MOST POPULAR

The Atlantic

I’m Not Black, I’m KanyeKanye West T. CoatesI could only have seen it there, on the waxed hardwood floor of my elementary-school auditorium, because I was young then, barely 7 years old, and cable had not yet come to the city, and if it had, my father would not have believed in it. Yes, it had to have happened like this, like folk wisdom, because when I think of that era, I do not think of MTV, but of the futile attempt to stay awake and n
11h
Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

Eggs not linked to cardiovascular risk, despite conflicting adviceEating up to 12 eggs a week does not increase cardiovascular risk factors in people with pre-diabetes or type 2 diabetes, new research finds -- despite conflicting dietary advice continuing around the world.
10h
Ingeniøren

En hund er en ulv er en hundUlven er løbende opblandet med hunden, og i dag er det især adfærden, der adskiller ulven og hunden.
13h

LATEST

The Atlantic

The Gender Trap of Being First LadyMelania Trump is an unusual first lady: It was a role she apparently did not want ; she delayed moving into the White House for several months to allow her son, Barron, to finish school in New York City; and she has had limited public presence for much of her husband’s presidency. All told, Melania Trump hasn’t seemed enthusiastic about her role. But speaking in the White House’s Rose Garden on M
2min
The Atlantic

The Atlantic Daily: What They SaidWhat We’re Following Decision Time: President Trump will announce whether the U.S. will remain in the nuclear deal with Iran on Tuesday afternoon. His decision has high stakes: As one simulation conducted by regional-security experts concluded last fall, reinstating the sanctions against Iran that were lifted as part of the deal could result in the country’s resuming its nuclear program as well a
now
Popular Science

Russian cuckoos are taking over AlaskaAnimals Thanks to climate change, these crybaby parasites are heading to North America. When cuckoos come to town, it invariably spells trouble for resident songbirds. New research shows that both common and oriental cuckoos may be moving into Alaska, which…
11min
Live Science

Woman's Runny Nose Was Actually Leaking Brain FluidIt may be allergy season, but this wasn't allergies.
14min
Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

Universal antibody drug for HIV-1 prevention and immunotherapyScientists have invented a universal antibody drug against HIV/AIDS. By engineering a tandem bi-specific broadly neutralizing antibody, the team found that this novel antibody drug is universally effective not only against all genetically divergent global HIV-1 strains tested but also promoting the elimination of latently infected cells in a humanized mouse model.
30min
The Atlantic

The Atlantic Politics & Policy Daily: Trump Tries to Sink Blankenship-Written by Elaine Godfrey ( @elainejgodfrey ) Today in 5 Lines President Trump discouraged West Virginians from voting for former coal executive Don Blankenship in the state’s Republican primary on Tuesday. Senate Majority Leader Mitch McConnell, who’s been the target of Blankenship’s attacks, reportedly urged Trump to weigh in on the race in a phone call over the weekend. Trump defended Gina Ha
38min
Popular Science

Drones, AI, and smart meetings at the beginning of the Microsoft Build conferenceTechnology What you need to know about the company's developers' event. “The world is becoming a computer,” Satya Nadella, the company’s CEO, said towards the beginning of his keynote address.
47min
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Romanian who attacked Warcraft gets year in prisonA Romanian man who launched a cyber attack on the California-based servers of the hugely popular online fantasy game World of Warcraft over a squabble with other players was sentenced on Monday to one year in prison.
59min
The Atlantic

The Logic of the NRA Choosing Ollie North as PresidentSometimes it feels as though the current moment in American history is unique. At other times, there’s a disquieting déjà vu—for example, this week, when both Daniel Ortega, the Nicaragua Sandinista leader, and Ollie North, the American Marine who funneled weapons to his right-wing opponents the Contras, are both in the news. Ortega, now president once again, is holding on for bare political life
1h
Live Science

Incredible Video Shows the Fiery Toll of Kilauea on Hawaii's Big IslandLava from the Kilauea volcano smothered roads and burned down trees and houses in what was a tumultuous weekend for Hawaii's Big Island.
1h
Live Science

Photos: Fiery Lava from Kilauea Volcano Erupts on Hawaii's Big IslandKilauea Volcano is spewing up red-hot lava on Hawaii's Big Island.
1h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News

New movement monitoring system helping prevent falls in the elderlyRTLS sensor network and fractal mathematics are used to pinpoint Assisted Living Facility residents experiencing increased cognitive decline, helping prevent an impending fall.
1h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Prescription drug monitoring programs may have negative unintended consequencesPrescription drug monitoring programs (PDMPs) are a key component of the President's Prescription Drug Abuse Prevention Plan and considered a critical tool for reducing prescription opioid-related illness and death. The results of a new study show there is insufficient evidence to confirm whether implementing these programs actually increases or decreases overdoses.
1h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Researchers say issues of dementia and gun ownership need more discussionAs the number of adults with Alzheimer's disease and dementia steadily increases, questions around their access to firearms remain largely unaddressed, according to a study by researchers at the University of Colorado Anschutz Medical Campus.
1h
Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

A new molecular target identified in depressionThe discovery of a new mechanism involved in depression -- and a way to target it with a drug as effective as classical antidepressants -- provides new understanding of this illness and could pave the way for treatments with fewer side effects.
1h
Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

Wrap an electrode material for Li-ion battery into the inner spacing of carbon nanotubeResearchers have designed a unique lithium ion battery (LIB) electrode, where red phosphorus is stuffed into carbon nanotubes (CNTs). They revealed reversible electrochemical reactions and relatively high structural stability of red phosphorus in the nanotubes even after the fiftieth charge-discharge cycle. The charge-discharge capacities are twice or even higher than that of graphite in commercia
1h
Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

Novel scientific method to derive water quality criteria of metalsIncreasing contamination of marine ecosystems by metals such as mercury, cadmium, chromium and nickel has been a global environmental concern, because elevated concentrations of metals can pose hazards to marine organisms, and humans who may consume contaminated seafood.
1h
Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

Women see through flashy cars and blingWhen a man throws money around on flashy cars, people intuitively interpret this behavior as a sign that he is more interested in short-term sexual relationships than in romantic commitment.
1h
NYT > Science

How Pruitt’s Aides Work to Shield the Boss: Seven QuotesEmails and other documents obtained from the Environmental Protection Agency show how determined Mr. Pruitt has been to keep the news media and the public at a distance.
1h
Live Science

Pregnant Woman's 'Houdini' Brain Tumor Vanishes After She DeliversNow you see it, now you don't.
1h
Live Science

Cow Eyes with Frickin' Laser Beams Could Aid SecurityA flexible membrane that can be attached to a contact lens enables eyes to shoot lasers — though not exactly like Superman.
1h
Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

Uncovering a hidden protein 'tail' that puts the brakes on cell signalingUsing an informatics tool that identifies "hotspots" of post-translational modification (PTM) activity on proteins, researchers have found a previously-unknown mechanism that puts the brakes on an important cell signaling process involving the G proteins found in most living organisms.
1h
Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

Carnivores in captivity give birth at the same time of year as those in the wildReproductive seasonality is a fixed characteristic of a species -- researchers have now found that carnivores in captivity give birth at the same time of year as their counterparts in the wild. In some species, the gestation period is shortened in order to provide ideal conditions for the offspring, while for others it is extended.
1h
Big Think

Random fact roundup: Guns, roses, and Guns N' RosesWhat do guns, roses, and Guns N' Roses have in common? They're all awesome. And all of them are in our weekly random fact roundup. Read More
1h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News

New software, HyperTools, transforms complex data into visualizable shapesEvery dataset in the observable universe has a fundamental geometry or shape to it, but that structure can be highly complicated. To make it easier to visualize complicated datasets, a Dartmouth research team has created HyperTools -- an open-source software package that leverages a suite of mathematical techniques to gain intuitions about high-dimensional datasets through the underlying geometric
1h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Study discovers new molecular mechanism likely involved in cancer metastasisScientists knew the PDK1 signaling pathway was active in metastasizing cancer cells, but no one knew why. New research has found for the first time that the PDK1 pathway regulates the formation of a three-protein core complex that facilitates purine biosynthesis. Further work aims to map all the protein complexes and signaling pathways they regulate in cancer cells, which would open doors to new w
1h
New on MIT Technology Review

This summer, you may be able to hail a self-driving car in TexasTexas Drive Frisco
1h
Science | The Guardian

Weatherwatch: 3.5bn social media posts prove power of sunFacebook and Twitter analyses confirm we are grumpier on cold days, happier when it’s sunny – prompting tip for advertisers It may seem extraordinary that it took collaboration between six top quality universities to prove that we are all happier when the sun comes out. Between them academics analysed 2.4bn Facebook messages and 1.1bn posts on Twitter, between 2009 and 2016, measuring the content
1h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Study: Reflecting on possessions can curb people's impulse buyingConsumers who reflected on their recently used personal belongings experienced less desire for an unexpectedly encountered product, were less likely to buy impulsively and expressed a lower willingness to pay for new products, according to a new paper by marketing and consumer behavior experts at Rice University.
1h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

New breakthrough paving the way for universal Ebola therapeuticA new collaborative study has identified and studied Ebola antibodies that could be used to design universal therapeutics that are effective against many different Ebola species. The findings were recently published in Nature Microbiology.
1h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

SimEarthThe Earth—with its myriad shifting atmospheric, oceanic, land and ice components—presents an extraordinarily complex system to simulate using computer models.
1h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Waves similar to those controlling weather on Earth have now been found on the SunA team of scientists led by the Max Planck Institute for Solar System Research (MPS) and the University of Göttingen has discovered new waves of vorticity on the Sun. As described in today's issue of Nature Astronomy, these Rossby waves propagate in the direction opposite to rotation, have lifetimes of several months, and maximum amplitudes at the Sun's equator. For forty years scientists had spec
1h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Study finds possibility of new ways to treat, manage epilepsy seizuresNew findings from the University of Kentucky published in the Journal of Neuroscience demonstrate that there may be ways to address blood-brain barrier dysfunction in epilepsy.
2h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News

New breakthrough paving the way for universal Ebola therapeuticA new collaborative study has identified and studied Ebola antibodies that could be used to design universal therapeutics that are effective against many different Ebola species. The findings were recently published in Nature Microbiology.
2h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Reflecting on possessions can curb people's impulse buyingConsumers who reflected on their recently used personal belongings experienced less desire for an unexpectedly encountered product, were less likely to buy impulsively and expressed a lower willingness to pay for new products, according to a new paper by marketing and consumer behavior experts at Rice University.
2h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Precision medicine approvals and rare disease treatment incentives evaluatedThe senior author of two separate articles published in Health Affairs on May 7, Kesselheim, members of the PORTAL research group and co-authors, examine the fast approvals of precision medicines in one paper while evaluating the impact of the Orphan Drug Act's seven-year market exclusivity in the other.
2h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Generic options provide limited savings for expensive drugsGeneric drug options did not reduce prices paid for the cancer therapy imatinib (Gleevec), according to a Health Affairs study released today in its May issue.
2h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Slopes of volcano offer lush, affordable piece of paradiseHawaii Kilauea volcanoAs lava crawled down Leilani Road in a hissing, popping mass, Cheryl Griffith stood in its path and placed a plant in a crack in the ground as an offering to the Native Hawaiian volcano goddess, Pele.
2h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Amos Genish confirmed as CEO of Telecom ItaliaIsraeli Amos Genish was on Monday confirmed as chief executive officer of Telecom Italia, by the new board of directors, after US hedge fund Elliott Management won control of the company following a power struggle with French telecom giant Vivendi.
2h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Microsoft launches $25M program to use AI for disabilitiesMicrosoft Build 2018Microsoft is launching a $25 million initiative to use artificial intelligence to build better technology for people with disabilities.
2h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

University of California workers start 3-day strike over payThousands of custodians, security guards, gardeners and other service workers at University of California campuses started a three-day strike Monday to address pay inequalities and demand higher wages.
2h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Researchers find genetic 'dial' can control body size in pigsResearchers from North Carolina State University have demonstrated a connection between the expression of the HMGA2 gene and body size in pigs. The work further demonstrates the gene's importance in body size regulation across mammalian species, and provides a target for gene modification.
2h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

25 years of fossil collecting yields clearest picture of extinct 12-foot aquatic predatorAfter 25 years of collecting fossils at a Pennsylvania site, scientists at the Academy of Natural Sciences of Drexel University now have a much better picture of an ancient, extinct 12-foot fish and the world in which it lived.
2h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

How recent economy kept black, white young adults from leaving nestEconomic tumult in the early 2000s persuaded many young people to keep living with their parents, but the reasons why differ starkly by race, a new Johns Hopkins University-led study concludes.
2h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

If El Ninos happen twice as often in the future, what happens to seabirds?More frequent El Niño events in the future may have surprising impacts on seabirds and some fish species, according to a study from the University of California, Davis.
2h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Uncovering a hidden protein 'tail' that puts the brakes on cell signalingUsing an informatics tool that identifies "hotspots" of post-translational modification (PTM) activity on proteins, researchers have found a previously-unknown mechanism that puts the brakes on an important cell signaling process involving the G proteins found in most living organisms.
2h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Large predators once hunted to near-extinction are showing up in unexpected placesAlligators on the beach. Killer whales in rivers. Mountain lions miles from the nearest mountain.
2h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Stomata—the plant pores that give us life—arise thanks to a gene called MUTE, scientists reportPlants know how to do a neat trick.
2h
The Atlantic

Gina Haspel's Lose-Lose Proposition for DemocratsGina Haspel CIA D. TrumpConfirmation hearings aren’t supposed to be fun, exactly, but some turn out to be far more brutal than others. A dramatic showdown seems likely for President Donald Trump’s nominee to serve as CIA Director, Gina Haspel, who will face a grilling on Wednesday by skeptical Democrats wary of her record on torture and annoyed by the CIA’s reluctance to declassify central components of that record. Has
2h
The Atlantic

The Alternate Future Hinging on Trump's Iran DecisionLast fall, a group of Israeli and American experts simulated what could happen next if Donald Trump were to do what he may well do Tuesday afternoon: reinstate sanctions lifted as part of the 2015 international nuclear deal with Iran. When the simulation concluded after nine hours, it wasn’t with a triumphant United States and a submissive Iran. While Trump argues that the U.S. “got nothing” from
2h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Researchers find genetic 'dial' can control body size in pigsResearchers from North Carolina State University have demonstrated a connection between the expression of the HMGA2 gene and body size in pigs. The work further demonstrates the gene's importance in body size regulation across mammalian species, and provides a target for gene modification.
2h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Planetary waves similar to those that control weather on Earth discovered on SunAn international team of scientists, led by Laurent Gizon, co-principal investigator of the Center for Space Science at NYU Abu Dhabi (NYUAD), have discovered planetary waves of vorticity on and inside the Sun similar to those that significantly influence weather on Earth.
2h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

A new connection between glucose and lipid regulation in cancer metabolismResearchers at Albert Einstein College of Medicine and Shanghai Jiao Tong University School of Medicine in China have identified an enzyme that helps cancer cells make the building materials they need to quickly proliferate. Inhibiting this enzyme could be a strategy to slow down cancer growth, leading to more effective treatments. The study was published in the April 27 issue of the Journal of Bi
2h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Geoscientists suggest 'snowball Earth' resulted from plate tectonicsAbout 700 million years ago, the Earth experienced unusual episodes of global cooling that geologists refer to as "Snowball Earth."
2h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

New CRISPR technology 'knocks out' yeast genes with single-point precisionThe CRISPR-Cas9 system has given researchers the power to precisely edit selected genes. Now, researchers have used it to develop a technology that can target any gene in the yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae and turn it off by deleting single letters from its DNA sequence.
2h
Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

'Snowball Earth' resulted from plate tectonicsAbout 700 million years ago, the Earth experienced unusual episodes of global cooling that geologists refer to as 'Snowball Earth.' Geologists now suggest that those major climate changes can be linked to one thing: the advent of plate tectonics.
2h
Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

AI detects patterns of gut microbes for cholera riskResearchers have used artificial intelligence to spot patterns within the communities of bacteria living in the human gut. These patterns could indicate who among the approximately one billion people around the globe at risk of cholera infection will get sick with the diarrheal disease.
2h
Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

25 years of fossil collecting yields clearest picture of extinct 12-foot aquatic predatorMore than two decades of exploration at a Pennsylvania fossil site have given paleontologists their best idea of how a giant, prehistoric predator would have looked and behaved.
2h
Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

Vulnerable communities may be adversely affected by the transition to cleaner energyResearchers have developed a method for identifying communities that may be negatively affected by clean energy policies that hasten the move from fossil fuels to more environmentally friendly solutions.
2h
Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

Earth's orbital changes have influenced climate, life forms for at least 215 million yearsEvery 405,000 years, gravitational tugs from Jupiter and Venus slightly elongate Earth's orbit, an amazingly consistent pattern that has influenced our planet's climate for at least 215 million years and allows scientists to more precisely date geological events like the spread of dinosaurs, according to a new study.
2h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Building better beta peptidesDesigning bioscaffolds offers bioengineers greater flexibility when it comes to tissue engineering and biomedicine. Systems that use self-assembling peptides can create a variety of materials. Beta peptides have especially become a key tool in building more robust biomaterials. These synthetic molecules mimic the structure of small proteins, but they are protected against processes that degrade na
2h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Transistor fabrication onto curved surface means turn toward better diabetes therapyTransparent transistors fabricated onto the sharp curves of a tiny glass tube are paving the way toward a therapeutic advance for the nearly 10 percent of the U.S. population who have diabetes.
2h
The Atlantic

Donald Glover Is Watching You Watch HimDonald Glover TIA AmericaIf you search for “This Is America” on Twitter, you find not only a gushing river of well-deserved praise for Donald Glover’s new work, which has quickly become the most talked-about music video of recent memory. You also find Trump supporters using the moment to spread their messages. The hashtag #ThisIsAmerica sits next to a rant about the deep state. It sits next to a sneering meme about Hilla
2h
Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

New insights into blood vessel growthHow new blood vessels form in mammals, for example during development or after injury, was so far not known exactly. Scientists have now been able to shed light on this process. They have shown that single cells in the innermost layer of blood vessels proliferate after injury and in so doing make a significant contribution to the formation of new vessels.
2h
Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

Russian cuckoo invasion spells trouble for Alaskan birdsCommon cuckoos and oriental cuckoos in eastern Russia appear to be expanding their breeding range into western Alaska, where songbirds are naive to the cuckoos' wily ways, researchers report. A new study suggests the North American birds could suffer significant losses if cuckoos become established in Alaska.
2h
Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

New evidence that infants track others' mental statesA brain-imaging study offers new support for the idea that infants can accurately track other people's beliefs. When 7-month-old infants in the study viewed videos of an actor who saw -- or failed to see -- an object being moved to a new location, activity in a brain region known to play a role in processing others' beliefs changed in the infants just as it did in adults watching the same videos.
2h
Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

Brain activity helps explain diabetics' negative feelings, risk for depressionFor millions of Americans who are obese and living with diabetes or prediabetes, feelings of sadness, anger and anxiety are often part of daily life. A new study suggests those negative feelings may stem from problems regulating blood sugar levels that influence emotional response in the brain.
2h
Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

Chemical sensing chip sniffs out cocaine within minutesWhat if you could test for cocaine, opioids and marijuana as quickly as a breathalyzer identifies alcohol? A new, low-cost chemical sensing chip brings us one step closer to this portable tech, which has long been on the wish list of police officers and others looking to monitor drug use and curb dangerous driving.
2h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News

The effect of night shifts: Gene expression fails to adapt to new sleep patternsNight shifts have an impact on genes regulating important biological processes and their expression can't adapt to new sleeping and eating patterns and that most of them stay tuned to their daytime biological clock rhythms.
2h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News

New CRISPR technology 'knocks out' yeast genes with single-point precisionResearchers have used CRISPR-Cas9 to develop a technology that can target any gene in the yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae and turn it off by deleting single letters from its DNA sequence. Such genome-scale engineering -- in contrast to traditional strategies that only target a single gene or a limited number of genes - could be useful for industry, where S. cerevisiae is widely used to produce etha
2h
The Atlantic

Travel Monday: A Photo Trip to ZhangjiajieIn Hunan Province, in South Central China, sits Zhangjiajie , a large prefecture-level city containing spectacular landforms and parks. These include Tianmen Mountain and the Wulingyuan Scenic Area, which encompasses the Zhangjiajie National Forest Park, Tianzi Mountain Nature Reserve, Yangjiajie Scenic Area, and more. The region is famous for its towering quartzite cliffs, said to have inspired
3h
The Atlantic

What Exactly Is Rudy Giuliani's Role?Despite a disastrous debut last week in his new role as a member of President Trump’s legal team—including making contradictory statements, revealing White House untruths, and being publicly upbraided by his client—Rudy Giuliani was back at it over the weekend. It’s unclear what Giuliani’s aim was. If he was hoping to clean up his mess and make the president look good, he didn’t have a great morn
3h
The Atlantic

Readers Don't Need the Nobel Prize in LiteratureYou don’t know what you’ve got till it’s gone, Joni Mitchell told us. So now that the Nobel Prize in Literature is gone—the 2018 prize will be postponed, as the Swedish Academy deals with the fallout of a sexual harassment scandal —it seems worth asking what, exactly, the prize gives us. Will we miss it this October, when the chemists and physicists and economists are buzzing about their laureate
3h
Big Think

Are right-wing Christian evangelicals accidentally creating more religious 'nones'?The number of non-religious Americans has reached unprecedented heights. Are the most religious Americans to blame? Read More
3h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Stomata -- the plant pores that give us life -- arise thanks to a gene called MUTENew research in plants shows that a gene called MUTE is required for the formation of stomata -- the tiny pores that a critical for gas exchange, including releasing the oxygen gas that we breathe.
3h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News

In ancient rocks, scientists see a climate cycle working across deep timeScientists drilling deep into ancient rocks in the Arizona desert say they have documented a gradual shift in Earth's orbit that repeats regularly every 405,000 years, playing a role in natural climate swings. Astrophysicists have long hypothesized that the cycle exists, but the authors of the new research have found the first verifiable physical evidence. They showed that the cycle has been stabl
3h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Scientists make strong, super-tough carbon sheets at low temperatureAn international research team led by scientists at Beihang University in China and The University of Texas at Dallas has developed high-strength, super-tough sheets of carbon that can be inexpensively fabricated at low temperatures. The team made the sheets by chemically stitching together platelets of graphitic carbon, which is similar to the graphite found in the soft lead of an ordinary pencil
3h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Could reading our circadian clocks according to DNA repair optimize chemotherapy?For the first time, the lab of Nobel laureate Aziz Sancar measured DNA repair after cisplatin treatment throughout the entire genome of a mammal over the 24-hour circadian cycle. They found DNA repair of normal tissue was most robust predawn and pre-dusk in mice, and these could represent the best times for treatment using the anti-cancer drug cisplatin, though much more work needs to be done.
3h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Breakthrough bioelectronic medicine discovery made by decoding immune system's neural signalsNorthwell Health's Feinstein Institute for Medical Research Assistant Professor Theodoros P. Zanos, Ph.D., and his collaborators are the first to decode specific signals the nervous system uses to communicate immune status and inflammation to the brain.
3h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Simple treatment may minimize hearing loss triggered by loud noisesNew research from the Keck School of Medicine of USC reveals how traumatic noise damages hearing and identifies a potential way to preserve it.
3h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Earth's orbital changes have influenced climate, life forms for at least 215 million yearsEvery 405,000 years, gravitational tugs from Jupiter and Venus slightly elongate Earth's orbit, an amazingly consistent pattern that has influenced our planet's climate for at least 215 million years and allows scientists to more precisely date geological events like the spread of dinosaurs, according to a Rutgers-led study.
3h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Flexible, wearable oral sodium sensor could help improve hypertension controlFor people who have hypertension and certain other conditions, eating too much salt raises blood pressure and increases the likelihood of heart complications. To help monitor salt intake, researchers have developed a flexible and stretchable wireless sensing system designed to be comfortably worn in the mouth to measure the amount of sodium a person consumes.
3h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Importing food damages domestic environmentTrees falling as fragile forests become cropland is a visual shorthand for the environmental costs exporting countries pay to meet lucrative global demands for food. Yet a new study reveals a counterintuitive truth: Importing food also damages homeland ecology.In this week's Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences, researchers at Michigan State University and their colleagues show that the
3h
Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

Scientists discover roadblocks that stop brain white matter healingA new study identifies a molecule that may be critical to the repair of white matter, the fatty tissue wrapped around parts of brain cells that helps speed up communication. New findings suggest that the molecule triggers a pathway that is normally used by the immune system to prevent excessive damage but may contribute to chronic white matter injury by completely blocking repair operations.
3h
Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

Deadly duet: Uncovering mechanism of action for a class of pore-forming bacterial toxinsPore-forming toxins are common bacterial poisons. They attack organisms by introducing holes in cell membranes. A team of scientists has now unraveled the mechanism of action for one of these toxins. The findings could help combat associated diseases and advance crop protection.
3h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Importing food damages domestic environmentTrees falling as fragile forests become cropland is a visual shorthand for the environmental costs exporting countries pay to meet lucrative global demands for food. Yet a new study reveals a counterintuitive truth: Importing food also damages homeland ecology.
3h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Scientists make strong, super-tough carbon sheets at low temperatureAn international research team led by scientists at Beihang University in China and The University of Texas at Dallas has developed high-strength, super-tough sheets of carbon that can be inexpensively fabricated at low temperatures.
3h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Earth's orbital changes have influenced climate, life forms for at least 215 million yearsScientists drilling deep into ancient rocks in the Arizona desert say they have documented a gradual shift in Earth's orbit that repeats regularly every 405,000 years, playing a role in natural climate swings. Astrophysicists have long hypothesized that the cycle exists based on calculations of celestial mechanics, but the authors of the new research have found the first verifiable physical eviden
3h
The Atlantic

'Climate-Change Deniers Are a Cult'“I’m not a fan of fiction that’s totally hopeless,” says Jeff VanderMeer, author of Annihilation , in an interview with The Atlantic , animated in the video above. “You find ways of documenting the world as it is, [with its] beauty, and you wind up redefining utopia and dystopia.” VanderMeer goes on to explain how, in writing fiction about climate change and environmental crises, he hopes to “pus
3h
Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

Measuring snow persistence can help predict streamflowA team of researchers found that snow persistence can be used to map patterns of annual streamflow in dry parts of the western United States.
3h
Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

Genetics help make a weed a weedNew research finds that the success of weedy and invasive plants like the Jerusalem artichoke lies in their genes.
3h
Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

The apparent inner calm of quantum materialsTransitions between phases of matter could result from topological excitations that force the particles to act in unison. Researchers have been studying BACOVO -- a one-dimensional quantum material. They have discovered in this material a novel topological phase transition, governed not by a single type of topological excitation, but by two different ones. In addition, they were able to choose whi
3h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Transistor fabrication onto curved surface means turn toward better diabetes therapyTransparent transistors fabricated onto the sharp curves of a tiny glass tube are paving the way toward a therapeutic advance for the nearly 10 percent of the US population who have diabetes.
3h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Geoscientists suggest 'snowball Earth' resulted from plate tectonicsAbout 700 million years ago, the Earth experienced unusual episodes of global cooling that geologists refer to as 'Snowball Earth.' In a new study published in the April issue of the journal Terra Nova, two geologists at The University of Texas at Dallas and UT Austin suggest that those major climate changes can be linked to one thing: the advent of plate tectonics.
3h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News

A new connection between glucose and lipid regulation in cancer metabolismResearchers at Albert Einstein College of Medicine and Shanghai Jiao Tong University School of Medicine in China have identified an enzyme that helps cancer cells make the building materials they need to quickly proliferate. Inhibiting this enzyme could be a strategy to slow down cancer growth, leading to more effective treatments. The study was published in the April 27 issue of the Journal of Bi
3h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Building better beta peptidesBeta peptides have become a key tool in building more robust biomaterials. These synthetic molecules mimic the structure of small proteins, but they are protected against processes that degrade natural peptides. A new study has expanded what we can do with these crafty peptides. Published in APL Bioengineering, the researchers show that molecules that have previously posed challenges to bioenginee
3h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Understanding how DNA is selectively tagged with 'do not use' marksSalk scientists identify proteins that target specific DNA regions to keep genetic material under control.
3h
Popular Science

Humans are the only animals to go through teenage rebellion, but a few species come closeAnimals Adolescence is more than a state of mind. Adolescence is more than a state of mind. Here's how a few members of the animal kingdom handle the transition to adulthood—from African elephants to wolf spiders.
3h
Popular Science

What would happen if the moon suddenly disappeared?Ask Us Anything Life as we know it probably wouldn’t exist. The moon is more than just a pretty face to gaze upon at night. It helps direct our ocean currents and tides, the movement of Earth’s atmosphere and climate, and even…
3h
Viden

Nyopdaget menneskeabe balancerer på randen af udryddelseDet er kun et år siden, at en ny art af orangutanger blev opdaget, men en ny undersøgelse viser, at den er tæt på at forsvinde for evigt.
3h
Live Science

How Tattoo Ink and Gold Could (One Day) Help Restore VisionAn artificial retina made of organic ink and gold may be able to restore vision someday, a new study suggests.
3h
Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

Multiple uses for empty plastic bottles during disaster relief and beyondPowerful hurricanes and earthquakes have wreaked havoc in the United States and around the world in recent years, often leaving people stranded for months and even years without access to water, food, and shelter. A unique project seeks to provide a sustainable solution, while also considering the environment.
3h
Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

Could seismology equipment help to protect elephants from poachers?Using tools developed to monitor earthquakes, an interdisciplinary team of researchers have found that it's possible to eavesdrop on elephants by listening in to vibrations through the ground as they move about and vocalize. The findings support theories that elephants use ground vibrations for long-distance communication among themselves. They might also lead a new kind of alarm system for detect
3h
Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

Novel techniques for three-dimensional visualization of microscopic structures in the human brainScientists have made a breakthrough in the visualization of human brain tissue at the microscopic level.
3h
Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

How land use and climate change are driving species distribution shiftsClimate change is altering where species live all over the planet. With global warming, species are moving towards the poles and up elevation where temperature is lower. However, along with global climate change, the world is also experiencing massive changes in land use which may also impact where species live. Could both of these forces be influencing current changes in species distributions?
3h
Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

New evidence that bullfrogs are to blame for deadly fungus outbreaks in western USIn the 1890s, settlers crossed the Rocky Mountains seeking new opportunities -- and bearing frogs. A new study draws a link between that introduction of American bullfrogs (Rana catesbeiana) to the western half of the United States with the spread of a fungus deadly to amphibians. The work highlights the catastrophic results of moving animals and plants to new regions.
3h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News

AI detects patterns of gut microbes for cholera riskResearchers at Duke University and Massachusetts General Hospital used artificial intelligence to spot patterns within the communities of bacteria living in the human gut. These patterns could indicate who among the approximately one billion people around the globe at risk of cholera infection will get sick with the diarrheal disease.
3h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News

New research suggests that dawn of plate tectonics could have turned Earth into snowballA research duo from The University of Texas at Austin and UT Dallas have put forward a hypothesis that links the dawn of plate tectonics with 'snowball Earth' -- a period of climate change that sent the planet into a deep freeze that lasted millions of years.
3h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News

25 years of fossil collecting yields clearest picture of extinct 12-foot aquatic predatorMore than two decades of exploration at a Pennsylvania fossil site have given Academy of Natural Sciences paleontologists their best idea of how a giant, prehistoric predator would have looked and behaved.
3h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Are health regulations enough? Lung disease on the rise in mine workersWhile on-the-job fatalities due to injuries and accidents have steadily decreased in nearly every industry in the US, the burden of debilitating lung disease in the coal mining industry has sharply increased within the last decade. A new study published in Risk Analysis: An International Journal examines whether compliance with health regulations at mines across the country was sufficient to decre
3h
New on MIT Technology Review

In a fatal crash, Uber’s autonomous car detected a pedestrian—but chose to not stopUber NTSB Arizona
3h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News

How recent economy kept black, white young adults from leaving nestEconomic tumult in the early 2000s persuaded many young people to keep living with their parents, but the reasons why differ starkly by race, a study concludes.
4h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Hypertensive patients may benefit from folic acid supplementsHypertensive adults with low platelet count who took a combined daily pill of both enalapril and folic acid saw a 73 percent reduction in their risk of first stroke compared to patients who took only enalapril daily, according to a study published in the Journal of the American College of Cardiology.
4h
Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

Alligators on the beach? Killer whales in rivers? Get used to itSightings of alligators and other large predators in places where conventional wisdom says they 'shouldn't be' have increased in recent years, in large part because local populations, once hunted to near-extinction, are rebounding. A new article finds that far from being outliers, these sightings signify the return of highly adaptable predators to prime hunting grounds they occupied long ago -- a
4h
Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

Study finds better measures than a person's occupation to predict long-term earningsResearchers found that a person's cross-sectional annual earnings taken at one point in time have greater predictive power of his or her 20-year long-term earnings, ahead of occupation-based classifications.
4h
Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

Social context matters in spread of disease'Patient zero' isn't entirely to blame when an infection takes root in a population. According to scientists, social context in the community has a lot to do with how a disease spreads.
4h
Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

Why people become more prone to distraction with ageThe locus coeruleus is a nucleus that controls attention, memory and alertness, but a study shows that it seems to weaken in later years.
4h
Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

Better together: Merged microscope offers unprecedented look at biological processesScientists have combined two different microscope technologies to create sharper images of rapidly moving processes inside a cell.
4h
Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

Protecting confidentiality in genomic studiesResearchers have developed a system for protecting the privacy of people who contribute genomic data to biomedical studies. The cryptographic system could enable 'crowdsourced' genomics studies involving as many as a million genomes.
4h
Feed: All Latest

Drive.ai Launches a Self-Driving Car Service in Frisco, TexasSilicon Valley's Drive.ai is starting a pilot program to ferry office workers around a small area of the city, with vehicles that can "chat" with passers-by.
4h
Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

Global tourism carbon footprint quantified in world firstThe world's tourism footprint has been quantified across the supply chain, with the carbon-intensive industry revealed as a significant and growing contributor to greenhouse gas (GHG) emissions. Small islands attract a disproportionate share of GHG emissions per capita, through international arrivals, while the US is responsible for the majority of tourism-generated emissions overall. The research
4h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Chemical octopus catches sneaky cancer clues, trace glycoproteinsCertain minuscule cancer signals easily evade detection, but perhaps no longer. Biomarkers made of glycoproteins are bound to get snared in the tentacles of this chemical octopus that Georgia Tech chemists devised over several years. The monstrous molecule could also be a windfall for the rising field of glycoscience.
4h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News

If El Niños happen twice as often in the future, what happens to seabirds?Doubling the frequency of El Niños unexpectedly resulted in higher population numbers and a lower chance of extinction for Brandt's cormorants, a recent UC Davis study found. Does that mean climate change could actually be good for seabirds? Not so fast.
4h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Uncovering a hidden protein 'tail' that puts the brakes on cell signalingUsing an informatics tool that identifies "hotspots" of post-translational modification (PTM) activity on proteins, researchers have found a previously-unknown mechanism that puts the brakes on an important cell signaling process involving the G proteins found in most living organisms.
4h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Alligators on the beach? Killer whales in rivers? Get used to itSightings of alligators and other large predators in places where conventional wisdom says they 'shouldn't be' have increased in recent years, in large part because local populations, once hunted to near-extinction, are rebounding. A new Duke-led paper finds that far from being outliers, these sightings signify the return of highly adaptable predators to prime hunting grounds they occupied long ag
4h
Big Think

That NASA twin study using astronauts? It’s being replicated on Earth — with mountain climbers.It's not a head-to-head study comparison, since there are major differences, but it might just provide a lot more clues. Read More
4h
Inside Science

When Stunning Won't Kill, Fish Use Electricity to CommunicateWhen Stunning Won't Kill, Fish Use Electricity to Communicate New insights could improve cochlear and retinal implants. Apteronotus_leptorhynchus-Juvenile_topNteaser.jpg Image of a juvenile of the brown ghost knifefish (Apteronotus leptorhynchus) Image credits: Guy l'Heureux Creature Monday, May 7, 2018 - 13:00 Charles Q. Choi, Contributor (Inside Science) – Ghost knifefish use electricity as a s
4h
The Scientist RSS

Opinion: How We Found a New Way to Detect Hidden SharksGiven the speed and efficiency of environmental (eDNA) sampling, a much larger portion of the sea can be screened, in a shorter time, for patterns of diversity.
4h
Live Science

Google AI Expert: Machine Learning Is No Better Than AlchemyMachine learning has produced impressive results, a Google expert argued, but it's fundamentally no more rigorous than medieval attempts to turn lead into gold.
5h
Popular Science

Last week in tech: Facebook dating, an iMac anniversary, and change your Twitter passwordTechnology Facebook does dating, a Waymo crashed, and don't forget to change your Twitter password. Download the latest episode of the Last Week in Tech podcast!
5h
Science | The Guardian

Impact of mass breast cancer screening has been overrated | LetterIt has not been shown to affect women’s life expectancy overall, but does increase invasive interventions, say Susan Bewley, Nick Ross and Margaret McCartney of HealthWatch The announcement that thousands missed out on mammography tests caused distress to many women and their families ( Report , 4 May). The implication was that they now risked premature death from cancer. In fact, as many experts
5h
Science | The Guardian

How Igglepiggle and friends make sense of the babble | LetterA former speech therapy lecturer defends In the Night Garden from accusations that the children’s TV programme encourages egocentric language learning As a former lecturer in speech and language therapy who once set students the task of researching the appeal of Teletubbies and drawing inferences for their practice with disabled children, may I mount a defence of In the Night Garden in the face of
5h
Science | The Guardian

Embrace Mediterranean or Nordic diets to cut disease, WHO saysMajor study suggests Britain could lower its rates of cancer, diabetes and cardiovascular disease by promoting the diets Britain could lower its rates of cancer, diabetes and cardiovascular disease by embracing Mediterranean- or Nordic-style diets, a major study into the benefits of healthy eating suggests. A review by the World Health Organization found compelling evidence that both diets reduce
5h
The Atlantic

Climate Change Could Destroy Even the Ocean's Most Pristine Parks“We should’ve known,” said John Bruno, “but we really didn’t.” Bruno is a professor of marine biology at the University of North Carolina. Recently, he and his colleagues asked a simple question: If scientists know that climate change will alter national parks on land , how will it affect the thousands of national parks and conservation areas around the world that are underwater? The answer, publ
5h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Neuro filter sharpens visual processingBlurry and clear versions of an image are represented similarly in the brain, according to a neuroimaging study published in eNeuro. The research shows how the visual system fills in missing information to maintain perception when visibility is low.
5h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Fish talk-os: Studying electrocommunication in the wildA field study published in JNeurosci of tropical fish in Central America reveals how the animals use electric fields to communicate in their natural habitat to accomplish coordinated behaviors including mating and reproduction.
5h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Thank brain for gratitudeA brain network that gives rise to feelings of gratitude has been uncovered in new research published in JNeurosci. The study could spur future investigations into how these 'building blocks' transform social information into complex emotions.
5h
Dagens Medicin

Regeringen uddeler millioner til nye læge- og sundhedshuseSundhedsministeriet har sat navn på de steder i landet, der får milliontilskud til nye læge- og sundhedshuset. I alt får 26 af landets kommuner et tilskud.
5h
Big Think

Scientists successfully reanimate the brains of decapitated pigsThe reanimation of decapitated pigs raises complex ethical questions about the future of life-extension research. Read More
5h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

News agencies hail 'major step' by EU to make net giants pay for newsNews agencies welcomed Monday what they called a "major step" by the EU parliament's legal committee asking internet giants to pay for press articles.
5h
New on MIT Technology Review

Self-driving cars are useless without specialized maps—this invention could free them
5h
NYT > Science

States Turn to an Unproven Method of Execution: Nitrogen GasAs problems mount with lethal injection, Alabama, Mississippi and Oklahoma are developing protocols for using nitrogen to carry out the death penalty. Little science exists about the method.
5h
NYT > Science

Trilobites: Listening to Elephants With Earthquake-Monitoring ToolsDetecting the vibrations that elephants create with their feet and vocalizations may be a useful tool to protect pachyderms from poaching.
5h
Feed: All Latest

Google I/O 2018: Expect Google to Flex Its AI MuscleArtificial intelligence will be the thread that weaves together all the announcements at Google's annual developer conference, which starts Tuesday.
5h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Fish talk-os: Studying electrocommunication in the wildA field study published in JNeurosci of tropical fish in Central America reveals how the animals use electric fields to communicate in their natural habitat to accomplish coordinated behaviors including mating and reproduction.
5h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Monsanto CEO and others to leave after Bayer takeoverMonsanto Chairman and CEO Hugh Grant will leave the company after it's acquired by Germany's Bayer AG.
5h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Buffett says stocks remain best investment option for mostBillionaire Warren Buffett recommends that investors stick with simple stock index funds—not bonds and especially not bitcoins.
5h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Oysters: one animal, two gluesOysters build extensive reef communities by cementing to one another early in their lives. Scientists have known they secrete an adhesive for this purpose, but new research shows the glue they make as babies and juveniles are entirely different substances.
5h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

New biotech technique accelerates protein therapy researchA Northwestern-led synthetic biology research team has combined technologies to develop a new biotech technique that promises to accelerate research into protein therapies that could one day become the next defense against antibiotic-resistant supergerms or the next new drug.
5h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Study of fruit flies shows sex composition of group alters disease transmission"Patient zero" isn't entirely to blame when an infection takes root in a population. According to Rice University scientists, social context in the community has a lot to do with how a disease spreads.
5h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Social context matters in spread of disease'Patient zero' isn't entirely to blame when an infection takes root in a population. According to Rice University scientists, social context in the community has a lot to do with how a disease spreads.
5h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News

New biotech technique accelerates protein therapy researchA Northwestern-led synthetic biology research team has combined technologies to develop a new biotech technique that promises to accelerate research into protein therapies.
5h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News

A new way to watch brain activity in actionA new imaging tool makes it possible to track the firing of millions of brain cells in mice while the animals move about as normal. The method could help shed new light onto the neural processes that create behavior.
5h
The Atlantic

The Secret to Hezbollah's Electoral SuccessHezbollah Lebanon HaririBAALBEK, LEBANON—Hezbollah’s yellow flags stretched for miles along the highway to Baalbek, a Lebanese city near the frontier with Syria. They hung from every light post, interspersed with images of Hassan Nasrallah, the leader of the party. In some, he smiled; in others, he wore a grave expression and saluted. The message to voters on the party’s banners was simple: We protect, and we build. Gha
5h
Scientific American Content: Global

Will the Clean Power Plan Repeal Come with a Replacement?Without an alternative to the signature Obama climate policy, EPA is more vulnerable to legal challenges -- Read more on ScientificAmerican.com
5h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Study shows how companies can help safeguard intellectual property when expanding into risky countriesIn 2015, Pfizer pharmaceutical company invested $14 million in Chile to launch the Center of Excellence in Precision Medicine, focusing on developing new genome-based diagnostic technologies for cancer.
5h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Providing clinicians feedback on their opioid prescribing data alters future prescribingAsking emergency department (ED) providers to self-identify their opioid prescribing practices and then providing them with timely, clinically relevant, individualized, and actionable feedback on their actual opioid prescribing data, significantly decreases future opioid prescribing among providers who underestimate their baseline prescribing.
6h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News

How companies can help safeguard intellectual property when expanding into risky countriNotre Dame researchers found that firms operating regionally through downstream commercialization activities can offer complementary assets to the upstream R&D activities that help protect the firms' intellectual property.
6h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Kilauea volcano claims more than two dozen homes in HawaiiHawaii Kilauea volcanoHawaii's Kilauea volcano has destroyed 26 homes since it began spewing lava hundreds of feet into the air last week, and residents who evacuated don't know how long they might be displaced.
6h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Should I stay or go? Birds migrate to save energy: studyWhy have some birds opted for a taxing life of constant migration—seeking out temperate climes to feed as winter arrives, only to return months later to breed?
6h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Study finds better measures than a person's occupation to predict long-term earningsIn sociological studies of people's economic stratification and intergenerational mobility, researchers have long presumed a person's occupation most accurately would reflect his or her lifetime earnings.
6h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

New model could help rebuild eroding lands in coastal LouisianaAs coastal lands in Louisiana erode, researchers, environmentalists and engineers are all searching for ways to preserve the marsh coastline.
6h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Hematene joins parade of new 2-D materials—Team extracts 3-atom-thick sheets from common iron oxideIn the wake of its recent discovery of a flat form of gallium, an international team led by scientists from Rice University has created another two-dimensional material that the researchers said could be a game changer for solar fuel generation.Rice materials scientist Pulickel Ajayan and colleagues extracted 3-atom-thick hematene from common iron ore. The research was introduced in a paper today
6h
Science | The Guardian

Did you solve it? I'm a mathematician, get me out of here!The solution to today’s escapology problem In my puzzle blog earlier today I set you the following puzzle: Imagine you are in a grid 100 squares long and 100 squares wide. (The grid is fixed to the compass directions: up/down is N/S, and left/right is W/E.) On each square of the grid, there’s an arrow. Each arrow is pointing either N, S, W or E. Continue reading...
6h
NeuWrite West

When the Brainstem Gets Excited About WalkingSource: Dorothy Sherrill, from Wikimedia Commons . When we’re walking from place to place, we have full control of when and how fast to go. But how does the brain tell the leg muscles to start walking? Speed up? Slow down? To figure this out, we must identify which neurons are involved and how they are connected. Previous studies have done this by putting an electrode into locomotor regions in th
6h
The Atlantic

Planned Parenthood Was Always Meant to Be ControversialFolded onto a narrow wooden bench at a hip taco joint in downtown Washington, Cecile Richards doesn’t look much like someone taking a victory lap after stepping down from one of the highest-profile, most politically contentious jobs in America. Knocking back a Mineragua club soda, the brand-new ex- CEO of Planned Parenthood is deep in conversation with her press secretary about the Trump administ
6h
Scientific American Content: Global

Obamacare Calorie Count Rules Ushered InMenu label requirements go into effect Monday -- Read more on ScientificAmerican.com
6h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Study finds better measures than a person's occupation to predict long-term earningsIn a new study, researchers found that a person's cross-sectional annual earnings taken at one point in time have greater predictive power of his or her 20-year long-term earnings, ahead of occupation-based classifications.
6h
Inside Science

BRIEF: Tourism Responsible for 8 Percent of All Carbon Dioxide EmissionsBRIEF: Tourism Responsible for 8 Percent of All Carbon Dioxide Emissions Researchers found that efforts to curtail tourism-related emissions have been outpaced by the industry's growth. glacier.jpg Image credits: Public Domain Earth Monday, May 7, 2018 - 11:30 Yuen Yiu, Staff Writer (Inside Science) -- New research reveals that the carbon footprint of global tourism is much larger than previously
6h
Inside Science

The Future of Interstellar Navigation Might be in Following the StarsThe Future of Interstellar Navigation Might be in Following the Stars Just as sailors can look to constellations for their bearings, interplanetary travelers could use pulsars to navigate the universe. pulsarnav_topNteaser.jpg Image credits: Abigail Malate, Staff Illustrator Rights information: Copyright American Institute of Physics ( reprinting information ) Space Monday, May 7, 2018 - 09:30 Ab
6h
Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

Mission to study how Mars was madeNASA's Mars Interior Exploration using Seismic Investigations, Geodesy and Heat Transport (InSight) mission is on a 300-million-mile (483-million-kilometer) trip to Mars to study for the first time what lies deep beneath the surface of the Red Planet. InSight is scheduled to land on the Red Planet around 3 p.m. EST (noon PST) Nov. 26, where it will conduct science operations until Nov. 24, 2020, w
6h
Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

Astronomers find exoplanet atmosphere free of cloudsScientists have detected an exoplanet atmosphere that is free of clouds, marking a pivotal breakthrough in the quest for greater understanding of the planets beyond our solar system.
6h
Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

What will happen when our sun dies?Scientists agree the sun will die in approximately 10 billion years, but they weren't sure what would happen next...until now. Astronomers predict it will turn into a massive ring of luminous, interstellar gas and dust, known as a planetary nebula.
6h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News

FSU research: New model could help rebuild eroding lands in coastal LouisianaA Florida State University researcher has developed a model to help stakeholders figure out what factors they need to consider to rebuild land in coastal Louisiana.
6h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Hematene joins parade of new 2D materialsAn international team led by scientists from Rice University has created two-dimensional hematene, an atomically thin form of the common iron oxide known as hematite. The new material shows promise for 2D magnetism and efficient light-assisted water splitting.
6h
Feed: All Latest

Microsoft Charts Its Own Path on Artificial IntelligenceGoogle and Facebook are building custom chips for AI. Microsoft is using Intel chips that can be reprogrammed for different uses.
6h
The Scientist RSS

Cell Biologist Andreas Doncic DiesThe young UT Southwestern professor studied cell fate in yeast and was about to publish the first results from his lab.
6h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Genetics help make a weed a weedNew University of British Columbia research finds that the success of weedy and invasive plants like the Jerusalem artichoke lies in their genes.
7h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News

The apparent inner calm of quantum materialsTransitions between phases of matter could result from topological excitations that force the particles to act in unison. Researchers from the UNIGE, CEA, CNRS and UGA have been studying BACOVO -- a one-dimensional quantum material. They have discovered in this material a novel topological phase transition, governed not by a single type of topological excitation, but by two different ones. In addi
7h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Nursing home residents with advanced dementia have lower mortality rate with hip surgeryResearchers from Hebrew SeniorLife's Institute for Aging Research and Brown University have conducted the first study to examine outcomes in nursing home residents with advanced dementia and hip fracture. They discovered that advanced dementia residents have a lower mortality rate after 6 months, if they undergo surgical repair. Those advanced dementia patients managed with surgery also reported l
7h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News

What will happen when our sun dies?Scientists agree the sun will die in approximately 10 billion years, but they weren't sure what would happen next...until now. A team of international astronomers, including Professor Albert Zijlstra from the University of Manchester, predict it will turn into a massive ring of luminous, interstellar gas and dust, known as a planetary nebula.
7h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Built for speed: DNA nanomachines take a (rapid) step forwardIn a new study, researchers from ASU, University of Michigan, the Wyss Institute, the Dana Farber Cancer Institute and the Department of Biological Chemistry at Harvard describe an innovative DNA walker, capable of rapidly traversing a prepared track. Rather than slow, tentative steps across a surface, the DNA acrobat cartwheels head over heels, covering ground 10- to 100-fold faster than previous
7h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Protecting confidentiality in genomic studiesMIT and Stanford researchers have developed a system for protecting the privacy of people who contribute genomic data to biomedical studies. The cryptographic system could enable 'crowdsourced' genomics studies involving as many as a million genomes.
7h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Global tourism carbon footprint quantified in world firstThe world's tourism footprint has been quantified across the supply chain, with the carbon-intensive industry revealed as a significant and growing contributor to greenhouse gas (GHG) emissions. Small islands attract a disproportionate share of GHG emissions per capita, through international arrivals, while the US is responsible for the majority of tourism-generated emissions overall. The research
7h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Better together: Merged microscope offers unprecedented look at biological processesScientists at the National Institute of Biomedical Imaging and Bioengineering (NIBIB) have combined two different microscope technologies to create sharper images of rapidly moving processes inside a cell.
7h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Leukemia protective role of Y chromosome gene discoveredScientists have discovered the first leukemia protective gene that is specific to the male-only Y chromosome. Researchers at the Wellcome Sanger Institute and the University of Cambridge found that this Y-chromosome gene protects against the development of acute myeloid leukemia (AML) and other cancers.
7h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Astronomers find exoplanet atmosphere free of cloudsScientists have detected an exoplanet atmosphere that is free of clouds, marking a pivotal breakthrough in the quest for greater understanding of the planets beyond our solar system.
7h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Why people become more prone to distraction with ageThe locus coeruleus is a nucleus that controls attention, memory and alertness, but a USC-led study shows that it seems to weaken in later years.
7h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Are psychological interventions associated with chronic pain outcomes?Psychological interventions to treat chronic pain in older adults were associated with some small benefits.
7h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Is dementia risk increased among veterans after mild TBI without loss of consciousness?Traumatic brain injury (TBI), even mild TBI without a loss of consciousness, was associated with increased risk for dementia in a study of more than 350,000 US veterans.
7h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Preclinical M.D. Anderson study suggests ARID1a may be useful biomarker for immunotherapyFunctional loss of ARID1a, a frequently mutated tumor suppressor gene, causes deficiencies in normal DNA repair and may sensitize tumors to immune checkpoint blockade therapies, according to researchers from The University of Texas M.D. Anderson Cancer Center. The preclinical study suggests that mutations in ARID1a could be beneficial in predicting immunotherapy success.
7h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Dementia risk doubles following concussion, UCSF study showsDementia should join the expanding list of possible complications following concussion, even if the patient did not lose consciousness, say researchers from UCSF Weill Institute for Neurosciences and the San Francisco Veterans Affairs Health Care System.
7h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Vulnerable communities may be adversely affected by the transition to cleaner energyIndiana University researchers have developed a method for identifying communities that may be negatively affected by clean energy policies that hasten the move from fossil fuels to more environmentally friendly solutions.
7h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Taking CRISPR from clipping scissors to word processorResearchers from NIST have developed a new platform that makes CRISPR less like a cutting tool and more like a word processor with a search-and-replace function.
7h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News

New study finds climate change threatens Marine Protected AreasNew research from the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill and collaborators found that most marine life in Marine Protected Areas will not be able to tolerate warming ocean temperatures caused by greenhouse gas emissions. The study found that with continued 'business-as-usual' emissions, the protections currently in place won't matter, because by 2100, warming and reduced oxygen concentrat
7h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Brain cholesterol associated with increased risk of Alzheimer's diseaseResearchers have shown how cholesterol -- a molecule normally linked with cardiovascular diseases -- may also play an important role in the onset and progression of Alzheimer's disease.
7h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Nuclear pore functions are essential for T cell survivalA new study by Sanford Burnham Prebys researchers describes how a specific nuclear pore component is critical for the survival of circulating T cells. The findings, published in Nature Immunology, identify a new node of T cell receptor signaling and could pave the way for the development of future immunotherapies.
7h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News

A new molecular target identified in depressionThe discovery of a new mechanism involved in depression -- and a way to target it with a drug as effective as classical antidepressants -- provides new understanding of this illness and could pave the way for treatments with fewer side effects.
7h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Could seismology equipment help to protect elephants from poachers?Using tools developed to monitor earthquakes, an interdisciplinary team of researchers reporting in Current Biology on May 7 have found that it's possible to eavesdrop on elephants by listening in to vibrations through the ground as they move about and vocalize. The findings support theories that elephants use ground vibrations for long-distance communication among themselves. They might also lead
7h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Cells change tension to make tissue barriers easier to get throughFly cells squeeze through tissue barriers in the body better when these barriers are made less stiff. This is the result of a study by Daria Siekhaus, Professor at the Institute of Science and Technology, and her team, including first author and postdoc Aparna Ratheesh, which was published today in the journal Developmental Cell. This mechanism was previously unknown.
7h
Live Science

Hawaii Is Banning Sunscreen to Protect Corals. But What About Your Skin?Don't worry, you can still hit the beach.
7h
Popular Science

These plants are napping their way through climate changeNexus Media News Some species are hitting snooze on flowering season to cope with the stresses of a warming planet. Some plant species have found a novel way to cope with environmental dangers like a prolonged climate change-induced drought: They sleep through it. An international…
7h
Quanta Magazine

A Thermodynamic Answer to Why Birds MigrateEvery year, flocks of tiny white birds embark on an arduous, zigzagging journey from Greenland to Antarctica and then back again, flying more than 44,000 miles. In its lifetime, each of these arctic terns covers a distance equivalent to three or four round trips to the moon. Meanwhile, the dusky grouse, which lives at the edges of forests in mountainous regions of North America, travels but a fra
7h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Measuring snow persistence can help predict streamflowWith warming climates around the world, many regions are experiencing changes in snow accumulation and persistence. Historically, researchers and water managers have used snow accumulation amounts to predict streamflow, but this can be challenging to measure across mountain environments.
7h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Chemical sensing chip sniffs out cocaine within minutesWhat if you could test for cocaine, opioids and marijuana as quickly as a breathalyzer identifies alcohol?
7h
Big Think

Maslo: This free A.I. app by ex-Google developers could be your new bestieTwo ex-Googlers release a new phone app that uses A.I. to become a safe, understanding listener. Read More
7h
Science | The Guardian

'It's all about vested interests': untangling conspiracy, conservatism and climate scepticism | Graham ReadfearnStudy across 24 countries suggests the fossil fuel industry has reshaped conservative political values in the US and Australia • Sign up to receive the latest Australian opinion pieces every weekday If you reckon the 11 September terrorist attacks might have been an “inside job” or there is a nefarious new world order doing whatever it is the illuminati do, what are you likely to think about the
7h
Science | The Guardian

Sun 'will flare into massive planetary nebula when it dies'In 5 billion years our dying sun will transform into a stunning planetary nebula visible for millions of light years around, scientists say Enjoy the sun while it lasts: in 5 billion years’ time, our host star will burn out, rip itself apart and turn into a massive glowing ring of interstellar gas and dust, scientists say. Astronomers have long known that the sun will die when it runs out of fuel
7h
New on MIT Technology Review

US will label GMO foods with smiley faces and sunshine
7h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Antipsychotic medications may result in increased risk of gestational diabetesResearchers from Brigham and Women's Hospital, Harvard Medical School, Harvard School of Public Health and Massachusetts General Hospital addressed the link between antipsychotic treatment during pregnancy and gestational diabetes in a new research paper published online today by the American Journal of Psychiatry.
7h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Measuring snow persistence can help predict streamflowA team of researchers found that snow persistence can be used to map patterns of annual streamflow in dry parts of the western United States.
7h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Deadly duetPore-forming toxins are common bacterial poisons. They attack organisms by introducing holes in cell membranes. A team of scientists at the Technical University of Munich (TUM) has now unraveled the mechanism of action for one of these toxins. The findings could help combat associated diseases and advance crop protection.
7h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Review of nearly 500 patient cases shows surgery benefits for congenital hyperinsulinismA review of nearly 500 cases of infants with severe congenital hyperinsulinism who underwent partial or near-total removal of their pancreas for persistent hypoglycemia at Children's Hospital of Philadelphia (CHOP) showed that surgeons can cure virtually all patients with the focal, or localized, form of the rare genetic disease.
7h
BBC News - Science & Environment

Tourism's carbon impact three times larger than estimatedA new study says global tourism accounts for 8% of carbon emissions, far larger than previously thought.
7h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Could seismology equipment help to protect elephants from poachers?Using tools developed to monitor earthquakes, an interdisciplinary team of researchers reporting in Current Biology on May 7 have found that it's possible to eavesdrop on elephants by listening in to vibrations through the ground as they move about and vocalize. The findings lend support to theories suggesting that elephants could use ground vibrations for long-distance communication among themsel
7h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Protecting confidentiality in genomic studiesGenome-wide association studies, which look for links between particular genetic variants and incidence of disease, are the basis of much modern biomedical research.
7h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Better together: Merged microscope offers unprecedented look at biological processesScientists at the National Institute of Biomedical Imaging and Bioengineering (NIBIB) have combined two different microscope technologies to create sharper images of rapidly moving processes inside a cell.
7h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Taking CRISPR from clipping scissors to word processorUsing the gene-editing tool CRISPR to snip at DNA is often akin to using scissors to edit a newspaper article. You can cut out words, but it's difficult to remove individual letters or instantly know how the cuts affect the meaning of the text. Someday, CRISPR could be used to "clip" disease-causing genetic mutations in patients. But such precision medicine is impossible so long as CRISPR remains
7h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Genetics help make a weed a weedNew University of British Columbia research finds that the success of weedy and invasive plants like the Jerusalem artichoke lies in their genes.
7h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

What will happen when our sun dies?Scientists agree the sun will die in approximately 10 billion years, but they weren't sure what would happen next... until now.
7h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Astronomers find exoplanet atmosphere free of cloudsScientists have detected an exoplanet atmosphere that is free of clouds, marking a pivotal breakthrough in the quest for greater understanding of the planets beyond our solar system.
7h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Global tourism carbon footprint quantified in world firstFor the first time, the world's tourism footprint has been quantified across the supply chain—from flights to souvenirs—and revealed as a significant and growing contributor to greenhouse gas (GHG) emissions.
7h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Built for speed: DNA nanomachines take a (rapid) step forwardWhen it comes to matching simplicity with staggering creative potential, DNA may hold the prize. Built from an alphabet of just four nucleic acids, DNA provides the floorplan from which all earthly life is constructed.
7h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

New study finds climate change threatens Marine Protected AreasNew research from the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill and collaborators found that most marine life in Marine Protected Areas will not be able to tolerate warming ocean temperatures caused by greenhouse gas emissions. Marine Protected Areas have been established as a haven to protect threatened marine life, like polar bears, penguins and coral reefs, from the effects of fishing and oth
7h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Cells change tension to make tissue barriers easier to get throughCells squeeze through tissue barriers in the body more easily when these barriers are made less stiff. This is the result of a study by Daria Siekhaus, Professor at the Institute of Science and Technology (IST Austria) and her team, including first author and postdoc Aparna Ratheesh, which was published today in the journal Developmental Cell. This mechanism was previously unknown.
7h
TED Talks Daily (SD video)

What it takes to be racially literate | Priya Vulchi and Winona GuoOver the last year, Priya Vulchi and Winona Guo traveled to all 50 US states, collecting personal stories about race and intersectionality. Now they're on a mission to equip every American with the tools to understand, navigate and improve a world structured by racial division. In a dynamic talk, Vulchi and Guo pair the personal stories they've collected with research and statistics to reveal two
7h
Latest Headlines | Science News

New ideas about how stars die help solve a decades-old mysteryNew ideas about stellar evolution help explain why astronomers see so many bright planetary nebulae where they ought not be.
7h
Latest Headlines | Science News

Globetrotting tourists are leaving a giant carbon footprint on the EarthGlobetrotters are responsible for about 8 percent of the world’s greenhouse gas emissions.
7h
Ingeniøren

Det norske FM-net genopstår – i MalawiNorkring pakker de bedste FM-sendere ned og sender det hele til Afrika.
7h
New Scientist - News

Meat substitutes aren’t perfect but they are worth a tryOur taste for meat is disastrous from an environmental point of view. We should celebrate those developing ever-meatier plant-based alternatives
7h
New on MIT Technology Review

AI generates new Doom levels for humans to playContent creation is hugely expensive for video-game makers. A way to automate some of the process would be hugely valuable, and this could be it.
7h
Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

Mars growth was stunted by early giant planetary instabilityAn astrophysics team explains why the growth of Mars was stunted by an orbital instability among the outer solar system's giant planets in a new study on the evolution of the young solar system. The study builds on the widely accepted Nice Model, which invokes a planetary instability to explain many peculiar observed aspects of the outer solar system. The research shows how planet accretion (growt
7h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Scientists discover roadblocks that stop brain white matter healingA new study identifies a molecule that may be critical to the repair of white matter, the fatty tissue wrapped around parts of brain cells that helps speed up communication. New findings suggest that the molecule triggers a pathway that is normally used by the immune system to prevent excessive damage but may contribute to chronic white matter injury by completely blocking repair operations.
7h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Chemical sensing chip sniffs out cocaine within minutesWhat if you could test for cocaine, opioids and marijuana as quickly as a breathalyzer identifies alcohol? A new, low-cost chemical sensing chip brings us one step closer to this portable tech, which has long been on the wish list of police officers and others looking to monitor drug use and curb dangerous driving.
7h
Futurity.org

Expert: Starbucks anti-bias training is just one stepWhen Starbucks announced plans to conduct anti-bias training at its 8,000 outlets following the unprovoked arrests of two African-American customers in Philadelphia, psychologist Rodolfo Mendoza-Denton was at once impressed and skeptical. A veteran scholar of prejudice, stigma, and race relations, Mendoza-Denton is keenly attuned to under-the-radar discrimination that runs counter to the stated v
7h
Ingeniøren

Tysk medie: Kun fire af Tysklands 128 Eurofighters er fuldt kampdygtigeIfølge oplysninger, som tyske Der Spiegel er kommet i besiddelse af, er kun en brøkdel af Tysklands Eurofighter-jagerfly fuldt funktionsdygtige. Resten står uden selvforsvarssystem på grund af manglende kølesystem til en vigtig komponent.
7h
Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

Visual homing for micro aerial vehicles using scene familiarityResearchers have discovered that a navigation algorithm is able to allow MAVs to find their way back to an earlier visited location fairly quickly and efficiently, allowing it to function more similar to a flying insect.
7h
Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

Molecule that supports blood-cell production under dietary stress is identifiedResearchers report how the Spred1 molecule is involved in hematopoietic stem cell self-renewal. Experiments with mouse models show that under normal conditions, Spred1 acts as a negative regulator, while under diet-induced stress, it protects hematopoietic homeostasis.
7h
Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

Can 'local acoustic treatment' reduce speech distraction within open-plan offices?To make open offices less noisy, researchers are creating small 'acoustic islands' using high-back chairs and retroreflective ceilings to direct sound to help you hear your own conversations -- not others' -- better.
7h
Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

Marine animals can hear us swim, kayak and scuba diveWhile it is obvious that things like boats can be heard by marine life under the water, what about human activities like swimming, canoeing and scuba diving?
7h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Big investor offers about $6.5 billion for athenahealthProminent athenahealth investor Elliott Management Corp. is offering about $6.5 billion to take the medical billing software maker private after saying it has grown frustrated with the company's performance.
7h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Researchers develop 'hibernation in a dish' to study how animals adapt to the coldResearchers at the National Eye Institute have discovered cellular mechanisms that help the 13-lined ground squirrel survive hibernation. Their findings could be a step to extending storage of human donor tissues awaiting transplantation and protecting traumatic brain injury patients who undergo induced hypothermia. NEI is part of the National Institutes of Health. The findings were published in t
7h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Brain activity helps explain diabetics' negative feelings, risk for depressionFor millions of Americans who are obese and living with diabetes or prediabetes, feelings of sadness, anger and anxiety are often part of daily life. A new Iowa State University study suggests those negative feelings may stem from problems regulating blood sugar levels that influence emotional response in the brain.
8h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Study adds new evidence that infants track others' mental statesA brain-imaging study offers new support for the idea that infants can accurately track other people's beliefs. When 7-month-old infants in the study viewed videos of an actor who saw -- or failed to see -- an object being moved to a new location, activity in a brain region known to play a role in processing others' beliefs changed in the infants just as it did in adults watching the same videos.
8h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Snapchat joins EU group fighting hate speechSnapchat has agreed to join an EU-sponsored group of US internet giants to combat hate speech and online extremism, EU officials said on Monday.
8h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Egypt approves law to govern popular ride-hailing appsEgypt's parliament has approved a law to govern popular ride-hailing apps Uber and Careem, which had faced legal challenges stemming from regulations designed for traditional taxis.
8h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Dinosaur tracks at Utah park dislodged, thrown into lakeVisitors at a Utah state park have been dislodging dinosaur tracks imprinted in sandstone and throwing the pieces into a nearby lake, officials said.
8h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Russian cuckoo invasion spells trouble for Alaskan birds, study findsCommon cuckoos and oriental cuckoos in eastern Russia appear to be expanding their breeding range into western Alaska, where songbirds are naive to the cuckoos' wily ways, researchers report. A new study suggests the North American birds could suffer significant losses if cuckoos become established in Alaska.
8h
Futurity.org

Quantum Newton’s cradle clarifies chaos and equilibriumBy putting the most magnetic element of the periodic table into a quantum version of the Newton’s cradle toy, scientists are exploring the emergence of quantum chaos and thermal equilibrium. With its suspended metallic spheres that clack back and forth, Newton’s cradle has taught a generation of students about conservation of momentum and energy. It is also the inspiration for the experiment that
8h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Construction begins on one of the world's most sensitive dark matter experimentsThe U.S. Department of Energy has approved funding and start of construction for the SuperCDMS SNOLAB experiment, which will begin operations in the early 2020s to hunt for hypothetical dark matter particles called weakly interacting massive particles, or WIMPs. The experiment will be at least 50 times more sensitive than its predecessor, exploring WIMP properties that can't be probed by other exp
8h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Carnivores in captivity give birth at the same time of year as those in the wildReproductive seasonality is a fixed characteristic of a species—University of Zurich re-searchers have now found that carnivores in captivity give birth at the same time of year as their counterparts in the wild. In some species, the gestation period is shortened in order to provide ideal conditions for the offspring, while for others it is extended.
8h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Kidney cells from amniotic fluid obtained from cesarean section at deliveryAmniotic fluid is a valuable source of fetal stem cells with regenerative potential and useful for therapeutic applications. The origin of amniotic fluid stem cells has been enigmatic. A recently publishes study shows for the first time, that amniotic fluid contains mesenchymal stem cells of kidney origin.
8h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Russian cuckoo invasion spells trouble for Alaskan birds, study findsCommon cuckoos and oriental cuckoos in eastern Russia appear to be expanding their breeding range into western Alaska, where songbirds are naive to the cuckoos' wily ways, researchers report. A new study suggests the North American birds could suffer significant losses if cuckoos become established in Alaska.
8h
Scientific American Content: Global

A Different Kind of Clean EnergyThe world needs carbon capture technology now more than ever in the fight against climate change -- Read more on ScientificAmerican.com
8h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Visual homing for micro aerial vehicles using scene familiarityIn a paper to be published in Unmanned Systems, a group of researchers have discovered that a navigation algorithm proposed by Baddeley et al. is able to allow MAVs to find their way back to an earlier visited location fairly quickly and efficiently, allowing it to function more similar to a flying insect.
8h
Futurity.org

Teen-parent relationship can shape young adult romanceNurturing parents may pass along strategies for building and maintaining positive relationships to their kids, setting them up for healthier, less-violent romantic relationships as young adults, according to new research. Researchers found that when adolescents reported a positive family climate and their parents using more effective parenting strategies—like providing reasons for decisions and r
8h
Futurity.org

Watch: Did demand for guns kick off Britain’s Industrial Revolution?War and Great Britain’s gun industry played a more important role in driving the 18th-century Industrial Revolution than scholars have previously recognized, according to new research. “Let’s acknowledge the fact that Britain was involved in a lot of wars, and in order to pursue those wars the government needed arms.” Scholars have long debated what led to the evolution of industrialism in the 18
8h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Continuous consumption of pangasius exposes to dangerous mercury levelsThe pangasius, originally from Vietnam, is one of the most consumed fish in the world for its low cost, mild flavor and fillet presentation without skin or thorns. It is especially requested in school canteens and senior centers. But the toxicological evaluation carried out by a team of Spanish scientists now shows that the mercury content in some samples exceeds all limits, so the consumption of
8h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News

New insights into blood vessel growthHow new blood vessels form in mammals, for example during development or after injury, was so far not known exactly. Scientists at the Goethe University have now been able to shed light on this process. They have shown that single cells in the innermost layer of blood vessels proliferate after injury and in so doing make a significant contribution to the formation of new vessels.
8h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Carnivores in captivity give birth at the same time of year as those in the wildReproductive seasonality is a fixed characteristic of a species -- University of Zurich re-searchers have now found that carnivores in captivity give birth at the same time of year as their counterparts in the wild. In some species, the gestation period is shortened in order to provide ideal conditions for the offspring, while for others it is extended.
8h
Dagens Medicin

Pensioneret overlæge opretter borgerforslag: Aktiv dødshjælp bør lovliggøresDen pensionerede overlæge Svend Lings har oprettet et nyt borgerforslag om aktiv dødshjælp. Han mener, at situationen, som den er nu, er utilfredsstillende.
8h
Dagens Medicin

Syddansk it-platform får fornem prisRegion Syddanmark har vundet en europæisk pris for sin it-platform, der indsamler forskellige data fra patienter og ensretter dem, så de kan bruges på tværs af sektorer.
8h
Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

If you believe it, it's truerA new study illuminates how rapid, involuntary mental processes kick in when responding to statements that correspond with an already held viewpoint.
8h
Ingeniøren

Ultrapræcis positionering i Aarhus - ned til 1 centimeterVed at kombinere satellitdata fra en række forskellige positionssystemer vil Styrelsen for Dataforsyning og Effektivisering stille 11 målestationer til rådighed for forskere og private virksomheder
8h
Viden

Mikrober i ekstrem vulkan-sø giver ny viden om liv på MarsMikroberne har levet i et ekstremt miljø og kan minde om de organismer, der engang fandtes på Mars.
9h
New on MIT Technology Review

How “Avengers: Infinity War” took CGI characters to the next level
9h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Women see through flashy cars and blingWhen a man throws money around on flashy cars, people intuitively interpret this behavior as a sign that he is more interested in short-term sexual relationships than in romantic commitment. This is according to Daniel Kruger of the University of Michigan and Jessica Kruger at the University at Buffalo in the US, in a study published in Springer's journal Evolutionary Psychological Science.
9h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News

HKU AIDS Institute invents universal antibody drug for HIV-1 prevention and immunotherapyA research team led by scientists at AIDS Institute and Department of Microbiology, Li Ka Shing Faculty of Medicine of The University of Hong Kong (HKU) invents a universal antibody drug against HIV/AIDS. By engineering a tandem bi-specific broadly neutralizing antibody,
9h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Novel scientific method to derive water quality criteria of metalsIncreasing contamination of marine ecosystems by metals such as mercury, cadmium, chromium and nickel has been a global environmental concern, because elevated concentrations of metals can pose hazards to marine organisms, and humans who may consume contaminated seafood.
9h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Wrap an electrode material for Li-ion battery into the inner spacing of carbon nanotubeResearchers at the Toyohashi University of Technology have designed a unique lithium ion battery (LIB) electrode, where red phosphorus is stuffed into carbon nanotubes (CNTs). They revealed reversible electrochemical reactions and relatively high structural stability of red phosphorus in the nanotubes even after the fiftieth charge-discharge cycle. The charge-discharge capacities are twice or even
9h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Scientists reveal drivers of prolonged spring-summer drought over North ChinaA recent study reveals the large-scale dynamic drivers of the prolonged spring-summer drought over North China, where prolonged drought tends to begin in spring and persists to summer with severe societal impacts.
9h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Study shows family psychiatric history increases risk of postpartum psychiatric episodesA new mother's risk of postpartum psychiatric conditions increases when she has an immediate family member with a psychiatric disorder, especially bipolar disorder, according to research published today in the American Journal of Psychiatry. The increased risk occurs with both male or female family members.
9h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Study: Use of some antipsychotics during pregnancy may raise risk of gestational diabetesWomen who take certain antipsychotic medications and continue the use of these medications through pregnancy may be at increased risk for gestational diabetes, according to new research published online today by the American Journal of Psychiatry.
9h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Visual homing for micro aerial vehicles using scene familiarityIn a paper to be published in Unmanned Systems, a group of researchers have discovered that a navigation algorithm proposed by Baddeley et al. is able to allow MAVs to find their way back to an earlier visited location fairly quickly and efficiently, allowing it to function more similar to a flying insect.
9h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Caffau's star is a dwarf, Gaia DR2 confirmsCaffau's star, the most metal-poor object known to date and one of the oldest stars in the Milky Way galaxy, turns out to be a dwarf star, according to an analysis of new measurements provided by Gaia Data Release 2 (DR2). The finding was detailed April 27 in a paper published on the arXiv pre-print server.
9h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Making a cleaner, greener, environmentally safe sunscreenAs the temperatures rise and Americans swarm to the beach, they slather on sunscreen to protect against the sun's harmful UV radiation that causes skin cancer. As they splash and swim, few give thought to whether the chemicals in the lotions and sprays are safe for marine organisms such as the fish and corals living in these coastal zones.
9h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News

If you believe it, it's truerAccording to Dr. Gilead, 'In order to make informed decisions, people need to be able to consider the merits and weaknesses of different opinions and adapt to new information. This involuntary, 'reflex-like' tendency to consider things we already believe in as being true, might dampen our ability to think things through in a rational way. Future studies could explore how other factors, such as acu
9h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Invisible structures exposed!Scientists at Osaka University succeeded in reconstruction of plant branch structures, including the branch structures under leaves, by using image analysis and artificial intelligence technology, a world first.
9h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Molecule that supports blood-cell production under dietary stress is identifiedResearchers at Kanazawa University report in Cell Stem Cell how the Spred1 molecule is involved in hematopoietic stem cell self-renewal. Experiments with mouse models show that under normal conditions, Spred1 acts as a negative regulator, while under diet-induced stress, it protects hematopoietic homeostasis.
9h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Ontology-based surgical subtask automation, automating blunt dissectionIn a paper to be published in the Journal of Medical Robotics Research, a team of researchers have discovered a way to automate blunt dissection using the da Vinci surgical robot, which is controlled by the Da Vinci Research Kit (DVRK).
9h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News

HKU discovers important interaction between land use and climate change in driving species distribution shiftsClimate change is altering where species live all over the planet. With global warming, species are moving towards the poles and up elevation where temperature is lower. However, along with global climate change, the world is also experiencing massive changes in land use which may also impact where species live. Could both of these forces be influencing current changes in species distributions?
9h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Novel techniques for three-dimensional visualization of microscopic structures in the human brainA team of scientists from the Li Ka Shing Faculty of Medicine of the University of Hong Kong and Imperial College London has made a breakthrough in the visualization of human brain tissue at the microscopic level.
9h
Feed: All Latest

Star Wars News: This Is Your New Favorite Room on the Millennium FalconUnsurprisingly, it's for Lando Calrissian—and it's perfect.
9h
Scientific American Content: Global

Tracing Thailand's Illegal Rosewood TradeRosewood is heavily smuggled, but resources to curb its trafficking are lacking -- Read more on ScientificAmerican.com
9h
Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

Breast cancer: Discovery of a protein linked to metastasisResearchers experimentally block the spread of a type of breast cancer.
9h
Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

Women's preference for masculine faces not linked with hormonesData from almost 600 participants show that women's perceptions of male attractiveness do not vary according to their hormone levels, in contrast with some previous research.
9h
Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

Self-driving cars for country roadsUber's recent self-driving car fatality underscores the fact that the technology is still not ready for widespread adoption. One reason is that there aren't many places where self-driving cars can actually drive. Companies like Google only test their fleets in major cities where they've spent countless hours meticulously labeling the exact 3D positions of lanes, curbs, off-ramps and stop signs.
9h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

US giant IFF to buy Israel's Frutarom for $7 bnInternational Flavors & Fragrances said Monday it agreed to buy Israel's Frutarom for more than seven billion dollars (5.9 billion euros) in a deal the US giant said would create a world leader.
9h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Is air pollution making you sick? 4 questions answeredNot a day seems to go by without a story of an "airpocalypse," usually somewhere in a developing nation. It's hard not to empathize with the people in the smoggy images of New Delhi or Ulaanbataar or Kathmandu, often wearing masks, walking to school or work though soupy cloudiness.
9h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Polygamy observed in trio of great horned owlsA trio of great horned owls has been found to be engaging in a polygamous relationship according to an ornithologist with Bird Studies Canada. The finding has been reported by Doug Main with National Geographic.
9h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Most successful entrepreneurs are older than you thinkThe romanticized image of entrepreneurs is a picture of youth: a 20-something individual with disruptive ideas, boundless energy and a still-sharp mind. Silicon Valley has bet on this image for years.
9h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Putin rolls out new Russian limo at inaugurationRussian President Vladimir Putin glided across the Kremlin square in a boxy black Russian-made limousine ahead of Monday's inauguration, making a break with previous ceremonies when he used a Mercedes.
9h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Report: Millions of tweets spread anti-Semitic messagesMillions of anti-Semitic messages on Twitter have spread negative stereotypes and conspiracy theories about Jews across the social media platform, according to a report Monday by the Anti-Defamation League.
9h
Live Science

Construction Workers in Iran Find Mummy That May Be Father of Last ShahFor those in power, however, the return of a dead shah represents a threat.
9h
Dagens Medicin

Tre måneders forsinkelse på dansk partikelterapianlægRegion Midtjylland må udskyde behandlingen af de første patienter på Dansk Center for Partikelterapi, da leverandøren af partikelterapianlægget er forsinket.
9h
Dagens Medicin

Ny ledende overlæge til Bispebjergs akutafdelingSøren Wistisen Rasmussen bliver ny ledende overlæge af Akutafdelingen på Bispebjerg og Frederiksberg Hospital.
9h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Study confirms curable state between single and widespread cancersUsing molecular determinants combined with clinical data, UChicago physicians confirm their oligometastasis hypothesis in colorectal cancers with limited spread of disease to the liver.
9h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News

An OU study explains why Mars growth stunted by early giant planetary instabilityAn OU astrophysics team explains why the growth of Mars was stunted by an orbital instability among the outer solar system's giant planets in a new study on the evolution of the young solar system. The OU study builds on the widely accepted Nice Model, which invokes a planetary instability to explain many peculiar observed aspects of the outer solar system. An OU model used computer simulations to
9h
Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

Higher risks associated with vaginal birth after cesarean, although absolute risk smallAttempted vaginal birth after cesarean (VBAC) is associated with higher rates of adverse effects or death for mothers and infants, although absolute rates were low in mothers who attempted this type of birth, according to new research.
9h
Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

Strong pupillary light reflex in infancy to later autism diagnosisA new study shows that infants who are later diagnosed with autism react more strongly to sudden changes in light. This finding provides support for the view that sensory processing plays an important role in the development of the disorder.
9h
Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

Proper burial of dead cells limits inflammationScientists demonstrate the importance of oxidants in the digestion of apoptotic, or dead cells.
9h
Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

Very-low-carb diet shows promise in type 1 diabetesVery-low-carbohydrate diets can improve blood sugar control in type 1 diabetes, with low rates of hypoglycemia and other complications, according to an online patient survey. The researchers now call for controlled clinical trials of this approach.
9h
Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

New approach in the fight against antibiotic resistanceAccording to the WHO, around 700,000 people die every year as a result of antibiotic resistance. Scientists have now discovered that there is a point in the production process of the proteins at which it can be regulated by bacteria.
9h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Skills and social change in postsocialistic MongoliaHow do people living in a remote part of Northern Mongolia experience the post-socialist transition that occurred twenty years ago? Based on extensive fieldwork, cultural anthropologist Richard Fraser argues that this is not at all clear. In his Ph.D. dissertation, he developed a new framework based on skills to better understand the differing experiences of postsocialist change. Ph.D. defense 14
9h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Professional speedcuber breaks world record on Rubik's cubeFeliks Zemdegs a 22-year-old man from Australia has broken the world record for solving a Rubik's cube. He has done it in just 4.22 seconds. The achievement was recorded at an event held in Melbourne called Cube for Cambodia.
9h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Study shows many science and tech grads heading to U.S. for workA new study from researchers at Brock University and the University of Toronto has found Canada's brain drain in the technology and innovation sector exceeds levels previously identified as detrimental to the growth of an economy.
9h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Study explains why Mars growth stuntedA University of Oklahoma astrophysics team explains why the growth of Mars was stunted by an orbital instability among the outer solar system's giant planets in a new study on the evolution of the young solar system. The OU study builds on the widely-accepted Nice Model, which invokes a planetary instability to explain many peculiar observed aspects of the outer solar system. An OU model used comp
9h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Shipwreck research unearths treasure trove of animal knowledgeResearch into accounts of Australia's first scientific expedition to foreign lands could assist with modern-day efforts to conserve native mammals and marsupials.
9h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Bioinspiration—plant-inspired pipettesThe authors of a new article published in Journal of the Royal Society Interface, "Plant-inspired pipettes", sought inspiration from the liverwort, a widely spread plant, for the creation of a bioinspired pipette. We asked one of the authors, Hirofumi Wada, about the study.
9h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Damage from flooding doesn't have to be inevitableFor the past five years the message has been the same—Alberta, specifically Calgary, needs flood mitigation, and there is no time to spare in taking action before the Bow or Elbow Rivers spill their banks again.
9h
Scientific American Content: Global

Does the Philosophy of "the Greatest Good for the Greatest Number" Have Any Merit?Utilitarianism and its discontents -- Read more on ScientificAmerican.com
9h
Futurity.org

Future eye doctors say they’re already burned outMany ophthalmology residents report feeling burned out and depressed, which can hurt them and the quality of care they give to patients. The new study, which included a survey of ophthalmology residents completing their graduate medical training in health care settings across the US, suggests there are ample opportunities for residency programs to improve—and not only to promote wellness initiati
9h
Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

Ophthalmologists link immunotherapy with a serious eye conditionEye inflammation and uveal effusion develop among patients taking anti-cancer immune checkpoint inhibitor therapy.
9h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Impacts of windfarm construction on harbor porpoisesScientists from Germany, Denmark and the U.K. have built a model tool to predict what happens to marine animals when exposed to noise from the construction and operation of wind farms at sea.
9h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

New ceramic material could cut down cost of piezoelectric devicesPiezoelectrics are materials that change their shape when an electric field is applied, with wide-ranging applications including printing ink onto paper and precisely moving the tip of a scanning tunnelling microscope. Currently, the most effective piezoelectrics are those in single crystal form, because they have a large electrostrain value (> 1 percent), which is a mark of how much the material
9h
The Scientist RSS

Image of the Day: The Five PercentA map of neural networks in the striatum of the mouse brain reveals clues about psychiatric and movement disorders.
10h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News

New evidence that bullfrogs are to blame for deadly fungus outbreaks in western USIn the 1890s, settlers crossed the Rocky Mountains seeking new opportunities -- and bearing frogs. A new study coauthored by a San Francisco State University biology professor draws a link between that introduction of American bullfrogs (Rana catesbeiana) to the western half of the United States with the spread of a fungus deadly to amphibians. The work highlights the catastrophic results of movin
10h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Can 'local acoustic treatment' reduce speech distraction within open-plan offices?To make open offices less noisy, researchers are creating small 'acoustic islands' using high-back chairs and retroreflective ceilings to direct sound to help you hear your own conversations -- not others' -- better. During the 175th ASA Meeting, Manuj Yadav, at the University of Sydney, will present his and his colleagues' work toward solutions to the speech distraction problem in open-plan offic
10h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Marine animals can hear us swim, kayak and scuba diveWhile it is obvious that things like boats can be heard by marine life under the water, what about human activities like swimming, canoeing and scuba diving? During the 175th ASA Meeting, Christine Erbe, director of the Centre for Marine Science & Technology at Curtin University in Perth, Western Australia, will describe her work exploring the impact of man-made underwater noise on marine life.
10h
Popular Science

Local honey might help your allergies—but only if you believe it willHealth Eating allergens seems like it should reduce sneezes. In practice? Not so much. Eating local honey to prevent the springtime sniffles seems like it should work: local bees collect pollen, pollen gets into the honey, you get exposed to the allergens,…
10h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Can 'local acoustic treatment' reduce speech distraction within open-plan offices?Overhearing conversations from nearby workstations can be one of the most distracting aspects of working in an open-plan office. To make these environments less noisy, while still providing acoustic support for speaking and listening, researchers are creating small "acoustic islands" using high-back chairs and retroreflective ceilings to direct sound to help you hear your own conversations—not oth
10h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Marine animals can hear us swim, kayak and scuba diveWhile it is obvious that things like boats and other water vehicles can be heard by marine life under the water, what about human activities like swimming, canoeing and scuba diving?
10h
The Atlantic

Your Body Acquires Trillions of New Mutations Every DayAs you read this article, the cells in your body are dividing and the DNA in them is being copied, letter by letter. So long is the human genome—more than 3 billion letters—that even an astonishingly low error rate of one in many million letters could amount to 10 new mutations every time a cell divides. Oh, perhaps you’re also catching some sun ( ultraviolet rays ) while you read this, or enjoyi
10h
The Atlantic

Can Protest Art Get Its Mojo Back?In the days after Donald Trump’s inauguration, the Brooklyn punk rocker Jeff Rosenstock retreated to the Catskill Mountains to do what liberals everywhere were doing—mourn—and what many artists were doing, create work about what had just happened. The resulting songs, released on New Year’s Day 2018, bore titles such as “Powerlessness,” “All This Useless Energy,” “Beating My Head Against a Wall,”
10h
Scientific American Content: Global

Cells Talk and Help One Another via Tiny Tube NetworksLong-overlooked “tunneling nanotubes” and other bridges between cells act as conduits for sharing RNA, proteins or even whole organelles -- Read more on ScientificAmerican.com
10h
Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

For mothers with advanced cancer, parenting concerns affect emotional well-beingA new study shows that parenting concerns have a significant impact on the mental and emotional health of women with advanced cancer. In particular, they found that a mother's emotional well-being was significantly linked with whether she had communicated with her children about her illness, and her concerns about how her illness will financially impact her children.
10h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Touch forms the foundation of the powerful human-horse relationshipTwo recent films, "Lean on Pete" and "The Rider," explore the transformative quality of human-horse relationships. Both films center on young men: One deals with the trauma of poverty and loneliness, the other struggles to rebuild his life after a horrific brain injury. For each, salvation is found in the relationships they form with their equine companions.
10h
Live Science

Elon Musk Ditched His 'Flufferbot.' No, It's Not What You Think.Musk bot botches battery build, fumbles fuzzy fiberglass.
10h
Scientific American Content: Global

People Who Understand Evolution Are More Likely to Accept ItEven among the religious and conservative, knowledge of the theory influenced belief -- Read more on ScientificAmerican.com
10h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Proper burial of dead cells limits inflammationScientists demonstrate the importance of oxidants in the digestion of apoptotic, or dead cells.
11h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Building a circular bioeconomy with synthetic biologyOn April 2010, the Gulf of Mexico turned black. The largest marine oil spill initiated by an explosion of methane gas on the Deepwater Horizon drilling rig is supposed to have leaked around 800 million liters of oil into the environment. Causing severe damage to the whole ecosystem of the Gulf of Mexico and to the people living around it, oil spills such as this demonstrate that our reliance on oi
11h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Magnetized plasmas that twist light can produce powerful microscopes and moreTo get the extremely high-resolution images vital to study new materials, microbes, and more, scientists often build microscopes based on optical vortices. Forming these tiny tornadoes of light is done using quartz or liquid crystals. However, using conventional materials for microscopes has its limits. As the power of the optical vortex increases, the material literally burns up and is destroyed.
11h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Invisible structures exposedThoroughly understanding the growth of branches and leaves of individual fruit-bearing trees and adequately managing them are important in improving their quality. However, daily observation and advanced knowledge are necessary for proper management and cultivation of trees, so tree management systems using cameras are drawing attention. The automatic 3-D modeling of plant shapes and branch struct
11h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Agroecology: A better alternative in Sub-Saharan AfricaAgroecology is a better alternative than large-scale agriculture, both for the climate and for small farmers in Sub-Saharan Africa, according to researcher Ellinor Isgren from Lund University in Sweden. This agricultural model preserves biodiversity and safeguards food supply while avoiding soil depletion.
11h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Later tropical blooms could affect marine lifeColor changes in the northern Red Sea indicate rising sea temperatures could significantly impact tropical marine ecosystems.
11h
Latest Headlines | Science News

Here’s how to use DNA to find elusive sharksHard-to-find sharks that divers and cameras miss appear in genetic traces in the ocean.
11h
Feed: All Latest

What Ecologists Can Learn From MemesSome scientists are studying YouTube comments and trying to do their part for the world—by going viral.
11h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

The hidden gems of data accessibility statementsSometimes the best part of reading a scientific paper is an unexpected moment of recognition—not in the science, but in the humanity of the scientists. It's reassuring in a way to find small departures from the staid scientific formula: a note that falls outside of the expected syntax of Abstract-Introduction-Methods-Results-Discussion. As an early career scientist who is very much in the middle o
11h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Sensor stickers transform the human body into a multi-touch surfaceSensors now make it possible to capture touches on the body very precisely, even from multiple fingers. Researchers have successfully tested a new prototype sensor in four different applications.
11h
Scientific American Content: Global

Rethinking the Narrative of Diversity in ScienceA new video series looks at researchers from underrepresented groups, not as underdogs, but as people with unique and valuable life experience -- Read more on ScientificAmerican.com
11h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Specialists in mechanics investigated the behavior of vacuum oil in spaceA research team from the Research Institute of Mechanics, MSU together with a colleague from the Center of New Space Technologies, MAI described the behavior of a liquid sheet propagating in open space. The results of the study were published in the Physics of Fluids journal.
11h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Custom-built DNA could be used as a sensor probeResearchers believe that DNA – the molecule that stores information about life – could one day be used as a type of sensor, to record information based on its surroundings.
11h
Science | The Guardian

Did the dying Stephen Hawking really mean to strengthen the case for God? | Philip GoffIn his final paper on the multiverse hypothesis, the world’s best-known atheist made a supernatural creator more plausible Scientists have discovered a surprising fact about our universe in the past 40 years: against incredible odds, the numbers in basic physics are exactly as they need to be to accommodate the possibility of life. If gravity had been slightly weaker, stars would not have exploded
11h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

NASA's Webb Observatory spacecraft element environmental testing updateThe spacecraft element of NASA's James Webb Space Telescope recently completed its first two major launch environmental tests at Northrop Grumman Aerospace Systems in Redondo Beach, California, and will soon undergo further tests to ensure it will handle the rigors of launch and the harsh environment of space.
11h
Live Science

Utah Landscapers Discover Remains of Ice Age HorseWhen the skeleton was found in a Utah yard, residents thought it belonged to a cow.
11h
Scientific American Content: Global

U.S. Cities Lose Tree Cover Just When They Need It MostUrbanization is on the rise; so is the urban heat island effect—a situation that is worsening with the decline of tree cover in U.S. metropolitan areas -- Read more on ScientificAmerican.com
11h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

High-performance multimetallic core-interlayer-shell icosahedral electrocatalysts for ORRProton-exchange membrane fuel cells (PEMFCs) are generally regarded as a clean and sustainable energy-conversion technology to replace increasingly scarce fossil fuels due to the high energy conversion efficiency, high energy density, and low or zero pollutant emission. Clearly, platinum (Pt) is a key component of the state-of-the-art electrocatalysts for the oxygen reduction reaction (ORR) at the
11h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Scientists hark back to Pleistocene to trace prioritary areas for conservationIdentifying priority areas for action is a major challenge in biodiversity conservation projects. A group of researchers has chosen an approach based on past scenarios to try to understand the history of climate conditions in the regions analyzed.
11h
Ingeniøren

Københavns bycykler ude af drift efter hackerangrebAlle databaser er slettet hos Gobike, der står for driften af de københavnske bycykler. Det har betydet at næsten ingen cykler har været i funktion over weekenden, og nu leder virksomheden bag efter cyklerne, så de kan blive opdateret
11h
Ingeniøren

Kinesisk havn skal styres af autonome lastbiler og kranerStartup fra Beijing ombygger standard lastbiler og sparer havnearbejdere.
11h
Ingeniøren

Norsk regeringskommission: Masseovervågning uden domstolskontrol er ulovligtDanmark kan være på kant med menneskeretskonventionen, fordi den masseovervågning af internet og telekommunikation som Forsvarets Efterretningstjeneste foretager ikke er underlagt en domstol og data om overvågede ikke slettes hurtigt nok. Det skriver Information
11h
Ingeniøren

Obamas projekt i luften: USA jagter førertrøjen i personlig medicinVær en af os og giv os dit dna, lyder opfordringen fra myndighederne, der nu begynder jagten på at sekventere en million borgeres dna.
11h
Ingeniøren

Techtopia #51: Mød kaptajnen for FE’s unge hackerePodcast: Cyberlandsholdet er statsautoriserede hackere hyret af Forsvarets Efterretningstjeneste (FE) for at uddanne unge danskere til at vinde EM i hacking. Men det handler også om at uddanne unge it-kyndige danskere til at kunne forsvare Danmark og danske virksomheder mod hackere.
11h
Ingeniøren

Ny landsretsdom: Teleselskaber skal ikke udlevere IP-adresserTelia og Telenor har fået medhold i, at de ikke skal udlevere navne og adresser på teleabonnenter bag ip-adresser.
11h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Systematic onset of periodic patterns in random disk packingsPhysicists at Friedrich-Alexander-Universität Erlangen-Nürnberg (FAU) have proven that random packings of disks of the same size between parallel walls always form a periodic structure, regardless of the width of the container. The results, which should help scientists to better understand the packing properties of microparticles, have now been published in the renowned journal Physical Review Let
11h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Toxin linked to motor neuron disease found in Australian algal bloomsAlgal blooms in major Australian rivers are releasing a toxic chemical that may contribute to the development of motor neuron disease (MND).
11h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Burst of newborn stars in young star cluster puzzles astronomersSince the limited amount of gas that survived from the first bulk star-forming process will be quickly expelled within several million years, star clusters have long been thought of as "infertile" stellar systems that cannot form new stars. Only collisions or mergers of stars can lead to rejuvenation of much older stars, making them look younger than most normal stars in much the same way as human
12h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Zebra finches' social experiences alter their genomic DNA, changing ability to learnAsst. Prof. Sarah London has long appreciated zebra finches for their unique learning characteristics. The males learn from another male tutor, but their ability to memorize the tutor's song is restricted to a "critical period," or CP. This offers a unique opportunity to study how the brain learns, and how brain processes affect whether or not a mentor's song can be learned, London said.
12h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Surviving the inferno of entry, descent and landingAnticipation is building as preparations are well underway for the launch of NASA's next Mars mission, InSight. But before the roar of the rocket lifting off from Vandenberg Air Force Base has subsided, a NASA team will be hard at work preparing for the lander's eventual plunge through the Martian atmosphere.
12h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Oversharing can have consequences, research saysSocial media and digital communication tools make sharing private information easier than ever, but communication research suggests that people often fail to set clear expectations and boundaries when they share private information with friends and family. This prompted Lindsey Aloia to investigate how people react when information they consider secret is made public by someone they trust. Her res
12h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Chemical octopus catches sneaky cancer clues, trace glycoproteinsCancer drops sparse chemical hints of its presence early on, but unfortunately, many of them are in a class of biochemicals that could not be detected thoroughly, until now.
12h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Impacts of windfarm construction on harbor porpoisesScientists from Germany, Denmark and the UK have built a model tool to predict what happens to marine animals when exposed to noise from the construction and operation of wind farms at sea.
12h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Deep learning comes full circleFor years, the people developing artificial intelligence drew inspiration from what was known about the human brain, and it has enjoyed a lot of success as a result. Now, AI is starting to return the favor.
12h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Low-carbon energy transition requires more renewables than previously thoughtThe transition to a low-carbon energy society will require more renewable energy sources than previous estimates if current levels of energy consumption per capita and lifestyles are to be maintained. This is one of the main conclusions of a study recently published in Nature Energy by Lewis King and Jeroen van den Bergh of the Institute of Science and Environmental Technology of the Universitat A
12h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Combating cancer and infectious diseases with natural milk proteinResearchers from the Institute for Hygiene and Applied Immunology of the Center for Pathophysiology, Infectology and Immunology at MedUni Vienna, led by Hannes Stockinger, have discovered a hitherto unknown function of the protein lactoferrin, which is primarily found in breast milk. The main finding of the study, which has now been published in the Journal of Biological Chemistry is that lactofer
12h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

New approach in the fight against antibiotic resistanceAccording to the WHO, around 700,000 people die every year as a result of antibiotic resistance. In Germany, around 6,000 people die every year because treatment with antibiotics is not effective. Scientists at Friedrich-Alexander-Universität Erlangen-Nürnberg (FAU) and the University of Oxford have now discovered that there is a point in the production process of the proteins at which it can be r
12h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Fujitsu develops molecular simulation technology to effectively create new drug candidatesFujitsu Laboratories today announced the development of molecular simulation technology for drug discovery that can accurately estimate binding affinity, which represents the degree to which proteins that can cause diseases (target proteins) bind to chemical substances that could become candidate drugs. In the process of drug discovery, there is a demand for accurate prediction of the binding affi
12h
Feed: All Latest

Watch Microsoft Build 2018 Right HereMicrosoft's developer conference kicks off with a keynote address at 8:30 am PST on Monday May 7. Watch it here.
12h
BBC News - Science & Environment

InSight Diary: Mars mission emerges from the mistsLondon scientist Tom Pike watches his experiment leave Earth on a six-month journey to Mars.
12h
The Atlantic

A Bill to Curtail the Forever War, or Extend It?As we lurch through the second year of Trump administration, it’s hard to know whether to just give up the whole rule-of-law thing or rejoice at the very faint stirrings of conscience appearing on Capitol Hill. Sign number one: The Senate Judiciary committee has approved a bill to protect the Mueller investigation from a presidential attempt to quash it. For now, the bill has no chance of passage
12h
The Atlantic

The Obesity Cure Is Out of Reach in the Heaviest StatesIn Mississippi, more than 37 percent of adults are obese, making it the second-most obese state in the nation. But Mississippi is also one of two states, along with Montana, that doesn’t cover bariatric surgery in its Medicaid program, which serves 760,000 people. One popular type of bariatric surgery, the gastric sleeve, costs between $20,000 and $35,000 without insurance, experts told me. It sh
12h
The Atlantic

Incumbency Is Toxic in the 2018 Republican PrimariesDon Blankenship SenateUpdated on May 7 at 7:47 a.m. ET The most revealing answer in last week’s Senate Republican primary debate in West Virginia was a silent one—but it said a great deal about the popularity of the party’s leadership in Washington a year and a half into the Trump presidency. Moderator Bret Baier of Fox News asked the three leading contenders in this week’s contest—Representative Evan Jenkins, state A
12h
Dagens Medicin

Sjællands Universitetshospital ansætter ny stabschefJesper Juel-Helwig tiltræder 1. juni som chef for den administrative stab på Sjællands Universitetshospital.
12h
NYT > Science

AIDS Runs Rampant in Venezuela, Putting an Ancient Culture at RiskThe disease threatens an entire indigenous population, the Warao people of the Orinoco Delta, as government programs collapse.
12h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News

New study links strong pupillary light reflex in infancy to later autism diagnosisA new study published in Nature Communications shows that infants who are later diagnosed with autism react more strongly to sudden changes in light. This finding provides support for the view that sensory processing plays an important role in the development of the disorder.
13h
Science | The Guardian

Inquiry into opiate deaths to hear from pill-testing expertsNSW coronial inquest examines how addictive painkillers prescribed and the dramatic increase in opiate-related overdoses in past decade • Sign up to receive the top stories every morning The effectiveness of pill-testing at music festivals will be examined to see if it can help to prevent opiates deaths in New South Wales. A special coronial inquest examining the deaths of six people from opiate-
13h
The Atlantic

A Design Lab Is Making Rituals for Secular PeopleReligions have long been the dominant suppliers of rituals, gamely stepping in with an answer to every question from How do I celebrate the birth of my baby boy? to How can I transfer my own sins onto a live chicken? But in an age of increasing religious disaffiliation, these rituals now feel hollow to millions of people. And even when they don’t, there’s a wide range of new experiences for which
13h
Science : NPR

Lyme Disease Is On The Rise Again. Here's How To Prevent ItThe tick-borne illness is spreading north and south — about 300,000 U.S. cases a year. As scientists work on better diagnostic tests and surveillance tools, you can take steps to cut your risk. (Image credit: Kenneth H Thomas/Science Source/Getty Images)
13h
Viden

Teleselskaber kan ikke tvinges til at udlevere kundedataKunder mistænkt for brug af ulovlige film- og musiktjenester behøver ikke frygte at få data udleveret af Telia og Telenor.
13h
Viden

Klimarådet langer ud efter biomasse: Ofte sort som kulDen største drivkraft i den grønne omstilling, biomasse, får hug for sin CO2-udledning i ny rapport.
13h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

New Zealand sinkhole reveals glimpse into 60,000-year-old volcanoA new sinkhole on a North Island farm as deep as four double-decker buses and almost the length of two football fields has grabbed the attention of New Zealand volcanologists.
13h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Hawaii volcano destroys dozens of homes, forces evacuationsHawaii Kilauea volcanoHawaii's Kilauea volcano destroyed 26 homes and spewed lava hundreds of feet into the air, leaving evacuated residents unsure how long they might be displaced.
13h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Trial set for Latvian accused of running malware operationJury selection is set to begin in Virginia in the trial of a Latvian man accused of running a hacking operation offering malware products and services to cybercriminals.
13h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Nestle pays $7.15 billion to sell Starbucks productsSwiss food giant Nestle announced Monday it will pay $7.15 billion in cash for the rights to market Starbucks products around the world, outside of the company's coffee shops.
13h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

ZTE petitions US government to lift sanctionsChinese telecom giant ZTE has asked the US government to lift a ban on sales to the company, which threatens its survival and has added to trade tensions between Washington and Beijing.
13h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Australia pledges cash to help save the koalaAustralia unveiled on Monday a US$34 million plan to help bring its koala population back from the brink, following a rapid decline in the furry marsupial's fortunes.
13h
Ingeniøren

Biomasse i danske kraftværker leverer ikke altid CO2-neutral el og varmeKlimarådets årlige rapport går i kødet på spørgsmålet om, hvorvidt biomasse er CO2 neutralt.
13h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Air France shares nosedive after CEO bails (Update)Air France shares went into a tailspin on the Paris stock exchange Monday after the strike-hit company's CEO resigned and the government seemed to worry about the carrier's very chances of survival.
14h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Cloud computing, artificial intelligence on Microsoft agendaMicrosoft Build 365Microsoft's annual Build conference for software developers kicks off on Monday, giving the company an opportunity to offer updates on its computing platforms and services.
14h
Science | The Guardian

Wikipedia: the most cited authors revealed to be three Australian scientistsTrio who wrote climate paper had no idea they were referenced more than 2.8 million times An academic paper on global climate zones written by three Australians more than a decade ago has been named the most cited source on Wikipedia, having being referenced more than 2.8m times. But the authors of the paper, who are still good friends, had no idea about the wider impact of their work until recen
14h
Science-Based Medicine

PLOS ONE, peer review, and a “crappy” acupuncture studyMeta-analyses can sometimes suffer from the "GIGO problem" (garbage in, garbage out). The publication of a "crappy" acupuncture "network meta-analysis" for acupuncture and chronic constipation illustrates the GIGO problem on steroids and reveals a problem with peer review.
14h
Science | The Guardian

'It's part of being human': the Canadian project to destigmatise lonelinessA Toronto designer’s online platform showcases experiences of people all over the world, aiming to destigmatise the topic The screen shows a cluster of apartment buildings, some of them empty, some with the figure of a person silhouetted against the window. Click on an apartment and a story pops up on screen. “I spent two hours alone, wandering around an Ikea, because I was too nervous to ask peo
15h
NYT > Science

Romaine Riddle: Why the E. Coli Outbreak Eludes Food InvestigatorsA major overhaul to safeguard the country’s produce is not yet in place, confounding attempts to shut down virulent strains or prevent them altogether.
15h
Science | The Guardian

Can you solve it? I'm a mathematician, get me out of here!Keep calm and follow the arrows UPDATE: Read the solution here Hi guzzlers Today’s puzzle is for escapologists. Continue reading...
16h
Ingeniøren

Boldene er givet op til spillet om et nyt energiforligInitiativer for cirka 15 mia. kroner i nyt regeringsudspil vil bringe det danske energisystem halvvejs mod målet om 50 pct. VE i 2030.
17h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Eggs not linked to cardiovascular risk, despite conflicting adviceEating up to 12 eggs a week does not increase cardiovascular risk factors in people with pre-diabetes or type 2 diabetes, new research finds -- despite conflicting dietary advice continuing around the world.
17h
Feed: All Latest

'Westworld' Recap, Season 2 Episode 3: Robot, Human, and Everything in BetweenThe rebellion engulfing the show's theme parks is spreading—and leading to some existential questions about what is real.
17h
Ingeniøren

Ny afgiftslov gør store biler billigere og små dyrereRegeringen vil ændre bilafgiftslovgivningen, fordi EU har indført en ny og mere realistisk testmetode for bilers brændstofforbrug. Regeringens forslag betyder at registreringsafgiften på store biler sænkes, mens små biler får en forhøjelse.
17h
Ingeniøren

Halvdelen af de it-sikkerhedsprofessionelle er ikke begejstrede for CFCS' rådgivningCFCS har kun i ringe grad leveret brugbare informationer eller rådgivning til befolkningen og de it-sikkerhedsprofessionelle og samfundet som helhed, mener it-sikkerhedsekspert og tidligere sikkerhedsofficer.
17h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Women's preference for masculine faces not linked with hormonesData from almost 600 participants show that women's perceptions of male attractiveness do not vary according to their hormone levels, in contrast with some previous research. The study findings are published in Psychological Science, a journal of the Association for Psychological Science.
18h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Study: Alcohol-related cirrhosis patients are sicker, costlier and often femaleA new review by Michigan Medicine finds that women drinkers are disproportionately affected in alcohol-related cirrhosis cases. Why -- and what's next.
18h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Breast cancer: Discovery of a protein linked to metastasisMontreal researchers experimentally block the spread of a type of breast cancer.
18h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Ophthalmologists link immunotherapy with a serious eye conditionEye inflammation and uveal effusion develop among patients taking anti-cancer immune checkpoint inhibitor therapy.
18h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News

New approach in the fight against antibiotic resistanceAccording to the WHO, around 700,000 people die every year as a result of antibiotic resistance. In Germany, around 6,000 people die every year because treatment with antibiotics is not effective. Scientists at Friedrich-Alexander-Universität Erlangen-Nürnberg (FAU) and the University of Oxford have now discovered that there is a point in the production process of the proteins at which it can be r
18h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News

For mothers with advanced cancer, parenting concerns affect emotional well-beingA new study from the UNC Lineberger Comprehensive Cancer Center shows that parenting concerns have a significant impact on the mental and emotional health of women with advanced cancer. In particular, they found that a mother's emotional well-being was significantly linked with whether she had communicated with her children about her illness, and her concerns about how her illness will financially
18h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Very-low-carb diet shows promise in type 1 diabetesVery-low-carbohydrate diets can improve blood sugar control in type 1 diabetes, with low rates of hypoglycemia and other complications, according to an online patient survey. The researchers, led by Belinda Lennerz, MD, Ph.D., and David Ludwig, M.D., Ph.D., of Boston Children's Hospital, now call for controlled clinical trials of this approach. Findings were reported in the journal Pediatrics.
18h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Parenting concerns create challenges for mothers with advanced cancer and dependent childrenA new study indicates that parenting concerns are associated with poor health-related quality of life among women with metastatic cancer who are parents of dependent children.
18h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Higher risks associated with vaginal birth after cesarean, although absolute risk smallAttempted vaginal birth after cesarean (VBAC) is associated with higher rates of adverse effects or death for mothers and infants, although absolute rates were low in mothers who attempted this type of birth, according to research in CMAJ (Canadian Medical Association Journal).
18h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Self-driving cars for country roadsUber's recent self-driving car fatality underscores the fact that the technology is still not ready for widespread adoption. One reason is that there aren't many places where self-driving cars can actually drive. Companies like Google only test their fleets in major cities where they've spent countless hours meticulously labeling the exact 3D positions of lanes, curbs, off-ramps and stop signs.
18h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Children hospitalized for injuries have increased mental health needsThe study looked at children ages 0-18 years who were hospitalized for unintentional injuries at Nationwide Children's from June 2005 through May 2015. All children in this study were enrolled in the hospital's managed-Medicaid program, which allowed evaluation of baseline mental health. Researchers found that children hospitalized for an injury had on average a 63 percent increase in mental healt
18h
Latest Headlines | Science News

This self-driving car could one day take you on a real road tripMost autonomous cars are city drivers. This one’s made for cross-country road trips.
18h
BBC News - Science & Environment

The coffee cup which can be recycled in existing systemsA recyclable coffee cup could help replace the 2.5 billion disposable cups binned each year.
19h
The Atlantic

Westworld: Ride the TigerEvery week for the second season of Westworld , three Atlantic staffers will discuss new episodes of HBO’s cerebral sci-fi drama. Spencer Kornhaber: Samurais, tigers, and flamethrowers, oh my! Freeze-frame on Bernard’s tablet as he diagnoses Peter Abernathy, and you’ll note that Dolores’s dad is cycling not only through personalities, but also through narratives, and narrative genres. Westworld ,
20h
Scientific American Content: Global

Plants Can Sense Animal Attack ComingTomato plants detected snail slime in soil near them and mounted preemptive defenses, even though they were not directly touched. -- Read more on ScientificAmerican.com
22h
Feed: All Latest

Chinese-American Elites Lament a Brewing Trade WarA Silicon Valley event explores the impact on tech firms of fraying US-China ties.
22h
New Scientist - News

Creative people are 90 per cent more likely to get schizophreniaA study of the entire population of Sweden has found that people who do artistic subjects at university are more likely to have schizophrenia and depression
22h
Science | The Guardian

Cancer: 'If exercise was a pill it would be prescribed to every patient'Leading Australian researchers back world-first campaign for activity to be part of any treatment • Sign up to receive the top stories in Australia every day at noon Exercise should be prescribed to all cancer patients, and not to do so would be harmful, some of Australia’s leading experts on cancer have warned. The Clinical Oncology Society of Australia has launched its position statement on the
22h
Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

Correlation between secondhand marijuana and tobacco smoke exposure and children ED visitsMarijuana is the most commonly used illicit substance in the US. Secondhand marijuana smoke (SHMS) exposure and its subsequent impact on child health have not been studied. The objective of this study was to determine association between SHMS exposure and rates of emergency department visitation, and rates of tobacco sensitive conditions (asthma, otitis media and viral respiratory infections).
23h
Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

New studies measure screen-based media use in childrenScreen-based media are increasingly prevalent in children's lives beginning in infancy, with different aspects linked to potential benefits and developmental/health risks. Related study is the first to use MRI to explore the influence of story format (audio, illustrated, animated) on the engagement of brain networks supporting language, visual imagery and learning in preschool-age children.
23h
Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

Long-term effects of pre-birth exposure to anti-depressants 12 years laterThis study investigates the complex relationships between pre-birth exposure to selective serotonin reuptake inhibitor (SSRI) antidepressants, and thinking and attention skills in 12-year-olds.
23h
Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

Stricter state firearms laws associated with lower pediatric mortality rates from firearmsStates with stricter firearm laws have lower rates of firearm-related deaths in children, according to cross-sectional analyses.
23h
Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

Majority of late preterm infants suffer from morbidities resulting in hospital stayLate preterm infants constitute 70 percent of the preterm population. Common neonatal morbidities are higher in this group compared to term infants. Although this increased risk is attributed to physiological immaturity, recent studies indicate that immaturity itself may not be the sole cause of morbidity as all premature infants experience this risk, but suffer different outcomes.
23h
Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

Endorsements enhance an MBA applicant's chanceScientists offer the first empirical evidence on the effects of endorsements on MBA students' performance.
23h
Futurity.org

Device makes clean water with paper and sunlightResearchers have created a method for using sunlight to generate clean water with nearly perfect efficiency. The idea of using energy from the sun to evaporate and purify water is ancient. The Greek philosopher Aristotle reportedly described such a process more than 2,000 years ago. The researchers’ method involves draping black, carbon-dipped paper in a triangular shape and using it to both abso
23h
Futurity.org

Software watches sports and quickly pulls out statsNew software called Cherrypick is the first capable of automatically analyzing volleyball matches and providing analytics about the game just an hour later. The software will allow coaches to make data-driven decisions based on player activity and tailor their coaching to specific situations. It allows coaches to record a game, upload video, and receive statistics from the game within an hour. Ma
23h
Futurity.org

Deleting enzyme blocks fat in mice on ‘burger diet’Researchers have inhibited the ability of mice to build and store fat. Genetically deleting the enzyme NAMPT in fat tissue of mice renders them completely resistant to becoming overweight or obese, even on a very fatty diet, they found. We are our own worst enemy when it comes to developing obesity, researchers say. The body is naturally geared to assimilate energy from the food we eat and store
23h
Futurity.org

Bacteria’s taste for antibiotics may clean up soilNew research illuminates key steps in the process of how bacteria turn antibiotics into food. The finding could lead to new ways to eliminate antibiotics from land and water, the researchers say. “It’s just carbon, and wherever there’s carbon, somebody will figure out how to eat it.” “Ten years ago we stumbled onto the fact that bacteria can eat antibiotics, and everyone was shocked by it,” says
23h
Futurity.org

Team ‘mines’ for new info about nanoporous goldNew analysis of existing literature on nanoporous gold offers a recipe, of sorts, for how to make NPG with specific characteristics.www NPG has growing applications in several areas, including energy storage and biomedical devices. Instead of conducting any experiments, the team used image-analysis software developed in-house to “mine” photographs of NPG from some 150 peer-reviewed papers, quickl
23h
Futurity.org

Toolkit lets chemists ‘mix-and-match’ for new nanoparticlesChemists have developed a designer’s toolkit that lets them build various levels of complexity into nanoparticles using a simple, mix-and-match process. “Researchers in areas as diverse as medicine, energy, and electronics often design complex nanoscale particles that are predicted to have useful functions,” says Raymond E. Schaak, professor of materials chemistry at Penn State and the leader of
23h


Vil du være med til at finde de mest interessante nyheder? Send email herom til BioNyt

Se nyheder fra en tidligere dato

Tegn abonnement på

BioNyt Videnskabens Verden (www.bionyt.dk) er Danmarks ældste populærvidenskabelige tidsskrift for naturvidenskab. Det er det eneste blad af sin art i Danmark, som er helliget international forskning inden for livsvidenskaberne.

Bladet bringer aktuelle, spændende forskningsnyheder inden for biologi, medicin og andre naturvidenskabelige områder som f.eks. klimaændringer, nanoteknologi, partikelfysik, astronomi, seksualitet, biologiske våben, ecstasy, evolutionsbiologi, kloning, fedme, søvnforskning, muligheden for liv på mars, influenzaepidemier, livets opståen osv.

Artiklerne roses for at gøre vanskeligt stof forståeligt, uden at den videnskabelige holdbarhed tabes.