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EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Scientists train spider to jump on demand to discover secrets of animal movementScientists have unlocked the secrets of how some predatory spiders catch their prey whilst hunting by successfully training one to jump different distances and heights for the first time.
12h
BBC News - Science & Environment

Wet wipes could face wipe-out in plastic clean-upThe government says it plans to eliminate all avoidable plastic waste, including wet wipes.
10h
Ingeniøren

Turisme belaster kloden langt mere end antagetNy forskning kigger på turisternes samlede CO2-aftryk. Det kalder på indgreb, mener forskerne.
10h

LATEST

Latest Headlines | Science News

How long will Kilauea’s eruption last?A volcanologist with the U.S. Geological Survey answers burning questions about the ongoing Kilauea eruption.
3min
EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Hunting dogs may benefit from antioxidant boost in dietFree radicals, those DNA-damaging single-oxygen atoms, are produced in spades during exercise. Dogs that exercise a lot, like hunting dogs, may need to consume more antioxidants than their less-active counterparts to protect against this damage. But what diet formulation best meets the needs of these furry athletes? A new University of Illinois study provides some answers in a real-world scenario.
9min
Latest Headlines | Science News

How long will Kilauea’s eruption last?A volcanologist with the U.S. Geological Survey answers burning questions about the ongoing Kilauea eruption.
10min
New Scientist - News

Towing icebergs to Cape Town is a poor way to halt water crisisHauling chunks of polar ice to dry regions to provide fresh water sounds tempting but there are many reasons to reject it, says Olive Heffernan
13min
New Scientist - News

Colombia’s peace deal unwittingly unleashed hell on the AmazonEver since Colombia signed a historic peace deal with the FARC guerrillas, farmers and criminal gangs have been burning its portion of the Amazon rainforest
13min
The Atlantic

The Three Crises Sparked by Trump's Withdrawal From the Iran DealIran Trump USPresident Trump has just pushed the plunger on a sequence of crises. The first will be a crisis with allies and other partners. Will they agree to reimpose their sanctions on Iran? It’s not just NATO countries that will have to be cajoled or coerced. Complying with UN-voted sanctions, India reduced its dependence on Iranian crude oil from 13 percent of its imports in 2009-2010 to 5 percent in 201
23min
Viden

Vild Google-demo: Kunstig intelligens ringer til frisøren og bestiller tidGoogle har netop fremvist en digital assistent, der på egen hånd ringer op og bestiller tid hos en frisør - uden frisøren aner, hun har talt med en computer.
23min
EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Stay safe, take the busA Montreal study reveals that people who travel by car are four times more likely to be injured than people who travel by city bus. Buses are safer for cyclists and pedestrians, too.
24min
EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Study looks at barriers to getting treatment for substance use disordersFor patients with substance use disorders seen in the emergency department or doctor's office, locating and accessing appropriate treatment all too often poses difficult challenges. Healthcare providers and treatment facility administrators share their views on delays and obstacles to prompt receipt of substance use disorder treatment after referral in a study in the Journal of Addiction Medicine,
24min
EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Leopard meals: Females go for diversityLeopards, top predators of the African savannah, are known to feed on a variety of prey species. It has been largely unknown, however, whether they specialize in certain prey animals and which factors might influence prey preferences. Christian Voigt and his colleagues from the Leibniz Institute for Zoo and Wildlife Research (Leibniz-IZW) in Berlin investigated these questions by studying the diet
24min
EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Blocking the molecular source of idiopathic pulmonary fibrosisSuccessfully tested in mice, targeted drug and gene therapies might one day benefit patients with a deadly lung disease, new U-M research finds.
24min
Big Think

Google goes all in on AIGoogle AI ResearchDepending on how you look at it, Google wants to jump on the hot new trend in tech or is trying to appease future robot-brain overlords Read More
28min
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Gates, Zuckerberg team up on new education initiativeTech moguls Bill Gates and Mark Zuckerberg are teaming up to help develop new technologies for kids with trouble learning, which will include dabbling into child brain science.
34min
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Disney seeks new frontiers as more people watch video onlineDisney is seeking new frontiers.
34min
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Georgia governor vetoes cybercrime legislationGeorgia's governor has vetoed a bill that would have criminalized unauthorized computer access after receiving blowback from the state's booming cybersecurity industry.
34min
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Stay or go? Volcano forces choice for all in eruption zoneEdwin Montoya's family carved their farm on the slopes of the Kilauea volcano out of "raw jungle," transforming it into a fertile collection of gardens, animal pens and fruit trees.
34min
EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Texas A&M study links breast cancer to the body's internal clockFor years, doctors have associated the BRCA1 and BRCA2 gene mutations with an increased risk of breast cancer. But researchers at Texas A&M University have now identified another gene that may have an impact on breast cancer --associated with the body's circadian rhythm.
45min
Science : NPR

For Babies Of The Opioid Crisis, Best Care May Be Mom's RecoveryEarly findings on infants born with neonatal abstinence syndrome are reassuring, and doctors are optimistic that normal development can continue. Making sure parents are treated for addiction is key. (Image credit: Sarah Jane Tribble/KHN)
52min
New on MIT Technology Review

The Trump administration is developing a weird love-hate relationship with AIWhite House AI Amazon
56min
EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Metastasis enablers: Findings could unlock new ovarian cancer treatmentsNew research from the lab of Pamela Kreeger, a University of Wisconsin-Madison biomedical engineering professor, has identified one way ovarian cancer cells appear to successfully spread.
1h
The Scientist RSS

Two Ebola Cases Confirmed in Democratic Republic of CongoThe country's health ministry and the World Health Organization rush to contain the new outbreak.
1h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Canada newspaper La Presse to become a non-profitThe Montreal daily La Presse, after ending its 134 year-old print edition and going digital, said on Tuesday it will become a non-profit entity reliant on donations and government support.
1h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Inequality is normal: Dominance of the big treesThe top 1% of the forest has been sharing some vital information with researchers. Ninety-eight scientists and thousands of field staff have concluded the largest study undertaken to date with the Smithsonian Forest Global Earth Observatory (ForestGEO), and what they have found will have profound implications toward ecological theories and carbon storage in forests. Rather than examining tree spec
1h
Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

Symmetry is essential for power network synchronizationScientists have clarified the fundamental principles for achieving the synchronization of power generator groups in power networks, which is essential for the stable supply of electric power. Based on this principle, the team developed a method for constructing an aggregated model of a power network that can efficiently analyze and control the behavior of generator groups (including rotor phase an
1h
Big Think

Study: Creative people have a 90% higher chance of being diagnosed with schizophreniaBeing creative gives you a natural predisposition to schizophrenia, according to a massive new study by the British Journal of Psychiatry. Read More
1h
Big Think

The key to solving Parkinson’s disease may not be in the brainIt's becoming more clear what the root cause of Parkinson's is. Read More
1h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News

ONC201 kills breast cancer cells in vitro by targeting mitochondria'Our work identifies a novel mechanism of ONC201 cytotoxicity that is based on the disruption of mitochondrial function, leading to ATP depletion and cell death in cancer cells that are dependent on mitochondrial respiration. Our study also suggests that cancer cells that are dependent on glycolysis will be resistant to ONC201' Dr. Stanley Lipkowitz, Chief, Women's Malignancies Branch, NCI.
1h
TED Talks Daily (SD video)

A playful solution to the housing crisis | Sarah MurrayFrustrated by her lack of self-determination in the housing market, Sarah Murray created a computer game that allows home buyers to design a house and have it delivered to them in modular components that can be assembled on-site. Learn how her effort is putting would-be homeowners in control of the largest purchase of their lives -- as well as cutting costs, protecting the environment and helping
1h
The Atlantic

The Iran Deal Will Limp Along Without America—for NowIran US Donald TrumpIn a move to derail an agreement he has frequently dubbed “insane,” “horrible,” and “the worst,” President Trump announced Tuesday that he is withdrawing the U.S. from the Iran nuclear deal, known as the Joint Comprehensive Plan of Action (JCPOA). Trump said the U.S. will reinstate sanctions it had waived as part of the deal, adding that “any nation that helps Iran in its quest for nuclear weapon
1h
The Atlantic

It Took Eric Schneiderman Just 3 Hours to Resign—Why?The fact of a powerful man being accused of sexual misconduct is not, at this stage, all that unusual—though the details of the accusations against New York Attorney General Eric Schneiderman were nauseating. What was unusual was the speed with which he resigned. Just three hours elapsed from the moment The New Yorker published an article detailing allegations of abuse by former romantic partners
1h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Inequality is normal: Dominance of the big treesThe top 1 percent of the forest has been sharing some vital information with researchers. Ninety-eight scientists and thousands of field staff have concluded the largest study undertaken to date with the Smithsonian Forest Global Earth Observatory (ForestGEO), and what they have found will have profound implications toward ecological theories and carbon storage in forests.
1h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

University of California nurses, medical workers join strikeTens of thousands of University of California nurses, pharmacists and radiologists joined a three-day strike Tuesday in support of university service workers who are demanding higher wages.
1h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Volcanic activity pauses at Hawaii crater but more eruptions expectedVolcanic activity from Hawaii's Kilauea volcano paused on Tuesday, authorities said, while warning that more outbreaks should be anticipated.
1h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Migratory animals carry more parasites, says studyEvery year, billions of animals migrate across the globe, carrying parasites with them and encountering parasites through their travels. Now, a team of researchers at the University of Georgia's Odum School of Ecology discovered that animals known to migrate long distances are infected by a greater number of parasite species than animals that do not migrate.
1h
Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

Migratory animals carry more parasitesEvery year, billions of animals migrate across the globe, carrying parasites with them and encountering parasites through their travels. Now, a team of researchers has discovered that animals known to migrate long distances are infected by a greater number of parasite species than animals that do not migrate.
1h
Scientific American Content: Global

How Kilauea's Lava Invades NeighborhoodsFollowing underground routes, molten rock moves from crater pools to people’s yards -- Read more on ScientificAmerican.com
1h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Living in better neighborhood may protect health of kids in povertyWhile poverty has long been linked with poor health, a study from UC San Francisco has found that simply living in a more desirable neighborhood may act as a health booster for low-income children.
2h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Patients and families who experience delirium report more distress than those who do notResearchers from Hebrew SeniorLife's Institute for Aging Research, Beth Israel Deaconess Medical Center, Harvard Medical School, Brown University, and Yale School of Nursing have reported that patients who develop delirium (an acute decline of cognitive functioning) during or after a hospital stay report more distress than those who do not. The same goes for family members of patients who have exp
2h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Overpopulation of free-roaming cats drives hunt for better contraceptiveWhile the true number of free-roaming cats in the United States is unknown, experts believe the population may rival that of pet cats, with estimates ranging from 70 million to 90 million. This staggering number contributes substantially to cat overpopulation and the estimated 1.4 million cats euthanized each year in this country alone.
2h
Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences current issue

In This Issue [This Week in PNAS]Ocean warming and continental temperature and humidity Ocean warming linked to continental temperature and humidity. Changes in temperature and humidity over oceans and land are expected with changes in climate. Current climate models predict larger future increases in surface temperature and declines in relative humidity over land compared with oceans....
2h
Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences current issue

Are most cancer cases a consequence of an immune deficiency caused by thymic involution? [Biological Sciences]In a recent article in PNAS, Palmer et al. (1) challenge the accepted idea that cancer is the result of the multistep accumulation of DNA changes. According to the established paradigm, cancer incidence increases dramatically with age because the cell that gives rise to cancer needs time to acquire the...
2h
Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences current issue

Strengthening the immune system for cancer prevention [Biological Sciences]Palmer et al. (1) make the fascinating suggestion that immune system senescence is a better explanation for cancer incidence than the accumulation of random mutations. Specifically, Palmer et al. show that a model based on immune senescence provides a better fit to age-specific cancer incidence than a model based on...
2h
Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences current issue

Shortcomings of the immunological model of carcinogenesis [Biological Sciences]With great enthusiasm, I read the PNAS article by Palmer et al. entitled “Thymic involution and rising disease incidence with age” (1). The authors address the somatic mutation model, which introduces the gradual accumulation of mutations as the reason for increased rates of cancer in older ages, and proposes the...
2h
Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences current issue

Reply to Jimenez-Alonso et al., Schooling and Zhao, and Mortazavi: Further discussion on the immunological model of carcinogenesis [Biological Sciences]In our PNAS article (1), we explore the relationship between thymic involution and rising disease incidence with age. In letters from Jiménez-Alonso et al. (2), Schooling and Zhao (3), and Mortazavi (4), the authors point out several topics deserving further discussion. The Role of the Thymus in Carcinogenesis Experimental research...
2h
Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences current issue

QnAs with Howard Y. Chang [QnAs]According to the traditional paradigm in molecular biology, genetic information contained in DNA is transcribed into RNA, which goes on to make proteins. A notable exception to this paradigm is long-noncoding RNA (lncRNA), which is not involved in protein synthesis. Although lncRNAs have been known for decades, recent discoveries have...
2h
Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences current issue

Profile of James C. Liao [Profiles]James Liao, President and Distinguished Research Fellow of Academia Sinica, is at the forefront of metabolic engineering, synthetic biology, and systems biology. His work is focused on the redesign of metabolism for microbial synthesis of fuels and carbon assimilation. His achievements include direct conversion of carbon dioxide to biofuels through...
2h
Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences current issue

Transient pausing by RNA polymerase II [Cell Biology]RNA polymerase II (Pol II) elongation control is utilized during transcription of most metazoan genes (1). Polymerases that successfully initiate must first break contacts with initiation factors and then interact with elongation factors including the DRB sensitivity-inducing factor (DSIF) and the negative elongation factor (NELF). This leads to a reduction...
2h
Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences current issue

Myosin goes for blood [Cell Biology]A major achievement of 20th century cell biology was the identification of the membrane cytoskeleton in mammalian red blood cells (RBCs) (1). This cytoskeletal network is comprised of long, flexible (α1β1)2 spectrin tetramers that are linked together by short, actin filament-based, junctional complexes to form a 2D, quasi-hexagonal lattice (2,...
2h
Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences current issue

Visualization of molecular biology: The LANA tether [Microbiology]The latency-associated nuclear antigen (LANA) plays a central role in the biology and pathogenesis of Kaposi’s sarcoma (KS)-associated herpesvirus (KSHV). Both classical and endemic KS in HIV-infected individuals and two lymphoproliferative diseases are associated with KSHV. During the latent phase of the viral life cycle in dividing tumor cells, the...
2h
Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences current issue

Invasive insect hybridizes with local pests [Population Biology]“Be afraid, be very afraid!” Kate Jones warned me over coffee in London. She is an expert on global emergent diseases. Her work showed that new diseases are on the increase and that they usually originate from contact with wild animals as our species occupies and further exploits natural areas...
2h
Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences current issue

On the existence of thermodynamically stable rigid solids [Physics]Customarily, crystalline solids are defined to be rigid since they resist changes of shape determined by their boundaries. However, rigid solids cannot exist in the thermodynamic limit where boundaries become irrelevant. Particles in the solid may rearrange to adjust to shape changes eliminating stress without destroying crystalline order. Rigidity is...
2h
Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences current issue

Status threat, not economic hardship, explains the 2016 presidential vote [Political Sciences]This study evaluates evidence pertaining to popular narratives explaining the American public’s support for Donald J. Trump in the 2016 presidential election. First, using unique representative probability samples of the American public, tracking the same individuals from 2012 to 2016, I examine the “left behind” thesis (that is, the theory...
2h
Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences current issue

Rapid acquisition and model-based analysis of cell-free transcription-translation reactions from nonmodel bacteria [Applied Biological Sciences]Native cell-free transcription–translation systems offer a rapid route to characterize the regulatory elements (promoters, transcription factors) for gene expression from nonmodel microbial hosts, which can be difficult to assess through traditional in vivo approaches. One such host, Bacillus megaterium, is a giant Gram-positive bacterium with potential biotechnology applications, although many...
2h
Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences current issue

Characterization and engineering of a plastic-degrading aromatic polyesterase [Biochemistry]Poly(ethylene terephthalate) (PET) is one of the most abundantly produced synthetic polymers and is accumulating in the environment at a staggering rate as discarded packaging and textiles. The properties that make PET so useful also endow it with an alarming resistance to biodegradation, likely lasting centuries in the environment. Our...
2h
Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences current issue

Elucidation of the trigonelline degradation pathway reveals previously undescribed enzymes and metabolites [Biochemistry]Trigonelline (TG; N-methylnicotinate) is a ubiquitous osmolyte. Although it is known that it can be degraded, the enzymes and metabolites have not been described so far. In this work, we challenged the laboratory model soil-borne, gram-negative bacterium Acinetobacter baylyi ADP1 (ADP1) for its ability to grow on TG and we...
2h
Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences current issue

Live-cell analysis of endogenous GFP-RPB1 uncovers rapid turnover of initiating and promoter-paused RNA Polymerase II [Cell Biology]Initiation and promoter-proximal pausing are key regulatory steps of RNA Polymerase II (Pol II) transcription. To study the in vivo dynamics of endogenous Pol II during these steps, we generated fully functional GFP-RPB1 knockin cells. GFP-RPB1 photobleaching combined with computational modeling revealed four kinetically distinct Pol II fractions and showed...
2h
Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences current issue

Myosin IIA interacts with the spectrin-actin membrane skeleton to control red blood cell membrane curvature and deformability [Cell Biology]The biconcave disk shape and deformability of mammalian RBCs rely on the membrane skeleton, a viscoelastic network of short, membrane-associated actin filaments (F-actin) cross-linked by long, flexible spectrin tetramers. Nonmuscle myosin II (NMII) motors exert force on diverse F-actin networks to control cell shapes, but a function for NMII contractility...
2h
Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences current issue

Interaction between cardiac myosin-binding protein C and formin Fhod3 [Cell Biology]Mutations in cardiac myosin-binding protein C (cMyBP-C) are a major cause of familial hypertrophic cardiomyopathy. Although cMyBP-C has been considered to regulate the cardiac function via cross-bridge arrangement at the C-zone of the myosin-containing A-band, the mechanism by which cMyBP-C functions remains unclear. We identified formin Fhod3, an actin organizer...
2h
Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences current issue

Molecular mechanism to recruit galectin-3 into multivesicular bodies for polarized exosomal secretion [Cell Biology]The beta-galactoside binding lectin galectin-3 (Gal3) is found intracellularly and in the extracellular space. Secretion of this lectin is mediated independently of the secretory pathway by a not yet defined nonclassical mechanism. Here, we found Gal3 in the lumen of exosomes. Superresolution and electron microscopy studies visualized Gal3 recruitment and...
2h
Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences current issue

Spatial and temporal organization of cadherin in punctate adherens junctions [Cell Biology]Adherens junctions (AJs) play a fundamental role in tissue integrity; however, the organization and dynamics of the key AJ transmembrane protein, E-cadherin, both inside and outside of AJs, remain controversial. Here we have studied the distribution and motility of E-cadherin in punctate AJs (pAJs) of A431 cells. Using single-molecule localization...
2h
Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences current issue

Unexpected metabolic disorders induced by endocrine disruptors in Xenopus tropicalis provide new lead for understanding amphibian decline [Environmental Sciences]Despite numerous studies suggesting that amphibians are highly sensitive to endocrine disruptors (EDs), both their role in the decline of populations and the underlying mechanisms remain unclear. This study showed that frogs exposed throughout their life cycle to ED concentrations low enough to be considered safe for drinking water, developed...
2h
Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences current issue

Environmental selection during the last ice age on the mother-to-infant transmission of vitamin D and fatty acids through breast milk [Evolution]Because of the ubiquitous adaptability of our material culture, some human populations have occupied extreme environments that intensified selection on existing genomic variation. By 32,000 years ago, people were living in Arctic Beringia, and during the Last Glacial Maximum (LGM; 28,000–18,000 y ago), they likely persisted in the Beringian refugium....
2h
Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences current issue

Recurrent structural variation, clustered sites of selection, and disease risk for the complement factor H (CFH) gene family [Evolution]Structural variation and single-nucleotide variation of the complement factor H (CFH) gene family underlie several complex genetic diseases, including age-related macular degeneration (AMD) and atypical hemolytic uremic syndrome (AHUS). To understand its diversity and evolution, we performed high-quality sequencing of this ∼360-kbp locus in six primate lineages, including multiple human...
2h
Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences current issue

Interdependent and separable functions of Caenorhabditis elegans MRN-C complex members couple formation and repair of meiotic DSBs [Genetics]Faithful inheritance of genetic information through sexual reproduction relies on the formation of crossovers between homologous chromosomes during meiosis, which, in turn, relies on the formation and repair of numerous double-strand breaks (DSBs). As DSBs pose a potential threat to the genome, mechanisms that ensure timely and error-free DSB repair...
2h
Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences current issue

Induction of antitumor cytotoxic lymphocytes using engineered human primary blood dendritic cells [Immunology and Inflammation]Dendritic cell (DC)-based cancer immunotherapy has achieved modest clinical benefits, but several technical hurdles in DC preparation, activation, and cancer/testis antigen (CTA) delivery limit its broad applications. Here, we report the development of immortalized and constitutively activated human primary blood dendritic cell lines (ihv-DCs). The ihv-DCs are a subset of...
2h
Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences current issue

Fully reduced HMGB1 accelerates the regeneration of multiple tissues by transitioning stem cells to GAlert [Medical Sciences]A major discovery of recent decades has been the existence of stem cells and their potential to repair many, if not most, tissues. With the aging population, many attempts have been made to use exogenous stem cells to promote tissue repair, so far with limited success. An alternative approach, which...
2h
Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences current issue

Systemic surfaceome profiling identifies target antigens for immune-based therapy in subtypes of advanced prostate cancer [Medical Sciences]Prostate cancer is a heterogeneous disease composed of divergent molecular and histologic subtypes, including prostate adenocarcinoma (PrAd) and neuroendocrine prostate cancer (NEPC). While PrAd is the major histology in prostate cancer, NEPC can evolve from PrAd as a mechanism of treatment resistance that involves a transition from an epithelial to...
2h
Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences current issue

Reduction in adaptor amounts establishes degradation hierarchy among protease substrates [Microbiology]ATP-dependent proteases control critical cellular processes, including development, physiology, and virulence. A given protease may recognize a substrate directly via an unfoldase domain or subunit or indirectly via an adaptor that delivers the substrate to the unfoldase. We now report that cells achieve differential stability among substrates of a given...
2h
Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences current issue

Descending pathway facilitates undulatory wave propagation in Caenorhabditis elegans through gap junctions [Neuroscience]Descending signals from the brain play critical roles in controlling and modulating locomotion kinematics. In the Caenorhabditis elegans nervous system, descending AVB premotor interneurons exclusively form gap junctions with the B-type motor neurons that execute forward locomotion. We combined genetic analysis, optogenetic manipulation, calcium imaging, and computational modeling to elucidate...
2h
Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences current issue

ZINC-FINGER interactions mediate transcriptional regulation of hypocotyl growth in Arabidopsis [Plant Biology]Integration of environmental signals and interactions among photoreceptors and transcriptional regulators is key in shaping plant development. TANDEM ZINC-FINGER PLUS3 (TZP) is an integrator of light and photoperiodic signaling that promotes flowering in Arabidopsis thaliana. Here we elucidate the molecular role of TZP as a positive regulator of hypocotyl elongation....
2h
Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences current issue

An atypical N-ethylmaleimide sensitive factor enables the viability of nematode-resistant Rhg1 soybeans [Plant Biology]N-ethylmaleimide sensitive factor (NSF) and α-soluble NSF attachment protein (α-SNAP) are essential eukaryotic housekeeping proteins that cooperatively function to sustain vesicular trafficking. The “resistance to Heterodera glycines 1” (Rhg1) locus of soybean (Glycine max) confers resistance to soybean cyst nematode, a highly damaging soybean pest. Rhg1 loci encode repeat copies...
2h
Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences current issue

Abscisic acid-induced degradation of Arabidopsis guanine nucleotide exchange factor requires calcium-dependent protein kinases [Plant Biology]Abscisic acid (ABA) plays essential roles in plant development and responses to environmental stress. ABA induces subcellular translocation and degradation of the guanine nucleotide exchange factor RopGEF1, thus facilitating ABA core signal transduction. However, the underlying mechanisms for ABA-triggered RopGEF1 trafficking/degradation remain unknown. Studies have revealed that RopGEFs associate
2h
Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences current issue

Cognitive underpinnings of nationalistic ideology in the context of Brexit [Psychological and Cognitive Sciences]Nationalistic identities often play an influential role in citizens’ voting behavior and political engagement. Nationalistic ideologies tend to have firm categories and rules for what belongs to and represents the national culture. In a sample of 332 UK citizens, we tested whether strict categorization of stimuli and rules in objective...
2h
Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences current issue

Sporadic sampling, not climatic forcing, drives observed early hominin diversity [Anthropology]The role of climate change in the origin and diversification of early hominins is hotly debated. Most accounts of early hominin evolution link observed fluctuations in species diversity to directional shifts in climate or periods of intense climatic instability. None of these hypotheses, however, have tested whether observed diversity patterns...
2h
Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences current issue

Skin microbiota and allergic symptoms associate with exposure to environmental microbes [Applied Biological Sciences]A rural environment and farming lifestyle are known to provide protection against allergic diseases. This protective effect is expected to be mediated via exposure to environmental microbes that are needed to support a normal immune tolerance. However, the triangle of interactions between environmental microbes, host microbiota, and immune system remains...
2h
Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences current issue

Nonviral gene editing via CRISPR/Cas9 delivery by membrane-disruptive and endosomolytic helical polypeptide [Applied Biological Sciences]Effective and safe delivery of the CRISPR/Cas9 gene-editing elements remains a challenge. Here we report the development of PEGylated nanoparticles (named P-HNPs) based on the cationic α-helical polypeptide poly(γ-4-((2-(piperidin-1-yl)ethyl)aminomethyl)benzyl-l-glutamate) for the delivery of Cas9 expression plasmid and sgRNA to various cell types and gene-editing scenarios. The cell-penetrating α
2h
Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences current issue

Complex role of NK cells in regulation of oncolytic virus-bortezomib therapy [Applied Mathematics]In the present work, we investigated the role of natural killer (NK) cells in combination therapy with oncolytic virus (OV) and bortezomib, a proteasome inhibitor. NK cells display rapid and potent immunity to metastatic and hematological cancers, and they overcome immunosuppressive effects of tumor microenvironment. We developed a mathematical model...
2h
Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences current issue

Glassy dynamics of landscape evolution [Applied Physical Sciences]Soil creeps imperceptibly downhill, but also fails catastrophically to create landslides. Despite the importance of these processes as hazards and in sculpting landscapes, there is no agreed-upon model that captures the full range of behavior. Here we examine the granular origins of hillslope soil transport by discrete element method simulations...
2h
Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences current issue

Suppressing viscous fingering in structured porous media [Applied Physical Sciences]Finger-like protrusions that form along fluid−fluid displacement fronts in porous media are often excited by hydrodynamic instability when low-viscosity fluids displace high-viscosity resident fluids. Such interfacial instabilities are undesirable in many natural and engineered displacement processes. We report a phenomenon whereby gradual and monotonic variation of pore sizes along the...
2h
Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences current issue

Reactivity of O2 versus H2O2 with polysaccharide monooxygenases [Biochemistry]Enzymatic conversion of polysaccharides into lower-molecular-weight, soluble oligosaccharides is dependent on the action of hydrolytic and oxidative enzymes. Polysaccharide monooxygenases (PMOs) use an oxidative mechanism to break the glycosidic bond of polymeric carbohydrates, thereby disrupting the crystalline packing and creating new chain ends for hydrolases to depolymerize and degrade recalci
2h
Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences current issue

SAMHD1 enhances immunoglobulin hypermutation by promoting transversion mutation [Biochemistry]Activation-induced deaminase (AID) initiates hypermutation of Ig genes in activated B cells by converting C:G into U:G base pairs. G1-phase variants of uracil base excision repair (BER) and mismatch repair (MMR) then deploy translesion polymerases including REV1 and Pol η, which exacerbates mutation. dNTP paucity may contribute to hypermutation, because...
2h
Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences current issue

Enzymatic control of dioxygen binding and functionalization of the flavin cofactor [Biophysics and Computational Biology]The reactions of enzymes and cofactors with gaseous molecules such as dioxygen (O2) are challenging to study and remain among the most contentious subjects in biochemistry. To date, it is largely enigmatic how enzymes control and fine-tune their reactions with O2, as exemplified by the ubiquitous flavin-dependent enzymes that commonly...
2h
Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences current issue

Efficient models of polymerization applied to FtsZ ring assembly in Escherichia coli [Biophysics and Computational Biology]High protein concentrations complicate modeling of polymer assembly kinetics by introducing structural complexity and a large variety of protein forms. We present a modeling approach that achieves orders of magnitude speed-up by replacing distributions of lengths and widths with their average counterparts and by introducing a hierarchical classification of species...
2h
Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences current issue

Druggable negative allosteric site of P2X3 receptors [Biophysics and Computational Biology]Allosteric modulation provides exciting opportunities for drug discovery of enzymes, ion channels, and G protein-coupled receptors. As cation channels gated by extracellular ATP, P2X receptors have attracted wide attention as new drug targets. Although small molecules targeting P2X receptors have entered into clinical trials for rheumatoid arthritis, cough, and pain,...
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Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences current issue

Phase behaviors of deeply supercooled bilayer water unseen in bulk water [Chemistry]Akin to bulk water, water confined to an isolated nanoslit can show a wealth of new 2D phases of ice and amorphous ice, as well as unusual phase behavior. Indeed, 2D water phases, such as bilayer hexagonal ice and monolayer square ice, have been detected in the laboratory, confirming earlier...
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Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences current issue

Two-dimensional infrared spectroscopy of vibrational polaritons [Chemistry]We report experimental 2D infrared (2D IR) spectra of coherent light–matter excitations––molecular vibrational polaritons. The application of advanced 2D IR spectroscopy to vibrational polaritons challenges and advances our understanding in both fields. First, the 2D IR spectra of polaritons differ drastically from free uncoupled excitations and a new interpretation is...
2h
Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences current issue

Trends in continental temperature and humidity directly linked to ocean warming [Earth, Atmospheric, and Planetary Sciences]In recent decades, the land surface has warmed substantially more than the ocean surface, and relative humidity has fallen over land. Amplified warming and declining relative humidity over land are also dominant features of future climate projections, with implications for climate-change impacts. An emerging body of research has shown how...
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Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences current issue

Global peatland initiation driven by regionally asynchronous warming [Ecology]Widespread establishment of peatlands since the Last Glacial Maximum represents the activation of a globally important carbon sink, but the drivers of peat initiation are unclear. The role of climate in peat initiation is particularly poorly understood. We used a general circulation model to simulate local changes in climate during...
2h
Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences current issue

Inferring genetic connectivity in real populations, exemplified by coastal and oceanic Atlantic cod [Ecology]Genetic data are commonly used to estimate connectivity between putative populations, but translating them to demographic dispersal rates is complicated. Theoretical equations that infer a migration rate based on the genetic estimator FST, such as Wright’s equation, FST ≈ 1/(4Nem + 1), make assumptions that do not apply to most...
2h
Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences current issue

Social contagion of ethnic hostility [Economic Sciences]Interethnic conflicts often escalate rapidly. Why does the behavior of masses easily change from cooperation to aggression? This paper provides an experimental test of whether ethnic hostility is contagious. Using incentivized tasks, we measured willingness to sacrifice one’s own resources to harm others among adolescents from a region with a...
2h
Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences current issue

Dome-headed, small-brained island mammal from the Late Cretaceous of Romania [Evolution]The island effect is a well-known evolutionary phenomenon, in which island-dwelling species isolated in a resource-limited environment often modify their size, anatomy, and behaviors compared with mainland relatives. This has been well documented in modern and Cenozoic mammals, but it remains unclear whether older, more primitive Mesozoic mammals responded in...
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Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences current issue

Polycomb protein SCML2 facilitates H3K27me3 to establish bivalent domains in the male germline [Genetics]Repressive H3K27me3 and active H3K4me2/3 together form bivalent chromatin domains, molecular hallmarks of developmental potential. In the male germline, these domains are thought to persist into sperm to establish totipotency in the next generation. However, it remains unknown how H3K27me3 is established on specific targets in the male germline. Here,...
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Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences current issue

Iron promotes oxidative cell death caused by bisretinoids of retina [Medical Sciences]Intracellular Fe plays a key role in redox active energy and electron transfer. We sought to understand how Fe levels impact the retina, given that retinal pigment epithelial (RPE) cells are also challenged by accumulations of vitamin A aldehyde adducts (bisretinoid lipofuscin) that photogenerate reactive oxygen species and photodecompose into...
2h
Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences current issue

Prevention of hepatocellular carcinoma by targeting MYCN-positive liver cancer stem cells with acyclic retinoid [Medical Sciences]Hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) is a highly lethal cancer that has a high rate of recurrence, in part because of cancer stem cell (CSC)-dependent field cancerization. Acyclic retinoid (ACR) is a synthetic vitamin A-like compound capable of preventing the recurrence of HCC. Here, we performed a genome-wide transcriptome screen and showed...
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Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences current issue

COBLL1 modulates cell morphology and facilitates androgen receptor genomic binding in advanced prostate cancer [Medical Sciences]Androgen receptor (AR) signaling is essential for prostate cancer progression and acquiring resistance to hormone therapy. However, the molecular pathogenesis through AR activation has not been fully understood. We performed integrative transcriptomic analysis to compare the AR program in a castration-resistant prostate cancer (CRPC) model with that in their parental...
2h
Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences current issue

Coupling MALDI-TOF mass spectrometry protein and specialized metabolite analyses to rapidly discriminate bacterial function [Microbiology]For decades, researchers have lacked the ability to rapidly correlate microbial identity with bacterial metabolism. Since specialized metabolites are critical to bacterial function and survival in the environment, we designed a data acquisition and bioinformatics technique (IDBac) that utilizes in situ matrix-assisted laser desorption/ionization time-of-flight mass spectrometry (MALDI-TOF MS) to..
2h
Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences current issue

One prophage WO gene rescues cytoplasmic incompatibility in Drosophila melanogaster [Microbiology]Wolbachia are maternally inherited, intracellular bacteria at the forefront of vector control efforts to curb arbovirus transmission. In international field trials, the cytoplasmic incompatibility (CI) drive system of wMel Wolbachia is deployed to replace target vector populations, whereby a Wolbachia-induced modification of the sperm genome kills embryos. However, Wolbachia in...
2h
Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences current issue

Superresolution microscopy reveals structural mechanisms driving the nanoarchitecture of a viral chromatin tether [Microbiology]By tethering their circular genomes (episomes) to host chromatin, DNA tumor viruses ensure retention and segregation of their genetic material during cell divisions. Despite functional genetic and crystallographic studies, there is little information addressing the 3D structure of these tethers in cells, issues critical for understanding persistent infection by these...
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Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences current issue

Suppression of costimulation by human cytomegalovirus promotes evasion of cellular immune defenses [Microbiology]CD58 is an adhesion molecule that is known to play a critical role in costimulation of effector cells and is intrinsic to immune synapse structure. Herein, we describe a virally encoded gene that inhibits CD58 surface expression. Human cytomegalovirus (HCMV) UL148 was necessary and sufficient to promote intracellular retention of...
2h
Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences current issue

Control of motor coordination by astrocytic tonic GABA release through modulation of excitation/inhibition balance in cerebellum [Neuroscience]Tonic inhibition in the brain is mediated through an activation of extrasynaptic GABAA receptors by the tonically released GABA, resulting in a persistent GABAergic inhibitory action. It is one of the key regulators for neuronal excitability, exerting a powerful action on excitation/inhibition balance. We have previously reported that astrocytic GABA,...
2h
Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences current issue

Spatiotemporal encoding of search strategies by prefrontal neurons [Neuroscience]Working memory is capacity-limited. In everyday life we rarely notice this limitation, in part because we develop behavioral strategies that help mitigate the capacity limitation. How behavioral strategies are mediated at the neural level is unclear, but a likely locus is lateral prefrontal cortex (LPFC). Neurons in LPFC play a...
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Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences current issue

Lifetime of muscarinic receptor-G-protein complexes determines coupling efficiency and G-protein subtype selectivity [Pharmacology]G-protein–coupled receptors (GPCRs) are essential for the detection of extracellular stimuli by cells and transfer the encoded information via the activation of functionally distinct subsets of heterotrimeric G proteins into intracellular signals. Despite enormous achievements toward understanding GPCR structures, major aspects of the GPCR–G-protein selectivity mechanism remain unresolved. As this
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Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences current issue

Synaptic adhesion protein ELFN1 is a selective allosteric modulator of group III metabotropic glutamate receptors in trans [Pharmacology]Functional characterization of the GPCR interactome has been focused predominantly on intracellular interactions, yet GPCRs are increasingly found in complex with extracellular proteins. Extracellular leucine-rich repeat fibronectin type III domain containing 1 (ELFN1) was recently reported to physically anchor mGluR6 and mGluR7 across retinal and hippocampal synapses, respectively; however, the..
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Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences current issue

Cryptographic hashing using chaotic hydrodynamics [Physics]Fluids may store and manipulate information, enabling complex applications ranging from digital logic gates to algorithmic self-assembly. While controllable hydrodynamic chaos has previously been observed in viscous fluids and harnessed for efficient mixing, its application to the manipulation of digital information has been sparsely investigated. We show that chaotic stirring...
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Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences current issue

Combining population genomics and fitness QTLs to identify the genetics of local adaptation in Arabidopsis thaliana [Population Biology]Evidence for adaptation to different climates in the model species Arabidopsis thaliana is seen in reciprocal transplant experiments, but the genetic basis of this adaptation remains poorly understood. Field-based quantitative trait locus (QTL) studies provide direct but low-resolution evidence for the genetic basis of local adaptation. Using high-resolution population genomic...
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Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences current issue

Hybridization and gene flow in the mega-pest lineage of moth, Helicoverpa [Population Biology]Within the mega-pest lineage of heliothine moths are a number of polyphagous, highly mobile species for which the exchange of adaptive traits through hybridization would affect their properties as pests. The recent invasion of South America by one of the most significant agricultural pests, Helicoverpa armigera, raises concerns for the...
2h
Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences current issue

Worldwide distribution of the DCDC2 READ1 regulatory element and its relationship with phoneme variation across languages [Psychological and Cognitive Sciences]DCDC2 is a gene strongly associated with components of the phonological processing system in animal models and in multiple independent studies of populations and languages. We propose that it may also influence population-level variation in language component usage. To test this hypothesis, we investigated the evolution and worldwide distribution of...
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Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences current issue

The Matthew effect in science funding [Social Sciences]A classic thesis is that scientific achievement exhibits a “Matthew effect”: Scientists who have previously been successful are more likely to succeed again, producing increasing distinction. We investigate to what extent the Matthew effect drives the allocation of research funds. To this end, we assembled a dataset containing all review...
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Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences current issue

Near-term deployment of carbon capture and sequestration from biorefineries in the United States [Sustainability Science]Capture and permanent geologic sequestration of biogenic CO2 emissions may provide critical flexibility in ambitious climate change mitigation. However, most bioenergy with carbon capture and sequestration (BECCS) technologies are technically immature or commercially unavailable. Here, we evaluate low-cost, commercially ready CO2 capture opportunities for existing ethanol biorefineries in the Unit
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Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences current issue

News Feature: Accidental urban oases [Sustainability Science]As some cities struggle with population declines, vacant lots are proliferating. Can these derelict spaces contribute to conservation? The bumblebees of southeast Michigan are wary of downtown living. Certainly, they buzz around city gardens and nature reserves—but numerous buildings and concrete structures nearby these green spaces typically mean fewer bumblebees...
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Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences current issue

Correction for Sheehan et al., Coevolution of landesque capital intensive agriculture and sociopolitical hierarchy [Correction]ANTHROPOLOGY Correction for “Coevolution of landesque capital intensive agriculture and sociopolitical hierarchy,” by Oliver Sheehan, Joseph Watts, Russell D. Gray, and Quentin D. Atkinson, which was first published March 19, 2018; 10.1073/pnas.1714558115 (Proc Natl Acad Sci USA 115:3628–3633). The authors note that Fig. 1 appeared incorrectly. The corrected figure and...
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Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences current issue

Correction for Gao et al., Chronic stress promotes colitis by disturbing the gut microbiota and triggering immune system response [Correction]IMMUNOLOGY AND INFLAMMATION Correction for “Chronic stress promotes colitis by disturbing the gut microbiota and triggering immune system response,” by Xinghua Gao, Qiuhua Cao, Yan Cheng, Dandan Zhao, Zhuo Wang, Hongbao Yang, Qijin Wu, Linjun You, Yue Wang, Yanting Lin, Xianjing Li, Yun Wang, Jin-Song Bian, Dongdong Sun, Lingyi Kong,...
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Equal subsidies 'surprisingly powerful,' in promoting use of gold-standard medications, new study showsGonzalo Romero shocked himself when his doctoral research in 2013 showed that under some conditions giving pharmaceutical companies identical subsidies was the best way to get the most current disease-fighting treatments into the hands of consumers who needed them.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

'Orbital-selective pairing' theory applied to first 'heavy fermion' superconductorA 2017 theory proposed by Rice University physicists to explain the contradictory behavior of an iron-based high-temperature superconductor is helping solve a puzzle in a different type of unconventional superconductor, the "heavy fermion" compound known as CeCu2Si2.
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Big Think

Cognitive scientists define critical period for learning languageA new study performed at MIT suggests that children remain very skilled at learning the grammar of a new language much longer than expected. Read More
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

At the forefront of developing new insights into peacebuildingThe contribution of economic, social and cultural rights to sustaining global peace is largely overlooked within new developments to tackle violent conflict, says new research led by Lancaster University.
2h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Why does the Sun's corona sizzle at one million degrees F? Team of physicists is unearthing cluesThe Sun's corona, invisible to the human eye except when it appears briefly as a fiery halo of plasma during a solar eclipse, remains a puzzle even to scientists who study it closely. Located 1,300 miles from the star's surface, it is more than a hundred times hotter than lower layers much closer to the fusion reactor at the Sun's core.
2h
Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

Transitional methods for determining causes of deathImproved tools are now underway for determining the causes of death in settings where medical examinations or post-mortem autopsies are not routinely conducted. The population-based approach, namely Verbal Autopsy using standardized interviews, including signs, symptoms and circumstances leading to death, conducted with the bereaved family, are becoming the best alternative in the more affluent pa
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Peruvian Amazon undergoing deforestation at accelerating pace: officialThe Peruvian Amazon lost nearly two million hectares (five million acres) of forest between 2001 and 2016, or more than 123,000 hectares (300,000 acres) a year, figures made public Tuesday by the ministry of the environment.
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Viden

Gik Anders Fogh Rasmussen med i Irakkrigen for at blive NATO's generalsekretær?Hvis du er venstreorienteret, så vil du være tilbøjelig til at svare ja. Ny rundspørge viser, at vi tror mere på vores egne holdninger end fakta.
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The Atlantic

Why the Dancing Makes 'This Is America' So Uncomfortable to Watch“This Is America” isn’t the first time that Donald Glover, as his musical alter ego Childish Gambino, has harnessed dance in service of surrealism . But the art form has a conspicuous symbolic significance in the artist’s latest single, which Glover debuted on Saturday Night Live : The song’s emphasis on dance was apparent in his live performance on the show, in the cover art for the track , and
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News

MRI 'glove' provides new look at hand anatomyA new kind of MRI component in the shape of a glove delivers the first clear images of bones, tendons and ligaments moving together.
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Migratory animals carry more parasites, says studyEvery year, billions of animals migrate across the globe, carrying parasites with them and encountering parasites through their travels. Now, a team of researchers at the University of Georgia's Odum School of Ecology discovered that animals known to migrate long distances are infected by a greater number of parasite species than animals that do not migrate.
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News

For women with history of pregnancy loss, walking may aid chance of becoming pregnantThe study was conducted by recent graduate Lindsey Russo and her advisor Brian Whitcomb, associate professor of biostatistics and epidemiology in the School of Public Health and Health Sciences at the University of Massachusetts Amherst. Their findings among healthy women ages 18 to 40 years old with a history of one or two pregnancy losses are based on their secondary analysis of the multi-site E
2h
New on MIT Technology Review

More than 10 million people now have jobs in renewable energy
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The Atlantic

Read Trump's Speech Withdrawing From the Iran DealIran US Donald TrumpOn Tuesday, President Donald Trump announced that the U.S. will withdraw from the Iran nuclear deal and reinstate sanctions on the country. The agreement—which was reached by the United States, the United Kingdom, France, Russia, China, and Germany, along with the European Union, in July 2015—lifted sanctions on Iran in return for the country halting its nuclear program. Trump has long been vocal
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The Atlantic

Trump Rips Up a 'Decaying and Rotten Deal' With IranUpdated at 4:18 p.m. ET President Trump announced Tuesday that he would reimpose nuclear-related sanctions on Iran, setting the stage for a long-expected dismantling of the Obama-era nuclear deal with the Islamic Republic. “I am announcing today that the United States will withdraw from the Iran nuclear deal,” he said. “In a few moments, I will sign a presidential memorandum to begin reinstating
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The Atlantic

A Look Back at Kilauea's Spectacular 1969 to 1974 Mauna Ulu EruptionHawaii Kilauea volcanoThe volcanic activity in Hawaii today is part of the ongoing Pu’u O’o eruption—the longest-duration eruption ever recorded on Kilauea. The Pu’u O’o eruption has been active, with varying levels of intensity, since January of 1983. Looking back a few decades, Kilauea’s previous record-holder was the spectacular Mauna Ulu eruption, which lasted from May of 1969 until July of 1974, generating amazin
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

Symptoms of osteoarthritis may be lessened with simple changes to the dietOne gram of fish oil a day could help reduce the pain of patients with osteoarthritis, a new study finds. Researchers also found that a reduction of weight for overweight and obese patients and the introduction of exercise tailored to mobility could also help ease the symptoms of osteoarthritis.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

Amplification of key cellular organizer may initiate cancerCells begin to accumulate centrosomes -- organelles that play a vital role during cell division -- before they transform into cancer cells, according to a new study of patients with Barrett's esophagus condition, which is associated with esophageal cancer. The research, which will be published May 8 in the Journal of Cell Biology, suggests that similar cases of centrosome amplification may contrib
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

Scientists dive into museum collections to reveal the invasion route of a small crustaceanWhile studies on biological invasions tend to focus on new records, two researchers went on to clarify a biological invasion at the Atlantic European coast. It turned out that a non-native crustacean has established its population 24 years prior to the available records.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

Unexpected behavior of atom clouds challenges existing theoriesClouds of ultra-cold atoms are a perfect model system to study fundamental questions of many-particle quantum physics. Now researchers have found remarkable results which cannot be explained by any of the existing theories. When two ultra-cold quantum gases are coupled, they can synchronize spontaneously, oscillating in perfect unison after just a few milliseconds. This means that textbook theorie
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

Age, marital status, BMI and sleep associated with risk for dementiaCould your age, marital status, BMI (body mass index) and amount of sleep impact your risk for dementia? Researchers analyzed data from the Framingham Heart Study (FHS) to identify new combinations of risk factors that are linked to increased risk of dementia in later life.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

Issues of dementia and gun ownership need more discussion, researchers sayAs the number of adults with Alzheimer's disease and dementia steadily increases, questions around their access to firearms remain largely unaddressed, according to a new study.
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'Red Alert' Is a Last-Ditch Effort to Save Net NeutralityOn Wednesday, sites including Etsy and Reddit will urge users to support a vote to preserve net neutrality rules.
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Lens, Google's Visual Search Tool, Gets Its Most Significant Update YetGoogle Lens LG SonyGoogle Lens now works in more than 10 native Android cameras, bringing it one step closer to dominating visual search.
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News

New research: Some gut bacteria may protect against intestinal infectionScientists have for the first time found evidence that a microbe in the human gut is associated with protection from typhoid fever infection. If the research is borne out, it could offer an exciting new way to reduce intestinal infections.
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Machine learning flags emerging pathogensA new machine learning tool that can detect whether emerging strains of the bacterium, Salmonella are more likely to cause dangerous bloodstream infections rather than food poisoning has been developed. The tool, created by a scientist at the Wellcome Sanger Institute and her collaborators greatly speeds up the process for identifying the genetic changes underlying new invasive types of Salmonella
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News

New study provides insight into blood signatures of inflammationA new study from Boston University Schools of Medicine (BUSM) and Public Health (BUSPH) identifies a pattern of inflammation associated with cardio-metabolic risks among participants in the Black Women's Health Study, as well as two independent groups of vulnerable women. These findings could help underserved patients benefit from precision medicine and personalized profiles of disease risk.
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Fringe benefits: Side effects of an immunosuppressant lead to treatment for hair lossHair loss can cause major psychological distress in patients, but a new drug could ease the distress of men and women who suffer from baldness, according to researchers from the University of Manchester's Centre for Dermatology Research.
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Fringe benefits: Drug side effects could treat human hair lossA new drug could ease the distress of men and women who suffer from baldness, according to researchers from the University of Manchester's Centre for Dermatology Research.The study from the laboratory of Professor Ralf Paus, is published today in the open-access journal PLOS Biology.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

Theory for one type of superconductor solves puzzle in anotherA 2017 theory proposed by physicists to explain the contradictory behavior of an iron-based high-temperature superconductor is helping solve a puzzle in a different type of unconventional superconductor, a "heavy fermion" compound.
3h
Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

Scientists can measure population change through chemicals found in fecesFecal stanols -- organic molecules -- located in sediment can give archaeologists new information about population numbers and changes.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

How a T cell passes HIV sexually to a new hostWhile it's well known that HIV is transmitted sexually, how the virus crosses genital mucus membranes to reach its targets in the immune system is less understood. Previous research has looked at biochemical measurements or morphology at various points during HIV transmission, but now researchers have constructed an in vitro model of urethral mucosa in order to view the process from start to finis
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

The secret of a long lifeWhy termite queens live exceptionally long and, at the same time, are extraordinary fertile.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

Troubling stats for kids with intellectual disabilitiesBy federal law passed in 1975, children with intellectual disabilities are supposed to spend as much time as possible in general education classrooms. But a new study suggests that progress toward that goal has stalled.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

Prolonged exposure to air pollution leads to genetic changes in rat brains, study findsProlonged exposure to particulate matter in air pollution in the Los Angeles Basin triggered inflammation and the appearance of cancer-related genes in the brains of rats, a new study has found.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

Tracing the footprints of a tumor: Genomic 'scars' allow cancer profilingMutations driving cancer development leave behind specific 'scars,' so-called mutational signatures, in the genome. In principle, they allow for profiling of the cancer type and its development -- but the noisy environment of a cancer genome makes correlations difficult. Using CRISPR-Cas9 technology, researchers were able to show for the first time that specific genetic alterations indeed lead to
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

Our vulnerable nervous system: What affects its protective sheaths?Multiple sclerosis is a serious neurological condition that has no known cure. Although the causes are far from being known, we do know that the immune system erroneously attacks the protective sheaths around nerve fibers. Scientists have discovered how the formation of myelin sheaths is regulated by protein molecules. This knowledge could be used to help MS patients by stimulating the formation o
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

New movement monitoring system helping prevent falls in the elderlyRTLS sensor network and fractal mathematics are used to pinpoint Assisted Living Facility residents experiencing increased cognitive decline, helping prevent an impending fall.
3h
New on MIT Technology Review

How uncertainty could help a machine hold a more eloquent conversationAI startup Gamalon developed a clever new way for chatbots and virtual assistants to converse with us.
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Live Science

Kilauea Volcano: Facts About the 30-Year EruptionOn the Big Island of Hawaii, one of the world's most active volcanoes has been spewing lava since 1983.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

Tech bends light more efficiently, offers wider angles for light inputEngineering and physics researchers have developed a new technology for steering light that allows for more light input and greater efficiency -- a development that holds promise for creating more immersive augmented-reality display systems.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

Switching off insatiable hungerResearchers have successfully treated patients whose obesity is caused by a genetic defect. Aside from its beneficial effects on the patients, the researchers also provided insights into the fundamental signaling pathways regulating satiety of the new drug.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

Despite mutations in makona Ebola virus, disease consistent in mice, monkeysEarly during the West African Ebola epidemic, scientists speculated that the genetic diversity of the Makona strain of virus (EBOV-Makona) would result in more severe disease and more transmissibility than prior strains. However scientists have determined that certain mutations stabilized early during the epidemic and did not alter Ebola disease presentation or outcome. Their work offers evidence
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

'League of Legends' to gain insights into mental modelsPsychology researchers have used the game League of Legends to advance our understanding of how people build 'mental models' -- the mental tools that allow people to make use of complex systems. The researchers found that mental models are developed in three distinct stages -- findings that have the potential to inform everything from workplace training to video-game development.
3h
Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

Why does the Sun's Corona sizzle at one million °F?The Sun's corona, invisible to the human eye except when it appears briefly as a fiery halo of plasma during a solar eclipse, remains a puzzle even to scientists who study it closely. Located 1,300 miles from the star's surface, it is more than a hundred times hotter than lower layers much closer to the fusion reactor at the Sun's core.
3h
Feed: All Latest

The Sprint and T-Mobile Merger Will Test the Department of Justice's MettleThe Trump administration is forcing the traditionally independent agency to choose: Follow the law, or follow the president.
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Big Think

APA survey shows Americans are more anxious than last yearThe survey asked respondents to rate their anxiety levels in five areas: safety, health, finances, relationships and politics. Read More
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Popular Science

All the cool new stuff from Google's 2018 I/O developers conferenceAndroid P Google I/OTechnology Android P and all the other good stuff from Google's annual coder gathering. Let's see what's new in the world of Android and Google at the I/O developers conference.
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New Scientist - News

The birds of South Georgia are finally safe from marauding ratsInvasive rats have cut a swathe through the birds living on the island of South Georgia, but a decade-long project has now eradicated every last rat
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Theory for one type of superconductor solves puzzle in anotherA 2017 theory proposed by Rice University physicists to explain the contradictory behavior of an iron-based high-temperature superconductor is helping solve a puzzle in a different type of unconventional superconductor, the "heavy fermion" compound known as CeCu2Si2.
4h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Why does the corona sizzle at 1 million degrees F? NJIT's Gregory Fleishman is unearthing cluesA team of physicists, led by NJIT's Gregory Fleishman, has recently discovered a phenomenon that may begin to untangle what they call 'one of the greatest challenges for solar modeling' -- determining the physical mechanisms that heat the upper atmosphere to 1 million degrees Fahrenheit and higher.
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Invasive procedures should be reserved for a sub-group of acid reflux patients, study saysAs the number of Americans with acid reflux grows, a study by researchers at the University of Colorado Anschutz Medical Campus says invasive procedures to treat those who don't respond to medication should be done for select patients.
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Equal subsidies 'surprisingly powerful,' in promoting use of gold-standard medicationsInternational aid groups promoting gold-standard anti-malarial treatments subsidize each pharmaceutical companies equally. The goal is to reduce the price consumers ultimately pay, encouraging more of them to choose the most effective drugs. While in general equal subsidies are still somewhat inefficient, that compromise is not as bad as it might seem, according a new study. Even under the worst t
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Live Science

Newfound Shrew Lives on a Single Remote Mountain (How the Heck Did It Get There?)A new species of shrew has been discovered living high on a single peak in the Philippines, and no one knows how it got there.
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Big Think

If the future is full of VR addicts, should we bring them back to reality?VR technology shows no signs of slowing down. We need to start asking the question of how we deal with those of us who become addicted to the wonders VR offers. Read More
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Scientists investigate new strategy to treat spinal muscular atrophy in infantsScientists investigate new strategy to treat spinal muscular atrophy in infants.
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The role of cannabis in the opioid crisis is focus of new expert roundtable discussionA multidisciplinary panel of experts discussed how medicinal cannabis can impact the opioid crisis, though clinical research to quantify this is difficult given strict federal laws.
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Overpopulation of free-roaming cats drives hunt for better contraceptiveMorris Animal Foundation-funded researchers at the Alliance for Contraception in Cats and Dogs embarked on a project to determine if GonaCon™, a nonsurgical contraceptive used in some wildlife species, might provide a solution for overpopulation of free-roaming cats. The results, unfortunately, were not as promising for fertility control of the cats as previously indicated.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

More Americans expect to work until 70; there are benefitsWhen it comes to retirement, later may be better.
5h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News

At the forefront of developing new insights into peacebuildingThe contribution of economic, social and cultural rights to sustaining global peace is largely overlooked within new developments to tackle violent conflict, says new research led by Lancaster University.
5h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Scientists can measure population change through chemicals found in fecesFecal stanols—organic molecules—located in sediment can give archaeologists new information about population numbers and changes, according to new research by faculty at Binghamton University, State University at New York.
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Latest Headlines | Science News

Is it an invasion of your kids’ privacy to post pictures of them on social media?Growing up in an online world doesn’t mean that kids don’t care about privacy. Parents should keep this in mind when posting pictures of their kids to social media.
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Live Science

Video Shows How HIV Infects Cells During Sex, and It's CreepyA new video shows the virus passing from an infected cell into a new host, as it would during sexual transmission.
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Researchers use 'League of Legends' to gain insights into mental modelsPsychology researchers have used the game League of Legends to advance our understanding of how people build 'mental models' -- the mental tools that allow people to make use of complex systems. The researchers found that mental models are developed in three distinct stages -- findings that have the potential to inform everything from workplace training to video-game development.
5h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Researchers discover cellular messengers communicate with bacteria in the mouthStudy authors Dr. David Wong, professor of oral biology and associate dean for research at the UCLA School of Dentistry, and Dr. Wenyuan Shi, chief executive officer and chief science officer at the Forsyth Institute, an oral health research institute in Cambridge, Massachusetts, asked the question of whether our RNA -- the cellular messengers -- can communicate with harmful bacteria in the mouth.
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Drinking more water does not slow decline of kidney function for kidney disease patientsA new study, published in JAMA by researchers at Lawson Health Research Institute and Western University, found that coaching patients with chronic kidney disease (CKD) to drink more water does not slow down the decline of their kidney function.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

Bird migration strategies revealedUsing weather surveillance radar and citizen-science data, researchers are learning how migratory birds return to their breeding grounds in North America each spring with near-pinpoint accuracy.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

Voltage loss in cable bacteriaAn international research group has shed new light on cable bacteria. Using laser light, researchers have followed electrons as they travel through the current-conducting bacteria, and on the basis of the electrical potential in the bacteria, they have calculated that the bacteria because of voltage loss cannot function efficiently at depths exceeding 3 cm into the sediment.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

Emojis used to develop a modern face scale for product testingA new study finds that emojis are a viable alternative to words when it comes to accurately measuring how kids feel about food, products and other experiences. With that discovery, researchers developed an emoji scale that may help companies better test products in non-Western cultures.
5h
Quanta Magazine

What Astronomers Are Learning From Gaia’s New Milky Way MapOn April 25, Teresa Antoja of the University of Barcelona was one of thousands of astronomers who downloaded and began exploring an exquisite new map of the Milky Way made by the European Space Agency’s Gaia spacecraft. Within a day, she and her colleagues reported the discovery of never-before-seen substructures throughout the galaxy: “shapes such as arches … snail shells and ridges,” they wrote
5h
Scientific American Content: Global

Global Tourism Has a Bigger Share of Carbon Emissions Than ThoughtU.S. has biggest footprint, both from foreign visitors and Americans traveling abroad -- Read more on ScientificAmerican.com
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Live Science

What Will the Sun Look Like After It Dies?When our sun finally goes out, what will it look like?
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Scientists can measure population change through chemicals found in fecesFecal stanols -- organic molecules -- located in sediment can give archaeologists new information about population numbers and changes, according to new research by faculty at Binghamton University, State University at New York.
5h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Financial strain has major impact on patients' health care decisionsLow-income individuals are often reluctant or too embarrassed to discuss their financial hardships and constraints with caregivers during office visits. As a result, physicians and caregivers frequently misinterpret that choice as noncompliance with medical care.
5h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Regulation of the Hoxb gene cluster maintains blood-forming cells and inhibits leukemiaNew research from the Stowers Institute for Medical Research reveals that a DNA regulatory element within the Regulation of the Hoxb cluster globally mediates signals to the majority of Hoxb genes to control their expression in blood-forming stem cells.
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News

An innovation that opens horizons for greenhouse gases' remote monitoringBrazilian researchers combine chip technology with laser calibration to enhance an infrared spectrometer which could be integrated to drones, smartphones and other portable devices.
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NYT > Science

Valeant, Distancing Itself From Its Past, Will Change Its Name to Bausch HealthThe company that became notorious for buying old drugs and dramatically raising prices wants to revamp its reputation.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

Carbon satellite to serve as an important tool for politicians and climate change expertsA new satellite that measures and provides detailed carbon balance information is one of the most important new tools in carbon measurement since infrared light. The researchers expect the satellite to be a valuable tool for the UN's work on climate change related to the Paris climate accord.
5h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Small earthquake felt widely in Southern CaliforniaA light earthquake was felt widely in Southern California before dawn Tuesday but there were no reports of damage.
6h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Despite mutations in Makona Ebola virus, disease consistent in mice, monkeysEarly during the West African Ebola epidemic, scientists speculated that the genetic diversity of the Makona strain of virus (EBOV-Makona) would result in more severe disease and more transmissibility than prior strains. However NIH scientists have determined that certain mutations stabilized early during the epidemic and did not alter Ebola disease presentation or outcome. Their work offers evide
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Switching off insatiable hungerIn a new study researchers from the Institute for Experimental Pediatric Endocrinology of the Charité - Universitätsmedizin Berlin have successfully treat patients whose obesity is caused by a genetic defect. Aside from its beneficial effects on the patients, the researchers also provided insights into the fundamental signaling pathways regulating satiety of the new drug. The results of this resea
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Simple post-surgery step reduces bladder cancer recurrenceIn the latest issue of JAMA, SWOG researchers show that flushing the bladder with a common chemotherapy drug immediately after surgery significantly reduces the chances of bladder cancer returning.
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Crowdfunding campaigns for unproven stem cell-based interventionsCrowdfunding campaigns by patients to raise money to pay for unproven stem cell treatments not covered by insurance often underemphasize risks and exaggerate the effectiveness of these treatments.
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News

USPSTF recommendation statement on screening for prostate cancerThe US Preventive Services Task Force (USPSTF) recommends that men 55 to 69 who are interested in screening talk to their doctors about potential benefits and harms of screening for prostate cancer before deciding whether to undergo periodic prostate-specific antigen (PSA)-based screening. The USPSTF recommends against PSA-based screening for men 70 and older.
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Cellular reprogramming approach promotes muscle regeneration in injured miceScientists have developed a simple and robust approach for directly reprogramming mature skin cells into immature muscle cells, called induced myogenic progenitor cells (iMPCs). These cells propagated extensively and shared key molecular and functional properties with skeletal muscle stem cells. When transplanted into mice with leg injuries, the iMPCs engrafted in the damaged tissue and contribute
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Watch how a T cell passes HIV sexually to a new hostWhile it's well known that HIV is transmitted sexually, how the virus crosses genital mucus membranes to reach its targets in the immune system is less understood. Previous research has looked at biochemical measurements or morphology at various points during HIV transmission, but in a study published May 8 in the journal Cell Reports, researchers in France constructed an in vitro model of urethra
6h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Tissue-engineered human pancreatic cells successfully treat diabetic miceResearchers tissue-engineered human pancreatic islets in a laboratory that develop a circulatory system, secrete hormones like insulin and successfully treat sudden-onset type 1 diabetes in transplanted mice. In a study published by Cell Reports, the scientists use a new bioengineering process they developed called a self-condensation cell culture. The technology helps nudge medical science closer
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Science : NPR

How Prized Bull Semen And DNA Testing Are Reshaping America's Beef HerdCattle ranchers know that making the best steak starts with the genetic makeup of the herd. Now those genetics have taken a historic leap thanks to new, predictive DNA technology. (Image credit: Kristofor Husted/Harvest Public Media)
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Many Airbnb venues lack basic safety protections, new study suggestsMany Airbnb venues in the United States fail to provide the critical carbon monoxide and fire safety protections that are legally required of hotels and motels, suggests new research from the Johns Hopkins Bloomberg School of Public Health.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

New research unveils bird migration strategiesUsing weather surveillance radar and citizen-science data, researchers are learning how migratory birds return to their breeding grounds in North America each spring with near-pinpoint accuracy. The research focuses on the Central Flyway that runs north-south through the middle of North America—an aerial superhighway carrying billions of birds northward each spring.
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Popular Science

These sea creatures create magnificent mucus nets to catch their foodAnimals Scientists think these critters deserve their own category in recognition of this strange feeding method. Marine biologists like me used to think mucous grazing was a “catch-all” feeding strategy – the idea was these guys would just chow down on whatever their mucous sheet…
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Science | The Guardian

Prostate cancer screening test is overused for older men, experts sayOveruse of the PSA test can lead to painful and unnecessary biopsies as well as over-diagnosis and over-treatment Adult American men aged between 55 and 69 should balance the risks and benefits of prostate cancer screening carefully before getting tested, a US health taskforce has recommended. Men older than 70 should not receive routine tests. Related: Judge affirms decision to put cancer warnin
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

Help with homework can affect child's persistenceDifferent types of maternal homework assistance have a different impact on the child's way of completing school assignments in grades 2 to 4 of elementary school, according to a new study. Although all homework assistance presumably aims at helping the child, not all types of homework assistance lead to equally positive outcomes.
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Feed: All Latest

Your Smartphone Choice Could Determine If You'll Get a LoanEuropean retailers are using digital footprints to help determine credit-worthiness, according to a new study.
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Ingeniøren

Japans maglev-tog kan blive en ingeniørbedrift – eller en dyr fiaskoJapans regering, store teknologifirmaer og togselskaber vil sammen investere mere end 600 mia. kr. i maglev-magnettog med en topfart på over 600 km/t. Kritikere påpeger, at de vil være mange gange dyrere end almindelige tog.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Watch how a T cell passes HIV sexually to a new hostWhile it's well known that HIV is transmitted sexually, how the virus crosses genital mucus membranes to reach its targets in the immune system is less well understood. Previous research has looked at biochemical measurements or morphology at various points during HIV transmission to investigate this process, but in a study published May 8 in the journal Cell Reports, researchers in France constru
6h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News

The secret of a long lifeWhy termite queens live exceptionally long and, at the same time, are extraordinary fertile.
6h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Many Airbnb venues lack basic safety protections, new study suggestsMany Airbnb venues in the United States fail to provide the critical carbon monoxide and fire safety protections that are legally required of hotels and motels, suggests new research from the Johns Hopkins Bloomberg School of Public Health.
6h
Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

Taking CRISPR from clipping scissors to word processorResearchers have developed a new platform that makes CRISPR less like a cutting tool and more like a word processor with a search-and-replace function.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

Cardiac arrhythmias: Expression of connexin 43 in infarct scar cuts cardiac arrhythmias after heart attackLife-threatening cardiac arrhythmias often occur after a heart attack, as the scar tissue can interfere with the spread of electrical impulses that activate the heart. Scientists have now developed a method to improve electrical transmission in the heart by transferring a single gene, Connexin 43, to cells that form the infarct scar.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

A new mechanism for neurodegeneration in a form of dementiaA new study reports that dementia-related and psychiatric-related proteins cluster together to form aggregates in the brain, leading to abnormal cell function and behavior. Aggregation of the protein TDP-43 is a hallmark of a pathological process that leads to dementia called frontotemporal lobar degeneration (FTLD). The study showed that as TDP-43 accumulates in the brain of patients with FTLD, i
6h
TED Talks Daily (SD video)

How Baltimore called a ceasefire | Erricka BridgefordIn one day, in one city, in one neighborhood -- what if everyone put their guns down? Erricka Bridgeford is a peacemaker who wants to stop the murders and violence in her hometown of Baltimore. So she helped organize the Baltimore Ceasefire, a grassroots campaign to keep the peace. In a passionate, personal talk, Bridgeford tells the story of the Ceasefire movement and their bigger vision for zero
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Futurity.org

Other planets stretch out Earth’s orbit every 405,000 yearsEvery 405,000 years, gravitational tugs from Jupiter and Venus slightly elongate Earth’s orbit, according to new research. The pattern is amazingly consistent, influencing our planet’s climate for at least 215 million years, the research suggests. The finding allows scientists to more precisely date geological events like the spread of dinosaurs. “It’s an astonishing result because this long cycl
6h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Researchers use emojis to develop a modern face scale for product testingA new study finds that emojis are a viable alternative to words when it comes to accurately measuring how kids feel about food, products and other experiences. With that discovery, researchers developed an emoji scale that may help companies better test products in non-Western cultures.
6h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Voltage loss in cable bacteriaAn international research group has shed new light on cable bacteria. Using laser light, researchers have followed electrons as they travel through the current-conducting bacteria, and on the basis of the electrical potential in the bacteria, they have calculated that the bacteria because of voltage loss cannot function efficiently at depths exceeding 3 cm into the sediment.
6h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News

A national conversation is essential to addressing challenging needs of an aging populationOver 40 percent of all older adults in the United States are living with four or more chronic illnesses, receive care from a fragmented health care system, and are struggling with rising costs and uneven quality. To confront this national crisis, more than 50 health system leaders, policy makers, innovators, and scholars convened last week to identify actionable recommendations designed to transfo
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Agile Implementation: Reengineering dissemination of healthcare in the USIn a study published in the Journal of the American Geriatrics Society, clinician-researchers and implementation scientists from the Regenstrief Institute, Eskenazi Health, and Indiana University address the escalating need for faster implementation of healthcare innovation. The authors present Agile Implementation, a simple new methodology which they designed, developed, embedded and tested. Agil
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Tech bends light more efficiently, offers wider angles for light inputEngineering and physics researchers have developed a new technology for steering light that allows for more light input and greater efficiency -- a development that holds promise for creating more immersive augmented-reality display systems.
6h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Cell phones at summer camp: Research explores the effectsNew research from University of Michigan C.S. Mott Children's Hospital delves into how digital media might affect the camp experience.
6h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News

New research unveils bird migration strategiesUsing weather surveillance radar and citizen-science data, researchers are learning how migratory birds return to their breeding grounds in North America each spring with near-pinpoint accuracy.
6h
Ingeniøren

Kameraer med kunstig intelligens forener overvågning med retten til privatlivMachine learning kan skabe overvågningskameraer, hvor billederne ikke gemmes, men sendes videre i form af sensordata. Det kræver mindre båndbredde og kan imødekomme bekymringer om privatlivets fred.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Tech bends light more efficiently, offers wider angles for light inputEngineering and physics researchers at North Carolina State University have developed a new technology for steering light that allows for more light input and greater efficiency – a development that holds promise for creating more immersive augmented-reality display systems.
7h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Influence of technology acquisition on organizational performance studied in Iran80 international companies from Iran were selected, and 320 respondents in key managerial positions were questioned. As the researchers found out, acquisition and use of technological innovations is a positive influence on organizational efficiency.
7h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News

A new mechanism for neurodegeneration in a form of dementiaA new study in Biological Psychiatry reports that dementia-related and psychiatric-related proteins cluster together to form aggregates in the brain, leading to abnormal cell function and behavior. Aggregation of the protein TDP-43 is a hallmark of a pathological process that leads to dementia called frontotemporal lobar degeneration (FTLD). The study showed that as TDP-43 accumulates in the brain
7h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Type of maternal homework assistance affects child's persistenceDifferent types of maternal homework assistance have a different impact on the child's way of completing school assignments in grades 2 to 4 of elementary school, according to a new study from the University of Eastern Finland and the University of Jyväskylä. Although all homework assistance presumably aims at helping the child, not all types of homework assistance lead to equally positive outcome
7h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Carbon satellite to serve as an important tool for politicians and climate change expertsA new satellite that measures and provides detailed carbon balance information is one of the most important new tools in carbon measurement since infrared light, believe researchers from the University of Copenhagen. The researchers expect the satellite to be a valuable tool for the UN's work on climate change related to the Paris climate accord.
7h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Troubling stats for kids with intellectual disabilitiesBy federal law passed in 1975, children with intellectual disabilities are supposed to spend as much time as possible in general education classrooms. But a new study suggests that progress toward that goal has stalled.
7h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News

York U researcher identifies 15 new species of stealthy cuckoo beesCuckoo bees sneakily lay their eggs in the nests of other bee species, after which their newly hatched prodigies kill the host egg or larva, and then feed on the stored pollen. The host, a solitary bee, never knows anything is awry. Nine new species of these clandestine bees have been found hiding in collections and museums across North America by York University Ph.D. candidate Thomas Onuferko. A
7h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News

New shrew species discovered on 'sky island' in PhilippinesA team of scientists, including Larry Heaney, Negaunee Curator of Mammals at the Field Museum in Chicago, recently identified Palawanosorex muscorum, a new species of shrew known more informally as the Palawan moss shrew. This shrew, found on what Heaney calls a 'sky island,' may help explain why the Philippines is such a hotbed for mammalian biodiversity.
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Impaired brain pathways may cause attention problems after strokeDamage to some of the pathways that carry information throughout the brain may be responsible for attention deficit in patients who have had a subcortical stroke in the brain's right hemisphere, according to a new study. Researchers hope the findings may provide a measure for selecting suitable patients for early interventions aimed at reducing cognitive decline following stroke.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

In latest diesel woes, Audi flags new emissions 'irregularities' (Update)German luxury carmaker Audi on Tuesday said it had detected "irregularities" in the emissions controls of recent A6/A7 models, prompting it to halt deliveries in the latest twist in the "dieselgate" scandal dogging parent company Volkswagen.
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Live Science

HIV Has a 'Long Lost' Cousin: What You Should Know About This VirusIt's related to HIV, yet you've probably never heard of it.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

TAP Air Portugal profits take off after years in the redPortugal's flagship TAP Air carrier returned to profit in 2017 after years in the red that had investors wondering whether it could even survive, results published on the group's website showed.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Facebook bans foreign ads targeting Irish abortion referendumFacebook Bitmoji IrelandFacebook said on Tuesday it will block foreign adverts aimed at Ireland's referendum on abortion later this month.
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New Scientist - News

Hawaii volcano is causing havoc and will spew lava for daysThe Kilauea volcano is unlikely to erupt explosively, but it will probably keep pumping out devastating lava for many days to come
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Video: Horizons mission"Horizons" is the name of ESA astronaut Alexander Gerst's second mission to the International Space Station.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

Decoding tornadoes' infrasound wavesTornado-producing storms can emit infrasound more than an hour before tornadogenesis, which inspired a group of researchers to develop a long-range, passive way of listening in on storms.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

What does a 'normal' voice sound like?Humans communicate their intentions, feelings and desires verbally, so voice disorders can have devastating personal and professional consequences. A perceived voice abnormality may lead to a negative assessment of the speaker's intelligence, health and personality. Researchers will describe their work on voice perception and what it means for a voice to sound 'normal.'
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

Synchronizing cochlear signals stimulates brain to 'hear' in stereoUsing both ears to hear increases speech recognition and improves sound localization. Researchers want to bring this advantage to people who use cochlear implants. They have developed a new technique that synchronizes the cochlear signals that stimulate the brain in a way that is similar to people who can hear normally.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

Possibility of new ways to treat, manage epilepsy seizuresNew findings demonstrate that there may be ways to address blood-brain barrier dysfunction in epilepsy.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

New molecular mechanism likely involved in cancer metastasisScientists knew the PDK1 signaling pathway was active in metastasizing cancer cells, but no one knew why. New research has found for the first time that the PDK1 pathway regulates the formation of a three-protein core complex that facilitates purine biosynthesis. Further work aims to map all the protein complexes and signaling pathways they regulate in cancer cells, which would open doors to new w
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

New software, HyperTools, transforms complex data into visualizable shapesEvery dataset in the observable universe has a fundamental geometry or shape to it, but that structure can be highly complicated. To make it easier to visualize complicated datasets, a research team has created HyperTools -- an open-source software package that leverages a suite of mathematical techniques to gain intuitions about high-dimensional datasets through the underlying geometric structure
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Futurity.org

Brain scans show diabetics more likely to focus on negativePeople with Type 2 diabetes and prediabetes are more likely to focus on and have a strong emotional response to threats and negative things, which affects quality of life and increases risk for depression, according to new research. The study, which appears in Psychosomatic Medicine , suggests those negative feelings of sadness, anger, and anxiety—which can be a daily occurrence for people with d
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Latest Headlines | Science News

Real numbers don’t cut it in the real world, this physicist arguesPhysicist Nicolas Gisin argues that real numbers don’t properly represent the natural world, which is a good thing for free will.
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Heartbeat out of syncLife-threatening cardiac arrhythmias often occur after a heart attack, as the scar tissue can interfere with the spread of electrical impulses that activate the heart. An international research team under the leadership of the University Hospital Bonn in collaboration with colleagues from the Cornell University and the University of Pittsburgh has now developed a method to improve electrical trans
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Scientists dive into museum collections to reveal the invasion route of a small crustaceanBiological invasions are widely recognised as one of the most significant components of global change. Far-reaching and fast-spreading, they often have harmful effects on biodiversity.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Researchers improve textile composite manufacturingWhile wearing a crisply ironed, wrinkle-free shirt makes a good impression, researchers at UBC's Okanagan campus are working to solve the issue of wrinkling when it comes to making textile composites.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Will automated vehicles take the stress out of driving? Research says 'don't count on it'The expectation that automated vehicles will make drivers' jobs easier, especially if they've been behind the wheel for an extended period, may be more than a little flawed, according to a study by human factors/ergonomics researchers at Texas Tech University.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Researchers identify 15 new species of stealthy cuckoo beesCuckoo bees sneakily lay their eggs in the nests of other bee species, after which their newly hatched prodigies kill the host egg or larva, and then feed on the stored pollen. The host, a solitary bee, never knows anything is awry. Nine new species of these clandestine bees have been found hiding in collections and museums across North America by York University PhD Candidate Thomas Onuferko, as
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

New shrew species discovered on 'sky island' in PhilippinesThe Philippines teems with biodiversity: 657 bird species roam and fly throughout the country's 7,641 islands, and over 2,000 fish species swim in the surrounding seas. But beyond these beaked and scaly creatures, the Philippines is also home to the world's greatest concentration per square mile of unique mammal species.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

America's water infrastructure is failing—but here's how we could start to fix itAmerica's water is under threat from many sides. It faces pollution problems, outdated infrastructure, rising costs, and unprecedented droughts and rainfall patterns as the climate changes. Yet at a recent event hosted by the Columbia Water Center, the tone was cautiously optimistic, and the conversation centered on solutions.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Oilseed crop's waste product yields compounds that protect skin from the sunMeadowfoam, a native Pacific Northwest plant cultivated as an oilseed crop, has emerged as a potential new source of protection against the sun's harmful effects on the skin.
7h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Decoding tornadoes' infrasound wavesInfrasound waves oscillate at frequencies humans can't hear, but they're extremely useful for monitoring nuclear blasts because infrasound decays so slowly within our atmosphere that it can wrap around Earth multiple times. In the late 1990s and early 2000s, researchers discovered that tornadoes and other geophysical events also produce sound within the "near-infrasound" range of 0.5 to 20 Hz.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

What does a 'normal' voice sound like?Have you ever turned the dial on the radio or switched the television channel because you found the quality of the presenter's voice grating? What is it about a person's voice that can be soothing, aggravating or even sensual? Jody E. Kreiman, at the University of California, Los Angeles, is tackling the question of how we perceive voice quality by studying how people think of a "normal" voice.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Can chimpanzee vocalizations reveal the origins of human language?It's very difficult to determine when, how and why human language began. While fossil primates provide important clues about human evolution, the sounds they made and the soft tissue involved in making those sounds weren't preserved.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

The EPA says burning wood to generate power is 'carbon-neutral.' Is that true?Environmental Protection Agency Administrator Scott Pruitt recently told a group of forestry executives and students that from now on the U.S. government would consider burning wood to generate electricity, commonly known as forest or woody biomass, to be "carbon neutral."
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

Malaria parasite accumulates undetected in bone marrowA Plasmodium vivax infection is like an iceberg: It's dangerous, in part, because much of it hides out of view. A new study shows how researchers are revealing more of this parasite's biology.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

Vigorous exercise reduces tiredness in testicular cancer survivorsHigh-intensity interval training reduces tiredness and improves self-esteem for testicular cancer survivors.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

New CRISPR technology 'knocks out' yeast genes with single-point precisionResearchers have used CRISPR-Cas9 to develop a technology that can target any gene in the yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae and turn it off by deleting single letters from its DNA sequence. Such genome-scale engineering -- in contrast to traditional strategies that only target a single gene or a limited number of genes - could be useful for industry, where S. cerevisiae is widely used to produce etha
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

Researchers find genetic 'dial' can control body size in pigsResearchers have demonstrated a connection between the expression of the HMGA2 gene and body size in pigs. The work further demonstrates the gene's importance in body size regulation across mammalian species, and provides a target for gene modification.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

New breakthrough paving the way for universal Ebola therapeuticA new collaborative study has identified and studied Ebola antibodies that could be used to design universal therapeutics that are effective against many different Ebola species.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

If El Niños happen twice as often in the future, what happens to seabirds?Doubling the frequency of El Niños unexpectedly resulted in higher population numbers and a lower chance of extinction for Brandt's cormorants, a recent study found. Does that mean climate change could actually be good for seabirds? Not so fast.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

Chemical octopus catches sneaky cancer clues, trace glycoproteinsCertain minuscule cancer signals easily evade detection, but perhaps no longer. Biomarkers made of glycoproteins are bound to get snared in the tentacles of this chemical octopus that chemists devised over several years. The monstrous molecule could also be a windfall for the rising field of glycoscience.
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Majority of the population trusts state structures in consumer health protectionWhether it's salmonella or antimicrobial resistance, residues of plant protection products or microplastics in food -- what health risks are consumers aware of? What concerns them and how is the perception of risks changing? Answers to these questions are given in the BfR Consumer Monitor, a regular population survey conducted by the German Federal Institute for Risk Assessment (BfR).
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Polarized light: A simple route to highly chiral materialsResearchers at University of Tokyo used an efficient method to create chiral materials using circularly polarized light. Depending on whether left- or right-polarized, the light source induced electric fields at opposite corners of gold nanocuboids on TiO2. Via plasmon-induced charge separation, the gold converted Pb2+ into PbO2 tips deposited at the corners, resulting in a chiral plasmonic nanost
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Prolonged exposure to air pollution leads to genetic changes in rat brains, study findsProlonged exposure to particulate matter in air pollution in the Los Angeles Basin triggered inflammation and the appearance of cancer-related genes in the brains of rats, a Cedars-Sinai study has found.
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Symptoms of osteoarthritis lessened with simple changes to the dietOne gram of fish oil a day could help reduce the pain of patients with osteoarthritis, a new study in Rheumatology reports.
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Oilseed crop's waste product yields compounds that protect skin from the sunMeadowfoam, a native Pacific Northwest plant cultivated as an oilseed crop, has emerged as a potential new source of protection against the sun's harmful effects on the skin.
7h
Dagens Medicin

Slagelse Psykiatrisygehus genstarter plaget sengeafsnitStore problemer med personaleflow gør, at Slagelse Psykiatrisygehus nu omorganiserer et sengeafsnit. Antallet af sengepladser skæres markant ned for derefter at begynde på ny.
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Feed: All Latest

Uber Unveils the Flying Taxi It Wants to Rule the SkiesThe catamaran-like electric concept is the sort of vehicle Uber wants to integrate into a flying taxi network—it just needs other people to build the thing.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Synchronizing cochlear signals stimulates brain to 'hear' in stereoUsing both ears to hear increases speech recognition and improves sound localization. In essence, it helps you to identify a friend's voice so you can follow her amusing anecdote over the din of a cocktail party. Ruth Litovsky, a researcher at the University of Wisconsin-Madison, wants to bring this advantage to people who use cochlear implants.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Troubling educational stats for kids with intellectual disabilitiesBy federal law passed in 1975, children with intellectual disabilities are supposed to spend as much time as possible in general education classrooms.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

New tool to identify endangered ecosystemsA team of researchers from Universidad Politécnica de Madrid, University Centre for Digital Art and Technology and Universidad Francisco de Vitoria has developed a new tool of visualization of bipartite biological networks, like the visualization between pollinators and plants or between diseases and genes, which identify their interactions and anticipate corrective measures.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Breakthrough Listen begins survey of the plane of the Milky Way at ParkesBreakthrough Listen – the initiative to find signs of intelligent life in the universe – announced today that a survey of millions of stars located in the plane of our galaxy, using the CSIRO Parkes Radio Telescope ("Parkes") in New South Wales, Australia, has commenced. Listen observations at Parkes began in November 2016, targeting a sample consisting mostly of stars within a few light years of
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Red sky in sight shows charging at heightThe Saharan dust cloud that cast a red glow over the UK last autumn helped scientists to take a step forward in understanding how to prepare for future volcanic eruptions.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Why steam burns are particularly viciousEven if the wound looks superficially harmless, steam burns must be cooled persistently. Empa researchers have now been able to show for the first time how hot steam achieves its vicious effect: It penetrates the upper skin layer and can cause severe burns in the lower skin layers—initially almost invisible.
7h
Popular Science

Make your friends finally commit to dinner with these RSVP web appsDIY They'll help you find the best date and time too. Want to plan a fun event for all your friends? You need these web apps to help you choose a date that works for (almost) everyone—and then collect RSVPs.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Dutch astronomers photograph possible toddler planet by chanceAn international team of astronomers headed by Dutch researchers from Leiden University has coincidently found a small companion around the young double star CS Cha. The astronomers examined the dust disc of the binary, while they stumbled upon the companion. The researchers suspect that it is a planet in his toddler years that is still growing. The astronomers used the SPHERE instrument on the Eu
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Why exceptionally fertile termite queens have long livesUsually the rule in the animal kingdom is that a lot of progeny means a short life – if you are less fertile, you live longer. However, it seems that social insects can escape this fate. How they do this has been revealed by a research team from the Institute of Zoology at the University of Freiburg, taking the termite species Macrotermes bellicosus as its model.
7h
Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

Stomata -- the plant pores that give us life -- arise thanks to a gene called MUTENew research in plants shows that a gene called MUTE is required for the formation of stomata -- the tiny pores that a critical for gas exchange, including releasing the oxygen gas that we breathe.
7h
Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

Flexible, wearable oral sodium sensor could help improve hypertension controlFor people who have hypertension and certain other conditions, eating too much salt raises blood pressure and increases the likelihood of heart complications. To help monitor salt intake, researchers have developed a flexible and stretchable wireless sensing system designed to be comfortably worn in the mouth to measure the amount of sodium a person consumes.
7h
Ingeniøren

Støvsugerproducent: Vi vil skabe en elbil, som skiller sig ud i teknologi og udseendeDyson kender motoren og batteriet. Nu skal de i elbiler.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Sun protection without blindsSummer. Blue sky. Sunshine. But you don't notice much of it in the office or in your home, because the blinds block the view so that the heat stays outside. This scenario could soon be a thing of the past: EPFL researchers are working with Empa on a window glass that keeps out the heat in summer and at the same time allows a clear view of the outside world.
7h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Computer-controlled 'greenhouses' in kitchens grow fresher, healthier produceA Purdue University-affiliated startup that seeks to redefine "farm-to-table" when it comes to garden vegetables by delivering its first orders of an appliance that fits under a kitchen counter and grows produce year-round.
7h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Flowerlike nanostructures in sodium batteriesSodium-ion batteries (SIB) are hot candidates for a cheap and sustainable battery technology, but a recurring issue is anode instability. A Chinese team of scientists now reports the preparation of a submicron-size structured anode composite material that can accommodate large volume changes. The antimony sulfide electrode is easily prepared and exhibits superior capacity and cycling performance,
7h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

New potent analogues of plant hormone provide drought stress relief for cropsAmongst abiotic stresses, drought stress is one of the main sources of crop loss around the globe. One protection strategy is the development of chemicals that help crops cope with water deficiency. Using a natural plant hormone as their starting point, scientists identified several novel analogues that are highly effective against drought stress. As they report in the European Journal of Organic
7h
Viden

Kinas cyberhær begår angreb i hele verdenDen kinesiske efterretningstjeneste har siden 2009 kontrolleret flere grupper af hackere, viser ny rapport.
7h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Bridgehead effect found to be a major driver for invasive species infestationsA team of researchers from Switzerland, France and New Zealand has found evidence suggesting that the bridgehead effect is a major driver for invasive species infections. In their paper published in Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences, the group describes their study of global alien ant spread and how they believe it has come about.
8h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Researchers improve textile composite manufacturingWhile wearing a crisply ironed, wrinkle-free shirt makes a good impression, researchers at UBC's Okanagan campus are working to solve the issue of wrinkling when it comes to making textile composites.Textile composites are known for their strength and durability. But as Abbas Milani, a professor in UBC Okanagan's School of Engineering explains, a simple wrinkle in the manufacturing process can sig
8h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Symmetry is essential for power network synchronizationA joint research team from Tokyo Tech and North Carolina State University has clarified the fundamental principles for achieving the synchronization of power generator groups in power networks, which is essential for the stable supply of electric power. Based on this principle, the team developed a method for constructing an aggregated model of a power network that can efficiently analyze and cont
8h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Tracing the footprints of a tumor: Genomic 'scars' allow cancer profilingMutations driving cancer development leave behind specific 'scars,' so-called mutational signatures, in the genome. In principle, they allow for profiling of the cancer type and its development -- but the noisy environment of a cancer genome makes correlations difficult. Using CRISPR-Cas9 technology, researchers at CeMM and the Wellcome Trust Sanger Institute were able to show for the first time t
8h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Unexpected behavior of atom clouds challenges existing theoriesClouds of ultra-cold atoms are a perfect model system to study fundamental questions of many-particle quantum physics. Now the research team of Professor Jörg Schmiedmayer (Institute of Atomic and Subatomic Physics, TU Wien) has found remarkable results which cannot be explained by any of the existing theories. When two ultra-cold quantum gases are coupled, they can synchronize spontaneously, osci
8h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Scientists dive into museum collections to reveal the invasion route of a small crustaceanWhile studies on biological invasions tend to focus on new records, Sabrina Lo Brutto and Davide Iaciofano, went on to clarify a biological invasion at the Atlantic European coast. It turned out that a non-native crustacean has established its population 24 years prior to the available records. Their paper published in the open-access journal ZooKeys highlights the important role of natural histor
8h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Age, marital status, BMI and sleep associated with risk for dementiaCould your age, marital status, BMI (body mass index) and amount of sleep impact your risk for dementia? Researchers at Boston University School of Medicine (BUSM) analyzed data from the Framingham Heart Study (FHS) to identify new combinations of risk factors that are linked to increased risk of dementia in later life.
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Amplification of key cellular organizer may initiate cancer, study suggestsCells begin to accumulate centrosomes -- organelles that play a vital role during cell division -- before they transform into cancer cells, according to a new study of patients with Barrett's esophagus condition, which is associated with esophageal cancer. The research, which will be published May 8 in the Journal of Cell Biology, suggests that similar cases of centrosome amplification may contrib
8h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News

UCalgary scientists discover a new way to battle multiple sclerosisUniversity of Calgary scientists Andrew Caprariello, Ph.D., and Dr. Peter Stys, professor at the Cumming School of Medicine, are challenging conventional thinking about the root cause of multiple sclerosis. Their findings show there may be something happening deeper and earlier that damages myelin and then later triggers immune attacks.
8h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News

PolyU endeavors in disaster management and disaster risk reductionIn the past decade after the devastated 5.12 Wenchuan Earthquake in Sichuan, academics and students from The Hong Kong Polytechnic University (PolyU) have been working on a series of inter-disciplinary projects to help enhance the resilience of the affected communities.
8h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Will automated vehicles take the stress out of driving? Research says 'don't count on it'Automated system designers take note: Attention erodes the longer the driver is not actively engaged in manual driving.
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Dagens Medicin

Sundhedsminister udskyder plan om det nære sundhedsvæsenDen længe ventede plan om det nære og sammenhængende sundhedsvæsen er igen udskudt. En frygt for at gribe ind i de igangværende afstemninger om overenskomster på de sundhedsfaglige områder ligger til grund.
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Dagens Medicin

Lose: Et presset sundhedsvæsenet kræver investeringerSundhedsvæsenet har akut behov for førstehjælp, og presset bliver ikke mindre i fremtiden siger Stephanie Lose (V) op til regionernes økonomiforhandlinger med regeringen.
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Futurity.org

Why more young adults live with their parentsEconomic tumult in the early 2000s persuaded many young people to keep living with their parents, but their reasons differ starkly by race, a study concludes. For black young adults, increasingly expensive apartment rentals kept them from moving out. But white young people stayed with their parents because they couldn’t find jobs. These findings appear in the Journal of Housing Economics . “It’s
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The Scientist RSS

Donald Seldin, Intellectual Father of UT Southwestern, DiesThe physician-scientist recruited future Nobel Prize winners to build the University of Texas Southwestern Medical Center in Dallas into a first-rate institution.
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Scientific American Content: Global

The Belly Fat BattleA wider waist is dangerous for reasons we don’t fully grasp -- Read more on ScientificAmerican.com
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Futurity.org

‘Odd’ sightings show big predators want their habitats backSightings of large predators in unexpected places suggest alligators, sea otters, and many other animals—marine and terrestrial species alike—are re-colonizing ecosystems that used to be prime hunting grounds for them before humans decimated their populations. In recent years, sightings of large predators in places where conventional wisdom says they “shouldn’t be” have increased, in large part b
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Futurity.org

Look for these features in apps for preschoolersApps for kids that encourage interactions between parents and their children can offer the same benefits to developing minds as analog toys do, according to a new study. The average preschooler watches more than three hours of TV, film, and other video programming each day. “I want to arm families with data to create consumer demand for thoughtful designs,” says Alexis Hiniker, an assistant profe
8h
Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

Can chimpanzee vocalizations reveal the origins of human language?Fossil primates provide important clues about human evolution, but the sounds they made and the soft tissue involved in making those sounds weren't preserved. So chimpanzees can provide important points of comparison for inferring the sorts of sounds our early ancestors may have made.
8h
Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

3-D printing of weapons threatens security on global, national and personal levelA new article suggests additive manufacturing could benefit military adversaries, violent extremists and even street criminals, who could produce their own weapons for use and sale.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

Reflecting on possessions can curb people's impulse buyingConsumers who reflected on their recently used personal belongings experienced less desire for an unexpectedly encountered product, were less likely to buy impulsively and expressed a lower willingness to pay for new products, according to a new article by marketing and consumer behavior experts.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

The effect of night shifts: Gene expression fails to adapt to new sleep patternsNight shifts have an impact on genes regulating important biological processes and their expression can't adapt to new sleeping and eating patterns and that most of them stay tuned to their daytime biological clock rhythms.
8h
The Atlantic

Digital Jukeboxes Are Eroding the Dive-Bar ExperienceBy the time I moved to Chicago’s North Side, true dive bars had become rare as pearls in a sea of fakes. The wood paneling, fluorescent beer signage, and Spartan restroom facilities of the imitators conjure the working-class homeyness of the American classic, while the prices, clientele, and subsequent atmosphere undermine that nostalgia wholeheartedly. The transformation—from earnest to faux—is,
8h
BBC News - Science & Environment

Spider trained to jump on demandThis is a regal jumping spider, and there are no prizes for guessing what it's good at.
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Science | The Guardian

What time is it, and why?The particles of which the universe is made don’t much care which way time goes. But we do, and so do the stars and the planets. At what we might call the most “fundamental” level, the laws of nature do not much care in which direction time flows. Yet from our point of view, as participants in the physical universe, the arrow time is an inescapable and supremely important fact. Put briefly, some
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

What happens when a dolphin holds its breath?When dolphins dive deep to search for prey, their respiration stops. Their heartbeat slows. Yet they are still able to power all of the functions they need to hunt. No one is entirely sure how they do it, because no one has ever been able to measure their blood oxygenation levels during these deep dives. It's a logistically complex challenge; how do you attach a sensor to a massive sea-dwelling cr
8h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Research duo finds way to predict shifts in watersheds as climate changesDuring the longest drought in California's modern history, a pair of UO researchers headed into the woods of the Sierra Nevada to investigate how forest composition affects water supply and what changes may come as climate change alters the ecological makeup of forests.
8h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

CRISPR-guided proximity labeling—dissecting gene transcription's proteomic choreographyMore powerful than previous methods, a new approach for tagging and harvesting DNA-associated proteins from cells could open deeper insights into transcription control.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Using AI to manage Canada's invasive speciesNew University of Alberta research on managing aquatic invasive species in Canada combines the power of machine learning with expertise in biology and statistics to build a simple, easy-to-use tool for environmental managers.
8h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

An inordinate fondness for bone-eating wormsOn February 6, 2002, MBARI marine biologist Robert Vrijenhoek went looking for deep-sea clams in Monterey Canyon. Little did he know that he would stumble upon something that would change the direction of his scientific career. It was a dead whale, sprawled out on the seafloor. The dead whale was interesting, but what really got Vrijenhoek's attention was what looked like red shag carpeting coveri
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

Scientists train spider to jump on demand to discover secrets of animal movementScientists have unlocked the secrets of how some predatory spiders catch their prey whilst hunting by successfully training one to jump different distances and heights for the first time.
8h
Scientific American Content: Global

Who Speaks Up in the Face of Uncivil Behavior?Psychologists develop theory of who stands up, and who lets it pass -- Read more on ScientificAmerican.com
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Tweet all about it – people in parks feel more positivePeople in parks are more positive, and around areas like major transport hubs more negative, according to our analysis of 2.2 million tweets in Melbourne.
9h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Issues still to be addressed for Breakthrough Starshot projectA team of researchers at the California Institute of Technology has taken a hard look at the challenges facing efforts to carry out the Breakthrough Starshot project. In their Perspective piece published in the journal Nature Materials, the researchers outline the obstacles still facing project engineers and possible solutions.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

The importance of accountability after deadly disastersThis week marks the 26th anniversary of the explosion at the Westray mine in the Nova Scotia community of Plymouth. Sparks in the mine combined with methane gas to cause an explosion that killed 26 men on May 9, 1992.
9h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

China's recycling ban calls for a long-term rethink in AustraliaAustralia's recycling industry is in crisis, with China having effectively closed its borders to foreign recycling. Emergency measures have included stockpiling, landfilling, and trying to find other international destinations for our recycling – but none of these are sustainable long-term solutions.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Exploring the best tactics to combat fall armyworm outbreaks in AfricaCereal farmers across Sub-Saharan Africa are experiencing heavy losses due to the devastation by an invasive pest: the Fall army worm - Spodoptera frugiperda. In Africa it has caused huge losses to staple cereals, especially maize and sorghum, affecting food security and trade. Damage to maize alone is estimated to be between USD$ 2.5—6.2 billion per year.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Perceptions of Science in America: Takeaways for Your SciCommSometimes it feels like much of the world is anti-science. GMO-free labels clutter our grocery stores, sea level rise threatens our coastlines, and some communities choose not to vaccinate their children—to name just a few affronts. Especially if you are a scientist or a proponent of science, anti-science behaviors can be especially glaring.
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Synchronizing cochlear signals stimulates brain to 'hear' in stereoUsing both ears to hear increases speech recognition and improves sound localization. Ruth Litovsky, at the University of Wisconsin-Madison, wants to bring this advantage to people who use cochlear implants. During the 175th ASA Meeting, Litovsky will present data showing a new technique that synchronizes the cochlear signals that stimulate the brain in a way that is similar to people who can hear
9h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Can chimpanzee vocalizations reveal the origins of human language?Fossil primates provide important clues about human evolution, but the sounds they made and the soft tissue involved in making those sounds weren't preserved. So chimpanzees can provide important points of comparison for inferring the sorts of sounds our early ancestors may have made. During the 175th ASA Meeting, Michael Wilson, an associate professor at the University of Minnesota, will present
9h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News

What does a 'normal' voice sound like?Humans communicate their intentions, feelings and desires verbally, so voice disorders can have devastating personal and professional consequences. A perceived voice abnormality may lead to a negative assessment of the speaker's intelligence, health and personality. During the 175th ASA Meeting, researchers will describe their work on voice perception and what it means for a voice to sound 'normal
9h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Decoding tornadoes' infrasound wavesTornado-producing storms can emit infrasound more than an hour before tornadogenesis, which inspired a group of researchers to develop a long-range, passive way of listening in on storms. During the 175th ASA Meeting, Brian Elbing will present his group's work collecting infrasound measurements from tornadoes to decode information contained in waves about the formation processes and life cycle bef
9h
Popular Science

Does taking allergy medication make my allergies worse?Health And other answers to the allergy questions you’re too afraid to ask. There are a lot of misconceptions about allergies, perhaps in part because we know amazingly little about how they really work. Our knowledge has exploded (much like…
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Feed: All Latest

A Tornado's Secret Sounds Could Reveal Where It'll StrikeTornadoes seem to emit sounds the human ear can't hear. That could help scientists develop better early detection systems.
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BBC News - Science & Environment

Sea giants do battleAs demand for natural gas continues to surge, huge extraction vessels are about to go into action.
9h
The Scientist RSS

Image of the Day: Bacterial FlagellaReal-time imaging reveals the formation of the bacterial flagella FlhA ring.
9h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

The latest from Juno as Jupiter appears bright in the night skyNow is a great time to see Jupiter in the night sky, as the planet reaches opposition on Wednesday, May 9.
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Scientific American Content: Global

Particle Physicists Turn to AI to Cope with CERN's Collision DelugeCan a competition with cash rewards improve techniques for tracking the Large Hadron Collider’s messy particle trajectories? -- Read more on ScientificAmerican.com
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Unexpected behaviour of atom clouds challenges existing theoriesExperiments with ultra-cold atoms at the TU Wien have shown surprising results: coupled atom clouds synchronize within milliseconds. This effect cannot be explained by standard theories.
9h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Gaining a bird's eye view of the greening of the ArcticUniversity of Virginia terrestrial ecologist Howie Epstein has won a $607,000 NASA grant to use Earth-observing satellite data to assess how vegetation diversity is changing in the Arctic tundra.
9h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

No sex means longer life for female stick insectsPromiscuity is a bad idea for female stick insects, in fact their smartest option is to have no sex at all.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Sea turtles like it localNew research has revealed how an endangered turtle capable of traversing big distances to find a mate may not do so due to seasonal ocean currents.
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Futurity.org

Cheaper cocaine sensor could also sniff out other drugsA new low-cost chemical sensing chip could one day be used to test for cocaine—and perhaps marijuana and opioids—as quickly as a breathalyzer for alcohol. The technology has long been on the wish list of police officers and others looking to monitor drug use and curb dangerous driving, researchers say. The chip could be integrated into a handheld, portable device for detecting drugs in biological
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Ingeniøren

Energinet og netselskaber uenige om ansvar ved for hurtig reguleringEnerginet og to vestjyske netselskaber skal i løbet af en måneds tid diskutere et nyt problem: lynhurtig regulering med så stor kapacitet, at der skabes over- og underspænding i distributionsnettet.
9h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Malaria parasite accumulates undetected in bone marrowA Plasmodium vivax infection is like an iceberg: It's dangerous, in part, because much of it hides out of view. A new study published this week in mBio shows how researchers are revealing more of this parasite's biology.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Being able to adapt in the classroom improves teachers' well-beingEvery few months, there are reports about the prevalence of poor well-being and high attrition among teachers. These reports describe many teachers as stressed or burnt out. Between 8% and 30% of Australian teachers are choosing to leave the profession each year.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Are conservatives more sceptical of climate change? It dependsThe widely held belief that people with conservative political views are more likely to reject climate change science has been challenged by University Queensland researchers.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Sharks can acquire a taste for jazz musicWhile for many people sharks bring to mind the Jaws theme music, it seems sharks themselves prefer jazz.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Taking air travel to the streets, or just above themThere was a time when people and goods were moved through the crowded city on the ground, restricted to the busy street surfaces by necessity and gravity.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Americans are becoming more socially isolated, but they're not feeling lonelierAre Americans becoming lonelier?
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

NASA Satellite detects Kilauea fissuresThe eruption of Kilauea Volcano on the island of Hawaii triggered a number of gas- and lava-oozing fissures in the East Riff Zone of the volcano. The fissures and high levels of sulfur dioxide gas prompted evacuations in the area.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Powerful hurricanes strengthen faster now than 30 years agoHurricanes that intensify rapidly—a characteristic of almost all powerful hurricanes—do so more strongly and quickly now than they did 30 years ago, according to a study published recently in Geophysical Research Letters, a journal of the American Geophysical Union.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Extinct pigeon species related to dodo foundA new pigeon species, the Zealandian Dove, which is related to the extinct dodo, has been identified at the Central Otago fossil site near St Bathans on the South Island of New Zealand by researchers from New Zealand and Australia.
10h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Diverse evidence is the key to helping people trust scienceIt takes more than just robust science to convince people to take on a certain point of view – consider topics such as vaccination, genetically modified foods and climate change.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

ESA selects three new mission concepts for studyA high-energy survey of the early Universe, an infrared observatory to study the formation of stars, planets and galaxies, and a Venus orbiter are to be considered for ESA's fifth medium class mission in its Cosmic Vision science programme, with a planned launch date in 2032.
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Feed: All Latest

Ketamine Stirs Up Hope—and Controversy—as a Depression DrugThe next big depression treatment might be ketamine, but how best to use it remains unknown.
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Feed: All Latest

Facebook's New Focus on 'Community' Might Actually Depress YouFacebook Ireland MarcusA survey finds that social networks that feature entertainment make users happier than those that highlight posts from friends and family.
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Feed: All Latest

This Startup Wants to Be AirBnb for Gene SequencersGene sequencers are pricey, so many researchers rent time on the machines. Now a startup called Meenta is simplifying the reservation process.
10h
Live Science

I Watched an Entire Flat Earth Convention — Here's What I LearnedWhile flat Earthers seem to trust and support scientific methods, they don't trust scientists.
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Ingeniøren

Android 9 begrænser overvågning af netværksaktivitetAndroid-apps kan i dag tilgå en masse data om enhedens netværksaktivitet, men det bliver ændret i forbindelse med næste version af Google's styresystem.
10h
Ingeniøren

Facebooks 'venneforslag' virker, ihvertfald for ISIS terroristerFacebooks 'venneforslag' har ifølge ny rapport hjulpet ekstremister med at finde hinanden på Facebook. Af de 1000 profiler tilhørende ISIS-sympatisører, som rapporten undersøgte, har Facebook kun slettet halvdelen.
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Ingeniøren

Spørg Scientariet: Hvad sker der med kroppen, hvis man kun spiser slik?En ung læser vil gerne vide, om der sker noget ved at leve af slik. Scientariets ernæringsforsker må desværre give et nedslående svar.
10h
The Atlantic

American Politics Are a Nightmare for Catholic UniversitiesAVE MARIA, Florida—In this enclave in Southwest Florida, the lush, pruned golf course and ritzy subdivisions are eclipsed only by the magnificent church that marks the town’s distinctive Catholic character. The town is also home to a similarly named religious institution, Ave Maria University, which was founded in 2003. The institution—and the master-planned community in which it is now located—i
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The Atlantic

In One Year, 57,375 Years of Life Were Lost to Police ViolencePeople killed by police in 2015 and 2016 had a median age of 35, and they still had an average of about 50 years left to live when they died. It’s this metric—the gap between how long someone lives and how long they were expected to live—that’s the focus of a new study by Anthony Bui, Matthew Coates, and Ellicott Matthay in the Journal of Epidemiology and Community Health. To find the true toll o
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The Atlantic

Every Culture AppropriatesMeet the Death Metal Cowboys of Botswana. In black leather decorated with metal studs, they play a pounding style of music that people who know more than me trace to the British band “Venom” and its 1981 album Welcome to Hell . Question: Is this cultural appropriation? Why or why not? The question is inspired by a spasm of social-media cruelty that caught wide attention last week. A young woman i
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The Atlantic

One Ohio School’s Quest to Rethink Bad BehaviorIn education, initiatives tend to roll down from above. A district buys a new curriculum, or gets funding for a new program, and principals receive their marching orders, which they in turn hand down to teachers below. That’s not the case at Ohio Avenue Elementary School in Columbus, Ohio. The 19th-century corniced brick building is perhaps an unlikely home for experimental methods of nurturing c
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Experimentation essential in saving Earth's degraded landGlobal land degradation is now so severe that hundreds of millions of hectares of land need to be restored back to health. Under the Bonn Challenge, nations have taken on the task of restoring 350 million hectares of degraded land around the globe by 2030.
10h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Optimised hearing devices featuring fibre-optic technologyGroundbreaking technology for the transmission of acoustic signals, designed for use in fully implantable hearing aids, has been successfully tested for the first time. The technology is based on completely contact-free fibre-optic technology, which senses the tiniest ossicle movements and uses them to stimulate the acoustic nerves. A joint Austrian-Serbian team including Karl Landsteiner Universi
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Scientific American Content: Global

9 Things That Matter about Psychoactive DrugsIf we focus only on the drug itself, we miss what really matters when it comes to how human beings respond -- Read more on ScientificAmerican.com
10h
Live Science

Former NASA Engineers Building Real-Life Underwater TransformerA transformer designed to do grunt work for the oil industry and military is coming, and it's… admittedly kind of fun to look at.
10h
Scientific American Content: Global

Does Parkinson's Begin in the Gut?A growing body of evidence links the neurodegenerative disease to the gastrointestinal tract, opening new possibilities for treatment -- Read more on ScientificAmerican.com
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Earth observations show Europe's natural wealth in steep declineIn March 2018, French scientists reported a steep decline in the country's bird populations, primarily as a result of agricultural activity. Causes include the increase in monoculture, detrimental land-use policies and, perhaps most importantly, the growth in the use of powerful pesticides such as neonicotinoids, which, by killing off insects, reduces the bird population by reducing the food avail
10h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Team discovers important interaction between land use and climate change in driving species distribution shiftsClimate change is altering where species live all over the planet. With global warming, species are moving towards the poles and up elevation where temperature is lower. However, along with global climate change, the world is also experiencing massive changes in land-use which may also impact where species live. Could both of these forces be influencing current changes in species distributions?
11h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Researchers teach robots to touchTouching and grasping objects are surprisingly complex processes, an area where contemporary robots are still clumsy. Principal investigator Jukka Häkkinen, Ph.D., and post-doctoral researcher Jussi Hakala, D.Sc. (Tech), have developed an imaging method for measuring human touch.
11h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Malaria parasite accumulates undetected in bone marrowA Plasmodium vivax infection is like an iceberg: It's dangerous, in part, because much of it hides out of view. A new study published this week in mBio shows how researchers are revealing more of this parasite's biology.
11h
Live Science

Enormous New Zealand Sinkhole to Be Fenced in So Cows Aren't Swallowed UpWhile rounding up cows before the crack of dawn last week, a New Zealand farm worker happened upon a gaping gouge in the earth.
11h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Antennas for lighter, more economic communications satellitesA telecommunications engineer at the NUP/UPNA-Public University of Navarre has designed two antenna prototypes for communications satellites; they offer more lightweight solutions, are less bulky than the ones used conventionally and constitute considerable savings for the space industry, which has already expressed an interest in them. The ESA-European Space Agency, among others, has collaborated
11h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Not so fantastic single-use plastic to get an eco-friendly makeoverMilk-based edible food packaging and ready-meal trays made from wood could help reduce the pervasiveness of single-use plastic, a major cause of environmental pollution adversely affecting wildlife, habitats and human health.
11h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Novel scientific method to derive water quality criteria of metals for protecting different marine ecosystems worldwideIncreasing contamination of marine ecosystems by metals such as mercury, cadmium, chromium and nickel is a global environmental concern, because elevated concentrations of metals can pose hazards to marine organisms, and humans who may consume contaminated seafood. Setting water quality criteria (WQC) for metals (i.e., environmental safety limits) is an essential step for assessing and regulating
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Scientists reveal drivers of prolonged spring-summer drought over North ChinaNorth China faces a serious water crisis. Almost half of China's population lives in the region, and most wheat and corn are grown there. Since the late 1990s, severe and extreme droughts have frequently occurred, and drought affects an area that has increased by 3.72 percent per decade over the past five decades, posing great challenges for regional sustainable development. Scientists have been c
11h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

The apparent inner calm of quantum materialsResearchers from the University of Geneva (UNIGE) and multi-institutional collaborators have been studying BACOVO—a one-dimensional quantum material. They report that the material exhibits a novel topological phase transition governed by two types of topological excitation. In addition, they were able to choose which of the two types would dominate the other. Their research is published in the jou
11h
The Atlantic

Tax Breaks for Products That Were Once Made in AmericaTwo weeks before the presidential election, Donald Trump flew into a faded textile town in North Carolina and riled up the crowd over one of his campaign’s signature promises: bringing back the jobs that businesses had shipped overseas. “They wouldn’t be doing it if I was president,” Trump said to cheers. “Believe me, when they say, ‘We want to send our product’—whatever the hell they make—‘We wa
11h
The Atlantic

What Black Voters WantIn 2018, black voters are finding out just what the hell they had to lose. Nazis and Klansmen march openly and proudly, and hate crimes appear to be on the rise . Police killings of people— especially black people —remain largely the same year to year, and this iteration of the Justice Department has largely abdicated any federal responsibility in reducing brutality . An infant-mortality crisis i
11h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Scientists train spider to jump on demand to discover secrets of animal movementScientists have unlocked the secrets of how some predatory spiders catch their prey whilst hunting by successfully training one to jump different distances and heights for the first time.
11h
Latest Headlines | Science News

A celebration of curiosity for Feynman’s 100th birthdayRichard Feynman, born a century ago, was a curious character in every sense of the word.
11h
Ingeniøren

Orbicon fik rekordunderskud i 2017Hedelselskabets rådgivningsdel, Orbicon, fik et driftsunderskud på 65 mio. kr. i 2017 på grund flere fejlslagne projekter. Ny ledelse skal få virksomheden på ret kurs
11h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Research team uncovers mechanism of action for a class of bacterial toxinsPore-forming toxins are common bacterial poisons. They attack organisms by introducing holes in cell membranes. A team of scientists at the Technical University of Munich (TUM) has now unraveled the mechanism of action for one of these toxins. The findings could help combat associated diseases and advance crop protection.
11h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Novel solution to a GPS blind spot for safer and smarter driving experience in multilevel road networksMultilevel road networks such as flyovers and overpasses are built in large cities to solve traffic congestion. Rapid, accurate identification of the road level in a multilevel road network is important to make driving safer and more comfortable.
11h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Wrap an electrode material for Li-ion battery into the inner spacing of carbon nanotubeResearchers at the Toyohashi University of Technology have demonstrated the electrochemical performance of lithium ion batteries (LIBs) using phosphorus-encapsulated carbon nanotube electrodes, in which red phosphorus with high capacity is introduced into the inner spacing of carbon nanotubes (CNTs). The electrodes indicated an improvement in the electrochemical reactivity of red phosphorus when a
11h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

3-D printing of weapons threatens security on global, national and personal levelWhile advances in additive manufacturing offer potential breakthroughs in prosthetic arms or jet engine parts, 3D printing, as it is known, may also accelerate weapons proliferation.
12h
BBC News - Science & Environment

Lava swallows car in HawaiiThe Kilauea volcano in Hawaii started erupting on 3 May and has so far destroyed 26 homes.
12h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Deutsche Post digs deep to master parcel boomGerman logistics group Deutsche Post DHL confirmed its annual forecasts Tuesday, showing confidence although first-quarter profits slipped in the midst of a package boom spurred by online shopping.
12h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Traumatised bears, wolves find solace at Greek sanctuaryOrphaned as an infant, three-year-old Patrick takes a wary view of visitors. He crouches low, licks his claws and starts humming—a bear's equivalent of thumb-sucking.
12h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

States await election security reviews as primaries heat upWith the midterm congressional primaries about to go into full swing, the Department of Homeland Security has completed security reviews of election systems in only about half the states that have requested them so far.
12h
The Atlantic

Iran Hawks Are the New Iraq HawksLast week, while watching Benjamin Netanyahu unveil secret information that supposedly proved that Iran is deceiving the world about its nuclear-weapons program, I had a flashback. It was to February 5, 2003, when then-Secretary of State Colin Powell unveiled secret information that supposedly proved that Iraq was deceiving the world about its nuclear, chemical, and biological weapons programs. L
12h
NYT > Science

Trilobites: How the Father of Computer Science Decoded Nature’s Mysterious PatternsIn research shortly before his death in 1954, Alan Turing used mathematics to explore how forms emerge, yielding insights that are now being applied to problems like desalination.
12h
NYT > Science

Nonfiction: What Does Quantum Physics Actually Tell Us About the World?Adam Becker’s “What Is Real?” explores the controversy around quantum physics and its ability to describe anything definite about the world of atoms.
12h
NYT > Science

Everything You (and John Oliver) Need to Know About Koala ChlamydiaTo honor the comedian John Oliver, the actor Russell Crowe has donated a new medical ward in Australia to treat koalas with chlamydia.
12h
Ingeniøren

Hemmelighedsfuld odyssé sikrede købet af Andreas Mogensens rumkapselKapslen er unik: Andreas Mogensen tog afsted i den, og verdensrekordholderen for ophold i rummet, Scott Kelly, vendte hjem i den.
12h
BBC News - Science & Environment

How a spider jumps on its prey - science has the answerScientists hope to learn how to build tiny jumping robots - by studying an extraordinary spider.
12h
Dagens Medicin

Hvis De lige vil lytte et øjeblik, dr. JacobsenSteffen Jacobsen skyder på djøferne og alle andre i sin nye bog, men er systemet nu også så sygt? Det mener jeg ikke. Faggrupperne i regionerne skaber jo resultater sammen.
12h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Japan's Takeda to buy Shire in record $62.5 bn dealDrug giant Takeda on Tuesday said it would buy Irish pharmaceuticals firm Shire in a deal worth $62.5 billion, the biggest foreign takeover ever by a Japanese firm.
13h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Google to showcase AI advances at its big conferenceGoogle is likely to again put artificial intelligence in the spotlight at its annual developers conference Thursday.
13h
Feed: All Latest

Google I/O 2018: Watch Live Video of the Keynote Right HereGoogle kicks off its annual developer conference in Mountain View, California on Tuesday, May 8 at 10 am Pacific. Watch it live.
14h
Feed: All Latest

Google I/O 2018 Liveblog: News From Google's Big ShowFollow along as WIRED's staff covers Google's biggest event of the year.
14h
Science-Based Medicine

Living WaterA device called Living Water will convert your tap water into acidic or alkaline water that supposedly is ionized and has antioxidant properties. There is no evidence that it offers any health benefits.
14h
Ingeniøren

Myndigheder blåstempler TDC’s salg af lokationsdataTeleselskabet må gerne følge danske og udenlandske turisters færden via lokationsdata fra mobilsignaler. Sådan lyder det fra Erhvervsstyrelsen der har undersøgt sagen.
15h
Ingeniøren

Ekspert om ny EPJ i Region Syd: De mangler en vision for formålet med investeringenRegion Syddanmark har for nylig valgt jyske Systematic som leverandør af et nyt EPJ-system til 252 millioner kroner. Men der ligger stadigvæk ikke en færdig business case.
15h
cognitive science

What do you guys think of the legitimacy of this study? Kind of scary if it’s true...submitted by /u/Simpleton4848 [link] [comments]
15h
Science | The Guardian

Weedkiller products more toxic than their active ingredient, tests showAfter more than 40 years of widespread use, new scientific tests show formulated weedkillers have higher rates of toxicity to human cells US government researchers have uncovered evidence that some popular weedkilling products, like Monsanto’s widely-used Roundup, are potentially more toxic to human cells than their active ingredient is by itself. These “formulated” weedkillers are commonly used
16h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Our vulnerable nervous system: What affects its protective sheaths?Multiple sclerosis is a serious neurological condition that has no known cure. Although the causes are far from being known, we do know that the immune system erroneously attacks the protective sheaths around nerve fibres. Scientists at Friedrich-Alexander-Universität Erlangen-Nürnberg have discovered how the formation of myelin sheaths is regulated by protein molecules. This knowledge could be us
17h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News

3-D printing of weapons threatens security on global, national and personal levelA new RAND Corporation paper suggests additive manufacturing could benefit military adversaries, violent extremists and even street criminals, who could produce their own weapons for use and sale.
17h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News

New biomarker identified for early diagnosis of lung cancerIn a novel study in The American Journal of Pathology investigators found that CKAP4 levels were significantly higher in patients with lung cancer than in healthy individuals. They further determined that CKAP4 levels are already elevated in the blood of patients with stage I disease, making it a potential noninvasive diagnostic marker that could change current practices in the diagnosis and treat
17h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Uterine cancer survivors are more likely to have cardiovascular problemsA new study in the Journal of the National Cancer Institute indicates that survivors of uterine cancer are more likely to experience cardiovascular problems years after treatment.
17h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News

A new approach to patient safety proactively addresses common health care system successesClinical researchers at Nationwide Children's Hospital have published one of the first health care studies to examine how behavior aligned with Safety II concepts impacts patient safety. Safety II is a novel approach to patient safety that focuses on why processes perform correctly in high-performing units, as opposed to its predecessor, Safety I, which focuses on why processes fail.
17h
Ingeniøren

Politikere kan glemme alt om hyldevarer: Alle eltog skal skræddersys til danske forholdBelært af IC4-sagen vil politikerne have hyldevarer, når Danmark skal købe elektriske tog til 11 milliarder kroner, mens DSB ønsker sig tog, der både kan bruges som regionaltog og intercity­tog.
18h
Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

Building better beta peptidesBeta peptides have become a key tool in building more robust biomaterials. These synthetic molecules mimic the structure of small proteins, but they are protected against processes that degrade natural peptides. A new study has expanded what we can do with these crafty peptides. The researchers show that molecules that have previously posed challenges to bioengineers can now be used to make new ki
19h
Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

Simple treatment may minimize hearing loss triggered by loud noisesNew research reveals how traumatic noise damages hearing and identifies a potential way to preserve it.
19h
Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

Importing food damages domestic environmentTrees falling as fragile forests become cropland is a visual shorthand for the environmental costs exporting countries pay to meet lucrative global demands for food. Yet a new study reveals a counterintuitive truth: Importing food also damages homeland ecology. In this week's Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences, researchers at Michigan State University and their colleagues show that th
20h
Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

Hematene joins parade of new 2D materialsAn international team has created two-dimensional hematene, an atomically thin form of the common iron oxide known as hematite. The new material shows promise for 2-D magnetism and efficient light-assisted water splitting.
20h
Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

A new way to watch brain activity in actionA new imaging tool makes it possible to track the firing of millions of brain cells in mice while the animals move about as normal. The method could help shed new light onto the neural processes that create behavior.
20h
Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

New biotech technique accelerates protein therapy researchA synthetic biology research team has combined technologies to develop a new biotech technique that promises to accelerate research into protein therapies.
20h
Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

Retaliatory tariffs could cost billions in reduced US soybean exportsResearchers have examined potential impacts to US soybean exports at three hypothetical tariff rates. The research indicates that exports are projected to drop by $4.5 billion to $7.7 billion if a 25 percent tariff is imposed, with even greater losses should a higher tariff be levied.
20h
Scientific American Content: Global

Mars Lander Will Peer Inside the Red PlanetThe InSight Mission will look at Mars's seismic activity and latent heat to find out more about how planets get made--and how humans might live there. -- Read more on ScientificAmerican.com
20h
Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

3D reconstruction of hidden branch structures made by using image analysis and AI techScientists have succeeded in reconstruction of plant branch structures, including the branch structures under leaves, by using image analysis and artificial intelligence technology, a world first.
20h
Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

Study confirms curable state between single and widespread cancersUsing molecular determinants combined with clinical data, physicians confirm their oligometastasis hypothesis in colorectal cancers with limited spread of disease to the liver.
20h
NYT > Science

New Files Detail the Threats Made Against Scott Pruitt at the E.P.A.The E.P.A. chief has cited the memos to justify costly round-the-clock security, which has attracted criticism and scrutiny.
20h
NYT > Science

After Fatal Uber Crash, a Self-Driving Start-Up Moves ForwardDrive.ai said it would start a taxi service in Texas. It was the first new rollout of autonomous cars in the United States since one operated by Uber killed a pedestrian in March.
20h
New Scientist - News

Tourism is four times worse for the climate than we thoughtTourism is being blamed for 8 per cent of greenhouse gas emissions, and it emits more every year – making it harder to stop dangerous climate change
21h
New Scientist - News

Exoplanet with a cloudless sky may let us see inside a gas giantA distant gas giant with one of the clearest atmospheres ever detected could let us see the interior of these huge planets, which are usually masked by clouds
21h
New Scientist - News

The sun will die in a blaze of swirling gas in 5 billion yearsWe used to think our sun was too small to produce a planetary nebula when it dies, but new models show it will indeed go out in a massive cloud of bright, hot gas
21h
cognitive science

Editing Strategysubmitted by /u/umlproducer1 [link] [comments]
21h
The Scientist RSS

Marine Protected Areas Arent Protected Against Climate ChangeIf left unchecked, greenhouse gas emissions will drive ocean temperatures up, affecting wildlife in these regions.
21h
Futurity.org

Social context changes how disease spreadsSocial context in a community has a lot to do with how a disease spreads, according to new research in fruit flies. The researchers found that the ratio of female flies to males, as well as the mating dynamics of the community, were strong indicators of how a disease outbreak would progress. While no one genotype was at greater risk than any other, they found males in a community faced a greater
21h
Futurity.org

Your job isn’t the best way to predict lifetime earningsNew research challenges the assumption that a person’s occupation most accurately predicts their lifetime earnings. “Even though there is a strong assumption, it was really difficult to test whether that was actually true or not,” says ChangHwan Kim, professor of sociology at the University of Kansas. In a new study, Kim and coauthors instead find that a person’s cross-sectional annual earnings t
22h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Vigorous exercise reduces tiredness in testicular cancer survivorsHigh-intensity interval training reduces tiredness and improves self-esteem for testicular cancer survivors, according to a study published in the British Journal of Cancer.
22h
Futurity.org

Compound stops sperm from swimming without side effectsA compound called EP055 binds to sperm proteins and significantly slows the overall motility of the sperm without affecting hormones. The finding, which appear in PLOS ONE , suggest EP055 could be a candidate for contraceptive pill for men that’s free of side effects. “Simply put, the compound turns-off the sperm’s ability to swim, significantly limiting fertilization capabilities,” says lead inv
22h
Live Science

You Have a Second Immune System, and It Might Be Ruining Your Love LifeIn the battle against germs, your immune system is the best wing-man there is. When it comes to dating? Not so much.
22h
Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

Understanding how DNA is selectively tagged with 'do not use' marksScientists identify proteins that target specific DNA regions to keep genetic material under control.
22h
Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

Neuro filter sharpens visual processingBlurry and clear versions of an image are represented similarly in the brain, according to a neuroimaging study. The research shows how the visual system fills in missing information to maintain perception when visibility is low.
22h
Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

Thank your brain for gratitudeA brain network that gives rise to feelings of gratitude has been uncovered. The study could spur future investigations into how these 'building blocks' transform social information into complex emotions.
22h
Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

New model could help rebuild eroding lands in coastal LouisianaA researcher has developed a model to help stakeholders figure out what factors they need to consider to rebuild land in coastal Louisiana.
22h
Futurity.org

Can crowdsourced workout plans rival personal trainers?A new platform crowdsources workouts from non-experts to create exercise regiments that align with national recommendations and suit the user’s schedule and interests. Its creators aimed to alleviate two difficulties with starting to exercise: the high cost of personal trainers and the low quality of existing free or low-cost exercise planning options. “Most apps available to the public offer lim
22h
Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

Nuclear pore functions are essential for T cell survivalA new study describes how a specific nuclear pore component is critical for the survival of circulating T cells. The findings identify a new node of T cell receptor signaling and could pave the way for the development of future immunotherapies.
22h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Police violence takes 'substantial' toll on youth and people of colorPolice violence in the US is taking a 'substantial' toll on youth and people of colour, indicates research published online in the Journal of Epidemiology & Community Health.
22h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Many US Airbnb venues may be falling short on fire safety, finds snapshot surveyMany US Airbnb venues may be falling short on fire safety, indicate the results of a snapshot survey of more than 120,500 rentals in 16 cities, published in the journal Injury Prevention.
22h

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