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California’s rooftop solar rule is a pricey path to emissions reductionsCalifornia USA solar panel on every house might sound good, but it isn’t smart climate policy.
41min
Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

Applied science may yield more translational research publications than basic scienceWhile translational research can happen at any stage of the research process, a recent investigation of behavioral and social science research awards granted by the NIH between 2008 and 2014 revealed that applied science yielded a higher volume of translational research publications than basic science, according to a new study.
6min
Futurity.org

Absurdly thin magnets could store way more dataResearchers have taken the magnetic materials that form the backbone of modern digital information technologies, such as hard-disk storage, one step further by encoding information using magnets that are just a few layers of atoms thick. This breakthrough may revolutionize both cloud computing technologies and consumer electronics by enabling data storage at a greater density and improved energy
25min
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

Spinal surgery for osteoporosis no better for pain relief than injectionsVertebroplasty (surgery to repair spinal fractures) is no more effective for pain relief than a sham (placebo) procedure in older patients with osteoporosis, finds a new published trial.
7min
Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

Step aside Superman, steel is no competition for this new materialWhen it comes to materials, there is no question as to who wins the strongman competition. Spider silk is known as being the strongest fabric, and steel, ceramics and glass fibers are the best building materials. But now, researchers are reporting that specially arranged nano-sized cellulose fibers are the strongest material of them all, in a move that might cause some to re-name Superman the 'man
6min
Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

Words matter: Stigmatizing language in medical records may affect the care a patient receivesA new study found that physicians who use stigmatizing language in their patients' medical records may affect the care those patients get for years to come.
6min
Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

Battery-free 'smart' toys move closer to commercial realityScientists report they have used specialized nanogenerators that gather energy from mechanical vibrations to transform squeaky bathtub companions and other conventional children's toys into 'smart' electronics. They say the finding could have broad commercial applications, leading to the development of battery-free, self-powered toys, medical sensors and other devices.
6min
Futurity.org

How a hotter early Earth became the rocky planet it is todayNew research supports the theory that the early Earth was highly volcanically active, and that evidence of its violent transition to plate tectonics is still visible today. “Geology is built upon an idea, uniformitarianism, that we can study geological processes occurring today and use these to understand how the Earth works at timescales of millions of years,” says Adam Beall, who studied early
11min
Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

Computer-designed customized regenerative heart valvesCardiovascular tissue engineering aims to treat heart disease with prostheses that grow and regenerate. Now, researchers have successfully implanted regenerative heart valves, designed with the aid of computer simulations, into sheep for the first time.
35min
Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

Neuroinflammation seen in spinal cord, nerve roots of patients with chronic sciaticaA study has found, for the first time in humans, that patients with chronic sciatica -- back pain that shoots down the leg -- have evidence of inflammation in key areas of the nervous system.
35min
Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

Gene study spots clues to heart risk for statin patientsA research team has discovered genetic variations that increase the risk of heart attack even when patients are receiving a statin drug like Lipitor or Crestor to lower their blood cholesterol.
35min
Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

New research shows how Indo-European languages spread across AsiaA new study has discovered that horses were first domesticated by descendants of hunter-gatherer groups in Kazakhstan who left little direct trace in the ancestry of modern populations. The research sheds new light on the long-standing 'steppe theory' on the origin and movement of Indo-European languages made possible by the domestication of the horse.
35min
Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

For food-aid recipients, information is powerA new study conducted in Indonesia shows that poor people are more likely to receive the assistance they're entitled to when they're notified about the social programs in question.
35min
EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Spinal fluid could be used to predict the progression of multiple sclerosis, study findsA study led by the University of Birmingham has found that analysis of fluid in the spine could be used to predict the future progression of multiple sclerosis.
39min
BBC News - Science & Environment

UN climate stalemate sees extra week of talks addedNegotiations deadlocked as delegates get bogged down in technical arguments about the Paris climate pact.
43min
Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

Tiny fossils unlock clues to Earth's climate half a billion years agoScientists have quantified the temperature of Earth's oceans over half a billion years ago by combining fossil data and climate models.
49min
Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

A small sea as a model region for the global coastal oceanWarming, acidification, eutrophication, the loss of oxygen -- examples of major changes being observed or expected for the future in coastal zones around the world. These processes are occurring in the Baltic Sea at a much faster pace than in other regions. But the Baltic also provides useful lessons for how negative trends can be reversed by protective measures. Researchers promote the Baltic Sea
49min
Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

For lemurs, size of forest fragments may be more important than degree of isolationOccurrence probability of three lemur species in tropical dry forest increases with fragment size but can increase or decrease with fragment isolation depending on the species, according to a new study.
49min
Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

The joy of neurons: A simplified 'cookbook' for engineering brain cells to study diseaseThe new research opens the door to studying common brain conditions such as autism, schizophrenia, addiction and Alzheimer's disease under reproducible conditions in a dish.
49min
Futurity.org

Listen to our rotating galaxy make strange musicA new website, Astronomy Sound of the Month or AstroSoM (pronounced “Astro Psalm”), features different sounds produced from actual astronomy data, along with an astronomer’s brief explanation. “…making sounds out of real astronomy data is just plain cool!” Scientists often transform astronomy data in a way that allows for interpretation with visual plots such as color-coded graphs. Greg Salvesen,
53min
Futurity.org

To feed a crowded planet, put more fish on your plate?New evidence shows seafood from aquatic farming—aquaculture—can help feed the growing global population while substantially reducing one of the biggest environmental impacts of meat production: land use. And it could do so without requiring people to entirely abandon meat. To satisfy the protein demands of an anticipated nearly 10 billion people by 2050, the United Nations’ Food and Agriculture O
1h
Big Think

What is ASMR, and does it explain the appeal of religion?Catch up on the phenomenon known as ASMR, which is exploding in popularity, and may be linked to the appeal of religion. Read More
1h
Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

Precision measurement of the proton's weak charge narrows the search for new physicsA new result from the Q-weak experiment provides a precision test of the weak force, one of four fundamental forces in nature. The proton's weak charge was found to be QWp=0.0719±0.0045, in excellent agreement with Standard Model predictions. Because the proton's weak charge is so precisely predicted in this model, the new Q-weak result provides insight into predictions of hitherto unobserved heav
1h
Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

Diverse Parkinson's-related disorders may stem from different strains of same proteinDifferent Parkinson's-related brain disorders, called synucleionpathies, are characterized by misfolded proteins embedded in cells. Researchers found that the type of brain cell afflicted dictates which pathological form of alpha-synuclein protein becomes the disease culprit.
1h
Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

Red Sea fungus yields leads for new epilepsy drugsNew treatments for epilepsy are sorely needed because current medications don't work for many people with the disease. To find new leads, researchers have now turned to the sea -- a source of unique natural products that have been largely untapped for prospective drugs. The scientists report that two metabolites produced by a fungus from the Red Sea look promising.
1h
Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

Mass vaccinations will not prevent Ebolavirus outbreaksProphylactic mass vaccination programs are not a realistic option in the battle to prevent new Ebolavirus outbreaks, a research team has shown.
1h
Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

Microwaved plastic increases lithium-sulfur battery lifespanEngineers have figured out a way to tackle plastic landfills while also improving batteries -- by putting ink-free plastic soaked in sulfur-containing solvent into a microwave, and then into batteries as a carbon scaffold.
1h
Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

Stress helps unlearn fearStress can have a positive effect on extinction learning, which causes previously learned associations to dissolve. According to the findings of cognitive psychologists, stress causes extinction learning to occur independent of context. This might prove useful for example in therapies for anxiety disorders.
1h
Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

Engineers make drug microparticles a thousand times faster than ever beforeExtended-release drugs rely on microparticles of consistent size and shape so they dissolve at a predictable rate. Engineers have now developed a microfluidic system where more than ten thousand microparticle generators run in parallel, making more than 300 billion an hour, all on a silicon-and-glass chip that can fit into a shirt pocket.
1h
Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

Breeding benefits when love bites wombats on the buttMonitoring wombats for behaviors such as pacing and rump biting could help conservation efforts by increasing the success of captive breeding.
1h
Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

Shiga toxin-producing E. coli found in foodEscherichia coli (E. coli) is a germ that occurs naturally in the gut of mammals and birds, as well as in the human intestinal flora. However, certain E. coli types can cause severe diarrhea in humans. These virulent E. coli types include Shiga toxin-producing E. coli (STEC), also known as Verotoxin-producing E. coli (VTEC).
1h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Genetic counseling and testing proposed for patients with the brain tumor medulloblastomaResearchers have created the first genetic screening guidelines for medulloblastoma patients after identifying gene variations that make carriers susceptible to develop the brain tumor and possibly other cancers.
1h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Should the number of GP's patient consultations be capped?The British Medical Association recently proposed guidance to cap the number of patients a GP sees each day to prevent unsafe working levels, but should this be recommended? Experts debate the issue in The BMJ today.
1h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Many newborn screening recommendations do not assess key evidence on benefits and harmsMany national recommendations on whether to screen newborn babies for rare conditions do not assess the evidence on the key benefits and harms of screening, warn researchers in a study published by The BMJ today.
1h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Spinal surgery for osteoporosis no better for pain relief than injectionsVertebroplasty (surgery to repair spinal fractures) is no more effective for pain relief than a sham (placebo) procedure in older patients with osteoporosis, finds a trial published by The BMJ today.
1h
The Atlantic

The Atlantic Daily: The Answer and the QuestionWhat We’re Following Intelligence Briefing: The Senate held a confirmation hearing for Gina Haspel, President Trump’s nominee to be CIA director. Here are 10 key moments from her testimony. In her career at the CIA, Haspel oversaw a so-called black site where at least one detainee was tortured. Though she told senators that she didn’t run the interrogation department and that the CIA had learned
1h
Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

Fish in schools can take it easyUsing a new computer model, researchers have shown that a fish expends less energy when it swims in a school, because neighbouring fish produce a 'suction' effect.
1h
Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

Brood parasitism in fishBiologists have demonstrated that 'evolutionary experience' as well as learning protects cichlid fish from the brood parasitism practiced by the African cuckoo catfish.
1h
Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

Occupational exposures linked with increased risk of COPDA study with more than 3,300 participants in 12 countries has established a relationship between occupational exposure to biological dusts, gases, fumes and pesticides and COPD. The researchers did a follow-up of the participants 20 years after the first assessment.
1h
Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

People with OCD process emotions differently than their unaffected siblingsA new study reports that people with obsessive-compulsive disorder (OCD) feel more distress when viewing images to provoke OCD-related emotions than their unaffected siblings. Although the unaffected siblings showed lower levels of distress, they had higher levels of brain activity in regions important for attention. The findings suggest that the family members may draw on additional brain resourc
1h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Probiotics and breastfeeding reduces potential antibiotic resistance in childrenTargeted probiotic supplementation in breastfed infants can significantly reduce the potential for antibiotic resistance, new research presented today at the 51st ESPGHAN Annual Meeting shows.
1h
Popular Science

The Leaning Tower of Pisa stays up for the same reason it leansScience Engineers and scientists have been fascinated by the unusual structure for half a millennium. Earthquakes, Mussolini, two hundred years of construction misadventures—the Leaning Tower of Pisa has kept standing through it all. New research from a European team of…
1h
The Atlantic

The Atlantic Politics & Policy Daily: Better Call Cohen-Written by Elaine Godfrey ( @elainejgodfrey ) Today in 5 Lines Shortly after Trump was inaugurated as president, Novartis, one of the world’s largest drug companies, signed a $1.2 million contract with Michael Cohen for consulting work, the company disclosed Wednesday. Cohen’s banking transactions have come under increased scrutiny after Stormy Daniels’s personal lawyer alleged that Cohen had fi
1h
Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

Revealing the mysteries of superconductorsScientists have successfully demonstrated that a new type of optical magnetometer, the NV magnetoscope, can map a unique feature of superconductive materials that along with zero resistance defines the superconductivity itself.
1h
Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

How to use limited bandwidth more efficiently? Think like a cave-dwelling fishFor the first time, researchers have demonstrated a light-based device that mimics a fish's incredible jamming avoidance response (JAR) by moving the frequency of an emitted signal away from other signals that could potentially cause interference. The new system could eventually help overcome the spectral bandwidth crunch caused by ever increasing numbers of wireless devices and transmitted data c
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

Infant growth patterns affected by type of protein consumedA new study has determined that protein intake from solid foods has a significant impact on infant growth during the first year of life. The study tested whether dairy-based or meat-based protein in an infant's diet contributed to growth and weight gain.
1h
Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

500-year-old Leaning Tower of Pisa mystery unveiled by engineersWhy has the Leaning Tower of Pisa survived the strong earthquakes that have hit the region since the middle ages? This is a long-standing question that experts in earthquake engineering and soil-structure interaction have now solved..
1h
Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

Microbes are savvy investors when contributing to the common goodScientists investigating the fundamental question in biology as to why individuals have evolved to cooperate rather than simply exploiting the contributions of their rivals, have found that microbes vary their contribution to maximize the return of investment.
1h
NYT > Science

With Schneiderman Out, Environmental Fight Loses a Prominent VoiceAs a leader of the fight against the Trump administration’s rollbacks leaves the stage, what comes next? And what about the Exxon investigation?
1h
Live Science

Physicists Just Measured One of the Four Fundamental Forces of Nature. Now They're Bummed.Physicists are looking for signs of new physics, but the new measurement showed no signs of it.
1h
Popular Science

Is the net still neutral?Net Neutrality SenateTechnology Wondering if Net Neutrality is still in place? Here's your answer. Net Neutrality is in trouble, but it still has a fighting chance. Here are the important dates and developments about the rules that govern the internet.
1h
Latest Headlines | Science News

Despite a new measurement, the neutron’s lifetime is still puzzlingTwo techniques for gauging the subatomic particle’s longevity disagree.
2h
Live Science

Man's Lurking Parasitic Infection 'Woke Up' in His BrainA large mass in a man's brain turned out to have an unusual cause.
2h
Science : NPR

'Holy Cow, The Waves Are Glowing!'An algae bloom off the San Diego coast is putting on a brilliant display of bioluminescence that is lighting up the water and drawing huge crowds to marvel at the rare phenomenon. (Image credit: Stephen Bay )
2h
Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

For how long will the USA remain the Nobel Prize leader?Since first being awarded in 1901, most Nobel Prizes for science have gone to the USA, the United Kingdom, Germany and France. A new study has now shown that the Nobel Prize productivity in these countries is primarily determined by two factors: a long-term success rate, and periods during which each country has been able to win an especially large number of Nobel Prizes.
2h
Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

Hostility towards minorities can be contagiousInter-ethnic conflicts often escalate surprisingly quickly. In a recent study, researchers have investigated the influence of the environment on peoples' hostility against minorities with the help of experiments. They found that hostility towards members of other ethnic groups is much more often imitated than hostility towards co-ethnics.
2h
Live Science

Watch a Massive 'Pollen Cloud' Explode from Late-Blooming TreeA new video showing a tree releasing a huge dust cloud of pollen, aka "plant sperm powder," doesn't show anything all that unusual, plant biologists say.
2h
Live Science

Biggest Test Yet Shows Einstein Was Wrong About 'Spooky Action at a Distance'Physicists recently addressed a persistent flaw in a test that defines reality.
2h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News

More than one day of early-pregnancy bleeding linked to lower birthweightWomen who experience vaginal bleeding for more than one day during the first trimester of pregnancy may be more likely to have a smaller baby, compared to women who do not experience bleeding in the first trimester, suggest researchers at the National Institutes of Health.
2h
Science : NPR

California Moves Forward With Plan To Require Solar Panels On New HomesCalifornia USThe state is poised to become the first in the country to require the panels on new single-family houses, with a few exceptions. The mandate will kick in as of 2020. (Image credit: Justin Sullivan/Getty Images)
2h
BBC News - Science & Environment

California becomes first US state to mandate solar on homesCalifornia USOfficials say homeowners could see significantly lower utilities costs per month.
2h
Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

Mixed forests: Ecologically and economically superiorMixed forests are more productive than monocultures. This is true on all five continents, and particularly in regions with high precipitation. These findings are highly relevant for forest science and forest management on a global scale.
2h
The Atlantic

'I Was Aspiring to be Like My Grandmothers'Under the beating sun on Mount Rainier, surrounded by waterfalls and meadows full of flowers, six-year-old Paulette Jordan used to listen to her uncles tell stories about her great-great-grandfathers and great-great-grandmothers. They were chiefs and leaders—one was the famous Chief Moses of the Sinkiuse-Columbia tribe. At the University of Washington, Jordan worked as a ​​​​​student activist, en
2h
Live Science

Most Marijuana Dispensaries Give Inaccurate Advice on Pot in PregnancyMany marijuana dispensaries recommend marijuana products for treating pregnant women's morning sickness, even though marijuana use in pregnancy is linked with health problems for newborns.
2h
Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

New polymer manufacturing process saves 10 orders of magnitude of energyMakers of cars, planes, buses -- anything that needs strong, lightweight and heat resistant parts -- are poised to benefit from a new manufacturing process that requires only a quick touch from a small heat source to send a cascading hardening wave through a polymer. Researchers have developed a new polymer-curing process that could reduce the cost, time and energy needed, compared with the curren
3h
Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

Beavers do 'dam' good work cleaning waterBeavers could help clean up polluted rivers and stem the loss of valuable soils from farms, new research shows.
3h
Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

Unlocking cancer's secrets using the 'social networks' of cellsScientists have developed a method for probing the genetic underpinnings of cancer and other diseases, which could lead to better treatments.
3h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Neuroinflammation seen in spinal cord, nerve roots of patients with chronic sciaticaA study by Massachusetts General Hospital investigators has found, for the first time in humans, that patients with chronic sciatica -- back pain that shoots down the leg -- have evidence of inflammation in key areas of the nervous system.
3h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News

New research shows how Indo-European languages spread across AsiaA new study has discovered that horses were first domesticated by descendants of hunter-gatherer groups in Kazakhstan who left little direct trace in the ancestry of modern populations. The research sheds new light on the long-standing "steppe theory" on the origin and movement of Indo-European languages made possible by the domestication of the horse.
3h
The Scientist RSS

Genetic Screen Predicts T-Cell Lymphoma AggressionSequencing of a single gene can spot patients with a dangerous form of mycosis fungoides better than other prognostic tests.
3h
The Scientist RSS

Novartis Paid More than $1 Million to Firm Linked to Trump LawyerThe drug company had an agreement with Essential Consultants, run by the president's former attorney Michael Cohen.
3h
Feed: All Latest

The Research Behind Google's New Tools for Digital Well-BeingGoogle wants to foster JOMO—the joy of missing out—by helping users understand their habits and unplug from their phones.
3h
Science : NPR

Google's New Voice Bot Sounds, Um, Maybe Too RealGoogle Duplex AI I/OThe company touts AI that peppers its conversation with "uh" and "hmm" to imitate the tics of human speech. Many observers took issue with how the bot apparently tricked a human on the phone. (Image credit: Justin Sullivan/Getty Images)
3h
Scientific American Content: Global

WHO Officials Fear Latest Ebola Outbreak in Congo Could Spread to Big CitiesTwo cases in the western part of the country have been confirmed -- Read more on ScientificAmerican.com
3h
NYT > Science

Matter: In Ancient Skeletons, Scientists Discover a Modern Foe: Hepatitis BFrom 15 sets of skeletal remains, researchers have recovered DNA from the oldest viruses known to have infected humans — and have resurrected some strains in the laboratory.
3h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Lesbian, bisexual women may be more likely to develop diabetes due to stressThe team theorizes that behavioral factors alone do not fully explain lesbian and bisexual women's greater risk of obesity and type 2 diabetes, saying it may also be necessary to address the detrimental health impacts of minority stress.
3h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Gene study spots clues to heart risk for statin patientsA Vanderbilt-led research team has discovered genetic variations that increase the risk of heart attack even when patients are receiving a statin drug like Lipitor or Crestor to lower their blood cholesterol.
3h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Depression linked to memory problems and brain agingDepression in older adults may be linked to memory problems, according to a study published in the May 9, 2018, online issue of Neurology®, the medical journal of the American Academy of Neurology. The study also showed that older people with greater symptoms of depression may have structural differences in the brain compared to people without symptoms.
3h
Big Think

Five ways artificial intelligence will shape the future of universitiesArtificial Intelligence (AI) is transforming many human activities ranging from daily chores to highly sophisticated tasks. But unlike many other industries, the higher education sector has yet to be really influenced by AI. Uber has disrupted the taxi sector, Airbnb has disrupted the hotel ... Read More
3h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

California regulator OKs solar panels mandate for new homesCalifornia USCalifornia moved a step closer Wednesday to requiring solar panels on new homes and low-rise apartment buildings starting in 2020, the first such mandate nationwide and the state's latest step to curb greenhouse gas emissions.
3h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

What happens when the robots sound too much like humans?Artificial intelligence has a new challenge: Whether and how to alert people who may not know they're talking to a robot.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

Dietary seaweed used to manipulate gut bacteria in miceScientists working with laboratory mice have shown that it's possible to favor the engraftment of one gut bacterial strain over others by manipulating the mice's diet. The researchers also have shown it's possible to control how much a bacterium grows in the intestine by calibrating the amount of a specific carbohydrate in each mouse's water or food.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

Rapid evolution fails to save butterflies from extinction in face of human-induced changeThe evolution of wild species, adapting them to human management practices, can cause localized extinctions when those practices rapidly change. And in a new study, biologists have used more than 30 years of research to fully document an example of this process.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Religious left mobilized in solidarity for Women's March on Chicago, study findsThe link between conservative religion and conservative politics is well known, and a Pew Research Center report even showed that 81 percent of white evangelical Protestants voted for Donald Trump.
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Science : NPR

Attitude Of Exactitude: How Precision Made The Modern WorldWe put a very fine point on it. (Image credit: Matt Cardy/Getty Images)
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Spinning science: multi-use Variable-g platform arrives at the ISSDelivered to the International Space Station aboard SpaceX CRS-14, the Multi-use Variable-g Platform (MVP) is a new commercial testbed for centrifuge-based science aboard the orbiting laboratory. Because gravity determines so much of a live organism's behavior and growth, centrifuge-based experiments have long been a part of biological investigations in space. While the pull of Earth's gravity mak
3h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News

NASA spacecraft finds new type of magnetic explosionFour NASA spacecraft have observed magnetic reconnection in a turbulent region of the Earth's outer atmosphere known as the magnetosheath, the planet's first line of defense against the intensity of the solar wind. The new insights could help us understand how such phenomena affect Earth's atmosphere because of the potential impact on astronauts in space, satellites and electrical power industries
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Popular Science

This is what it takes for scientists to get you those amazing pictures of the Kilauea eruptionEnvironment Photography is only a small part of volcano monitoring. In under two hours a fissure 492 feet wide sliced through the subdivision, forcing residents to evacuate. But for the researchers, it was time to go to back to work.
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The Atlantic

The Iran Deal and the Dark Side of American ExceptionalismWho, or what, is to blame for Donald Trump’s decision to leave the Iran nuclear agreement? There are lots of candidates: Trump’s assumption that any deal not negotiated by him is a rip-off, his obsession with undoing Barack Obama’s legacy, Israel and Saudi Arabia’s desire to prevent any rapprochement between Washington and Tehran. These all surely played a role. But underlying them is something m
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The Atlantic

10 Years Since the Devastating 2008 Sichuan EarthquakeOn May 12, 2008, a magnitude-8.0 earthquake struck beneath a mountainous region in south-central China, toppling buildings and sending landslides crashing into cities, resulting in nearly 70,000 deaths. The 2008 Sichuan earthquake (also called the 2008 Wenchuan earthquake) became even more infamous for exposing the cheap and inferior construction methods used in schools across the region, which l
4h
Live Science

Here's Why US Claims of Cuban 'Ultrasonic Weapons' Don't Make SenseA global expert on ultrasonic waves explains why the widely reported claim that U.S. embassy staffers in Cuba were attacked with a sonic weapon doesn't make sense.
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cognitive science

We are more than our brains: on neuroscience and being humansubmitted by /u/burtzev [link] [comments]
4h
New on MIT Technology Review

A new company audits algorithms to see how biased they are
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Big Think

Are our politics revealed by our favorite music? (Infographics)1,007 people were surveyed about their political affiliations and opinions, and their music tastes to learn to what extent they correspond to each other. Survey results are shown as infographics. Read More
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

New magnetic process in turbulent spaceExplorations in Earth's space environment by NASA's Magnetospheric Multiscale spacecraft have discovered a surprising new magnetic event in turbulent plasma.
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Progress in posttraumatic stress disorder --Increased understanding points to new approaches for PTSD prevention and treatmentRecent advances in scientific understanding of how posttraumatic stress disorder (PTSD) develops and persists may lead to more effective treatment and even prevention of this debilitating disorder, according to the May/June special issue of Harvard Review of Psychiatry, published by Wolters Kluwer.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

The Big Bell Test: Global physics experiment challenges EinsteinSimultaneous experiments on five continents challenge Einstein's principle of local realism. Participants contributed to the experiment generating more than 90 million bits, unpredictably choosing among measurements to escape a paradox known as the 'freedom-of-choice loophole'.
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Feed: All Latest

What Did AT&T Want From Michael Cohen?Michael Cohen AT&TThe telecom giant confirms that it paid President Trump's personal lawyer $200,000 "to provide insights into understanding the new administration."
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Feed: All Latest

Facial Recognition Tech Is Creepy When It Works—And Creepier When It Doesn’tIt's a powerful tool, but recent incidents have shown that there's no winning with facial recognition.
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Dagens Medicin

Nu, hvor Hjalte Aaberg stopper…… så kunne det måske være en mulighed at droppe den uduelige Sundhedsplatformen til fordel for det velfungerende Systematic.
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Science : NPR

Tobacco Smoke Residue Can Become Airborne Again IndoorsResearchers have found that residue stuck on smokers' clothes, furniture or other surfaces can become airborne and pollute indoor air. (Image credit: Prawitr Sae Wa Ni/EyeEm/Getty Images)
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Religious left mobilized in solidarity for Women's March on Chicago, study findsKriag Beyerlein's study, co-authored with Notre Dame graduate student Peter Ryan, compares the 2017 Women's March Chicago with historical examples of religiously motivated progressive social activism and is now published in Sociology of Religion.
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Operating on brain gliomas by detecting the 'glow'Research by Barrow Neurological Institute physicians and University of Washington scientists on novel imaging technology for malignant brain tumors was published in the April issue of World Neurosurgery.
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Idle talk or fierce competition? Research finds women use gossip as a weapon in rivalriesA researcher finds women use gossip as a technique to enhance their standing in romantic rivalries.
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The Scientist RSS

CDC Director Takes a $165,300 Pay CutRobert Redfield's record-setting salary was nearly double that of his predecessors.
5h
Popular Science

The weirdest things we learned this week: The first celebrity diet, confused albatrosses, and delusions of deathScience Three PopSci editors share the freakiest facts they could find. What’s the weirdest thing you learned this week? Well, whatever it is, we promise you’d have an even weirder answer if you’d listened to PopSci’s newest podcast.
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New on MIT Technology Review

Robots may someday explore the world using features borrowed from your brainDeepMind has discovered that an artificial neural network will spontaneously form something similar to the brain’s navigation neurons.
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Science : NPR

The Colonel In the Kitchen: A Surprising History Of Sous VideCooking food in a vacuum-sealed bag in a hot water bath is the height of haute cuisine. But an ex-Army colonel testing tastier hospital food seems to have had a lot to do with developing sous vide. (Image credit: courtesy McGuckian family)
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Big Think

Stephen Hawking's effort to find intelligent life just got a huge boostE. T. phone home? Read More
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The Atlantic

Rush Limbaugh's Latest Rejection of ConservatismTalk radio’s Rush Limbaugh delighted at the expansive twists and turns of the independent counsel investigation of Bill Clinton, cheering it all the way to impeachment, despite polls suggesting Americans wanted Congress to censure the president and move on. He met Barack Obama’s election by declaring that he wanted him to fail, then allied with men who tried to discredit Obama by falsely stating
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

Atmospheric seasons could signal alien lifeTo complement traditional biosignatures, scientists are developing the first quantitative framework for dynamic biosignatures based on seasonal changes in the Earth's atmosphere.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

Climate change may even threaten one of the world's most resilient lizardsBahamian anole lizards are popular exotic pets and are found throughout the Western Hemisphere, suggesting that they are extremely adaptable creatures. A new study suggests that their adaptability may not extend to the temperature changes predicted by climate change models.
5h
Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

Breakdown of brain's visual networks linked to mental illnessBrain regions that help process what we see may play a key role in mental health. Researchers used brain imaging to identify patterns of brain connectivity -- the ability of brain regions to talk to each other -- that affect a person's likelihood for developing common forms of mental illness. They found that risk of mental illness increases when the visual cortex struggles to communicate with brai
5h
Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

The slipperiness of ice explainedEverybody knows that sliding on ice or snow, is much easier than sliding on most other surfaces. But why is the ice surface slippery? Researchers have now shown that the slipperiness of ice is a consequence of the ease with which the topmost water molecules can roll over the ice surface.
5h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News

University of Michigan professor, graduate work together to empower Sudanese womenSouth Sudanese women have among the highest fertility rates and maternal death rates in the world, yet cultural norms still frown upon contraceptives -- even to make pregnancy and birth safer for women.
5h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Step aside Superman, steel is no competition for this new materialWhen it comes to materials, there is no question as to who wins the strongman competition. Spider silk is known as being the strongest fabric, and steel, ceramics and glass fibers are the best building materials. But now, researchers are reporting in ACS Nano that specially arranged nano-sized cellulose fibers are the strongest material of them all, in a move that might cause some to re-name Super
5h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News

For stroke victims, brain magnetic stimulation leads to improved walking speedA technique of magnetic stimulation of the brain can increase walking speed in patients who are undergoing rehabilitation after a stroke, reports a research update in the American Journal of Physical Medicine & Rehabilitation, the official journal of the Association of Academic Physiatrists. The journal is published by Wolters Kluwer.
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Facebook app offers opportunity to help unpaid Alzheimer's caregivers via friendsourcingResearchers at IUPUI have developed a Facebook app that, a study shows, offers a way to provide much-needed support to unpaid caregivers of people with Alzheimer's disease.
5h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Lab-on-a-chip device mimics eye damage due to intense lightHouston Methodist researchers developed a new lab-on-a-chip technology that could quickly screen possible drugs to repair damaged neuron and retinal connections, like what is seen in people with macular degeneration or who've had too much exposure to the glare of electronic screens.
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New tool predicts deadly form of rare cancerA tool to accurately determine which early-stage patients are at risk of dying from mycosis fungoides and which patients are likely to only require conventional therapy is desperately needed. Investigators from Brigham and Women's Hospital have found that next-generation, high-throughput sequencing of a specific gene (T-cell receptor beta or TCRB) is a stronger predictor of which early-stage patie
5h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Computer-designed customized regenerative heart valvesCardiovascular tissue engineering aims to treat heart disease with prostheses that grow and regenerate. Now, researchers from the University of Zurich, the Technical University Eindhoven and the Charité Berlin have successfully implanted regenerative heart valves, designed with the aid of computer simulations, into sheep for the first time.
5h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Tiny fossils unlock clues to Earth's climate half a billion years agoScientists from the UK and France have quantified the temperature of Earth's oceans over half a billion years ago by combining fossil data and climate models.
5h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Reprogrammed stem cell-derived neurons survive long-term in pigs with spinal cord injuriesIn a new paper, publishing May 9 in Science Translational Medicine, an international team led by scientists at University of California San Diego School of Medicine describe successfully grafting induced pluripotent stem cell (iPSC)-derived neural precursor cells back into the spinal cords of genetically identical adult pigs with no immunosuppression efforts. The grafted cells survived long-term,
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Growing life-like heart valves, thanks to help from computational modelingScientists have harnessed the power of computational modeling to design a bioengineered heart valve that emulates the properties of native heart valves.
5h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Identified in a nonsmoking classroom: A new avenue for exposure to thirdhand smokeResearchers measuring air in an unoccupied, nonsmoking classroom found that almost 30 percent of the tiny particles in it were associated with residue of so-called thirdhand smoke, a finding that reveals a whole new route by which people can be exposed to smoke from tobacco products.
5h
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Study finds marine protected areas help coral reefsNew research finds the best way to measure the effectiveness of coral reef conservation is by using a suite of metrics, including the number of fish, amount of seaweed and the number of baby corals, rather than just one indicator of reef health.
5h
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Drexel study: 'Non-smoking' doesn't mean smoke-freeDespite decades of indoor smoking bans and restrictions, new research from Drexel University suggests the toxins we've been trying to keep out are still finding their way into the air inside. Findings by a group of environmental engineers show that third-hand smoke, the chemical residue from cigarette smoke that attaches to anything and anyone in the vicinity of a smoke cloud, can make its way int
5h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News

The Baltic Sea as a time machineWarming, acidification, eutrophication, the loss of oxygen -- examples of major changes being observed or expected for the future in coastal zones around the world. These processes are occurring in the Baltic Sea at a much faster pace than in other regions. But the Baltic also provides useful lessons for how negative trends can be reversed by protective measures. In Science Advances, an internatio
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Applied science may yield more translational research publications than basic scienceWhile translational research can happen at any stage of the research process, a recent investigation of behavioral and social science research awards granted by the NIH between 2008 and 2014 revealed that applied science yielded a higher volume of translational research publications than basic science, according to a study published May 9, 2018 in the open-access journal PLOS ONE by Xueying Han fr
5h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News

For lemurs, size of forest fragments may be more important than degree of isolationOccurrence probability of three lemur species in tropical dry forest increases with fragment size but can increase or decrease with fragment isolation depending on the species, according to a study published May 9, 2018 in the open-access journal PLOS ONE by Travis Steffens and Shawn Lehman from University of Toronto, Canada.
5h
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Google and the Rise of 'Digital Well-Being'Google wants to unglue people from their phones. But like other wellness trends, "digital well-being" promises more than it can deliver.
5h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Shared data and shrinking aircraft seats to cut travel times in EuropeAircraft seats that temporarily shrink and a joined-up transport system that allows people to easily plan a door-to-door journey could help shift people's first choice of travel away from cars and towards public transport by reducing the time and effort involved.
5h
Science : NPR

Reporter On New Email Dump That Reveals Secret Inner Workings Of The EPANew York Times reporter Eric Lipton says the response to a recent FOIA request shows that Scott Pruitt and his staff have gone to great lengths to keep the public and the news media at a distance.
5h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News

NASA spacecraft discovers new magnetic process in turbulent spaceExplorations in Earth's space environment by NASA's Magnetospheric Multiscale spacecraft have discovered a surprising new magnetic event in turbulent plasma.
5h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Some coral reefs keep up with sea-level rise, research findsRising sea-level is threatening island nations that are no more than 3 feet above the high-tide line, but a new study has found that healthy coral reefs may be able to keep up and thus protect these vulnerable areas.
6h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

The Baltic Sea as a time machineWarming, acidification, eutrophication, and the loss of oxygen are examples of major changes being observed or expected for the future in coastal zones around the world. These processes are occurring in the Baltic Sea at a much faster pace than in other regions. But the Baltic also provides useful lessons for how negative trends can be reversed by protective measures. In Science Advances, an inter
6h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Study finds marine protected areas help coral reefsReports in recent years that marine protected areas (MPAs) aren't effective in saving coral reefs from the damaging effects of global climate change have led some to argue that such expensive interventions are futile. But a study that spanned 700 kilometers of the eastern Caribbean reveals that MPAs can, indeed, help coral reefs.
6h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Applied science may yield more translational research publications than basic scienceWhile translational research can happen at any stage of the research process, a recent investigation of behavioral and social science research awards granted by the NIH between 2008 and 2014 revealed that applied science yielded a higher volume of translational research publications than basic science, according to a study published May 9, 2018 in the open-access journal PLOS ONE by Xueying Han fr
6h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Tiny fossils unlock clues to Earth's climate half a billion years agoAn international collaboration of scientists, led by the University of Leicester, has investigated Earth's climate over half a billion years ago by combining climate models and chemical analyses of fossil shells about 1mm long.
6h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

For lemurs, size of forest fragments may be more important than degree of isolationOccurrence probability of three lemur species in tropical dry forest increases with fragment size but can increase or decrease with fragment isolation depending on the species, according to a study published May 9, 2018 in the open-access journal PLOS ONE by Travis Steffens and Shawn Lehman from University of Toronto, Canada.
6h
New Scientist - News

Doing Dry January lowers cancer-promoting proteins in your bloodStopping drinking for just one month is enough to dramatically lower the levels of hormone-like chemicals in your blood that help cancer to develop and spread
6h
Big Think

Astronomers discover possible ‘toddler’ exoplanet by accidentWhile observing a young star system, astronomers noticed the star had a small, mysterious companion in its orbit. Read More
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Ancient Humans Had Hepatitis BAnalyses of more than 300 ancient human genomes show that Hepatitis B virus has infected humans for at least 4,500 years and has much older origins than modern viral genomes would suggest.
6h
BBC News - Science & Environment

Cocaine breathalyser 'one step closer'Researchers plan to integrate their cocaine-detecting chip in a portable scanner.
6h
Popular Science

Self-driving cars should earn people's trust with good communicationTechnology These vehicles are ugly and eye-catching and that's the point. Autonomous cars may be capable of driving around on their own, but they still need to be able to communicate their intentions to other people on the road.
6h
The Atlantic

Congress Is Quietly Nudging NASA to Look for AliensIn October 1992, astronomers kicked off an ambitious project years in the making. Two radio telescopes, one in Puerto Rico and the other in California, started scouring the night sky for potential signals from alien civilizations somewhere deep in the cosmos. “We begin the search,” declared Jill Tarter, the project scientist, as the telescopes started listening around glimmering stars many light-
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The Atlantic

Revenge Is a Shocking and Subversive Piece of HorrorThe first 15 minutes of Revenge could easily double as a garish Bacardi ad or a car commercial. The colors are dialed up to maximum saturation, the soundtrack is pulsing with loud dance music, and our star, Jen (Matilda Lutz), is lazily sucking on a lollipop, having been whisked away by helicopter to a remote desert vacation home by her boyfriend, Richard (Kevin Janssens), the married man she’s h
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Atmospheric seasons could signal alien lifeDozens of potentially habitable planets have been discovered outside our solar system, and many more are awaiting detection.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Horse-riding changed Eurasia's ethnic profile: studiesHorse domestication changed the face of Eurasia, helping ancient Huns and Mongols supplant western "Indo-European" farmers in an incremental westward drive that also brought Hepatitis B and plague, scientists said Wednesday.
6h
New Scientist - News

Ferocious pack-hunting pseudoscorpions believe in sharing fairlyOne species of pseudoscorpion has learned to work together to bring down prey larger than themselves – and when they make a kill they make sure the food is shared equitably
6h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Atmospheric seasons could signal alien lifeTo complement traditional biosignatures, and thanks to funding from the NASA Astrobiology Institute, scientists at the University of California, Riverside's Alternative Earths Astrobiology Center are developing the first quantitative framework for dynamic biosignatures based on seasonal changes in the Earth's atmosphere.
6h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News

The joy of neurons: A simplified 'cookbook' for engineering brain cells to study diseaseThe new research opens the door to studying common brain conditions such as autism, schizophrenia, addiction and Alzheimer's disease under reproducible conditions in a dish.
6h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News

The Big Bell Test: Participatory science puts quantum physics to the testAn international collaboration created by The Institute of Photonic Sciences in Barcelona, including twelve laboratories on five continents, including Institut de Physique de Nice (CNRS/Université Nice Sophia Antipolis), conducted a unique participatory science experiment. By gathering about 100,000 people worldwide through a video game, the researchers circumvented the data generation problem and
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New research reveals how energy dissipates outside Earth's magnetic fieldA new research paper in Nature provides the first evidence that magnetic reconnection--a process that dissipates magnetic energy and accelerates charged particles in Earth's magnetic field--also occurs at very small spatial scales in the turbulent magnetosheath. The results suggest that small-scale magnetic reconnection may play a role in heating the solar corona and the solar wind, as well as tur
6h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News

The weak side of the protonA new result from the Q-weak experiment at the Department of Energy's Thomas Jefferson National Accelerator Facility provides a precision test of the weak force, one of four fundamental forces in nature. The proton's weak charge was found to be QWp=0.0719±0.0045, in excellent agreement with Standard Model predictions. Because the proton's weak charge is so precisely predicted in this model, the ne
6h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News

New polymer manufacturing process saves 10 orders of magnitude of energyMakers of cars, planes, buses -- anything that needs strong, lightweight and heat resistant parts -- are poised to benefit from a new manufacturing process that requires only a quick touch from a small heat source to send a cascading hardening wave through a polymer. Researchers at the University of Illinois have developed a new polymer-curing process that could reduce the cost, time and energy ne
6h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Reconnection tames the turbulent magnetic fields around EarthWherever magnetic fields occur in the cosmos, their field lines tend to cross and reconnect, spitting out charged particles. To date, space scientists have studied these short circuits in the near-Earth environment, but only in rather calm regions of the magnetosphere. Now scientists led by Tai Phan at UC Berkeley have seen how turbulent magnetic fields reconnect in the much more violent magnetosh
6h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Fleet of spacecraft spot long-sought-after process in the Earth's magnetic fieldA NASA mission has discovered an important process explaining the fate of energy contained in the turbulent magnetic fields surrounding the Earth.
6h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Diverse Parkinson's-related disorders may stem from different strains of same proteinDifferent Parkinson's-related brain disorders are characterized by misfolded proteins embedded in cells. Researchers found that the type of brain cell afflicted dictates which pathological form of α-synuclein protein becomes the disease culprit.
6h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Rapid evolution fails to save butterflies from extinction in face of human-induced changeThe evolution of wild species, adapting them to human management practices, can cause localized extinctions when those practices rapidly change. And in a new study published in Nature, professors Michael C. Singer and Camille Parmesan have used more than 30 years of research to fully document an example of this process.
6h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News

The big bell testSimultaneous experiments on five continents challenge Einstein's principle of local realism. Participants contributed to the experiment generating more than 90 million bits, unpredictably choosing among measurements to escape a paradox known as the 'freedom-of-choice loophole'. The study has been published in Nature.
6h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Stanford scientists use dietary seaweed to manipulate gut bacteria in miceStanford University School of Medicine working with laboratory mice have shown that it's possible to favor the engraftment of one gut bacterial strain over others by manipulating the mice's diet. The researchers also have shown it's possible to control how much a bacterium grows in the intestine by calibrating the amount of a specific carbohydrate in each mouse's water or food.
6h
The Atlantic

Breaking Down Gina Haspel’s Tense Confirmation HearingGina Haspel CIA SenateGina Haspel’s confirmation hearing for CIA director was never going to be a breeze. The CIA veteran oversaw the torture of a suspected al-Qaeda member at a “black site” in Thailand in 2002 and was later involved in the destruction of tapes documenting the interrogations. Lawmakers honed in on that time Wednesday, repeatedly asking Haspel about her involvement in the program, the morality of the t
6h
The Atlantic

The Oldest Virus Ever Sequenced Comes From a 7,000-Year-Old ToothSeven thousand years ago, in a valley that is today central Germany, a young man laid down to die. He was 25 or 30, and a farmer most likely. It is not known why he died young. But powerful genetic tools have now pulled out a tantalizing clue: the fragmented DNA of a virus that infected his liver all those millennia ago. It is the oldest virus ever directly sequenced, opening up a new window onto
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The Atlantic

The Kids’ Guide to the Postwar WorldF or Baby Boomers whose childhood dreams were of Paris and Hong Kong rather than Narnia and Hobbiton, Miroslav Šašek’s This Is picture-book series offered a magic carpet to take them there. Beginning with This Is Paris , published in 1959 by the British firm W. H. Allen, the exiled Czech artist charted an idiosyncratic, primary-color-saturated path through the mid-20th-century world. In total, he
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Science | The Guardian

Google’s AI program DeepMind learns human navigation skillsGoogle’s AI beat humans at a game that involved racing around an unfamiliar virtual environment Notch up another win for the robots: the latest program from Google’s artificial intelligence group, DeepMind, has trounced experts at a maze game after it learned to find its way around like a human. Scientists noticed that when they trained the AI to move through a landscape, it spontaneously develop
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

'Top-ranked' reviewers aren't the top influencers when it comes to online sales: studyTop-ranked reviewers on online retail sites such as Amazon.com may influence purchases, but a research study from Indiana University's Kelley School of Business finds that those who post reviews less often and more informally can be seen as more trustworthy and have more of an impact on sales.
6h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Reconnection tames the turbulent magnetic fields around EarthWhen the solar wind - which is really a driving rain of charged particles from the sun - strikes Earth's protective magnetic field, the shock generates roiling, turbulent magnetic fields that enshroud the planet and stretch for hundreds of thousands of miles.
6h
New on MIT Technology Review

Hundreds of companies are competing for one of 10 slots in a new US drone project
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Quanta Magazine

Artificial Neural Nets Grow Brainlike Navigation CellsHaving the sense to take a shortcut, the most direct route from point A to point B, doesn’t sound like a very impressive test of intelligence. Yet according to a new report appearing today in Nature , in which researchers describe the performance of their new navigational artificial intelligence, the system’s ability to explore complex simulated environments and find the shortest route to a goal
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Latest Headlines | Science News

The proton’s weak side is just as feeble as physicists thoughtScientists make the most precise measurement yet of the proton’s weak charge and find it agrees with predictions.
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Latest Headlines | Science News

This AI uses the same kind of brain wiring as mammals to navigateThis AI creates mental maps of its environment much like mammals do.
6h
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This Random Videogame Powers Quantum Entanglement ExperimentsHow a simplistic keyboard-mashing game recruited thousands of players—for physics!
6h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Rapid evolution fails to save butterflies from extinction in face of human-induced changeThe evolution of wild species, adapting them to human management practices, can cause localised extinctions when those practices rapidly change. And in a new study published in Nature, Professors Michael C. Singer and Camille Parmesan have used more than 30 years of research to fully document an example of this process.
7h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

The BIG Bell Test—Global physics experiment challenges Einstein with the help of 100,000 volunteersOn November 30th, 2016, more than 100,000 people around the world contributed to a suite of first-of-a-kind quantum physics experiments known as The BIG Bell Test. Using smartphones and other internet-connected devices, participants contributed unpredictable bits, which determined how entangled atoms, photons, and superconducting devices were measured in 12 laboratories around the world. Scientist
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

New polymer manufacturing process saves 10 orders of magnitude of energyMakers of cars, planes, buses - anything that needs strong, lightweight and heat resistant parts - are poised to benefit from a new manufacturing process that requires only a quick touch from a small heat source to send a cascading hardening wave through a polymer. Researchers at the University of Illinois have developed a new polymer-curing process that could reduce the cost, time and energy need
7h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Precision measurement of the proton's weak charge narrows the search for new physicsA new result from the Q-weak experiment at the Department of Energy's Thomas Jefferson National Accelerator Facility provides a precision test of the weak force, one of four fundamental forces in nature. This result, published recently in Nature, also constrains possibilities for new particles and forces beyond our present knowledge.
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Scientific American Content: Global

Universe's Coolest Lab Set to Open Quantum WorldNASA’s Cold Atom Laboratory will allow physicists to play with quantum phenomena like never before -- Read more on ScientificAmerican.com
7h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News

'Top-ranked' reviewers aren't the top influencers when it comes to online salesTop-ranked reviewers on online retail sites such as Amazon.com may influence purchases, but a research study from Indiana University's Kelley School of Business finds that those who post reviews less often and more informally can be seen as more trustworthy and have more of an impact on sales.
7h
Live Science

This Horrifying AI Thought Experiment Got Elon Musk a DateSpaceX founder Elon Musk is dating musician Grimes, apparently because of a shared love of nerdy puns.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

China's ZTE stops major operations following US export banZTE US China ChineseChinese technology company ZTE said late Wednesday it has halted its main operations after U.S. authorities banned it from doing business with American suppliers.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Germany's BMW expands UK car recallGerman car manufacturer BMW on Wednesday said it was expanding a British recall on faulty vehicles whose engines are at risk of suddenly cutting out.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Kasich orders all Ohio roads open to smart vehicle testingRepublican Gov. John Kasich (KAY'-sik) is opening all of Ohio's public roads to smart vehicle testing.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

US to decide best site option for nuclear weapons production (Update)The federal agency that oversees the nation's nuclear weapons stockpile is expected this week to release a report on the best site option for the United States as it looks to ramp up production of the plutonium cores that trigger nuclear warheads.
7h
The Scientist RSS

Stanley Falkow, Father of Molecular Microbial Pathogenesis, DiesThe microbiologist was known for his work on bacterial antibiotic resistance and infectious disease.
7h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

A simple card explaining a government aid program leads to more rice for poor villagers in IndonesiaEven for poor villagers in rural Indonesia, information is power.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

The slipperiness of ice explainedWinter sports such as skiing, speed skating, figure skating, and curling require the slippery surfaces of ice and snow. While the fact that the ice surface is slippery is widely acknowledged, it is far from being completely understood. In 1886 John Joly, an Irish physicist, offered the first scientific explanation for low friction on ice; when an object - i.e. an ice skate - touches the ice surfac
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Revealing the mysteries of superconductors: Team's new scope takes a closer lookThe U.S. Department of Energy's Ames Laboratory has successfully demonstrated that a new type of optical magnetometer, the NV magnetoscope, can map a unique feature of superconductive materials that along with zero resistance defines the superconductivity itself.
7h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Sinclair to sell 7 TV stations to Fox to win regulatory OKMedia company Twenty-First Century Fox has agreed to buy seven TV stations from Sinclair Broadcast Group for $910 million.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Beavers do dam good work cleaning water, research revealsBeavers could help clean up polluted rivers and stem the loss of valuable soils from farms, new research shows.
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Scientific American Content: Global

Cryptojacking Spreads across the WebRight now, your computer might be using its memory and processor power—and your electricity—to generate money for someone else, without you ever knowing -- Read more on ScientificAmerican.com
7h
The Atlantic

HBO and The Atlantic Challenge Viewers to Examine Their Own Beliefs in New Short Film SeriesHBO and The Atlantic have partnered to create Question Your Answers , a series of short films that challenge audiences to, in a time of increasing cultural and political polarization—when every side seems convinced it has the answer—confront their own beliefs and assumptions. The series begins today with a film starring Westworld actor Jeffrey Wright wrestling with a question: “Should I be scared
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

An AI oncologist to help cancer patients worldwideBefore performing radiation therapy, oncologists review medical images to identify tumors and surrounding tissue, a process known as contouring. Researchers have developed a new method for automating the contouring of high-risk clinical target volumes using artificial intelligence and supercomputers. They found the predicted contours could be implemented clinically, with only minor or no changes.
7h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Climate change may even threaten one of the world's most resilient lizardsSporting a bright red-and-yellow dewlap under its chin, the color-changing Bahamian anole lizard is a popular exotic pet. This wily anole has escaped captivity on enough occasions to successfully invade large areas across the Western Hemisphere. At first glance, this suggests that the anole is well-suited to adapt to a changing climate. But a new study led by a Smithsonian researcher, suggests tha
7h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Revealing the mysteries of superconductors: Ames Lab's new scope takes a closer lookThe US Department of Energy's Ames Laboratory has successfully demonstrated that a new type of optical magnetometer, the NV magnetoscope, can map a unique feature of superconductive materials that along with zero resistance defines the superconductivity itself.
7h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News

The slipperiness of ice explainedEverybody knows that sliding on ice or snow, is much easier than sliding on most other surfaces. But why is the ice surface slippery? Researchers from AMOLF, the University of Amsterdam and the Max Planck Institute for Polymer Research in Mainz, have now shown that the slipperiness of ice is a consequence of the ease with which the topmost water molecules can roll over the ice surface.
7h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Microwaved plastic increases lithium-sulfur battery lifespanPurdue engineers have figured out a way to tackle plastic landfills while also improving batteries -- by putting ink-free plastic soaked in sulfur-containing solvent into a microwave, and then into batteries as a carbon scaffold.
7h
New Scientist - News

Google’s human-like phone calls are a clever but nasty trickGoogle Duplex AI I/OGoogle’s AI assistant is getting an upgrade to let it make you an appointment by impersonating a human on the phone, but this tech could cause a host of problems
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

How to use limited bandwidth more efficiently? Think like a cave-dwelling fishFor the first time, researchers have demonstrated a light-based device that mimics a fish's incredible jamming avoidance response (JAR) by moving the frequency of an emitted signal away from other signals that could potentially cause interference. The new system could eventually help overcome the spectral bandwidth crunch caused by ever increasing numbers of wireless devices and transmitted data c
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Red Sea fungus yields leads for new epilepsy drugsNew treatments for epilepsy are sorely needed because current medications don't work for many people with the disease. To find new leads, researchers have now turned to the sea—a source of unique natural products that have been largely untapped for prospective drugs. The scientists report in the journal ACS Chemical Neuroscience that two metabolites produced by a fungus from the Red Sea look promi
7h
Big Think

Court ruling denies appeal for Tommy and Kiko, but not their rightsA court has ruled against a motion for appeal on behalf of chimpanzees Tommy and Kiko with a landmark opinion asserting the importance of better addressing the rights of nonhumans. The opinion calls this “a deep dilemma of ethics and policy that demands our attention.” Read More
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Scientific American Content: Global

Emails Reveal EPA Approach to Climate Policy under Pruitt's LeadershipThe newly released documents show communication with industry affected by Clean Power Plan -- Read more on ScientificAmerican.com
7h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Leafcutter ants' success due to more than crop selectionA complex genetic analysis has biologists re-evaluating some long-held beliefs about the way societies evolved following the invention of agriculture—by six-legged farmers.
7h
Big Think

What if Europe and North America switched populations?Just how equal in size are the populations of Europe and North America? Read More
7h
The Atlantic

Incumbents Are Out and a New Democrat Is InDURHAM, N.C.—Voters in two of North Carolina’s biggest counties turned out elected sheriffs and chose reform-minded district attorneys in Tuesday’s Democratic primaries. Those candidates inaugurate new experiments in liberal criminal-justice reform on a local level, as Democrats remain shut out of power in Washington. In Mecklenburg County, home to Charlotte, incumbent Sheriff Irwin Carmichael wa
7h
The Atlantic

The Eroding GOP Resistance to Trump's Immigration AgendaThe results of Tuesday’s primary elections simultaneously bolstered the Republican Party mainstream and demonstrated how much ground it has yielded to Donald Trump, particularly on the volatile issue of immigration. In several key races, GOP primary voters rejected candidates who presented themselves as the most ardent acolytes of Trump, in terms of style, political agenda, or both. But the relat
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Did YouTube Phenomenon Poppy Steal Her Style From Another Star?YouTuber Mars Argo is suing the mysterious pop sensation and her creative partner for copyright infringement.
7h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News

For food-aid recipients, information is powerAn MIT-led study conducted in Indonesia shows that poor people are more likely to receive the assistance they're entitled to when they're notified about the social programs in question.
8h
Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

Nutmeg's hidden power: Helping the liverSmelling nutmeg evokes images of fall, pumpkin pie and hot apple cider. But the spice has been used for years in traditional Chinese medicine to treat gastrointestinal illnesses. Now one group reports that they have figured out how nutmeg helps other organs, specifically the liver.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

Adversity early in life linked with more physical pain in adulthoodExperiencing trauma as a child may influence how much pain an individual feels in adulthood. Gaining insight about who feels more pain and why is important as issues like the opioid crisis continue to escalate.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

How even one automated, connected vehicle can improve safety and save energy in trafficConnected cruise control uses vehicle-to-vehicle communication to let automated vehicles respond to multiple cars at a time in an effort to save energy and improve safety.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

A detective story of wildfires and wineIn this story of wine and smoke taint, everyone knows "whodunit"—it's the smoke from wildfires. But it's the "how" that's got researchers and winemakers stymied. According to an article in Chemical & Engineering News (C&EN), the weekly newsmagazine of the American Chemical Society, researchers are making some headway, sifting through complex, and perhaps misleading, clues.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Nutmeg's hidden power: Helping the liverSmelling nutmeg evokes images of fall, pumpkin pie and hot apple cider. But the spice has been used for years in traditional Chinese medicine to treat gastrointestinal illnesses. Now one group reports in ACS' Journal of Proteome Research that they have figured out how nutmeg helps other organs, specifically the liver.
8h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Sagittarius A* swarm: Black hole bounty captured in the Milky Way centerAstronomers have discovered evidence for thousands of black holes located near the center of our Milky Way galaxy using data from NASA's Chandra X-ray Observatory.
8h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Engineers' liquid assembly line makes drug microparticles a thousand times faster than ever beforePharmaceuticals owe their effects mostly to their chemical composition, but the packaging of these drugs into specific physical formulations also need to be done to exact specifications. For example, many drugs are encapsulated in solid microparticles, the size and shape of which determine the timing of the drug's release and its delivery to specific parts of the body.
8h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Beavers do dam good work cleaning water, research revealsBeavers could help clean up polluted rivers and stem the loss of valuable soils from farms, new research shows.
8h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News

New gene therapy sparks healthy heart beatsMichael Kotlikoff, provost of Cornell University and a professor of molecular physiology, is part of an international collaboration that is aiming to prevent heart arrhythmias with a simple gene-therapy approach.
8h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Study may help explain racial disparities in prostate cancerNew research published in Molecular Oncology may help explain why African American men are at a higher risk of being diagnosed with prostate cancer and a higher risk of dying from the disease compared with European American men.
8h
Ingeniøren

Efter Twitterfejl: Sådan beskytter du dig mod password-eksponeringTwitter og GitHub gemte kodeord i klartekst. Det behøver ikke være et stort problem, hvis man blandt andet anvender en kodeords-husker.
8h
Viden

Dansk superforsker: Menneskelig intuition skal gøre computere klogereJacob Sherson og hans kolleger vil parre intuition med rå regnekraft - og måske vinde kontrollen med vores data tilbage.
8h
The Atlantic

America Keeps Accidentally Helping IranIran US Donald TrumpFor decades, since the Iranian Revolution, the United States has engaged in a quasi-war with Tehran. Washington backed Saddam Hussein in the Iran-Iraq War, described Iran as being part of an “axis of evil” alongside Iraq and North Korea, launched the Stuxnet cyberattack on Iranian nuclear facilities in 2009, and provided weapons for Saudi Arabia to fight a proxy war against Iran in Yemen. Today,
8h
Popular Science

To shorten flights and lower emissions, scientists are discussing the birds and the beesNexus Media News The behavior of cuckoos and swarming bees could help us fly more efficiently. With the goal of reducing greenhouse gas emissions, noise pollution and operating costs, scientists and engineers are designing new algorithms to optimize flight routes…
8h
Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

Leafcutter ants' success due to more than crop selectionA complex genetic analysis has biologists re-evaluating some long-held beliefs about the way societies evolved following the invention of agriculture -- by six-legged farmers.
8h
Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

The far-reaching effects of ocean floors on the sea surfaceLow rises on the ocean floor at a depth of 5,500 meters in the western North Pacific regulate surface flows and create sharp sea surface temperature (SST) fronts, which have tremendous effects on the climate and marine resources.
8h
Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

Heart failure: The Alzheimer's disease of the heart?Similar to how protein clumps build up in the brain in people with some neurodegenerative diseases such as Alzheimer's and Parkinson's diseases, protein clumps appear to accumulate in the diseased hearts of mice and people with heart failure.
8h
Big Think

Creative people have a 90% higher chance of being diagnosed with schizophreniaBeing creative gives you a natural predisposition to schizophrenia, according to a massive new study by the British Journal of Psychiatry. Read More
8h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Mass vaccinations will not prevent Ebolavirus outbreaks, new research showsProphylactic mass vaccination programmes are not a realistic option in the battle to prevent new Ebolavirus outbreaks, a University of Kent-led research team has shown.
8h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Bridging the gaps in global conservationThe BioScience Talks podcast features discussions of topical issues related to the biological sciences.
8h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Climate geoengineering research should include developing countriesAn appeal on projects that could mask global warming is published in Nature by scientists from 12 countries, including Brazilian Paulo Artaxo.
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Red Sea fungus yields leads for new epilepsy drugsNew treatments for epilepsy are sorely needed because current medications don't work for many people with the disease. To find new leads, researchers have now turned to the sea -- a source of unique natural products that have been largely untapped for prospective drugs. The scientists report in the journal ACS Chemical Neuroscience that two metabolites produced by a fungus from the Red Sea look pr
8h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Study reveals challenges of menstrual hygiene management in emergenciesResearchers developed a toolkit to address the menstruation-related needs of girls and women fleeing disaster or conflict. A pilot test of the toolkit gathered feedback from humanitarian experts and displaced girls and women in refugee camps in Tanzania. Findings showed there remains a lack of effective, coordinated approaches for assisting vulnerable groups to manage their menstruation in challen
8h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News

How to use limited bandwidth more efficiently? Think like a cave-dwelling fishresearchers have demonstrated a light-based device that mimics a fish's incredible jamming avoidance response (JAR) by moving the frequency of an emitted signal away from other signals that could potentially cause interference.
8h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Breakdown of brain's visual networks linked to mental illnessBrain regions that help process what we see may play a key role in mental health. Duke researchers used brain imaging to identify patterns of brain connectivity -- the ability of brain regions to talk to each other -- that affect a person's likelihood for developing common forms of mental illness. They found that risk of mental illness increases when the visual cortex struggles to communicate with
8h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Words matter: Stigmatizing language in medical records may affect the care a patient receivesA Johns Hopkins study found that physicians who use stigmatizing language in their patients' medical records may affect the care those patients get for years to come.
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Climate change may even threaten one of the world's most resilient lizardsBahamian anole lizards are popular exotic pets and are found throughout the Western Hemisphere, suggesting that they are extremely adaptable creatures. A new study suggests that their adaptability may not extend to the temperature changes predicted by climate change models.
8h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News

In-person training proves most effective method to educate laypeople in bleeding controlResearchers at Brigham and Women's Hospital devised the PATTS Trial (Public Access and Tourniquet Training Study) to measure how effective different training methods are in preparing laypeople, the non-medical public, to control bleeding with a tourniquet and whether they could retain that skill.
8h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Study about 'shock therapy' for depression suggests more patients should try it soonerVery few depression patients receive the treatment once known as 'shock therapy'. But a new cost-effectiveness study suggests that the modern form of the approach, called ECT, should be made more available to patients who fail to get relief from two other types of treatment.
8h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Is teledermoscopy cost-effective in Australia for skin cancer referrals?An analysis estimates using teledermoscopy (dermatologic care that uses information and communications technology and digital dermoscopic images) in Australia for skin cancer referrals would cost extra per case but could achieve clinical resolution faster.
8h
New Scientist - News

Trump says the Iran nuclear deal is bad. Here’s why he’s wrongDonald Trump didn't like the Iran deal's 2031 deadline, but by then we will have the tech to continue keeping a lid on Iran’s – and others’ - nuclear ambitions
8h
The Atlantic

Then the Censors Came for Rap MusicLast week, Larry Moneta, Duke’s vice president of student affairs, stopped into his regular coffee shop in the student center, Joe Van Gogh, for a hot tea and a vegan muffin. The business was streaming music on Spotify, per usual, and as the university administrator stood waiting in line, “Get Paid” by Young Dolph happened to be playing. Its endlessly repeated refrain is “Get paid, young nigga, g
8h
Ingeniøren

Varmepumper vipper biomasse af pinden, hvis lav elvarme-afgift gennemføresNye beregninger viser, at regeringens foreslåede elvarmeafgift på bare 15 øre pr kWh vil gøre varmepumper til fjernvarmeværkernes førstevalg. Også de individuelle varmepumper vil storme frem
8h
Feed: All Latest

Childish Gambino's 'This Is America' and the New Shape of Protest MusicDonald Glover's trap gospel is a bold divergence from protest songs of the past.
8h
Big Think

Google renames its research wing, going all-in on A.I.Depending on how you look at it, Google wants to jump on the hot new trend in tech or is trying to appease future robot-brain overlords Read More
8h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Microwaved plastic increases lithium-sulfur battery life spanPurdue engineers have figured out a way to tackle plastic landfills while also improving batteries – by putting ink-free plastic soaked in sulfur-containing solvent into a microwave, and then into batteries as a carbon scaffold.
9h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News

A detective story of wildfires and wineIn this story of wine and smoke taint, everyone knows 'whodunit' -- it's the smoke from wildfires. But it's the 'how' that's got researchers and winemakers stymied. According to an article in Chemical & Engineering News (C&EN), the weekly newsmagazine of the American Chemical Society, researchers are making some headway, sifting through complex, and perhaps misleading, clues.
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News

'Peace has only recently become the prime objective of politics'Historian Hans-Ulrich Thamer on the history of peace politics and the peace movement to present day: potential for mobilisation in the face of growing feelings of threat -- Church and Katholikentag provided for mobilisation and continuity in the history of the movement -- Symbols of peace such as the dove and the peace sign linked the diverse peace groups, whether communist, ecological or Christia
9h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Integrative group examines the ethical fit of mindfulness in corporate AmericaAn invited commentary for the Journal of Alternative and Complementary Medicine from leaders of the Osher Collaborative for Integrative Medicine raises challenging questions begged by the rapid uptake of mindfulness practices in corporate America, given the potential conflicts between prioritizing shareholder return and mindfulness' philosophical commitment to 'non-harm and wholesome living.'
9h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Battery-free 'smart' toys move closer to commercial reality (video)Rubber duckies could soon be at the forefront of an electronic revolution. In ACS Sustainable Chemistry & Engineering, scientists report they have used specialized nanogenerators that gather energy from mechanical vibrations to transform squeaky bathtub companions and other conventional children's toys into 'smart' electronics. They say the finding could have broad commercial applications, leading
9h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News

UTSA researcher identifies barriers impacting PrEP use among Latino gay and bisexual menA new study led by a UTSA researcher examines the social perceptions of Pre-Exposure Prophylaxis (PrEP), a medication to prevent HIV, among gay and bisexual men in Texas. Over a six-month period, UTSA assistant professor Phillip Schnarrs worked with education, health care and nonprofit partners to survey more than 100 gay and bisexual men from the White, Latino and African-American communities abo
9h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News

CU researchers: Infant growth patterns affected by type of protein consumedA new study by CU School of Medicine researchers has determined that protein intake from solid foods has a significant impact on infant growth during the first year of life. The study tested whether dairy-based or meat-based protein in an infant's diet contributed to growth and weight gain.
9h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News

An AI oncologist to help cancer patients worldwideBefore performing radiation therapy, oncologists review medical images to identify tumors and surrounding tissue, a process known as contouring. Researchers from MD Anderson Cancer Center developed a new method for automating the contouring of high-risk clinical target volumes using artificial intelligence and supercomputers. They found the predicted contours could be implemented clinically, with
9h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News

For how long will the USA remain the Nobel Prize leader?Since first being awarded in 1901, most Nobel Prizes for science have gone to the USA, the United Kingdom, Germany and France. An empirical study by Professor Claudius Gros from the Institute for Theoretical Physics at the Goethe University in Frankfurt has now shown that the Nobel Prize productivity in these countries is primarily determined by two factors: a long-term success rate, and periods d
9h
TED Talks Daily (SD video)

Why you should make useless things | Simone GiertzIn this joyful, heartfelt talk featuring demos of her wonderfully wacky creations, Simone Giertz shares her craft: making useless robots. Her inventions -- designed to chop vegetables, cut hair, apply lipstick and more -- rarely (if ever) succeed, and that's the point. "The true beauty of making useless things [is] this acknowledgment that you don't always know what the best answer is," Giertz say
9h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Emirates airline profit more than doubles on cargo demandLeading Middle East airline Emirates said on Wednesday its net profits had more than doubled last year, mainly on improved cargo business.
9h
The Atlantic

The World Still Spins Around Male GeniusEric Schneiderman NYOn Monday evening, The New Yorke r published yet more proof that the #MeToo moment continues apace: a report containing the testimony of four women accusing the New York attorney general, Eric Schneiderman, of a range of physical and emotional abuses. The story, under the powerhouse co-byline of Jane Mayer and Ronan Farrow, was striking—and nauseating—for several reasons, among them allegations o
9h
The Atlantic

An Ominous Night for House RepublicansAn incumbent Republican congressman lost his primary on Tuesday night, and three sitting GOP members of the House were defeated in their bids for promotions to the Senate. Yet in an era when conservative primary voters are rewarding insurgency over incumbency , that somehow still counts as a good night for the GOP establishment. Party leaders in Washington escaped their nightmare scenario in West
9h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Lives in the balance as UN debates climate financeBehind wrangling at UN climate talks over financial aid for poor countries dealing with increasingly extreme weather and bracing for worse to come, real-world projects that can save livelihoods—and sometimes lives -– are queued up, waiting for approval and money.
9h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Breeding benefits when love bites wombats on the buttMonitoring wombats for behaviours such as pacing and rump biting could help conservation efforts by increasing the success of captive breeding.
9h
Feed: All Latest

The Iran Nuclear Deal Unraveling Raises Fears of CyberattacksFor the last three years, Iran has restrained its state-sponsored hackers from disruptive attacks on the West. That ceasefire may now be over.
9h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Getting health data sharing off the groundTo make progress in personalised medicine, researchers and doctors need access to health data. However, as a study by ETH researchers shows, comprehensive guidelines for the exchange of such data are lacking, being one of the primary factors why health data are still shared so infrequently.
9h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Nutmeg's hidden power: Helping the liverSmelling nutmeg evokes images of fall, pumpkin pie and hot apple cider. But the spice has been used for years in traditional Chinese medicine to treat gastrointestinal illnesses. Now one group reports in ACS' Journal of Proteome Research that they have figured out how nutmeg helps other organs, specifically the liver.
9h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Adversity early in life linked with more physical pain in adulthoodExperiencing trauma as a child may influence how much pain an individual feels in adulthood, according to Penn State researchers. Gaining insight about who feels more pain and why is important as issues like the opioid crisis continue to escalate.
9h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Leafcutter ants' success due to more than crop selectionA complex genetic analysis has biologists re-evaluating some long-held beliefs about the way societies evolved following the invention of agriculture -- by six-legged farmers. Findings from biologists at Rice University, the University of Texas at Austin and Brazil's São Paulo State University appear this week in Molecular Ecology.
9h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News

New study demonstrates toll of anxiety on bone healthAnxiety has already been shown to take its toll on the human body in many ways, including increased risk for heart disease and gastrointestinal disorders. Now a new study demonstrates how anxiety levels are linked to an increased risk of bone fractures in postmenopausal women. Study results are published online today in Menopause, the journal of The North American Menopause Society (NAMS).
9h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News

How even one automated, connected vehicle can improve safety and save energy in trafficConnected cruise control uses vehicle-to-vehicle communication to let automated vehicles respond to multiple cars at a time in an effort to save energy and improve safety.
9h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Penn experts call for safeguards if Medicaid work requirement policies prevailWhen the Centers for Medicare and Medicaid Services (CMS) announced controversial policies inviting states to establish work requirements as a condition to receive Medicaid, many in the medical community opposed it. If these measures continue to be approved, CMS should act to minimize the potential harms they could cause to Medicaid recipients, two Penn Medicine experts in law and ethics argue in
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Stress helps unlearn fearStress can have a positive effect on extinction learning, which causes previously learned associations to dissolve. According to the findings of cognitive psychologists at Ruhr-Universität Bochum, stress causes extinction learning to occur independent of context. This might prove useful for example in therapies for anxiety disorders. Dr. Shira Meir Drexler, Professor Dr. Oliver Wolf, and assistant
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Satellite row tests UK's post-Brexit security plansBritain outlined its proposals Wednesday for close security cooperation with the EU after Brexit, but these risk being undermined by the bloc's refusal to share sensitive data on the Galileo satellite project.
9h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Stowaway rats eradicated from British island territory of South GeorgiaTwo centuries after rats first landed on the British overseas territory of South Georgia on board sealing and whaling ships, a team of conservationists on Wednesday declared the island rodent-free.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

European businesses in firing line of Iran sanctionsEuropean businesses have the most to lose from renewed US sanctions against Iran, analysts said Wednesday, with massive sums at stake for some of the continent's big names.
9h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Google suspends all ads related to Irish abortion referendumGoogle is suspending all advertising connected to Ireland's abortion referendum as part of moves to protect "election integrity," the company announced Wednesday.
9h
The Atlantic

Ebola Returns Just as Trump Asks to Rescind Ebola FundsEbola is back. The infamous viral disease first made itself known to the world in 1976, in a small village called Yambuku in the Democratic Republic of the Congo. Now, 42 years later, Ebola is causing another outbreak in the DRC—the ninth in the country’s history. The new outbreak has hit the town of Bikoro in the northwestern part of the country. The nearby iIkoko Iponge health facility—picture
9h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Germany okays class-action suits before diesel deadlineThe German government on Wednesday approved a draft law allowing US-style class action lawsuits, opening the door for drivers to seek compensation over Volkswagen's diesel emissions cheating scam before the case expires.
9h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

SoftBank reports soaring annual operating profitJapanese telecom giant SoftBank on Wednesday reported a surge in its annual operating profit, driven by the increasing value of its Vision Fund and robust performances from its telecoms units.
9h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

SoftBank confirms deal to sell Flipkart stake to WalmartThe head of Japanese technology company SoftBank Group Corp. said Wednesday it has reached an agreement to sell its stake in Indian e-commerce company Flipkart to Walmart.
9h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News

500-year-old Leaning Tower of Pisa mystery unveiled by engineersWhy has the Leaning Tower of Pisa survived the strong earthquakes that have hit the region since the middle ages? This is a long-standing question a research group of 16 engineers has investigated, including a leading expert in earthquake engineering and soil-structure interaction from the University of Bristol.
9h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Penn engineer make drug microparticles a thousand times faster than ever beforeExtended-release drugs rely on microparticles of consistent size and shape so they dissolve at a predictable rate. University of Pennsylvania engineers have now developed a microfluidic system where more than ten thousand microparticle generators run in parallel, making more than 300 billion an hour, all on a silicon-and-glass chip that can fit into a shirt pocket.
9h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Mixed forests: Ecologically and economically superiorMixed forests are more productive than monocultures. This is true on all five continents, and particularly in regions with high precipitation. These findings from an international overview study, in which the Technical University of Munich (TUM) participated, are highly relevant for forest science and forest management on a global scale.
9h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Fish in schools can take it easyUsing a new computer model, researchers at the Ecole Centrale de Marseille and CNRS have shown that a fish expends less energy when it swims in a school, because neighbouring fish produce a 'suction' effect. This work will be published on 11 May 2018 in Physical Review Letters.
9h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News

People with OCD process emotions differently than their unaffected siblingsA new study in Biological Psychiatry: Cognitive Neuroscience and Neuroimaging reports that people with obsessive-compulsive disorder (OCD) feel more distress when viewing images to provoke OCD-related emotions than their unaffected siblings. Although the unaffected siblings showed lower levels of distress, they had higher levels of brain activity in regions important for attention. The findings su
9h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Shiga toxin-producing E. coli in foodEscherichia coli (E. coli) is a germ that occurs naturally in the gut of mammals and birds, as well as in the human intestinal flora. However, certain E. coli types can cause severe diarrhea in humans. These virulent E. coli types include Shiga toxin-producing E. coli (STEC),also known as Verotoxin-producing E. coli (VTEC).
9h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Occupational exposures linked with increased risk of COPDA study with more than 3,300 participants in 12 countries has established a relationship between occupational exposure to biological dusts, gases, fumes and pesticides and COPD. The researchers did a follow-up of the participants 20 years after the first assessment.
9h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Microbes are savvy investors when contributing to the common goodUK scientists investigating the fundamental question in biology as to why individuals have evolved to cooperate rather than simply exploiting the contributions of their rivals, have found that microbes vary their contribution to maximize the return of investment.
9h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Axial reports findings of elevated 4-EPS in children with ASDAxial Biotherapeutics today announced that Srinivas Rao, M.D., Ph.D., Axial's Chief Medical Officer, will present new data from Axial's research of the link between the human gut microbiome and Autism Spectrum Disorder (ASD) at the International Society for Autism Research (INSAR) conference. The findings showed that concentrations of the bacterial metabolite, 4-ethylphenylsulfate (4-EPS) were ele
9h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Breeding benefits when love bites wombats on the buttMonitoring wombats for behaviors such as pacing and rump biting could help conservation efforts by increasing the success of captive breeding.
9h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News

New CAR T case study shows promise in acute myeloid leukemiaAccording to a case study from trial published online ahead of print in the journal Haematologica, a patient has remained cancer free for nine months after being treated with CYAD-01, followed by a bone marrow transplant.
9h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Darwin's finches—where did they actually come from?In 1835, Charles Darwin visited the Galapagos Islands and discovered a group of birds that would shape his groundbreaking theory of natural selection. Darwin's Finches are now well-known as a textbook example of animal evolution. But just where did a species synonymous with the discovery of evolution come from? A new study from The Auk: Ornithological Advances presents some of the best models to d
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Ultrasonic attack is unlikely, but incidental exposure presents plenty of problemsNew technologies for mobile devices may use ultrasonic sound waves for a variety of purposes, from charging your phone when you enter your room to collecting data on which advertisements you watch. Pest deterrents, dog controllers, some automatic sliding doors, public address voice alarms—and even a device marketed in the U.K. as a teenager repellant to keep kids from loitering outside storefronts
9h
Futurity.org

Implanting stem cell ‘patch’ can restore visionResearchers have developed a specially engineered retinal patch to treat people with sudden, severe sight loss. In July 2015, 86-year-old Douglas Waters developed severe age-related macular degeneration. He struggled to see things clearly, even when up close. A few months later, he became part of the clinical trial that used stem cell-derived ocular cells. Doctors implanted his retinal eyepatch a
9h
Ingeniøren

Mysterium består efter superpræcis måling af neutronens levetidFor første gang er neutronens levetid målt med en metode, hvor de nødvendige systematiske korrektioner er mindre end måleusikkerheden. Målingen bekræfter, at to vidt forskellige måleprincipper giver afgørende og helt uforklarligt forskellige værdier.
9h
The Atlantic

A Beginner’s Guide to Hawaii’s Otherworldly LavaHawaii Kilauea Big IslandThere is something remarkable about the lava spurting out of Kilauea, the miles-wide shield volcano on Hawaii’s Big Island that fissured anew last week. It cuts across roads, forming berms of black and smoldering rock . It bursts from the ground, dancing like bubbles above a cauldron. In one video, it creeps across the land and then devours a Ford Mustang . So far, the lava has destroyed 35 struc
9h
Feed: All Latest

This Photo Was Made With Radiation From Vintage DishesPeter Shellenberger uses old Fiestaware and Ektachrome film to make his autoradiographs.
9h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Brood parasitism in fishBiologists from Brno (Czech Republic) and the University of Konstanz prove that 'evolutionary experience' as well as learning protects cichlid fish from the brood parasitism practiced by the African cuckoo catfish.
10h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News

USTC develops all-optically controlled non-reciprocal multifunctional photonic devicesUSTC Microcavity Research Group in the Key Laboratory of Quantum Information have perfected a 4-port all-optically controlled non-reciprocal multifunctional photonic device based on a magnetic-field-free optomechanical resonator is demonstrated for the first time.
10h
Futurity.org

Discovery links breast cancer and body clockNew research identifies another gene—beyond BRCA1 and BRCA2 mutations—that may have an effect on breast cancer, one associated with the body’s circadian rhythm. Period 2 (Per2), a regulatory mechanism within each cell’s peripheral clock, plays a crucial function in mammalian mammary gland development and suppressing it leads to severely disrupted gland development in mice, find Weston Porter, pro
10h
Popular Science

Indoor campfires, motion sensitivity, and 9 other smart-light tricks to tryDIY They can do a lot more than turn on and off. Sure, you can turn your smart lights on with an app—but they have lots of other abilities, from creating an artificial sunrise to changing in time with music.
10h
BBC News - Science & Environment

Lonely asteroid tells Solar System storyAn unusual object has been found lurking in the Kuiper Belt, and it may have a tale to tell.
10h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

500-year-old Leaning Tower of Pisa mystery unveiled by engineersWhy has the Leaning Tower of Pisa survived the strong earthquakes that have hit the region since the middle ages? This is a long-standing question a research group of 16 engineers has investigated, including a leading expert in earthquake engineering and soil-structure interaction from the University of Bristol.
10h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Hostility towards minorities can be contagiousIf people act hostile towards other ethnic groups, they easily find imitators.
10h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News

The far-reaching effects of ocean floors on the sea surfaceLow rises on the ocean floor at a depth of 5,500 meters in the western North Pacific regulate surface flows and create sharp sea surface temperature (SST) fronts, which have tremendous effects on the climate and marine resources.
10h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Microbes are savvy when contributing to the common goodMicrobes vary their contribution to a community to maximise the return on their investment according to a new study led by UCL and the University of Bath.
10h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

How to understand one of Stephen Hawking's final papers – according to an expertThe late physicist Stephen Hawking made a huge contribution to cosmology during his lifetime, but he didn't quite manage to resolve all the mysteries of the universe. Now one of the last papers he ever worked on has been published – and it introduces some new ideas about the size and shape of the cosmos. But what does the research actually say and how important are the findings?
10h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Method assembles cellulose nanofibres into a material stronger than spider silkResearchers in Sweden have produced a bio-based material that is reported to surpass the strength of all known bio-based materials whether fabricated or natural, including wood and spider silk.
10h
BBC News - Science & Environment

Brexit to 'force work on Galileo sat-nav system out of UK'An Airbus executive says future UK work on the Galileo sat-nav system would have to be moved to the continent because of Brexit.
10h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Dispersing refugees around a country puts them at an immediate disadvantage – why this matters for integrationThe estimated number of people worldwide displaced by conflict and violence reached an unprecedented 68.9m at the end of 2017.
10h
Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

Ultrasonic attack is unlikely, but incidental exposure presents plenty of problemsNew technologies for mobile devices may use ultrasonic sound waves, and these devices have varying effects on different subsets of the population. Regulation of these technologies is in many ways 'the wild west,' according to researchers who wrote a guide for moving forward in today's new world of ultrasonic exposure.
10h
Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

From the mouths of babes: Infants really enjoy hearing from their peersSorry, new parents -- even though your infants appreciate your coos, they prefer to hear sounds from their peers -- other babies. Even at the pre-babbling stage, infants recognize vowel-like sounds, but they tend to dwell on these sounds when from the mouths of babes.A new line of research focuses on one aspect of infant speech development: how babies perceive speech with infant vocal properties.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

Virtual reality technology opens new doors of (spatial) perceptionLocating and discriminating sound sources is extremely complex because the brain must process spatial information from many, sometimes conflicting, cues. Using virtual reality and other immersive technologies, researchers can use new methods to investigate how we make sense of the word with sound.
10h
Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

Key factors to support quality of life in dementiaA robust research analysis has identified what factors can be targeted to support people to live as well as possible with dementia.
10h
Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

78,000 year cave record from East Africa shows early cultural innovationsScientists have excavated the Panga ya Saidi cave site, in the coastal hinterland of Kenya. The excavations and analyses represent the longest archaeological sequence in East Africa over the last 78,000 years. The evidence for gradual cultural changes does not support dramatic revolutions, and despite being close to the coast, there is no evidence that humans were using coastal 'super-highways' fo
10h
Dagens Medicin

Tre initiativer skal lette presset på Holbæk SygehusRegion Sjælland er klar med tre initiativer, der skal løse den ubalance, der i øjeblikket opleves mellem ressourcer og patientindtag på Holbæk Sygehus. Overlæge på sygehuset er optimistisk omkring det øgede fokus på problemet.
10h
Dagens Medicin

Over 9000 hjerner flytter fra Aarhus til OdenseVerdens største samling af konserverede hjerner flytter til efteråret formentlig fra Aarhus til Odense.
10h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Visualization of molecular soccer ballsResearchers led by the University of Tsukuba imaged lithium ion-doped fullerene, which resembles a molecular soccer ball, by scanning tunneling microscopy. The microscopy images of the single lithium ion-doped fullerene molecules and corresponding density functional theory calculations allowed the electronic structure of lithium ion-doped fullerene to be comprehensively determined. Such knowledge
10h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Darwin's finches -- where did they actually come from?In 1835, Charles Darwin visited the Galapagos Islands and discovered a group of birds that would shape his groundbreaking theory of natural selection. Darwin's finches are now well-known as a textbook example of animal evolution. But just where did a species synonymous with the discovery of evolution come from? A new study from The Auk: Ornithological Advances presents some of the best models to d
10h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Scientists observe stronger-than-binary correlations with entangled photonic qutritsProfessor LI Chuanfeng's Group of CAS Key Laboratory of Quantum Information demonstrates the existence of stronger-than-binary correlations in quantum mechanics for the first time. The results are published in Physical Review Letters on May 4 and incorporated into the 'Editor's Suggestion.' Li Chuanfeng, Liu Biheng, and others collaborated with theoretical physicists from Spain, Hungary, and Germa
10h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Your Spotify history could help predict what's going on with the economyThe Bank of England's chief economist, Andy Haldane, has urged his colleagues to examine the musical mood of the nation when contemplating changes to the Bank's interest rate. How could an increase in Taylor Swift downloads or a decline in the popularity of rock and roll be relevant for managing the economy?
10h
New Scientist - News

There is no secret burial chamber in Tutankhamun’s tombIt was hoped apparent chambers in Tutankhamun’s tomb might be the burial place of Queen Nefertiti, the wife of his father. But radar shows there’s probably nothing there
10h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

First early-type magnetic star in an eclipsing binary detectedAstronomers report the discovery of the first known early-type magnetic star in an eclipsing binary system. The finding, detailed in a paper published April 27 on the arXiv pre-print server, could have important implications for our understanding of the evolutionary process of binary stars.
10h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Friends, likes, fake followers and cash—internet influencers under the microscopeLocal businesses, PR agencies and consumers should beware, warns Murdoch University researcher Dr. Catherine Archer, as ethical concerns surrounding the activities of social media influencers grow.
10h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Speeding up micro-CT scanningMicro-computed tomography or "micro-CT" is X-ray imaging in 3-D, by the same method used in hospital CT (or "CAT") scans, but on a small scale with massively increased resolution. It enables scientists and engineers to see inside structures and reveal hidden secrets.
10h
The Atlantic

Trump's First Big Breakthrough in North Korea NegotiationsNorth Korea Mike PompeoUpdated at 9:41 a.m. ET President Trump announced Wednesday that three Americans who were detained in North Korea are now free, marking perhaps the most significant success so far in the Trump administration’s negotiations with the regime in Pyongyang. I am pleased to inform you that Secretary of State Mike Pompeo is in the air and on his way back from North Korea with the 3 wonderful gentlemen t
10h
Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

Exiled asteroid discovered in outer reaches of solar systemAstronomers have used ESO telescopes to investigate a relic of the primordial solar system. The team found that the unusual Kuiper Belt Object 2004 EW95 is a carbon-rich asteroid, the first of its kind to be confirmed in the cold outer reaches of the Solar System. This curious object likely formed in the asteroid belt between Mars and Jupiter and has been flung billions of kilometers from its orig
10h
Feed: All Latest

The Physics of Swinging a Mass on a String for FunWith a specific setup, you can control the tension in the string.
10h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Birds wearing backpacks trace a path to conservationWith the arrival of spring, we look forward to the return of hundreds of species of migratory songbirds from their wintering grounds.
11h
Scientific American Content: Global

Unleashing the Energy Trapped within Undereducated GirlsThe energy within undereducated girls must be unleashed -- Read more on ScientificAmerican.com
11h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Heart failure: The Alzheimer's disease of the heart?Similar to how protein clumps build up in the brain in people with some neurodegenerative diseases such as Alzheimer's and Parkinson's diseases, protein clumps appear to accumulate in the diseased hearts of mice and people with heart failure, according to a team led by Johns Hopkins University researchers.
11h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Fish in schools can take it easyUsing a new computer model, researchers at the Ecole Centrale de Marseille and CNRS have shown that a fish expends less energy when it swims in a school, because neighbouring fish produce a 'suction' effect. This work will be published on 11 May 2018 in Physical Review Letters.
11h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

From drone swarms to tree batteries, new tech is revolutionising ecology and conservationUnderstanding Earth's species and ecosystems is a monumentally challenging scientific pursuit. But with the planet in the grip of its sixth mass extinction event, it has never been a more pressing priority.
11h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Researcher uses 'shotgun sequencing' to study microorganismsThe rice genome. The grape genome. The original human genome project. You name it, Bonnie Hurwitz probably worked on it in her 12 years as a computational biologist in industry, where she combined her loves for genomics and computer programming.
11h
Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

Human MAIT cells sense the metabolic state of enteric bacteriaA little-explored group of immune cells plays an important role in the regulation of intestinal bacteria. Changing metabolic states of the microbes have an effect on defense cells at different stages of alert or rest.
11h
Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

Basing everyday decisions on risk of pain or loss linked to increased anxietyScientists have shone new light on how the human brain uses past experiences and generalizes them to future events, helping us safely navigate the world around us.
11h
Futurity.org

Doctors overseas spend way less time taking notesUS doctors’ clinical notes are, on average, four times as long as those of their counterparts in other countries, new research finds. Three physicians—whose work sometimes entails helping with the launch of electronic health record software in hospitals both in the United States and abroad—noticed something curious when they traveled overseas. “The highly trained American physician… has become a
11h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Coal plants get new life in the sunCheaper renewable energy is reshaping how electricity is generated and consumed. In many U.S. electricity markets, including Texas, coal-fired power plants are being retired because they can no longer compete on price compared with other sources of energy, including wind and solar.
11h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

How many of earth's moons crashed back into the planet?For decades, scientists have pondered how Earth acquired its only satellite, the Moon. Whereas some have argued that it formed from material lost by Earth due to centrifugal force, or was captured by Earth's gravity, the most widely accepted theory is that the moon formed roughly 4.5 billion years ago when a Mars-sized object (named Theia) collided with a proto-Earth (aka. the Giant Impact Hypothe
11h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Animals bred in captivity found to undergo internal physical changesA team of researchers from the University of Wollongong and the University of New South Wales has found that some wild animals undergo internal physical changes when bred in captivity. In their paper published in the journal Royal Society Open Science, the group describes experiments they conducted on captive mice and what they found.
11h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Lava, ash flows, mudslides and nasty gases—good reasons to respect volcanoesVolcanoes are beautiful and awe-inspiring, but the ongoing eruption of Kilauea on Hawaii's Big Island is showing how dangerous these events can be. So far this event has destroyed dozens of homes and displaced hundreds of people, but no deaths or serious injuries have been reported. Other volcanic eruptions have had deadlier impacts.
11h
Ingeniøren

MIT-teknologi skal bringe selvkørende biler ud på landetNy teknologi kan gøre kørslen i ødemarken uafhængig af 3D-kort.
11h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Australia's fuel stockpile is perilously low, and it may be too late for a refillAustralia is an island nation that depends heavily on imported fuel – and our stockpile is critically low. According to recent reports, we have just 22 days' worth of crude oil, 59 days of liquefied petroleum gas (LPG), 20 days of petrol, 19 days of aviation fuel, and 21 days of diesel in reserve.
11h
The Scientist RSS

Image of the Day: Hold My BroodCuckoo catfish trick cichlids into caring for their eggs in a strategy known as brood parasitism.
11h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Maintaining valuable soilsEach year almost one thousand hectares of cultivated land continue to be lost, thereby wiping out numerous services delivered by the soil, such as filtering water and storing carbon, which are central for our society's wellbeing. The National Research Programme "Sustainable Use of Soil as a Resource" (NRP 68) is suggesting ways in which spatial planning can be structured so that this loss remains
11h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

The far-reaching effects of ocean floors on the sea surfaceLow rises on the ocean floor at a depth of 5,500 meters in the western North Pacific regulate surface flows and create sharp sea surface temperature (SST) fronts, which have tremendous effects on the climate and marine resources.
11h
Popular Science

Why do my allergies change as I age?Health Kids and the elderly don't have much in common when it comes to allergies. If we were to sum up allergies with an emoji, it’d be a shrug. We know so little about them, and yet tens of millions of Americans experience allergies of some kind or…
11h
Scientific American Content: Global

How Do We Find Exoplanets?Astronomers have found more than 3700 worlds outside of our solar system in the past 25 years. How do they find them? -- Read more on ScientificAmerican.com
11h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Bursting pulsar found to 'hiccup' during crucial stage of its lifecycleResearchers at the University of Southampton have discovered that the unique 'Bursting Pulsar' – a neutron star which steals matter from a low-mass stellar neighbour – may also be the slowest known 'transitional pulsar' in existence. Transitional pulsars are a rare class of neutron stars, which alternate between showing X-ray and radio pulsations over timescales of years.
11h
Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

Powerful hurricanes strengthen faster now than 30 years agoHurricanes that intensify rapidly -- a characteristic of almost all powerful hurricanes -- do so more strongly and quickly now than they did 30 years ago, according to a new study. The phenomenon is due largely to a climate cycle known as the Atlantic Multidecadal Oscillation.
11h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Virtual reality technology opens new doors of (spatial) perceptionLocating and discriminating sound sources is extremely complex because the brain must process spatial information from many, sometimes conflicting, cues. Using virtual reality and other immersive technologies, researchers can use new methods to investigate how we make sense of the word with sound. At the 175th ASA Meeting, G. Christopher Stecker will survey his team's use of virtual reality and au
11h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News

From the mouths of babes: Infants really enjoy hearing from their peersSorry, new parents -- even though your infants appreciate your coos, they prefer to hear sounds from their peers -- other babies. Even at the pre-babbling stage, infants recognize vowel-like sounds, but they tend to dwell on these sounds when from the mouths of babes. At the 175th ASA Meeting, researchers will present from a new line of research focusing on one aspect of infant speech development:
11h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Ultrasonic attack is unlikely, but incidental exposure presents plenty of problemsNew technologies for mobile devices may use ultrasonic sound waves, and these devices have varying effects on different subsets of the population. Regulation of these technologies is in many ways 'the wild west,' according to Timothy Leighton, who wrote a guide for moving forward in today's new world of ultrasonic exposure. He will describe his work uncovering the strange history and uncertain fut
11h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Moving magnetic fields disrupt ice nucleationGreat science stems from curiosity and hard work. In this case, it all began with a broken freezer.
11h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Researcher develops a new generation of grapheneThe material graphene has many incredible properties, but to date it has been difficult to use on a large scale in industry, because it loses its unique properties and goes back to its origin graphite. Researcher Mamoun Taher has developed a new form of graphene that can solve the problem.
11h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Getting robotic surgical tools from the lab to the operating roomThe path from university lab to commercialization is especially complex in the biotech industry. Challenges range from long lead times, sometimes measured in decades, to the costs of transforming ideas into innovations, as well as issues of intellectual property, patenting and licensing.
11h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Image: Spring color in the North SeaThe increasing sunlight and warmth of springtime provoke buds and blooms amidst the trees, flowers, and grasses on land. Warm air and sunlight also beget warmer ocean waters and provoke blooms of the "grass of the sea"—phytoplankton. These tiny, plant-like organisms float near the ocean surface and turn sunlight and carbon dioxide into sugars and oxygen. In turn, they become food for the grazing z
11h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

NASA, Uber to explore safety, efficiency of future urban airspaceNASA has signed a second space act agreement with Uber Technologies, Inc., to further explore concepts and technologies related to urban air mobility (UAM) to ensure a safe and efficient system for future air transportation in populated areas.
11h
The Atlantic

Dear Therapist: I'm Scared of Having KidsEditor’s Note: Every Wednesday, Lori Gottlieb answers questions from readers about their problems, big and small. Have a question? Email her at dear.therapist@theatlantic.com. Dear Therapist, I want to be a parent, but I am absolutely terrified. How do I get over this? I’m 31 and my husband is 34. My husband has been ready to start trying for a while, and in my gut I know I want to be a parent, b
11h
The Atlantic

The Last Days of the Blue-Blood HarvestHorseshoe crabs are sometimes called “living fossils” because they have been around in some form for more than 450 million years . In this time, the Earth has gone through multiple major ice ages, a Great Dying , the formation and subsequent breaking up of Pangaea, and an asteroid impact that killed the dinosaurs and most of life on Earth yet again. In other words, horseshoe crabs have truly seen
11h
The Atlantic

‘Maybe We Have Swung Too Far Toward Being Empathetic’In 2011, the comedian Seth Meyers, then the head writer for Saturday Night Live and host of the show’s “Weekend Update” news roundup, mocked Donald Trump at the White House Correspondents’ Dinner. “Donald Trump has been saying that he will run for president as a Republican,” Meyers said, as Trump sat stone-faced in the audience, “which is surprising, since I just assumed he was running as a joke.
11h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Lasers in space—Earth mission tests new technologyImagine standing on the roof of a building in Los Angeles and trying to point a laser so accurately that you could hit a particular building in San Diego, more than 100 miles (160 kilometers) away. This accuracy is required for the feat that a novel technology demonstration aboard the soon-to-launch Gravity Recovery and Climate Experiment Follow-On (GRACE-FO) mission will aim to achieve. For the f
11h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

New Zealand's glaciers are shrinkingNew Zealand's glaciers are some of our most prized landmarks, valued by residents and visitors alike. But according to scientific data, these glaciers are shrinking, melting into the ocean and causing the sea level to rise. Scientists at Victoria University of Wellington's Antarctic Research Centre, including Ph.D. student Lauren Vargo, are tracking those changes using the latest digital modelling
11h
Science-Based Medicine

Essential Oils in the AmbulanceAromatherapy with essential oils is pseudoscience, backed only with low quality studies guaranteed to show a placebo effect. Their growing popularity warns that better science education is needed.
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Feed: All Latest

Want to Prove Your Business Is Fair? Audit Your AlgorithmA slew of tech companies are opening up their inner workings to outside evaluators, including Weapons of Math Destruction author Cathy O'Neil
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Feed: All Latest

AI Isn’t a Crystal Ball, But It Might Be a MirrorUsing algorithms to predict crimes has created a biased system: Better to use AI for looking inward.
11h
Feed: All Latest

The Complex Engineering of Aston Martin's DB11 VolanteEngineers spent four years designing and abusing a folding roof for the convertible version of the DB11.
11h
Feed: All Latest

Xbox One Game Sale: Our Favorite Games for Cheap (May 2018)Looking for Xbox games to play this summer? Grab some on the cheap.
11h
Scientific American Content: Global

Vaccines Built for the Rich Don't Protect the Poor as WellThe same preventive shot may be less effective in poor neighborhoods than in rich ones -- Read more on ScientificAmerican.com
12h
The Atlantic

My Fears, My Daughters, and #MeTooEditor’s Note: This article is part of Parenting in an Uncertain Age , a series about the experience of raising children in a time of great change. For a long time, my younger daughter and her friends didn’t go to the movies or the mall. They are all post-9/11 babies, and they’ve grown up in the shadow of a violence they don’t really understand. These girls somehow intuited that public spaces cou
12h
Dagens Medicin

Fra solopraksis til sundhedshus: »Arbejdsglæden er kommet tilbage«Efter 20 år i solopraksis flyttede Kristian Egersgård sidste år ind i Fredericia Sundhedshus. En beslutning han ikke har fortrudt et eneste sekund. I de kommende år forventes yderligere 10 praksislæger at slå sig ned i det tværfaglige hus, der i denne uge modtog 20 mio. kr. fra Sundhedsministeriet til ombygning og modernisering.
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Dagens Medicin

Hjertelæge modtager forskerpris for sine evner for talentudviklingProfessor og overlæge Gunnar Gislason har en helt særlig evne til at finde og dyrke talenter, og den evne har nu resulteret i, at han modtager Dansk Cardiologisk Selskabs årlige forskerpris.
12h
Ingeniøren

Vækstteam netop udpeget af regeringenNetop udpeget ‘vækstteam for grøn energi- og miljøteknologi’ er udpeget af Regeringen. Udvalget består af erhvervsfolk og skal hjælpe Danmark med at udnytte vækstpotentiale.
12h
Viden

Opdag en planet, hjælp folk i nød eller gå i krig i 1864: 7 forskningsprojekter, hvor du kan deltageHar du en forsker gemt i maven? Eller er du bare nysgerrig på naturen, rummet, historie eller noget fjerde? Så er citizen science - borgervidenskab - måske noget for dig.
12h
Viden

Vil du være med til at skabe Danmarks nye superhjerne?Aarhus-forskere vil skabe fremtidens kunstige intelligens med computerspil, hvor alle kan være med- og du er hermed inviteret til at spille 'Science Detective'.
12h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Image: Shaker test of 8-tonne cooling systemTypically ESA's shaker tables are used to replicate the take-off vibrations of a satellite-lifting rocket. The large object seen here is not a satellite at all but an 8-tonne cooling system being subjected to a simulated earthquake – while blasting a chilly wave of air towards the engineer observing the test.
12h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Hostility towards minorities can be contagiousInter-ethnic conflicts often escalate surprisingly quickly. In a recent study, researchers have investigated the influence of the environment on peoples' hostility against minorities with the help of experiments. They found that hostility towards members of other ethnic groups is much more often imitated than hostility towards co-ethnics.
12h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

X-ray laser opens new view on Alzheimer's proteinsA new experimental method permits the X-ray analysis of amyloids, a class of large, filamentous biomolecules which are an important hallmark of diseases such as Alzheimer's and Parkinson's. An international team of researchers headed by DESY scientists has used a powerful X-ray laser to gain insights into the structure of different amyloid samples. The X-ray scattering from amyloid fibrils give pa
12h
Scientific American Content: Global

Colombia after the ViolencePeace efforts in Colombia have ended 50 years of intense conflict. Now, scientists are studying former fighters and victims as they attempt to heal -- Read more on ScientificAmerican.com
12h
Scientific American Content: Global

Mindfulness Under the SeaWhen you go free diving, physical strength is not enough -- Read more on ScientificAmerican.com
12h
The Atlantic

How to Make Your Open Office Less AnnoyingYou know you’re in an open-plan office when you click on an article that will allow you to hate-read about open offices, then kind of hide your computer screen with the top half of your torso so that your colleagues don’t realize just how much you’re not a team player. You know you’re in an open office because you’re trying to write a sensitive email while wedged between one coworker making a gyn
12h
Live Science

See 15 Crazy Animal Eyes — Rectangular Pupils to Wild ColorsFrom the mantis shrimp to the dragonfly, here are 15 amazing animal eyes.
12h
Live Science

Why the Heck Do So Many Koalas Have Chlamydia?The the John Oliver Koala Chlamydia Ward will treat the sick marsupials. But how do they get the disease in the first place?
12h
Feed: All Latest

Why Nashville Voters Rejected Public TransitAfter the city's voters shot down an ambitious plan to fund light rail and bus lines, transit advocates wonder where they went wrong.
12h
Latest Headlines | Science News

Gaia delivers a trove of data revealing secrets of the Milky WayAstronomers are already using Gaia’s new information to estimate the galaxy’s mass, the diameter of exoplanets and more.
13h
Scientific American Content: Global

Amur Leopard Population Triples--to 103Thanks to protective efforts in Russia, these critically endangered big cats have renewed hope of avoiding extinction -- Read more on ScientificAmerican.com
13h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Leopard meals—females go for diversityLeopards, top predators of the African savannah, are known to feed on a variety of prey species. These include smaller and medium-sized mammals such as impala, gemsbok, kudus and warthogs, but they also target relatively small "appetizers" such as hares.
13h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

When lipids meet hormones—plants' answer to complex stressesUnlike animals, plants can't run away when things get bad. That can be the weather changing or a caterpillar starting to slowly munch on a leaf. Instead, they change themselves inside, using a complex system of expand iconhormones, to adapt to challenges.
13h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

An innovation that opens horizons for greenhouse gases' remote monitoringFourier-transform infrared (FTIR) spectrometers, among the most frequently used research tools to identify and analyze chemicals, are too large to be used in the field to detect compounds.
13h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Voltage loss in electrically conductive bacteriaAn international research group has shed new light on cable bacteria. Using laser light, researchers have followed electrons as they travel through the current-conducting bacteria, and on the basis of the electrical potential in the bacteria, they have calculated that the bacteria cannot function efficiently at depths exceeding 3 cm into the sediment due to voltage loss.
13h
Live Science

Ancient Romans Painted Horrifying Blood-Red Warnings on Wall Across ScotlandAncient Romans used blood red, bright yellow and stunning white paints to illustrate dire warnings on the wall that separated them from the rebellious tribespeople of Scotland, a new study shows.
13h
Live Science

Ancient Asteroid Suggests Gas Giants Once Roved the Solar System Like Unhinged DrunksA huge asteroid may be lurking at the fringes of our solar system.
13h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Carbon satellite to serve as an important tool for politicians and climate change expertsA new satellite that measures and provides detailed carbon balance information is one of the most important new tools in carbon measurement since infrared light, say researchers from the University of Copenhagen. The researchers expect the satellite to be a valuable tool for the U.N.'s work on climate change related to the Paris climate accord.
13h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Polarized light—a simple route to highly chiral materialsResearchers at the University of Tokyo used an efficient method to create chiral materials using circularly polarized light. Depending on whether left- or right-polarized, the light source induced electric fields at opposite corners of gold nanocuboids on TiO2. Via plasmon-induced charge separation, the gold converted Pb2+ into PbO2 tips deposited at the corners, resulting in a chiral plasmonic na
13h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Symmetry is essential for power network synchronizationA joint research team from Tokyo Institute of Technology (Tokyo Tech) and North Carolina State University has clarified the fundamental principles for achieving the synchronization of power generator groups in power networks, which is essential for the stable supply of electric power. Based on this principle, the team developed a method for constructing an aggregated model of a power network that
13h
The Atlantic

The Ivanka FundAmerican dollars are now finding their way into the hands of female entrepreneurs in Sri Lanka, Yemen, Nigeria, and Mali, among other countries, to be used to expand their businesses, improve their lives, and aid their countries’ development. This is happening with high-level international cooperation. It is happening with the instrumental help of the World Bank. It is happening on the advice of
13h
The Atlantic

Is 'Ladies Lingerie' a Harmless Joke or Harassment?Last month, during a conference for scholars who study international affairs, Simona Sharoni, a professor of women's and gender studies at Merrimack College, asked a crowded hotel elevator what floor everyone needed. Richard Ned Lebow, a professor of political theory at King’s College London, replied, “Ladies’ lingerie” (or, as Sharoni remembers it, “Women’s lingerie.”) Several people laughed. Wa
13h
Scientific American Content: Global

The Milky Way's Speediest Stars Could Solve a 50-Year-Old MysteryStars traveling more than 1,200 kilometers per second hint at a new mechanism behind cosmos-spanning stellar explosions -- Read more on ScientificAmerican.com
13h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Exiled asteroid discovered in outer reaches of solar systemAn international team of astronomers has used ESO telescopes to investigate a relic of the primordial solar system. The team found that the unusual Kuiper Belt Object 2004 EW95 is a carbon-rich asteroid, the first of its kind to be confirmed in the cold outer reaches of the Solar System. This curious object likely formed in the asteroid belt between Mars and Jupiter and has been flung billions of
13h
New Scientist - News

AI is now better than humans at spotting signs of cardiac arrestA system designed by Copenhagen-based artificial intelligence company Corti is more accurate and faster at detecting signs of a cardiac arrest over the phone than dispatchers
13h
The Atlantic

The Presidency Is Too Big to SucceedThe American presidency is broken, and everyone seems to know it. Many of its challenges are, by now, familiar. Presidents are bombarded by a 24-hour news media, populated by journalists looking to expose any appearance of negligence or wrong-doing. The range of crises—foreign and domestic—has expanded as the country has grown. And yes, presidents are more isolated than ever before. But the count
13h
Ingeniøren

Guldtip fra graven: Fokusér kun på de 80 procent af helhedenNår du skal sammenligne mange tal og udvælge de vigtigste, viser erfaringen, at du bør koncentrere dig om afvigelser og usædvanlige proportioner inden for 80 procent af den samlede mængde, anbefaler den afdøde svenske professor Hans Rosling.
13h
Ingeniøren

»Reklamer kan nedbryde demokratier«Facebook/Cambridge Analytica-skandalen har ifølge ITU-professor lært os, at nødvendigt med kritisk refleksion og debat om, hvad det vil sige at leve i samfund, der er inficeret med data.
13h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Exiled asteroid discovered in outer reaches of solar systemAn international team of astronomers has used ESO telescopes to investigate a relic of the primordial Solar System. The team found that the unusual Kuiper Belt Object 2004 EW95 is a carbon-rich asteroid, the first of its kind to be confirmed in the cold outer reaches of the Solar System. This curious object likely formed in the asteroid belt between Mars and Jupiter and has been flung billions of
14h
Dagens Medicin

Tæt samarbejde skal opdage diabetes blandt hjertepatienterEt nyt tæt samarbejde mellem SDCC og blandt andet Nordsjællands Hospital skal sikre, at hjertepatienter med diabetes eller risiko for det bliver opdaget tidligere.
14h
Ingeniøren

Topforskere skal optimere kollektiv transport i DanmarkMed en voksende underskov af datakilder og nye matematiske modeller vil DTU-forskere sammen med bl.a. MIT og Banedanmark optimere den kollektive trafik herhjemme.
14h
Ingeniøren

Windows lapper 21 kritiske fejl og alvorlige sikkerhedshullerTirsdag udsendte Windows en kritisk patch, som lukkede sikkerhedshuller, der allerede var taget i brug af hackere.
14h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News

X-ray laser opens new view on Alzheimer's proteinsA new experimental method permits the X-ray analysis of amyloids, a class of large, filamentous biomolecules which are an important hallmark of diseases such as Alzheimer's and Parkinson's. An international team of researchers has used a powerful X-ray laser to gain insights into the structure of different amyloid samples. The scientists present their new technique in the journal Nature Communicat
14h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Major enhancement to in vitro testing of human liver-stage malariaResearchers have developed an enhanced method to conducting liver-stage malaria research in vitro, allowing them to more quickly screen preclinical drugs and vaccines than current techniques.
14h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Human MAIT cells sense the metabolic state of enteric bacteriaA little-explored group of immune cells plays an important role in the regulation of intestinal bacteria. Changing metabolic states of the microbes have an effect on defense cells at different stages of alert or rest, as researchers from the Department of Biomedicine at the University and University Hospital of Basel report in the journal Mucosal Immunology.
14h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News

78,000 year cave record from East Africa shows early cultural innovationsA project led by the Max Planck Institute for the Science of Human History has excavated the Panga ya Saidi cave site, in the coastal hinterland of Kenya. The excavations and analyses represent the longest archaeological sequence in East Africa over the last 78,000 years. The evidence for gradual cultural changes does not support dramatic revolutions, and despite being close to the coast, there is
14h
Ingeniøren

Verdens farligste malariaparasits vigtigste gener er fundetForskningen giver håb om mere målrettet medicin mod den mest dødelige af malariaparasitterne.
14h
The Atlantic

Iran Is Now UnfetteredDuring the Obama years, Saudi Arabia and its Middle East allies were enraged by Washington’s perceived indifference to their security concerns over Iran. They couldn’t seem to convince the president that Tehran’s ambitions posed the greatest security threat to the region. Then came Donald Trump, who seemed eager to adopt their view of Iran as the single most malignant threat to the region—the wor
14h
The Atlantic

The CIA Needs an Independent Thinker—Not Gina HaspelGina Haspel CIA SenateForty-five years ago this month, in the wake of the Watergate break-ins involving former CIA personnel, the agency produced a report known as the “ family jewels. ” It contained the CIA’s accounting of incidents that it had engaged in, including operations that exceeded legislative limits. The report ran nearly 700 pages, and detailed operations against American journalists, assassination attempt
14h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

78,000 year cave record from East Africa shows early cultural innovationsA project led by the Max Planck Institute for the Science of Human History has excavated the Panga ya Saidi cave site, in the coastal hinterland of Kenya. The excavations and analyses represent the longest archaeological sequence in East Africa over the last 78,000 years. The evidence for gradual cultural changes does not support dramatic revolutions, and despite being close to the coast, there is
15h
Ingeniøren

Batterifærger fortøjes med vakuumUberørt af menneskehænder og uden tov og trosser holder Cavotec godt fast på alle norske batterifærger.
15h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Walmart, India's Flipkart to announce e-commerce mega dealUS retail behemoth Walmart is expected to announce Wednesday that it is to buy a majority stake in India's largest e-commerce company Flipkart for around $15 billion.
15h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Deutsche Telekom confident after Q1 profit bumpGermany's Deutsche Telekom lifted its earnings forecast for 2018 on Wednesday as it presented first-quarter results, saying fast growth especially in US arm T-Mobile would juice its operating income.
15h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Vodafone buys Liberty Global assets for 18.4 bn eurosBritish telecommunications giant Vodafone agreed Wednesday to buy a raft of US cable giant Liberty Global's European activities for 18.4 billion euros ($21.9 billion), which it said would catapult it into being the largest operator in the EU.
15h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Basing everyday decisions on risk of pain or loss linked to increased anxietyScientists have shone new light on how the human brain uses past experiences and generalizes them to future events, helping us safely navigate the world around us.
16h
Dagens Medicin

Diabetescenter henter ny leder for tværsektorielt programKristine Skovgaard Bossen er fra 1. juni ny programleder for de tværsektorielle regionale satsninger ved Steno Diabetes Center Copenhagen
16h
Science : NPR

Artificial Intelligence Takes Scientists Inside Living Human CellsDiseases like cancer involve changes that occur inside a cell — and usually out of sight. A new technology can reveal a cell's inner workings, using inexpensive graphics processors from video games. (Image credit: Courtesy of Allen Institute)
16h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

In Japan-China ties, ibis outreach but no panda diplomacyChina has famously used its cuddly panda bears as a diplomatic tool, but to mark warming ties with Japan it is offering a distinctly more angular gift: two crested ibises.
17h
New Scientist - News

Hope for herpes vaccine after it wipes out virus in monkeysAnimal trials have proved successful in preventing and treating genital herpes in guinea pigs and monkeys, giving hope that the vaccine will move into human trials within the year
17h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

China moves to rope in its tech 'unicorns'Having lost the likes of Alibaba and Baidu to Wall Street, China is hatching a plan to woo them back and make sure it keeps a new generation of technology titans closer to home as it battles the US for supremacy in the sector.
17h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Volcanic gases prompt door-to-door evacuation in HawaiiPolice went door-to-door in Hawaii to roust residents near two new vents emitting dangerous gases in areas where lava has been pouring into streets and backyards for the past week.
17h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Facebook makes major management overhaulFacebook on Tuesday confirmed an unprecedented management team shakeup in the aftermath of a major data privacy scandal that has rocked the social network.
17h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Boeing, Airbus, GE among biggest losers from US Iran shiftUS President Donald Trump's decision to withdraw from the Iran nuclear pact threatens new business for several big companies, including Boeing, Airbus and General Electric.
17h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Dutch eye Air France woes fearing headwinds for KLMDutch politicians and unions are watching the unfolding crisis at Air France with increasing concern, amid fears the turbulence at the French company will sideswipe its Dutch partner KLM—another chapter in an already stormy union.
17h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

California may require solar panels on new homes in 2020California USCalifornia may start requiring solar panels on new homes and low-rise apartment buildings built after 2020, the first such mandate nationwide and the state's latest step to curb greenhouse gas emissions.
17h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Toyota reports improved quarterly profit despite incentivesToyota Motor Corp. reported Wednesday its quarterly profit rose 21 percent as cost cuts and booming sales in some markets offset the toll from higher U.S. incentives.
17h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

NYPD tests new tool that detects credit card skimmersPatrick Traynor, a cybersecurity expert, was in New York in February working with police to help identify a way to detect credit card skimmers on ATMs when he got a financial fraud alert: his own information had been stolen while he was in town.
17h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

China's Alibaba buys Pakistan e-commerce firm DarazChinese e-commerce giant Alibaba said Wednesday it had purchased leading Pakistani online retailer Daraz, continuing its overseas expansion by gaining a foothold in the growing South Asian consumer market.
17h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Allen Integrated Cell released onlineThe Allen Institute for Cell Science today launched the first predictive and comprehensive, 3D model of a live human cell, the Allen Integrated Cell. By allowing researchers around the world to see many structures inside a living cell together at the same time, the Allen Integrated Cell provides a baseline for understanding cells and studying human disease models.
17h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Unlocking cancer's secrets using the 'social networks' of cellsMegha Padi, PhD, of the UA Cancer Center has developed a method for probing the genetic underpinnings of cancer and other diseases, which could lead to better treatments.
19h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Powerful hurricanes strengthen faster now than 30 years agoHurricanes that intensify rapidly -- a characteristic of almost all powerful hurricanes -- do so more strongly and quickly now than they did 30 years ago, according to a study published recently in Geophysical Research Letters. The phenomenon is due largely to a climate cycle known as the Atlantic Multidecadal Oscillation.
19h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Vaginal estradiol tablets outperform moisturizers when treating vulvovaginal problemsSex shouldn't hurt at any age, yet 75 percent of postmenopausal women report vaginal dryness, and up to 40 percent report pain with intercourse. A new study reports that vaginal estradiol tablets just might be what's needed to relieve vulvovaginal problems and improve overall quality of life. Study results are published online today in Menopause, the journal of The North American Menopause Society
19h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News

White shark researchers tap data from electronic tags to gain insights into survival ratesResearchers in the United States and Mexico have tagged juvenile white sharks for nearly two decades, tracking their movements in coastal waters of the Northeastern Pacific. Now -- drawing on methods used to study mountain lions, coyotes, moose and other terrestrial animals -- they've tapped those data in a new way, gaining the first empirical estimate of annual survival rates for young white shar
19h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Research reveals key factors to support quality of life in dementiaThe study, led by the University of Exeter and published in the journal Psychological Medicine, found that good relationships, social engagement, better everyday functioning, good physical and mental health, and high-quality care were all linked to better quality of life for people with dementia.
19h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

White shark researchers tap data from electronic tags to gain insights into survival ratesCalifornia USThe study, "Juvenile survival, competing risks, and spatial variation in mortality risk of a marine apex predator," published today in the Journal of Applied Ecology, confirms that unintentional capture in fishing gear (bycatch) is the greatest cause of death for young white sharks, a protected species in both Mexico and the United States.
19h
New on MIT Technology Review

A stealthy Harvard startup wants to reverse aging in dogs, and humans could be nextBiologist George Church says the idea is to live to 130 in the body of a 22-year-old.
20h
Ingeniøren

Region H undersøger Sundhedsplatformen for skjulte omkostningerDer er afsat 156 millioner kroner til udviklingen af Sundhedsplatformen i år, men ingen kender udgifterne produktionstab, oplæring af personale og andre afledte omkostninger. Nu har Region Hovedstaden bestilt en grundig analyse.
20h
Ingeniøren

Cookie-festen er forbi: Det skal du vide om de nye stramningerCookies må med GDPR ikke længere bruges til det samme som før.
20h
Ingeniøren

Nye tal: Brændeovne er hovedskurken i Region HovedstadenUdledninger fra brændeovne er skyld i over halvdelen af Region Hovedstadens lokalt skabte sundhedsskadelige partikelforurening, der forvolder for tidlige dødsfald. Langt de fleste partikler bliver dog blæst til byen.
20h
The Atlantic

The Strange Case of AT&T's Payments to Michael CohenAmong the details in a document released by Stormy Daniels’s lawyer Michael Avenatti on Tuesday evening is the description of a series of $50,000 payments by AT&T to Essential Consultants, a shell company owned by Michael Cohen. And although Avenatti would not detail the source of the information in the dossier in an interview with my colleague Natasha Bertrand, AT&T confirmed that it contracted
21h
BBC News - Science & Environment

Waterwheel: Ten times faster than a Venus flytrapThe hunting mechanism of the carnivorous waterwheel plant has been studied in detail for the first time.
21h
The Atlantic

Former Israeli Prime Minister: Iran May Believe Trump Is Looking for WarPresident Trump’s exit from the Iran deal on Tuesday afternoon could send a signal to the Iranians that Trump is looking for a war. That was the assessment offered by the former Israeli Prime Minister Ehud Barak, in a live interview with The Atlantic’ s Jeffrey Goldberg, at Washington’s Sixth & I Historic Synagogue Tuesday evening. But if the Iranians believe Trump is looking for an excuse to bom
21h
Feed: All Latest

The Price of Google's New Conveniences? Your DataGoogle introduces new features to make life easier, and to help the company collect more data on users.
22h
Live Science

Who Was Hippocrates?Hippocrates was a physician who lived in ancient Greece. He was the first to teach that illness had a natural cause rather than being the wrath of the gods.
23h
Feed: All Latest

Google I/O 2018: How Google’s Duplex Demo Stole the ShowGoogle Duplex AI I/OGoogle's new "Duplex" technology presents a significant tipping point for machine intelligence–powered virtual assistants.
23h
NYT > Science

C.D.C. Director’s Salary Is Reduced to $209,700 From $375,000The pay cut for Dr. Robert Redfield, the newly appointed agency chief, came about after senators and the public questioned why his salary was much higher than his predecessors’.
23h
New Scientist - News

ESA eyes Venus mission or space telescope to launch by 2030The European Space Agency has three finalists for a mission to launch by 2030: a Venus probe and two space telescopes to view ancient gamma rays and young stars
23h
BBC News - Science & Environment

Indonesian EcoBricks: A new approach in its plastics 'war'The boss of an Indonesian food factory is encouraging his community to creatively reuse plastic waste.
23h
Futurity.org

Listen: What biology can teach us about designing better stuffFrom the smallest proteins to entire ecosystems, nature might be the most sophisticated engineer on Earth. Researchers like Rama Ranganathan are trying to uncover the basic design principles that govern biology and apply them through engineering. He calls the field “evolutionary physics,” and the goal is to unlock the secrets of evolutionary history. “Evolution has taken millions and millions of
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Futurity.org

One easy step cuts risk of bladder cancer recurrenceFlushing the bladder with a common chemotherapy drug immediately after surgery significantly reduces the chances of bladder cancer returning, new research shows. The study may be the first phase III trial in the United States in two decades to show a benefit from this treatment strategy. European and Canadian urologists have been using it for years, with their own clinical trial data to support t
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The Atlantic

Trump’s Two Biggest Scandals Converge in a Single TweetThe attorney for adult-film performer Stormy Daniels made an explosive claim on Tuesday, merging the two biggest scandals of Donald Trump’s presidency in a single tweet—and setting off a frenzy of fresh speculation about the Trump campaign’s possible ties to Russia. On Tuesday evening, Daniels’s lawyer, Michael Avenatti, upped the ante further, publicly alleging that a Russian oligarch “may have”
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Does HPV vaccination prevent the development of cervical cancer?New evidence published today in the Cochrane Library shows that human papilloma virus (HPV) vaccines protect against cervical lesions in young women, particularly in those who are vaccinated between the ages of 15 and 26. It also summarizes findings on harms that have been assessed in randomized controlled trials.
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Popular Science

Scientists taught a spider how to jump so they can one day do the same for robotsAnimals Kim the spider has a thing or two to teach us. We know spiders best as quiet, eight-legged monsters who lurk around and trap their prey with webs and venom. But 13 percent of the more than 450,000 arachnid species…
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Futurity.org

A.I. spots gut bacteria patterns to predict who will get choleraArtificial intelligence can spot patterns in communities of bacteria living in the human gut that could indicate who among the approximately one billion people around the globe at risk of cholera infection will get sick with the diarrheal disease, according to new research. “These are patterns that even the most sophisticated scientist couldn’t detect by eye,” says Lawrence A. David, assistant pr
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

Hunting dogs may benefit from antioxidant boost in dietFree radicals, those DNA-damaging single-oxygen atoms, are produced in spades during exercise. Dogs that exercise a lot, like hunting dogs, may need to consume more antioxidants than their less-active counterparts to protect against this damage. But what diet formulation best meets the needs of these furry athletes? A new study provides some answers in a real-world scenario.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

Climate change threatens Marine Protected AreasNew research found that most marine life in Marine Protected Areas will not be able to tolerate warming ocean temperatures caused by greenhouse gas emissions. The study found that with continued 'business-as-usual' emissions, the protections currently in place won't matter, because by 2100, warming and reduced oxygen concentration will make Marine Protected Areas uninhabitable by most species curr
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

Breast cancer linked to the body's internal clockFor years, doctors have associated the BRCA1 and BRCA2 gene mutations with an increased risk of breast cancer. But researchers have now identified another gene that may have an impact on breast cancer --associated with the body's circadian rhythm.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

Leopard meals: Females go for diversityLeopards, top predators of the African savannah, are known to feed on a variety of prey species. It has been largely unknown, however, whether they specialize in certain prey animals and which factors might influence prey preferences. Scientists investigated these questions by studying the diet of leopards on commercial farmland in central Namibia.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

People who travel by car are four times more likely to be injured than people who travel by city busTaking the bus is a whole lot safer than taking the car -- and it's also safer for cyclists and pedestrians who take the same routes, according to a new study.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

Invasive procedures should be reserved for a sub-group of acid reflux patients, study saysAs the number of Americans with acid reflux grows, a new study says invasive procedures to treat those who don't respond to medication should be done for select patients.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

A new connection between glucose and lipid regulation in cancer metabolismResearchers have identified an enzyme that helps cancer cells make the building materials they need to quickly proliferate. Inhibiting this enzyme could be a strategy to slow down cancer growth, leading to more effective treatments.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

Oilseed crop's waste product yields compounds that protect skin from the sunMeadowfoam, a native Pacific Northwest plant cultivated as an oilseed crop, has emerged as a potential new source of protection against the sun's harmful effects on the skin.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

Will automated vehicles take the stress out of driving? Research says 'don't count on it'Automated system designers take note: Attention erodes the longer the driver is not actively engaged in manual driving.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

Researchers improve textile composite manufacturingWhile wearing a crisply ironed, wrinkle-free shirt makes a good impression, researchers are working to solve the issue of wrinkling when it comes to making textile composites.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

Polarized light: A simple route to highly chiral materialsResearchers in Japan have successfully created chiral nanostructures from particles of gold. The trick was to use circularly polarized light to generate electric fields.
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Live Science

Photos: Ancient Egyptian General's Tomb Discovered in SaqqaraHere's a look at photos of the tomb discovered in Saqqara in Egypt.
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Live Science

Sprawling 3,300-Year-Old Egyptian Tomb Hides Secrets of Ancient WarScenes on the tomb walls show an infantry unit and charioteers crossing a waterway with crocodiles.
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Futurity.org

Targeting this protein may prevent COPD inflammationBlocking a protein that stimulates the production of white blood cells could prevent the destructive inflammation of chronic obstructive pulmonary disease, a lung disease which kills about 3 million people a year, a study with mice shows. Chronic inflammation slowly eats away at the lung tissue of people with emphysema or COPD, and the major culprits are specialized white blood cells called neutr
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Feed: All Latest

What's the Deal With Facebook and the Blockchain?Facebook is working on a management reorganization that would create a new unit around blockchain technology, led by three high-profile executives.
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The Atlantic

The Atlantic Daily: Fired UpWhat We’re Following What’s Next for the Iran Deal? President Trump announced his decision to withdraw the U.S. from the multilateral agreement to lift sanctions on Iran in exchange for the country curtailing its nuclear program. Here’s the full text of his speech. While the deal’s European signatories could still try to save it, the United States’ withdrawal may spell its ultimate collapse. Davi
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New on MIT Technology Review

Google’s new tools will make your life more convenient—for a priceDon’t forget that forking over more and more of your data remains part of the bargain.
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Live Science

How Is Uranium Enriched?Only a certain type of uranium works in nuclear reactors and bombs. Separating that type from the more common kind requires a great deal of engineering skill.
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Futurity.org

Tool gives scientists a glimpse of real-time brain activityA new invention could give researchers a dynamic tool to study the brain’s role in various behaviors. It’s a neuroscientist’s dream: being able to track the millions of interactions among brain cells in animals that move about freely, behaving as they would under natural circumstances. The new technology is a step towards realizing that goal. Although designed for use with mice, information glean
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

ONC201 kills breast cancer cells in vitro by targeting mitochondriaTRAIL, a member of the TNF family of ligands, causes caspase-dependent apoptosis through activation of its receptors, death receptor 4 and DR5.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

Inequality is normal: Dominance of the big treesThe top 1 percent of the forest has been sharing some vital information with researchers. Ninety-eight scientists and thousands of field staff have concluded the largest study undertaken to date with the Smithsonian Forest Global Earth Observatory (ForestGEO), and what they have found will have profound implications toward ecological theories and carbon storage in forests.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

For women with history of pregnancy loss, walking may aid chance of becoming pregnantResults of a recent study to better understand modifiable factors such as physical activity that may affect a woman's ability to conceive a child suggest that walking may help women to improve their chances of becoming pregnant.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

MRI 'glove' provides new look at hand anatomyA new kind of MRI component in the shape of a glove delivers the first clear images of bones, tendons and ligaments moving together.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

Machine learning flags emerging pathogensA new machine learning tool that can detect whether emerging strains of the bacterium, Salmonella are more likely to cause dangerous bloodstream infections rather than food poisoning has been developed. The tool greatly speeds up the process for identifying the genetic changes underlying new invasive types of Salmonella that are of public health concern.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

Insight into blood signatures of inflammationA new study identifies a pattern of inflammation associated with cardio-metabolic risks among participants in the Black Women's Health Study, as well as two independent groups of vulnerable women. These findings could help under-served patients benefit from precision medicine and personalized profiles of disease risk.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

Fringe benefits: Drug side effects could treat human hair lossA new drug could ease the distress of men and women who suffer from baldness.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

Some gut bacteria may protect against intestinal infectionScientists have for the first time found evidence that a microbe in the human gut is associated with protection from typhoid fever infection. If the research is borne out, it could offer an exciting new way to reduce intestinal infections.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

Cellular messengers communicate with bacteria in the mouthCellular messengers in saliva may be able to regulate the growth of oral bacteria responsible for diseases, such as periodontitis and meningitis. A new study suggests that a body's cellular messengers play an important role in managing the amount of good and bad bacteria in the mouth.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

Equal subsidies 'surprisingly powerful,' in promoting use of gold-standard medicationsInternational aid groups promoting gold-standard anti-malarial treatments subsidize each pharmaceutical companies equally. The goal is to reduce the price consumers ultimately pay, encouraging more of them to choose the most effective drugs. While in general equal subsidies are still somewhat inefficient, that compromise is not as bad as it might seem, according a new study. Even under the worst t
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

Tissue-engineered human pancreatic cells successfully treat diabetic miceResearchers tissue-engineered human pancreatic islets in a laboratory that develop a circulatory system, secrete hormones like insulin and successfully treat sudden-onset type 1 diabetes in transplanted mice. The scientists use a new bioengineering process they developed called a self-condensation cell culture. The technology helps nudge medical science closer to one day growing human organ tissue
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

Cell phones at summer camp: Research explores the effectsNew research delves into how digital media might affect the camp experience.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

Prescription drug monitoring programs may have negative unintended consequencesPrescription drug monitoring programs (PDMPs) are a key component of the President's Prescription Drug Abuse Prevention Plan and considered a critical tool for reducing prescription opioid-related illness and death. The results of a new study show there is insufficient evidence to confirm whether implementing these programs actually increases or decreases overdoses.
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Futurity.org

Light could solve one of quantum computing’s big problemsResearchers have demonstrated how infrared laser pulses can shift electrons between two different states, the classic 1 and 0, in a thin sheet of semiconductor. The technique could help to solve a major issue with quantum computing. “Ordinary electronics are in the range of gigahertz, one billion operations per second. This method is a million times faster,” says Mackillo Kira, a professor of ele
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Popular Science

The Kilauea volcano is ‘speaking in a code’ we don’t yet understandEnvironment Hawaii’s latest eruption has much to teach us about hazard mitigation, volcanology, and even outer space. The latest volcanic eruption on Hawaii is a bummer for residents, but a big boon to volcanologists.
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The Atlantic

Service Workers Forced to Act Like Robots Meet Their MatchOn Tuesday, Google showed off Duplex , a new service the company is testing that allows Google Assistant to call establishments on a user’s behalf to make a dinner reservation or schedule a haircut. The voice synthesis in these calls is jaw-dropping: With a few millisecond mistakes, Duplex sounds like a human, complete with mmms and uhhs and cheery colloquialisms. The ability of the AI to respond
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Science : NPR

Days, Weeks, Years? Scientists Say Hawaii Volcano Eruption Has No End In SightScientists are closely tracking the eruption at Hawaii's Kilauea volcano. But there's still a lot that they don't know about the eruption — most notably, when it's going to be over. (Image credit: U.S. Geological Survey via AP)
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Live Science

This 'Glue-Gun-Like' Device Prints Skin to Heal WoundsDeep wounds might one day be treated with a skin-depositing device
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

At a glance: How new Google features tap digital smartsGoogle showcased its plans for the next several months as it kicked off its annual developers' conference Tuesday. Many of the new features center on the use of artificial intelligence to help save time.
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The Atlantic

The Atlantic Politics & Policy Daily: Withdrawal Symptoms-Written by Elaine Godfrey ( @elainejgodfrey ) Today in 5 Lines President Trump announced the U.S. will withdraw from the Iran nuclear deal and reinstate sanctions against the country. Read his full remarks here . The leaders of France, Germany, and the United Kingdom put out a joint statement condemning the decision. Iranian President Hassan Rouhani said that his country will remain in the agree
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Hunting dogs may benefit from antioxidant boost in dietFree radicals, those DNA-damaging single-oxygen atoms, are produced in spades during exercise. Dogs that exercise a lot, like hunting dogs, may need to consume more antioxidants than their less-active counterparts to protect against this damage. But what diet formulation best meets the needs of these furry athletes? A new University of Illinois study provides some answers in a real-world scenario.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

US environmental groups slam Ford over clean fuel stanceEnvironmental groups on Tuesday targeted Ford Motor Co. over its stance on the US clean fuel standard, delivering a petition with 250,000 signatures urging the automaker to drop support for weaker emission rules.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Google pitches artificial intelligence to help unplug (Update)Google unveiled Tuesday an artificial intelligence tool capable of handling routine tasks—such as making restaurant bookings—as a way to help people disconnect from their smartphone screens.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Uber shows off its vision for future 'flying taxi'It's not a bird, nor a plane. But Uber's new prototype vehicle unveiled Tuesday shows off its vision of the future of transportation—a "flying taxi" that aims to alleviate urban congestion.
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Popular Science

These bird feeders won’t get raided by squirrelsGadgets You have options when it comes to keeping furry menaces away from our feathered friends’ snacks. You have options when it comes to keeping furry menaces away from our feathered friends’ snacks. These feeders each keep the furballs at bay while welcoming birds.
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