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CORNICHON sorting and regulation of GLR channels underlie pollen tube Ca2+ homeostasisCompared to animals, evolution of plant calcium (Ca 2+ ) physiology has led to a loss of proteins for influx and small ligand–operated control of cytosolic Ca 2+ , leaving many Ca 2+ mechanisms unaccounted for. Here, we show a mechanism for sorting and activation of glutamate receptor–like channels (GLRs) by CORNICHON HOMOLOG (CNIH) proteins. Single mutants of pollen-expressed Arabidopsis thalian
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BBC News - Science & Environment

Seal avoids 'slow and painful death' by air vent filterVets who treated the seal, which had a deep neck wound, had "never seen anything as severe".
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Viden

Danske Henrik vil slå Tesla af tronenFor fem år siden endte det med konkurs, da danske Henrik Fisker forsøgte at skabe en luksus-elbil. Nu er han tilbage og lover en elbil-revolution om blot to år.
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Surgeons Remove 'Very Rare' 132-Pound Ovarian TumorConnecticut surgeons recently removed a 132-lb. (60 kilograms) ovarian tumor from a woman's abdomen.
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How to Change Your Twitter Password Right NowTwitterOn World Password Day, Twitter discloses a major gaffe that left user passwords potentially vulnerable.
11min
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Endorsements enhance an MBA applicant's chanceCollege applicants and job hunters are often told to scour their networks for someone who could make a quick call or send an email on their behalf, telling the decision-maker a special applicant is heading their way.
20min
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

CWD prions discovered in soil near Wisconsin mineral licks for the first timeNew research out of the University of Wisconsin-Madison has, for the first time, detected prions responsible for chronic wasting disease (CWD) in samples taken from sites where deer congregate.
20min
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Prototype camera set for integration into novel gamma-ray telescopeA unique high-speed camera, designed to capture the fleeting effects of gamma rays crashing into the Earth's atmosphere, will soon be on its way from the University of Wisconsin-Madison to Arizona's Mount Hopkins.
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New Scientist - News

Your bones contain crystals shaped like fingers and handsA blurry brown picture is the most detailed 3D image of bone ever produced. The model gives unique insight into the crystals inside our bones
29min
New Scientist - News

People adapted to the cold and got more migraines as a resultA gene variant that helps humans cope with colder climates also seems to have put people living in northerly regions at a higher risk of migraine
29min
New Scientist - News

Alan Turing inspired a faster way to make seawater drinkableComputer pioneer Alan Turing’s only chemistry paper has inspired a new material that can remove salt from seawater five times faster than traditional filters
29min
New Scientist - News

Stars from outside the Milky Way seen zooming through the galaxyWe’ve seen two runaway stars hurtling through the galaxy at more than 700 kilometres per second, and dozens more going so fast they could escape the Milky Way
29min
Live Science

Trying to Conceive? Fast Food Could Double the Risk of InfertilityThe foods women eat could be tied to their risk of infertility, a new study from Australia finds.
35min
EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Increased nerve activity may raise blood pressure in anxietySympathetic nerve activity to skeletal muscle blood vessels--a function of the nervous system that helps regulate blood pressure--increases during physiological and mental stress in people with chronic anxiety, a new study finds. Over time, this response may increase the risk of high blood pressure and heart disease, although the study did not test this specifically. The study, published ahead of
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New on MIT Technology Review

Under the Trump administration’s plan to roll back fuel standards, emissions will soar
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New on MIT Technology Review

Scammers are using the EU’s new privacy regulations to steal your data
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Science : NPR

Landowner Aims To Bring Wolves Back To Scotland, Centuries After They Were Wiped OutThe proposal to reintroduce wolves to the Scottish Highlands is controversial, just like the Yellowstone project it's modeled after. (Image credit: Gunter Lenz/imageBROKER RF/Getty Images)
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The Scientist RSS

NIHs Neuroscience Institute Plans to Limit Financial Support for Well-Funded InvestigatorsUnder a new policy, the National Institute of Neurological Disorders and Stroke will provide fewer grants to labs receiving more than $1 million in funds.
58min
Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

Daily aspirin linked to double melanoma risk in menMen who take once-daily aspirin have nearly double the risk of melanoma compared to men who are not exposed to daily aspirin, reports a large new study.Women, however, do not have an increased risk. This does not mean men should stop aspirin therapy to lower the risk of heart attack, the authors stressed. They should avoid tanning beds and get regular skin checks by a dermatologist.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

Mindfulness at work: Study first to uncover positive benefits for teamsChallenges and differences in opinion are inevitable when working in a team. But new research suggests some of these conflicts can be reduced, or even avoided, through team mindfulness.
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Walnuts impact gut microbiome and improve healthDiets rich in nuts, such as walnuts, have been shown to play a role in heart health and in reducing colorectal cancer. According to a new study from the University of Illinois, the way walnuts impact the gut microbiome--the collection of trillions of microbes or bacteria in the gastrointestinal tract--may be behind some of those health benefits.
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New on MIT Technology Review

Meet the blockchain for building better widgets, cheaper and fasterA new prototype gets at how—and why—manufacturers and product designers might benefit from a blockchain.
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Science | The Guardian

Spacewatch: one step on for space tourism as Bezos rocket landsAmazon CEO retrieves New Shepard rocket and capsule after suborbital flight piloting way to paying passengers Blue Origin , the aerospace company owned by Jeff Bezos, Amazon’s chief executive, has completed the eighth test flight of its New Shepard reusable rocket and unmanned crew capsule, blasting off from West Texas on 29 April. After a 10-minute flight, during which the hydrogen-fuelled vehic
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Viden

Eksperter efter Cambridge Analytica-konkurs: Facebook har stadig et problemDet underliggende problem om tilstrækkelig beskyttelse af brugernes data består, vurderer eksperter.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

Maternal placenta consumption causes no harm to newbornsA study found mothers who consumed their placenta passed on no harm to their newborn babies when compared to infants of mothers who did not consume their placenta.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

Engineers invent smart microchip that can self-start and operate when battery runs outBATLESS, a smart microchip, can self-start and continue to operate even when the battery runs out of energy. This novel technology could enable smaller and cheaper Internet of Things (IoT) devices.
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Science : NPR

Landowner Aims To Bring Wolves Back To Scotland, Centuries After They Were Wiped OutThe proposal to reintroduce wolves to the Scottish Highlands is controversial, just like the Yellowstone project it's modeled after. (Image credit: Gunter Lenz/imageBROKER RF/Getty Images)
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Women who eat fast food take longer to become pregnantWomen who eat less fruit and more fast food take longer to get pregnant and are less likely to conceive within a year, according to a study by researchers at the University of Adelaide's Robinson Research Institute.
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Women who eat fast food and little or no fruit take longer to become pregnantWomen who eat less fruit and more fast food take longer to get pregnant and are less likely to conceive within a year, according to a study published in Human Reproduction, one of the world's leading reproductive medicine journals.
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Science : NPR

Yellowstone's Largest Geyser Erupts 3 Times, Puzzling ScientistsYellowstone's Steamboat Geyser, which is the world's largest active geyser, has erupted three times in the past two months. The last time Steamboat erupted three times in one year was 2003. (Image credit: Sean Sperry/AP)
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

Brain circuit helps us learn by watching othersResearchers have identified a brain circuit required to learn by watching others. This circuit, which is distinct from the brain network used to learn from firsthand experiences, relies on input from a part of the brain responsible for interpreting social cues.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

Picking one photon out of the flowResearchers have discovered a way to subtract a single quantum of light from a laser beam. This method paves the way towards future quantum communication and computation using the subtle aspects of quantum mechanics for technological applications.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

Flockmate or loner? Identifying the genes behind sociality in chickensFive genes that affect sociality-related behavior in chickens have now been identified. Several of the genes have been previously linked to nervous system function or behavior.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

Bowel disease study points to new therapies for lifelong conditionsTreatments for 'incurable' bowel conditions may be a step closer following the discovery of a key molecule associated with disease flare-ups. Researchers say the finding helps to explain the underlying cause of disorders such as Crohn's disease and ulcerative colitis.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

Bacteria therapy for eczema shows promiseTopical treatment with live Roseomonas mucosa -- a bacterium naturally present on the skin -- was safe for adults and children with atopic dermatitis (eczema) and was associated with reduced disease severity, according to initial findings from an ongoing early-phase clinical trial. Preclinical work in a mouse model of atopic dermatitis had suggested that R. mucosa strains collected from healthy sk
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

The true 'value' of biodiversityPlanning conservation policies to protect biodiversity using single core 'values' such as the 'usefulness' of a species could put 'less useful' species at risk.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

Childhood communication enhances brain development, protecting against harmful behaviorsChildren with greater parent communication in early adolescence have less harmful alcohol use and emotional eating in young adulthood.
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TED Talks Daily (SD video)

Why you don't like the sound of your own voice | Rébecca KleinbergerYour voice is indistinguishable from how other people see you, but your relationship with it is far from obvious. Rébecca Kleinberger studies how we use and understand our voices and the voices of others. She explains why you may not like the sound of your own voice on recordings, the differences between your outward, inward and inner voices -- and the extraordinary things you communicate without
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Big Think

Our universe resides in the center of a black hole, this theory claimsWormholes might very well be a key feature to our cosmos. Read More
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Popular Science

Invasive treefrogs have snuck into Louisiana and they are not good neighborsAnimals Keep an eye on your toilet bowl (seriously). Invasive treefrogs have spread to Louisiana from Cuba, and are threatening to displace native treefrogs.
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Anti-alcoholism drug shows promise in animal modelsScientists at The University of Texas at Austin have successfully tested in animals a drug that, they say, may one day help block the withdrawal symptoms and cravings that incessantly coax people with alcoholism to drink.
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Live Science

This Man Went 5 Days with a Chicken Bone Stuck in His LungIt really did go down the wrong pipe.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

Wriggling tadpoles may hold clue to how autism developsNew research sheds light on a phenomenon called neuroplasticity.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

The headache of adapting to the cold, literallyA common genetic variant implicated in migraine headaches may have proliferated because it helped early humans adapt to cold weather in northern climates.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

3-D batteries pack power into tiny footprintsBatteries might seem like they come in every shape and size that you can imagine. But as electronic devices become tinier and skinnier without reducing their power and energy demands, they challenge engineers to design batteries that can fit into smaller spaces without compromising on performance. Researchers have used non-traditional techniques to fashion one possible solution -- a powerful 3-D l
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

Unlocking the genome of the world’s deadliest parasiteAntimalarial drugs and vaccines are expected to be far more superior with the uncovering of Plasmodium falciparum's full genome, the parasite that makes malaria so deadly.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

Noise throws the heart out of rhythmWith an increasing level of noise, the incidence of atrial fibrillation also increases dramatically. Scientists found that the incidence of atrial fibrillation in subjects with extreme noise annoyance reactions increases to 23 percent, compared to just 15 percent without this environmental impact. Looking at the proportion of sources of extreme noise pollution, aircraft noise came first with 84 pe
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

Why children with autism may be at increased risk of bullyingChildren with autism may be at greater risk of bullying because they are more willing to accept unfair behavior, say psychologists. Children played trading games with a puppet and those with autism were 37 percent less likely to reciprocate fair offers and three times more likely to accept unfair offers of just one sticker. They may be particularly susceptible to bullies exploiting their lower con
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Newly discovered anti-inflammatory substances may potentially treat variety of diseasesResearchers have discovered a new family of substances which has been found to display highly potent activity against the release of pro-inflammatory cytokines and the toxicity induced by reactive oxygen species (ROS). The novel compounds synthesized and evaluated belong to a family of low molecular weight substances named indolines. In early experiments, these compounds have shown promising activ
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News

CWD prions discovered in Wisconsin soils for the first timeNew research out of the University of Wisconsin-Madison has, for the first time, detected prions responsible for chronic wasting disease (CWD) in samples taken from sites where deer congregate.
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NYT > Science

Trilobites: Gassy Earthquakes Near Istanbul May Pose New Risks to RegionScientists have found that tremors near Turkey’s largest city were caused by underground gases, which could have implications for the area’s earthquake hazards.
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The Atlantic

A Pruitt Aide's Attack on Zinke Angers the White HouseAs Environmental Protection Agency Administrator Scott Pruitt faces a seemingly endless stream of scandal, his team is scrambling to divert the spotlight to Interior Secretary Ryan Zinke. And the White House isn’t happy about it. In the last week, a member of Pruitt’s press team, Michael Abboud, has been shopping negative stories about Zinke to multiple outlets, according to two sources with dire
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

Harvesting clean hydrogen fuel through artificial photosynthesisA new, stable artificial photosynthesis device doubles the efficiency of harnessing sunlight to break apart both fresh and salt water, generating hydrogen that can then be used in fuel cells.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

Chemical engineers discover how to control knots that form in DNA moleculesResearchers have discovered the factors that influence how knots travel along a strand of DNA, using technology that allows them to stretch DNA molecules and image the knots' behavior.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

Shrinking the synthesizerEngineers team up to reduce the size, cost and power requirements of an optical frequency device.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

Weeds will take over from kelp in high CO2 oceansWeedy plants will thrive and displace long-lived, ecologically valuable kelp forests under forecast ocean acidification, new research shows. The researchers describe how kelp forests are displaced by weedy marine plants in high CO2 conditions, equivalent to those predicted for the turn of the century.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

Mystery solved: The bacterial protein that kills male fruit fliesAn endosymbiotic bacterium, Spiroplasma, specifically kills the males of its fruit-fly host (Drosophila). This has perplexed biologists since the 1950's, but scientists have now solved the mystery by identifying the gene behind this gender-specific killing.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

Crocodiles listen to classical music in MRI scannerWhat happens in a crocodile's brain when it hears complex sounds? An international research team has provided the answer to this question. In a first, the researchers examined a cold-blooded reptile using functional MRI. They were thus able to determine that complex stimuli triggered activation patterns in the crocodile's brain that are similar to those in birds and mammals.
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Highly elastic biodegradable hydrogel for bioprinting of new tissuesResearchers at The University of Texas at Arlington have developed a highly elastic biodegradable hydrogel for bio-printing of materials that mimic natural human soft tissues. Bio-printing uses live cells within the scaffolding of the new tissues and could potentially transform cell printing.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

Gray hair linked to immune system activity and viral infectionA new study on mice offers insights into why some people's hair may turn gray in response to a serious illness or chronic stress. Researchers have discovered a connection between the genes that contribute to hair color and the genes that notify our bodies of a pathogenic infection.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

New light on genetic foundation of migrainesThe nauseating, often debilitating, headaches affect 15-20 percent of adults in developed countries, yet they remain stubbornly hard to explain. Scientists know that migraines tend to run in families but aren't sure exactly how. A new study shows why some families are susceptible to migraines and how genetics may influence the type of migraine they get.
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The Atlantic

Are We There Yet?In 2012, it took the Curiosity rover seven minutes to descend from the top of the Martian atmosphere down to the surface, slowing from a speed of 13,000 miles per hour to zero. It took double that for signals from the spacecraft to reach Earth. N ASA scientists and engineers held their breath as these minutes passed, waiting to learn the fate of their spacecraft. (Curiosity turned out fine .) Thi
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Latest Headlines | Science News

Fighting like an animal doesn’t always mean a duel to the deathConflict resolution within species isn’t always deadly and often involves cost-benefit analyses.
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Live Science

Does This 3,000-Year-Old House Confirm King David's Lost Biblical Kingdom?The Hebrew Bible states that the United Monarchy collapsed after the death of King Solomon. New evidence suggests the kingdom was real.
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Endorsements enhance an MBA applicant's chanceA Cornell University researcher and his colleague offer the first empirical evidence on the effects of endorsements on MBA students' performance.
2h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Marmoset monkey model of Zika virus infection offers new insights into the human conditionA novel marmoset model of human Zika virus infection offers new opportunities for better understanding of how the virus causes congenital disease in humans.
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The Atlantic

Muslims Recoil at a French Proposal to Change the QuranA manifesto published in the French daily Le Parisien on April 21—signed by some 300 prominent intellectuals and politicians, including former President Nicolas Sarkozy and former Prime Minister Manuel Valls—made a shocking demand. Arguing that the Quran incites violence, it insisted that “the verses of the Quran calling for murder and punishment of Jews, Christians, and nonbelievers be struck to
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

A potentially cheap, efficient and eco-friendly system for purifying natural gasFundamental researchers at the Colorado School of Mines have proposed a novel two-part system for separating impurities from natural gas in the Journal of Renewable and Sustainable Energy. Natural gas primarily contains methane, but impurities in the gaseous mixture need to be removed before the methane can be put into the pipeline. The newly proposed purification system combines two separation me
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Popular Science

The weirdest things we learned this week: Giant sloths, caged babies, and spicy horse buttsScience Three PopSci editors share the freakiest facts they could find. What’s the weirdest thing you learned this week? Well, whatever it is, we promise you’d have an even weirder answer if you’d listened to PopSci’s newest podcast. Check…
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

24 and me: Discovery of gene of extra chromosome boosts zebra finch biologyIn the zebra finch, an extra chromosome exists in the reproductive, or germline, cells. (Songbirds have 40 chromosomes and 41 with the extra chromosome.) Known as the germline-restricted chromosome, its sequence is largely unknown and none of its genes have been identified, until now. Using sophisticated genome-sequencing techniques, American University researchers have identified the first gene o
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Live Science

Bones Exposed on NYC 'Island of the Dead' Where 1 Million Bodies RestErosion reveals dozens of bones on the beach of a New York burial island.
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The Scientist RSS

Genetic Adaptation to Cold Brought Migraines With ItHumans living in higher latitudes tend to have a variant of a gene involved in sensing cold temperatures, but it comes with a cost.
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News

A potentially cheap, efficient and eco-friendly system for purifying natural gasFundamental researchers have proposed a novel two-part system for separating impurities from natural gas in the Journal of Renewable and Sustainable Energy. Natural gas primarily contains methane, but impurities in the gaseous mixture need to be removed before the methane can be put into the pipeline. The newly proposed purification system combines two separation methods and, in principle, promise
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Environmental quality research questions identified for Latin American regionUsing an innovative initiative, Latin American researchers from academia, government agencies and businesses leaders identified priority research questions for the region to tackle pressing environmental quality issues.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Volcanic hazard scenarios: Mount Taranaki, New ZealandOver the last 5000 years, Mount Taranaki volcano, located in the westernmost part of New Zealand's North Island, produced at least 16 Plinian-scale explosive eruptions, the latest at AD 1655. These eruptions had magnitudes of 4 to 5, eruptive styles, and contrasting basaltic to andesitic chemical compositions comparable to the eruptions of Etna, 122 BC; Vesuvius, AD79; Tarawera, 1886; Pelée, 1902;
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Environmental quality research questions identified for Latin American regionUsing an innovative initiative, Latin American researchers from academia, government agencies and businesses leaders identified priority research questions for the region to tackle pressing environmental quality issues.
3h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News

24 and meAmerican University researchers have identified the first gene of the germline-restricted chromosome in zebra finches, a finding that could pave the way for further research into what makes a bird male or female.
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Essential malaria parasite genes revealedResearchers have exploited a quirk in the genetic make-up of the deadly malaria parasite, Plasmodium falciparum, to create 38,000 mutant strains and then determine which of the organism's genes are essential to its growth and survival. P. falciparum is responsible for about half of all malaria cases and 90 percent of all malaria deaths. New information about the parasite's critical gene repertoire
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Nation's first cardiac ablation with mapping system recently cleared by the FDA performed at Penn MedicineAfter eight years of failed treatment for persistent atrial fibrillation (AF), Janet Szilagyi, 78 of Clayton, New Jersey, became the first patient in the United States to undergo cardiac ablation -- a procedure in which an electrophysiologist will scar or destroy tissue in the heart that's allowing incorrect electrical signals to cause an abnormal heart rhythm -- using an intraoperative imaging an
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Volcanic hazard scenarios: Mount Taranaki, New ZealandOver the last 5000 years, Mount Taranaki volcano, located in the westernmost part of New Zealand's North Island, produced at least 16 Plinian-scale explosive eruptions, the latest at AD 1655. These eruptions had magnitudes of 4 to 5, eruptive styles, and contrasting basaltic to andesitic chemical compositions comparable to the eruptions of Etna, 122 BC; Vesuvius, AD79; Tarawera, 1886; Pelée, 1902;
3h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Wriggling tadpoles may hold clue to how autism developsNew research sheds light on a phenomenon called neuroplasticity.
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News

UIC researchers create heart cells to study AFibUniversity of Illinois at Chicago researchers have discovered a way turn pluripotent stem cells into atrial cells. The discovery will enable them to better study atrial fibrillation, the most common heart rhythm disorder.
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Researchers unravel genomic mystery of malaria's deadliest parasiteAntimalarial drugs and vaccines are expected to be far more superior with the uncovering of Plasmodium falciparum's full genome, the parasite that makes malaria so deadly.
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Intestinal worm infections could be dramatically reduced: StudyThe number of children suffering from intestinal worm infections could be dramatically reduced around the world by treating adults as well as children, based on the results of a new pilot study in Timor-Leste led by The Australian National University.
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Atomically thin magnetic device could lead to new memory technologiesIn a study published online May 3 in the journal Science, a University of Washington-led team announced that it has discovered a method to encode information using magnets that are just a few layers of atoms in thickness. This breakthrough may revolutionize both cloud computing technologies and consumer electronics by enabling data storage at a greater density and improved energy efficiency.
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Milestone research on Madagascar periwinkle uncovers pathway to cancer-fighting drugsPlant scientists have taken the crucial last steps in a 60-year quest to unravel the complex chemistry of Madagascar periwinkle in a breakthrough that opens up the potential for rapid synthesis of cancer-fighting compounds.
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Deadliest human malaria parasite reveals the genomic chinks in its armorFor the first time, scientists have revealed the essential genes for the most deadly human malaria parasite, Plasmodium falciparum. Researchers from the Wellcome Sanger Institute and the University of South Florida (USF) created new genomic techniques to analyse every gene in the parasite and determine which ones are indispensable. Published in Science, the core repertoire of genes identified will
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Revealing the remarkable nanostructure of human boneUsing advanced 3D nanoscale imaging of the mineral in human bone, research teams from the University of York and Imperial College London have shown that the mineral crystals of bone have a hierarchical structure integrated into the larger-scale make-up of the skeleton.
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News

A new model for communication in plant cellsA study led by University of Maryland researchers suggests a new model for how glutamate receptor-like proteins (GLRs) function in plant cells. Working with Arabidopsis thaliana pollen cells, the researchers found that GLRs form the basis of a complex communication network inside individual plant cells. Their findings also suggest that GLRs rely on another group of proteins, called 'cornichon' pro
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News

How a light touch can spur severe itchingScientists at the Washington University Center for the Study of Itch have found that itching caused by touch is directly related to the number of touch receptors embedded in the skin. His team found, in mice, that fewer receptors make it more likely touch will induce itching.
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News

How a type of beneficial bacteria colonize the gutA type of beneficial bacterium takes hold in the gut by using a protein produced by the host's immune system, a new study in mice reports.
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News

At odds: Less sensory neurons induce stronger sensations of itchThe irritating itchiness that affects people as they age and their skin becomes drier may be caused by the loss of Merkel cells, a new study in mice suggests.
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News

The secret microstructure of bone: Insights into what makes it stiff and toughThe detailed structure of bone on a microscopic scale has been revealed. Bone is an impressive natural material because it combines properties which are usually mutually exclusive -- stiffness (for support and leverage) and toughness (for protection and resisting impacts).
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News

A sophisticated design to turn saltwater into freshwaterScientists have developed an improved type of membrane for desalinating water. By controlling the evolution of the structures of the membrane, researchers were able to boost the water flux of a membrane by five-fold. The advancement also
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News

A designer's toolkit for constructing complex nanoparticlesA team of chemists at Penn State has developed a designer's toolkit that lets them build various levels of complexity into nanoparticles using a simple, mix-and-match process. This work will allow researchers to create a library of complex nanoparticles that could be used in medical, energy, and electronic applications.
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Live Science

Being Extra-Itchy May Mean You're Missing Some CellsFor mice, mechanical itching is caused by loss of a certain type of skin cell, researchers found.
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New on MIT Technology Review

How can we be sure AI will behave? Perhaps by watching it argue with itself.Experts suggest that having AI systems try to outwit one another could help a person judge their intentions.
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Inside Science

BRIEF: Migraines May be a Side Effect of Adapting to the ColdBRIEF: Migraines May be a Side Effect of Adapting to the Cold A genetic variant linked to cold sensation and migraine headaches may have helped people survive in northern climates. shutterstock_250874710.jpg Image credits: Tetiana Iatsenko/ Shutterstock Human Thursday, May 3, 2018 - 14:00 Nala Rogers, Staff Writer (Inside Science) -- Migraine headaches might be the price some people pay for their
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Inside Science

The Link Between Gray Hair and Viral InfectionsThe Link Between Gray Hair and Viral Infections Mice gene research reveals connection between hair color and immune response. Gray-Hair.jpg Image credits: Eric McGregor via Flickr Rights information: CC BY-2.0 Human Thursday, May 3, 2018 - 14:00 James Gaines, Contributor (Inside Science) -- As we age, our hair naturally begins to lose some of its color. Now, though, researchers may have stumbled
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Science current issue

Joint statement on EPA proposed rule and public availability of data
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Science current issue

Global data meet EU rules
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Science current issue

News at a glance
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Science current issue

Critics see hidden goal in EPA data access rule
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Science current issue

Clever use of public data could sidestep new rule
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Science current issue

Europe moves to compete in global AI arms race
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Science current issue

DOE unveils climate model in advance of global test
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Science current issue

Korean thaw raises hopes for scientific cooperation
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Science current issue

Bucking global trends, Japan again embraces coal power
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Science current issue

Fossils reveal how ancient birds got their beaks
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Science current issue

Has artificial intelligence become alchemy?
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Science current issue

A hidden history
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Science current issue

How to pay for saving biodiversity
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Sonochemistry of silicon hydrides
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Indispensable malaria genes
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A cellular mechanism for age-induced itch
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Science current issue

The controversial correlates of consciousness
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Science current issue

Louise M. Slaughter (1929-2018)
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Scrutinizing the EU General Data Protection Regulation
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Deconstructing time
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Irreplaceable avian specimens, ransacked
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The sugar industry's influence on policy
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Science current issue

Response--The sugar industry's influence on policy
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Linguistics' role in the right to education
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Saturating malaria mutagenesis
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Retrosynthesizing complex nanostructures
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Turing structures at the nanoscale
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Emptying the reservoir
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Relationships among North Africans
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PTEN prevents the cytokine storm
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How to build a better morphogen gradient
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Multiple, diverse, and complex
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How calcium gates a potassium channel
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Smaller but more thermally stable
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Loss of touch receptors leads to itch
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Setting conscious perception alight
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Complement is a CD8+ T cell metabolic rheostat
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Financing biodiversity conservation
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Establishing NK cell identity
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Direct plasmon chemistry
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Curving bones
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Staying attached through division
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Winter can be hard
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Watching the clock in asthma
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Synaptic downscaling during "up" states
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Mitochondria fight Toxoplasma for fat
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Science current issue

You can't be what you can't see
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Science current issue

Metallacycles in carbon supports
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Science current issue

Reusable protein-based sensors
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Science current issue

Activation mechanism of a human SK-calmodulin channel complex elucidated by cryo-EM structuresSmall-conductance Ca 2+ -activated K + (SK) channels mediate neuron excitability and are associated with synaptic transmission and plasticity. They also regulate immune responses and the size of blood cells. Activation of SK channels requires calmodulin (CaM), but how CaM binds and opens SK channels has been unclear. Here we report cryo–electron microscopy (cryo-EM) structures of a human SK4-CaM
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Science current issue

Tunable intraparticle frameworks for creating complex heterostructured nanoparticle librariesComplex heterostructured nanoparticles with precisely defined materials and interfaces are important for many applications. However, rationally incorporating such features into nanoparticles with rigorous morphology control remains a synthetic bottleneck. We define a modular divergent synthesis strategy that progressively transforms simple nanoparticle synthons into increasingly sophisticated pro
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Science current issue

Polyamide membranes with nanoscale Turing structures for water purificationThe emergence of Turing structures is of fundamental importance, and designing these structures and developing their applications have practical effects in chemistry and biology. We use a facile route based on interfacial polymerization to generate Turing-type polyamide membranes for water purification. Manipulation of shapes by control of reaction conditions enabled the creation of membranes wit
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Science current issue

Real-space and real-time observation of a plasmon-induced chemical reaction of a single moleculePlasmon-induced chemical reactions of molecules adsorbed on metal nanostructures are attracting increased attention for photocatalytic reactions. However, the mechanism remains controversial because of the difficulty of direct observation of the chemical reactions in the plasmonic field, which is strongly localized near the metal surface. We used a scanning tunneling microscope (STM) to achieve r
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Science current issue

Enhanced thermal stability of nanograined metals below a critical grain sizeThe limitation of nanograined materials is their strong tendency to coarsen at elevated temperatures. As grain size decreases into the nanoscale, grain coarsening occurs at much lower temperatures, as low as ambient temperatures for some metals. We discovered that nanometer-sized grains in pure copper and nickel produced from plastic deformation at low temperatures exhibit notable thermal stabili
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Science current issue

Piezo2 channel-Merkel cell signaling modulates the conversion of touch to itchThe somatosensory system relays many signals ranging from light touch to pain and itch. Touch is critical to spatial awareness and communication. However, in disease states, innocuous mechanical stimuli can provoke pathologic sensations such as mechanical itch (alloknesis). The molecular and cellular mechanisms that govern this conversion remain unknown. We found that in mice, alloknesis in aging
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Science current issue

The threshold for conscious report: Signal loss and response bias in visual and frontal cortexWhy are some visual stimuli consciously detected, whereas others remain subliminal? We investigated the fate of weak visual stimuli in the visual and frontal cortex of awake monkeys trained to report stimulus presence. Reported stimuli were associated with strong sustained activity in the frontal cortex, and frontal activity was weaker and quickly decayed for unreported stimuli. Information about
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Science current issue

Morphogen gradient reconstitution reveals Hedgehog pathway design principlesIn developing tissues, cells estimate their spatial position by sensing graded concentrations of diffusible signaling proteins called morphogens. Morphogen-sensing pathways exhibit diverse molecular architectures, whose roles in controlling patterning dynamics and precision have been unclear. In this work, combining cell-based in vitro gradient reconstitution, genetic rewiring, and mathematical m
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Science current issue

Pleistocene North African genomes link Near Eastern and sub-Saharan African human populationsNorth Africa is a key region for understanding human history, but the genetic history of its people is largely unknown. We present genomic data from seven 15,000-year-old modern humans, attributed to the Iberomaurusian culture, from Morocco. We find a genetic affinity with early Holocene Near Easterners, best represented by Levantine Natufians, suggesting a pre-agricultural connection between Afr
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Science current issue

Structure of the DASH/Dam1 complex shows its role at the yeast kinetochore-microtubule interfaceKinetochores connect mitotic-spindle microtubules with chromosomes, allowing microtubule depolymerization to pull chromosomes apart during anaphase while resisting detachment as the microtubule shortens. The heterodecameric DASH/Dam1 complex (DASH/Dam1c), an essential component of yeast kinetochores, assembles into a microtubule-encircling ring. The ring associates with rodlike Ndc80 complexes to
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Science current issue

C1q restrains autoimmunity and viral infection by regulating CD8+ T cell metabolismDeficiency of C1q, the initiator of the complement classical pathway, is associated with the development of systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE). Explaining this association in terms of abnormalities in the classical pathway alone remains problematic because C3 deficiency does not predispose to SLE. Here, using a mouse model of SLE, we demonstrate that C1q, but not C3, restrains the response to sel
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Science current issue

New Products
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Science current issue

Finding reward in risk
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Science current issue

Fractal-like hierarchical organization of bone begins at the nanoscaleThe components of bone assemble hierarchically to provide stiffness and toughness. However, the organization and relationship between bone’s principal components—mineral and collagen—has not been clearly elucidated. Using three-dimensional electron tomography imaging and high-resolution two-dimensional electron microscopy, we demonstrate that bone mineral is hierarchically assembled beginning at
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Science current issue

Uncovering the essential genes of the human malaria parasite Plasmodium falciparum by saturation mutagenesisSevere malaria is caused by the apicomplexan parasite Plasmodium falciparum. Despite decades of research, the distinct biology of these parasites has made it challenging to establish high-throughput genetic approaches to identify and prioritize therapeutic targets. Using transposon mutagenesis of P. falciparum in an approach that exploited its AT-rich genome, we generated more than 38,000 mutants
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Science current issue

Erratum for the Report "Seasonal and daily climate variation have opposite effects on species elevational range size" by W.-P. Chan, I-C. Chen, R. K. Colwell, W.-C. Liu, C. Huang, S.-F. Shen
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Science current issue

Erratum for the Report "Translocation of a gut pathobiont drives autoimmunity in mice and humans" by S. Manfredo Vieira, M. Hiltensperger, V. Kumar, D. Zegarra-Ruiz, C. Dehner, N. Khan, F. R. C. Costa, E. Tiniakou, T. Greiling, W. Ruff, A. Barbieri, C. Kriegel, S. S. Mehta, J. R. Knight, D. Jain, A. L. Goodman, M. A. Kriegel
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Latest Headlines | Science News

Adapting to life in the north may have been a real headacheA cold-sensing protein has adapted to different local climates, also affecting risk of migraine.
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Viden

Lektor: Vores følelser forfører fornuftenFølelser kan få os til at handle mod bedre vidende. Men vi kan ikke være rationelle hele tiden, siger lektor emeritus Johannes Andersen.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Microbeads to combat infection show promise in burn wound simulationsComputer simulations of microscopic, protein-coated beads that block bacteria from binding to host cells suggest that the microbeads could help reduce or eliminate bacterial infections in burn wounds. Paul Roberts of the University of Birmingham, U.K., and colleagues present these new findings, funded by the BBSRC, in PLOS Computational Biology.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Revealing the remarkable nanostructure of human boneScientists have produced a 3-D nanoscale reconstruction of the mineral structure of bone.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

A new model for communication in plant cellsPlant cells share a strange and surprising kinship with animal neurons: many plant cells have proteins that closely resemble glutamate receptors, which help to relay nerve signals from one neuron to another. While plants lack a true nervous system, previous studies have shown that plants need these glutamate receptor-like proteins (GLRs) to do important things such as mate, grow, and defend themse
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Milestone research on Madagascar periwinkle uncovers pathway to cancer-fighting drugsPlant scientists have taken the crucial last steps in a 60-year quest to unravel the complex chemistry of Madagascar periwinkle in a breakthrough that opens up the potential for rapid synthesis of cancer-fighting compounds.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Deadliest human malaria parasite reveals the genomic chinks in its armorFor the first time, scientists have revealed the essential genes for the most deadly human malaria parasite, Plasmodium falciparum. Researchers from the Wellcome Sanger Institute and the University of South Florida (USF) created new genomic techniques to analyse every gene in the parasite and determine which ones are indispensable.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Atomically thin magnetic device could lead to new memory technologiesMagnetic materials are the backbone of modern digital information technologies, such as hard-disk storage. A University of Washington-led team has now taken this one step further by encoding information using magnets that are just a few layers of atoms in thickness. This breakthrough may revolutionize both cloud computing technologies and consumer electronics by enabling data storage at a greater
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

A designer's toolkit for constructing complex nanoparticlesA team of chemists at Penn State has developed a designer's toolkit that lets them build various levels of complexity into nanoparticles using a simple, mix-and-match process. "Researchers in areas as diverse as medicine, energy, and electronics often design complex nanoscale particles that are predicted to have useful functions," said Raymond E. Schaak, DuPont Professor of Materials Chemistry at
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Scientific American Content: Global

Core Strength: Extreme "Close-Ups" May Help Explain Why Our Bones Are So StrongSnapshots taken at roughly 400,000x zoom reveal mineral crystals and proteins organize into twisting, helical shapes -- Read more on ScientificAmerican.com
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Discovery (uploads) on YouTube

Rescuing Rhinos | Racing Extinction (360 Video)Orphaned at 2 weeks old on November 2014, Matimba was found next to her mother who had been killed by her poachers for her horn. Weighing only 35 pounds at the time, she has been protected and nursed back to health in South Africa. Join a conservation biologist on an interactive mission to learn how animals critical to the world’s ecosystem thrive and survive in the wild. For a more immersive exp
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The Atlantic

Trump Creates a Not-So-New Faith Office in the White HousePresident Trump announced a new White House faith office on Thursday. At a speech in the Rose Garden, he called the initiative “another historic action to promote religious freedom,” saying the office will help “ensure that faith-based organizations have equal access to government funding and the equal right to exercise their deeply held beliefs.” The new initiative will also “design new policies
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Sprint's rough weekSprint is having its worst week in almost four years on Wall Street after announcing another attempt at merging with rival T-Mobile.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Erosion unearths bones on New York's island of the deadStorms and the tides are unearthing the long-hidden bones of Hart Island, creating eerie scenes of skulls, femurs and collarbones on this sliver of land where New York City's destitute dead have for 150 years been sent off to be unceremoniously buried and forgotten.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Researchers find promising nanoparticle candidates for carbon dioxide capture and conversionA recent article in the sustainable chemistry journal ChemSusChem revealed researchers at the University of Pittsburgh are "doping" nanoparticles to enhance their ability to capture carbon dioxide and provide a raw source of carbon for industrial processes. Not to be confused with its negative use in athletics, "doping" in chemical engineering refers to adding a substance into another material to
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

Plant relationships breakdown when they meet new 'fungi'Researchers explain the process of plant cooperation, in relation to their new study which has shed light on why cooperative relationships breakdown.
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Shrinking the synthesizerEngineers team up to reduce the size, cost and power requirements of an optical frequency device.
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Big Think

NASA technology reveals hidden text on Dead Sea ScrollsThe Dead Sea Scrolls were first discovered in the West Bank in 1946, but now a specialized camera is helping researchers read bits of the manuscripts for the first time. Read More
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Scientific American Content: Global

Mineral Found in Lunar Meteorite Hints at Hidden Moon WaterMoganite within a moon rock found in northwest Africa suggests a treasure trove of ice in the lunar subsurface -- Read more on ScientificAmerican.com
3h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

'I opened a bottle with Stephen Hawking to celebrate our eureka moment' – Prof. Thomas HertogA theory developed with the late Professor Stephen Hawking stating that the universe is more simple and uniform than current models suggest was so shocking that it had to be sat on for a while before it was released to the world, according to co-author Professor Thomas Hertog from KU Leuven in Belgium.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

New York Times gains 139,000 subscribers in Q1The New York Times—dismissed as a "failing" newspaper by US President Donald Trump—had a net gain of 139,000 online subscribers in the first three months of 2018, the daily said Thursday.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Q&A: Cambridge Analytica's bankruptcy won't halt probesCambridge AnalyticaThe company at the center of the Facebook privacy scandal, political consultancy Cambridge Analytica, is going out of business. But that doesn't mean those behind the entity will escape the scrutiny of regulators.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

New study sheds light (and some shade) on anole diversificationThe islands of Puerto Rico, Cuba, Hispaniola, and Jamaica—collectively known as the Greater Antilles—are home to more than 100 species of Anolis lizards. The success of this colorful group of reptiles is often attributed to the evolution of distinct body shapes and behaviors that allow species to occupy different ecological niches. A new study from an international team of biologists including fro
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Science | The Guardian

The Guardian view on the Galileo project: we must be partners not rivals | EditorialBritain has played a key role in the development of Europe’s satellite navigation system. Brexit should not be an excuse for ending this vital security cooperation The European Union’s Galileo network of satellites is the latest in a series of global satellite navigation systems providing precision data from space. America has had one since 1978, in the shape of the familiar GPS system . Russia ha
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Popular Science

Why do we still have fax machines?Technology Just the fax, please. The invention of the fax machine has roots all the way back in 1840. But the future of the facsimile machine isn’t so certain.
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Study: Maternal placenta consumption causes no harm to newbornsA joint UNLV and Oregon State University study found mothers who consumed their placenta passed on no harm to their newborn babies when compared to infants of mothers who did not consume their placenta.
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News

New study sheds light (and some shade) on anole diversificationThe Greater Antilles are home to more than 100 species of Anolis lizards. The success of these reptiles is often attributed to the evolution of distinct body shapes and behaviors that allow them to occupy ecological niches. A study from an international team of biologists including the University of Missouri reports that the evolution of physiological differences may have been just as important as
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The Atlantic

The NBA’s New Age Is on Full DisplayThe tetralogy is still in play. Thanks largely to LeBron James’s heroics during a first-round series against the Indiana Pacers—averages of 34.4 points, 10 rebounds, and 7.7 assists, including a 45-point effort in Game 7—the Cleveland Cavaliers and Golden State Warriors could meet for a fourth consecutive year in the NBA Finals. That would confirm what hardly needs confirming: that these two club
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Ingeniøren

Mælkevejens mysterierNogle forskere kortlægger med høj præcision position og bevægelse for milliarder af Mælkevejens stjerner. Andre spekulerer i eksistensen af vandrende og supertunge sorte huller, og atter andre prøver at få bedre styr på, hvad Mælkevejen egentligt vejer.
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Viden

Ekspert: Flydende atomkraftværker kan blive populæreAtomkraftværker på pramme i havet er billigere at producere. Derfor kan der blive flere af dem i fremtiden.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Bacterial toxins wreak havoc by crippling cellular infrastructureBacterial toxins can wreak mass havoc within cells by shutting down multiple essential functions at once, a new study has found.
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Feed: All Latest

How Artificial Intelligence Can—and Can't—Fix FacebookFacebook is counting on artificial intelligence to remedy problems including violent imagery, hate speech, and fake news. It's making progress, but big hurdles remain.
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The Atlantic

Elderly Mice's Brains Are Bad at Handling Jet LagStrange things happen to sleep as the body ages. For humans, getting older can mean waking up over and over again or shifting to a much earlier wake-up time. In elderly mice, the region in the brain that directs the circadian clock—the suprachiasmatic nucleus—can go off the rails, as the 10,000 cells that make it up, which normally fire all together, lose touch and fall out of sync. In a new set
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Chemical engineers discover how to control knots that form in DNA moleculesJust like any long polymer chain, DNA tends to form knots. Using technology that allows them to stretch DNA molecules and image the behavior of these knots, MIT researchers have discovered, for the first time, the factors that determine whether a knot moves along the strand or "jams" in place.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Antimatter study to benefit from recipe for ten-fold spatial compression of plasmaAn international team of physicists studying antimatter have now derived an improved way of spatially compressing a state of matter called non-neutral plasma, which is made up of a type of antimatter particles, called antiprotons, trapped together with matter particles, like electrons. The new compression solution, which is based on rotating the plasma in a trapped cavity using centrifugal forces
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NeuWrite San Diego

The Neurogenesis Saga: Are new neurons born in the adult human brain?One of neuroscience’s most heated debates during the past 50 years has been whether or not new neurons are born (a process called neurogenesis) in the adult mammalian brain. Before the late 1990s, we believed that we were born with all the neurons we would have throughout our lives. However, evidence of adult neurogenesis from […]
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

'Digital snapshots' reveal the protein landscape of mitochondrial quality controlAlmost every cell in the human body, from beating heart cells to bacteria-gobbling immune cells, is powered by chemical energy produced by specialized organelles called mitochondria. The process of energy generation creates waste products that can be highly toxic, so, like real power plants, these organelles require tight quality control and oversight.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

World's rarest ape on the edge of extinctionIn a new research article, a team of international researchers argue that the Tapanuli Orangutan—a species discovered last year in Sumatra, Indonesia, and one of the rarest animals on the planet—could lose its battle for survival, unless decisive steps are taken to rescue it.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Researchers create instrument to rapidly test if drugs contain trace crystallinityResearchers at Purdue University have created a device that can quickly and inexpensively determine whether new pharmaceutical formulations have trace crystallinity that can negatively impact the drug's stability and bioavailability.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Students create exoskeleton app for patient with muscular dystrophyZach Smith has Duchenne muscular dystrophy, a genetic disorder marked by progressive muscle degeneration. His lack of muscle control and being in a wheelchair made him a prime candidate for a computer-controlled exoskeleton arm.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Mining for gold with a computerEngineers from Texas A&M University and Virginia Tech report important new insights into nanoporous gold—a material with growing applications in several areas, including energy storage and biomedical devices—all without stepping into a lab.
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NYT > Science

Will Tourism Ruin the Rainbow Mountain of Peru?The remarkable landscape, discovered only in the past five years, has become a must-see attraction. But the tourism boom may be environmentally harmful.
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NYT > Science

Iraqi Artifacts Once Bought by Hobby Lobby Will Return HomeImmigration and Customs Enforcement returned thousands of smuggled Iraqi artifacts to the Iraq government, which plans to send them to a Baghdad museum.
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Science : NPR

NASA Tests New Nuclear Reactor For Future Space TravelersThe reactor could keep the lights on during long-duration missions far from Earth. (Image credit: NASA)
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

X-ray navigation considered for possible CubeSat missionNow that NASA has shown the viability of autonomous X-ray navigation in space, a team led by the Smithsonian Astrophysical Observatory plans to include the technology on a proposed CubeSat mission to the Moon, and NASA engineers are now studying the possibly of adding the capability to future human-exploration spacecraft.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Harvesting clean hydrogen fuel through artificial photosynthesisA new, stable artificial photosynthesis device doubles the efficiency of harnessing sunlight to break apart both fresh and salt water, generating hydrogen that can then be used in fuel cells.
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The Atlantic

Giuliani’s Defense Only Intensifies the Legal Risks for TrumpRudy Giuliani, who joined President Trump’s personal legal team last week, told Fox News on Thursday that the Trump attorney Michael Cohen had arranged a payment to the adult-film actress Stormy Daniels in order to prevent allegations of an affair from coming out in the closing days of the 2016 election. The former New York City mayor’s explanation for the $130,000 payment to Daniels suggests the
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Cognitive remediation can be implemented in large systems of psychiatric careCognitive remediation, an evidence-based, recovery-oriented behavioral intervention for patients with mental illness, can feasibly be implemented in large systems of care, according to researchers at the New York State Psychiatric Institute and Columbia University Irving Medical Center.
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Study: Transgender people who are denied mental health care at higher risk of self-harmWhen those who identify as transgender are denied mental health care, they stand at higher risk of substance abuse as a coping method. In turn, this can increase their vulnerability to attempted suicide.
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Scientific American Content: Global

Possible Autism Biomarker Found in MonkeysLow levels of vasopressin linked to social behavior differences -- Read more on ScientificAmerican.com
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New Scientist - News

Flying beetle cyborgs guided with tiny battery-powered backpacksBeetles have been turned into autonomous flying robots. They could one day swarm through disaster zones on search and rescue missions
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New Scientist - News

Mistletoe’s cells are broken at a fundamental levelAll complex organisms rely on tiny nodules called mitochondria to supply their cells with energy – but mistletoe’s mitochondria don’t work and yet it survives
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Bacterial toxins wreak havoc by crippling cellular infrastructureBacterial toxins can wreak mass havoc within cells by shutting down multiple essential functions at once, a new study has found. The discovery could one day open the door to exploring better ways to fight life-threatening infections.
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News

'Digital snapshots' reveal the protein landscape of mitochondrial quality controlHarvard Medical School scientists developed a new technique to analyze, with unprecedented quantitative precision, how cells initiate the removal of defective mitochondria by the cell's autophagy, or 'self-eating,' system.
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Daily aspirin linked to higher risk in menMen who take once-daily aspirin have nearly double the risk of melanoma compared to men who are not exposed to daily aspirin, reports a large new study.Women, however, do not have an increased risk. This does not mean men should stop aspirin therapy to lower the risk of heart attack, the authors stressed. They should avoid tanning beds and get regular skin checks by a dermatologist.
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Mindfulness at work: UBC study first to uncover positive benefits for teamsChallenges and differences in opinion are inevitable when working in a team. But new research from the UBC Sauder School of Business suggests some of these conflicts can be reduced, or even avoided, through team mindfulness.
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Untangling DNA knotsMIT researchers have discovered the factors that influence how knots travel along a strand of DNA, using technology that allows them to stretch DNA molecules and image the knots' behavior.
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The Economist: The world this week

Business this week
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The Economist: The world this week

Politics this week
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The Economist: The world this week

KAL’s cartoon
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New Scientist - News

The UK’s plan to build a rival GPS is a bonkers Brexit schemeNow the UK is excluded from contracts to build Europe’s Galileo satellites, it wants to talk up building its own system to keep aerospace firms from leaving
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Historians name 2 Indian Ocean 19th century shipwrecksA four-year search of the depths of the Indian Ocean has failed to find Malaysia Airlines Flight 370. But the unprecedented sonar hunt for the missing airliner might be close to solving 19th century mysteries—the locations of two sailing ships that vanished with cargos of coal.
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Harvesting clean hydrogen fuel through artificial photosynthesisA new, stable artificial photosynthesis device doubles the efficiency of harnessing sunlight to break apart both fresh and salt water, generating hydrogen that can then be used in fuel cells.
5h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Brain stimulation reduces suicidal thinking in people with hard-to-treat depressionA specific kind of brain stimulation is effective in reducing suicidal thinking in a significant portion of people with hard-to-treat depression, according to a new CAMH study published in the Journal of Clinical Psychiatry. Forty per cent of people in the study reported that they no longer experienced suicidal thoughts after receiving bilateral repetitive transcranial magnetic stimulation.
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Should ethics or human intuition drive the moral judgments of driverless cars?Driverless cars will encounter situations requiring moral assessment -- and new research suggests that people may not be happy with the decisions their cars make. Experiments designed to test people's reactions to a driving dilemma that endangers human life, revealed a high willingness for self-sacrifice, a consideration of the age of potential victims and swerving onto the sidewalk to save more l
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Engineers upgrade ancient, sun-powered tech to purify water with near-perfect efficiencyThe idea of using energy from the sun to evaporate and purify water is ancient. The Greek philosopher Aristotle reportedly described such a process more than 2,000 years ago. Now, researchers are bringing this technology into the modern age, using it to sanitize water at what they report to be record-breaking rates.
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Antimatter study to benefit from recipe for ten-fold spatial compression of plasmaAn international team of physicists studying antimatter have now derived an improved way of spatially compressing a state of matter called non-neutral plasma, which consists of both antimatter and matter particles. In a new EPJ D study, the team achieved a ten-fold compression of the size of the antiparticle cloud, down to a radius of only 0.17 mm. This will contribute to the first direct measurem
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Poachers shoot dead three rhinos inside Kenyan sanctuaryPoachers have shot dead three critically endangered black rhinos in a specially-protected sanctuary in northern Kenya, the wildlife service said Thursday.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Wizz Air granted UK licence ahead of BrexitHungarian budget airline Wizz Air on Thursday said it had been granted a British air operator's licence following an application last year as it prepares for possible disruption from Brexit.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

German authorities smash potato packers' cartelTwo German potato packing firms landed in hot water Thursday as competition authorities pounded them with a massive fine for secretly agreeing prices for their sacks of spuds.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Six endangered S.African rhinos on way to ChadSix critically endangered black rhinos were en route from South Africa to Chad on Thursday in a pioneering project to re-introduce the animals to a country where they were wiped out by poaching nearly 50 years ago.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

NASA's newest Mars lander to study quakes on Red PlanetNASA is poised to launch its first lander to Mars since 2012, an unmanned spacecraft called InSight that aims to listen for quakes and unravel the mystery of how rocky planets like Earth form.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Girl power: All-female teams compete at robotics eventHalf a dozen teenage girls from Canada know exactly how to narrow the skills gap.
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Ingeniøren

Socialdemokratiet: Tre nye havmølleparker og fossilfrit Danmark allerede i 2045Landets største parti lancerede torsdag en samlet klima- og miljøpolitik, der både i bredde og ambitioner overbyder regeringens energiudspil, der blev offentliggjort for en uge siden. Helt nyt er en grøn investeringsfond med 20 mia. kr. til nye teknologier.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

We reconstructed the genome of the 'first animal'The first animals emerged on Earth at least 541m years ago, according to the fossil record. What they looked like is the subject of an ongoing debate, but they're traditionally thought to have been similar to sponges.
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The Atlantic

The Atlantic Hires Ellen Cushing To Lead New San Francisco Bureau as Senior Tech EditorThe Atlantic announced today that Ellen Cushing is joining its Technology section as a senior editor. Cushing will help to establish and lead a new bureau in San Francisco, as The Atlantic grows both its reporting team and coverage dedicated to technology and Silicon Valley. She will begin with The Atlantic next month. “Ellen comes aboard at a time when we are aggressively expanding our coverage
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Scientific American Content: Global

Caribbean Island Nations Cite U.S. Report at Climate Change TalksU.N. meeting is aimed in part at strengthening countries’ commitments to climate action -- Read more on ScientificAmerican.com
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Popular Science

Why hasn’t the sun burned out yet?Ask Us Anything Our planet's personal space heater is incredibly efficient. Luckily for us, the sun didn’t burn out before we showed up a few hundred thousand years ago. But how could it have that much fuel? Why hasn’t it been snuffed out like a…
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Researchers levitate water droplets to improve contaminant detectionIn a new study, researchers showed that using sound waves to levitate droplets of water in midair can improve the detection of harmful heavy metal contaminants such as lead and mercury in water. Detecting small amounts of heavy metals in water is important because these contaminants are harmful to human health and the environment. The new technique could eventually lead to instruments that perform
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Futurity.org

How positions of power fuel narcissismEndowing people with social power inflates the socially-toxic component of narcissism called exploitation and entitlement, according to new research. Until now, the assumption was that narcissists tended to clinch powerful positions for themselves. However, recent research suggests that power itself may create narcissists. “While power doesn’t turn everyone into a destructive tyrant, it has perni
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Cryptocurrency for the rest of usThanks to a WA startup, there's now an easy way for everyone to invest in cryptocurrencies like bitcoin.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

The true 'value' of biodiversityPutting policies in place that are designed to protect biodiversity but are based on only one key species 'value' could inadvertently put some of our best loved wildlife in jeopardy, new research has shown.
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Purdue researchers create instrument to rapidly test if drugs contain trace crystallinityResearchers at Purdue University have created a device that can quickly and inexpensively determine whether new pharmaceutical formulations have trace crystallinity that can negatively impact the drug's stability and bioavailability. The researchers have developed instrumentation that can accurately detect in early stages whether a pharmaceutical formulation has trace crystalline content. The inst
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Mercury rising: Are the fish we eat toxic?Canadian researchers say industrial sea fishing may be exposing people in coastal and island nations to excessively high levels of mercury.
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Mining for gold with a computerEngineers from Texas A&M University and Virginia Tech report important new insights into nanoporous gold -- a material with growing applications in several areas, including energy storage and biomedical devices -- all without stepping into a lab.
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Decoding the brain's learning machineIn studies with monkeys, Johns Hopkins researchers report that they have uncovered significant new details about how the cerebellum -- the 'learning machine' of the mammalian brain -- makes predictions and learns from its mistakes, helping us execute complex motor actions such as accurately shooting a basketball into a net or focusing your eyes on an object across the room.
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Early HIV treatment key to avoiding brain atrophyWhile the human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) has largely dropped from news headlines since the 1990s, at the end of 2016 there were 36.7 million people living with the infection, and of those only 53 per cent had access to treatment. A new study underscores the neurological consequences of exposure to HIV without antiretroviral therapy.
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Weekday for operation does not affect survival from lung cancerThe day of the week on which a patient has a lung cancer operation has no significance for their survival. This has been demonstrated by researchers at Karolinska Institutet, Sweden, in a new study published in the journal Chest.
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Plants get a brace to precisely shed flowers and leavesA study on how petals fall, and plants cope with the lost. To protect reproductive organs from bacterial and external harm, plants create a special brace to assure an accurate detaching process and a coating to seal the open cut left by the shedding
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Interconnected cells-in-a-dish let researchers study brain diseaseUsing multiple types of cells found in the brain's hippocampus, Salk researchers modeled how connections between cells go awry in schizophrenia.
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News

World's rarest ape on the edge of extinctionIn a new research article, a team of international researchers argue that the Tapanuli orangutan -- a species discovered last year in Sumatra, Indonesia, and one of the rarest animals on the planet -- could lose its battle for survival, unless decisive steps are taken to rescue it.'In 40 years of research, I don't think I've ever seen anything this dramatic,' said Professor William Laurance from J
6h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Mistletoe mystery -- something's missing from the kissing plant?Scientists at the John Innes Centre, Norwich, UK, working alongside colleagues at the Max Planck Institute of Molecular Plant Physiology, Germany, were surprised to discover that mistletoe has evolved in a manner that makes it unique among multicellular organisms.
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Is prognosis poor for breast cancer diagnosed after negative screening mammography?A study of mammography data for more than 300,000 women suggests cases of breast cancer diagnosed after a negative screening mammogram were more likely to be associated with poor prognosis than those cancers diagnosed after a positive screening mammogram.
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Largest-ever family study of migraine provides new insight into the diseaseAn international research consortium has shown that an accumulation of many independent genetic risk variants is the reason why migraine tends to run in families. The genetic burden was shown to be greater in patients that experience aura symptoms during attacks or have an early age of onset of migraine.
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Neurons use a single switch to decide whether to make or break new connectionsVisualizing the signals that make brain cells connect reveals new insights into the developing brain.
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Fasting boosts stem cells' regenerative capacityAge-related declines in stem cell function can be reversed by a 24-hour fast, according to a new study from MIT. Biologists found fasting dramatically improves stem cells' ability to regenerate, in both aged and young mice.
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Study offers new approach to starve p53 deficient tumorsSanford Burnham Prebys (SBP) researchers recently discovered an alternative metabolic pathway that might be used by cancer cells to survive nutrient deprivation. Targeting these proteins to disrupt autophagy in cancer cells is an exciting therapeutic strategy that could minimize toxicity.
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Brain circuit helps us learn by watching othersMIT researchers have identified a brain circuit required to learn by watching others. This circuit, which is distinct from the brain network used to learn from firsthand experiences, relies on input from a part of the brain responsible for interpreting social cues.
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News

3-D batteries pack power into tiny footprintsBatteries might seem like they come in every shape and size that you can imagine. But as electronic devices become tinier and skinnier without reducing their power and energy demands, they challenge engineers to design batteries that can fit into smaller spaces without compromising on performance. Researchers have used non-traditional techniques to fashion one possible solution -- a powerful 3-D l
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Mistletoe has lost 'most of its respiratory capacity,' two studies showMost people know mistletoe as a plant to hang up and kiss under at the holidays. But in its natural environment, mistletoe is a hemiparasite, latching onto trees and extracting water and nutrients from them. Now, two independent studies reported in Current Biology on May 3 show that mistletoe's parasitic lifestyle has brought about a surprising evolutionary loss. Mistletoe lacks key components of
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Study sheds light on genetic foundation of migrainesThe nauseating, often debilitating, headaches affect 15-20 percent of adults in developed countries, yet they remain stubbornly hard to explain. Scientists know that migraines tend to run in families but aren't sure exactly how. A new study published May 3 in the journal Neuron shows why some families are susceptible to migraines and how genetics may influence the type of migraine they get.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

The need to work less is a matter of life and deathThe May bank holiday is intimately linked to labour history and to struggles over time spent at work. In the US, May Day has its origins in the fight for an eight-hour work day at the end of the 19th century. This fight was – and remains – a quest for a broader ideal, namely the achievement of a life beyond work.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Innovative process for environmentally friendly manure treatment comes onto the marketThe BioEcoSIM process for the treatment of liquid manure developed at the Fraunhofer Institute for Interfacial Engineering and Biotechnology IGB is being introduced to the market by SUEZ Germany as an operator of large-scale plants. This creates an opportunity for farms to dispose of surplus manure and digestate. Slurry treatment products are phosphate fertilizers, ammonium fertilizers and organic
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Futurity.org

Fossil footprints show humans stalked giant ground slothFootprints within footprints at New Mexico’s White Sands National Monument may be the first evidence that humans hunted giant, razor-clawed ground sloths at the end of the Ice Age. The White Sands trackway—a series of tracks and footprints that animals and humans left as long as tens of thousands of years ago—suggests that a human followed a sloth, purposely stepping in its tracks, says David Bus
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Quanta Magazine

Three Decades Later, Mystery Numbers ExplainedAlmost thirty years ago, a group of physicists noticed some of the most important numbers in mathematics appearing where they didn’t seem to belong. A new proof finally explains why they’re there. The work, which is still unpublished, is by four leading mathematicians in the field of mirror symmetry. It explains why the so-called zeta values — numbers that have preoccupied mathematicians since th
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NYT > Science

Trilobites: Lightning Struck Her Home. Then Her Brain Implant Stopped Working.Doctors suggested that electrical storms be added to the list of things patients with electrodes implanted in their brains should watch out for.
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NYT > Science

An Ancient Horse Is Unearthed in a Utah BackyardPaleontologists recently determined that a skeleton discovered during a landscaping project belonged to a horse from the Pleistocene Era.
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TED Talks Daily (SD video)

To design better tech, understand context | Tania DouglasWhat good is a sophisticated piece of medical equipment to people in Africa if it can't handle the climate there? Biomedical engineer Tania Douglas shares stories of how we're often blinded to real needs in our pursuit of technology -- and how a deeper understanding of the context where it's used can lead us to better solutions.
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Big Think

What are time crystals and why are they in kids’ toys?Time crystals have been detected in an unexpected place: monoammonium phosphate, a compound found in fertilizer and 'grow your own crystal' kits. Read More
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Indonesia has far more than enough pumped hydro storage sites to support a 100% renewable electricity gridWith the support of the Australia Indonesia Centre we have identified 657 potential sites across Bali for pumped hydro energy storage (PHES), with a combined potential storage capacity of 2,300 Gigawatt-hours.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

New science from JupiterWhen NASA's Juno spacecraft recently flew over the poles of Jupiter, researchers were astonished, as if they had never seen a giant planet before.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Mistletoe has lost 'most of its respiratory capacity,' studies showMost people know mistletoe (Viscum album) primarily as a plant to hang up and kiss under at the holidays. But in its natural environment, mistletoe is a hemiparasite (a parasitic plant that is capable of some photosynthesis), latching onto trees and extracting water and nutrients from them. Now, two independent studies reported in Current Biology on May 3 show that mistletoe's parasitic lifestyle
6h
Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

Infection control and prevention in clinics is in everyone's handsWhen it comes to the examination room at your health care clinic, you might think that avoiding catching the flu or other more deadly viruses is out of your hands, so to speak. But infectious disease experts, who just published a practical guide for infectious disease control in clinics, reveal how we can all help make a difference in infection control.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

A new giant virus found in the waters of Oahu, HawaiiResearchers have characterized a new, unusually large virus that infects common marine algae. Found in the coastal waters off Oahu, Hawai'i, it contains the biggest genome ever sequenced for a virus infecting a photosynthetic organism.
6h
Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

Mix of natural cures, biomedical devices prompts bone health, growthIn a first-ever effort, researchers improved the bone-growing capabilities on 3D-printed, ceramic bone scaffolds by 30-45 percent with curcumin, a compound found in the spice, turmeric.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

Women should have right to reject pregnancy, experts sayExperts argue that, despite decades of debate, advocates and opponents of abortion have been unable to demonstrate conclusively that either side's view is false, or agree on when life starts. He says laws should not force women to risk death and injury by having a baby.
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News

The brain's 'rising stars': New options against Alzheimer's?A study by scientists of the German Center for Neurodegenerative Diseases points to a novel potential approach against Alzheimer's disease. In studies in mice, the researchers were able to show that blocking a particular receptor located on astrocytes normalized brain function and improved memory performance. Astrocytes are star-shaped, non-neuronal cells involved in the regulation of brain activi
6h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News

PET imaging agent could provide early diagnosis of rheumatoid arthritisA novel PET tracer developed by Korean researchers can visualize joint inflammation and could provide early diagnosis of rheumatoid arthritis, a common autoimmune disease that causes chronic inflammation of joints and can lead to deformity and dysfunction. The study is reported in the featured basic science article in The Journal of Nuclear Medicine's May issue.
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Odd microbial partnerships via electrically conductive particlesHuman activities have contributed to global warming subsequently leading to increasing erosion of land. This results in conductive minerals being washed increasingly into water streams. The inflow of conductive particles can enable unusual electric partnerships between microbes leading to additional emissions of methane, which is a potent greenhouse gas.
6h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Researchers defy biology: Mice remain slim on burger dietOur bodies are extremely efficient at storing fat from food into our fat tissue. In a new study, researchers from the University of Copenhagen have managed to completely block the development of obesity. The researchers deleted an enzyme and made it impossible for mice to increase their amount of fat tissue, despite the mice eating an extremely fatty diet. They are hoping the findings will open ne
6h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Smart skin for flexible monitoringAn electronic tag that stretches and flexes while it records location and environmental data can monitor marine animals in their natural habitat.
6h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Arts and culture could help Finnish schools reach new heights of excellenceFinland has one of the best education systems in the world. If Finnish schools wished to reach a new level of excellence, they should strengthen the integration of arts and culture in the teaching of all subjects, researchers now say.
6h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Could robots be counselors? Early research shows positive user experienceNew research has shown for the first time that a social robot can deliver a 'helpful' and 'enjoyable' motivational interview (MI) -- a counseling technique designed to support behavior change.
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Scientific American Content: Global

Women in Innovation: Gaining Ground, but Still Far BehindPatents are a reasonable proxy for the relative contributions of the genders, and there's a huge disparity still to be overcome -- Read more on ScientificAmerican.com
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Morphing twisted nanoscale objects to tailor applications in future technologiesFor the first time scientists have created a way to model the interaction between light and twisted molecules, as these molecules transition from left- to right-handed versions, or vice versa. The transitional forms offer a deeper insight into material symmetries and their unexpected behaviour could lead to improved design of telecoms components.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Laia Andreu-Hayles explores tropical forests in a warming worldLaia Andreu-Hayles is a tree-ring scientist and Lamont Associate Research Professor at Lamont-Doherty Earth Observatory who uses the data contained in tree rings to reconstruct past climate conditions and study the interactions between forests and the environment. This work enables scientists to better understand current and future climate trends, the impact of global change on forests, and the Ea
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Young women are more left wing than men, study revealsNew research shows that among older voters, women are more right wing than men, but in younger cohorts, women are more to the left.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

A new giant virus found in the waters of Oahu, HawaiiResearchers at the Daniel K. Inouye Center for Microbial Oceanography: Research and Education (C-MORE) at the University of Hawai'i (UH) at Mānoa have characterized a new, unusually large virus that infects common marine algae. Found in the coastal waters off Oahu, Hawai'i, it contains the biggest genome ever sequenced for a virus infecting a photosynthetic organism.
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BBC News - Science & Environment

Ancestral remains 'people not objects'A collective of scientists recommends that human ancestors be respected as individuals.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Digging into Easter Island's climate historyDuring March, a team of scientists led by William D'Andrea, associate research professor at Columbia University's Lamont-Doherty Earth Observatory, travelled to Rapa Nui (Easter Island) to work on a major research project in the island's most important wetlands. The collaborative field team also included Lamont-Doherty's Lorelei Curtin; Andrea Seelenfreund from Chile's Universidad Academia de Huma
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