though some research has disputed that characterization—then expanding access to those degrees will help make society more equal. Are any colleges succeeding in doing that? A new report from Third Way, a center-l
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The Atlantic

Even Amid Scandal, Facebook Is UnstoppableWhen Mark Zuckerberg takes the stage on Tuesday at F8, Facebook’s big annual conference, I expect him to gesture briefly at the troubles of the last year and a half, and then look grandly forward, talking up the future of augmented and virtual reality, the company’s commitments to fostering “community,” and Facebook’s growth outside the United States. It will feel a little strange. Wasn’t this co
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Scientific American Content: Global

Using Behavioral Science to Build an Exercise HabitA new scientific research project to help you get active—and keep you motivated -- Read more on ScientificAmerican.com
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Real-time coverage of inside of the brain made possibleReal-time monitoring of the dynamics of endogenous molecules in organisms is an important aspect in the study of diseases. However, this process is difficult because of issues such as sensitivity, resolution, and invasiveness. This challenge has become a major motivation for the development of new effective tools for real-time monitoring of analytes of interest.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Why parts of Earth have barely changed in 3 billion yearsThere is a mystery in Earth's ancient past, and the clues lie in the desert rocks of Australia and other ancient places.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Like evolution, all scientific theories are a work in progressDiscussions about the nature of science and scientific theories are often confused by the outdated view that such theories are rendered false when anomalies arise. The notion of a scientific theory as a static object should be replaced with the more current view that it is part of a living research programme, which can broaden its scope into new areas.
9h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Signals from a spectacular neutron star merger that made gravitational waves are slowly fading awayEight months ago, the detection of gravitational waves from a binary neutron star merger had us and other astronomers around the world rushing to observe one of the most energetic events in the universe.
10h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

How are drones changing warfare, threatening security?The Trump administration recently announced a new policy that could vastly expand the sale of armed aerial drones, a specialty of Nicholas Grossman. The professor of political science at the University of Illinois teaches international relations and is the author of the new book "Drones and Terrorism: Asymmetric Warfare and the Threat to Global Security." He spoke with News Bureau social sciences
10h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

How shared parental leave gives adoptive parents real time to build a new family unitThe latest video in the government's campaign to promote shared parental leave features two dads. The video, which we helped to develop, is a timely reminder that the implications of shared parental leave extend beyond a family with two biological parents.
10h
The Scientist RSS

Researchers Succeed in Keeping Disembodied Pig Brains AliveThe organs showed neural activity for up to 36 hours, adding fuel to discussions about the ethics of future neuroscientific research.
10h
Live Science

Your Genome May Have Already Been HackedOn April 25, California law enforcement announced the possible capture of a long-sought serial killer. Shortly after, it was reported that police had used public DNA databases to determine his identity.
10h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Ultra-safe cells resistant to natural viruses announced as first GP-write major projectThe Leadership Group and Scientific Executive Committee of Genome Project-write announced its first community-wide project, to develop 'ultra-safe cells' that resist natural viruses and potentially radiation, freezing, aging and cancer. The project will generate a wealth of information connecting the sequence of nucleotide bases in DNA with their physiological properties and functional behaviors,
10h
Live Science

We Could Find Aliens by Spotting Their SatellitesAlien civilizations with technology levels similar to that of Earth could be visible with current instruments, if they've hoisted enough satellites into orbit, a new study suggests.
10h
New Scientist - News

Lightning hit a woman’s home and switched off her brain implantDoctors are warning that some people should change the way they recharge their brain implants, after a lightning strike shut down a woman’s stimulation device
10h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Researchers discuss the MIT and Legacy of Slavery projectThe first class of the "MIT and Slavery" undergraduate research project ran in the fall of 2017. Set in motion by MIT President L. Rafael Reif with Melissa Nobles, the Kenan Sahin Dean of the School of Humanities, Arts, and Social Sciences, the course was developed and taught by Craig Steven Wilder—the Barton L. Weller Professor of History and the nation's leading expert on the links between unive
10h
New on MIT Technology Review

“Project Recode” aims to make human cells invulnerable to infection
10h


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