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Banebrydende migrænekur kan komme til Danmark næste årI denne måned godkender USA’s myndigheder muligvis ny medicin, der kan halvere antallet af migræneanfald hos bestemte patienter.
11h
Ingeniøren

Borgerindsigt er en bombe under dansk videoovervågningEjerne af landets 1,5 millioner overvågningskameraer risikerer overarbejde, hvis de skal leve op til regler om indsigt og undgå millionbøder.
19h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Gut check: Metabolites shed by intestinal microbiota keep inflammation at bayResearchers have elucidated a mechanism by which 'good' bacteria that reside in our gastrointestinal tract can help protect us from inflammation, and how their disruption (dysbiosis) can increase the susceptibility of the liver to more harmful forms of disease. Their study, now available in the journal Cell Reports, identified two key metabolites produced by the bacteria in mice that modulate infl
7h

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NYT > Science

Caught in the Theranos Wreckage: Betsy DeVos, Rupert Murdoch and Walmart’s WaltonsNewly unsealed court documents reveal that some of the world’s richest people invested millions in the discredited blood-testing company Theranos.
11min
NYT > Science

As Winter Warms, Bears Can’t Sleep. And They’re Getting Into Trouble.American black bears are not always hibernating when they should be. Sometimes, they go in search of humans’ food, and that’s an even bigger problem.
10min
Live Science

A Speck of Weapons-Grade Plutonium Is Missing in IdahoThe small bit of weapons-grade material, about the weight of a paperclip, was discovered missing after more than a decade.
17min
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Why Wall Street's worried about TeslaElon Musk's track record for technological feats as chief of SpaceX has turned skeptics into believers in everything from his quest to open space travel to Mars to his desire to build a tunnel for high-speed travel between New York and Washington. As Tesla's CEO, his ambitious vision for electric cars has also earned him a faithful following.
28min
Live Science

This 'Star Wars' Scroll Illusion Would Stump Even a JediWhy do these identical images appear to be scrolling in different directions? Search your feelings. (Or read this article to find out.)
32min
Popular Science

You should buy an instant film camera—here’s howGadgets Instant prints make smart phone photography seem boring. You have lots of options for instant film cameras. Here's how to pick the best one for you.
39min
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Retaliatory tariffs could cost billions in reduced US soybean exportsIn an ongoing tug-of-war over threatened tariffs between the United States and the Chinese government, researchers at the University of Tennessee Institute of Agriculture have examined potential impacts to U.S. soybean exports at three hypothetical tariff rates. The research indicates that exports are projected to drop by $4.5 billion to $7.7 billion if a 25 percent tariff is imposed, with even gr
40min
New on MIT Technology Review

Before he died, this biohacker was planning a CRISPR trial in MexicoAaron Traywick and his company, Ascendance Biomedical, are connected to a website advertising a gene therapy trial for lung cancer.
1h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

NASA's InSight mission will look deep into the heart of Mars for clues about its pastMars NASA InSight WCFor decades, earthlings have dispatched spacecraft to Mars to study the planet's dusty surface and its thin atmosphere. Now NASA is sending a lander to the red planet to look deep into its heart.
1h
Live Science

A Cockroach Crawled Inside a Woman's Ear, and It Can Happen to YouYes, insects can crawl in your ear... and it happens more often than you think.
1h
NYT > Science

Q&A: Butterflies: Riders on the StormHow do the delicate insects survive pounding rains and high winds? Trees provide refuge, experts say.
1h
Feed: All Latest

Tesla Turmoil and More This Week in the Future of CarsA blitz of Tesla news, plus: electric scooters, more trouble for Uber, and more arrests in Volkswagen's diesel emissions scheme.
1h
Feed: All Latest

Why Is NASA's InSight Mars Mission Launching from California?This month, NASA will fire its first interplanetary mission from Vandenberg Air Force Base north of Los Angeles. Why the snub for Cape Canaveral in Florida?
1h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Air France-KLM boss resigns after staff reject pay dealAir France-KLM boss Jean-Marc Janaillac announced his resignation Friday after staff at the carrier's French operations rejected a pay deal aimed at ending weeks of strikes.
1h
The Atlantic

Trump and His Aides Have No Idea What They're Talking AboutAs yet another bizarre week comes to a close for the president, no one seems to know the reality of what happened between Donald Trump, Stormy Daniels, and Michael Cohen. The only thing that is proven beyond a reasonable doubt is that the White House is lying about it. This particular drama began Wednesday evening, when Rudy Giuliani, a new addition to the president’s legal team, went on Sean Han
1h
The Atlantic

Why Hawaii's Newest Eruption Makes Volcanologists NervousHawaii Kilauea volcanoAn ordinary American neighborhood has been evacuated ... because of a volcano. On Thursday evening, Hawaii County ordered roughly 1,500 people near Pahoa, Hawaii, to leave their homes. The cause: A new lava fissure opened on Kilauea, a massive volcano in the southeast of the state’s Big Island. Lava from the fissure has come within several hundred yards of homes, threatening two subdivisions in t
1h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

50 live crocodiles from Malaysia seized at London airportBritish officials have seized an illegal shipment of 50 live crocodiles at London Heathrow Airport, the UK Border Force said Friday.
1h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Canada oil sector faces 'significant challenges' to reduce emissionsCanada's oil industry faces "significant challenges" in reducing greenhouse gas emissions, which account for 26 percent of local emissions, but cuts are "essential" for meeting climate agreement targets, the Senate said Friday.
1h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Tesla's Musk defends comments made during conference callTesla CEO Elon Musk is going on the defensive Friday in a series of tweets, saying the people he shut down during a contentious conference call were analysts who believe investors could profit by betting that the company's stock price will fall.
1h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Hawaii volcano sends more lava, sulfur gas into communitiesHawaii Kilauea volcanoThe Kilauea volcano sent more lava into Hawaii communities Friday, a day after forcing more than 1,500 people to flee from their mountainside homes, and authorities detected high levels of sulfur gas that could threaten the elderly and people with breathing problems.
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The Scientist RSS

Petition Asks National Academy of Sciences to Boot Sexual HarassersThe organization says election to the NAS is for life.
2h
New on MIT Technology Review

A criminal gang used a swarm of drones to disrupt an FBI raidFBI Defense One
2h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

How to pick a new password, now that Twitter wants oneYet another service is asking you to change your password.
2h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

A molecular dance of phospholipid synthesisThe most abundant molecule in cell membranes is the lipid phosphatidylcholine (PC, commonly known as lecithin); accordingly, the enzymes responsible for synthesizing it are essential. Research published in the May 4 issue of the Journal of Biological Chemistry used computer simulations to gain insights into how one of these enzymes activates and shuts off PC production. These results could help re
2h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Can this invasive exotic pest make better materials for industry and medicine?Researchers at the National Institute of Standards and Technology (NIST) have combined derivatives of two surplus materials—wood pulp and dried-up pieces of an invasive exotic pest—to form a new composite material that is flexible, sustainable, nontoxic and UV light-reflective. The material, described in a new paper published in Advanced Functional Materials, could soon be used in a wide variety o
2h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

IMERG shows devastating rainfall over East AfricaHeavy seasonal rainfall has recently caused flooding in Kenya and NASA analyzed and estimated the total rainfall using data from a suite of satellites and gauges.
2h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Dengue virus transmission dominated by those with undetected infection, study findsThe University of Notre Dame study estimates that more than 80 percent of dengue virus infections are attributable to individuals with mild to no symptoms who do not seek treatment from a physician.
2h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Novel simulation technique models material-aging processThe nation's aging infrastructure requires massive investment. The American Society of Civil Engineers estimates the U.S. needs to spend some $4.5 trillion by 2025 to fix the country's roads, bridges, dams and other infrastructure.
2h
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Amazon Tussles With Seattle as It Seeks a Second HomeAmazon halted plans for two buildings in Seattle in response to a proposed tax that would cost the company about $22.5 million a year.
2h
Popular Science

A few simple habits can tack some extra years on your lifespanHealth You can do more for your health. And it’s not that hard. Researchers calculated that people who adhered to five things—drink no more than one glass of alcohol per day (two for men), maintain a healthy body weight, eat a…
2h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Structural variation in key brain receptor enables it to cope with hostile conditionDuring a stroke or an epileptic seizure, neurons in affected parts of the brain fire at an abnormally rapid rate. One byproduct of this condition is that the pH of the brain drops markedly, rendering the local environment inhospitably acidic. CSHL scientists have imaged a structural variant of the brain's MNDA receptor that can operate in this hostile environment.
2h
Inside Science

From Tiny Neutron Skins, the Secrets of Neutron StarsFrom Tiny Neutron Skins, the Secrets of Neutron Stars Physicists are looking inside atoms on Earth to learn more about mysterious neutron stars thousands of light-years away. neutron-star.jpg An artist's illustration of a neutron star. Image credits: Kevin Gill via Flickr Rights information: CC BY 2.0 Physics Friday, May 4, 2018 - 12:15 Yuen Yiu, Staff Writer (Inside Science) -- When an atom cont
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Apple iPhones are still selling. There goes your hope of a price cut.People are still buying lots of iPhones, so don't expect Apple to roll out bargains anytime soon.
2h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News

NASA's IMERG shows devastating rainfall over East AfricaHeavy seasonal rainfall has recently caused flooding in Kenya and NASA analyzed and estimated the total rainfall using data from a suite of satellites and gauges.
2h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Computerized test may help improve ADHD diagnosesA new clinical trial published in the Journal of Child Psychology and Psychiatry shows that adding a computerised test of attention and activity (QbTest) to standard care can reduce the time needed to make a diagnostic decision on ADHD, increase the likelihood of excluding ADHD when it is not present, and improve clinicians' confidence in their decision-making.
2h
Feed: All Latest

Tesla's Favorite Autopilot Safety Statistic Doesn't Hold UpElon Musk's automaker says the semi-autonomous feature cuts crashes by 40 percent, but a closer look at the math reveals some major caveats.
3h
The Scientist RSS

Wellcome Trust Makes Reporting Harassment MandatoryThe UK-based biomedical research charity says researchers or institutions that fail to report misconduct will risk losing grants.
3h
Feed: All Latest

V2, the Second Coming of Vine, Is on Indefinite HoldVine Dom Hofmann V2V2 got everyone's hopes up, but there's just not enough money to move the project forward, says one of Vine's original co-founders.
3h
Feed: All Latest

Gadget Lab Podcast: The Virtual Insanity of F8A wrap-up of this week's Facebook F8 developer conference: New dating features, AI ethics, and VR magic.
3h
Big Think

Where in the world sugar daddies thrive, why, and what's being done about itOlder, wealthy men exploiting financially strapped young women isn’t new, but it’s an exploding phenomenon with the rising price of higher education and a factor in the ongoing HIV crisis in Africa. Read More
3h
Science : NPR

Doctors Stumped By Rare Eye Cancer Cases In North Carolina, AlabamaOcular melanoma typically affects 6 out of every 1 million people, but doctors have found dozens of cases where the patients have connections to either Huntersville, N.C., or Auburn, Ala. (Image credit: Karen Bleier/AFP/Getty Images)
3h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Google Assistant is now in 5,000 smart-home devicesAs far as Google is concerned, there's no place like home.
3h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News

UCI simulation technique models material-aging processImagine if engineers could build structures with materials that do not degrade over time. Researchers at the University of California, Irvine have proposed a new simulation technique that could help engineers do just that.
3h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News

A molecular dance of phospholipid synthesisThe most abundant molecule in cell membranes is the lipid phosphatidylcholine (PC, commonly known as lecithin); accordingly, the enzymes responsible for synthesizing it are essential. Research published in the May 4 issue of the Journal of Biological Chemistry used computer simulations to gain insights into how one of these enzymes activates and shuts off PC production.
3h
Live Science

How Does Norovirus Get into Oysters? (It's Pretty Gross)Raw oysters from Canada are tied to a norovirus outbreak that's sickened more than 200 people.
3h
Big Think

Humpback whales are having a 'baby boom' in AntarcticaOnce hunted to near-extinction, humpback whales living in southern oceans near Antarctica are making a comeback. But will it last? Read More
3h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Can this invasive exotic pest make better materials for industry and medicine?Tunicates are slimy invasive exotic pests that some people like to eat. Now they may be used to make UV-reflective, flexible construction materials.
3h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Nanoscale measurements 100x more precise, thanks to improved two-photon techniqueThe precision of measuring nanoscopic structures could be substantially improved, thanks to research involving the University of Warwick and QuantIC researchers at the University of Glasgow and Heriot Watt University into optical sensing.
3h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Laser-driven electron recollision remembers molecular orbital structureScientists from the Max Born Institute for Nonlinear Optics and Short Pulse Spectroscopy (MBI) in Berlin combined state-of-the-art experiments and numerical simulations to test a fundamental assumption underlying strong-field physics. Their results refine our understanding of strong-field processes such as high harmonic generation (HHG) and laser-induced electron diffraction (LIED).
3h
Viden

Adfærdspsykolog: Derfor kan vi ikke styre vores forbrug51 procent af de danske voksne er overvægtige. Det kan skyldes, at vi har svært ved at styre overfloden af ressourcer, mener adfærdspsykolog.
4h
The Scientist RSS

Monkey Hybrids Challenge Assumptions of What a Species IsA study finds two species of guenon monkeys in Tanzania have been mating and producing fertile offspring for generations.
4h
Big Think

When will we see the first VR blockbuster movie?Ready Player One's spectacular VR OASIS experience has us wondering how achievable it really is and when we'll start seeing immersive VR movies. Read More
4h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Nanoscale measurements 100x more precise, thanks to improved two-photon techniqueThe precision of measuring nanoscopic structures could be substantially improved, thanks to research involving the University of Warwick and QuantIC researchers at the University of Glasgow and Heriot Watt University into optical sensing.
4h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Laser-driven electron recollision remembers molecular orbital structureScientists from the Max Born Institute for Nonlinear Optics and Short Pulse Spectroscopy (MBI) in Berlin combined state-of-the-art experiments and numerical simulations to test a fundamental assumption underlying strong-field physics. Their results refine our understanding of strong-field processes such as high harmonic generation (HHG) and laser-induced electron diffraction (LIED).
4h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Cancer cells thrive in stiff tissue, according to new studyScientists studying tumor growth and metastasis at the University of Notre Dame fabricated a human tissue model to examine how cancer cells interact with connective tissue in the breast.
4h
The Atlantic

Photos of the Week: Splash Dogs, Beltane Sunrise, a Springtime RompUp close with a sea lion in Vienna, under the cherry blossoms in Stockholm, World Dance Day in Budapest, “Bodies in Urban Spaces” in Vilnius, May Day protests in Puerto Rico, ballet in Central Park, flooding in coastal Kenya, yoga in a Mexican desert, thousands of guitarists play “Hey Joe” in Poland, and much more.
4h
New Scientist - News

Monkey face recognition app can help spot endangered primatesIndividual primates are harder to recognise from their markings than other species. A new face recognition app might be able to help conservationists spot who’s who
4h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Pentagon halts sales of Chinese-made smartphones as security riskThe Pentagon has ordered retail stores on its bases around the world to cease selling all smartphones and devices made by two Chinese companies, citing security concerns.
4h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Hotel rooms by the hour—or the minuteMost hotels already offer quick checkout. Now, a growing number are selling briefer stays, too.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

A gut bacterium's guide to building a microbiomeMany studies have linked the gut microbiome to health and disease. New research reveals mechanisms utilized by gut bacteria to assemble a microbiome in the first place.
4h
Live Science

Are These Neanderthal Etchings a Long-Lost Message?A Neanderthal channeled its inner artist about 35,000 years ago when carving zigzag lines into a stone tool, a new study finds.
4h
NYT > Science

In Hawaii, Kilauea Volcano Erupts, Spewing Lava Near HomesHawaii Kilauea volcanoAfter a series of earthquakes, lava began spewing into an area on the eastern edge of the island of Hawaii. High levels of sulfur dioxide gasses were also a worry.
4h
NYT > Science

Take a Number: A Census of Gorillas and Chimpanzees Finds More Than ExpectedThere are more than 360,000 gorillas and 128,000 chimpanzees in Africa, roughly twice as many as previously estimated.
4h
New on MIT Technology Review

An unbelievably detailed 3-D model of Paris is getting the Eiffel Tower ready for a revamp
4h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Apple took 8 days to give me the data it had collected on me. It was eye opening.How much does Apple know about me? The answer surprised me.
4h
Big Think

Criminals use drones to swarm FBI agents during hostage raidFBI Defense OneIt marks one of the latest cases in which criminals have been using consumer drones to facilitate illegal activity. Read More
4h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Google to show who is behind US political adsGoogle on Friday said that people looking to place US election ads on its platform will need to show identification, and make clear who is paying.
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Science | The Guardian

David Doel obituaryIn his late teens, my father, David Doel, had a Damascene experience when he climbed Todmorden moor in West Yorkshire. Depressed, he lay down in the bracken, surrendered to his fate and, as he wrote in a later poem: “Love found me like water from a spring, not open to my grasp but flowing as a gift through arid ground, refurbishing and making new.” The course of his life changed. David, who has d
4h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Ediacara Biota flourished in bacterially rich marine habitatsSome of the earliest animals on Earth were soft-bodied ocean-dwellers that ranged from a few inches to several feet and were shaped like circular discs, tubes, or cushion-like bags.
4h
New on MIT Technology Review

This visualization shows just how crazy and explosive the ICO market has become
5h
Feed: All Latest

'Dear White People,' 'The Rachel Divide,' and the Hard Questions of IdentityThe show and documentary, both on Netflix, speak to each other in a strangely resonant way.
5h
The Scientist RSS

Research Scandal Involving Popular Heart Drug Engulfs Three More PapersThe scientists involved have hired lawyers to fight the conclusions of a recent investigation into some studies of Diovan in Japan.
5h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Ediacara Biota flourished in bacterially rich marine habitatsIn a paper published Friday, May 4, in Nature Communications, researchers at the University of California, Riverside, used biomarkers in ancient rocks to learn more about the environmental conditions and food sources that sustained the Ediacara Biota.
5h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News

A gut bacterium's guide to building a microbiomeMany studies have linked the gut microbiome to health and disease. New research from Caltech reveals mechanisms utilized by gut bacteria to assemble a microbiome in the first place.
5h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Scientists hark back to Pleistocene to trace prioritary areas for conservationBy recreating a 20,000 years-old South American biome map and then comparing it with current conditions, a Brazilian study identifies intact forest remnants which has greater genetic diversity for they presented high climatic stability in the period.
5h
The Atlantic

#MeToo Hits the Nobel PrizesPARIS—Somewhere, Philip Roth must be laughing. For years, his readers reckoned he’d probably never win the Nobel Prize in literature since his sensibility is hardly in line with that of the Swedish Academy, whose 18 members select the prizewinners and thereby wield outsized power in the international world of letters. Their mandate is to pick idealistic works and their taste, the stereotype goes,
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Vermont reduces incentives for renewable energy programVermont regulators are reducing the financial incentives for electric customers who install renewable energy systems such as solar panels and get a credit on their electric bills for providing power to the grid.
5h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

NASA spacecraft will have company all the way to MarsMars NASA InSight WCNASA's next Mars explorer is going to have company all the way to the red planet: a couple of puny yet groundbreaking sidekicks.
5h
Popular Science

This albatross couple adopted a baby of another speciesAnimals The endangered birds are picking up some parenting practice. Even though the little critter doesn’t represent the rare birth scientists had hoped for, there’s still reason to celebrate. The Black-footed babe could still do its…
5h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News

For parents of multiples, elevated rates of mental health symptoms but low rates of treatmentParents of twins and other multiple-birth children experience higher than average rates of depression, anxiety and other mental health issues, particularly during the first three months, according to a survey study in the May issue of Journal of Psychiatric Practice. The journal is published by Wolters Kluwer.
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Blog » Languages » English

Team Python wins!The Pythons have snaked their way to victory! Woohoo! After twenty-four hours of serpentine, rubular battle, we have our winning code. Congratulations to all participants, and check out the leaderboard! Artwork by Daniela Gamba
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Volcanic 'curtain of fire' sends people fleeing Hawaii homesHawaii Kilauea volcanoThe Kilauea volcano sent more lava into Hawaii communities Friday, a day after forcing nearly 1,500 people to flee from their mountainside homes, and authorities detected high levels of sulfur gas that could threaten the elderly and people with breathing problems.
5h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

May the forest be with you: GEDI moves toward launch to space stationA first-of-its-kind laser instrument designed to map the world's forests in 3-D is moving toward an earlier launch to the International Space Station than previously expected.
5h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Building with bottlesPowerful hurricanes and earthquakes have wreaked havoc in the United States and around the world in recent years, often leaving people stranded for months and even years without access to water, food, and shelter. A unique collaborative project at Rensselaer Polytechnic Institute seeks to provide a sustainable solution, while also considering the environment.
5h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Switching element made of Cr2O3 may yield smaller, more energy-efficient memory for computers and flash drivesFor years, manufacturers have offered computers with increasing amounts of memory packed into smaller devices. But semiconductor companies can't reduce the size of memory components as quickly as they used to, and current designs are not energy-efficient. Conventional memory devices use transistors and rely on electric fields to store and read out information. An alternative approach being heavily
5h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Non-white scholars are underrepresented in scholarly articles in communicationsNon-White scholars continue to be underrepresented in publication rates, citation rates, and editorial positions in communications and media studies, finds a new study by NYU Steinhardt School of Culture, Education, and Human Development and published in the Journal of Communication.
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Science : NPR

NASA Is Heading Back To Mars To Peer Inside The Red PlanetMars NASA InSight WCThe NASA mission is set to launch Saturday morning. The InSight spacecraft will land in the Elysium Planitia to listen for "Marsquakes" and learn more about what Mars is made of. (Image credit: NASA/JPL-CalTech)
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Fifteen percent of osteoporosis patients who take 'drug holidays' suffer bone fracturesA Loyola Medicine study has found that 15.4 percent of patients who take so-called 'drug holidays' from osteoporosis drugs called bisphosphonates experienced bone fractures. During a six-year follow-up period, the yearly incidence of fractures ranged from 3.7 percent to 9.9 percent, with the most fractures occurring during the fourth and fifth years.
5h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Design for magnetoelectric device may improve your memoryConventional memory devices use transistors and rely on electric fields to store and read out information. An alternative approach uses magnetic fields, and a promising version relies on the magnetoelectric effect which allows an electric field to switch the magnetic properties of the devices. Existing devices, however, tend to require large magnetic and electric fields. One potential solution is
5h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News

May the forest be with you: GEDI moves toward launch to space stationGEDI (pronounced like 'Jedi,' of Star Wars fame) is a first-of-its-kind laser instrument designed to map the world's forests in 3-D from space. These measurements will help fill in critical gaps in scientists' understanding of how much carbon is stored in the world's forests, the potential for ecosystems to absorb rising concentrations of carbon dioxide in Earth's atmosphere, and the impact of for
5h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News

UM researcher finds link between crystal methamphetamine and immune changes in HIVA researcher at the University of Miami Miller School of Medicine has found that the use of stimulants, such as methamphetamine, can negatively affect the health of HIV-positive persons even when they are adhering to medical treatment. This study indicates that stimulants affect pathways in the immune system that allow HIV to become more active and could expand the reservoir.
5h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Non-white scholars are underrepresented in scholarly articles in communicationsNon-white scholars continue to be underrepresented in publication rates, citation rates, and editorial positions in communications and media studies, finds a new study by NYU Steinhardt School of Culture, Education, and Human Development and published in the Journal of Communication. This has negative professional implications both for non-white scholars, in terms of contract renewals, tenure and
5h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Insight into potential new strategy to target skin diseases like psoriasResearch at UT Southwestern has shown that targeting metabolism in growing cells holds promise for the treatment of skin diseases like psoriasis that are characterized by skin overgrowth resulting from excess cell division, known as hyperproliferation.
5h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Expert disease detective unravels mysterious illness that killed famed 12th century sultanSaladin may not be well known in the West, but even 800 years after his death, he remains famous in the Middle East. During his illustrious life, he successfully led armies against the invading Crusaders and conquered several kingdoms. But his death remains a mystery. Now an expert disease detective has a new theory about what may have killed him.
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NYT > Science

Matter: The Very First Animal Appeared Amid an Explosion of DNANobody knows what the first animal looked like. But many of its genes are still present in humans today.
5h
New Scientist - News

Bonobos barely use their opposable thumbs when climbing treesApes and humans are famed for their opposable thumbs, but our close cousins the bonobos regularly swing through trees without using their thumbs
6h
Big Think

Murder in virtual reality should be illegalVR Lenovo Mirage GoogleIn an immersive virtual environment, what will it be like to kill? Read More
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Expert disease detective unravels mysterious illness that killed famed 12th century sultanSaladin may not be well known in the West, but even 800 years after his death, he remains famous in the Middle East. Born in 1137, he rose to become the Sultan of an enormous area that now includes Egypt, Syria, parts of Iraq, Lebanon, Yemen and other regions of North Africa. He successfully led armies against the invading Crusaders and conquered several kingdoms. Historians have described him as
6h
New on MIT Technology Review

This VR point-and-shoot camera will let you rewind your life and relive your memoriesVR Lenovo Mirage SoloThe future of home movies is shooting them in 3-D and playing them back in VR.
6h
Live Science

Why This Optical Illusion Arrow Always Points RightKnock... draw... lose your mind
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Scientific American Content: Global

Is it Time to Give Up on a Single Diagnostic Label for Autism?That was the ruling by the editors of the authoritative Diagnostic and Statistical Manual in 2013, but it remains controversial -- Read more on ScientificAmerican.com
6h
Big Think

This Prohibition-era map is a love letter to alcoholA rare counter-example to the flood of Temperance maps, this Prohibition-era chart celebrates alcohol in its many forms Read More
6h
Live Science

How Adorable Hibernating Squirrels Could Help Scientists Preserve Human OrgansHibernating animals may look lazy, but their bodies are actually accomplishing an outstanding feat.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Sexism isn't just unfair—it makes women sick, study suggestsRecent social movements such as the Women's March, #MeToo, #TimesUp, #BalanceTonPorc (#OutYourPig), and #SayHerName draw attention to the broad spectrum gender-related violence that is pervasive in the United States and around the world.
6h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Molecular movies of RNA guide drug discoveryDuke researchers have invented a technique that can capture the many states of an RNA molecule and screen hundreds of thousands of potential drug candidates. In research published May 4 in the journal Nature Structural and Molecular Biology, they show that the technique can pick compounds with anti-HIV activity out of a line-up of 100,000 that do not. By making it possible to accurately target RNA
6h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Warning signs—how early humans first began to paint animalsVisual culture – and the associated forms of symbolic communication, are regarded by palaeo-anthropologists as perhaps the defining characteristic of the behaviour of Homo sapiens. One of the great mysteries of archaeology is why figurative art, in the form of the stunningly naturalistic animal depictions, appeared relatively suddenly around 37,000 years ago in the form of small sculpted objects a
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Popular Science

We could move to another planet with a spaceship like thisSpace Our best guess for what it would take to get to planets that are really, really far away. Proxima b, our nearest neighboring exoplanet, is almost 25 trillion miles away. It will take several hundred years to get there. Here's our best guess for what it would…
6h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Alibaba says annual net profit up 47% in 2017/2018Chinese e-commerce giant Friday announced a massive 47 percent leap in net profit for the fiscal year 2017/2018, helped by a rise in smartphone and tablet transactions on its shopping platform.
6h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Optimizing customized steel products for manufacturersCompanies that process steel usually require customized cutting of steel bars for their products. As a result, steel traders are faced with the challenge of meeting customer-specific requirements while producing as little scrap as possible. That means they have to divide the inventory as efficiently as possible in terms of material. Researchers from the Fraunhofer Institute for Algorithms and Scie
6h
The Atlantic

98 Years of Mail FraudA few years ago I received a letter from a law firm in Madrid informing me that their client Graham Gardner had died in the Air France Flight 447 crash, leaving behind $10 million that was now mine to claim. In the letter, printed on crisp white paper and peppered with seemingly official credentials, Graham Gardner’s supposed attorney recounted his fruitless search for the extended family since t
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Futurity.org

Prototype could simplify getting dressed with dementiaA “smart home” dresser prototype may help people with dementia dress themselves through automated assistance. This would enable them to maintain independence and dignity and provide their caregivers with a much-needed break. People with dementia or other cognitive disorders have difficulty with everyday activities—such as bathing, dressing, eating, and cleaning—which in turn makes them increasing
7h
Latest Headlines | Science News

50 years ago, starving tumors of oxygen proposed as weapon in cancer fightStarving cancerous tumors of oxygen was proposed to help kill them. But the approach can make some cancer cells more aggressive.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Buffett's firm buys 75 million more Apple shares in 1QWarren Buffett's company bought 75 million more Apple shares in the first quarter, giving it more than 240 million shares of the iPhone maker.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Michigan says Flint water is safe to drink, but residents' trust in government has corrodedOn April 6, 2018, with little warning, the state of Michigan closed water point of distribution (POD) centers that have provided residents in Flint for the past three years with bottled water to drink, cook and bathe. This move was based on analysis showing that the city's water quality had tested below action levels defined in federal drinking water regulations for nearly two years.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Molecular movies of RNA guide drug discoveryThumb through any old science textbook, and you'll likely find RNA described as little more than a means to an end, a kind of molecular scratch paper used to construct the proteins encoded in DNA.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Xerox CEO to stay as Icahn deal deadline expiresXerox's chief executive and several board members will keep their posts after an agreement with activist shareholders to replace them expired, the company said late Thursday.
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Engineered polymer membranes could be new option for water treatmentAccording to Notre Dame researchers, the global applications are significant when considering those populations without suitable drinking water and limited resources.
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Science | The Guardian

60-year-old maths problem partly solved by amateurMaverick biologist Aubrey de Grey has cracked the Hadwiger-Nelson problem which has flummoxed mathematicians worldwide since 1950 An amateur mathematician has made the first breakthrough in more than 60 years towards solving a well-known maths problem. Aubrey de Grey, who is more widely known as a maverick biologist intent on extending the human lifespan, has taken the academic world by surprise
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New on MIT Technology Review

Researchers wonder what it means when you keep your phone out without using itMen are less likely to do it than women, and mixed-sex pairs least likely of all.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

UK car sales rebound from year-long falls: industryBritain's new car sales rebounded slightly in April, industry data showed Friday, having slid a year earlier on taxation changes for high-polluting diesel vehicles.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

NIST virtual reality aims to win for public safetyVirtual reality produces entertaining video games. But it's also a serious training and testing tool. Pilots test their skill with flight simulators, and the military can practice by playing war games, for example.
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TED Talks Daily (SD video)

How to build (and rebuild) trust | Frances FreiTrust is the foundation for everything we do. But what do we do when it's broken? In an eye-opening talk, Harvard Business School professor Frances Frei gives a crash course in trust: how to build it, maintain it and rebuild it -- something she worked on during a recent stint at Uber. "If we can learn to trust one another more, we can have unprecedented human progress," Frei says.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Around a million fewer people moved house in the 2000s than in the 1970sAround a million fewer people moved house in the 2000s than in the 1970s and it is mostly due to an ageing population, changes in the housing market and altered attitudes, a Queen's University Belfast researcher has found.
7h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Line-1 modes of nuclear entrance and retrotranspositionIn a new SLAS Discovery auto-commentary, two authors of an article recently published in eLife ("LINE-1 Protein Localization and Functional Dynamics During the Cell Cycle") explain their general views on their novel discoveries and discuss ideas on the relevant new questions generated by their data.
7h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Dead zones are a global water pollution challenge – but with sustained effort they can come back to lifeScientists have identified a dead zone as large as Florida in the Gulf of Oman, which connects the Arabian Sea to the Persian Gulf. Around the world there are more than 400 current dead zones in oceans and lakes, where water contains so little oxygen that aquatic life can't survive.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Kilauea: Volatile home of Hawaii's volcano goddessHawaii Kilauea volcanoHawaii's Kilauea volcano is one of the world's most active, with a lake of molten lava at its peak and an eastern rift erupting near-continuously since 1983.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Racing can be fatal to horses, new study revealsIntense exercise can be fatal to racehorses, according to a new University of Guelph study.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

The Argentinian fight against 'mega mining'On May 7 1813, when Argentina was beginning the process of becoming a sovereign country, the first Argentinian law for the promotion of mining was sanctioned. The day has now become a national day of mining. But mining in Argentina is surrounded by a series of controversies that invite us to question this celebratory commemoration. Most notably, resistance to what is known as "open-pit" or "mega"
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Search for life on Mars could get water-enhanced boostMars NASA InSight WCA new experiment designed to detect amino acids on Mars, in spite of the reactive perchlorate in the Martian soil that typically breaks organic compounds down, could fly on a future mission to Mars to help in the search for life there.
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Ingeniøren

Gitter fra Aalborg øger effekten af brændselsceller med 30 procentTurbulens skal der til, når brændselsceller skal køles til at afgive mere strøm.
7h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News

This is not a game: NIST virtual reality aims to win for public safetyResearchers at the National Institute of Standards and Technology (NIST) now aim to make virtual reality simulations more of a reality for first responders, enabling firefighters, law enforcement officers and others to learn and practice how to best operate and communicate in emergencies.
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Urine of kidney disease patients contains diverse mix of bacteriaThe urine of kidney disease patients contains a diverse mix of bacteria such as Staphylococcus and Streptococcus, according to a Loyola study. The bacteria diversity generally was higher among kidney patients who also experienced urinary urgency (sudden, urgent need to urinate). The findings could lead to new approaches to treating lower urinary tract problems such as urinary urgency and incontine
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Home internet connections hacked – here's how to protect yourselfIn late April, the top federal cybersecurity agency, US-CERT, announced that Russian hackers had attacked internet-connected devices throughout the U.S., including network routers in private homes. Most people set them up – or had their internet service provider set them up – and haven't thought much about them since. But it's the gateway to the internet for every device on your home network, incl
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Enhanced power devices open the way for high-voltage applicationsPower semiconductors play an important role in power conversion in a wide range of electronic equipment we use in our everyday lives, from smartphones and computers to photovoltaics and electric vehicles. Given the extensive and global use of power semiconductors, scientists have been focusing on making them more energy efficient and cost effective.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

What if aliens can't reach Earth because gravity traps them on their worlds?The truth is out there. You want to believe. But you are becoming more and more frustrated because there's no conclusive evidence. All this time, the reason could be basic physics. A study submitted to the International Journal of Astrobiology suggests that aliens living on distant planets can't cruise the cosmos because of gravity.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Was the Earth ever frozen solid?The movie The Day After Tomorrow depicts a catastrophic climate shift to global cooling, which is referred to as the new ice age. In the movie, melting of polar ice caused by global warming disrupts the North Atlantic current, rapidly dropping the ocean temperature, ultimately leading to the freezing of the ocean on a global scale. Although this over-the-top effect portrayed by this fictional film
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Veterinary intervention helps Kansas bald eagle fly again after lead poisoningThanks to diligent action by concerned landowners, local law enforcement, staff of the Milford Nature Center and veterinary intervention at Kansas State University, a bald eagle suffering from lead contamination is flying again over the Tuttle Creek River Pond near Manhattan.
7h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Study finds post-9/11 combat service negatively impacts veterans' educationA new study analyzing administrative U.S. Army data not available to the public discovered that post-9/11 military conflicts in Iraq and Afghanistan have generated "substantial economic costs" for combat veterans.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Researchers seek to make wheat fungus a thing of the pastResearchers have a new understanding of the genetic makeup of a fungus that causes the disease Wheat Stripe Rust, one of the most destructive wheat diseases globally costing $1 billion annually.
7h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Microbes with a reserve pack of sulfurSUP05 bacteria are often found in places where there is really no basis for life for them. Researchers in Bremen have now discovered that they are even quite active there – possibly with consequences for the global nitrogen cycle. The bacteria travel with a "reserve pack." In addition, the researchers have deciphered the bacteria's genome.
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BBC News - Science & Environment

Nasa's InSight mission will target 'Marsquakes'Mars NASA InSight WCThe InSight probe is due to launch this weekend to investigate the interior of the Red Planet.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Astronomer composes galactic jazzA new musical composition expressing the movement of gases through the galaxy as musical notes, "Milky Way Blues" by astronomer Mark Heyer, a research professor at the University of Massachusetts Amherst, will be featured for the next 30 days on the website, Astronomy Sound of the Month.
7h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Decellularized muscle grafts support skeletal muscle regeneration to treat tissue lossA new comparative study showed the advantages of using donor decellularized muscle to promote functional tissue regeneration at the site of bulk skeletal muscle loss due to trauma or surgery.
7h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Genomics is disrupting the healthcare sectorAffordable, rapid DNA sequencing is causing a revolution in medicine and healthcare globally -- and it's happening now, says Thomas Barlow (Barlow Advisory), the author of the landmark Garvan Global Genomics Report, which launches today.
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Futurity.org

This gives lots of drugs both powers and drawbacksNew research clarifies a molecular pathway that lets roughly half of all medications do their jobs—but also causes many of their side effects. Ron Dror, an associate professor of computer science at Stanford University, led the study in Nature that combines computer simulations with laboratory experiments to explore the possibility of functional drugs with fewer side effects. For example, opioids
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Futurity.org

How a touch can turn into seriously itchy skinResearchers have discovered why a touch can cause such severe itching in mice and, in the process, identified some possible therapeutic targets. For some people, particularly those who are elderly, even a light touch of the skin or contact with clothing can lead to unbearable itching. What’s worse, anti-itch treatments, including hydrocortisone, don’t provide much relief. The new research, which
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Viden

Mennesket kom til Filippinerne over 600.000 år tidligere end hidtil troet700.000 år gamle mærker efter redskaber på næsehornsknogler sætter spørgsmålstegn ved hvordan menneskeart nåede øerne så tidligt.
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Futurity.org

There’s more to Parkinson’s than ‘stop and go’Researchers have tested a core theory of Parkinson’s disease and found it lacking, which could have implications well beyond Parkinson’s disease itself. Parkinson’s disease affects around 10 million people worldwide, yet exactly how the disease and treatments for its symptoms work remain mysterious. The theory in question, known as the rate hypothesis, has it that Parkinson’s results from an imba
8h
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Best Comic Book Movies You Can Stream Right Now, Starting With 'Guardians of the Galaxy Vol. 2'Summer blockbuster season is here! And by "here" we mean in your living room!
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Scientific American Content: Global

Astronomers Spot Helium on Exoplanet for First TimeAfter more than a decade of searching, scientists finally detect the element billowing out of a gas giant -- Read more on ScientificAmerican.com
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Latest Headlines | Science News

An enzyme involved in cancer and aging gets a close-upThe structure of telomerase, described with the greatest detail yet, may give researchers clues to cancer treatments and other telomerase-related illnesses.
8h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Racing can be fatal to horses, new U of G study revealsUniversity of Guelph researchers examined 1,713 cases of racehorse deaths from 2003 to 2015, and found racing was connected to some of the deaths.
8h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Burnout, depression can affect ophthalmology residents, study findsA Brown University undergraduate led a JAMA Ophthalmology study showing that many ophthalmology residents face burnout and are often unable to participate in wellness initiatives, which has adverse consequences for both residents and patients.
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Popular Science

How to securely store and share sensitive filesDIY A tin foil hat that actually works. If you digitally store sensitive information—think tax forms and legal documents—you need to take extra steps to keep that information safe from prying eyes.
8h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Low-carbon energy transition requires more renewables than previously thoughtThe transition to a low-carbon energy society will require more renewable energy sources than previously thought if current levels of energy consumption per capita and lifestyles are to be maintained. This is one of the main conclusions of the study carried out by the researchers of the Institute of Science and Environmental Technology of the Universitat Autònoma de Barcelona Lewis King and Jeroen
8h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News

New approach for treating neuropathic painNeuropathic pain is the chronic, pathological pain that continues even when the cause of pain is removed. Causes include damage to nerve cells and medicines used to treat cancer. A collaboration between research groups from Indiana University in Bloomington, USA and Turku Centre for Biotechnology in Finland has discovered a novel therapeutic that appears to interrupt the signaling cascades in the
8h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Automatically periodicalPhysicists at Friedrich-Alexander-Universität Erlangen-Nürnberg (FAU) have proven that random packings of disks of the same size between parallel walls always form a periodic structure, regardless of the width of the container. The results, which should help scientists to better understand the packing properties of microparticles, have now been published in the renowned journal Physical Review Let
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News

MSU-based specialists in mechanics investigated the behavior of vacuum oil in spaceA research team from the Research Institute of Mechanics, MSU together with a colleague from the Center of New Space Technologies, MAI described the behavior of a liquid sheet propagating in open space. The results of the study were published in the Physics of Fluids journal.
8h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News

High-performance multimetallic AuPd@Pd@Pt core-interlayer-shell icosahedral electrocatalysts for ORRPt-based core-shell electrocatalysts have received abundant research interests over the past decade. Recently, a research team led by Professor Deren Yang from Zhejiang University has successfully synthesized the AuPd@Pd@Pt core-interlayer-shell nanoicosahedra catalysts for oxygen reduction. Such catalysts exhibited not only an excellent ORR activity but also a good durability compared with commer
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News

To treat pain, you need to treat the patientPeople in chronic pain are some of the most difficult patients to treat. Clinicians and researchers at UW Medicine's Center for Pain Relief found that an in-depth questionnaire can help immensely. Their work to create a pain assessment adaptable to any primary care clinic was recently published in the Journal of General Internal Medicine.
8h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Researchers clarify the identity of brain stem cellsThe human nervous system is a complex structure that sends electrical signals from the brain to the rest of the body, enabling us to move and think. Unfortunately, when brain cells are damaged by trauma or disease they don't automatically regenerate. This can lead to permanent disability.
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Less is more when it comes to developing bigger brainsThe superior size and complexity of the human brain compared to other mammals may actually originate from fewer initial starting materials, new research has suggested.
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Ingeniøren

Vakuumløfter giver cobot Herkules-kræfterVirksomheden Cobot Lift kombinerer vakuumløfter og robotarm i en løsning, der øger en cobots løfteevne med en faktor 2,5. Den mere muskuløse robot kan dermed sætte ind, hvor normale UR-robotter må give fortabt.
8h
Dagens Medicin

Politiet rykker oftere ud til Psykiatrisk Hospital i RisskovPsykiatrisk Hospital i Risskov har haft fem gange så mange politianmeldelser i 2017 i forhold til året forinden. Formand for regionens psykiatri- og socialudvalg ser det som udtryk for højere sikkerhed.
8h
Live Science

The Best 'Star Wars Day' DealsMay the Fourth is upon us and fans don't have to travel to a galaxy far, far away to score Jedi-worthy deals. May the force be with you!
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Around a million fewer people moved house in the 2000s than in the 1970sAround a million fewer people moved house in the 2000s than in the 1970s and it is mostly due to an ageing population, changes in the housing market and altered attitudes, a Queen's University Belfast researcher has found.
8h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Line-1 modes of nuclear entrance and retrotranspositionIn a new SLAS Discovery auto-commentary, the authors of an article recently published in eLife ('LINE-1 Protein Localization and Functional Dynamics During the Cell Cycle') explain their general views on their novel discoveries and discuss ideas on the relevant new questions generated by their data.
8h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Osteoporosis drug could be used to treat aggressive form of breast cancer, researchers sayResearchers in China have discovered that an enzyme called UGT8 drives the progression of basal-like breast cancer, an aggressive form of the disease that is largely untreatable. But the study, which will be published May 4 in the Journal of Experimental Medicine, reveals that the widely used osteoporosis drug zoledronic acid inhibits UGT8 and prevents the spread of basal-like breast cancer in mic
8h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Burst of newborn stars in young star cluster puzzles astronomersUsing the Hubble Space Telescope, an international research team led by Dr. DENG Licai from the National Astronomical Observatories of China detected an unexpected population of blue straggler stars in a young 'globular' cluster, known by its catalogue number 'NGC 2173.'
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

Making new layered superconductors using high entropy alloysResearchers have created new superconductors made of layers of bismuth sulfide and a high entropy rare earth alloy oxyfluoride, containing five different rare earth elements at the same crystallographic site. The new material retains superconducting properties over a wider range of lattice parameters than materials without high-entropy-alloy states. Their work promises an exciting new strategy for
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

Greenhouse gas 'feedback loop' discovered in freshwater lakesLatest research finds plant debris in lake sediment affects methane emissions. The flourishing reed beds created by changing climates could threaten to double the already significant methane production of the world's northern lakes.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

Atomically thin magnetic device could lead to new memory technologiesScientists have discovered a method to encode information using magnets that are just a few layers of atoms in thickness. This breakthrough may revolutionize both cloud computing technologies and consumer electronics by enabling data storage at a greater density and improved energy efficiency.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

One size does not fit all when exploring how carbon in soil affects the climateScientists from Stanford University are opening a window into soil organic carbon, a critical component of the global carbon cycle and climate change.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

NASA's first mission to study the interior of Mars awaits May 5 launchMars NASA InSight WCAll systems are go for NASA's next launch to the Red Planet.
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Futurity.org

Photosynthesis device makes hydrogen fuel more efficientlyA new, stable artificial photosynthesis device doubles the efficiency of harnessing sunlight to break apart both fresh and salt water, generating hydrogen for use in fuel cells. Researchers could also reconfigure the device to turn carbon dioxide back into fuel. “If we can directly store solar energy as a chemical fuel, like what nature does with photosynthesis, we could solve a fundamental chall
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

A drug lord and the world's largest invasive animalAt his infamous zenith in the 1990s, Pablo Escobar's drug-fueled empire—a vast underworld syndicate built upon the United States' insatiable appetite for cocaine—made him one of the wealthiest criminals in history.
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Viden

Flydende atomkraftværker – frygt eller fremtiden?Rusland har sat verdens første flydende kommercielle atomkraftværk til søs.
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Star Wars Is Becoming a Religion, and May 4 Is Its Spring FestivalMay the Fourth may be a cheap pun, but it's also got all the makings of a real religious holiday.
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The Scientist RSS

Image of the Day: Bird BraincaseNewly discovered fossils shed light on the structure of the feeding apparatus of ancient seabirds.
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The Scientist RSS

Ali's JourneyAli Guthy, the daughter of cosmetics entrepreneur Victoria Jackson, discusses NMO, the rare autoimmune disease she suffers from.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Breathing lunar dust could pose health risk to future astronautsFuture astronauts spending long periods of time on the moon could suffer bronchitis and other health problems by inhaling tiny particles of dust from its surface, according to new research.
9h
Scientific American Content: Global

Readers Respond to the January 2018 IssueLetters to the editor from the January 2018 issue of Scientific American -- Read more on ScientificAmerican.com
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

How the hard work of wild animals benefits us tooLike other nature lovers and rural residents, I have been marvelling at the many animal courtships and other mating preparations that accompany the arrival of spring in the Northern Hemisphere.
9h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

AI-created family trees confirm 18th and 19th century class divisions in FinlandIt would take 100 person-years for a genealogist to map and find all the parents for five million people – with a rate of one person per minute. The AncestryAI algorithm can do the same work in an hour using 50 parallel computers and with a success rate of 65 per cent. The algorithm can also measure the level of uncertainty for each connection so that unreliable results can be ignored. Genealogist
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

X-ray study yields new insights on lithium-sulfur batteriesLithium-sulfur (Li-S) batteries are a relatively new variety of battery being studied and developed by researchers around the world. Because they have very high theoretical energy densities – storing more than five times as much energy in a smaller volume than the most state-of-the-art lithium-ion batteries – they are strong contenders for applications both small and large.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Norwegian says it rejected two IAG takeover bidsLow-cost airline Norwegian Air Shuttle said Friday it had turned the cold shoulder to two separate takeover bids by British Airways owner IAG, which recently acquired a 4.61 percent stake in the company.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Making meshes using Turing's mathematical model results in efficient water filtersA team of researchers at Zhejiang University in China has used a mathematical model developed by Alan Turing to create a unique type of polyamide mesh. In their paper published in the journal Science, the group describes their process and how they discovered the mesh could be used to filter water.
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Ingeniøren

Quiz: Har Einstein virkelig sagt det?Det vrimler med citater tillagt Albert Einstein om alt mellem himmel og jord. Nogle er ægte, andre er mere skarpt optrukne omformuleringer af Einsteins egne ord, og en stor del har Einstein aldrig nogensinde sagt.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Thorium-aluminum complex the first with an actinide element to donate electrons when bonding with a metalA small team of researchers from the University of California, Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory and LPCNO, Université de Toulouse, has developed a way to synthesize a thorium-aluminum complex with an actinide element to donate electrons when bonding with a metal. In their paper published in the journal Chemical Science, the group explains how they achieved the first-of-its-kind feat.
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Science | The Guardian

Nasa mission to map Mars interior will launch this weekendThe InSight lander will make contact on the Martian equator and dig deep down into the planet to examine its inner core Nasa’s latest mission to another planet is set to blast off on Saturday on a seven month voyage across the frigid depths of space to Mars, with the aim of mapping the planet’s interior for the first time. The InSight mission aims to drop a lander the size of a garden table on to
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Scientific American Content: Global

Debunking Animal Myths, the Truth about Time and Other New Science BooksThe latest book recommendations from Scientific American -- Read more on ScientificAmerican.com
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Flipkart board approves $15 bn deal with Walmart: reportIndian e-commerce giant Flipkart has agreed to sell 75 percent of the company to US retail behemoth Walmart for about $15 billion, a report said Friday, in what would be a blow to rival Amazon.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

US hedge fund wins control of Telecom Italia boardThe activist hedge fund Elliott Management claimed victory in a shareholder battle for control of the Telecom Italia board, narrowly winning a vote Friday to install a cadre of well-known Italian businessmen as a majority over those loyal to the controlling stakeholder, French entertainment group Vivendi.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Motorizing fibres with geometric zero-energy modesPhysicists and material scientists have succeeded in constructing a motor and an energy storage device from one single component. They used an elastic polymer fibre closed into a ring that was made to rotate on application of an external energy supply. The researchers from the universities in Heidelberg and Strasbourg (France) hope that this mechanism will spur the development of intelligent mater
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Futurity.org

Moon dust would give astronauts ‘lunar hay fever’Future astronauts who spend long periods of time on the moon could suffer from bronchitis and other health problems by inhaling tiny particles of lunar dust. Simulated lunar soil is toxic to human lung and mouse brain cells. Up to 90 percent of human lung cells and mouse neurons died when exposed to dust particles that mimic soils found on the moon’s surface. The results show that breathing toxic
9h
The Atlantic

The Problems With Breastfeeding Go Way Beyond Breast PumpsOn the sixth floor of MIT’s Media Lab last weekend, babies and strollers seemed to outnumber laptops. The bathrooms were stocked with diapers, wipes, and essential-oil atomizers. Private spaces for nursing, with soft lighting and fuzzy pillows, abounded. The occasion was a hackathon that brought together developers, designers, and others to, as the event’s title puts it, “Make the Breast Pump Not
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The Atlantic

Tully Is a Daring, and Baffling, Look at Motherhood“Mom, what’s wrong with your body?” cries Emmy (Maddie Dixon-Poirier) as her mother, Marlo (Charlize Theron), flops into a chair at the breakfast table. Marlo just had her third kid and, after another sleepless night, admittedly looks a little worse for wear—adding to that, she’s opted to go sans shirt for this particular family meal. Tully , Jason Reitman’s new film about the trials of baby-rear
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Popular Science

Plane travel only feels like it's dangerousAviation Despite the headlines, airplanes remain the safest form of travel. Several recent high-profile incidents on Southwest airlines are outliers, according to decades of research on the relative safety of transportation modes.
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How Fans Helped Hasbro Build Its Biggest Star Wars Ship EverA dramatic crowdfunding campaign for Jabba's sail barge ends in a Yub Nub-worthy victory.
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Meet the Star Wars Fan Building a Full-Scale Millennium FalconThere are fans, and then there are *fans*. And then there's Greg Dietrich.
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Feed: All Latest

How to Fight Climate Change: Figure Out Who's to Blame, and Sue ThemIt's only possible with the new science of extreme weather attribution.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Nasa's Rossi X-ray Timing Explorer leaves scientific legacyNASA's decommissioned Rossi X-ray Timing Explorer (RXTE) satellite re-entered Earth's atmosphere on April 30. Orbiting for more than 22 years, the 6,700-pound satellite operated from 1996 to 2012, providing scientists with an unprecedented look into the extreme environments around neutron stars—also known as pulsars—and black holes.
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Science-Based Medicine

TIC’D OFFTwo years ago we discussed the TicTocStop, a dental appliance that the inventors assured us would help mitigate the symptoms of Tourette Syndrome. In the intervening years things have...not went well. This illustrates the need for skepticism regarding questionable medical claims, and the importance of initiatives like AllTrials to ensure the good, the bad, and the ugly research is available to eve
10h
Live Science

May the 4th Be With You As You Check Out These Amazing Animals of 'The Last Jedi'Today (May 4) — also known as Star Wars Day — Live Science is debuting a new movie-themed column and video series, where we'll be looking at how feature films represent science and scientists.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Molecular atlases of turtle and lizard brains shed light on the evolution of the human brainOur cerebral cortex, a sheet of neurons, connections and circuits, comprises "ancient" regions such as the hippocampus and "new" areas such as the six-layered "neocortex," found only in mammals and most prominently in humans. But when in evolution did the components of cerebral cortex arise and how did they evolve? Scientists at the Max Planck Institute for Brain Research in Frankfurt am Main stud
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Study examines how therapy horses are affected when helping othersAnimal therapy helps people to relax, but how do the animals feel about it? A Rutgers University-New Brunswick study finds that horses don't mind working as part of therapy for traumatized veterans.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Ushering in the next phase of exoplanet discoveryEver since scientists discovered the first planet outside of our solar system, 51 Pegasi b, the astronomical field of exoplanets has exploded, thanks in large part to the Kepler Space Telescope. Now, with the successful launch of the Transiting Exoplanet Survey Satellite (TESS), Professor Sara Seager sees a revolution not only in the amount of new planetary data to analyze, but also in the potenti
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Blood and bodies—the messy meanings of a life-giving substanceA collection of essays explores understandings of a vital bodily fluid in the period 1400-1700. Its contributors offer insight into both theory and practice during a period that saw the start of empiricism and an overturning of the folklore that governed early medicine.
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Dagens Medicin

Ny professor i kritisk sygdom skal forske i overlevere efter hjertestopOverlæge Christian Hassager er ny professor i kritisk sygdom. Han mener, at vi ved for lidt om alvorligt hjertesyge patienter, og derfor er forskningen på dette felt helt essentiel.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

A microscopic roundabout for light—team develops a magnet-free optical circulatorCirculators are important components in communication technology. Their unique way of routing light usually requires centimeter-sized magnets, which are difficult to miniaturize for use on optical chips. Researchers at AMOLF and the University of Texas have circumvented this problem with a vibrating glass ring that interacts with light. They thus created a microscale circulator that directionally
10h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Making new layered superconductors using high entropy alloysResearchers from Tokyo Metropolitan University have created new superconductors made of layers of bismuth sulfide (BiS2) and a high-entropy rare earth alloy oxyfluoride, containing five rare earth (RE) elements at the same crystallographic site. The new material retains superconducting properties over a wider range of lattice parameters than materials without high-entropy alloy states. Their work
10h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Chemists 'crystallize' new approach to materials scienceA team of chemists at the University of California San Diego conducted breakthrough research for materials science—a field for which chemistry frequently provides information about the structure and composition of materials, as well as the processes for making and using them. Its aim is to create new materials—from metals and rubber to coatings and crystals.
10h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Membrane can better treat wastewater, recover valuable resourcesA membrane made up of block polymers has the customizable and uniform pore sizes needed for filtering or recovering particular substances from wastewater, researchers say in a review published in npj Clean Water.
10h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Forensic chemist uses sweat to distinguish individuals at crime sceneAn average square inch of skin contains 650 sweat glands. That means our bodies leave small amounts of sweat on everything we touch—whether we're making a phone call, eating supper or committing a crime.
10h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Odd microbial partnerships via electrically conductive particlesHuman activities have contributed to global warming, leading to increasing erosion of land. This results in conductive minerals being washed into water streams. The inflow of conductive particles can enable unusual electric partnerships between microbes, leading to additional emissions of methane, which is a potent greenhouse gas.
10h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Towards sustainable blockchainsAs blockchains become ever more popular and widespread, a growing concern is their sustainability. Current designs, most notably the blockchain underlying the Bitcoin cryptocurrency, are secured using so-called "proofs of work," which requires huge amounts of computational power. This is an ecological problem challenging the long-term viability of cryptocurrencies. In an ongoing collaboration, Ins
10h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Novel approach for photosynthetic production of carbon neutral biofuel from green algaeReducing carbon emissions in order to prevent climate change requires developing new technologies for sustainable and renewable biofuel production. Molecular hydrogen is regarded as one of the most promising energy carriers due to its high energy density and clean, carbon-free use. A research group from the University of Turku, Finland, has discovered an efficient way for transforming solar energy
10h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Viral infection a matter of simple physicsThe manner in which some viruses inject their DNA into bacteria or other types of cells appears to be much simpler than scientists had previously thought. Rather than using molecular engines or complicated mechanisms, viruses let simple physics do the work for them. This is a recent finding by Prof Willem Kegel from Utrecht University and colleagues from the University of California Los Angeles (U
10h
Live Science

Proof of 'Planet Nine' May Be Sewn into Medieval TapestriesScientists turn to 1,000-year-old data in the hunt for a missing planet.
10h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Study shows minorities widely underrepresented in autism diagnosesJason Travers of the University of Kansas found in an analysis that minorities were widely underrepreseted in autism identifications in 2014. The levels vary by state, but run counter to the claim that minorities are overrepresented in all areas of special education and show that many students of color are not getting services that could be beneficial.
10h
The Atlantic

Radio Atlantic: Is Politics Ruining Pop Culture?Kanye West Donald TrumpSome Americans who grew up identifying with Roseanne have found themselves alienated by Roseanne Barr’s outspoken devotion to President Trump. Many of Kanye West’s fans revolted after he tweeted out an image of himself wearing a “Make America Great Again” hat. Pop culture will probably always mirror the divides playing out in society. But when social divides are more massive than they’ve been in
10h
Ingeniøren

Offentlig digitalisering ikke ungdomsvenlig: Halvdelen har brug for hjælp til selvbetjeningNi ud af ti unge bruger internettet flere gange hver eneste dag. Men de har lige så svært ved at tilgå den offentlige sektor online som de ældre.
11h
Ingeniøren

Twitter advarer: Skift jeres kodeord, vi har set demI dag udstedte Twitter en advarsel til alle deres brugere: En log-fil har opbevaret kodeord i klartekst og har været tilgængelig for ansatte i Twitter.
11h
Feed: All Latest

Donald Trump and the Golden Age of SubtweetingWhat was once a way to dodge Twitter's notification settings has turned trolling into a refined linguistic art.
11h
Feed: All Latest

The Physics of Leia Using the ForceHappy Star Wars Day! Celebrate by determining how much force is applied by *the* Force.
11h
Feed: All Latest

Director Andrew Niccol Lives in His Own Truman Show (and So Do You)In his latest movie, *Anon,* Andrew Niccol revisits many of the themes—surveillance, technology, artifice—that have defined his career.
11h
Scientific American Content: Global

In a Big Data World, Scholars Need New Guidelines for ResearchUser information from Facebook and other social-media sites is invaluable to political and social scientists, but it must be treated with care -- Read more on ScientificAmerican.com
11h
Latest Headlines | Science News

‘Time crystals’ created in two new types of materialsA state of matter that repeats itself in time, not space, was found in certain liquids and a solid.
11h
cognitive science

Women’s increased willingness to use appearance-enhancing products during times of economic recession are motivated primarily by their attempts to create a favorable impression of themselves in the workplace, rather than by the desire to attract romantic partners.submitted by /u/randomusefulbits [link] [comments]
11h
Scientific American Content: Global

At What Age Does Our Ability to Learn a New Language Like a Native Speaker Disappear?Despite the conventional wisdom, a new study shows picking up the subtleties of grammar in a second language does not fade until well into the teens -- Read more on ScientificAmerican.com
11h
Ingeniøren

Hør ugens podcast om videoovervågningEnhver borger har ifølge loven ret at få udleveret de overvågningsvideoer, hvor man selv er med i billedet. En bombe under systemet, konkluderer vi efter at have taget lovgiverne på ordet og bedt om en række optagelser. GridTech er et nyt nichemedie fra Ingeniøren om fremtidens elsystemer.
11h
Ingeniøren

Ny Mars-lander letter lørdag: Skal afsløre planetens indreLørdag eftermiddag kl. 13.05 sender Nasa InSight-landeren mod Mars, der med en 'muldvarp' og et seismometer skal afsløre planetens indre. Fysikere fra NBI har budt ind på en opgave.
11h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Smart beehives and heat treatments could protect bees from declineSince the mid-1980s, the number of bees in Europe has been in decline. Threatened by pesticides, insecticides and climate change, they are also being struck by infestations of mites and a crippling virus that deforms their wings. But new technology aims to take the sting out of the situation.
11h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Plants get a brace to precisely shed flowers and leavesIn the spring, pink cherry blossom petals are borne by the wind. Each of the falling petals leaves behind a little open cut on the plant, which might be prone to infection. The same happens when plants shed leaves, fruits and seeds. Biologists at DGIST and IBS have just reported in Cell how plants regulate the detachment process and protect themselves. As shedding is closely associated with a plan
11h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Armed conflicts in Sahara and Sahel endangering wildlife in the regionAn international study involving researchers from the University of Granada has established that the escalation of armed conflicts in the Sahara-Sahel region is leading to a dramatic population decline of species such as the African elephant and dorcas gazelle. The research paper calls for greater emphasis on environmental factors in the peace process initiatives that aim to bring an end to the co
11h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Engineers invent smart microchip that can self-start and operate when battery runs outThe Internet of Things (IoT), while still in its infancy, is shaping the future of many industries and will also impact daily life in significant ways. One of the key challenges of moving IoT devices from concept to reality is to have long-lasting operation with tightly constrained energy sources, and thus extreme power efficiency. IoT devices such as sensors are often deployed on a massive scale
11h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Researchers subtract a single quantum of light from a laser beamIn a collaboration between Aarhus University and the University of Southern Denmark, researchers have discovered a way to subtract a single quantum of light from a laser beam. This work has recently been published in Physical Review Letters. The method paves the way toward future quantum communication and computation using quantum mechanics for technological applications.
11h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Electron-hole pairs in two-dimensional crystalsWhen light of specific frequency hits a semiconductor crystal, it is absorbed and produces excitation, a state of higher energy. In solar cells, this energy is converted into electricity. In two-dimensional crystals, which consist of only a few atomic layers, so called "excitons" are the protagonists of these processes. These excitations consist of one particle of positive charge and one of negati
11h
The Atlantic

There’s More to Being Jewish Than Fighting Anti-SemitismA Jewish journalist lives in the big city. He is largely secular and proudly defies religious traditions; he runs easily with his generation’s cohort of elite writers and thinkers. When evidence of virulent anti-Semitism begins to emerge around him, he is shocked. Jews must wake up and recognize their dire situation, he thinks. If only they could band together, he imagines, Jews could not just su
11h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Air France-KLM chief puts job on the line in standoff with unionsThe chief executive of Air France-KLM raised the stakes Friday after weeks of strikes by pilots and other workers, warning he will quit if employees reject the company's latest offer on wages.
12h
BBC News - Science & Environment

New climate 'feedback loop' discovered in freshwater lakesMethane emissions from lakes could almost double as warming boosts plants that feed gas production.
12h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Effects of hypoxia stronger on a busy benthosAs coastal marine environments become starved of oxygen, the response of one key species could have further consequences for an entire ecosystem.
12h
Ingeniøren

Søkablet revet over: 'Alarmen hyler og blinker ... men telefonerne er underligt tavse'I første del af vores serie om 'kontrolrummets helte' genoplever vi lillejuleaften 2017, da søkablet til Bornholm blev revet over, og John Johansen kæmpede mod en kulsort jul.
12h
Ingeniøren

Udspil til nyt forskningsbudget for EU skufferDer er lagt op til en stigning i EU's forskningsbudget, men forslaget fra kommissionen er ikke så vidtgående, som mange havde håbet.
12h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Targeted 'click-to-release' chemotherapy gives good results in miceTagworks Pharmaceuticals, based at Radboud university medical center, has developed a new technique for the targeted delivery of chemotherapy for tumors in cases where this was previously very difficult. By way of the controlled 'click-to-release' of the chemotherapy drug from its tumor-binding carrier, the chemotherapy can be activated at the right location. The company is publishing the results
12h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Greenhouse gas 'feedback loop' discovered in freshwater lakesLatest research finds plant debris in lake sediment affects methane emissions. The flourishing reed beds created by changing climates could threaten to double the already significant methane production of the world's northern lakes.
12h
The Atlantic

The Iran Deal Is Strategically and Morally AbsurdEditor’s Note: This article is part of a debate about whether to stay in the Iran deal. Read the other entries here . It was surely Barack Obama’s profound aversion to the use of American military power that so enfeebled his nuclear diplomacy and made his atomic accord with Iran the worst arms-control agreement since the Washington Naval Treaty of 1922 . I do not know whether a more forceful pres
13h
The Atlantic

Trump Is Setting America on an Unpredictable Course in the Middle EastEditor’s Note: This article is part of a debate about whether to stay in the Iran deal. Read the other entries here . Iran hawks seem to be in pretty good spirits these days, with John Bolton having taken over as national-security adviser and Mike Pompeo as secretary of state. They are thrilled with the promotion of two high-ranking officials who want to tear up the nuclear deal, actively promote
13h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Greenhouse gas 'feedback loop' discovered in freshwater lakesA new study of chemical reactions that occur when organic matter decomposes in freshwater lakes has revealed that the debris from trees suppresses production of methane—while debris from plants found in reed beds actually promotes this harmful greenhouse gas.
13h
Ingeniøren

Kameraer overvåger dig hver dag: Vi benyttede retten til at se medDu har ret til at se med på overvågningsbilleder af dig selv, men virksomheder behandler retten vidt forskelligt. En enkelt virksomhed har helt afvist at leve op til kravet i Ingeniørens test.
14h
Ingeniøren

Defekt møtrik bremser levering af kamphelikoptereDet amerikanske forsvar har i snart tre måneder afvist at modtage flere AH-64E Apache på grund af risiko for, at rotorblade løsrives under flyvning. Boeing håber på løsning i august.
14h
Dagens Medicin

Stram styring har øget aktivitetenDen stramme styring af sundhedsvæsenet har grundlæggende haft den ønskede effekt. Det konkluderer sundhedsøkonomer på baggrund af to nye rapporter. Men hvilke styringsredskaber der har effekt, er sværere at afgøre.
14h
Dagens Medicin

Alt det, som ikke blev løst i forligsenAt arbejdsgiverne også forventer nødberedskab blandt lockoutet personale, er besynderligt. Arbejdsgiverne kan da lade være med at lockoute medarbejdere, der ikke kan undværes.
14h
Dagens Medicin

Korte studieophold i almen praksis spænder ben for lægedækningenManglen på praktiserende læger stiger, men på Københavns Universitet er de medicinstuderende færre dage ude i almen praksis end tidligere. Et stort problem, lyder det fra flere af afdelingens ansatte. Mødet med virkeligheden er nemlig i høj grad afgørende for de studerendes senere valg af speciale.
14h
Dagens Medicin

Praksislæge satte sig selv friTidligere praktiserende læge Kirsten Holm Nielsen valgte som 60-årig at sælge sin praksis og springe ud som kunstner på fuld tid. Hun mener, at det har gjort hende til et mere frit og ubekymret menneske.
14h
Dagens Medicin

Den store forårsrengøringNye ansigter på vej på en lang række topposter i sundhedsvæsenet
14h
Dagens Medicin

To klare gevinster til arbejdsgiverne. Og en til lønmodtagerneDet var smart af arbejdsgiverne at acceptere en så høj lønstigning – det ramte lige ned i musketer-eden og gav samtidig lønmodtagerne en gevinst. Arbejdsgiverne vandt hvad angår spisepausen og lærernes arbejdstid. Og Dennis Kristensens sololøb? Det var helt sikkert clearet med baglandet.
14h
Science | The Guardian

Nature or nurture: unravelling the roots of childhood behaviour disordersStudies on young children have identified a genetic link for some such disorders, but environmental factors also have an effect Humans have succeeded as a species in large part because of our ability to cooperate and coordinate with each other . These skills are driven by a range of “moral emotions” such as guilt and empathy, which help us to navigate the nuance of social interactions appropriate
15h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Seven chateaux and counting: Chinese billionaire is big in BordeauxOver the past decade Chinese investors have conquered dozens of chateaux in Bordeaux, France's famed wine-growing region.
15h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Harvard forum examining safety of self-driving vehiclesA Harvard University forum is examining how a recent death linked to self-driving technology is causing concern about safety.
15h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

European airlines seek bigger piece of Latin American pieAir France-KLM's inauguration Thursday of a flight to a little developed corner of Brazil highlights European airlines' attempt to bring the continents together, catching up with far more dominant routes between South and North America.
15h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Deadly India superstorms kill nearly 150A series of powerful super storms that tore through India this week have killed 143 people, as officials warned Friday the death toll could rise with more extreme weather expected.
15h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Vivendi and activist fund set for Telecom Italia showdownA weeks-long power struggle over the control of Telecom Italia between Vivendi and a US activist fund comes to a head Friday when shareholders vote on a new board.
15h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

BMW races into 2018 with sales, profits recordGerman high-end carmaker BMW said Friday it booked a strong first three months with record first-quarter shipments and profits, confirming its targets for the full year.
15h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Third of Australia's threatened species not being monitoredA third of Australia's threatened species are not being tracked, scientists said Friday, warning they could easily slide into extinction without anyone noticing.
15h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Tech companies not hiring blacks despite ownership ratesAfrican-Americans are among the top owners of mobile devices, but aren't being considered when it's time for social media and technology companies to hire.
15h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Zoo's aardvark contributes to national animal milk researchAn aardvark in Cincinnati is sharing his mother's milk—with scientists in Washington.
15h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Hawaii volcano forces 1,500 from homes as lava bubbles up (Update)Hawaii Kilauea volcanoNearly 1,500 residents were ordered to evacuate from their volcano-side homes after Hawaii's Kilauea Volcano erupted, sending molten lava to chew its way through forest land and bubble up on paved streets.
15h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Scientists call for 'open-skies' imagery policy over Israel and PalestineNew Oxford University research has called for an 'open-skies policy' around the availability of high resolution satellite imagery of Israel and Palestine.
15h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Luke Skywalker's hand inspires scientists to create robotic skinScientists at the University of Bristol are engineering human skin on artificial robotic muscles that can stretch and bend the tissue just like in the real world. This living and moving skin equivalent represents a much more realistic model of human skin and it could have potential applications for burns patients needing skin grafts.
15h
Ingeniøren

Direktør: Der er gået Y2K-hysteri i GDPR-debattenDe fleste virksomheder får ikke tænkt længere end 25. maj, mener direktøren i konsulenthuset Siscon.
16h
Viden

Racistiske computere bliver snart "klogere"Kunstig intelligens kan "arve" fordomme fra deres skabere. Det skal ny forskning forhindre.
16h
Science | The Guardian

Butchered rhino suggests humans were in the Philippines 700,000 years agoExcavation proves early humans colonised the area hundreds of thousands of years earlier than previously believed The discovery of a butchered rhino has led scientists to conclude early humans were in the Philippines as far back as 700,000 years ago. Dozens of human-made stone artefacts and tools, alongside the clearly bludgeoned and eaten remains of a rhino, were discovered in a clay bed in on L
16h
Science | The Guardian

Cross Section: Carlo Rovelli – Science Weekly podcastGuest host Richard Lea reimagines time with theoretical physicist Carlo Rovelli. What is time, after all? Should we be thinking about it differently? Subscribe and review on Acast , Apple Podcasts , Soundcloud , Audioboom and Mixcloud . Join the discussion on Facebook and Twitter Time is both deeply mysterious and perfectly obvious. Artists have attempted to capture it to explore its bewildering
17h
Ingeniøren

Leder: Genfind din energist, Lars Chr. Lilleholt
17h
The Guardian's Science Weekly

Cross Section: Carlo Rovelli – Science Weekly podcastGuest host Richard Lea reimagines time with theoretical physicist Carlo Rovelli. What is time, after all? Should we be thinking about it differently?
17h
Live Science

Hawaii's Kilauea Volcano Erupts Dramatically After a 5.0-Magnitude QuakeA magnitude-5.0 earthquake shook the Big Island of Hawaii on Thursday (May 3), causing lava to spew into a residential subdivision.
17h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News

First robotic system plays tic tac toe to improve task performanceThe researchers tested the system on 62 healthy right-handed people from two age groups: 40 young adults around 25 years old (23 women and 17 men) and 22 older adults around 75 years old (10 women and 12 men). Both groups preferred the robotic system over the LED lights system. The older adults said it was more human-like, while the young adults reported the robot 'was more interesting, fun and ap
17h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Making new layered superconductors using high entropy alloysResearchers from Tokyo Metropolitan University have created new superconductors made of layers of bismuth sulfide (BiS 2 ) and a high entropy rare earth alloy oxyfluoride, containing five different rare earth elements at the same crystallographic site. The new material retains superconducting properties over a wider range of lattice parameters than materials without high-entropy-alloy states. Thei
17h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Scientists call for 'open-skies' imagery policy over Israel and PalestineOxford University research has called for an 'open-skies policy' around the availability of high resolution satellite imagery of Israel and Palestine. Since 1997, the Kyl-Bingaman Amendment (KBA) to the 1997 US National Defense Authorization Act, has limited the availability of high-resolution satellite imagery of these countries. However, new Oxford University research has called for these restri
17h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News

How low is too low? Experts debate blood pressure targets in post-SPRINT eraFollowing the landmark SPRINT trial, there is a growing body of evidence for reducing systolic blood pressure targets, resulting in the development of new US guidelines. However, this has led to many questions about the impact of such fundamental changes in blood pressure management, and whether they should be implemented in other constituencies. Two new studies published in the Canadian Journal o
17h
Dagens Medicin

I Aalborg er de medicinstuderende tre uger i almen praksisPå Aalborg Universitet tilbringer de medicinstuderende tre uger i almen praksis. Ambitionen er, at en stor del af de studerende ender som speciallæger i almen medicin og dermed er med til at afhjælpe lægemanglen i Region Nordjylland.
17h
Dagens Medicin

Lose: Sundhedsvæsenet skal sættes friRegionernes formand vil have en kulturændring i styringen af sundhedsvæsenet. Afskeden med to procent-kravet skal gøres permanent, og fokus skal flyttes fra incitamenter til indhold, lyder det fra Stephanie Lose som optakt til økonomiforhandlingerne.
17h
Dagens Medicin

To nye gigtprofessorer vil skabe sammenhæng for patienterLektor Jette Primdahl og professor Ann Bremander tiltræder stillingen som landets to første professorer i rehabilitering 1. juni. De glæder sig til at komme i gang, men det var ikke meningen, at de to professorer skulle dele stillingen.
18h
Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

Long-distance relationships of particles: Electron-hole pairs in two-dimensional crystalsResearchers reveal the nature of optical excitations in two-dimensional crystals within an international collaboration
18h
Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

Study points to the futility of urine tests for salbutamol dopingSalbutamol, also known as albuterol, is a medication that opens up constricted medium and large airways in the lungs and is often used to treat asthma.
18h
Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

Temperature swings to hit poor countries hardestTemperature fluctuations that are amplified by climate change will hit the world's poorest countries hardest, new research suggests.
18h
Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

COPD-associated inflammation halted in model experimentChronic obstructive pulmonary disease, or COPD for short, is believed to be the third most common cause of death worldwide. However, because the underlying mechanism is still largely unknown, today's treatments can only slow progression of the disease. Scientists have now reported a previously unknown pathogenic mechanism, which they have already been able to prevent in the laboratory.
18h
Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

Novel approach for photosynthetic production of carbon neutral biofuel from green algaeReducing carbon emissions in order to prevent climate change requires developing new technologies for sustainable and renewable biofuel production. Molecular hydrogen is regarded as one of the most promising energy carriers due to its high energy density and clean, carbon-free use. A research group has discovered an efficient way for transforming solar energy into the chemical energy of biohydroge
18h
Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

Even brief maternal deprivation early in life alters adult brain function and cognition: Rat studyWhen a baby is taken from its mother for even a brief period early in life, this traumatic event significantly alters the future, adult function of the brain, according to a new animal model study. These changes in the brain are similar to disturbances in brain structure and function that are found in people at risk for neuropsychiatric disorders, such as schizophrenia.
18h
Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

Could robots be counselors? Early research shows positive user experienceNew research has shown for the first time that a social robot can deliver a 'helpful' and 'enjoyable' motivational interview (MI) -- a counseling technique designed to support behavior change.
18h
Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

Natural gas prices, not 'war on coal,' were key to coal power declineSteep declines in the use of coal for power generation over the past decade were caused largely by less expensive natural gas and the availability of wind energy -- not by environmental regulations.
18h
Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

First-in-world robot-assisted spinal surgeryPenn neurosurgeons and otolaryngologists performed the first robot-assisted spinal surgery. The robotic arms made it possible for the team to successfully remove a rare tumor in the patient's neck.
18h
Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

Researchers defy biology: Mice remain slim on burger dietOur bodies are extremely efficient at storing fat from food into our fat tissue. In a new study, researchers have managed to completely block the development of obesity. The researchers deleted an enzyme and made it impossible for mice to increase their amount of fat tissue, despite the mice eating an extremely fatty diet. They are hoping the findings will open new avenues for better treatment of
18h
Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

Global warming: Odd microbial partnerships via electrically conductive particlesHuman activities have contributed to global warming subsequently leading to increasing erosion of land. This results in conductive minerals being washed increasingly into water streams. The inflow of conductive particles can enable unusual electric partnerships between microbes leading to additional emissions of methane, which is a potent greenhouse gas.
19h
Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

PET imaging agent could provide early diagnosis of rheumatoid arthritisA novel PET tracer can visualize joint inflammation and could provide early diagnosis of rheumatoid arthritis, a common autoimmune disease that causes chronic inflammation of joints and can lead to deformity and dysfunction.
19h
Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

The brain's 'rising stars': New options against Alzheimer's?A new study points to a novel potential approach against Alzheimer's disease. In studies in mice, the researchers were able to show that blocking a particular receptor located on astrocytes normalized brain function and improved memory performance. Astrocytes are star-shaped, non-neuronal cells involved in the regulation of brain activity and blood flow.
19h
Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

Decoding the brain's learning machineIn studies with monkeys, researchers report that they have uncovered significant new details about how the cerebellum -- the 'learning machine' of the mammalian brain -- makes predictions and learns from its mistakes, helping us execute complex motor actions such as accurately shooting a basketball into a net or focusing your eyes on an object across the room.
19h
Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

Early HIV treatment key to avoiding brain atrophyWhile the human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) has largely dropped from news headlines since the 1990s, at the end of 2016 there were 36.7 million people living with the infection, and of those only 53 per cent had access to treatment. A new study underscores the neurological consequences of exposure to HIV without antiretroviral therapy.
19h
Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

Antimatter study to benefit from recipe for ten-fold spatial compression of plasmaPhysicists studying antimatter have now derived an improved way of spatially compressing a state of matter called non-neutral plasma, which consists of both antimatter and matter particles. In a new study, the team achieved a ten-fold compression of the size of the antiparticle cloud, down to a radius of only 0.17 mm. This will contribute to the first direct measurement of the gravitational effect
19h
Science | The Guardian

InSight: Nasa lander asks Mars the questions Earth can't answerScientists hope latest mission will shed light on the similar processes believed to have formed both planets 4.5bn years ago Nasa’s first lander to Mars since 2012 is set to launch on Saturday morning from Vandenberg air force base in California. The InSight spacecraft aims to listen for quakes and unravel the mystery of how rocky planets such as Earth form. If all goes as planned it should land
19h
Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

Instrument to rapidly test if drugs contain trace crystallinityResearchers have created a device that can quickly and inexpensively determine whether new pharmaceutical formulations have trace crystallinity that can negatively impact the drug's stability and bioavailability. The researchers have developed instrumentation that can accurately detect in early stages whether a pharmaceutical formulation has trace crystalline content. The instrument is based off o
19h
Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

Engineers upgrade ancient, sun-powered tech to purify water with near-perfect efficiencyThe idea of using energy from the sun to evaporate and purify water is ancient. The Greek philosopher Aristotle reportedly described such a process more than 2,000 years ago. Now, researchers are bringing this technology into the modern age, using it to sanitize water at what they report to be record-breaking rates.
19h
Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

Brain stimulation reduces suicidal thinking in people with hard-to-treat depressionA specific kind of brain stimulation is effective in reducing suicidal thinking in a significant portion of people with hard-to-treat depression, according to a new study. Forty per cent of people in the study reported that they no longer experienced suicidal thoughts after receiving bilateral repetitive transcranial magnetic stimulation.
19h
Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

Levitating water droplets with sound waves to improve contaminant detectionResearchers showed that using sound waves to levitate droplets of water in midair can improve the detection of harmful heavy metal contaminants such as lead and mercury in water.
19h
Feed: All Latest

Tesla's Elon Musk Threatens to Become a LiabilityAfter the CEO attacked analysts for asking hard questions about Tesla's finances, investors might be wary of Musk's role in the company's future.
20h
The Scientist RSS

Mistletoe Lacks Key Energy-Generating ComplexThe parasitic plant manages to go without a component of mitochondria found in all other multicellular life forms.
20h
The Scientist RSS

European Commission Recommends 100 Billion for ResearchThe budget is smaller than what some researchers hoped for, and too high for at least one EU member state.
20h
cognitive science

a smarter cognitive movie. ENJOY.submitted by /u/umlproducer1 [link] [comments]
20h
Science | The Guardian

Treat HTLV-1 virus or risk it spreading widely, doctor who discovered it warnsRobert Gallo says prevalence in Indigenous communities is ‘extraordinary’ and if he lived in Australia he would be tested Sign up to receive the top stories in Australia every day at noon One of the world’s most eminent scientists says Australia needs to speed up testing and treatment for the lethal human immune virus, HTLV-1 , or risk it spreading more widely, and admits he and others could have
20h
Big Think

Diversity is more than a box to tick. It's a smart business strategy.Should businesses foster diversity just because of the political climate, or are there other inherent advantages in having diversity of people and thought? Read More
21h
The Scientist RSS

Mistletoe Lack Key Energy-Generating ComplexThe parasitic plant manages to go without a component of mitochondria found in all other multicellular life forms.
21h
BBC News - Science & Environment

Extreme weather 'potentially catastrophic' for batsExtreme weather appears to be disrupting the lifecycle of bats, raising concern over their long-term future.
21h
Science : NPR

Lava Briefly Spews From Hawaii's KilaueaHawaii Kilauea volcanoA lava fissure erupts on the Big Island for about two hours following days of earthquakes. (Image credit: U.S. Geological Survey via AP)
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Nyheder - Forskning - Videnskab

Forskere finder forbindelse mellem døgnrytme og aggressionEt forskerhold med Det Sundhedsvidenskabelige Fakultet repræsenteret har i mus fundet et kredsløb...
21h
Nyheder - Forskning - Videnskab

Fedtceller ser ud til at huske usund kostFedtceller kan på kort tid blive beskadigede, når de gennem en fedtholdig kost bliver udsat...
21h
Live Science

Why Is NASA Looking for 'Marsquakes'?Are marsquakes the same as earthquakes?
22h
Ingeniøren

Bagsiden BREAKING: Ekstruderet Kattegat-tunnel via SamsøUgens fake news anno 1962
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Ingeniøren

Bagsiden: Ugens tilståelsessag
22h
Futurity.org

Toothy beak bridges gap between dinosaurs and birdsResearchers have pieced together the 3D skull of an iconic, toothed bird that represents a pivotal moment in the transition from dinosaurs to modern-day birds. Ichthyornis dispar lived nearly 100 million years ago in North America, looked something like a toothy seabird, and drew the attention of such famous naturalists as O.C. Marsh (who first named and described it) and Charles Darwin. “Right u
22h
BBC News - Science & Environment

Making the desert sand bloomNorwegian scientists have developed a treatment that can turn arid desert sand into farmland soil.
22h
Futurity.org

Exoskeleton app makes life with muscular dystrophy easierA new app helps patients with muscular dystrophy control a robotic exoskeleton that assists with everyday tasks like drinking a glass of water or turning on a light switch. “I like that the app is very simple and, because it’s on my phone, it’s always in my reach if I need to adjust the arms…” Zach Smith has Duchenne muscular dystrophy, a genetic disorder marked by progressive muscle degeneration
22h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Gait assessed with body-worn sensors may help detect onset of Alzheimer's diseaseBody-worn sensors used at home and in clinic by people with mild Alzheimer's to assess walking could offer a cost-effective way to detect early disease and monitor progression of the illness.
22h
Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

How a light touch can spur severe itchingScientists have found that itching caused by touch is directly related to the number of touch receptors embedded in the skin. The team found, in mice, that fewer receptors make it more likely touch will induce itching.
22h
Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

Mining for gold with a computerEngineers report important new insights into nanoporous gold -- a material with growing applications in several areas, including energy storage and biomedical devices -- all without stepping into a lab.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

Mercury rising: Are the fish we eat toxic?Researchers say industrial sea fishing may be exposing people in coastal and island nations to excessively high levels of mercury.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

'Digital snapshots' reveal the protein landscape of mitochondrial quality controlScientists have developed a new technique to analyze, with unprecedented quantitative precision, how cells initiate the removal of defective mitochondria by the cell's autophagy, or 'self-eating,' system.
22h
Futurity.org

If sea slugs take ‘eternal energy’ from algae, can we?Certain sea slugs suck raw materials from algae to provide a lifetime supply of solar-powered energy, according to new research. That’s kind of like attaching solar panels to your body. “It’s a remarkable feat because it’s highly unusual for an animal to behave like a plant and survive solely on photosynthesis,” says Debashish Bhattacharya, senior author of the study and professor in the biochemi
22h
Futurity.org

Breast cancer patients need more support for ‘chemo brain’Breast cancer patients and survivors need more support to help manage symptoms of “chemo brain,” which can include memory loss, short attention span, and mental confusion, researchers say. The study involving 131 female breast cancer patients in Singapore revealed that almost half had suffered from cognitive decline at some point during treatment and up to one year post-treatment. “I would walk f
23h
Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

Bacterial toxins wreak havoc by crippling cellular infrastructureBacterial toxins can wreak mass havoc within cells by shutting down multiple essential functions at once, a new study has found. The discovery could one day open the door to exploring better ways to fight life-threatening infections.
23h
Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

New study sheds light (and some shade) on anole diversificationThe Greater Antilles are home to more than 100 species of Anolis lizards. The success of these reptiles is often attributed to the evolution of distinct body shapes and behaviors that allow them to occupy ecological niches. Biologists report that the evolution of physiological differences may have been just as important as these physical differences.
23h
Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

New research uncovers 'stability protein' for cancer treatmentResearchers have characterized a new protein that is important to the genetic stability of our cells. It may be significant for the development of new drugs against genetically determined diseases like cancer, sterility and premature aging.
23h
Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

Morphing twisted nanoscale objects to tailor applications in future technologiesFor the first time scientists have created a way to model the interaction between light and twisted molecules, as these molecules transition from left- to right-handed versions, or vice versa. The transitional forms offer a deeper insight into material symmetries and their unexpected behavior could lead to improved design of telecoms components.
23h
The Atlantic

The Atlantic Daily: Equally MatchedWhat We’re Following Payment Pains: Rudy Giuliani, the former New York City mayor who is now a member of President Trump’s legal team, told Fox News that Trump had reimbursed his personal lawyer, Michael Cohen, for a $130,000 payment made to the adult-film actress Stormy Daniels. Here’s a rundown of the White House’s statements about the money. Giuliani’s comments suggest that the payment was mad
23h
Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

Environmental quality research questions identified for Latin American regionUsing an innovative initiative, Latin American researchers from academia, government agencies and businesses leaders identified priority research questions for the region to tackle pressing environmental quality issues.
23h
Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

Community helminth control programs may reach more children than school programsSoil-transmitted helminths (STHs) infect nearly 1.5 billion people around the world and can contribute to stunted growth and development in children. Expanding control programs to be administered at the community level may have a greater impact on STH infections in children than school-based programs.
23h
Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

Mistletoe has lost 'most of its respiratory capacity'Most people know mistletoe as a plant to hang up and kiss under at the holidays. But in its natural environment, mistletoe is a hemiparasite, latching onto trees and extracting water and nutrients from them. Now, two independent studies show that mistletoe's parasitic lifestyle has brought about a surprising evolutionary loss. Mistletoe lacks key components of the cellular machinery other organism
23h
Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

A designer's toolkit for constructing complex nanoparticlesA team of chemists has developed a designer's toolkit that lets them build various levels of complexity into nanoparticles using a simple, mix-and-match process. This work will allow researchers to create a library of complex nanoparticles that could be used in medical, energy, and electronic applications.
23h
Popular Science

Stephen Hawking’s final scientific paper explores the mysteries of the multiverse—but it’s not a big dealSpace Hawking’s posthumous paper is more like a ruminative twist on multiverse theory, but that's just fine. Stephen Hawking’s death in March incited us all take a moment and think about the famed physicist’s impact on the scientific world, and the myriad ways his research…
23h
The Atlantic

Roman Polanski Wants 'Due Process'Updated on May 4, 2018 In March of 1977, Roman Polanski was arrested in Los Angeles for charges emerging from a sexual encounter he had had with Samantha Gailey, then 13 years old : The 43-year-old Polanski, she said, had given her champagne and a quaalude , and then had raped her. Polanski, in response to the charges, eventually struck a deal: He pled guilty to a blanket count of unlawful sex wi
23h
Live Science

Do Hundreds of Earthquakes in Hawaii Mean Kilauea Could Blow?More than 600 earthquakes have rattled Hawaii's Big Island since Monday as red-hot magma from the Kilauea volcano roils underground, moving underneath residential areas, a region where magma hasn't historically traveled, according to the USGS.
23h
Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

Volcanic hazard scenarios: Mount Taranaki, New ZealandOver the last 5000 years, Mount Taranaki volcano, located in the westernmost part of New Zealand's North Island, produced at least 16 Plinian-scale explosive eruptions, the latest at AD 1655. These eruptions had magnitudes of 4 to 5, eruptive styles, and contrasting basaltic to andesitic chemical compositions comparable to the eruptions of Etna, 122 BC; Vesuvius, AD79; Tarawera, 1886; Pelée, 1902;
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

Microbeads to combat infection show promise in burn wound simulationsComputer simulations of microscopic, protein-coated beads that block bacteria from binding to host cells suggest that the microbeads could help reduce or eliminate bacterial infections in burn wounds.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

Should ethics or human intuition drive the moral judgments of driverless cars?Driverless cars will encounter situations requiring moral assessment -- and new research suggests that people may not be happy with the decisions their cars make. Experiments designed to test people's reactions to a driving dilemma that endangers human life, revealed a high willingness for self-sacrifice, a consideration of the age of potential victims and swerving onto the sidewalk to save more l
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

City will use mussels as natural water-treatment plantsIn a first for the nation, Philadelphia officials have launched the first city-owned mussel hatchery as part of an effort to improve water quality in the Delaware River Basin.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

4.6-magnitude earthquake rattles Hawaii's Big IslandThe U.S. Geological Survey reports a 4.6-magnitude earthquake has struck Hawaii's Big Island.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Backers of data privacy measure submit signatures for ballotSupporters of a California initiative aimed at giving consumers more control over their personal data say they have collected enough signatures to qualify for the November ballot.
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The Atlantic

The Atlantic Politics & Policy Daily: Hotline Sting-Written by Elaine Godfrey ( @elainejgodfrey ) Today in 5 Lines NBC News reports that federal authorities have been monitoring the phone lines of Michael Cohen, President Trump’s personal lawyer, since before the raids on Cohen’s offices and home. Earlier in the day, the network incorrectly reported that he had been wiretapped. White House Press Secretary Sarah Huckabee Sanders said Trump, who ha
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Feed: All Latest

Facebook Dating Looks a Lot Like HingeThe social network's new feature looks eerily similar to a dating app created in 2012—but as in the past, Facebook can get away with it
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Toyota to build test track for self-driving carsToyota is going all-in on autonomous vehicles, announcing Thursday plans to open a center this year to test driving scenarios too dangerous to perform on public roads.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Former Volkswagen CEO Winterkorn indicted in US over 'Dieselgate'Former Volkswagen CEO Martin Winterkorn has been indicted in the United States over his alleged role in the German auto giant's 'dieselgate' scandal, court papers showed Thursday.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Twitter urges users to change 'unmasked' passwordsTwitterTwitter on Thursday urged its more than 300 million users to change their passwords, saying they had been unintentionally "unmasked" inside the company by a software bug.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Men rescued after getting bad GPS info on way to YellowstoneTwo men drove around at least two road-closed signs due to faulty navigation device information while trying to get to Yellowstone National Park and had to be rescued from deep snow, sheriff's officers in Wyoming said Thursday.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Tesla CEO's peculiar conduct causes angst on Wall StreetElon Musk's quirky behavior has long been chalked up to that of a misunderstood genius. But never have his actions caused so much angst on Wall Street.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Highly elastic biodegradable hydrogel for bioprinting of new tissuesResearchers at The University of Texas at Arlington have developed a highly elastic biodegradable hydrogel for bio-printing of materials that mimic natural human soft tissues. Bio-printing uses live cells within the scaffolding of the new tissues and could potentially transform cell printing.
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