Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Not enough homes being built for older people, research saysThe number of people aged 85 and over will more than double in the UK over the next 25 years. With an ageing population will come additional pressures on services and resources – and one area of specific concern is housing.
6h

Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Australian-first 'hospital' burrow a design-led solution to saving wombats from extinctionMarcus Foth, Professor of Urban Informatics at the QUT Design Lab, is leading the research and evaluation of an Australian-first quarantine hospital burrow specifically designed to treat the deadly sarcoptic mange disease threatening bare-nosed wombats with extinction.
6h

EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Researchers levitate water droplets to improve contaminant detectionResearchers showed that using sound waves to levitate droplets of water in midair can improve the detection of harmful heavy metal contaminants such as lead and mercury in water.
6h

EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Penn performs first-in-world robot-assisted spinal surgeryPenn neurosurgeons and otolaryngologists performed the first robot-assisted spinal surgery. The robotic arms made it possible for the team to successfully remove a rare tumor in the patient's neck.
6h

EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Natural gas prices, not 'war on coal,' were key to coal power declineSteep declines in the use of coal for power generation over the past decade were caused largely by less expensive natural gas and the availability of wind energy -- not by environmental regulations.
6h

EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Long-distance relationships of particles: Electron-hole pairs in two-dimensional crystalsResearchers of TU Dresden reveal the nature of optical excitations in two-dimensional crystals within an international collaboration
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Even brief maternal deprivation early in life alters adult brain function and cognitionWhen a baby is taken from its mother for even a brief period early in life, this traumatic event significantly alters the future, adult function of the brain, according to a new animal model study from the School of Science at IUPUI. These changes in the brain are similar to disturbances in brain structure and function that are found in people at risk for neuropsychiatric disorders, such as schizo
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Pitt and UPMC join NIH in launching nationwide precision medicine effortOn May 6, the National Institutes of Health will open national enrollment for the All of Us Research Program -- a momentous effort to advance individualized prevention, treatment and care for people of all backgrounds -- in collaboration the University of Pittsburgh and other partners.
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Novel approach for photosynthetic production of carbon neutral biofuel from green algaeReducing carbon emissions in order to prevent climate change requires developing new technologies for sustainable and renewable biofuel production. Molecular hydrogen is regarded as one of the most promising energy carriers due to its high energy density and clean, carbon-free use. A research group from the University of Turku, Finland, has discovered an efficient way for transforming solar energy
6h

Ingeniøren

Sikkerhedsekspert: Industriens gamle scada-systemer kan godt beskyttesSelvom mange industrielle kontrolsystemer har adskillige år på bagen, behøver de ikke stå pivåbne for cyberangreb. Man kan faktisk med få midler vende svagheder i industrielle it-systemer til fordele, lyder det fra sikkerhedsekspert og it- beredskabskoordinator i Energinet Mikael Vingaard.
7h

Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Natural gas prices, not 'war on coal,' were key to coal power decline: studyNew research from North Carolina State University and the University of Colorado Boulder finds that steep declines in the use of coal for power generation over the past decade were caused largely by less expensive natural gas and the availability of wind energy – not by environmental regulations.
7h

Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Cracking the RNA-binding code of a cell fate regulatorInteractions between RNA and proteins impact all aspects of RNA metabolism. These interactions are mediated by diverse RNA binding domains (RBDs), of which many remain to be discovered. One example of a recently identified RBD is the NHL domain. This domain is present in so-called TRIM-NHL proteins, like the C. elegans LIN-41 or its human homolog LIN41/TRIM71, collectively referred to as LIN41.
7h

Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Public sees sophistication, coordination as key threat in terrorist attacks, study findsMembers of the public perceive coordinated terrorist attacks that involve multiple actors as more threatening than attacks carried out by individuals, according to a study that includes two University of Kansas international relations professors.
7h

Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

First results positive from rare 'natural statin' fruitA little-known fruit used to make perfumes and Earl Grey tea is being investigated as a potential anti-cancer and anti-cholesterol treatment.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

Frequent sauna bathing reduces risk of strokeFrequent sauna bathing is associated with a reduced risk of stroke, according to a new international study.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

Sex after 65: Poll finds links to health, gender differences, lack of communicationA new poll busts stereotypes about the sex lives of older Americans -- and reveals gender and health-related divides on key aspects of sexual health, while highlighting the need for more people to talk with their health providers about sexual issues.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

Earthquake aftermath: Life-threatening blood clots in legs and lungs from sitting in cars for extended periodsPhysicians highlight the risks and clinical significance for individuals who remain seated and immobile in vehicles for prolonged periods. They call for preventive awareness activities and education about the risk of venous thromboembolisms.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Fusion scientists find inspiration in atmospheric whistlesThe challenge of fusion energy is often equated to capturing—and holding—lightning in a bottle. The analogy is apt. Lightning and a fusion energy plasma have a lot in common. Similarities include very high temperatures, massive electric charges, and extremely complex fluid dynamics. Researchers at the DIII-D National Fusion Facility found another characteristic shared between the two types of plas
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

New proof reveals fundamental limits of scientific knowledgeA new proof by SFI Professor David Wolpert sends a humbling message to would-be super intelligences: you can't know everything all the time.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Another problem with China's coal—mercury in riceMercury pollution is a problem usually associated with fish consumption. Pregnant women and children in many parts of the world are advised to eat fish low in mercury to protect against the adverse health impacts, including neurological damages, posed by a particularly toxic form of mercury, methylmercury.
7h

Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Flockmate or loner? Identifying the genes behind sociality in chickensFive genes that affect sociality-related behaviour in chickens have been identified by researchers at Linköping University in Sweden. Several of the genes have been previously linked to nervous system function or behaviour. The new study, which is published in Genetics, is the first that assigns these genes a role in sociality.
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Temperature swings to hit poor countries hardestTemperature fluctuations that are amplified by climate change will hit the world's poorest countries hardest, new research suggests.
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Electrical signals in plants affect photosynthetic activityPlants are constantly exposed to various stressors, including drought, fluctuations in temperature and light intensity, attacks by insects, etc. Since plants have an attached lifestyle, the only way to survive the impact of the stress factor is to quickly adapt their metabolism to the changing conditions. In the case when stressors (for example, strong light or mechanical damage) only act on certa
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News

COPD-associated inflammation halted in model experimentChronic obstructive pulmonary disease, or COPD for short, is believed to be the third most common cause of death worldwide. However, because the underlying mechanism is still largely unknown, today's treatments can only slow progression of the disease. Scientists at Helmholtz Zentrum München have now reported a previously unknown pathogenic mechanism, which they have already been able to prevent i
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Study points to the futility of urine tests for salbutamol dopingSalbutamol, also known as albuterol, is a medication that opens up constricted medium and large airways in the lungs and is often used to treat asthma.
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Plant relationships breakdown when they meet new 'fungi'Gijsbert Werner, Postdoctoral Fellow and Stuart West, Professor of Evolutionary Biology, both in the Oxford University Department of Zoology, explain the process of plant cooperation, in relation to their new study published in PNAS, which has shed light on why cooperative relationships breakdown.
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Childhood communication enhances brain development, protecting against harmful behaviorsChildren with greater parent communication in early adolescence have less harmful alcohol use and emotional eating in young adulthood, according to a new study in Biological Psychiatry.
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Why children with autism may be at risk of bullyingChildren with autism may be at risk from bullying because they are more willing to accept unfair behavior say psychologists.Children played trading games with a puppet and those with autism were 37 percent less likely to reciprocate fair offers and three times more likely to accept unfair offers of just one sticker.They may be particularly susceptible to bullies exploiting their lower concern for
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News

The true 'value' of biodiversityPlanning conservation policies to protect biodiversity using single core 'values' such as the 'usefulness' of a species could put 'less useful' species at risk.
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Bowel disease study points to new therapies for lifelong conditionsTreatments for incurable bowel conditions may be a step closer following the discovery of a key molecule associated with disease flare-ups. Researchers at the University of Edinburgh say the finding helps to explain the underlying cause of disorders such as Crohn's disease and ulcerative colitis.
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Weeds take over kelp in high CO2 oceansWeedy plants will thrive and displace long-lived, ecologically valuable kelp forests under forecast ocean acidification, new research from the University of Adelaide shows. The researchers describe how kelp forests are displaced by weedy marine plants in high CO2 conditions, equivalent to those predicted for the turn of the century.
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Noise throws the heart out of rhythmWith an increasing level of noise, the incidence of atrial fibrillation also increases dramatically. Scientists at the Mainz University Medical Center found that the incidence of atrial fibrillation in subjects with extreme noise annoyance reactions increases to 23 percent, compared to just 15 percent without this environmental impact. Looking at the proportion of sources of extreme noise pollutio
7h

EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Flockmate or loner? Identifying the genes behind sociality in chickensFive genes that affect sociality-related behavior in chickens have been identified by researchers at Linköping University in Sweden. Several of the genes have been previously linked to nervous system function or behavior. The new study, which is published in Genetics, is the first that assigns these genes a role in sociality.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

GRACE-FO: Cracking a cold caseReports of the rapidly melting West Antarctic ice sheet often refer to how much the melting could add to global sea levels—as if meltwater raises the ocean evenly, like a sink filling up. The reality is far different. Water from West Antarctica will end up raising sea levels more in Los Angeles and Miami than in Rio de Janeiro, for example, even though Brazil is thousands of miles closer to Antarc
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Crocodiles listen to classical music in MRI scannerCrocodiles count among the most ancient species of vertebrates and have barely changed over the space of more than 200 million years. Accordingly, they constitute a link between dinosaurs and bird species today. "Analyses of crocodile brains thus provide deep insights into the evolution of the nervous system in mammals and may help us understand at which point certain brain structures and behaviou
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Great Britain's need for guns, war supplies drove 18th-century industrialism, scholar saysWar and Great Britain's gun industry played a more important role in driving the 18th-century Industrial Revolution than scholars have previously recognized, according to new research from a Stanford historian.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Mineral in lunar meteorite suggests water was once on the moonA team of researchers led by Masahiro Kayama of Tohoku University has found evidence in a lunar meteorite that water once existed on the moon. In their paper published on the open access site Science Advances, the team describes their study of the meteorite and why they believe it offers evidence of water on the moon.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Eliminating small instabilities in tokamaks before they become disruptionsOne of the greatest obstacles to producing energy via fusion on Eearth is the formation and growth of small magnetic field imperfections in the core of experimental fusion reactors. These reactors, called tokamaks, confine hot ionized gas, or plasma. If the imperfections persist, they let the energy stored in the confined plasma leak out; if allowed to grow, they can lead to sudden termination of
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Direct optical reading of single-molecule DNA bases in modified nanoporesIn a Nature Communications paper published this week, IMEC, the world-leading research and innovation hub in nano-electronics and digital technology, describes a new concept for direct identification of single DNA bases. The technique has the potential to detect, with an unprecedented spatial resolution and without any labeling, the genetic code, as well as epigenetic variations in DNA. The combin
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Mercury rising—are the fish we eat toxic?The amount of mercury extracted from the sea by industrial fishing has grown steadily since the 1950s, potentially increasing mercury exposure among the populations of several coastal and island nations to levels that are unsafe for foetal development.
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Feed: All Latest

Want to Hunt Aliens? Go to West Virginia's Low-Tech 'Quiet Zone'The 13,000-square-mile swathe of silence at the Green Bank Observatory is the perfect place for scientists to listen in on outer space.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Future cities could be lit by algaeThe way we produce light has changed surprisingly little since Thomas Edison developed the first light bulb in 1879.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Migration patterns changed among threatened whale populationClimate change has potentially had a major effect on the migration of southern right whale populations, research led by the University of St Andrews has found.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Ferrari hails 'record' Q1 results as profits zoomItalian luxury carmaker Ferrari on Thursday said it was racing towards scoring "another great year" after profits accelerated past forecasts in the first quarter of 2018.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

International agreements on acid rain have improved soil conditions in European forestsThe amount of sulphate, nutrients and aluminium have decreased in the water present in Europe's forest soils, due to reductions in sulphur emissions to the atmosphere.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Meet the ocean creatures that use a mesh of mucus to catch their foodAll animals must eat to survive. If you've heard the term "grazer" before, it may bring to mind familiar farm animals, such as cows or sheep munching on pastureland. But the ocean has its own suite of grazers, with very different—even bizarre—body forms and feeding techniques. Instead of teeth, one group of these invertebrates uses sheets of mucus to consume huge quantities of tiny plant-like part
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Mystery solved: The bacterial protein that kills male fruit fliesIn the fifties, geneticists were faced with a mystery: when two strains of the same fruit fly species (Drosophila) crossed, they only produced female flies instead of the expected 50:50 sex ratio. At first, scientists thought that what lay behind this was a genetic mutation, but it was later discovered that the cause was a hidden bacterium, Spiroplasma poulsonii.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Simulations suggest poor tropical regions likely to suffer more from global warmingA team of researchers from the Netherlands, France and the U.K. has found via simulation that poorer tropical regions are likely to suffer more than other areas from global warming. In their paper published on the open access site Science Advances, the group describes building their model and what it showed.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Tesla's problem: overestimating automation, underestimating humansElon Musk Tesla Model YTesla was hoping to produce 5,000 new Model 3 electric cars each week in 2018. So far, it has failed to manufacture even half that number. Questioned on the matter, the company's CEO, Elon Musk, claimed that "excessive automation was a mistake" and that "humans are underrated".
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Controlling the crystal structure of gallium oxidePrecise control of the atomic structure of gallium-oxide layers improves the development of high-power electronic devices.
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Lining MOF pockets to detect noxious gasesCustom-made gas-sensing material could lead to inexpensive devices for real-time air quality analysis.
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Frequent sauna bathing reduces risk of strokeFrequent sauna bathing is associated with a reduced risk of stroke, according to a new international study.
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Morphing twisted nanoscale objects to tailor applications in future technologiesFor the first time scientists have created a way to model the interaction between light and twisted molecules, as these molecules transition from left- to right-handed versions, or vice versa. The transitional forms offer a deeper insight into material symmetries and their unexpected behavior could lead to improved design of telecoms components.
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Cutting number of cancers diagnosed as emergencies could save 1,400 lives a yearOver 1,400 lives could be saved every year -- four more every day -- if more cancers were diagnosed through GP referral instead of emergency hospital admissions, according to a new study led by City, University of London and funded by Macmillan Cancer Support.
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Futurity.org

‘MRI’ diagnoses what’s wrong with batteriesA new MRI-based technique quickly diagnoses what ails certain types of batteries—from determining how much charge remains to detecting internal defects—without opening them up. “The use of alternative energy and electrically powered vehicles will further increase the demand for better and safer batteries,” says Alexej Jerschow, a professor in New York University’s chemistry department. “However,
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Controlling the crystal structure of gallium oxideA simple method that uses hydrogen chloride can better control the crystal structure of a common semiconductor and shows promise for novel high-powered electronic applications.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Increasing climate variability will hit world's poorest countriesIt has been difficult to predict how weather extremes such as heat waves and cold snaps might change in a future climate. Now, a team of researchers from the Universities of Wageningen, Montpellier and Exeter revealed an unfair pattern. The research team found that rich countries that contributed most to climate change will see less temperature fluctuation, whereas in poor countries the fluctuatio
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Facebook gets into dating, but there's little scientific evidence online personality matching worksFacebook F8 M. ZuckerbergOne of the biggest reveals of Facebook's F8 developer conference so far has been that it is planning on getting into the dating game. The announcement was made during Facebook CEO Mark Zuckerberg's keynote address on day one.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Two decades of hurricanes change coastal ecosystems—increase algae blooms, fish kills, dead zonesArthur, Bertha, Fran, Josephine. Ana, Joaquin, Hermine, Matthew—each might be a favorite child's name. But in fact they're terms for something that's far from good news: hurricanes.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Smaller trout have growth spurts when they decide to go to seaA four-year survey of brown trout in the burns of Orkney has revealed a surprise finding about Scotland's most ubiquitous fish: smaller members of the school have growth spurts when they decide to go to sea.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Research could minimize unwanted side effects in new drugsOpioids relieve pain, but can cause respiratory failure and death through overdosing. Antipsychotic drugs can help people cope with mental illnesses, but muscle spasms can be a debilitating side effect. What if we could design drugs that retain their desirable traits with fewer troubling downsides?
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

Chemists develop MRI-like technique to detect what ails batteriesA team of chemists has developed an MRI-based technique that can quickly diagnose what ails certain types of batteries -- from determining how much charge remains to detecting internal defects -- without opening them up.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

Custom silicon microparticles dynamically reconfigure on demandResearchers at Duke University and North Carolina State University have demonstrated the first custom semiconductor microparticles to exhibit dynamically selectable behaviors while suspended in water. The study presents the first steps toward realizing advanced applications such as artificial muscles and reconfigurable computer systems.
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Futurity.org

Holographic brain device would edit our senses and memoriesNeuroscientists are building equipment to edit the sensations we feel, paste images we’ve never seen into our brains, insert non-existent scents into memory, and even cut out unwanted pain. The researchers are using holographic projection into the brains of mice to activate or suppress dozens and ultimately thousands of neurons at once, hundreds of times each second, copying real patterns of brai
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The Atlantic

Why 'Stories' Took Over Your SmartphoneFacebook’s chief product officer, Chris Cox, made a remarkable announcement during a keynote at the company’s big conference this week: “The increase in the Stories format,” he explained, “is on a path to surpass feeds as the primary way people share things with their friends sometime next year.” This caught me off guard. I have been ignoring Stories for years, deeming it a trifle for young peopl
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The Atlantic

The 130,000 Bucks That Stopped EverywhereStormy Daniels GiulianiHarry Truman had a sign on his desk that read, “The Buck Stops Here.” On Wednesday, Donald Trump’s newest attorney, former New York City Mayor Rudy Giuliani, went on Fox News to address the $130,000 bucks that seem to stop everywhere. Days before the 2016 presidential election, the porn actress Stormy Daniels received that six-figure sum from Trump’s then-attorney, Michael Cohen, for ceasing to t
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Dagens Medicin

Ny læge i almen praksis vil pessimismen til livsPraktiserende læge Thilde Sangild Villemann har købt to 0-ydernumre af Region Midtjylland og slår til august dørene op til sin praksis i Herning. Flere kolleger har advaret hende mod den store arbejdsbyrde, men det har ikke fået den unge læge til at miste modet – tværtimod. Pessimisme kommer man ingen steder med, lyder det.
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Popular Science

How to make your headphones more comfortableDIY No matter what's bothering you about them. With good headphones, your music can sound indescribable...and your head can feel like it’s in a trash compactor. Here's how to make them more comfortable.
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Picking one photon out of the flowIn a collaboration between Aarhus University and the University of Southern Denmark, researchers have discovered a way to subtract a single quantum of light from a laser beam. This work has recently been published and selected as an Editor's Suggestion in Physical Review Letters. This method paves the way towards future quantum communication and computation using the subtle aspects of quantum mech
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Mystery solved: The bacterial protein that kills male fruit fliesAn endosymbiotic bacterium, Spiroplasma, specifically kills the males of its fruit-fly host (Drosophila). This has perplexed biologists since the 1950's, but EPFL scientists have now solved the mystery by identifying the gene behind this gender-specific killing.
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Sylentis announces the results of tivanisiran for dry eye syndromeThe studies carried out with tivanisiran showed an improvement in the inflammatory ocular parameters, tear quality, and a reduction in ocular pain, that is associated with dry eye syndrome.
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Women should have right to reject pregnancyIn a new paper published in The Australian and New Zealand Journal of Obstetrics and Gynaecology, QUT's Dr. Andrew McGee and his co-authors argue that, despite decades of debate, advocates and opponents of abortion have been unable to demonstrate conclusively that either side's view is false, or agree on when life starts. He says laws should not force women to risk death and injury by having a bab
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News

New research uncovers 'stability protein' for cancer treatmentResearchers from the Novo Nordisk Foundation Center for Protein Research at the Faculty of Health and Medical Sciences have characterized a new protein that is important to the genetic stability of our cells. It may be significant for the development of new drugs against genetically determined diseases like cancer, sterility and premature aging.
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Crocodiles listen to classical music in MRI scannerWhat happens in a crocodile's brain when it hears complex sounds? An international research team headed by Dr. Felix Ströckens from the Department of Biopsychology at Ruhr-Universität Bochum has provided the answer to this question. In a first, the researchers examined a cold-blooded reptile using functional MRI. They were thus able to determine that complex stimuli triggered activation patterns i
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Armed conflicts in Sahara and Sahel endangering wildlife in the regionThe researchers warn that armed conflicts in the region, which have been escalating since 2011 and now represent 5 percent of all conflicts in the world are wiping out animal species such as the African elephant and dorcas gazelle at an alarming rate.
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News

NUS engineers invent smart microchip that can self-start and operate when battery runs outBATLESS, a smart microchip developed by a team of researchers led by Associate Professor Massimo Alioto from National University of Singapore's Faculty of Engineering, can self-start and continue to operate even when the battery runs out of energy. This novel technology could enable smaller and cheaper Internet of Things (IoT) devices.
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Futurity.org

Coating turns microscope slides into thermometersA new kind of microscope slide lets scientists see tiny objects while also measuring their temperature. The new transparent coating at the forefront of optics theory has the potential to help streamline and enhance scientific research worldwide, from clandestine government biology labs to high school chemistry classes. It may also have implications in other industries, such as computers and elect
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Ingeniøren

Spørg Scientariet: Bliver Jorden forstyrret af andre planeters tiltrækningskraft?En læser vil gerne vide, om Jorden oplever forstyrrelser, ligesom Neptun påvirker Uranus’ bane. Det svarer lektor på Aarhus Universitet på.
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Science | The Guardian

Kew Gardens' Temperate House restored - in picturesAfter five years, 10,000 plants uprooted and replanted, 15,000 panes of glass replaced, 69,000 sections of metal, stone and timber repaired or replaced, enough scaffolding to stretch the length of the M25, and £41m spent, the largest Victorian glasshouse in the world is ready to open its doors again. The Temperate House in Kew Gardens is once again, as Sir David Attenborough describes it, ‘a brea
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The Atlantic

Ukraine’s Successful Courtship of TrumpThe United States completed its shipment of Javelin anti-tank missiles to Ukraine on Monday, finalizing a sale that was reluctantly approved by President Donald Trump in November. The deal was widely reported as a rebuke to Russian President Vladimir Putin , who annexed Crimea and invaded eastern Ukraine in 2014. “This decision … reflects our country’s longstanding commitment to Ukraine in the fa
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

What the gorilla microbiome tells us about evolution and human healthA study of the microbiomes of wild gorillas and chimpanzees offers insights into the evolution of the human microbiome and might even have implications for human health.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

Solar powered sea slugs shed light on search for perpetual green energyIn an amazing achievement akin to adding solar panels to your body, a Northeast sea slug sucks raw materials from algae to provide its lifetime supply of solar-powered energy, according to a new study.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

SWAT team of immune cells found in mother's milkImmune cells that are ready to take action against invaders like bacteria have been found in women's breast milk, researchers say.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

Trial finds no benefit of bath emollients beyond standard eczema care for childrenEmollient bath additives provide no meaningful benefit when used in addition to standard eczema care in children, finds a trial published by The BMJ today.
8h

Big Think

Is this the key to eating less?New research on the hypothalamus shows that body heat matters. Read More
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Dagens Medicin

»Jeg ville ikke have været Sundhedsplatformen foruden«Region Hovedstadens direktør Hjalte Aaberg stopper ved dette års udgang. En lyst til at prøve noget helt andet blev afgørende og på trods af en tid præget af kritik af Sundhedsplatformen, så ville den afgående direktør ikke være platformen foruden.
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Mix of natural cures, biomedical devices prompts bone health, growthIn a first-ever effort, WSU researchers improved the bone-growing capabilities on 3D-printed, ceramic bone scaffolds by 30-45 percent with curcumin, a compound found in the spice, turmeric.
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Bacteria therapy for eczema shows promise in NIH studyTopical treatment with live Roseomonas mucosa--a bacterium naturally present on the skin--was safe for adults and children with atopic dermatitis (eczema) and was associated with reduced disease severity, according to initial findings from an ongoing early-phase clinical trial at the National Institutes of Health. Preclinical work in a mouse model of atopic dermatitis had suggested that R. mucosa
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News

A new giant virus found in the waters of Oahu, HawaiiResearchers at the Daniel K. Inouye Center for Microbial Oceanography: Research and Education at the University of Hawai'i at Mānoa have characterized a new, unusually large virus that infects common marine algae. Found in the coastal waters off Oahu, Hawai'i, it contains the biggest genome ever sequenced for a virus infecting a photosynthetic organism.
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Pioneering paper shows infection control and prevention in clinics is in everyone's handsWhen it comes to the examination room at your health care clinic, you might think that avoiding catching the flu or other more deadly viruses is out of your hands, so to speak. But infectious disease experts at the University of Texas Health Science Center at Houston, who just published a practical guide for infectious disease control in clinics, reveal how we can all help make a difference in inf
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Nyheder - Forskning - Videnskab

Forskere trodser biologien: Mus forbliver slanke på burger-diætKroppen er rigtig god til at lagre fedt fra mad i fedtvæv. Men i et nyt studie er det lykkedes...
8h

New Scientist - News

Why breast screening error stories are getting death stats wrongHeadlines claim up to 270 women died as a result of missed breast checks due to an IT error. They are unlikely to be correct, says David Spiegelhalter
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

Discovery could lead to personalized medical therapies for emerging food allergy disorderScientists have uncovered three distinct subtypes of eosinophilic esophagitis (EoE), an emerging food allergic disease. The discovery provides a framework for developing precision medicines to treat this often-debilitating disorder.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

Vasopressin a possible biomarker for social deficits in autismA new study shows that rhesus macaques with low sociability also had low levels of the peptide vasopressin in cerebrospinal fluid, as did children with autism spectrum disorder.
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The Atlantic

The Experiment in IrresponsibilityIn high school, Leslie Jamison worked in an architect’s office, at Gap, and at Jamba Juice. Later, she pursued higher education at Harvard and other elite institutions, but didn’t leave the service sector entirely, holding jobs as an innkeeper and a baker, among others. She’s now the director of the nonfiction concentration in the writing program at Columbia University School of the Arts, and an
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Feed: All Latest

Figure Out Where You Are With Nothing But a Watch and ProtractorTeach yourself the basics of celestial navigation.
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Feed: All Latest

'Lambchild Superstar' Is Social VR’s 'Rock Band'—In the Best Possible WayWant to make music with a psychedelically gaseous cow? Soon, you will.
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Popular Science

These are the most common—and deadliest—allergiesHealth Seasonal allergies hit us hard, but you might be surprised by what kills us. Given how confused we all seem about what the word “allergy” means, it’s not surprising that it seems like suddenly everyone has one. But it’s not just our perception.
8h

Dagens Medicin

Ellen Trane Nørby: Politiet skal kun have adgang til genom-data i terrorsagerSundhedsministeren er klar med et ændringsforslag, der skal garantere, at politiet ikke kan få adgang til oplysninger fra Nationalt Genom Center i andet end sager om terror.
8h

Futurity.org

To bond with your kids, turn on some music?Young adults who listen to music with their parents during childhood—and especially during adolescence—report having better relationships with their moms and dads as they enter young adulthood, according to a new study. “If you have little kids, and you play music with them, that helps you be closer to them, and later in life will make you closer to them,” says study coauthor Jake Harwood, profes
8h

The Scientist RSS

Image of the Day: A-maize-ing!By combining alleles involved in plant height, an agricultural scientist has grown the world's tallest cornstalk, breaking his own record set in 2017.
9h

The Scientist RSS

NIH Plans to Enroll 1 Million People for Health DatabaseThe agency says it has taken various steps to ensure the privacy of participants' data.
9h

Ingeniøren

Stigning i CO2-udledning skyldes større og kraftigere bilerBilindustrien har hævdet, at stigningen i CO2-udledningen fra nye biler i EU skyldes et fald i salget af dieselbiler, men nye beregninger fra miljøorganisation viser, at det er fordi vi køber flere SUV'er og dieselbiler med kraftige motorer.
9h

The Atlantic

The First Porn President“I can now retire from politics ,” he said—the king of cool, the ironist in chief—“after having had ‘Happy Birthday’ sung to me in such a sweet, wholesome way”: JFK, speaking to the vast audience at Madison Square Garden as Marilyn Monroe tottered away on her high heels, in her flesh-colored dress, leaving behind the hot trail of her sexual desire glowing in the darkness. In less than two years,
9h

Science : NPR

Midwestern Vintner Saves The Forgotten Grapes That Saved Europe's WinesJerry Eisterhold wanted to make unique wines. It all started when he pulled a random, rare book from his shelf — a book written by a 19th-century horticulturist whose work had fallen into obscurity. (Image credit: Laura Ziegler/KCUR 89.3)
9h

New on MIT Technology Review

Ubiquity6 lets your friends visit your augmented realityCome, let us feed virtual tigers digital cake in real-world locations until the end of time.
9h

Feed: All Latest

Americans Are Falling in Love With Bike ShareBut they're not yet sold on dockless bikes, according to a new report.
9h

Feed: All Latest

Nigerian Email Scammers Are More Effective Than EverBy fine-tuning social engineering techniques and targeting small businesses, Nigerian scammers have kept well ahead of defenses.
9h

Feed: All Latest

How to Interact With Robots Without Embarrassing YourselfResearchers are crashing tiny drones into PhD students to make humans and machines get along better.
9h

Scientific American Content: Global

A Worldwide Effort to Stop Epidemics Is in PerilA program to stop deadly diseases from spreading to the U.S. by helping foreign countries contain them now faces steep cuts -- Read more on ScientificAmerican.com
9h

Science-Based Medicine

Five steps to add ten years to your life expectancyA new study identifies five lifestyle decisions that can add over a decade to your life expectancy.
9h

Dagens Medicin

Ny lov skal styrke it-sikkerheden i sundhedsvæsenetFolketinget har vedtaget en ny lov, der skal styrke sundhedsvæsenets it-sikkerhed og sikre det mod hacker-angreb.
9h

Dagens Medicin

Praksislægen og kommunaldirektøren går samarbejdet efter i sømmeneAlle snakker om de besværlige sektorovergange. Men hvor slemt er det egentlig? Og hvad kan gøres bedre? Vi har sat praksislægen over for kommunaldirektøren – og det går ikke stille for sig. Der står gnister mellem Roar Maagaard og Hosea Dutschke. Heldigvis er der et stort glimt i øjet på dem begge.
9h

Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

'Game changing' space-mission power system passes tests with flying colorsA new nuclear power system that could enable long-duration crewed missions to the Moon, Mars and destinations beyond recently passed an extensive operating test in the Nevada desert, performing well under a variety of challenging conditions.
9h

Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Weeds take over kelp in high CO2 oceansWeedy plants will thrive and displace long-lived, ecologically valuable kelp forests under forecast ocean acidification, new research from the University of Adelaide shows.
10h

Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Global warming of 1.5C or 2C: The lower limit would reduce flood hazardsWhat difference does it make to the Earth's water resources if humans limit global warming to 1.5°C instead of 2°C? A research group led by Goethe University Frankfurt has simulated these scenarios with global hydrological models. An important result: High flows and thus flood hazards will increase significantly over an average of 21 percent of the global land area if the temperature rises by 2°C.
10h

Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Stellar family portrait in X-raysIn some ways, star clusters are like giant families with thousands of stellar siblings. These stars come from the same origins—a common cloud of gas and dust—and are bound to one another by gravity. Astronomers think that our Sun was born in a star cluster about 4.6 billion years ago that quickly dispersed.
10h

Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Research track multiplies proportion of researchersMost medical students choose to practice medicine after graduation. Few choose a career exclusively as researchers. The trend in the proportion of doctors who want to do research has been declining for several decades and has resulted in a recruitment problem. But a medical student research programme (MSRP) option built into Norwegian medical curricula shows a different picture. "The research prog
10h

Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Three distinct variants of magnetic domain walls discovered in helimagnet iron germanium (FeGe)Researchers have discovered three distinct variants of magnetic domain walls in the helimagnet iron germanium (FeGe). Their results have been published in Nature Physics. Researcher Dennis Meier, an associate professor at the Norwegian University of Science and Technology (NTNU), says understanding the creation of magnetic fields is key to understanding the significance of the discovery.
10h

New on MIT Technology Review

This article was written by a human (the next one may not be)Job of the future: blending human journalists and robo-reporters.
10h

Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Why plants are so sensitive to gravity: The lowdownPlants can detect the slightest angle of inclination. Yet the mechanism by which they sense gravity relies on microscopic grains. In theory, such a system should hardly allow for precise detection of inclination. Researchers from the CNRS, the French National Institute of Agronomic Research (INRA), and Université Clermont Auvergne have now explained this curious paradox: The grains are constantly
10h

Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Pre-war Japanese music reflects the developments and conflicts of Japanese societyJapanese-style composition before World War II was more diverse and complex than has been thought thus far. Modern European compositional techniques were used as Japanese expression, even though it has often been claimed that such expression didn't begin until after the war.
10h

Scientific American Content: Global

Life Expectancy Is Rising Disproportionately across the U.S.U.S. life span is rising disproportionately -- Read more on ScientificAmerican.com
10h

Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Recent work challenges view of early Mars, picturing a warm desert with occasional rainThe climate of early Mars is a subject of debate. While it has been thought that Mars had a warm and wet climate like Earth, other researchers have suggested early Mars might have been largely glaciated. A recent study by Ramses Ramirez from the Earth-Life Science Institute (Tokyo Institute of Technology, Japan) and Robert Craddock from the National Air and Space Museum's Center for Earth and Plan
10h

Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

New species in the North SeaExperts from the Alfred Wegener Institute and the Universities of Oldenburg and Potsdam, Germany, have confirmed the existence of a new cryptic amphipod species in the North Sea. For the first time for the description of a new species, they used a level of mitogenomic information, which was normally applied in other areas of genetics. The discovery of Epimeria frankei has been reported in the jour
10h

Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Lining MOF pockets to detect noxious gasesA porous material with tailor-made pockets stitched into its structure is a promising material for sensing noxious gases. A thin film of the material, coated onto an electrode, formed an electronic sensor that could detect traces of sulfur dioxide gas. The sensor is a significant step toward real-world devices that can sniff out dangerous gases in real air.
10h

EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Scientists develop a new test to safely and accurately diagnose peanut allergiesScientists have developed a new laboratory test to diagnose peanut allergy. The test has 98 percent specificity and, unlike current options, it doesn't run the risk of false-positives or causing allergic reactions such as anaphylactic shock.
10h

EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Sex after 65: Poll finds links to health, gender differences, lack of communicationA new poll busts stereotypes about the sex lives of older Americans -- and reveals gender and health-related divides on key aspects of sexual health, while highlighting the need for more people to talk with their health providers about sexual issues.
10h

Science | The Guardian

Sex a key part of life for people over 65, study saysUS survey finds two-fifths of people between 65 and 80 report being sexually active, but topic is rarely discussed Sex is not only a pursuit of the young and carefree but also a key part of life for adults in their later years, a new poll has revealed – putting paid to the trope that action stops as pensions loom. A US survey has found that 40% of those aged between 65 and 80 report being sexuall
10h

Live Science

Jeff Bezos Wildly Overestimates the Power of the Human BrainHmmm…no.
10h

New Scientist - News

First US death due to romaine lettuce as E. coli outbreak widensThe contaminated romaine lettuce that has spread illness across 25 states is now responsible for one death, and the source of the E. coli outbreak is still unknown
10h

The Atlantic

The Rain Is a Taut Dystopian ThrillerIt’s best not to think too hard about the premise for The Rain , which is that a sudden storm appears one day in Denmark and wipes out most of the country’s population. In short: the rain contains a bioengineered virus, and whoever comes in contact with it starts instantly vomiting and choking to death, and all water is therefore contaminated and totally deadly, except people are mostly fine goin
10h

Latest Headlines | Science News

NASA gets ready to launch the first lander to investigate Mars’ insidesThe InSight lander is launching to Mars on May 5 and is expected to be in position to sense seismic activity by early 2019.
10h

Feed: All Latest

Airbus Aerial Provides a Whole New View of the World'Airbus Aerial' is using a variety of vehicles to provide vital data to climate modelers, farmers, city planners, infrastructure engineers, and first responders.
10h

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Biology Will Be the Next Great Computing PlatformNew companies are popping up to become the Amazons, Apples, and Intels of genome engineering.
10h

Viden

Mus mæsker sig i junkfood, men tager ikke påGenmanipulerede mus mangler evnen til at tage på på trods af kost med 60% fedt.
10h

Scientific American Content: Global

How Chasing Bigfoot Can Lead to Actual ScienceDNA studies haven’t led to the discovery of any mythical creatures, but they’ve helped us understand the evolution of real ones -- Read more on ScientificAmerican.com
10h

Dagens Medicin

Nordsjællands Hospital ansætter ny ledende overlæge på Kirurgisk AfdelingKirurgisk afdeling får ny ledende overlæge 1. juni, hvor overlæge Jakob Westergren Hendel tiltræder stillingen.
10h

Scientific American Content: Global

Powerful Investors Push Big Companies to Plan for Climate ChangeThis spring, Wall Street seems more accepting of climate science as shareholders demand plans to reduce risks -- Read more on ScientificAmerican.com
10h

Ingeniøren

Cambridge Analytica lukker nedBagmænd har dog allerede stiftet ny datavirksomhed kaldet Emerdata Limited med hovedkvarter i moderselskabets kontorer, skriver britisk medie.
11h

Ingeniøren

Ingeniører skilte en Model 3 ad: Mekanikken er noget af det dårligste, vi har setTeslas Model 3 imponerer uafhængige bil-ingeniører, der sammenligner den med et F-35-fly. Mekanikken er imidlertid en anden snak.
11h

Live Science

How 2 Massive Carvings Found Near Egypt Pyramid Were Rescued from LootersThe archaeologists essentially risked their lives to carry the carvings out of the desert, an act that required both physical grit and ingenuity.
11h

Science : NPR

Australian Politician Warns Tourists: Don't Feed The KangaroosA member of the New South Wales Parliament is calling for warning signs at a hospital that has become a hot spot for tourists wanting kangaroo selfies after several attacks there. (Image credit: Paul Kane/Getty Images)
11h

Live Science

Hidden Text Found on 'Blank' Dead Sea ScrollsPreviously hidden text on fragments of the Dead Sea Scrolls is now readable, revealing a possible undiscovered scroll and solving a debate about the sacred Temple Scroll. The discoveries came from a new infrared analysis of the artifacts.
11h

The Atlantic

The Scandal Tearing Apart America's Largest Protestant DenominationOver the past 20 years, the Southern Baptist Convention has weathered an onslaught of controversies, from renaming the denomination to repudiating the Confederate flag. But in the end, all it took to potentially rend the organization in two was a single quote about domestic violence from a solitary leader that most Americans have never even heard of. Paige Patterson is the 75-year-old president o
11h

The Atlantic

American Higher Education Hits a Dangerous MilestoneDrawing almost no attention, the nation crossed an ominous milestone last year that threatens more economic polarization and social division: For the first time, public colleges and universities in most states received most of their revenue from tuition rather than government appropriations. This historic shift away from tax dollars funding the bulk of public higher education comes precisely as t
11h

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New Rowhammer Attack Hijacks Android Smartphones RemotelyDutch researchers have pushed the mind-bending Rowhammer hacking technique one more step towards a practical attack.
11h

Ingeniøren

Forskere måler strålingsdosis i kæbeknogle fra Hiroshima-offerBrasilianske forskere anvender elektronspinresonansspektroskopi til at fastslå mængden af radioaktiv stråling fra a-bomben.
12h

EurekAlert! - Breaking News

What gorilla poop tells us about evolution and human healthA study of the microbiomes of wild gorillas and chimpanzees offers insights into the evolution of the human microbiome and might even have implications for human health. The research project was led by scientists at the Center for Infection and Immunity (CII) at Columbia University's Mailman School of Public Health. Findings appear in the journal Nature Communications.
12h

EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Custom silicon microparticles dynamically reconfigure on demandResearchers at Duke University and North Carolina State University have demonstrated the first custom semiconductor microparticles to exhibit dynamically selectable behaviors while suspended in water. The study presents the first steps toward realizing advanced applications such as artificial muscles and reconfigurable computer systems.
12h

EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Chemists develop MRI-like technique to detect what ails batteriesA team of chemists has developed an MRI-based technique that can quickly diagnose what ails certain types of batteries -- from determining how much charge remains to detecting internal defects -- without opening them up.
12h

New Scientist - News

Are we deluding ourselves when we shop for eco-friendly stuff?A highly critical new report questions the worth of the sustainability logos that appear on many products. Are they still a force for good, wonders Fred Pearce
12h

Ingeniøren

Keynote på Infosecurity: GDPR kan få ledelsens øjne op for it-sikkerhedTopledelsen vil ofte hellere sætte nye projekter i søen, end at polstre sikkerheden i den eksisterende forretning. GDPR kan få ledelsen til at sætte fokus på it-sikkerhed, mener jurist.
12h

Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Chemists develop MRI-like technique to detect what ails batteriesA team of chemists has developed an MRI-based technique that can quickly diagnose what ails certain types of batteries—from determining how much charge remains to detecting internal defects—without opening them up.
12h

Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Custom silicon microparticles dynamically reconfigure on demandResearchers at Duke University and North Carolina State University have demonstrated the first custom semiconductor microparticles that can be steered into various configurations repeatedly while suspended in water.
12h

Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

What gorilla poop tells us about evolution and human healthA study of the microbiomes of wild gorillas and chimpanzees offers insights into the evolution of the human microbiome and might even have implications for human health. The research project was led by scientists at the Center for Infection and Immunity (CII) at Columbia University's Mailman School of Public Health. Findings appear in the journal Nature Communications.
12h

Ingeniøren

TDC tester 5G på de rigtige frekvenserTDC tester nu høje hastigheder på den endelige 5G-standard og på den fremtidige frekvens.
13h

Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

News Corp leads charge against tech giants in Australia probeRupert Murdoch's News Corporation accused Facebook and Google of "anti-competitive practices" in one of dozens of submissions to a probe of the tech giants released Thursday by Australia's competition watchdog.
13h

Ingeniøren

Ingeniør i første job: Stå ved din uvidenhedSom nyuddannet ingeniør er du yngre og mere uerfaren end dine nye kolleger i det første job. Vær ikke bleg for at spørge om hjælp, og vis til gengæld, at du kan tage initiativ, siger den 25-årige bygningsingeniør Frederik Sørensen.
13h

Science | The Guardian

'Breathtakingly beautiful': Kew's Temperate House reopens after revampFive-year project involved moving 10,000 plants and replacing 15,000 panes of glass After five years, 10,000 plants uprooted and replanted, 15,000 panes of glass replaced, 69,000 sections of metal, stone and timber repaired or replaced, enough scaffolding to stretch the length of the M25, and £41m spent, the largest Victorian glasshouse in the world is ready to open its doors again. The Temperate
13h

Science | The Guardian

The true secret of happiness? Accepting that there isn’t oneSo many claim to know the secret of happiness. But what if there’s no such thing? Hello. Are you happy? Continue reading...
14h

Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

No sperm or egg required: mouse proto-embryo made in the labScientists have for the first time created embryo-like structures in the lab from stem cells, without recourse to eggs or sperm, they reported Wednesday.
15h

Science | The Guardian

Coalition to spend $50m on first Australian space agency, insiders sayMoney will be given to agency as ‘seed funding’ with most long-term funding expected to come from private sector The government will set aside $50m to fund Australia’s first dedicated space agency, according to senior insiders. The ABC on Thursday reported that funding for the space agency was guaranteed in the budget on Tuesday. It is understood $50m will be given to the fledgling agency as “see
15h

Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Use of genealogy site to arrest Golden State Killer raises concernsThe arrest of a notorious rapist and serial killer in California using DNA and a public genealogy website has been hailed as a triumph of ingenuity by law enforcement.
15h

Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Africa struggles for weapons against armyworm curseOn farms across Africa, a seemingly innocuous brown and beige caterpillar is waging a silent war, devastating rural incomes and posing a major threat to the continent's food supply.
15h

Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Currency headwinds sap Bayer in Q1German chemicals firm Bayer said Thursday exchange rate headwinds had undermined revenues and profits in the first quarter, but kept its eyes on a planned takeover of US seeds and pesticides maker Monsanto.
15h

Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

China's Xiaomi submits HK filing, with big IPO expectedXiaomi Hong Kong ChineseChinese smartphone maker Xiaomi has kicked off what is expected to be the world's biggest initial public offering (IPO) of shares in years after it filed documents with Hong Kong's stock exchange.
15h

Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Hawaii poised to ban sale of some sunscreens that harm coralMany sunscreen makers could soon be forced to change their formulas or be banned from selling the lotions in Hawaii.
15h

Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Australia's biggest bank loses 20 million customer recordsAustralia's troubled Commonwealth Bank admitted Thursday it had lost financial records for almost 20 million customers in a major security blunder—but insisted there was no need to worry.
15h

Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Vanuatu plans to permanently evacuate entire volcanic islandThe Pacific nation of Vanuatu is preparing to permanently evacuate the entire population of one of its islands as thick ash spewing from a volcano kills crops, dirties water supplies and fouls the air.
15h

Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Afraid of heights in space: NASA astronaut details flightWhen NASA astronaut Joseph Acaba was out doing a spacewalk during a recent trip to the International Space Station, he held on tight. That's because Acaba is afraid of heights.
15h

Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Chip Wars: Tech rivalry underlies US-China trade conflictChinese and American officials will be trying to defuse tensions pushing the world's two largest economies toward trade war in meetings beginning Thursday where analysts say chances for a breakthrough seem slim given the two sides' desperate rivalry in strategic technologies.
15h

Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Solar powered sea slugs shed light on search for perpetual green energyIn an amazing achievement akin to adding solar panels to your body, a Northeast sea slug sucks raw materials from algae to provide its lifetime supply of solar-powered energy, according to a study by Rutgers University-New Brunswick and other scientists.
15h

Ingeniøren

F-Secure-chef: Valgkampagner på sociale medier bør forbydesIndividuelle politiske budskaber på sociale medier er farlige og bør forbydes ved lov, mener Mikko Hyppönen fra F-Secure.
15h

Ingeniøren

Version2-undersøgelse: Hver femte har GDPR-udgifter på mere end 1 millionDet er en stor opgave at blive GDPR-klar – og ingen kan gøre det gratis.
15h

Ingeniøren

Kamstrups el-målere har 20 nøgler til både kryptering og rollebaseret adgangsstyringHos målerproducenten Kamstrup bliver krypteringsnøgler også brugt til rollebaseret adgangsstyring.
15h

Science | The Guardian

Pre-eclampsia blood test: Melbourne hospital helps develop world-firstTest predicts likelihood of pregnant women developing the condition, which can be fatal A world-first blood test that can help predict the potentially deadly pregnancy condition pre-eclampsia is being introduced at Melbourne’s Royal Women’s hospital. The hospital helped develop the blood test, which predicts the likelihood of pregnant women developing the condition. Continue reading...
16h

EurekAlert! - Breaking News

SWAT team of immune cells found in mother's milkImmune cells that are ready to take action against invaders like bacteria have been found in women's breast milk, researchers say.
17h

EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Solar powered sea slugs shed light on search for perpetual green energyIn an amazing achievement akin to adding solar panels to your body, a Northeast sea slug sucks raw materials from algae to provide its lifetime supply of solar-powered energy, according to a study by Rutgers University-New Brunswick and other scientists.
17h

EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Topological domain walls in helimagnetsSpecial domain walls with magnetic vortex structures have been discovered in helimagnets. Domain walls can have exotic magnetic properties that the regions which they separate don't reveal. For example, it's possible that the walls may interact more strongly with an electric current and could be used for data transfer and storage in the future.
17h

EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Earthquake aftermath: Life-threatening blood clots in legs and lungs from sitting in cars for extended periodsJapanese physicians highlight the risks and clinical significance for individuals who remain seated and immobile in vehicles for prolonged periods. They call for preventive awareness activities and education about the risk of venous thromboembolisms (VTE) in a Letter to the Editor in the Canadian Journal of Cardiology.
17h

Science | The Guardian

The toxic legacy of Canada's CIA brainwashing experiments: 'They strip you of your soul'In the 1950s and 60s, a Montreal hospital subjected psychiatric patients to electroshocks, drug-induced sleep and huge doses of LSD. Families are still grappling with the effects Sarah Anne Johnson had always known the broad strokes of her maternal grandmother’s story. In 1956, Velma Orlikow checked herself into a renowned Canadian psychiatric hospital, the Allan Memorial Institute in Montreal, h
17h

Ingeniøren

Speed pedelec-forsøgsordning udskudt: »Det var jo noget bras«En forsøgsordning for speed pedelecs, der er elcyklens hurtigere storebror, er udskudt efter en hård modtagelse. »Uanset om de er på vejene eller på cykelstierne, så går det jo helt galt,« advarer trafikforsker.
17h

Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

French bulldogs at risk of various health problemsFrench bulldogs, predicted soon to become the most popular dog breed in the UK, are vulnerable to a number of health conditions, according to a new study.
18h

EurekAlert! - Breaking News

AI better than most human experts at detecting cause of preemie blindnessAn algorithm that uses artificial intelligence can automatically and more accurately diagnose a potentially devastating cause of childhood blindness than most expert physicians, a paper in JAMA Ophthalmology suggests.
19h

EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Can an algorithm detect signs of a serious eye disease in premature infants like human experts?An algorithm could detect signs of a serious eye disease in images from premature infants with accuracy comparable to or better than human experts.
19h

Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

The DES saga: Death risk high for young women exposed in uteroA new reports on the risks of exposure during pregnancy to a supplement, diethylstilbestrol (DES), that is linked to a rare cancer. The study found that DES-exposed patients with clear-cell adenocarcinoma had 'increased mortality across their life span.' For women aged 10 to 34 with DES-related clear-cell adenocarcinoma, the risk of death was 27 times higher than for other US women in that age gro
19h

Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

An ironic health care twist for undocumented immigrantsA new analysis highlights an ironic development in the intertwined issues of immigration and health care - two areas where current and previous administrations differ greatly. Undocumented people in certain states may get more medical help while they are here, it finds, thanks to the current administration's effort to give states more flexibility with their health care spending. And in a reversal
19h

Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

Whooping cough more widespread than previously knownNew research suggests that whooping cough cases in Ontario are nearly eight times the number actually reported, reinforcing the importance of up-to-date vaccinations to protect against illness and the spread of disease.
19h

Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

'Hairdryer wind' melts snow in Antarctica in winter as wellEven though the sun does not shine in Antarctica in winter, in some places snow on the glaciers can melt. The cause: warm wind. Utrecht glacier researchers discovered that fact by combining the results of weather stations and satellite images.
19h

BBC News - Science & Environment

Kew Gardens: World's largest glasshouse reopensKew Gardens' largest glasshouse - the Temperate House - reopens after an ambitious five-year restoration.
19h

Live Science

The Louvre Museum: Facts, Paintings & TicketsThe Louvre is the world’s largest museum and houses one of the most impressive art collections in history.
20h

EurekAlert! - Breaking News

French bulldogs at risk of various health problemsFrench bulldogs, predicted soon to become the most popular dog breed in the UK, are vulnerable to a number of health conditions, according to a new study published in the open-access journal Canine Genetics and Epidemiology.
21h

New Scientist - News

Cambridge Analytica has shut down amid ongoing data scandalCambridge AnalyticaCambridge Analytica, the firm that harvested data from up to 87 million Facebook users without their knowledge, is declaring bankruptcy and closing up shop
21h

Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

French bulldogs at risk of various health problemsFrench Bulldogs, predicted soon to become the most popular dog breed in the UK, are vulnerable to a number of health conditions, according to a new study published in the open access journal Canine Genetics and Epidemiology.
21h

Futurity.org

‘CaRROT’ system uses light to turn genes on or offResearchers have created tools that would enable real-time activation of target genes in specific locations in the genome. This technology may help scientists to illuminate the gene function during different biological processes and find use in regenerative medicine. Although genes stay the same throughout the lifespan, genetic code isn’t necessarily a person’s destiny. In fact, genes can switch
21h

Futurity.org

Method may delay onset of inherited blindnessScientists have shown that boosting cells’ ability to process misfolded proteins could keep them from aggregating inside the cell, significantly delaying the onset of blindness in mice. More than two million people worldwide live with inherited and untreatable retinal conditions, including retinitis pigmentosa, which slowly erodes vision. “You can offer almost nothing in terms of treatment to a p
21h

Futurity.org

Nurse care for new moms shows in baby DNA decades afterScientists have been able to demonstrate subtle but long-lasting effects, at a genetic level, on the babies of young mothers who took part in a nurse visitation program for vulnerable first-time moms. Researchers have known for a couple of decades that early life adversity can affect the way that particular genes function through a process called epigenetics—a bit like a dimmer switch on a light,
21h

Scientific American Content: Global

Africa: Future Worldwide Science HubThierry Zomahoun, President of the African Institute for Mathematical Sciences, talks about the potential and needs of science in the continent. -- Read more on ScientificAmerican.com
21h

Futurity.org

‘Time crystal’ presents mystery for physicistsPhysicists have uncovered hints of a time crystal—a form of matter that “ticks” when exposed to an electromagnetic pulse—in the last place they expected: a crystal you might find in a child’s toy. The discovery means there are now new puzzles to solve, in terms of how time crystals form in the first place. Ordinary crystals such as salt or quartz are examples of three-dimensional, ordered spatial
22h

Futurity.org

Treating water for one toxic thing can create anotherA water treatment method may cause a new potential contaminant while taking care of an old one, researchers say. The scientists examined what can result when treatment plants use peroxide radicals to remove phenols from water. “We’re very good at developing methods to remove chemicals,” says lead author Carsten Prasse of Johns Hopkins University. “Once the chemical is gone, the job–it would seem–
22h

Futurity.org

Are high school pitchers throwing too many baseballs?Nearly half the number of pitches—ones thrown during warm-ups and in the bullpen—typically go uncounted, adding significantly to a pitcher’s risk of injury, a new study shows. Excessive pitching is one of the main risk factors for elbow and shoulder injuries among high school baseball players. The Florida High School Athletic Association limits 17- and 18-year-old players to 105 pitches a day. Bu
22h

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Facebook Hid Unreleased Features in Its AR Scavenger Hunt at F8Like Pokemon Go, but for Amazon gift cards. Or backpacks. Or maybe a Thermos.
22h

BBC News - Science & Environment

Kew Gardens will reopen the world's largest Victorian glasshouseThe Temperate House at Kew Gardens, which was built in 1863, is home to some of the world's rarest plants.
22h

Science | The Guardian

Identifying peanut allergies cheaper and easier with new testScientists says blood test could avoid costly, stressful, food tests for confirming allergy A new blood test could make it much easier and cheaper to identify children with peanut allergies, say scientists. The test, which looks for biomarkers released by mast cells, or white blood cells forming part of the immune system, made a correct diagnosis 98% of the time in a study involving 174 children.
22h

EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Harsher drug laws won't stop violence, argues former police chiefHarsher drug prohibition won't stop violence, argue Paul Whitehouse, former Chief Constable of Sussex Police, and Jason Reed at Law Enforcement Action Partnership (LEAP UK) which supports drug policy reform, in The BMJ today.
22h

EurekAlert! - Breaking News

No evidence of 'gaming' after death rates for bowel surgeons publishedThere is no evidence that publishing patient death rates for individual bowel surgeons in England has led to risk averse behavior or 'gaming' of data, finds a study published by The BMJ.
22h

EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Trial finds no benefit of bath emollients beyond standard eczema care for childrenEmollient bath additives provide no meaningful benefit when used in addition to standard eczema care in children, finds a trial published by The BMJ today.
22h

EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Discovery could lead to personalized medical therapies for emerging food allergy disorderScientists at Cincinnati Children's Hospital Medical Center have uncovered three distinct subtypes of eosinophilic esophagitis (EoE), an emerging food allergic disease. The discovery provides a framework for developing precision medicines to treat this often-debilitating disorder.
22h

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Tesla Ramps Up Model 3 Production and Predicts ProfitabilityElon Musk Tesla Model YElon Musk's automaker is now building more than 2,000 Model 3 sedans a week, thanks in part to the demise of Flufferbot.
23h

The Atlantic

The Atlantic Daily: The Ensuing ChaosWhat We’re Following Legal Developments: Ty Cobb, the head of the legal team representing the White House in Special Counsel Robert Mueller’s Russia investigation, is retiring. He’ll be replaced by the lawyer Emmet Flood, whose résumé includes significant work on disputes related to executive power in the George W. Bush administration. That—along with President Trump’s mounting threats to interve
23h

Big Think

Predictive policing: Data can be used to prevent crime, but is that data racially tinged?Predictive policing introduces a scientific element to law enforcement decisions, such as whether to investigate or detain, how long to sentence, and whether to parole. Read More
23h

Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

Newly improved glass slide turns microscopes into thermometersA new study describes how an updated version of the microscope slide can enable scientists to see tiny objects while also measuring their temperature. The advancement, made possible by a new transparent, has the potential to streamline and enhance scientific research worldwide, from clandestine government biology labs to high school chemistry classes. It may also have implications in computers, el
23h

Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

Understanding fear of guilt key in better treating OCDAdvances in our understanding of the development and persistence of Obsessive-Compulsive Disorder (OCD) have the potential to improve treatment according to a new study.
23h

Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

Gap in financial literacy widens for couples the longer the relationship lasts, study suggestsAs couples mature together, they often grow apart in their level of interest and skill in handling their finances. A disparity in financial literacy that may be small or even nonexistent at first can increase over time depending on how much responsibility one partner undertakes.
23h

Popular Science

The universe may be a giant video game, but it certainly isn't Pac-ManSpace How to interpret one popular Flat Earth theory. Silicon Valley kooks may hold the belief that we live in a simulation, but one conspiracy theorist at the Flat Earth Convention in England last weekend articulated an…
23h

Latest Headlines | Science News

The first smallpox treatment is one step closer to FDA approvalThe first treatment for smallpox has received a key recommendation on its path toward FDA approval.
23h

Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

Engraved Crimean stone artifact may demonstrate Neanderthal symbolismA flint flake from the Middle Paleolithic of Crimea was likely engraved symbolically by a skilled Neanderthal hand, according to a new study.
23h

Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

River dolphins are declining steeply in the Amazon basinPopulations of freshwater dolphins in the Amazon basin are in steep decline, dropping by half about every decade at current rates, according to a new study.
23h

Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

Research finds 'Achilles heel' for aggressive prostate cancerResearchers have discovered a promising new line of attack against lethal, treatment-resistant prostate cancer. Analysis of hundreds of human prostate tumors revealed that the most aggressive cancers depend on a built-in cellular stress response to put a brake on their own hot-wired physiology. Experiments in mice and with human cells showed that blocking this stress response with an experimental
23h

Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

How small molecule halts spread of toxic protein associated with Alzheimer's progressionResearchers have reported a promising drug strategy that blocks tau transmission.
23h

Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

Protecting campus free speech, even when it challenges beliefsResearchers say psychological science's extensive study of bias offers an important lens to view conflicts between free speech and hate speech.
23h

Science : NPR

Hawaii Approves Bill Banning Sunscreen Believed To Kill Coral ReefsIf Gov. David Ige signs the bill, popular sunscreen brands including Coppertone, Banana Boat and Hawaiian Tropic will be illegal. Lawmakers say they contain chemicals harmful to delicate marine life. (Image credit: Caleb Jones/AP)
23h

The Atlantic

The Atlantic Politics & Policy Daily: Après Cobb, Le Déluge-Written by Elaine Godfrey ( @elainejgodfrey ) Today in 5 Lines Ty Cobb, the White House lawyer in charge of dealing with the Russia investigation, will retire at the end of the month and be replaced by Emmet Flood. Bloomberg reports that President Trump’s current team of lawyers lacks the security clearances necessary to view sensitive materials related to the investigation. A group of 18 House
23h

New Scientist - News

The real palm oil problem: it’s not just in your foodSoaring demand for palm oil is being driven by its use as biofuel, which is increasing carbon emissions as well as destroying forests and biodiversity
23h

New Scientist - News

Colossal exoplanet has an enormous comet-like tail of heliumA huge planet is losing its atmosphere in a stream trailing off its night side, and we’ve seen the first signs of helium on an exoplanet in its comet-like tail
23h

New Scientist - News

Ancient humans in Philippines may have given rise to ‘hobbits’A butchered rhino found on the island of Luzon shows early humans were living in the Philippines 709,000 years ago, which may explain the origins of the diminutive Homo floresiensis
23h

New Scientist - News

Quantum internet is one step closer thanks to new theoryEncrypted quantum messages are limited by how far photons can stably pass through optical fibres, but they can now travel the distance between London and Paris
23h

New on MIT Technology Review

Your #sunset photos might have helped improve Facebook’s AI
23h

The Atlantic

The 'H' In IMHO Does Not Mean Humble or HonestIt’s impossible not to like imho . If you’ve spent any time online, you’ve seen the word at least a dozen times. It usually sets off an opinion from the text around it: Those jeans don’t look very good, imho. But it’s a pliable little devil. Depending on its context, imho can function as a gentle nudge or a punch in the gut. It can ease you into the persuasive mode: This is all smart but imho you
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News

The DES saga: Death risk high for young women exposed in uteroA letter in the May 3, 2018, NEJM updates reports on the risks of exposure during pregnancy to a supplement, diethylstilbestrol (DES), that is linked to a rare cancer. The study found that DES-exposed patients with clear-cell adenocarcinoma had 'increased mortality across their life span.' For women aged 10 to 34 with DES-related clear-cell adenocarcinoma, the risk of death was 27 times higher tha
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News

An ironic health care twist for undocumented immigrantsA new analysis highlights an ironic development in the intertwined issues of immigration and health care - two areas where current and previous administrations differ greatly. Undocumented people in certain states may get more medical help while they are here, it finds, thanks to the current administration's effort to give states more flexibility with their health care spending. And in a reversal
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Science : NPR

In Oklahoma, Critics Say Pruitt Stalled Pollution Case After Taking Industry FundsWhen Scott Pruitt served as Oklahoma's attorney general, he took over a major pollution lawsuit brought by his predecessor. Critics accuse Pruitt of inaction on the case, which remains unresolved. (Image credit: Sue Ogrocki/AP)
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Live Science

1st Death Tied to Outbreak of E. Coli in Romaine Lettuce — How It KillsHow exactly does E. coli kill?
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Live Science

How Far Could You Sail in a Straight Line Without Hitting Land?If you sailed the oceans in a straight line, how far would you get?
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The Atlantic

Hiring Emmet Flood Signals a Big Shift for Trump's DefenseOn Wednesday, the White House announced that Ty Cobb, the lead White House lawyer in Special Counsel Robert Mueller’s probe, is retiring. He will be replaced by Emmet Flood, a veteran Washington lawyer. Headlines highlighted the fact that Flood, who currently works at Williams & Connolly LLP, represented President Bill Clinton during his impeachment trial. But one of Flood’s other experiences may
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Researchers seek existence of exotic quantum spin iceResearchers from the Paul Scherrer Institute (PSI) in Switzerland, Romain Sibille and Nicolas Gauthier, are studying a fascinating sample using neutrons at the Department of Energy's (DOE's) Spallation Neutron Source (SNS) at Oak Ridge National Laboratory.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Missing sharks found through DNA in water samplesAs sharks disappear from key locations, scientists are using environmental DNA to find a small number that may actually be hanging on.
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Science : NPR

A Temperature Roller Coaster Could Be ComingGlobal warming has so far seen a gradual rise in average temperatures. But that may change, with extreme variations. And poor countries could bear the brunt of it. (Image credit: Taylor Weidman/Bloomberg via Getty Images)
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Amazon halts Seattle construction project ahead of tax voteAmazon Seattle Jeff BezosAmazon says it has halted construction planning on a high-rise building in Seattle while it awaits the outcome of a city proposal to tax worker hours.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Spotify narrows losses as subscribers growTop music streaming platform Spotify said Wednesday that it narrowed its losses in the first quarter as it kept a steady growth of subscribers.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Data firm at center of Facebook privacy scandal will closeCambridge AnalyticaCambridge Analytica, the Trump-affiliated data firm at the center of Facebook's worst privacy scandal in history, is declaring bankruptcy and shutting down.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Dozens of quakes rattle Hawaii volcano, eruption possibleDozens of earthquakes were rattling Hawaii's Kilauea Volcano on Wednesday as underground magma moved into a new area east of the Puu Oo (POO'-oo OH'-oh) vent.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Ancient artifacts seized from Hobby Lobby returned to IraqThousands of ancient clay tablets, seals and other Iraqi archaeological objects that were smuggled into the U.S. and shipped to the head of arts and crafts chain Hobby Lobby were returned to the Iraqi government on Wednesday.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Tesla cash burn accelerates, CEO predicts profit ahead (Update)Tesla's record net loss in the first quarter and fast-burn through millions of dollars is raising questions about the company's ability to pay all its bills.
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Findings of game-changing EMS airway study to be presented at SAEM18Endotracheal intubation (ETI) is the most common advanced airway technique used in the resuscitation of out-of-hospital cardiac arrest (OHCA), but Supraglottic airway devices such as the King Laryngeal Tube (LT) offer simpler airway management alternatives. A Plenary Session to be held May 16, on opening day of SAEM18 in Indianapolis, will present the findings of a multicenter, pragmatic clinical
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The Atlantic

'Take Me From Here. I Will Die Here.'In 2013, Laura Wadha, who is half-Syrian and half-Scottish, enrolled in film school in the UK. Her grandfather offered some resonant parting words: use filmmaking to help people. “I immediately thought of my family in Syria,” Wadha told The Atlantic . Thus began the four-year process of making Flight , a heartrending short film that follows Wadha’s aunt, Eman, and two young cousins, Mera and Mari
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The Atlantic

Cosby’s Honorary Degree Is the First Yale Has Rescinded in 300-Plus YearsYale has doled out more than 2,500 honorary degrees since it was founded in 1701. On Tuesday, Bill Cosby, who had an honorary doctorate of humane letters from the university—the kind awarded to people who have made “contributions to society”—conferred upon him in 2003, became the first person in the institution’s history to have his rescinded. The decision was “based on a court record providing c
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The Atlantic

100 Years Ago: France in the Final Year of World War IThe American photographer Lewis Hine is perhaps most famous for his compelling images of child labor across the United States in the early 20th century. In 1918, Hine was hired by the American Red Cross to document their work in Europe, as they provided aid to wounded soldiers and refugees affected by World War I. The photographs were also intended to drum up support for the Red Cross, and appeal
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

NASA's GPM examines developing US severe weatherThe Global Precipitation Measurement mission or GPM core satellite has been busy analyzing severe weather in the U.S.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

The case for hope: Educating as if survival mattersThe world is facing ever-more-dire warnings from scientists about the faltering health of the environment and the negative consequences for humans, habitats, and the creatures with whom we share the Earth. Still, a new article in the journal BioScience suggests there's reason for hope. It boils down to what we teach today's young people.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Survival and restoration of China's native forests imperiled by proliferating tree plantationsChina has implemented some of the world's most ambitious policies to protect and restore forests, yet these programs still miss the mark, according to a team of researchers led by Princeton University.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Newly improved glass slide turns microscopes into thermometersThe humble glass microscope slide may be primed for a makeover.
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Understanding fear of guilt key in better treating OCDAdvances in our understanding of the development and persistence of Obsessive-Compulsive Disorder (OCD) have the potential to improve treatment according to a new study by the University of Waterloo.
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News

NASA's GPM examines developing US severe weatherThe Global Precipitation Measurement mission or GPM core satellite has been busy analyzing severe weather in the US.
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Mixed progress on drug resistance in A. baumannii infections in childrenResearchers examined antibiotic resistance trends in clinical specimens from children with Acinetobacter baumannii infections, over 13 years. An overall increase was observed between 1999 and 2012 in the proportion of isolates that were resistant to cephalosporin and carbapenem; a slight decline was detected after a peak in 2008. 'It is encouraging to see a downtrend after 2008, but we need to con
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Popular Science

China's opening a factory to build engines for hypersonic missiles and spaceplanesEastern Arsenal Reconnaissance and strike capabilities of aircrafts with these engines could upend air combat and strategies around the world. The Institute of Mechanics at the Chinese Academy of Sciences has agreed to build a factory in Hefei, Anhui Province, for the commercial production of hypersonic…
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New on MIT Technology Review

Cambridge Analytica is closing its doorsCambridge Analytica
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

Omega-3s made by many marine animals, including corals, worms and molluscsA major discovery that could 'revolutionize' the understanding of omega-3 production in the ocean has been made by an international team of scientists.
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Tip sheet for the Frontiers in Ecology and the Environment May 2018 IssueHighlights from the May issue of Frontiers in Ecology and the Environment, including:The Earth's environment across generations: we forget the past, pardon the present...and condemn the future? Reef restorers who plant new coral need to plan for predators and find that sweet spot.Murky lakes and turbid streams are full of talkative fish and bugs.How to store carbon in forests that might burn.Fragm
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Society for Academic Emergency Medicine announces Annual Meeting plenary speakersEmergency medicine academicians in six plenary presentations will explore a variety of subjects related to the practice of emergency medicine during a special plenary session to be held on the opening day of SAEM18--the annual meeting for the Society for Academic Emergency Medicine (SAEM) and the largest forum for the presentation of original education and research in academic emergency medicine.
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Frequent sauna bathing reduces risk of strokeFrequent sauna bathing is associated with a reduced risk of stroke, according to a new international study. In a 15-year follow-up study, people taking a sauna four to seven times a week were 61 percent less likely to suffer a stroke than those taking a sauna once a week. This is the first prospective large-scale study on this topic, and the findings were reported in Neurology.
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News

More than relaxation? Saunas may be linked to lower stroke riskTaking frequent saunas may be linked to a lower risk of stroke, according to a study published in the May 2, 2018, online issue of Neurology®, the medical journal of the American Academy of Neurology. The study was conducted in Finland, where saunas originated and nearly every home has one.
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The Scientist RSS

Trump Administration Considers Restrictions on Chinese ResearchersThe proposed limitations stem from fears of intellectual property theft.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

Survival and restoration of China's native forests imperiled by proliferating tree plantationsChina's reforestation efforts have led to an increase in tree cover by 32 percent but the increase mostly comes from people turning former croplands into tree plantations with only one type of tree, which is of little value to wildlife. Likewise, native forests actually decreased by 6 percent because people continued to clear native forests to make way for tree plantations.
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Big Think

How the crisis of the 1930s made the Catholic Church modernThe 20th century is littered with failed global experiments. The British Empire roared into the century with the wind at its back, only to fall apart. The Russian Revolution promised to inaugurate a century of communist insurgency, but that dream, too, expired. Of all the global projects afoot in ... Read More
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Newly improved glass slide turns microscopes into thermometersA study published today in Nature Communications describes how an updated version of the microscope slide can enable scientists to see tiny objects while also measuring their temperature. The advancement, made possible by a new transparent, has the potential to streamline and enhance scientific research worldwide, from clandestine government biology labs to high school chemistry classes. It may al
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Big Think

Stephen Hawking’s final theory, written just before he died, was released todayStephen Hawking's final paper is all about the multiverse, quantum relativity, string theory, relativity and more. Read More
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

Toy-inspired experiment on behavior of quantum systemsBy placing the most magnetic element of the periodic table into a quantum version of a popular desktop toy, scientists explore the emergence of quantum chaos and thermal equilibrium.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

The case for hope: Educating as if survival mattersThe world is facing ever-more-dire warnings from scientists about the faltering health of the environment and the negative consequences for humans, habitats, and the creatures with whom we share the Earth. Still, a new article suggests there's reason for hope. It boils down to what we teach today's young people.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

Weather forecast model predicts complex patterns of volcanic ash dispersalNew research has provided fresh insight into how huge volcanic ash plumes, which can critically disrupt aviation and cause major impact on the ground, are transported in the atmosphere.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

Cryo-EM structures of the nicotine receptor may lead to new therapies for addictionResearchers have published atomic-scale blueprints of the most abundant class of brain nicotinic acetylcholine receptors. A structural understanding of the protein, found in neurons, could lead to new ways to treat nicotine addiction from smoking and vaping.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

Precise targeting technique could regulate gut bacteria, curtailing diseaseEmerging evidence suggests that microbes in the digestive system have a big influence on human health and may play a role in the onset of disease throughout the body. Now, in a new study, scientists report that they have potentially found a way to use chemical compounds to target and inhibit the growth of specific microbes in the gut associated with diseases without causing harm to other beneficia
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

Why plants are so sensitive to gravity: The lowdownPlants can detect the slightest angle of inclination. Yet the mechanism by which they sense gravity relies on microscopic grains. In theory, such a system should hardly allow for precise detection of inclination. Researchers have now explained this curious paradox: the grains are constantly being agitated within the plant cells!
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The Atlantic

Afghanistan Takes a Bloody Path to Pursue PeaceThe years keep passing with the United States in Afghanistan—nearly 17 in all now—and the death toll keeps climbing. This week it was twin suicide bombings in Kabul that killed 25 people, including nine journalists, plus an attack on a military convoy in the country’s south that wounded several Romanian service members and killed an unknown number of children nearby. American soldiers, too, despi
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Big Think

Could Facebook’s new ‘Dating’ service really destroy Tinder?Facebook F8 M. ZuckerbergFacebook CEO Mark Zuckerberg just announced plans to add a dating feature to Facebook, a move that threatens established companies in the online dating industry. Read More
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News

App allows for crowdsourced exercise plans, which rival trainers in effectivenessResearchers at the University of Washington and Seattle University have created CrowdFit, a platform for exercise planning that relies on crowdsourcing from nonexperts to create workout regimens guided by national exercise recommendations and tailored around user schedules and interests.
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Popular Science

Drones can take scientists to strange new places—like inside whale snotTechnology Remote-controlled robots make data more accessible and are quickly becoming a desired tool in scientific research. Scientists often need to perform some difficult feats for research, like getting close enough to an elusive, yet enormous whale to get a biopsy of its skin. One…
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The Atlantic

There Is Only One Thing IMHO Can MeanThose lovable scoundrels at BuzzFeed , as they are wont to do , have kicked up a new controversy about the breakdown of our shared reality in this time of dislocation and doubt. They have asked people to settle, via internet poll, what the correct meaning of IMHO is . If you, like me, grew up on the bulletin-board systems (BBSs) and forums that predated the web, you might be scratching your head.
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The Atlantic

Trump Goes to War With MuellerUpdated on May 2 at 3:05 p.m. When the president of the United States says repeatedly that he’s going to do something, it’s probably because he intends to do it. Donald Trump lies repeatedly , but on big issues he tends to follow through, or try to follow through , on what he promises. Trump has now several times indicated his intention to meddle in the Justice Department and with the special cou
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Live Science

Naps Can Make Our Brains 'Remember' Things That Never HappenedQuick bursts of brain activity may be creating false memories while we nap
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Big Think

This inflatable building concept could save thousands of lives in a natural disasterA team of Polish designers has just won a competition with its design for an inflatable skyscraper designed for use in emergency zones. Read More
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

Improving 3-D printing of plastic partsRobots that can build homes, marathoners' running shoes and NASA's upcoming spacecraft all have one thing in common: 3-D printed parts. But as enthusiasm for 3-D printing continues to grow and expand across markets, the objects printed by the process can have weaknesses. Now, one group reports that using a simple modification to the manufacture of the starting materials improves the toughness of t
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

Are emperor penguins eating enough?For emperor penguins waddling around a warming Antarctic, diminishing sea ice means less fish to eat. How the diets of these tuxedoed birds will hold up in the face of climate change is a big question scientists are grappling with.
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Live Science

Doctors Pulled 14 Squirming Roundworms from a Woman's Bile DuctsThe woman had severe abdominal pain for months before doctors found the cause: More than a dozen worms in her bile duct.
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Survival and restoration of China's native forests imperiled by proliferating tree plantationsChina's reforestation efforts have led to an increase in tree cover by 32 percent but the increase mostly comes from people turning former croplands into tree plantations with only one type of tree, which is of little value to wildlife. Likewise, native forests actually decreased by 6 percent because people continued to clear native forests to make way for tree plantations.
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Live Science

Stephen Hawking's Final Paper Cuts the Multiverse Down to SizeThe great physicist's library of work is now complete.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

Scientists find fear, courage switches in brainResearchers have identified two adjacent clusters of nerve cells in the brains of mice whose activation levels upon sighting a visual threat spell the difference between a timid response and a bold or even fierce one.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

Pilot study validates artificial intelligence to help predict school violenceA pilot study indicates that artificial intelligence may be useful in predicting which students are at higher risk of perpetrating school violence. The researchers found that machine learning -- the science of getting computers to learn over time without human intervention -- is as accurate as a team of child and adolescent psychiatrists, including a forensic psychiatrist, in determining risk for
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News

A simple catalyst helps to assemble complex molecular frameworks of antifungal agentsA team of Russian chemists led by Professor Dmitry Perekalin from Nesmeyanov Institute of Organoelement Compounds have recently developed a new rhodium catalyst for organic synthesis. The active center of the catalyst, the rhodium atom, is 'wearing' an asymmetric 'hat,' that allows the catalyst to assemble the reacting molecules with full spatial control. The method is expected to help to synthesi
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News

The case for hope: Educating as if survival mattersThe world is facing ever-more-dire warnings from scientists about the faltering health of the environment and the negative consequences for humans, habitats, and the creatures with whom we share the Earth. Still, a new article in the journal BioScience suggests there's reason for hope. It boils down to what we teach today's young people.
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Protecting campus free speech, even when it challenges beliefsTwo Cornell University researchers say psychological science's extensive study of bias offers an important lens to view conflicts between free speech and hate speech.
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News

How small molecule halts spread of toxic protein associated with Alzheimer's progressionResearchers at the UCLA School of Nursing and the department of neurology at the David Geffen School of Medicine at UCLA have reported a promising drug strategy that blocks tau transmission. The study was published online in the journal Biochemical and Biophysical Research Communications.
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Quanta Magazine

Cells Talk in a Language That Looks Like VirusesFor cells, communication is a matter of life and death. The ability to tell other members of your species — or other parts of the body — that food supplies are running low or that an invading pathogen is near can be the difference between survival and extinction. Scientists have known for decades that cells can secrete chemicals into their surroundings, releasing a free-floating message for all t
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Popular Science

Facebook used billions of hashtagged Instagram photos to train its AITechnology Hashtags are actually useful for training computer vision systems. Hashtags are a good way to see millions of #travel photos in one place, but Facebook used those labeled photographs to train their image-recognition software.
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Scientific American Content: Global

Watch the Life Cycle of HIV in Colorful New DetailAnimation software brings together data to tell a molecular story -- Read more on ScientificAmerican.com
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Feed: All Latest

Cambridge Analytica Shuts Down Amid Ongoing Facebook CrisisThe troubled data firm, which improperly accessed the data of up to 87 million Facebook users, has ceased operations.
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Whooping cough more widespread than previously knownNew research from Public Health Ontario and the Institute for Clinical Evaluative Sciences suggests that whooping cough cases in Ontario are nearly eight times the number actually reported, reinforcing the importance of up-to-date vaccinations to protect against illness and the spread of disease.
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Climate change to cause dramatic drop in Persian Gulf biodiversity and fisheries potentialThe Persian Gulf, also known as the Arabian Gulf, may lose up to 12 per cent of its marine biodiversity in some areas before the end of the century if countries in the region do not take measures to address climate change. A business-as-usual climate scenario will severely affect species richness off the coast of Saudi Arabia, Bahrain, Qatar and the United Arab Emirates (UAE) by the end of the cen
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Scientists make major breakthrough on omega-3 productionA major discovery that could 'revolutionize' the understanding of omega-3 production in the ocean has been made by an international team of scientists.
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Using Google Street View to estimate travel patterns in citiesA study published today in PLOS ONE indicates that Google Street View has the potential to estimate how common cycling is in cities, and potentially other travel patterns too. The analysis of 2,000 Google Street View images from 1,000 random locations in each of 34 cities in Great Britain found strong agreement with data on cycling, and public transport and motorbike use from the 2011 census and a
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Seeking the truth on female genital cuttingA new study by anthropologists at the University of Bristol will help campaigners to closely target their work in eradicating female genital cutting (FGC).
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Vasopressin a possible biomarker for social deficits in autismA new study from UC Davis and Stanford researchers shows that rhesus macaques with low sociability also had low levels of the peptide vasopressin in cerebrospinal fluid, as did children with autism spectrum disorder.
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Stanford scientists find possible autism biomarker in cerebrospinal fluidAutism diagnosis is slow and cumbersome, but new findings linking a hormone called vasopressin to social behavior in monkeys and autism in people may change that. Low vasopressin in cerebrospinal fluid was related to less sociability in both species, indicating the hormone may be a biomarker for autism.
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Blood pressure-regulating hormone may be a key marker of sociality in monkeysScientists have discovered that monkeys with low levels of social behavior harbor low amounts of a hormone found in brain and spinal cord fluid.
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Rare sharks are no longer in the 'dark,' thanks to new species survey methodPreviously unobserved shark species swim in areas impacted by humans, reports a new study. The results reveal a greater prevalence of sharks in such regions than traditional survey methods have uncovered, and the approach for uncovering them may lead to more thorough species diversity assessments in areas with rare and threatened large animals - often hard to
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Research finds 'Achilles heel' for aggressive prostate cancerUCSF researchers have discovered a promising new line of attack against lethal, treatment-resistant prostate cancer. Analysis of hundreds of human prostate tumors revealed that the most aggressive cancers depend on a built-in cellular stress response to put a brake on their own hot-wired physiology. Experiments in mice and with human cells showed that blocking this stress response with an experime
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Engraved Crimean stone artifact may demonstrate Neanderthal symbolismA flint flake from the Middle Paleolithic of Crimea was likely engraved symbolically by a skilled Neanderthal hand, according to a study published May 2, 2018, in the open-access journal PLOS ONE by Ana Majkic from the University of Bordeaux, France and colleagues. The authors developed a detailed framework for interpreting engravings on stone artifacts.
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News

River dolphins are declining steeply in the Amazon basinPopulations of freshwater dolphins in the Amazon basin are in steep decline, dropping by half about every decade at current rates, according to a study published May 2, 2018, in the open-access journal PLOS ONE by Vera da Silva from Instituto Nacional de Pesquisas da Amazônia, Manaus, Amazonas, Brazil, and colleagues.
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Plants can use underground communication to find out when neighbors are stressedCorn seedlings that grow close together give off underground signals that impact the growth of nearby plants, reports a study published May 2, 2018, in the open-access journal PLOS ONE by Velemir Ninkovic from the Swedish University of Agricultural Sciences, Sweden, and colleagues.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

Parental support linked career success of childrenA recent study finds that young people who get financial support from their parents have greater professional success, highlighting one way social inequality is transmitted from one generation to the next.
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New on MIT Technology Review

Chinese tech firms are throwing out applicants over the age of 30
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Science | The Guardian

Plants 'talk to' each other through their rootsScientists studying corn seedlings believe that they send signals under the soil, advising each other of the proximity of other plants Plants use their roots to “listen in” on their neighbours, according to research that adds to evidence that plants have their own unique forms of communication. The study found that plants in a crowded environment secrete chemicals into the soil that prompt their
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The Scientist RSS

Study Explains How Newborn Mice Can Regrow Damaged HeartsThe extracellular matrix appears to inhibit regeneration; but scientists debate whether heart muscle really comes back.
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The Atlantic

'We Will Not Negotiate Under Threat'At the last minute, the United States this week deferred a decision about whether to subject Europe to steel and aluminum tariffs. Trump at first announced sweeping and expensive measures designed to discourage imports of those products to the United States from around the world, but soon began distributing exemptions to some allies. The European Union thus got a reprieve, but when it came time f
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New on MIT Technology Review

The US is approaching a defining moment for cryptocurrency innovation
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Engraved Crimean stone artifact may demonstrate Neanderthal symbolismA flint flake from the Middle Paleolithic of Crimea was likely engraved symbolically by a skilled Neanderthal hand, according to a study published May 2, 2018 in the open-access journal PLOS ONE by Ana Majkic from the University of Bordeaux, France and colleagues. The authors developed a detailed framework for interpreting engravings on stone artifacts.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Amazon river dolphins in steep decline: study (Update)Two kinds of river dolphins are dying off fast in the Amazon region, and may face extinction unless they are more vigorously protected against fishing, researchers in Brazil said Wednesday.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Climate change to cause dramatic drop in Persian Gulf biodiversity and fisheries potentialThe Persian Gulf, also known as the Arabian Gulf, may lose up to 12 per cent of its marine biodiversity in some areas before the end of the century if countries in the region do not take measures to address climate change.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Scientists make major breakthrough on omega-3 productionA major discovery that could "revolutionise" the understanding of omega-3 production in the ocean has been made by an international team of scientists.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Plants can use underground communication to find out when neighbors are stressedCorn seedlings that grow close together give off underground signals that impact the growth of nearby plants, reports a study published May 2, 2018 in the open-access journal PLOS ONE by Velemir Ninkovic from the Swedish University of Agricultural Sciences, Sweden, and colleagues.
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Viden

Professor: Jordens ressourcer er vores valutaVi bliver cirka 9,8 milliarder mennesker i 2050, men Jorden har ikke nok ressourcer til os alle. Derfor må vi ændre vores opfattelse af valuta, mener professor.
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Popular Science

You can't buy your mother's love, but you can try with these giftsGadgets She raised you. The least you could do is get her a candle that smells like a national park. Mothers are pretty amazing, so treat them to some equally amazing gifts. Check out our 2018 Mother's Day gift guide.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

How some liver cells switch identities to build missing plumbingBy studying a rare liver disease called Alagille syndrome, scientists discovered the mechanism behind a form of tissue regeneration that may someday reduce the need for organ transplants. Researchers report that when disease or injury causes a shortage in one type of liver cell, the organ can instruct another type of liver cell to change identities to provide replacement supplies. The findings one
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

Scientists find the first bird beak, right under their nosesResearchers have pieced together the three-dimensional skull of an iconic, toothed bird that represents a pivotal moment in the transition from dinosaurs to modern-day birds.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

Hubble detects helium in the atmosphere of an exoplanet for the first timeAstronomers using the NASA/ESA Hubble Space Telescope have detected helium in the atmosphere of the exoplanet WASP-107b. This is the first time this element has been detected in the atmosphere of a planet outside the Solar System. The discovery demonstrates the ability to use infrared spectra to study exoplanet extended atmospheres.
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Live Science

Photos: See Gorillas and Chimpanzees in Their Native ForestsHumans will have to work together to save the great apes, such as the gorillas and chimpanzee.
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Live Science

Half of Western Lowland Gorillas May Vanish by 2040. Here's How We Can Prevent That. (Op-Ed)In 1988, a wild great ape charged a researcher. Now, she's working to save these majestic animals from poachers and land loss.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Amazon bids for 60% stake in India's Flipkart: reportAmazon has made a formal offer to acquire a controlling stake in Indian e-commerce giant Flipkart, putting it in contention with Walmart, according to a report Wednesday on Indian network CNBC TV18.
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Viden

Svie, kløe og rødmen: Plaster skal erstatte ubehagelig allergitestForskere har netop fået 5,6 millioner kroner til at udvikle et plaster, der skal være hurtigere og mere effektiv end priktesten.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Facebook taps advisers for audits on bias and civil rightsFacebook has enlisted two outside advisers to examine how it treats underrepresented communities and whether it has a liberal bias.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Investors will eye cash, production in Tesla 1Q earningsWhen Tesla releases first-quarter earnings after the closing bell on Wednesday, investors will be scrutinizing more than the bottom line.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Cryo-EM structures of the nicotine receptor may lead to new therapies for addictionUT Southwestern researchers today published in Nature atomic-scale blueprints of the most abundant class of brain nicotinic acetylcholine receptors. A structural understanding of the protein, found in neurons, could lead to new ways to treat nicotine addiction from smoking and vaping.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Study shows drug comes up short in osteoarthritis pain reliefMorris Animal Foundation-funded researchers from the University of Georgia, have found that tramadol was ineffective in alleviating signs of pain associated with osteoarthritis in dogs. The research team published their results in the Journal of the American Veterinary Medical Association.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Researchers investigate behavior in quantum systems with a toy-inspired techniqueWith its suspended metallic spheres that clack back and forth, Newton's cradle is more than a popular desktop plaything. It has taught a generation of students about conservation of momentum and energy. It is also the inspiration for an experiment Benjamin Lev, associate professor of physics and of applied physics at Stanford University, has created to study quantum systems.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Study links parental support and career success of childrenA recent study finds that young people who get financial support from their parents have greater professional success, highlighting one way social inequality is transmitted from one generation to the next.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

NASA finds Tropical Cyclone Flamboyan in a southeastern stretchStrong vertical wind shear had taken its toll on Tropical Cyclone Flamboyan when NASA's Aqua satellite passed over the Southern Indian Ocean. Flamboyan, now a subtropical cyclone, had been stretched out and its only precipitation pushed southeast of the center.The Moderate Resolution Imaging Spectroradiometer or MODIS instrument aboard NASA's Aqua satellite provided a visible image of Flamboyan on
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Cryo-EM structures of the nicotine receptor may lead to new therapies for addictionUT Southwestern researchers today published in Nature atomic-scale blueprints of the most abundant class of brain nicotinic acetylcholine receptors. A structural understanding of the protein, found in neurons, could lead to new ways to treat nicotine addiction from smoking and vaping.
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Morris Animal Foundation study shows drug comes up short in osteoarthritis pain reliefMorris Animal Foundation-funded researchers from the University of Georgia, have found that tramadol was ineffective in alleviating signs of pain associated with osteoarthritis in dogs. The research team published their results in the Journal of the American Veterinary Medical Association.
1d

EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Hubble detects helium in the atmosphere of an exoplanet for the first timeAstronomers using the NASA/ESA Hubble Space Telescope have detected helium in the atmosphere of the exoplanet WASP-107b. This is the first time this element has been detected in the atmosphere of a planet outside the Solar System. The discovery demonstrates the ability to use infrared spectra to study exoplanet extended atmospheres.
1d

EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Scientists find the first bird beak, right under their nosesResearchers have pieced together the three-dimensional skull of an iconic, toothed bird that represents a pivotal moment in the transition from dinosaurs to modern-day birds.
1d

EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Liver fix thyselfBy studying a rare liver disease called Alagille syndrome, scientists discovered the mechanism behind a form of tissue regeneration that may someday reduce the need for organ transplants. Researchers report in Nature that when disease or injury causes a shortage in one type of liver cell, the organ can instruct another type of liver cell to change identities to provide replacement supplies. The fi
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Helium detected in exoplanet atmosphere for the first timeAstronomers have detected helium in the atmosphere of a planet that orbits a star far beyond our solar system for the very first time.
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Stanford scientists find fear, courage switches in brainResearchers at the Stanford University School of Medicine have identified two adjacent clusters of nerve cells in the brains of mice whose activation levels upon sighting a visual threat spell the difference between a timid response and a bold or even fierce one.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

Heart disease symptoms improved by blocking immune cell migrationNew research suggests that the location of immune cells in the body determines whether they help or harm the development of heart disease. The study supports the view that the immune system directly impacts heart failure -- still the leading cause of death for men and women in the United States.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

Viscosity of suspensions: It all comes down to roughnessResearchers have explained how the surface characteristics of microspheres affect rapid increases in the viscosity of suspensions, thus laying the groundwork for applications such as smoothly flowing cement.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

Flaw found in water treatment method: Process may generate harmful chemicalsSome potentially toxic chemicals in water may be created, ironically, during the water treatment process itself.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

Brick by brick: Assembly of the measles virusResearchers have been able to capture images of measles viruses as they emerge from infected cells, using state of the art cryo-electron tomography techniques. The new images will help with a greater understanding of measles and related viruses, and could give hints on antiviral drug strategies likely to work across multiple viruses of this type.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

Climate change will boost global lake evaporation -- with 'extreme' consequencesGlobal lake evaporation will increase 16 percent by the end of the century, triggering, among other outcomes, stronger precipitation events, according to a new study. But the specific mechanisms that will drive that phenomenon are not quite what scientists expected.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

Gut microbiome plays an important role in atherosclerosisResearchers have shown a novel relationship between the intestinal microbiome and atherosclerosis, one of the major causes of heart attack and stroke. This was measured as the burden of plaque in the carotid arteries.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

Novel reaction could spark alternate approach to ammonia productionThe search for a more energy efficient and environmentally friendly method of ammonia production for fertilizer has led to the discovery of a new type of catalytic reaction.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Are emperor penguins eating enough? Scientists gauge foraging success by spying with time-lapse videoFor Emperor penguins waddling around a warming Antarctic, diminishing sea ice means less fish to eat. How the diets of these tuxedoed birds will hold up in the face of climate change is a big question scientists are grappling with.
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BBC News - Science & Environment

How birds got their beaks - new fossil evidenceScientists piece together the skull of an ancient bird, which had a primitive beak lined with teeth.
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Science | The Guardian

Fossil sheds light on evolutionary journey from dinosaur to birdScientists have reconstructed the skull of an Ichthyornis dispar, a very early bird species that still had the sharp teeth of a dinosaur It was one of the fossils Darwin hailed as evidence of evolution. Now scientists have unveiled four skulls of an ancient toothed seabird in a study experts say reveals the face of early birds. Thought to have lived between 66 and 100m years ago the gull-like bir
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Your Instagram #Dogs and #Cats Are Training Facebook's AIPaying humans to label images can get expensive. So Facebook turned to 3.5 billion Instagram photos.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

Bats go quiet during fall mating seasonGiving someone the 'silent treatment' during courtship might not be the best strategy for romance. But, new research shows hoary bats fly with little or no echolocation at all as a possible mating-related behavior.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

Physicists find signs of a time crystalPhysicists have uncovered hints of a time crystal -- a form of matter that 'ticks' when exposed to an electromagnetic pulse -- in the last place they expected: a crystal you might find in a child's toy.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

Global warming of 1.5°C or 2°C: The lower limit would reduce flood hazardsA research group has simulated the scenarios of limiting global warming to 2°C versus 1.5°C with global hydrological models. An important result: High flows and flood hazards will increase significantly over an average of 21 percent of global land area if the temperature rises by 2°C. But if the rise in global warming is limited to 1.5°C only 11 percent of global land area would be affected.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

Weight loss surgery may cause significant skeletal health problemsA new review examines the negative impacts of weight loss surgery on bone health.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

New research shows that children with autism are able to create imaginary friendsPlaying with an imaginary companion (IC) helps children learn essential social skills such as empathy with other people. It is often believed that autistic youngsters are incapable of creating pretend play pals -- a further hindrance to their development of emotional understanding.
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Science : NPR

How Did Birds Lose Their Teeth And Get Their Beaks? Study Offers CluesModern birds are dinosaurs without toothy jaws, and with bigger brains. Newly published research fills in some of the missing links in their evolution. (Image credit: Michael Hanson and Bhart-Anjan S. Bhullar/Nature Publishing Group)
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iBiology (uploads) on YouTube

Sheng-Yang He (Michigan State U. and HHMI) 2: The effect of climate in plant diseaseDr. Sheng-Yang He explores plant-pathogen interactions and provides an overview of a plant's basic immunological responses. https://www.ibiology.org/plant-biology/plant-pathogen-interactions Talk Overview: What mechanisms do plants have to fight pathogens? In this seminar, Dr. Sheng-Yang He explores plant-pathogen interactions and provides an overview of a plant's basic immunological responses. A
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iBiology (uploads) on YouTube

Sheng-Yang He (Michigan State U. and HHMI) 1: Introduction to Plant-Pathogen InteractionsDr. Sheng-Yang He explores plant-pathogen interactions and provides an overview of a plant's basic immunological responses. https://www.ibiology.org/plant-biology/plant-pathogen-interactions Talk Overview: What mechanisms do plants have to fight pathogens? In this seminar, Dr. Sheng-Yang He explores plant-pathogen interactions and provides an overview of a plant's basic immunological responses. A
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New on MIT Technology Review

Facebook helped create an AI scavenger hunt that could lead to the first useful home robotsTo make AI programs smarter, researchers are creating virtual worlds for them to explore.
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Are emperor penguins eating enough?For emperor penguins waddling around a warming Antarctic, diminishing sea ice means less fish to eat. How the diets of these tuxedoed birds will hold up in the face of climate change is a big question scientists are grappling with.
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Toy-inspired experiment on behavior of quantum systemsBy placing the most magnetic element of the periodic table into a quantum version of a popular desktop toy, Stanford scientists explore the emergence of quantum chaos and thermal equilibrium.
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Breast cancer places greater financial burden on black womenHaving breast cancer placed a significantly greater financial strain on black women than white women, according to study at the University of North Carolina Lineberger Comprehensive Cancer Center. A survey of women who were diagnosed with breast cancer in North Carolina between 2008 and 2013 found that two years after a diagnosis, 58 percent of black women reported a negative financial impact of c
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

New find shows early humans were in the Philippines 700,000 years agoNew archaeological evidence shows that humans were living in the Philippines by 709,000 years ago – hundreds of thousands of years earlier than previously thought.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Helium detected in exoplanet atmosphere for the first timeAstronomers have detected helium in the atmosphere of a planet that orbits a star far beyond our solar system for the very first time.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Scientists find the first bird beak, right under their nosesResearchers have pieced together the three-dimensional skull of an iconic, toothed bird that represents a pivotal moment in the transition from dinosaurs to modern-day birds.
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Latest Headlines | Science News

Butchered rhino bones place hominids in the Philippines 700,000 years agoStone tools and butchery marks point to an ancient hominid presence on islands in the Philippines.
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Latest Headlines | Science News

This ancient fowl bit like a dinosaur and pecked like a birdA new fossil of Ichthyornis dispar helped scientists create a 3-D reconstruction of the ancient bird’s skull, shedding light on early bird evolution.
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Scientific American Content: Global

New Fossils Offer Clues about a Primordial Bird BeakThe toothy snout had a tip covered by a hornlike sheath -- Read more on ScientificAmerican.com
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The Atlantic

The Hard-to-Trace Ingredient Behind Skyrocketing Cocaine DeathsIn the United States, more people are dying because of synthetic drugs like fentanyl than because of heroin or prescribed painkillers. While, to many, the opioid crisis has been synonymous with heroin and prescription pills, a report published Tuesday in JAMA Psychiatry builds the case that the class of synthetic drug is increasingly making its way into other drugs like cocaine and leading to ove
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Study links parental support and career success of childrenA recent study finds that young people who get financial support from their parents have greater professional success, highlighting one way social inequality is transmitted from one generation to the next.
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Inside Science

Sick Plants May Attract Distant Bacteria as MedicineSick Plants May Attract Distant Bacteria as Medicine New study shows how sand sedges lure beneficial bacteria to their roots. P1010116_adjusted_cropped.jpg This experimental setup allows researchers to place bacteria at the ends of the glass tubes, then measure how much bacteria moves toward the plants. Image credits: Kristin Schulz-Bohm Rights information: This photo can be reproduced only with
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Big Think

Think you have only 5 senses? You've actually got about 14 to 20Humans have way more than five senses, and if you include the animal kingdom there even more still. Read More
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Improving 3-D printing of plastic partsRobots that can build homes, marathoners' running shoes and NASA's upcoming spacecraft all have one thing in common: 3-D printed parts. But as enthusiasm for 3-D printing continues to grow and expand across markets, the objects printed by the process can have weaknesses. Now, one group reports in ACS Applied Materials & Interfaces that using a simple modification to the manufacture of the starting
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Harvesting health information from an unusual place: The wastewater treatment plantEvery day, people all over the world unwittingly release a flood of data on what drugs they are taking and what illnesses they are battling, simply by going to the bathroom and flushing. And according to an article in Chemical & Engineering News (C&EN), the weekly newsmagazine of the American Chemical Society, researchers aren't letting all of that information go to waste.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Precise targeting technique could regulate gut bacteria, curtailing diseaseEmerging evidence suggests that microbes in the digestive system have a big influence on human health and may play a role in the onset of disease throughout the body. Now, in a study appearing in ACS Chemical Biology, scientists report that they have potentially found a way to use chemical compounds to target and inhibit the growth of specific microbes in the gut associated with diseases without c
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Why plants are so sensitive to gravity: The lowdownPlants can detect the slightest angle of inclination. Yet the mechanism by which they sense gravity relies on microscopic grains. In theory, such a system should hardly allow for precise detection of inclination. Researchers from the CNRS, the French National Institute of Agronomic Research (INRA), and Université Clermont Auvergne have now explained this curious paradox : the grains are constantly
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Medical aid-in-dying laws are increasing, but substantial barriers to access remainMedical aid-in-dying is now legal in eight U.S. jurisdictions, but patients still face substantial barriers to access, according to a new analysis by Dr. Mara Buchbinder of the University of North Carolina School of Medicine.
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Harvesting health information from an unusual place: The wastewater treatment plantEvery day, people all over the world unwittingly release a flood of data on what drugs they are taking and what illnesses they are battling, simply by going to the bathroom and flushing. And according to an article in Chemical & Engineering News (C&EN), the weekly newsmagazine of the American Chemical Society, researchers aren't letting all of that information go to waste.
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News

NASA finds Tropical Cyclone Flamboyan in a southeastern stretchStrong vertical wind shear had taken its toll on Tropical Cyclone Flamboyan when NASA's Aqua satellite passed over the Southern Indian Ocean. Flamboyan, now a subtropical cyclone, had been stretched out and its only precipitation pushed southeast of the center.
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Precise targeting technique could regulate gut bacteria, curtailing diseaseEmerging evidence suggests that microbes in the digestive system have a big influence on human health and may play a role in the onset of disease throughout the body. Now, in a study appearing in ACS Chemical Biology, scientists report that they have potentially found a way to use chemical compounds to target and inhibit the growth of specific microbes in the gut associated with diseases without c
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Pilot study validates artificial intelligence to help predict school violenceA pilot study indicates that artificial intelligence may be useful in predicting which students are at higher risk of perpetrating school violence. The researchers found that machine learning -- the science of getting computers to learn over time without human intervention -- is as accurate as a team of child and adolescent psychiatrists, including a forensic psychiatrist, in determining risk for
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Improving 3-D printing of plastic partsRobots that can build homes, marathoners' running shoes and NASA's upcoming spacecraft all have one thing in common: 3-D printed parts. But as enthusiasm for 3-D printing continues to grow and expand across markets, the objects printed by the process can have weaknesses. Now, one group reports in ACS Applied Materials & Interfaces that using a simple modification to the manufacture of the starting
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Scientific American Content: Global

Mosquito-and Tick-Borne Diseases Are Rising in the U.S.Rates have tripled in 15 years, and some scientists suspect climate change is partly to blame -- Read more on ScientificAmerican.com
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The Scientist RSS

Reprogrammed Cells Treat Diabetes in MiceResearchers used a trio of transcription factors to transform pancreatic duct cells in vivo into β-like cells that secrete insulin and improve diabetes symptoms.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Climate change will boost global lake evaporation—with 'extreme' consequencesGlobal lake evaporation will increase 16 percent by the end of the century as a consequence of climate change, a new Yale study finds. But the specific mechanisms that will drive that phenomenon are not quite what scientists expected.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Flaw found in water treatment method—Process may unwittingly generate harmful chemicalsPublic water quality has received a lot of attention in recent years as some disturbing discoveries have been made regarding lead levels in cities across the country. Now, a new study from the Johns Hopkins University pinpoints other chemicals in water that are worth paying attention to - and in fact, some of them may be created, ironically, during the water treatment process itself.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

New leads on treating dementia and Alzheimer'sA new research study provides an explanation for why clinical trials of drugs reducing proteins in the brain that were thought to cause dementia and Alzheimer's have failed. The study has opened the way for potential new treatments with existing drugs.
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Ingeniøren

Kommuner hænger på lavradioaktivt affald i 55 år: »Det er ikke gangbart«Det midlertidig depot for radioaktivt affald ved Risø får ikke plads til det boremudder, der står oplagret uden miljøvurdering i landets kommuner. Esbjergs borgmester beder ministre om en afklaring.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Novel reaction could spark alternate approach to ammonia productionThe search for a more energy efficient and environmentally friendly method of ammonia production for fertilizer has led to the discovery of a new type of catalytic reaction.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Physicists find signs of a time crystalYale physicists have uncovered hints of a time crystal—a form of matter that "ticks" when exposed to an electromagnetic pulse—in the last place they expected: a crystal you might find in a child's toy.
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Futurity.org

Genomes could offer ways to fight ‘rice blast’About 21 million years ago, a fungus called rice blast became harmful to the food that nourishes roughly half the world’s population, research finds. The findings may help lead to different ways to fight or prevent crop and plant diseases, such as new fungicides and more effective quarantines. Rice blast, the staple’s most damaging fungal disease, destroys enough rice to feed 60 million people an
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Scientific American Content: Global

Bill Gates in Search of Nuclear NirvanaHis company, TerraPower, aims to build a safe, nearly waste-free reactor that won't contribute to weapons proliferation or climate change -- Read more on ScientificAmerican.com
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Latest Headlines | Science News

Bull sharks and bottlenose dolphins are moving north as the ocean warmsRising temperatures are making ocean waters farther north more hospitable for a variety of marine species.
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New Scientist - News

Brexit and Trump votes screwed with our heart rates for monthsA study of nearly 12,000 people wearing health monitoring devices shows how people’s biological rhythms fall out of sync after big political events
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

Researchers discover connection between circadian rhythm and aggressionA research team has discovered a circuit in the brains of mice connecting circadian rhythm to aggressive behavior. The discovery is particularly interesting to Alzheimer's patients who experience increased aggression at night. The researchers have developed special protein tools capable of turning off the cells in the brain causing the behavior.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

Substance in Chinese medicine can cause cardiac arrhythmiaA medicinal plant frequently used in Traditional Chinese Medicine (TCM) -- Evodia rutaecarpa -- contains substances that can cause cardiac arrhythmia.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

Having two jobs is great for employers, but family life suffersPeople who hold two jobs demonstrate as much engagement and performance in the workplace as their colleagues who have one job. However, dual job holders are likely to sacrifice family and personal time as a result.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

New species in the North SeaExperts have confirmed the existence of a new cryptic amphipod species in the North Sea.
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News

New research shows that children with autism are able to create imaginary friendsThe research could eventually help to develop new therapies.
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Longevity Industry Landscape Overview Volume II: 'The Business of Longevity'The Global Longevity Consortium, consisting of the Biogerontology Research Foundation, Deep Knowledge Life Sciences, Aging Analytics Agency and Longevity.International platform, announce the publication of a new 650-page analytical report entitled Longevity Industry Landscape Overview Volume II: The Business of Longevity.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

Energy recovery of urban wasteResearchers have proposed a system which is capable of converting waste in a more controlled manner, and, basically, in two stages: first, the solid is converted to gas in reducing conditions (that is, with the presence of little oxygen), and then the generated gas is burnt very efficiently in specifically optimized equipment.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

Organic printing inks may restore sight to blind peopleA simple retinal prosthesis is under development. Fabricated using cheap and widely-available organic pigments used in printing inks and cosmetics, it consists of tiny pixels like a digital camera sensor on a nanometric scale. Researchers hope that it can restore sight to blind people.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

New report details experiences of graduates with student loan debt during the Great RecessionMost non-borrowers (81 percent) reported that their undergraduate education was worth the cost, compared with 69 percent of graduates who took out student loans.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

Scientists map key brain-to-spinal cord nerve connections for voluntary movementResearchers trying to help people suffering from paralysis after a spinal cord injury or stroke mapped critical brain-to-spinal cord nerve connections that drive voluntary movement in forelimbs, a development that scientists say allows them to start looking for specific repair strategies. The study is an important step toward one day rehabilitating motor circuits to help motor function recover aft
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

Study sheds light on how 'dopamine neurons' contribute to memory formation in humansResearch sheds light on how the human brain rapidly forms new memories, providing insights into potential new treatments for memory disorders. A new study examined neurons that produce dopamine, a compound that acts as a transmitter for nerve impulses. It found that these dopamine neurons play a critical role in the formation of episodic memory, which allows people to remember such things as where
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Live Science

Baby Humpback Whales May Soon Fill Antarctic SeasLots of little baby humpback whales may be on their way.
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The Atlantic

Trump's Brazen, Effective LieHarold Bornstein DTHarold N. Bornstein, a New York gastroenterologist, released a 2015 statement to his fellow citizens about the health of a presidential candidate. “I have been the personal physician of Mr. Donald J. Trump since 1980,” he wrote. He reported that across those decades, his patient had “no significant medical problems,” that an exam showed “only positive results,” and that “his physical strength and
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Researchers find gut microbiome plays an important role in atherosclerosisResearchers at Western University and Lawson Health Research Institute have shown a novel relationship between the intestinal microbiome and atherosclerosis, one of the major causes of heart attack and stroke. This was measured as the burden of plaque in the carotid arteries.
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News

It all comes down to roughnessLucio Isa and his team of researchers have explained how the surface characteristics of microspheres affect rapid increases in the viscosity of suspensions, thus laying the groundwork for applications such as smoothly flowing cement.
1d

EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Climate change will boost global lake evaporation -- with 'extreme' consequencesGlobal lake evaporation will increase 16 percent by the end of the century, triggering, among other outcomes, stronger precipitation events, according to a new Yale-led study. But the specific mechanisms that will drive that phenomenon are not quite what scientists expected.
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The MoviePass Unlimited Plan Is BackMoviePassTwo weeks after MoviePass' unlimited plan disappeared, the service is reviving it—and explaining some of its controversial practices.
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Popular Science

America's most populated areas lose 175,000 acres of tree cover every yearNexus Media News People need trees, but they keep destroying them. Trees are beneficial to human health and the fight against climate change. And yet, tree cover is on the decline in urban settings, where we need them the most.
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New on MIT Technology Review

How to prepare cities and citizens for more killer heat wavesAs climate change takes hold, researchers are exploring what it will take for communities to adapt.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

Cracking open the formation of fossil concretionsResearchers developed a unified model of the formation mechanism of spherical carbonate concretions, which often contain exceptionally well-preserved fossils. The carbon in the carbonate originates from the organisms preserved inside the concretions, and the surrounding muddy matrix limits diffusion and permeability, and thus causes supersaturation of carbonate at a reaction front. Calcite precipi
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

Ultrafast laser pulse created by golden nanoparticlesThe creation of a fast, tunable and stable nanoparticle-array laser is a stepping stone to affordable and efficient sensing and switching. New study shows that organic dye material combined with metallic nanostructures can provide ultrafast lasing dynamics with short and rapidly appearing laser pulses.
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cognitive science

A paper in Psychological Science separates the concepts of confidence and certainty in the context of evaluating advisors.submitted by /u/markmana [link] [comments]
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The Atlantic

'Infinity War' and the Point of Comic-Book DeathsThis article contains major spoilers about the end of Avengers: Infinity War. The old adage in superhero comics used to be that any character could come back to life, no matter how tragic or meaningful their death was, with three exceptions: Captain America’s sidekick Bucky Barnes, Batman’s former ward Jason Todd, and Spider-Man’s Uncle Ben. Those three deaths were seen as so crucial to those her
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Brick by brick: Assembly of the measles virusResearchers have been able to capture images of measles viruses as they emerge from infected cells, using state of the art cryo-electron tomography techniques. The new images will help with a greater understanding of measles and related viruses, and could give hints on antiviral drug strategies likely to work across multiple viruses of this type.
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Weight loss surgery may cause significant skeletal health problemsA new JBMR Plus review examines the negative impacts of weight loss surgery on bone health.
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Flaw found in water treatment methodSome potentially toxic chemicals in water may be created, ironically, during the water treatment process itself.
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Global warming of 1.5°C or 2°C: The lower limit would reduce flood hazardsA research group led by Goethe University Frankfurt has simulated the scenarios of limiting global warming to 2°C versus 1.5°C with global hydrological models. An important result: High flows and flood hazards will increase significantly over an average of 21 percent of global land area if the temperature rises by 2°C. But if the rise in global warming is limited to 1.5°C only 11 percent of global
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Novel reaction could spark alternate approach to ammonia productionThe search for a more energy efficient and environmentally friendly method of ammonia production for fertilizer has led to the discovery of a new type of catalytic reaction.
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News

PD-L1 expression in medulloblastoma: An evaluation by subgroupThis study evaluated the expression of PD-L1 and markers of immune mediated resistance in human medulloblastoma, the most common malignant pediatric brain tumor.
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Heart disease symptoms improved by blocking immune cell migrationNew research led by investigators at Case Western Reserve University School of Medicine and University Hospitals Cleveland Medical Center suggests that the location of immune cells in the body determines whether they help or harm the development of heart disease. The study supports the view that the immune system directly impacts heart failure -- still the leading cause of death for men and women
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Yale physicists find signs of a time crystalYale physicists have uncovered hints of a time crystal -- a form of matter that 'ticks' when exposed to an electromagnetic pulse -- in the last place they expected: a crystal you might find in a child's toy.
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Live Science

Can Marijuana Treat Autism? These Clinical Trials Aim to Find OutA growing number of clinical trials are looking into whether compounds in marijuana can be used to treat some of the symptoms of autism.
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Scientific American Content: Global

Cannabis versus CancerWe know weed can mitigate the side effects of the disease and its treatments, but it might also fight malignancies directly -- Read more on ScientificAmerican.com
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The Atlantic

Dear Therapist: How Do I Know If I'm Compromising Too Much for My Partner?Editor’s Note: Every Wednesday, Lori Gottlieb answers questions from readers about their problems, big and small. Have a question? Email her at dear.therapist@theatlantic.com. Dear Therapist, I have been dating my current girlfriend for about a year and a half. We are really happy together, and never fought until it was time to decide where to go to graduate school a couple weeks ago. There aren’
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TED Talks Daily (SD video)

It's time for the law to protect victims of gender violence | Laura L. DunnTo make accountability the norm after gender violence in the United States, we need to change tactics, says victims' rights attorney and TED Fellow Laura L. Dunn. Instead of going institution by institution, fighting for reform, we need to go to the Constitution and finally pass the Equal Rights Amendment, which would require states to address gender inequality and violence. By ushering in sweepin
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Futurity.org

Starting tackle football early sets kids up for brain problemsPlaying youth tackle football may lead to earlier onset of cognitive, behavior, and mood symptoms in later life, according to a new study. “The younger they started to play football, the earlier these symptoms began.” Researchers conducted telephone clinical interviews with family and friends of 246 deceased football players and found that those who began tackle football before age 12 experienced
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New Scientist - News

Inquiry launched into 450,000 missed breast cancer screeningsA "colossal" computer error meant 450,000 women missed crucial breast cancer screening appointments, possibly resulting in hundreds of avoidable deaths
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Honey, I shrunk the vacuum chambers!It takes a lot of work to achieve nothingness. The beam pipes within particle accelerators are some of the emptiest regions in the universe. They are evacuated so as to prevent the accelerating particles from colliding with gas molecules in their path. The extreme vacuums inside these pipes are achieved by pumping out all the gasses within them and then coating their insides with layers of a speci
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Giant ship transits Istanbul after laying Russia-Turkey gas lineOne of the biggest maritime vessels in the world on Wednesday transited through the Bosphorus in Istanbul after completing the first line of a new gas pipeline between Russia and Turkey beneath the Black Sea.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Bats go quiet during fall mating seasonGiving someone the "silent treatment" during courtship might not be the best strategy for romance. But, new research shows hoary bats fly with little or no echolocation at all as a possible mating-related behavior.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

New report details experiences of graduates with student loan debt during the Great RecessionA new report prepared by RTI International for the National Center for Education Statistics provides important insights about rising student debt and its consequences for students who graduated from college during the Great Recession. The study details a variety of post-college outcomes for students who graduated with a bachelor's degree in 2007-08, reflecting graduates' perceptions of how that de
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Science | The Guardian

Stephen Hawking's final theory sheds light on the multiverseShortly before he died the eminent physicist completed his final theory of the cosmos, and it’s simpler than we thought Reality may be made up of multiple universes, but each one may not be so different to our own, according to Stephen Hawking ’s final theory of the cosmos. The work, completed only weeks before the physicist’s death in March, paints a simpler picture of the past 13.8 billion year
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

Effectiveness of nonsurgical treatments for knee osteoarthritis rankedAn estimated 45 percent of people are at risk of developing knee osteoarthritis (OA) in their lifetime. According to a network meta-analysis research article the nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drug (NSAID) naproxen was ranked most effective in individual knee OA treatment for improving both pain and function, and is considered a relatively safe and low-cost treatment method.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

Where brain cells get their information may determine their roles in diseasesScientists find differences in communication pathways to two cell types implicated in psychiatric and movement disorders.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

Internal control helps corals resist acidificationScientists have found that some corals are able to combat the effects of ocean acidification by controlling their own chemistry.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Having two jobs is great for employers, but family life suffersPeople who hold two jobs demonstrate as much engagement and performance in the workplace as their colleagues who have one job. However, dual job holders are likely to sacrifice family and personal time as a result. These are the findings of a new study in Springer's Journal of Business and Psychology led by Brian Webster of Ball State University in the US which challenges the commonly-held notion
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Tumorcode, a software to simulate vascularized tumorsThe tumor vasculature is a major target of anticancer therapies. Rieger, Fredrich and Welter at Saarland University, Germany have been pursuing a quantitative analysis of the physical determinants of vascularized tumors for several years. With the help of computer simulations they have been able to recapitulate the knowledge accrued from in vitro research of tumor spheroids, animal models and clin
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

ISIS online propaganda makes people feel nauseous but also provokes curiosityResearch shows that ISIS atrocity videos provoke a morbid curiosity among viewers, as well as disgust, discomfort and fear.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Rossi X-ray Timing Explorer ends mission after 'listening' to the universeOn May 1, NASA's Rossi X-ray Timing Explorer spacecraft reentered and burned up in Earth's atmosphere. Although not as well-known to the public as Hubble and Chandra, RXTE ranks among NASA's most successful astrophysics missions. For the past 16 years RXTE continuously "listened" to the streams of X-ray radiation coming from black holes, neutron stars and pulsars.
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Weather forecast model predicts complex patterns of volcanic ash dispersalNew research, led by the University of Bristol, has provided fresh insight into how huge volcanic ash plumes, which can critically disrupt aviation and cause major impact on the ground, are transported in the atmosphere.
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Bats go quiet during fall mating seasonGiving someone the 'silent treatment' during courtship might not be the best strategy for romance. But, new research shows hoary bats fly with little or no echolocation at all as a possible mating-related behavior.
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News

New report details experiences of graduates with student loan debt during the Great RecessionMost non-borrowers (81 percent) reported that their undergraduate education was worth the cost, compared with 69 percent of graduates who took out student loans.
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Organic printing inks may restore sight to blind peopleA simple retinal prosthesis is being developed in collaboration between Tel Aviv University in Israel and Linköping University in Sweden. Fabricated using cheap and widely-available organic pigments used in printing inks and cosmetics, it consists of tiny pixels like a digital camera sensor on a nanometric scale. Researchers hope that it can restore sight to blind people.
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Why Antarctic snow melts even in winterEven though the sun does not shine in Antarctica in winter, in some places snow on the glaciers can melt. The cause: warm wind. Utrecht glacier researcher Peter Kuipers Munneke discovered that fact by combining the results of weather stations and satellite images.
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Having two jobs is great for employers, but family life suffersPeople who hold two jobs demonstrate as much engagement and performance in the workplace as their colleagues who have one job. However, dual job holders are likely to sacrifice family and personal time as a result. These are the findings of a new study in Springer's Journal of Business and Psychology led by Brian Webster of Ball State University in the US.
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News

In southern Mozambique, 1 out of 3 persons diagnosed with HIV do not disclose their statusAlmost 40 percent of people previously diagnosed with HIV do not disclose their HIV status during diagnosis campaigns, leading to unnecessary retesting. In addition to wasting valuable resources, this phenomenon can distort indicators of progress towards the UNAIDS targets. These are the conclusions of a study performed in southern Mozambique and led by ISGlobal -- an institution supported by the
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Live Science

Flat-Earthers Explain Why We Don't Fall Off the Edge of Our Planet, and It Involves Pac-ManTheir evidence included an odd Pac-Man effect.
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Futurity.org

Brain circuit could be key to Alzheimer’s ‘sundowning’New research uncovers a circuit in the brains of mice that links circadian rhythm and aggression. The researchers have developed special protein tools capable of turning off the cells in the brain causing the behavior. The discovery is particularly relevant to Alzheimer’s patients who experience increased aggression at night. When the sun sets, 20 percent of all Alzheimer’s patients experience in
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

Scientists discover the secret behind the stability of carbon isotopesAn international research collaboration has provided experimental and theoretical evidence for the existence of the magic number of six in carbon isotopes. The researchers experimentally determined the radius of protons in the nuclei of different carbon isotopes. The results were combined with those of calculations and other data analyses, revealing that a proton number of six gave an isotope with
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

How do cells sense glutamine and control their autophagy and activation?Scientists have clarified that the Pib2 complex directly bound to glutamine in yeast cells, which activated a signaling pathway for cell growth by suspending autophagy.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

Wintering warblers choose agriculture over forestEffective conservation for long-distance migrants requires knowing what's going on with them year-round -- not just when they're in North America during the breeding season. A new study uncovers yellow warblers' surprising habitat preferences in their winter home in Mexico and raises questions about what their use of agricultural habitat could mean for their future.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

Rethinking the umbrella species conceptAccording to the 'umbrella species' concept, preserving and managing habitat for a single high-profile species also benefits a whole suite of other species that share its habitat -- but how well does this really work? Not all species that share the same general habitat necessarily have the same specific needs, and a new study from The Condor: Ornithological Applications finds that habitat manageme
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

Taming the multiverse: Stephen Hawking's final theory about the big bangProfessor Stephen Hawking's final theory on the origin of the universe has just been published.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

Recent work challenges view of early Mars, picturing a warm desert with occasional rainThe climate of early Mars is a subject of debate. A recent study suggests that the early Martian surface may not have been dominated by ice, but instead it may have been modestly warm and prone to rain, with only small patches of ice.
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The Atlantic

The White House Still Loves Joe ArpaioVice President Mike Pence was in Tempe, Arizona, on Tuesday night to tout the tax bill. But he praised a guest , too, saying that a “favorite” was in attendance: former Arizona Sheriff Joe Arpaio. Pence went on to call Arpaio a “great friend of this president” and a “tireless champion of strong borders and the rule of law.” Pence was, he told the crowd, “honored” to have the sheriff there. In Aug
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Elements from the stars—the unexpected discovery that upended astrophysics 66 years agoNearly 70 years ago, astronomer Paul Merrill was watching the sky through a telescope at Mount Wilson Observatory in Pasadena, California. As he observed the light coming from a distant star, he saw signatures of the element technetium.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Gap in financial literacy widens for couples the longer the relationship lasts, study suggestsAs couples mature together, they often grow apart in their level of interest and skill in handling their finances. A disparity in financial literacy that may be small or even nonexistent at first can increase over time depending on how much responsibility one partner undertakes, according to researchers at The University of Texas at Austin and the University of Colorado-Boulder.
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Viden

Zuckerberg gør grin med sin afhøring i KongressenDe seneste uger har Zuckerberg undskyldt igen og igen. Men tonen var en anden på Facebooks store udviklerkonference.
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New Scientist - News

AI can predict your personality just by how your eyes moveShifty looks or wide pupils, our eyes give away clues to our personality - a discovery that could help robots better understand and interact with humans
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Ultrafast laser pulse created by golden nanoparticlesA new study shows that organic dye material combined with metallic nanostructures can provide ultrafast lasing dynamics with short and rapidly appearing laser pulses.
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Ultrafast laser pulse created by golden nanoparticlesThe creation of a fast, tunable and stable nanoparticle-array laser is a stepping stone to affordable and efficient sensing and switching.New study shows that organic dye material combined with metallic nanostructures can provide ultrafast lasing dynamics with short and rapidly appearing laser pulses.
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Energy recovery of urban wasteResearchers from the University of Seville have proposed a system which is capable of converting waste in a more controlled manner, and, basically, in two stages: first, the solid is converted to gas in reducing conditions (that is, with the presence of little oxygen), and then the generated gas is burnt very efficiently in specifically optimized equipment.
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Nanodiamond turns into controllable light sourceA research group from ITMO University first time in the world developed a controlled light source based on nanodiamond. Experiments have shown that diamond shell doubles the emission speed light sources and helps to control them without any additional nano- and microstructures. This was achieved due to artificially created defects in a diamond crystal lattice. Obtained results are important for th
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News

ISIS online propaganda makes people feel nauseous but also provokes curiosityResearch shows that ISIS atrocity videos provoke a morbid curiosity among viewers, as well as disgust, discomfort and fear.
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Substance in Chinese medicine can cause cardiac arrhythmiaA medicinal plant frequently used in Traditional Chinese Medicine (TCM) -- Evodia rutaecarpa -- contains substances that can cause cardiac arrhythmia. This is what researchers from the Universities of Basel, Vienna and Utrecht have recently found out.
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News

New species in the North SeaExperts from the Alfred Wegener Institute and the universities of Oldenburg and Potsdam, Germany have confirmed the existence of a new cryptic amphipod species in the North Sea.
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Researchers discover connection between circadian rhythm and aggressionA research team including a researcher from the Faculty of Health and Medical Sciences has discovered a circuit in the brains of mice connecting circadian rhythm to aggressive behaviour. The discovery is particularly interesting to Alzheimer's patients who experience increased aggression at night. The researchers have developed special protein tools capable of turning off the cells in the brain ca
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News

A novel voltage peak in the metal nanowire-superconductor hybrid structureA novel voltage peak was detected when cooling the system across the proximity induced superconducting transition temperature in a crystalline gold nanowire contacted by a superconducting electrode. This work was recently reported in Science China-Physics, Mechanics & Astronomy (https://doi.org/10.1007/s11433-018-9210-x).
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Weather forecast model predicts complex patterns of volcanic ash dispersalNew research, led by the University of Bristol, has provided fresh insight into how huge volcanic ash plumes, which can critically disrupt aviation and cause major impact on the ground, are transported in the atmosphere.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Claiming credit for cyberattacksThe decision to claim credit for a cyberattack on a government or institution depends on both the goals of the attack and the characteristics of the attacker, according to a study co-authored by a UConn political scientist that is one of the first to look into the voluntary claiming of cybersecurity operations.
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Science | The Guardian

The secrets of resilience: what one woman’s extraordinary trauma – and survival – can teach usCarmen Tarleton was so badly beaten and burned by her ex-husband that she needed 38 operations and a face transplant. Yet she found a path back to happiness. What helps her – and others like her – retain their essential optimism? On 10 June 2007, Carmen Tarleton, then 38, was at home with her young daughters in Thetford, Vermont in the US, when her estranged husband broke into the house. Herbert
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Science | The Guardian

Fred Dunning obituaryAs curator of the Geological Museum in London in the 1970s and 80s, Fred Dunning, who has died aged 89, was responsible for moving that institution away from orderly display cases of rocks, minerals and fossils and towards something much more engaging. Fred became curator of the museum in 1970 and immediately showed that he was eager to share the magic and mystery of geology not just with existin
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

New way for scientists to see how cells moveScientists have developed a new way to see inside individual cells, and study how they move and operate inside the human body.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Could bats guide humans to clean drinking water in places where it's scarce?Desert life depends on reliable access to water. In Namibia's stark Namib Desert, where I spent 18 months doing research for my Ph.D., wildlife concentrates around natural springs. Increasingly, animals there also rely on man-made ponds intended for livestock.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Nanodiamond turns into controllable light sourceA research group from ITMO University has developed a controlled light source based on nanodiamond. Experiments have shown that the diamond shell doubles the emission speed light sources and helps to control them without any additional nano- and microstructures. This was achieved due to artificially created defects in a diamond crystal lattice. Obtained results are important for the development of
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Mining asteroids could unlock untold wealth – here's how to get startedSeveral privately funded space companies are locked in a race to claim the trillions of pounds worth of precious metals thought to exist in asteroids. The UK has now entered the race, with the Asteroid Mining Corporation becoming the first of these new firms in the country.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Energy recovery of urban wasteThe use of urban waste for energy creation, especially the use of technologies based in gasification, is presented as a more sustainable alternative than controlled dumping at a tip.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

Math sheds light on how living cells 'think'How does the 'brain' of a living cell work, allowing an organism to function and thrive in changing and unfavorable environments? Researchers have developed new mathematics to solve a longstanding mystery of how the incredibly complex biological networks within cells can adapt and reset themselves after exposure to a new stimulus.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

Paramedics find better drug to tame violent patientsParamedics are using a new drug to quickly calm violent patients and they have the data to prove it works. Researchers found the sedative, droperidol, was a safer and faster option for paramedics to use compared with the internationally accepted, midazolam. The drug is also easier to administer. Other ambulance services from around the world are now looking to make the change.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

Changing cities' food systems to help reduce carbon emissionsMany US cities and states are looking for ways to slash greenhouse gas emissions, including cap-and-trade programs, building-efficiency regulations, and boosting public transit and renewable energy sources. Now scientists report additional measures cities could take to further cut their carbon footprint: by tackling emissions related to food consumption and waste.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

CryoSat reveals retreat of Patagonian glaciersWhile ESA's CryoSat continues to provide clear insight into how much sea ice is being lost and how the Antarctic and Greenlandic ice sheets are changing, the mission has again surpassed its original scope by revealing exactly how mountain glaciers are also succumbing to change.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Warm wind melts snow in Antarctica in winter as wellEven though the sun does not shine in Antarctica in winter, in some places, snow on the glaciers can melt as a result of warm wind. Utrecht glacier researcher Peter Kuipers Munneke discovered that fact by combining the results of weather stations and satellite images. His findings were published in Geophysical Research Letters on Wednesday 2 May.
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News

New leads on treating dementia and Alzheimer'sA new research study by scientists in Australia and the US provides an explanation for why clinical trials of drugs reducing proteins in the brain that were thought to cause dementia and Alzheimer's have failed. The study has opened the way for potential new treatments with existing drugs.
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Cracking open the formation of fossil concretionsResearchers developed a unified model of the formation mechanism of spherical carbonate concretions, which often contain exceptionally well-preserved fossils. The carbon in the carbonate originates from the organisms preserved inside the concretions, and the surrounding muddy matrix limits diffusion and permeability, and thus causes supersaturation of carbonate at a reaction front. Calcite precipi
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Study sheds light on how 'dopamine neurons' contribute to memory formation in humansResearch from Cedars-Sinai sheds light on how the human brain rapidly forms new memories, providing insights into potential new treatments for memory disorders. A new study examined neurons that produce dopamine, a compound that acts as a transmitter for nerve impulses. It found that these dopamine neurons play a critical role in the formation of episodic memory, which allows people to remember su
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Gap in financial literacy widens for couples the longer the relationship lasts, study suggestsAs couples mature together, they often grow apart in their level of interest and skill in handling their finances. A disparity in financial literacy that may be small or even nonexistent at first can increase over time depending on how much responsibility one partner undertakes, according to researchers at The University of Texas at Austin and the University of Colorado-Boulder.
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Popular Science

How to recover your precious data from a seemingly-dead computerDIY And possibly bring it back to life. If your computer won't start up, don't panic. This guide will take you through troubleshooting tools to help you fix your computer—or at least recover your data.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Bacteria may be powerful weapon against antibiotic resistanceWhen I was a child, my parents gave me a sweet pink syrup to destroy the bacteria causing my sore throat. That memory is a testament to the power of antibiotics. But, through my research as a microbiologist over the past few years, I've learned that not only are some microbes immune to antibiotics but they can actually "eat" these drugs, using them as a nutritious food to grow and multiply.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Are public objections to wind farms overblown?While most surveys suggest that the public generally supports wind and solar power, opposition from local communities and residents sometimes blocks or delays specific new projects.
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Dagens Medicin

Stor indsats på gigtafdeling har givet 70 pct. færre udeblivelserReumatologisk Afdeling på Aarhus Universitetshospital har på to år reduceret antallet af udeblivelser kraftigt. Opkald fra klinikeren til udeblevne patienter er et af de midler, afdelingen har taget i brug.
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Dagens Medicin

Syddanmark og Midtjylland er klar til at samarbejde om epj-udviklingEfter Region Syddanmark har valgt samme epj-system som Region Midtjylland, har de to regioner ambitioner om at samarbejde om udvikling og dele omkostninger i fremtiden
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Paramedics find better drug to tame violent patientsAustralian paramedics are using a new drug to quickly calm violent patients and they have the data to prove it works. In a world-first research evaluation, researchers found the sedative, droperidol, was a safer and faster option for paramedics to use compared with the internationally accepted, midazolam. The drug is also easier to administer. Other ambulance services from around the world are now
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Math sheds light on how living cells 'think'How does the 'brain' of a living cell work, allowing an organism to function and thrive in changing and unfavorable environments? Researcher Dr. Robyn Araujo, from the Queensland University of Technology, Brisbane, Australia, has developed new mathematics to solve a longstanding mystery of how the incredibly complex biological networks within cells can adapt and reset themselves after exposure to
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Recent work challenges view of early Mars, picturing a warm desert with occasional rainThe climate of early Mars is a subject of debate. A recent study by Ramses Ramirez from the Earth-Life Science Institute (Tokyo Institute of Technology) and Robert Craddock from the National Air and Space Museum's Center for Earth and Planetary Studies (Smithsonian Institution) suggests that the early martian surface may not have been dominated by ice, but instead it may have been modestly warm an
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News

How do cells sense glutamine and control their autophagy and activation?Scientists at Osaka University clarified that the Pib2 complex directly bound to glutamine in yeast cells, which activated a signaling pathway for cell growth by suspending autophagy.
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Scientists discover the secret behind the stability of carbon isotopesAn international research collaboration led by Osaka University has provided experimental and theoretical evidence for the existence of the magic number of six in carbon isotopes. The researchers experimentally determined the radius of protons in the nuclei of different carbon isotopes. The results were combined with those of calculations and other data analyses, revealing that a proton number of
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Orange county teen dating violence is twice the national averageOrange County teens are facing varied and more frequent types of dating violence than any generation before them. Chapman University researchers have partnered with Orange County domestic violence agency Laura's House to determine how prevalent this issue is amongst teens to aid prevention efforts.
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Teen tanning addiction afflicts minorities in Los AngelesTanning addiction plagues teenage minorities in Los Angeles, and that dependency is associated with marijuana abuse, obsessive-compulsive disorder and other mental health issues. For decades, tanning and tanning addiction was thought to be a problem prevalent almost solely among white, college-age women; however, research by USC's Kimberly Miller and others are beginning to dispel that myth.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Kanpur leads WHO blacklist of cities with worst air pollutionResidents of Kanpur reacted with dismay Wednesday after the Indian city was found to have the worst air quality in a global World Health Organization survey that urged the nation to clean up its act.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Higher humpback whale pregnancy rates suggest they are reboundingA team of researchers with members from several institutions in the U.S. has found that pregnancy rates for humpback whales living near Antarctica are increasing. In their paper published in Royal Society Open Science, the group describes studying the whales and what the increased rates may mean for them.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Spring melts a path through frozen Finnish archipelagoSpring has started to melt a way through the giant frozen expanse of this archipelago in western Finland, as cracks in the ice turn into rust-coloured pools around wooden jetties in a sign of the coming summer.
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Science | The Guardian

The universe is an egg and the moon isn't real: notes from a Flat Earth conferenceMichael Marshall attended the UK’s annual gathering of people who share the unshakeable belief that the Earth is flat There was the three-hour presentation which contended that the universe is a giant egg. There was the Manchester musician who posited that the Earth is the shape of a diamond. And another who believes that the moon is a projection. Welcome to the Flat Earth UK Convention , a rauco
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Futurity.org

Fewer doctors withhold opioids from black patientsFewer doctors are discriminating against black patients when prescribing narcotics for pain relief, research finds. Racial disparities in pain management are well-documented, with doctors historically more willing to prescribe opioids to whites than to other racial and ethnic groups. In light of new national policies to improve prescribing practices, researchers wanted to know whether racial and
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Over 10,000 endangered tortoises are rescued in MadagascarInternational conservationists in Madagascar have been treating more than 10,000 critically endangered radiated tortoises that were seized from traffickers who had crammed them into a home with no access to food or water.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Pedal power: the rise of cargo bikes in GermanyWhether they're hauling parcels or children, cargo bikes are becoming a familiar sight in German cities as the nippy, clean alternative to cars and delivery vans—and shaking up urban transport in the process.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Math sheds light on how living cells 'think'How does the 'brain' of a living cell work, allowing an organism to function and thrive in changing and unfavourable environments?
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Ingeniøren

Ringvej i São Paulo gav utilsigtet gevinstOmfartsvejen skulle egentlig lette trængslen i centrum, men kom til at fungere som en miljøzone for tung trafik.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Internal control helps corals resist acidificationScientists from the ARC Centre of Excellence for Coral Reef Studies (Coral CoE) at The University of Western Australia (UWA) have found that some corals are able to combat the effects of ocean acidification by controlling their own chemistry.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

New insight into why most nanoparticles don't make it through biological barriersThe biological barriers our bodies have developed evolve to keep us safe from infection and parasites. But they also filter out many of the nanoparticle drugs that hold such promise for treatment. Working out why is central to the development of next-generation drugs.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

A new point-of-need nanodiagnostic for better healthcareThe Nano4 project takes fast, reliable and low-cost molecular point of care (POC) diagnostic tools down to the nano-scale, offering better healthcare outcomes for patients.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Taming the multiverse—Stephen Hawking's final theory about the big bangProfessor Stephen Hawking's final theory on the origin of the universe, which he worked on in collaboration with Professor Thomas Hertog from KU Leuven, has been published today in the Journal of High Energy Physics.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

NASA greenlights self-assembling space telescopeSure, it sounds kind of far out: a modular space telescope, nearly 100 feet across, composed of individual units launched as ancillary payloads on space missions over a period of months and years, units that will navigate autonomously to a predetermined point in space and self-assemble.
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Let's get physical: Breast cancer survivors on the movePhysical activity is an effective way to help improve the many mental and physical side effects of breast cancer treatment. Yet, studies show up to 70 per cent of breast cancer survivors are not getting enough activity. This may be about to change thanks to new research from UBC's Okanagan campus that demonstrates that financial support and incentives are effective in increasing physical activity
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Rethinking the umbrella species conceptAccording to the 'umbrella species' concept, preserving and managing habitat for a single high-profile species also benefits a whole suite of other species that share its habitat -- but how well does this really work? Not all species that share the same general habitat necessarily have the same specific needs, and a new study from The Condor: Ornithological Applications finds that habitat manageme
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Wintering warblers choose agriculture over forestEffective conservation for long-distance migrants requires knowing what's going on with them year-round -- not just when they're in North America during the breeding season. A new study from The Condor: Ornithological Applications uncovers yellow warblers' surprising habitat preferences in their winter home in Mexico and raises questions about what their use of agricultural habitat could mean for
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Where brain cells get their information may determine their roles in diseasesSalk scientists find differences in communication pathways to two cell types implicated in psychiatric and movement disorders
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Internal control helps corals resist acidificationScientists from the ARC Centre of Excellence for Coral Reef Studies (Coral CoE) at The University of Western Australia (UWA) have found that some corals are able to combat the effects of ocean acidification by controlling their own chemistry.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Improved understanding of groundbreaking liquid-metal 2-D techniqueLast year, FLEET researchers at RMIT developed a ground-breaking new method of depositing atomically-thin (two-dimensional) crystals using molten metals, described as a 'once-in-a-decade' advance.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Clearwing moths found to fly like bees to enhance deceptionA team of researchers with members from Poland, Australia and the U.S. has found that some types of clearwing moths fly like bees to avoid predators. In their paper published in the journal Biology Letters, the group describes their study of the insects in Southeast Asian rainforests and what they found.
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Dagens Medicin

Slagelse Sygehus har ansat to nye ledende overlæger til to medicinske afdelingerBenedikte Wanscher og Lene Marie Isaksen tiltræder som ledende overlæger på to medicinske afdelinger på Slagelse Sygehus.
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Facebook F8 Liveblog Day Two: All the News, as It HappensJoin us for live coverage of Facebook F8's day two keynote, starting at 9:30am PDT.
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The Doomy Gloomy Revival of Old-School First-Person ShootersTwo new games are bringing back the narrative strokes of classic shooters—and that's awesome.
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Feed: All Latest

Want to Prune Trees More Easily? Use PhysicsA blade will slice into a limb at some particular minimum pressure—but there are different ways to reach that value.
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Futurity.org

At this rate, it’ll take centuries to close STEM’s gender gapGender parity in some areas of the STEMM (science, technology, engineering, math, and medicine) workforce could be centuries away unless we systematically identify and close the gender gap, according to a new study. By analyzing 10 million academic papers, and the genders of their 36 million authors, researchers at the University of Melbourne have gained this new insight into when STEMM fields co
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The Scientist RSS

Image of the Day: Swiss Army CrustaceanThe tools researchers used to study how this amphipod's limbs develop could help inform our understanding of cell lineages and fates.
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The Atlantic

Does Starbucks Understand the Science of Racial Bias?Starbucks PhiladelphiaMany have seen the viral video by now: Last month, two black men arrived early to a business meeting at a Starbucks in Philadelphia, and were led out in handcuffs after one man asked to use the bathroom without making a purchase, then calmly joined his friend at a table. In the moment, their expressions were impassive, but they later described feeling disbelief and fear. After days of protests an
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Taming the multiverse: Stephen Hawking's final theory about the big bangProfessor Stephen Hawking's final theory on the origin of the universe, which he worked on in collaboration with Professor Thomas Hertog from KU Leuven, has been published today in the Journal of High Energy Physics.
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Hawking's last paper co-authored with ERC grantee posits new cosmologyProfessor Stephen Hawking's final theory on the origin of the universe, which he worked on in collaboration with Professor Thomas Hertog from KU Leuven, has been published this week in the Journal of High-Energy Physics.
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Ingeniøren

Forskere bekæmper hjernekræft med den frygtede zikavirusBrasilianske forskere har fundet tegn på, at den zika, der giver hjerneskader, brugt på den rettet måde kan angribe hjernetumorer. Efter vellykkede forsøg på mus vil lægerne teste metoden på de første mennesker.
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Scientific American Content: Global

How to Build a Better Flu VaccineAn experimental approach may arm immune cells against many strains, eliminating annual guesswork -- Read more on ScientificAmerican.com
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Rethinking the umbrella species conceptAccording to the "umbrella species" concept, preserving and managing habitat for a single high-profile species also benefits a whole suite of other species that share its habitat—but how well does this really work? Not all species that share the same general habitat necessarily have the same specific needs, and a new study from The Condor: Ornithological Applications finds that habitat management
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Wintering warblers choose agriculture over forestEffective conservation for long-distance migrants requires knowing what's going on with them year-round—not just when they're in North America during the breeding season. A new study from The Condor: Ornithological Applications uncovers Yellow Warblers' surprising habitat preferences in their winter home in Mexico and raises questions about what their use of agricultural habitat could mean for the
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Longest straight-line ocean path on planet Earth calculatedA pair of researchers, one with United Technologies Research Center, the other with IBM Research, has developed an algorithm that can be used to determine the longest straight-line path over water on Earth. In their paper uploaded to the arXiv preprint server, Rohan Chabukswar and Kushal Mukherjee describe their algorithm and what it revealed.
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New Scientist - News

Mediterranean diet delays Alzheimer’s for three extra yearsFilling your diet with plants, fish and oil and limiting your intake of processed food may slow the build-up of amyloid plaque, delaying the onslaught of Alzheimer's
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Futurity.org

How farming screwed up Midwest carbon storageChanges in land use and agricultural practices affect the amount of carbon stored in Midwestern soils, according to new research. The results show that management practices can help to store carbon, a component of major greenhouse gases such as carbon dioxide and methane, and keep it from releasing into the atmosphere where it may contribute to climate change. The study, which appears in the jour
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

Strategy prevents blindness in mice with retinal degenerationNew research outlines a strategy that in mouse models significantly delayed the onset of blindness from inherited retinal degeneration such as retinitis pigmentosa.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

Unconventional immune cell capable of fighting viral infectionsResearch has identified a novel unconventional type of immune cell capable of fighting viral infections.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

Plant breeders balance shared innovation, revenueCrop breeding research and innovation requires funding. But funding -- and revenue from the crops developed -- is increasingly hard to obtain. In response, a group of plant breeders met to discuss best practices. A recent paper summarizes their recommendations.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

Microbes living in a toxic volcanic lake could hold clues to possible life on MarsResearchers have discovered microbes living in one of the harshest environments on Earth. Their findings could guide scientists looking for signs of ancient life on Mars.
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Latest Headlines | Science News

Neutron stars shed neutrinos to cool down quicklyScientists find the first clear evidence of rapid cooling of a neutron star by neutrino emission.
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Dagens Medicin

Medicinrådet uddeler første ’topkarakter’Lungekræftmidlet Alecensa giver ‘stor klinisk merværdi’ i forhold til behandling med Xalkori, skriver Medicinrådet i et udkast til en vurderingsrapport
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

Flares in the universe can now be studied on EarthSolar flares, cosmic radiation, and the northern lights are well known phenomena. But exactly how their enormous energy arises is not as well understood. Now, physicists have discovered a new way to study these spectacular space plasma phenomena in a laboratory environment.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

Risk factors involved in the early onset and severity of childhood obesityA family history of obesity, high blood pressure and lipid levels, type 2 diabetes and coronary heart disease should all be considered high risk factors for the severity and early onset of childhood obesity, reveals a new study. The study, which assessed these risk factors together from children's parents, siblings and grandparents, also finds the most severely obese children -- even the very youn
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

Bloomberg era's emphasis on 'health in all policies' improved New Yorkers' heart healthFrom 2002 to 2013, New York City implemented a series of policies prioritizing the public's health in areas beyond traditional healthcare policies and illustrated the potential to reduce cardiovascular disease risk. This strategy is known as employing a 'health in all policies' approach. Researchers catalogued health-relevant legislation in New York City from 1998 to 2017 and found that 7.4 percen
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

New research warns of a resistance gene at risk in oilseed rapeA new study by University of Hertfordshire researchers has discovered that an important source of gene resistance against one of the leading pathogens of oilseed rape, Phoma stem canker, is becoming less effective, which could lead to substantial losses to the oilseed rape breeding industry and to arable farmers in the UK.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Introduction of Craigslist increased prostitution across U.S., study saysAs Craigslist expanded across the United States, the free classifieds website also bolstered the sex industry, according to a new study by researchers at the University of Minnesota Carlson School of Management and the New York University Stern School of Business.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Recent Australian droughts may be the worst in 800 yearsAustralia is a continent defined by extremes, and recent decades have seen some extraordinary climate events. But droughts, floods, heatwaves, and fires have battered Australia for millennia. Are recent extreme events really worse than those in the past?
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Innovative nanotransistor for easy measurement of electrolyte concentration in bloodTesting the blood of patients that doctors believe may be suffering from an electrolyte imbalance is usually a major effort because various selective tests have to be performed. Electrolytes are certain nutrients or chemicals in the body that carry out a number of important functions, such as regulating the heartbeat. A disruption of the electrolyte balance can be dangerous. Researchers working in
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Physics team investigates influence of ions on atomic motionsIn batteries, fuel cells or technical coatings, central chemical processes take place on the surface of electrodes which are in contact with liquids. During these processes, atoms move over the surface, but how this exactly happens has hardly been researched. Physicists at Kiel University want to gain a better understanding of these motions, and the role of the chemical components involved. To do
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Scientific American Content: Global

Is the Vegan Impossible Burger Healthy for You?These juicy plant-based burgers could fool even a meat lover. But are they actually healthier for us? -- Read more on ScientificAmerican.com
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Debunking three common myths about divorce and abuse in Muslim communitiesA recent ABC News investigation highlighted the difficulties some Muslim women in Australia have experienced in trying to obtain a religious divorce from imams. This in turn can many times trap Muslim women in abusive relationships for years.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Six rules for improving city bus servicesPublic transport that is safe, efficient and effective is a core priority when it comes to city-building. While trains get a lot of attention, buses can also deliver successful public transport services – if we can overcome some common problems.
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New Scientist - News

This mind-reading hearing aid knows who you’re listening toAn ear mounted device with a battery of brain-scanning electrodes knows which sounds you're paying attention to – it might also help you get a good night's sleep
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The Atlantic

Animating the Best of The Atlantic's ArchivesArt came to The Atlantic only belatedly. The magazine’s first issue, published in November 1857, comprised 128 pages of text without any visual accompaniment except for a small portrait of John Winthrop, a 17th-century governor of the Massachusetts Bay Colony, on the front. Aside from the occasional small sketch or header in this vein, no illustrations really graced the magazine’s pages or its co
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Changing cities' food systems to help reduce carbon emissionsMany US cities and states are looking for ways to slash greenhouse gas emissions, including cap-and-trade programs, building-efficiency regulations, and boosting public transit and renewable energy sources. Now scientists report in ACS' Environmental Science & Technology additional measures cities could take to further cut their carbon footprint: by tackling emissions related to food consumption a
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

To save coastal property from rising seas, we need collaborative planningIf we are going to confront climate change effectively, said Radley Horton, an associate research professor at Lamont Doherty Earth Observatory (LDEO) of Columbia University, scientists need to translate their work and "co-generate" ideas in cooperation with powerful actors in society. "We have to meet them in their decision-making context," he said.
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What Mark Zuckerberg Gets Wrong—and Right—About Hate SpeechOpinion: Artificial intelligence can help identify hate speech, but even the best AI can’t replace human beings.
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The Tricky Logistics of Delivering a Spacecraft on the InterstateMcCollister's hauls a lot of oversized things, from astronaut capsules to weather-monitoring satellites to military aircraft. And it goes fine—usually.
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NASA’s InSight Lander Will Probe Mars, Measure Its QuakesBrace yourself, Mars. NASA's sending a 5-meter probe to take your temperature.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Scientists study declining numbers of bonefish in high-stress watersAnglers in South Florida are catching fewer bonefish. FIU scientists believe answers could be found in Cuba.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Stricter FAA regulations on pilots linked to higher fares, fewer flightsWhen federal legislators passed a bill in 2010 requiring longer rest periods and more flight training for commercial airline pilots, the goal was to improve passenger safety. But a University of California, Irvine study has found that the regulations had unintended consequences: higher fares and fewer choices for air travelers.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Is nature exclusively left handed? Researchers study chilled atoms to find outThe study of how atoms radioactively decay has played a critical role in developing the standard model, our modern understanding of our universe's evolution since the Big Bang. Experiments investigating one form of decay, where a radioactive nucleus emits a beta particle to become more stable, have led to revolutionary ideas that are part of the standard model. The most surprising result from beta
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Researchers resolve the formation mechanism of spherical carbonate concretionsAll over the world, spectacular fossils have frequently been found preserved inside solid, roughly spherical rocks called "concretions." From geologists to casual observers, many have wondered why these hardened masses of carbonate formed around dead organisms, with round shapes and sharp boundaries with the surrounding material, typically in marine mud and mudstone.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Glutamine-dependent activation of cell growth discoveredThe human body consists of about 35 trillion cells, so it could be said that overall body growth is the growth of individual cells. One essential nutrient for cells are amino acids, the building blocks of proteins (one of the three major nutrients). The presence or absence of amino acids regulates cell growth.
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The Atlantic

How Facebook Became the Tech Company People Love to HateHis congressional testimony behind him, his company’s shares rebounding, a confident Mark Zuckerberg took the stage in San Jose on Tuesday at F8, Facebook’s annual conference. The Facebook CEO was as comfortable as I’ve ever seen him, as if all the trials of the last couple months leveled him up. Zuckerberg spent the first 15 minutes of the two-day event in the mode he’s been in for a year: talki
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Popular Science

Consumer DNA tests can’t tell you much, but they sure can get your relatives arrestedScience It's time to think about who has your data. The suspected Golden State Killer’s apprehension last week caught a lot of people off guard. Prior to the big reveal that detectives were able to trace the alleged…
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Scientists discover the secret behind the stability of carbon isotopesA magic number is a number of protons or neutrons in the nucleus of an elemental particle that results in much greater stability than that of nuclei with other numbers of protons or neutrons.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Changing cities' food systems to help reduce carbon emissionsMany U.S. cities and states are looking for ways to slash greenhouse gas emissions, including cap-and-trade programs, building-efficiency regulations, and boosting public transit and renewable energy sources. Now scientists report in ACS' Environmental Science & Technology additional measures cities could take to further cut their carbon footprint: by tackling emissions related to food consumption
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New on MIT Technology Review

Researchers warn of new flaw that lets hackers blow up factories
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Ingeniøren

DTU-professor: Deterministiske CPU’er kan forhindre fremtidige Spectre og Meltdown-hullerDet er svært at spå om, hvor fremtidens angreb kommer fra. Men der er i hvert fald råd for Spectre og Meltdown, uden at ydelsen mindskes.
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Scientific American Content: Global

A Wave of Resurgent Epidemics Has Hit the U.S.Resurgent outbreaks of infectious diseases are sickening thousands, and the causes are societal -- Read more on ScientificAmerican.com
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Futurity.org

Fracking chemicals may harm developing immune systemExposure to fracking chemicals in utero may harm the immune system and diminish the ability of female offspring to fend off diseases like multiple sclerosis, according to a new study with mice. Fracking, also called hydraulic fracturing or unconventional oil and gas extraction, involves pumping millions of gallons of chemical-laden water deep underground to fracture rock and release oil and gas.
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Science | The Guardian

What is geologic time, and how does it work?We all recognise the names of some time periods such as Jurassic or Devonian - but how many us of actually understand how geologists divide up the earth’s past? I’m sure you all remember where you were when you found out that the statistical correlation of magneto-biostratigraphic calcareous nannofossils with M-sequence magnetic anomalies approximated new boundaries for Tethyan Kimmeridgian of Sa
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

The effect of gut microbes on the mouse brain depends on both sex and stage of developmentImmune cells in a mouse's brain react differently to changes in gut-dwelling bacteria depending on whether the mouse is male or female and whether it is a fetus or an adult, A*STAR researchers have found. This discovery has potential implications for brain development and disorders.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Recognizing "spin" in the scientific literatureFacts are facts and data are data—both reveal objective truths. But, subjectivity is introduced the moment those facts and data are interpreted. In other words, they are susceptible to spin, or the biased interpretation of facts and data to persuade opinion in favor or against those facts and data. Therefore, individuals who are not entrenched in the science community are at a severe disadvantage
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Science-Based Medicine

Stem Cell Tourism Comes HomeYou used to have to go to China to get ripped off by fraudulent stem cell clinics. Now you can get conned right here at home.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

Food for thought: Ketogenic diets reduce athletes' anaerobic performance, study findsResearchers found that after following a ketogenic diet, study participants did not perform as well at anaerobic exercise tasks.
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Ingeniøren

VIDEO: 26-etagers højhus kollapser efter 90 minutters brandEn gaslæk var muligvis årsagen til, at et højhus i São Paulo i Brasilien kollapsede i nat. Bygningen, der var blevet forladt af de oprindelige lejere og siden besat af cirka 50 familier. Indtil videre har politiet fundet én omkommet men frygter at finde flere.
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Scientific American Content: Global

Shock and Thaw--Alaskan Sea Ice Just Took a Steep, Unprecedented DiveWeather conditions and a boost from global warming led to the stunning record low ice cover in winter 2018 -- Read more on ScientificAmerican.com
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Live Science

Gooey, Magma Ocean May Have Once Roiled Inside the MoonThe ancient moon may have had a gooey interior that likely triggered the lunar magnetic field.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

Traffic-related pollution linked to risk of asthma in childrenNew research suggests that long-term exposure to traffic-related pollution significantly increases the risk of pediatric asthma, especially in early childhood. Children living within a football field's length of major roadways had nearly three times the odds of pediatric asthma compared to children who lived four times farther away.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

For high school baseball pitchers, extra throws on game day add up but go uncountedFor high school baseball pitchers, limiting throws during a game helps to prevent fatigue and injuries. But nearly half the number of pitches -- ones thrown during warm-ups and in the bullpen -- are typically not counted, adding significantly to a pitcher's risk of injury, new findings show.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

Formate prevents most folic acid-resistant neural tube defects in miceA multi-institutional research team has developed a novel folic acid-resistant neural tube defect mouse model of the human condition by silencing the Slc25a32 gene, and, in most of the mutant mice, neural tube defects can be prevented by formate supplementation.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

Scientists discover balance of thermal energy and low climate stress drive coral species diversityMarine scientists have identified two key factors that create the ideal conditions needed for high species diversity in coral reefs: thermal energy in the form of warm water and low climate stress.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

Novel theranostic approach for treating pancreatic cancer patients shows promiseGerman researchers have developed a novel diagnostic and therapeutic (theranostic) procedure for patients with ductal pancreatic adenocarcinoma, a deadly cancer with an extremely poor prognosis (five-year survival rate of less than 5 percent) and limited treatment options.
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BBC News - Science & Environment

Prof Stephen Hawking's multiverse finaleIn his last paper, the Cambridge physicist tackles multiple universes and a cosmic paradox.
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New Scientist - News

Giant sea spiders sit and wait for prey to knock themselves outHuge sea spiders move excruciatingly slowly, but they can still catch prey animals that move much faster than them – because their prey sometimes crash into the seafloor
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Nyheder - Forskning - Videnskab

Forskere "snigmyrder" sygdomsfremkaldende bakterier i tyndtarmen med cocktail af viraDet er lykkedes forskere fra Københavns Universitet at dræbe sygdomsfremkalende E. coli-bakterier...
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Social Media Makes Us Soldiers in the War Against OurselvesBots don’t care what they share, but our very humanness—craving that which shocks and disgusts the most—may be our undoing online.
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Insect-Borne Diseases Have Tripled. Here's Why.More people get sick from mosquito, tick, and flea bites than ever before. Climate change is a culprit, yes. But there are other factors at play.
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F8 2018: Facebook Needs to Stop Bad VR Apps Before They StartWith AR and VR apps, Facebook has the chance to crack down on bad actors early in on the game. Will it get it right this time?
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A California Ruling Could Force Uber and Lyft to Change How They OperateThe California Supreme Court said more workers should be classified as employees, hurting companies such as Uber and Lyft that treat workers as contractors.
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Buying a Tesla? Don't Count on That $7,500 Tax CreditTesla Elon MuskTesla's about to max out its use of the federal tax credit, setting up yet another hurdle for the struggling automaker as challenges mount from GM, Ford, Volvo, VW, and others.
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New on MIT Technology Review

Facebook’s head of social VR admits there isn’t much to do in its social VR appRachel Franklin says she’s working on it, and she also talked to MIT Technology Review about how virtual reality is becoming more inclusive.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Researcher exposes the reality of food insecurityA family discussing scavenging for food in rubbish bins and the ethics of killing a pet rabbit for meat is just one story from Dr. Rebekah Graham's doctoral study on New Zealanders experiencing food insecurity.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

It all comes down to roughnessLucio Isa and his team of researchers have explained how the surface characteristics of microspheres affect rapid increases in the viscosity of suspensions, thus laying the groundwork for applications such as smoothly flowing cement.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Shake rattle and codeSouthern California defines cool. The perfect climes of San Diego, the glitz of Hollywood, the magic of Disneyland. The geology is pretty spectacular, as well.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Guardians of the Ring—Researchers reveal structure of protein involved in inflammatory diseasesWhen the body detects a threat, be it a viral invader or an Alzheimer's disease plaque, guardian proteins on the cell surface kick into gear.
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Scientific American Content: Global

The Problem with Asperger'sIt’s not the condition; it’s Hans Asperger, who wasn’t the first to describe it in any case, and whose research was influenced by Nazism -- Read more on ScientificAmerican.com
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Why public spaces in European cities are becoming homogenizedEuropean public spaces are becoming more original, but also more homogeneous. The author of an architecture thesis, written at EPFL, explains this paradox and calls on critics and public authorities to do something about it.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Is your genome really your own? The public and forensic value of DNAWhen Joseph DeAngelo was arrested in the United States last month over a series of 30-year-old murders and assaults, attention quickly focused on how the suspect was found.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

DNA sequences suggest 250 people made up original Native American founding populationA University of Kansas anthropological geneticist is part of an international research team working to shed light upon one of the unanswered questions concerning the peopling of the New World: Namely, what was the size of the original founding population of the Americas?
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Dagens Medicin

#40 Palæstina – En dag i den mobile klinikI Palæstina lever tusindvis af mennesker uden adgang til basale sundhedsydelser – en mobil klinik skal sikre, at lægen kommer ud til patienten.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

Researchers study how to improve southern sea otter survivalAnalysis of 13 years of demographic and genetic data from 1,006 sea otters to assess multiple effective population size estimators, as well as temporal trends in genetic diversity and population genetic structure, show a need for development of new delisting criteria for the southern sea otter.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

Virus inhibits immune response of caterpillars and plantsIt is well known that certain wasps suppress the immune systems of their caterpillar hosts so they can successfully raise their young within those hosts. Now researchers show that, in addition to suppressing caterpillar immune systems, wasps also suppress the defense mechanisms of the plants on which the caterpillars feed, which ensures that the caterpillars will continue to provide a suitable env
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Science : NPR

Iowa Legislature Passes 'Fetal Heartbeat' Bill To Ban Abortions After 6 WeeksThe bill would make most abortions illegal after a fetal heartbeat can be detected. Republican Gov. Kim Reynolds has not said whether she will sign the measure.
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Scientific American Content: Global

When Love Breeds Madness: Read This If You've Ever Googled Your ExIn a new book a clinical psychologist describes patients who developed consuming romantic obsessions -- Read more on ScientificAmerican.com
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Ingeniøren

Keynote på Infosecurity: Anonymisering af masseindsamlede lokationsdata er en narresutDet er relativt nemt at identificere et individ ud fra masseindsamlede lokationsdata, der i udgangspunktet påstås og lader til at være anonymiserede, lyder det fra lektor på Imperial College i London, der holder keynote på Version2 Infosecurity 2. maj.
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Ingeniøren

Google-grundlægger advarer mod den mørke side af AIManer til stor forsigtighed, ansvarlighed og ydmyghed.
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Ingeniøren

Ny miljøminister: Regeringens sikre kort til øretævernes holdepladsVenstres politiske ordfører, Jakob Ellemann-Jensen, overtager posten som miljø- og fødevareminister, hvor slagsmålene med oppositionen er størst.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Rapid changes in the high ArcticA new study led by an INSTAAR postdoctoral researcher has found dramatic shifts in the ecosystem of a remote archipelago in the Arctic Ocean in response to recent climate change.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

Apps for children should emphasize parent and child choice, researchers sayParents don't need to fear their children playing with iPads and other devices, researchers say. Mindful play with an adult, combined with thoughtful design features, can prove beneficial to young developing minds. New research shows that thoughtfully designed content that intentionally supports parent-child interactions facilitated the same kind of play and development as analog toys.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

Extreme mobility of mantis shrimp eyesNew research has uncovered fresh findings about the most mobile eyes in the animal kingdom -- the eyes of the mantis shrimp.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

Vitamin D improves weight gain and brain development in malnourished childrenHigh dose vitamin D supplements improve weight gain and the development of language and motor skills in malnourished children, according to a new study.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

To improve future relationship with your kids, turn up the musicChildren who grow up listening to music with their parents report having better quality relationships with their moms and dads when they reach young adulthood, researchers found.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

Wearable fitness monitors useful in cancer treatment, study findsWearable fitness trackers, such as Fitbits, that measure steps taken per day may be a useful tool to evaluate and help treat cancer patients, researchers have shown.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Superman's laser vision a step closer to realitySuperman's ability to shoot laser beams from his eyes has come a step closer to reality, with discoveries made by a research team at the University of St Andrews.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

Blood type O patients may have higher risk of death from severe traumaBlood type O is associated with high death rates in severe trauma patients, according to a study that involved 901 Japanese emergency care patients.
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Dagens Medicin

Ny vejledning skal sikre kræftpatienter støtte fra praktiserende lægeOpfølgning på patienter, der har eller har haft kræft, er en voksende opgave i almen praksis. Ny vejledning fra Dansk Selskab for Almen Medicin peger på samtalen med patienter som et af vigtigste redskaber til at sikre bedre livskvalitet og helbred.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Researcher examines how people perceive interruptions in conversationWe all know that unpleasant feeling when we're talking about something interesting and halfway through our sentence we're interup – "Wait, what's for dinner?" – pted.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Tuneable genetic 'clocks' might lead to improved biotech strategiesImperial scientists have worked out how to fine-tune cellular clocks, which might lead to optimised production of drugs, biofuels and other chemicals.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

A physical basis for the cognitive process of decision-makingIn experiments studying how fruit flies distinguish between ever closer concentrations of an odour, the researchers led by Professor Gero Miesenböck had previously identified a tiny minority of about 200 nerve cells in the brain as critical for decision-making.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Image: Airway monitoring experiment for astronautsIn recognition of World Asthma Day, here is ESA astronaut Alexander Gerst preparing to take preflight measurements for the Airway Monitoring experiment, which looks into inflammation of the airway.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Material to help transition to clean hydrogen fuelThe ability of plants to harvest sunlight and split water into hydrogen and oxygen through photosynthesis has long fascinated scientists, who have sought to replicate the process to capture hydrogen as a renewable and sustainable fuel source.
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The Atlantic

A Republican Plan Could Worsen Rural America's Food CrisisThe quinquennial reapproval of the Farm Bill is back before Congress, only this time with a bit more drama than the past. The draft under consideration in the House will implement sweeping changes—including strengthened work requirements in the SNAP program —in nutrition-program eligibility. The defenses of the proposed changes and the attacks against them both center on a set of racialized urban
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Ingeniøren

Iværksætteren Tommy Ahlers fra Løvens Hule til ForskningsministerietEn række af den tidligere ministers kæpheste står og venter i entreen til den nye mand i stolen.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Eco detergents – for greener whites in the airing cupboard'Clean' and 'soft' are words strongly associated with washing products and fabric softeners, and soon they are set to be described as 'green' too with less chemical waste and longer-lasting action.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Scientists find a new way to make novel materials by 'un-squeezing'Some materials can morph into multiple crystal structures with very different properties. For instance, squeezing a soft form of carbon produces diamond, a harder and more brilliant form of carbon. The Kurt Vonnegut novel "Cat's Cradle" featured ice-nine, a fictional form of water with a much higher melting point than regular ice that threatened to irreversibly freeze all the water on Earth.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

New class of single-atom catalysts for carbon nanotubes exhibit outstanding electrochemical reduction of CO2 to COExperiments using X-rays on two beamlines at the Australian Synchrotron have helped characterise a new class of single atom catalysts (SACs) supported on carbon nanotubes that exhibit outstanding electrochemical reduction of CO2 to CO. A weight loading of 20 wt% for the new class, nickel single atom nitrogen doped carbon nanotubes (NiSA-N-CNTs), is believed to be the highest metal loading for SACs
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Ingeniøren

Ny ventil slap Industri 4.0 ind på fabrikkenLanceringen af en ny produktserie gav ventilproducenten Broen mulighed for at bygge en højt automatiseret produktionslinje op fra bunden. Linjen har været med til at skubbe grænserne for, hvordan virksomheden arbejder med automatisering og digitalisering.
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Research identifies unconventional immune cell capable of fighting viral infectionsResearch led by the University of Birmingham has identified a novel unconventional type of immune cell capable of fighting viral infections.
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Risk factors involved in the early onset and severity of childhood obesityA family history of obesity, high blood pressure and lipid levels, type 2 diabetes and coronary heart disease should all be considered high risk factors for the severity and early onset of childhood obesity, reveals a new study. The study, which assessed these risk factors together from children's parents, siblings and grandparents, also finds the most severely obese children -- even the very youn
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The Atlantic

Competing Visions of Islam Will Shape Europe in the 21st CenturyAkbar Ahmed was born a subject of the British Raj. He devoted his career to building a modern Pakistani state, accepting some of his government’s most dangerous jobs, including political commissioner in the tribal agency of Waziristan. He rose to represent Pakistan as its high commissioner in the United Kingdom. Since retiring from government, he has taught at American University in Washington, D
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Dagens Medicin

Regional PLO-formand frygter sammenbrud i lægevagtenDen aftale, som de praktiserende læger indgik med Region Sjælland sidste år for at forhindre, at lægevagten lukkede i store dele af regionen, er utilstrækkelig, mener formand i PLO-Sjælland, Ulrik Hesislev. Han står atter med 400-500 ubesatte vagter, og uden radikale ændringer frygter han et sammenbrud.
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Dagens Medicin

Hjalte Aaberg stopper som regionsdirektør i HovedstadenNår Hjalte Aabergs kontrakt udløber 31. december 2018, fratræder han sin stilling som regionsdirektør i Region Hovedstaden.
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Ingeniøren

ANALYSE: Bosch vil redde dieselmotoren med teknologisk fix - men skal den overhovedet reddes?Hvis dieseludstødning nu kan gøres ren, hvad er så argumentet for at udfase teknologien? Tyskland ønsker det i hvert fald ikke.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Wood frogs' No. 1 option: Hold in pee all winter to surviveIf you've ever been unable to find a bathroom in a moment of need, you know the gotta-go feeling. That's nothing compared to the wood frog, which doesn't urinate all winter.
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Dagens Medicin

Michael Dupont går på fagpolitisk pension
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Ingeniøren

Danske biler pulser mere CO2 udDer kommer mere CO2 ud af udstødningen fra nye danske biler end tidligere. Samme tendens ses i hele EU. Måske skyldes det, at salget af dieselbiler er faldet.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Nine out of 10 people breathing polluted air: WHOMore than 90 percent of the global population is breathing in high levels of pollutants, the World Health Organization said Wednesday, blaming poor air quality for some seven million deaths annually.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Qantas orders six more Dreamliner planes as jumbo bows outAustralian national carrier Qantas on Wednesday ordered six Dreamliner planes from aviation giant Boeing to replace the last of its ageing jumbo jets, which have been a staple of the firm's fleet since 1971.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Xerox CEO to resign in settlement with top shareholdersThe CEO of US photocopier and printer maker Xerox is stepping down to end a battle with shareholders opposed to a planned takeover by Japan's Fujifilm.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

NASA sending robotic geologist to Mars to dig super deepSix years after last landing on Mars, NASA is sending a robotic geologist to dig deeper than ever before to take the planet's temperature.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Plant breeders balance shared innovation, revenueHave you thanked a crop breeder today?
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Microbes living in a toxic volcanic lake could hold clues to life on MarsResearchers at the University of Colorado Boulder have discovered microbes living in a toxic volcanic lake that may rank as one of the harshest environments on Earth. Their findings, published recently online, could guide scientists looking for signs of ancient life on Mars.
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Viden

Bor, blod og bræk: Fortidens læger var dramatikereSelvom moderne viden omkring 1830'erne talte mod forældede behandlingsmetoder, holdt de ved i lang tid. For de så effektive ud.
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Science | The Guardian

Why genetic IQ differences between 'races' are unlikelyThe idea that intelligence can differ between populations has made headlines again, but the rules of evolution make it implausible The idea that there may be genetic differences in intelligence between one population and another has resurfaced recently, notably in the form of a New York Times op-ed by the Harvard geneticist David Reich. In the article, Reich emphasises the arbitrary nature of tra
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Ingeniøren

6 ud af 10 privatansatte it-folk er utrygge ved persondatahåndteringen i det offentligeVersion2's it-sikkerhedsundersøgelse indikerer en gensidig mistillid mellem privat- og offentligt ansatte i forhold til evnen til at beskytte persondata.
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Ingeniøren

Facebook ikke klar til GDPR: De ender i rettenFacebooks indsats for at blive klar til databeskyttelsesforordningen er særdeles utilstrækkelige, mener eksperter.
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Ingeniøren

Problemer med nye togsignaler kan udløse ekstraregning for elektrificeringNår nye togsignaler forsinkes, går det ud over det planlagte elektrificering af jernbanen. Banedanmark har bare ikke medregnet de økonomiske konsekvenser.
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Flares in the universe can now be studied on EarthSolar flares, cosmic radiation, and the northern lights are well known phenomena. But exactly how their enormous energy arises is not as well understood. Now, physicists at Chalmers University of Technology, Sweden, have discovered a new way to study these spectacular space plasma phenomena in a laboratory environment. The results have been published in the renowned journal Nature Communications.
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Microbes living in a toxic volcanic lake could hold clues to life on MarsResearchers at the University of Colorado Boulder have discovered microbes living in one of the harshest environments on Earth. Their findings could guide scientists looking for signs of ancient life on Mars.
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Plant breeders balance shared innovation, revenueCrop breeding research and innovation requires funding. But funding--and revenue from the crops developed--is increasingly hard to obtain. In response, a group of plant breeders met to discuss best practices. A recent paper summarizes their recommendations.
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Bloomberg era's emphasis on 'health in all policies' improved New Yorkers' heart healthFrom 2002 to 2013, New York City implemented a series of policies prioritizing the public's health in areas beyond traditional healthcare policies and illustrated the potential to reduce cardiovascular disease risk. This strategy is known as employing a 'health in all policies' approach. Researchers catalogued health-relevant legislation in New York City from 1998 to 2017 and found that 7.4 percen
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Infants exposed to hepatitis C increasing, yet not adequately screened, MWRI study findsAmong the 1,025 HCV-exposed infants, 31 percent received well-child services in the same health system, and among these, only 30 percent were screened for HCV.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

'Smart' dresser prototype guides people with dementia in getting dressedA new study describes how a 'smart home' prototype may help people with dementia dress themselves through automated assistance, enabling them to maintain independence and dignity and providing their caregivers with a much-needed respite.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

Lymphatic endothelial cells promote melanoma to spreadThe lymph vessel endothelial cells play an active role in the spread of melanoma, according to the new study. The researchers found that growing human melanoma cells in co-cultures with human primary lymphatic endothelial cells revealed crosstalk of cancer cells with the tumor microenvironment leading to the increased invasive growth of melanoma cells and distant organ metastasis in a mouse tumour
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

Posting, commenting and customizing on Facebook help involve, empower older adultsSocial networking sites, such as Facebook, offer tools and activities that may help older adults feel more empowered and less isolated, according to researchers. In a study of Facebook use, older adults who posted a lot of personal stories on the social networking site felt a higher sense of community, and the more they customized their profiles, the more in control they felt.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

Soccer coaches are an untapped resource in assessing and developing player psychologySoccer coaches should be empowered to make reliable assessments of player psychological characteristics, propose sports researchers. Citing the extensive experience of coaches in working with many talented players as an untapped resource in sports psychology research, they suggest that coaches could provide unique insights into the psychological characteristics required for player success. Using c
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

Vegan and traditional kimchi have same microbesResearchers have found that kimchi made without seafood products has the same 'probiotic' bacteria as more traditional kimchi.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

Dielectric metamaterial is dynamically tuned by lightResearchers have built the first metal-free, dynamically tunable metamaterial for controlling electromagnetic waves. The approach could form the basis for technologies ranging from improved security scanners to new types of visual displays. While previous metamaterials control electromagnetic waves through their electric properties, the new technology can also manipulate them through their magneti
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

Discovery of immune cells able to defend against mutating viruses could transform vaccine developmentScientists have found immune cells can fight different strains of the same virus -- a discovery which could help transform vaccine development.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

Laser frequency combs may be the future of Wi-FiResearchers have uncovered a new phenomenon of quantum cascade laser frequency combs, which would allow these devices to act as integrated transmitters or receivers that can efficiently encode information.
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The Atlantic

The Problem With Trump Dictating His Own Medical AssessmentHarold Bornstein DTThis has been a tortured administration for doctors. The respective scandals of physicians Tom Price, Ronny Jackson, and Harold Bornstein are raising questions for the profession about how it polices itself—and about what role doctors should play in the political process. On Tuesday, in contradiction to his previous statements, Bornstein claimed that he had taken dictation from then-candidate Don
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The Scientist RSS

Opinion: Microbial Mind ControlTruth or Scare?Normal brain function may have evolved to depend on gut microbes and their metabolites.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

One-dimensional material packs a powerful punch for next generation electronicsEngineers have demonstrated prototype devices made of an exotic material that can conduct a current density 50 times greater than conventional copper interconnect technology.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

Army's new find lowers accidental stockpile detonationScientists at two major national laboratories have demonstrated a new method for testing explosives stored in weapons stockpiles, a step they say will help reduce accidental detonation and ensure the weapons perform as expected.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

Hormone from fat boosts metabolism in both exercise and coldResearchers have uncovered a new kind of clue to an individual's variable response to exercise -- a hormone whose levels in the bloodstream rise sharply in exercise as well as in cold.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

New diagnostic technique picks up the S in visionA new technique that could help improve diagnosis of vision disorders has been successfully tested.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

Gliomas: Persistence pays off in discovery that could lead to improved treatment and survivability of patientGliomas are the most common type of central nervous system cancer but how these tumors develop is not fully understood. Sheri Holmen, PhD a researcher at Huntsman Cancer Institute (HCI) and professor of surgery at the University of Utah just published the results of her research on gliomas in Cell Reports. The work is focused on a mutated gene that is a critical piece of the puzzle for glioma deve
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

Curves or angles? Shapes in businesses affect customer responseWhen you're waiting in a busy restaurant or doctor's office, it may matter whether the tables, light fixtures and other objects are round or square. In a laboratory study, researchers found the shape of physical objects in a service business affected customer satisfaction, depending on how crowded the business was in the experimental scenarios.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

Patients get faster life-saving treatment in states with policies allowing direct transport to specialized heart attack care hospitalsPeople having heart attacks get faster life-saving treatment if they live in states that allow EMS to bypass closer hospitals that don't offer the specialized treatment, taking patients directly to those that do. Reducing the time from first medical contact to treatment that restores blood flow to the heart is the most critical factor in improving patient survival.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

American pikas tolerate climate change better than expectedThe American pika, a relative of rabbits, occupies rocky environments in the mountains of western Northern America. It has been widely thought that pikas could not survive extremes of temperature and thus were at risk of running out of space at the tops of mountains as temperatures rise due to climate change. But is there more to the story?
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

Novel cancer vaccine strategy blocks death of tumor-specific cytotoxic T cellsNew research could serve as the stepping-stone in constructing vaccines with a greater likelihood of finding and attacking tumors in the human body.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

Diet rich in fish and legumes may help delay natural menopauseA diet rich in fish and legumes may help to delay the natural menopause, while high dietary intake of refined carbs, such as pasta and rice, may instead help to hasten it, suggests the first UK study of its kind.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

Farming fish saves landNew evidence shows seafood from aquatic farming -- aquaculture -- can help feed the future global population while substantially reducing one of the biggest environmental impacts of meat production -- land use -- without requiring people to entirely abandon meat as a food source.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

Lightning carries potential danger to people with deep brain stimulatorsPatients receiving deep brain stimulation are warned that their neurostimulators may dysfunction when confronted by electromagnetic fields generated by particular electrical devices found at work, home, and in the hospital. A new and potentially dangerous source of dysfunction has been identified: nearby lightening.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

Acute and chronic changes in myelin following mild traumatic brain injuryPreliminary research using mcDESPOT magnetic resonance imaging shows changes in the myelin content of white matter in the brain following mild traumatic brain injury. Myelin changes are apparent at the time of injury and three months afterward.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

Protein mimic developed to help injured lungs breatheResearchers have bioengineered an effective protein mimic that restored breathing capacity to the injured lungs of rats, according to a new study.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

New insights into the origins of mutations in cancerUsing worm experiments, scientists were able to study the processes generating cancer-causing DNA mutations in detail. The findings help identify the causes of human cancer. Such insights could be an important first step in identifying possible directions for new cancer treatments.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

Proximity to fracking sites affects public support of them, study findsPeople who live closer to fracking sites are more familiar with and more supportive of hydraulic fracturing, while those who live in proximity to areas of higher oil and gas well density are more familiar with but not necessarily more supportive of the practice.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

Identifying the mechanism in obesity's link to colon cancerResearchers report that they have identified a new molecular mechanism to explain the link between obesity and increased risk of colon inflammation, which is a major risk factor in colorectal cancer.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

Citizen scientists discover a new water beetle and name it after Leonardo DiCaprioCitizen scientists decided to name a new water beetle, which they discovered in the pristine Maliau Basin, Malaysian Borneo, after Hollywood actor and environmentalist Leonardo DiCaprio. The tribute also marks the 20th anniversary of the celebrity's Leonardo DiCaprio Foundation that supports various projects dedicated to the preservation of biodiversity and magnificent unspoiled habitats just like
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The Atlantic

Mark Zuckerberg Doesn’t Understand JournalismMark Zuckerberg wants you to know that he cares, really cares, about journalism. “I view our responsibility in news as two things,” he said in a wide-ranging conversation with a small group of news editors and executives assembled in Palo Alto for a journalism gathering known as Off the Record on Tuesday afternoon. “One is making sure people can get trustworthy news.” The other, he said, “is buil
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

Use of ibuprofen and similar NSAIDs may shorten life of patients with metastatic renal cell carcinomaIbuprofen, aspirin, and other non-steroidal anti-inflammatory medications are among the most commonly utilized medications in the United States. Primarily for treating pain, inflammation, and preventing cardiovascular disease, NSAIDs' promising anti-cancer properties have been highlighted by a growing body of data in recent years. However, a new study indicated that non-aspirin NSAID use was assoc
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

La Niña-like ocean cooling patterns intensify northwestern Pacific tropical cyclonesAtmospheric researchers report that a strong connection between sea surface temperature patterns is associated with the Global Warming Hiatus and changes in cyclone activity over the northwest Pacific Ocean, particularly increasing intensities in coastal regions of East Asia.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

'Valleytronics' discovery could extend limits of Moore's LawResearchers have found useful new information-handling potential in samples of tin(II) sulfide (SnS), a candidate 'valleytronics' transistor material that might one day enable chipmakers to pack more computing power onto microchips.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

Fracking the immune systemResearchers are the first to report links between early life exposure to chemicals in ground water near fracking sites and immune system imbalances in mice. Their findings suggest that exposure to these chemicals during development may adversely affect the immune system's ability to fight diseases like multiple sclerosis later in life.
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The Scientist RSS

CRISPR Patent Dispute Heard in Federal CourtIn an ongoing legal battle, the University of California, Berkeley has challenged the Broad Institute's patent claims on the gene editing technology.
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Science : NPR

States Sue The EPA To Protect Obama-Era Fuel Efficiency StandardsCalifornia is leading a lawsuit challenging the Trump administration's plan to weaken car emissions standards. EPA chief Scott Pruitt says the rules, designed to fight climate change, are too strict. (Image credit: Mario Tama/Getty Images)
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Most academic institutions unprepared to meet new HHS clinical trial reporting regulationsAcademic institutions have been slow to adhere to new, stricter requirements by the Department of Health and Human Services (HHS) and National Institutes of Health for clinical trial registration and reporting, according to a study led by researchers at Johns Hopkins Bloomberg School of Public Health.
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Blood type O patients may have higher risk of death from severe traumaBlood type O is associated with high death rates in severe trauma patients, according to a study published in the open-access journal Critical Care that involved 901 Japanese emergency care patients.
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NYT > Science

Ecstasy as a Remedy for PTSD? You Probably Have Some Questions.A study suggests that therapy combined with the drug MDMA could be useful when traditional treatments for PTSD have failed.
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The Scientist RSS

Biohacker Aaron Traywick Found Dead in DC Float SpaThe CEO of a biomedical startup had made headlines this year when he injected himself with an untested herpes vaccine in front of an audience.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

One detector doesn't 'fit all' for smoke in spacecraftResearchers describe how they looked at the smoke particles produced by five materials commonly used aboard crewed spacecraft, defined their characteristics and evaluated how well they could be detected by two traditional smoke detection systems.
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News

For patients with esophageal cancer, status of lymph nodes after preoperative therapy determines survivalThe status of lymph nodes rather than the status of the primary tumor following preoperative neoadjuvant chemotherapy or chemoradiation therapy is the most important factor that determines whether patients with locally advanced esophageal cancer will survive. The study presented at the AATS 98th Annual Meeting indicates that while preoperative chemotherapy and radiation therapy improve survival of
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Futurity.org

Listen: Why ice makes this crazy noiseDuring a research trip to Antarctica, Peter Neff recorded a video of the sound ice makes when it falls 80-90 meters into a glacier borehole. What began as a “silly pastime” of tossing ice chunks down a borehole in Taylor Glacier, Antarctica, has led to a video with more than 8 million views and a collaboration between an acoustics expert and a climate scientist. 🔊🔊Sound ON🔊🔊 When #science is
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Extreme mobility of mantis shrimp eyesNew research, led by biologists from the University of Bristol, has uncovered fresh findings about the most mobile eyes in the animal kingdom -- the eyes of the mantis shrimp.
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Vitamin D improves weight gain and brain development in malnourished childrenHigh dose vitamin D supplements improve weight gain and the development of language and motor skills in malnourished children, according to a study led by University of the Punjab, Pakistan, and Queen Mary University of London.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

Mercury Rising: New evidence that volcanism triggered the late Devonian extinctionThe late Devonian extinction, about 370 million years ago, is one of the 'Big Five.' It killed up to 80 percent of species, obliterating the lavish Devonian coral reef ecosystem. The final pulse in this multi-step crisis, called the Frasnian-Famennian event, was its most devastating. But what, exactly, did the killing?
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

Environmental impact of electric vehicles in China? It depends on how they are chargedElectric vehicles play a key role in China's plan to improve air quality and reduce CO2 emissions but, with the majority of China's electricity still coming from coal-fired power plants, many question just how effective this strategy will be. Now, researchers have found that how electric vehicles are charged -- whether in the low-energy slow mode or high-energy fast mode -- plays a significant rol
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

Sea turtle nesting beaches threatened by microplastic pollutionTiny pieces of plastic could be jeopardizing sensitive sea turtle nesting beaches.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

Down side of being dubbed 'class clown'Being dubbed the class clown by teachers and peers has negative social repercussions for third-grade boys that may portend developmental and academic consequences for them, researchers found.
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Futurity.org

A virus ‘cocktail’ could one day treat food poisoningIn a simulated small intestinal microbiome, a cocktail of viruses successfully targeted and killed E. coli without harming its bacterial neighbors. The study shows that this approach is as effective in killing the targeted E. coli as broad-spectrum antibiotics but has much gentler impact on the normal, and often beneficial, microflora. The experiment underlines the potential of using bacteriophag
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Latest Headlines | Science News

Defenseless moths do flying impressions of scary bees and waspsFaking that erratic bee flight or no-nonsense wasp zoom might save a moth’s life.
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Futurity.org

Water-based battery stores green energy for laterA new water-based battery could provide a cheap way to store wind or solar energy for later, researchers say. The battery stores energy generated when the sun is shining and wind is blowing so it can be fed back into the electric grid and redistributed when demand is high. The prototype manganese-hydrogen battery, reported in Nature Energy , stands just three inches tall and generates a mere 20 m
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Futurity.org

We tell these lies when looking for love onlineLying about availability is a common deception online dating users tell potential partners, according to a new paper. “Communication technologies connect us now more than ever,” says Jeffrey Hancock, a professor of communication in Stanford University’s School of Humanities and Sciences. “This paper is an example of how people respond to some of the new pressures from the technologies that connec
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NYT > Science

Trilobites: Humpback Whale Baby Boom Near AntarcticaPregnancy rates in the southern oceans are high, according to a study that showed the species is rebounding, a rare piece of good news for whales.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Extreme mobility of mantis shrimp eyesNew research, led by biologists from the University of Bristol, has uncovered fresh findings about the most mobile eyes in the animal kingdom - the eyes of the mantis shrimp.
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Futurity.org

Vegan kimchi contains the same ‘good’ bacteriaA new study finds that kimchi made without fish products has the same type of bacteria as the more traditional recipe. That finding suggests that vegan versions would have the same probiotic effects. Along with other fermented foods like yogurt and kombucha, kimchi is surging in popularity as a probiotic food—one that contains the same kinds of healthy bacteria found in the human gut. A tradition
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Futurity.org

Rats could clarify how Alzheimer’s progresses in our brainResearchers have developed a rat model to help them study the buildup of amyloid plaques and vascular abnormalities in the brain of people with Alzheimer’s disease. Alzheimer’s disease currently affects more than 5.5 million Americans and is one of the costliest diseases to treat, according to the Alzheimer’s Association. Characterized by a buildup of plaque in the brain, few animal models exist
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Science : NPR

Stolen Iranian Nuclear Plans May Trigger New InspectionsFormer inspectors say documents obtained by the Israeli government may prompt a fresh look at the nation's nuclear sites. (Image credit: Jack Guez/AFP/Getty Images)
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Science | The Guardian

Ecstasy ingredient could help ease PTSD symptoms, study findsResearch suggests MDMA could reduce symptoms when combined with talking therapies MDMA, the main ingredient of the party drug ecstasy, could help reduce symptoms among those living with post-traumatic stress disorder, research suggests. Post-traumatic stress disorder is commonly treated with drugs, psychotherapies or both. However, some find little benefit, with certain talking therapies linked t
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BBC News - Science & Environment

InSight Diary: Mars mission ready to rumbleLondon scientist Tom Pike is looking forward to InSight, Nasa's new mission to the Red Planet.
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The Scientist RSS

Diseases From Ticks and Mosquitoes Have TripledWarmer weather is thought to be behind the rise in vector-borne illnesses in recent years.
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BBC News - Science & Environment

This is what coral reefs sound likeSounds from the Great Barrier Reef have got quieter over the past five years.
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Popular Science

Yes, Earth's magnetic poles can flip. But they probably won't anytime soon.Space But they might wobble. Earth is kind of overdue to see its magnetic field pull a 180 and reverse on itself. But according to a new study, the magnetic field might be feeling a bit shaky, but…
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Tech giants urge governor to veto Georgia cybercrime billTech giants Google and Microsoft have joined a chorus or cybersecurity experts urging Georgia Gov. Nathan Deal to veto a bill that makes unauthorized computer access a crime punishable by up to a year in prison.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Brexit prompts UK to probe developing satellite navigation systemBritain will explore developing and launching its own satellite navigation system, Downing Street announced on Tuesday, amid doubt over its future inclusion in a key European project after Brexit.
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Science | The Guardian

David Goodall: doctors threaten 104-year-old scientist's bid to end his lifePhilip Nitschke says Perth doctors believe Goodall ‘a danger to himself and not fit to travel’ • Sign up to receive the top stories every morning Doctors in Perth are threatening to stop Australia’s oldest scientist flying to Switzerland to end his life through voluntary euthanasia. Edith Cowan University honorary research associate David Goodall, 104, does not have a terminal illness but his qua
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The Atlantic

The Atlantic Daily: The Shadow of 2016What We’re Following ‘Dangerous Questions’: A list of questions leaked to The New York Times reveals what Robert Mueller plans to ask President Trump if he agrees to be interviewed in the special counsel’s probe into Russian interference in the 2016 presidential election. Among other matters, the questions deal with Trump’s decision to fire James Comey as FBI director, and what the president knew
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