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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Mitochondria and the art of DNA maintenanceHumans have 46 chromosomes, and each one is capped at either end by repetitive sequences called telomeres. If you ask a biologist if humans have circular DNA, they are likely to say 'no.' That is because eukaryotic cell nuclei have linear chromosomes, while prokaryotes have circular nucleoids and plasmids. However, biologists also know that most of our cells have mitochondria that do, in fact, ret
5h
The Atlantic

It’s Time for Trump Voters to Face the Bitter TruthDonald Trump promised to “drain the swamp” while running for office. Voters gave him the opportunity to follow through when they propelled him to the White House. Instead, he surrounded himself with people who saw his victory as an opportunity to enrich themselves by selling the promise of access or influence. This betrayal of the American public warrants more attention. Trump voters who wanted t
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Ingeniøren

Nu kommer de virtuelle SIM-kort til DanmarkI dag åbner salget af Apple Watch her til lands. Dermed kommer de første E-SIM-enheder i brug i Danmark og baner vej for mobiltelefoner uden simkort.
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Army Surgeons Grow Ear in Soldiers ArmThe woman's own cartilage was used to construct the transplant after she lost her left ear in a car crash.
5min
Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

Reducing tapeworm infection could improve academic performance, reduce povertyTapeworm infection from eating contaminated pork can damage the brain, causing learning impairments and possibly enforcing cycles of poverty. A new study is the first to look at infection rates within schools and propose solutions targeting children.
6min
Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

Beyond killing tuberculosisHistorically, our view of host defense against infection was that we must eliminate pathogens to eradicate disease. However, this perspective has recently been challenged as scientists have taken a lesson from plant biologists about an ancient strategy involving the ability to 'tolerate' rather than 'resist' infection to maintain health. This concept, referred to as 'disease tolerance', provides a
6min
Popular Science

If Kilauea's lava lake falls below the water table, the results could be explosiveScience Here’s how that steam-powered boom could happen. The swift and tunneling descent into the earth of a lava lake near Hawaii's erupting Kilauea volcano raises the potential of a different kind of eruptive event…
6min
The Atlantic

Photos of the Week: a Welsh Owl, a Belgian Bat, an Alabamian BeeRetiring police dogs in Ecuador, the Medieval Combat World Championships in Scotland, Victory Day in Russia, a sunset in Paris, a rumbling volcano in Hawaii, the Met Gala in New York, humanoid robots built in England, lost World War II soldiers in Russia, senior ballet in Australia, and much more.
10min
EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Dozens of binaries from Milky Way's globular clusters could be detectable by LISAA next-generation observatory, called LISA, is expected to be in space in 2034, and it will be sensitive to gravitational waves of a lower frequency than those detected by the Earth-bound Laser Interferometer Gravitational-Wave Observatory (LIGO).
20min
EurekAlert! - Breaking News

OSU researchers question conservation community's acceptance of trophy huntingResearchers at Oregon State University are challenging the premise that trophy hunting is an acceptable and effective tool for wildlife conservation and community development.
20min
New on MIT Technology Review

Video games could be serious tools for historical researchAn undergraduate history course incorporating strategy games is just the beginning: computer simulations are allowing people to study the past in ways that have never been possible.
22min
Live Science

Here Are the Most Popular Baby Names in the US Right NowEmma and Liam topped American parents' lists for baby names in 2017.
37min
Live Science

The 50 Most Popular Baby Names of 2017The Social Security Administration has announced the top baby names of 2017. And the winners are … Liam and Emma!
37min
EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Beyond killing tuberculosisHistorically, our view of host defense against infection was that we must eliminate pathogens to eradicate disease. However, this perspective has recently been challenged as scientists have taken a lesson from plant biologists about an ancient strategy involving the ability to 'tolerate' rather than 'resist' infection to maintain health. This concept, referred to as 'disease tolerance', provides a
42min
The Atlantic

The New Ebola Outbreak Could Take 'Three, Maybe Four' Months to ControlEbola DRC WHOThe Democratic Republic of Congo is currently fighting its ninth Ebola outbreak —and Jean-Jacques Muyembe Tamfum is as calm as ever. Warm, round-faced, and preternaturally chill, Muyembe was the first scientist to encounter Ebola during the first-ever outbreak in 1976, and he has been involved in studying and fighting the disease ever since. “We have a long-standing experience,” he told me on Fri
50min
EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Reducing tapeworm infection could improve academic performance, reduce povertyTapeworm infection from eating contaminated pork can damage the brain, causing learning impairments and possibly enforcing cycles of poverty. A new study is the first to look at infection rates within schools and propose solutions targeting children.
56min
Live Science

Ancient Lost City of Mardaman Uncovered in IraqThe cuneiform tablets were hidden inside a pottery vessel found in the ruins of a palace.
1h
Big Think

Hawaii volcano explosions could fling 10-ton boulders into the air, spew ‘vog’Steam-driven explosions at the summit of the Kilauea volcano in Hawaii could pose new threats to residents on the island. Read More
1h
Popular Science

You’re less likely to get a tick bite if you steer clear of these spotsAnimals It's time to start taking precautions. Some parts of the forests may be tick magnets but the little suckers are pretty much everywhere…
1h
NYT > Science

Black Rhinos Roam Chad for the First Time in 46 YearsSix black rhinos were flown from South Africa to Chad in an effort to re-establish a population there. They will live — and hopefully breed — at Zakouma National Park.
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Large Female Fish Play a Big Role in Replenishing Populations: StudyBigger, older mothers produce disproportionately more eggs than their smaller counterparts do.
1h
Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

Dengue 'hot spots' provide map to chikungunya and Zika outbreaksIdentifying dengue fever 'hot spots' can provide a predictive map for outbreaks of chikungunya and Zika -- two other viral diseases that, along with dengue, are spread by the Aedes aegypti mosquito.
1h
Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

Key protein in sperm tail assembly identifiedA new study focuses on the development of the sperm tail, the structure that enables sperm cells to swim and is therefore critical for male fertility.
1h
The Atlantic

The Coming Storm in IsraelTEL AVIV, Israel—While predictions of doom in Israeli-Palestinian relations tend to come easy, the worst doesn’t always come to pass. But thanks to a pair of major upcoming anniversaries, the vagaries of the Jewish and Muslim calendars, and the whimsy of President Donald Trump, the coming week could be different. The confluence of numerous events set to take place over a few days in May has felt,
1h
The Atlantic

Iran vs. Israel: Is a Major War Ahead?Israel Iran Syria USTEL AVIV—These are uneasy days for citizens of Israel. Almost everywhere, one hears anxious questions: Will there be war? How bad will it be? Should we prepare the bomb shelter at home? And what should we tell the children? At the same time, though, routine life goes on despite recent tensions on the border with Syria. At most, they have meant inconveniences like canceling a planned family holida
1h
The Atlantic

Donald Glover, Atlanta, and the Ties That BindIn one of the central conflicts of Atlanta ’s sophomore season, the shiftless Earn (Donald Glover) fears his cousin Alfred (Brian Tyree Henry), better known by his stage name, Paper Boi, will fire him. Earn, who has served as Paper Boi’s manager since the latter first began rapping, has seen his professional insecurities deepen throughout the season: In the second episode, the two men meet the ri
1h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Multi-drug resistant infections rising in childrenAntibiotic-resistant Acinetobacter baumannii infections, one of the most common hospital-acquired infections in children across the United States, are on the rise, according to results of a recent study published in the Journal of the Pediatric Infectious Diseases Society on March 22.
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News

UCI-Harvard research may help combat the deadly gastrointestinal infection C. diffClostridium difficile infection is the most common cause of antibiotic-associated diarrhea in developed countries. Researchers have discovered how the C. diff toxin B recognizes the human Frizzled protein, the receptor it uses to invade intestinal cells and lead to deadly gastrointestinal infections. The findings, published in Science, could pave the way for new C. diff antitoxins and also show po
1h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News

The photoexcited graphene puzzle solvedA boost for graphene-based light detectors.
1h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News

X-rays from tabletop lasers allows scientists to peer through the 'water window'Studying the fleeting actions of electrons in organic materials will now be much easier, thanks to a new method for generating fast X-rays.
1h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Atrial fibrillation patients diagnosed with coronary heart disease face increased risk of dementiaAtrial fibrillation patients who are diagnosed with carotid artery disease face higher risks for developing dementia, according to new research from the Intermountain Medical Center Heart Institute in Salt Lake City.
1h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Mimicking a sweet solution to mop up pollutionA fast and safe method to prepare a 3D porous material that mimics the shape of a honeycomb could have broad applications from catalysis to drug delivery or for filtering air to remove pollutants or viruses.
1h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Mimicking a sweet solution to mop up pollutionA fast, safe method to prepare a 3-D porous material that mimics the shape of a honeycomb could have broad applications in catalysis, drug delivery, or for filtering air to remove pollutants or viruses.
1h
Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

Healthy diet may lower risk of hearing loss in womenIn a new study, researchers examined the relation between three different diets and risk of developing hearing loss, and found that eating a healthy diet is associated with a lower risk of acquired hearing loss in women.
1h
Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

Conventional view of opioid mechanism of action upended in new studyA new discovery shows that opioids used to treat pain, such as morphine and oxycodone, produce their effects by binding to receptors inside neurons, contrary to conventional wisdom that they acted only on the same surface receptors as endogenous opioids, which are produced naturally in the brain.
1h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

X-rays from tabletop lasers allows scientists to peer through the 'water window'Studying the fleeting actions of electrons in organic materials will now be much easier, thanks to a new method for generating fast X-rays.
1h
Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

Noninvasive brain stimulation leads to fine motor improvement after strokeA new analysis finds that non-invasive brain stimulation may have beneficial effects on fine motor movement in stroke patients and healthy participants.
1h
Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

Osteoporosis drug may benefit heart healthThe osteoporosis drug alendronate was linked with a reduced risk of cardiovascular death, heart attack, and stroke in a study of patients with hip fractures.
1h
Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

Tiny spiders, big colorThere's plenty that's striking about Phoroncidia rubroargentea, a species of spider native to Madagascar, starting with their size -- at just three millimeters, they're barely larger than a few grains of salt. But the reason they caught Sarah Kariko's eye had to do with their color. Unlike many other species, which gradually see their color leach away when preserved in ethanol, the tiny spiders da
1h
Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

Opening a new door to immunityA new study could have major implications for our understanding of disease processes for conditions such as autoimmunity, atherosclerosis and heart failure, potentially leading to better prevention and treatment.
1h
Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

Obesity link between grandmothers and grandchildren revealed in new studyA new study is the first to prospectively examine the relationship between grandparent and grandchild abdominal obesity.
1h
Popular Science

Fixing harmful smartphone habits is a lot harder than getting users hookedTechnology New features in the latest Android reflect a growing trend of people trying to separate from their devices. Google's new tools try to address increasing concern from smartphone users and advocacy groups.
1h
Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

Jurassic fossil tail tells of missing link in crocodile family treeA 180-million-year-old fossil has shed light on how some ancient crocodiles evolved into dolphin-like animals.
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Congress, Privacy Groups Question Amazon's Echo Dot for KidsThe groups are concerned that Amazon's new services aimed at children promote dependence on technology and may jeopardize kids' privacy.
2h
The Scientist RSS

Proposed Seismic Surveys Raise Concern Over Health of Marine LifeThe Atlantic has been free of intense air-gun blasts to probe for oil and gas for 30 years, and researchers fear for endangered North Atlantic right whales and other animals.
2h
The Scientist RSS

FDA Seeks to Block Two Unregulated Stem Cell ClinicsTwo patients became legally blind after receiving treatments at the facilities.
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Viden

Peru mister regnskovsareal på størrelse med Lolland - hvert årPerus andel af Amazonas er alvorligt truet af massiv skovrydning, der fortsat finder sted ifølge nye tal fra det peruvianske miljøministerium.
2h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Trial shows chemotherapy is helping kids live with pulmonary vein stenosisA clinical trial shows that adding chemotherapy to a treatment regimen including catheterization and surgery can deter abnormal cellular growth and finally give children with pulmonary vein stenosis a chance to grow up.Results of the trial, run by the Boston Children's Hospital Pulmonary Vein Stenosis Program, were recently published in the Journal of Pediatrics.
2h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Cyberattack on Tennessee election website preceded outageAn intentional cyberattack and suspicious activity by foreign computers preceded the crash of a website that was reporting results in a Tennessee county's primary elections, a cyber-security firm said Friday.
2h
Live Science

78-Foot Wave Is the Largest Ever Recorded in Southern HemisphereAn eight-story monster wave that crashed down in the Southern Ocean off the coast of New Zealand has set a record. It's the largest known wave to ever hit the Southern Hemisphere, according to New Zealand scientists.
2h
Live Science

Teen Unearths Milk Cans Holding WWII Heirlooms from Aristocratic Prussian FamilyA teenager unexpectedly discovered a cache of World War II artifacts — including an officer's uniform from the Wehrmacht, the unified armed forces of Nazi Germany — hidden in two milk cans buried by a lake in what is now northeastern Poland.
2h
The Atlantic

The Novel That Asks, ‘What Went Wrong With Mankind?’“P eople see better what looks like them,” observes the field biologist Patricia Westerford, one of the nine— nine —main characters of Richard Powers’s 12th novel, The Overstory . And trees, Patricia discovers, look like people. They are social creatures, caring for one another, communicating, learning, trading goods and services; despite lacking a brain, trees are “aware.” After borers attack a
2h
Scientific American Content: Global

Arctic Sea Ice Is Getting Younger. Here Is Why That Is a Problem.Young, thin sea ice melts faster, putting Arctic ecosystems in danger -- Read more on ScientificAmerican.com
2h
NYT > Science

Q&A: Where Have All the Gypsy Moths Gone?A fungus has become a stealthy caterpillar killer, a natural bioweapon to help control the destructive moth infestations.
2h
New on MIT Technology Review

Yes, Atlas is running, but please don’t panicBoston Dynamics Atlas
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Postal Service: More financial loss as mail delivery slumpsThe U.S. Postal Service reported another quarterly loss on Friday after an unrelenting drop in mail volume and costs of its health care and pension obligations outweighed strong gains in package deliveries.
2h
New on MIT Technology Review

Kenya’s first satellite is now in Earth orbit
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Foxconn sets groundbreaking ceremony for Wisconsin facilityFoxconn Technology Group plans to officially break ground for its southeastern Wisconsin manufacturing complex next month.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Volkswagen to recall 410,000 cars over faulty seat beltsGerman carmaker Volkswagen said Friday it would recall 410,000 cars from its own brand and Spanish subsidiary Seat over faulty seat belts, warning customers not to use the middle seat in the meantime.
2h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

AT&T admits 'big mistake' in hiring Trump fixer Michael CohenMichael Cohen AT&TAT&T's top executive said Friday it was a "big mistake" to hire a Donald Trump's personal lawyer as a consultant after the presidential election, but maintained that the telecom giant's actions were legal and "entirely legitimate."
2h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

NASA completes survey flights to map Arctic iceOperation IceBridge, NASA's longest-running airborne mission to monitor polar ice change, concluded this year's springtime survey of Arctic sea and land ice on May 2. The flights, which began on March 22, covered the western basin of the Arctic Ocean and Greenland's fastest-changing glaciers.
2h
The Atlantic

The Baby-Name Trend That Unites AmericaLiam, Noah, Emma, Olivia—the Social Security Administration has released its annual list of the United States’ most popular baby names and one thing is clear: American parents love vowels. Continuing an on-and-off reign that began in 2008 , “Emma” took the top slot for newborn girls’ names. “Liam” became the most popular name for boys for the first time ever. Both, notably, have a 1:1 ratio of co
2h
Science : NPR

Earth's 'Bigger, Older Cousin' Maybe Doesn't Even ExistIn 2015, to great fanfare, NASA announced a planet discovery considered a milestone in the hunt for another Earth. But now some researchers say it's not clear that this planet actually exists. (Image credit: NASA Ames/JPL-Caltech/T. Pyle)
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Jurassic fossil tail tells of missing link in crocodile family treeA 180 million-year-old fossil has shed light on how some ancient crocodiles evolved into dolphin-like animals.
2h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News

How signals get inside cancer cells and spur aggressive growthA new study provides a surprising model of the process by which signals enter and influence a cancer cell. The finding could open up a potential new avenue to pursue new therapies against cancer.
2h
Inside Science

The Looming End to the Smartphone Company-Law Enforcement StandoffThe Looming End to the Smartphone Company-Law Enforcement Standoff The major war between law enforcement and cell phone manufacturers is mostly over. PhoneCode.jpg Image credits: Oatawa via Shutterstock Technology Friday, May 11, 2018 - 10:15 Joel Shurkin, Contributor (Inside Science) -- On December 2, 2015, two terrorists opened fire on a Christmas party in San Bernardino, California, killing 14
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Online Ad Targeting Does Work—As Long As It's Not CreepyNew research conducted at Harvard Business School shows people find some invasive online tracking methods to be unacceptable.
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New on MIT Technology Review

People are freaking out about Google’s extremely human-sounding phone-call-making AIGoogle Duplex AI I/O
2h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Study reveals how tiny Madagascar spiders retain their color over decadesThere's plenty that's striking about Phoroncidia rubroargentea, a species of spider native to Madagascar, starting with their size—at just three millimeters, they're barely larger than a few grains of salt.
3h
The Atlantic

The Gutting of The Denver Post is a Death Knell for Local NewsOn Tuesday, I met my wife and 1-year-old daughter at the plant where my office is located, a hangar of a building in Adams County, Colorado, that prints The Denver Post . I wore a black T-shirt with #NewsMatters printed across the front (my daughter was in a onesie bearing the same message, in purple Sharpie ) and joined dozens of my co-workers—fellow reporters, editors, page designers, pressmen—
3h
The Atlantic

The Power of the Small LieEarly in his Thursday-night rally in Elkhart, Indiana, President Trump had a special treat for Hoosiers: He was going to make them the first to hear the tagline for his reelection campaign. “By the way, this is the first, for Indiana,” he confided. “Our new slogan for 2020. You know what it is? ‘Keep America Great.’ Because we’re doing so well that in another two years when we start the heavy cam
3h
The Atlantic

A Shia Cleric's Radical Vision for IraqSoon after the U.S.-led invasion of Iraq toppled Saddam Hussein in 2003, a CBS News crew interviewed a young Shia cleric who explained what was happening in his country this way: “The little serpent has left,” Moqtada al-Sadr said , referring to the ousted dictator, “and the great serpent [the United States] has come.” In the early days of the post-Saddam era, U.S. military officials variously de
3h
Live Science

Meet Kim, the First Spider to Jump on DemandA female jumping spider went to great lengths in a leaping experiment.
3h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Opening a new door to immunityA new study could have major implications for our understanding of disease processes for conditions such as autoimmunity, atherosclerosis and heart failure, potentially leading to better prevention and treatment.
3h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Dengue 'hot spots' provide map to chikungunya and Zika outbreaksIdentifying dengue fever 'hot spots' can provide a predictive map for outbreaks of chikungunya and Zika -- two other viral diseases that, along with dengue, are spread by the Aedes aegypti mosquito.
3h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Healthy diet may lower risk of hearing loss in womenIn a new study, researchers from Brigham and Women's Hospital examined the relation between three different diets and risk of developing hearing loss, and found that eating a healthy diet is associated with a lower risk of acquired hearing loss in women.
3h
Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

Do we subconsciously judge face-likeness?Scientists have suggested that face-likeness is judged by early visual processing at around 100ms after viewing an object. The present study focused on the relation between face-likeness recognition and brain activity to suggest for the first time that face-likeness recognition is influenced by early visual processing.
3h
Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

Increased overweight in children of mothers who drank coffee while pregnantA new study shows that even moderate coffee consumption during pregnancy, one to two cups per day, is related to a risk of overweight or obesity in school age children. It has not been clearly shown if caffeine is the direct cause of the overweight, but the relationship, alone, has caused researchers to encourage increased caution.
3h
New on MIT Technology Review

Carnegie Mellon is set to offer the first undergrad AI degree in the US
3h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Dental checklist of bad practice has patient care at its heartDental experts have drawn up a definitive list of never events -- scenarios that patients should never face -- in a bid to ensure excellent patient care worldwide.
3h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News

NASA completes survey flights to map Arctic iceOperation IceBridge, NASA's longest-running airborne mission to monitor polar ice change, concluded this year's springtime survey of Arctic sea and land ice on May 2. The flights, which began on March 22, covered the western basin of the Arctic Ocean and Greenland's fastest-changing glaciers.
3h
The Atlantic

Ebola Returns Just as the White House Loses Its Top Biodefense ExpertThis week, three things happened with painfully ironic synchronicity. First, the Democratic Republic of the Congo revealed that it is facing down its ninth Ebola outbreak . Second, President Trump asked Congress to rescind a $252 million pot that had been put aside to deal with Ebola. And third, global health expert Tim Ziemer unexpectedly departed the National Security Council , where he served
3h
The Atlantic

The Infectious Enthusiasm of Breaking the BeeIf you tuned in to the finals of last year’s Scripps National Spelling Bee, broadcast in prime time on ESPN, you would have seen 15 young students remaining in the competition—and 13 of them were Indian American. And at the end of 36 grueling rounds, Ananya Vinay, a sixth-grade girl from Fresno, California, won it all, continuing the 10-year streak of Indian American champions. Since 1999, when N
3h
Live Science

How the Bugs In Your Gut Could Affect Your Blood VesselsThe more types of microbes, the better off your blood vessels.
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New Scientist - News

Utterly bizarre theoretical ‘fractons’ could be made for realA fracton is a weird imaginary half-particle, and can only move when paired with another fracton. It sounds wild but we could make one in a crystal
3h
The Scientist RSS

Measles Cases On the Rise in EnglandThe increase is associated with travel to Europe, where large outbreaks are occurring.
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The Atlantic

The Scientific Case for Two Spaces After a PeriodThis is a time of much division. Families and communities are splintered by polarizing narratives. Outrage surrounds geopolitical discourse—so much so that anxiety often becomes a sort of white noise, making it increasingly difficult to trigger intense, acute anger. The effect can be desensitizing, like driving 60 miles per hour and losing hold of the reality that a minor error could result in in
4h
Popular Science

Americans spend more time alone than ever—but that doesn’t mean we’re lonelyHealth But social media might not be a longterm solution. Taken together, research finds that young people in the U.S. may be more socially isolated in recent years, but are paradoxically becoming less lonely. There doesn’t…
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Science | The Guardian

Golden State Killer: the end of DNA privacy? Chips with Everything podcastUS investigators recently tracked down the suspect of a 40-year-old murder case after uploading DNA to a genealogy website. Jordan Erica Webber weighs up the pros of finding ancestors with the cons of selling privacy Subscribe and review: Acast , Apple , Spotify , Soundcloud , Audioboom , Mixcloud . Join the discussion on Facebook , Twitter or email us at chipspodcast@theguardian.com. A former po
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Big Think

How Facebook helps members of ISIS and other extremists find friendsA new study highlights the role Facebook algorithms unwittingly played in ISIS recruitment and points to continuing problems. Read More
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Big Think

SpaceX aborts Falcon 9 rocket launch at the last minuteThe newest iteration of SpaceX's flagship rocket hit a stumbling block during its first launch and has been delayed in order to work out unknown problems before another attempt. Read More
4h
Big Think

The pull of Jupiter and Venus on Earth causes major climate eventsNew research finds evidence that the gravitational pull of Jupiter and Venus has been warping our orbit every 405,000 years, at least as far back as 215 million years ago. Read More
4h
Live Science

These Everyday 'Drugs' Cause More Harm Than the Illegal Ones, Study SaysThese drugs kill the most people worldwide, and they're pretty familiar.
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Feed: All Latest

Bolivia Is Landlocked. Don't Tell That to Its NavyA century ago Bolivia lost a major piece of itself: the sea.
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Latest Headlines | Science News

The window for learning a language may stay open surprisingly longA crucial period for language learning may extend well into teen years, a new study suggests.
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Futurity.org

Fancy foodies nearly ate these turtles to death150 years of restaurant menus show why the northern diamondback terrapin nearly went extinct. The turtle went from not very popular at all, to insanely popular, to hard-to-find, and then to virtually non-existent on seafood menus from the 1850s to the 1970s. Seafood menus are especially good at capturing fads through the ages. Lobster, for example, was a “trash fish” 150 years ago that made for c
4h
Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

Gadolinium deposition in the brain not dose dependentInvestigators have determined that in children receiving gadolinium as a contrast agent to enhance MRI examinations, signal changes attributed solely to deposition of this material in the brain are not dependent on the amount of gadolinium administered but rather these changes are seen in association with other factors such as the presence of brain tumors and treatment using brain irradiation.
4h
Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

Punching holes in graphene to boost hydrogen productionA research team has created an electrode for hydrogen evolution. A nickel-molybdenum (NiMo) catalyst is wrapped in a 'holey' graphene layer containing nanometer-sized holes. The fringes of the holes are chemically active sites, boosting hydrolysis by accelerating charge transfer and H atom adsorption. Meanwhile, graphene protects the NiMo core from dissolving. Through efficient hydrogen generation
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

Microscale IR spectroscopy enabled by phase change materials and metasurfacesResearchers have demonstrated that tuneable phase change materials can be used to tune the response of microscale infrared transmissive 'metasurface' filters which can be tuned across the broad band of frequencies in the mid-infrared spectrum.
4h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Tiny spiders, big colorThere's plenty that's striking about Phoroncidia rubroargentea, a species of spider native to Madagascar, starting with their size -- at just three millimeters, they're barely larger than a few grains of salt. But the reason they caught Sarah Kariko's eye had to do with their color. Unlike many other species, which gradually see their color leach away when preserved in ethanol, the tiny spiders da
4h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Study upends conventional view of opioid mechanism of actionA new discovery shows that opioids used to treat pain, such as morphine and oxycodone, produce their effects by binding to receptors inside neurons, contrary to conventional wisdom that they acted only on the same surface receptors as endogenous opioids, which are produced naturally in the brain.
4h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Is colonialism creating inappropriate regulation of traditional medicine practitioners?Two commentaries in JACM (The Journal of Alternative and Complementary Medicine), a peer-reviewed journal from Mary Ann Liebert, Inc., publishers that is dedicated to examining paradigm, practice, and policy advancing integrative health, raise questions about whether the value to health care of traditional, complementary, and integrative practices and practitioners is unfairly devalued by the domi
4h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Jurassic fossil tail tells of missing link in crocodile family treeA 180 million-year-old fossil has shed light on how some ancient crocodiles evolved into dolphin-like animals.
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TED Talks Daily (SD video)

The truth about unwanted arousal | Emily NagoskiSex educator Emily Nagoski breaks down one of the most dangerous myths about sex and introduces us to the science behind arousal nonconcordance: when there's a disconnect between physical response and the experience of pleasure and desire. Talking about such intimate, private moments can feel awkward or difficult, yet in this straightforward talk Nagoski urges all of us to share this crucial infor
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Futurity.org

In rough times, sea urchin moms toughen up their babiesFor female purple sea urchins ( Strongylocentrotus purpuratus ), exposure to stressful climate conditions such as low pH levels often makes for hardier, larger offspring, according to a new study. “We’ve known that these things go on in fish and other species, but we’ve never studied this in the context of climate change in the marine ecology of kelp forests,” says coauthor Gretchen Hofmann, chai
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

Taurine deficiency in sperm causes male infertilitySperm cells have a unique shape that allows them to travel. During fertilization, sperm pass through several physiological environments while still maintaining their shape, using poorly understood mechanisms. Researchers found that male mice lacking cysteine dioxygenase, a protein involved in taurine production, have severely impaired fertility, and that taurine production allows sperm cells to ma
4h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Osteoporosis drug may benefit heart healthThe osteoporosis drug alendronate was linked with a reduced risk of cardiovascular death, heart attack, and stroke in a Journal of Bone and Mineral Research study of patients with hip fractures.
4h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Older Americans are rarely evaluated for obstructive sleep apnea, yet many are at riskIn a study of community-dwelling Medicare beneficiaries aged 65 and older who were asked about sleep disturbances, 56 percent were estimated to be at high risk of obstructive sleep apnea, but only 8 percent of the high-risk individuals had been tested for it.
4h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Study reveals obesity link between grandmothers and grandchildrenObesity is known to cluster in families, but most studies to date are limited to two generations.
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Where are HIV diagnoses made?In the first study to comprehensively describe where people are diagnosed with HIV in England, Wales, and Northern Ireland, investigators found that an increasing proportion of HIV diagnoses are being made outside of sexual health clinics, which is in line with evolving HIV testing guidelines.
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Noninvasive brain stimulation leads to fine motor improvement after strokeStroke is common and accompanied by complex disabilities -- such as lower and upper limb disability, speech impairment, and chronic post-stroke pain.
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Researchers offer new technology for liquid-crystal displaysAn international research team from Russia, France, and Germany has proposed a new method for orienting liquid crystals. It could be used to increase the viewing angle of liquid-crystal displays. The researchers have found that by merely adding one methylene group to the side chain of the polymer, they could switch the LC orientation, which is crucial for most applications of liquid crystals, incl
4h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Many patients with rectal cancer may not need chemoradiotherapyIt's unclear whether all patients with advanced rectal cancer need chemoradiotherapy, or whether some can forego the treatment and therefore be spared its side effects.
4h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Many older adults discharged from the hospital receive inappropriate prescriptionsIn a British Journal of Clinical Pharmacology study of 259 older adults discharged from a general medical hospital, more than 4 in 5 patients were issued a potentially inappropriate prescription containing at least 1 potentially inappropriate medication (PIM) or potential prescribing omission (PPO).
4h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Chronic medical conditions are common in women with urinary incontinenceNew research published in BJU International indicates that women with urinary incontinence often have other chronic conditions.
4h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Oral drug treatment helps protect cancer patients from potentially deadly blood clotsResearch from the University of Warwick indicates that taking a tablet a day can help treat cancer patients of a potentially deadly condition.
4h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Microsoft and Amazon show Cortana and Alexa can talk to each other, at least on stage at Build conferenceMicrosoft and Amazon's integration of their digital personal assistants is getting closer, the companies demonstrated at a Microsoft technology conference Monday, though they still don't have a date for public availability.
5h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Should patients in remission stop taking expensive Rheumatoid Arthritis drugs?Stopping expensive biological drugs used to treat rheumatoid arthritis in patients who are in remission or who have low disease activity can save considerable costs, but it results in a small loss of quality-adjusted life years, according to a recent Arthritis & Rheumatology study.
5h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Increased overweight in children of mothers who drank coffee while pregnantA study published in the BMJ Open journal shows that even moderate coffee consumption during pregnancy, one to two cups per day, is related to a risk of overweight or obesity in school age children. It has not been clearly shown if caffeine is the direct cause of the overweight, but the relationship, alone, has caused researchers to encourage increased caution.
5h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Scientists screen molecules for promise as new prostate cancer drugsCancer researchers at the University of Bath have measured systematically how efficient molecules are at suppressing the activity of a protein associated with prostate and other cancers. The molecules could eventually be developed into new anti-cancer drugs.
5h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Genome surgery for eye disease moves closer to realityResearchers from Columbia University have developed a new technique for the powerful gene editing tool CRISPR to restore retinal function in mice afflicted by a degenerative retinal disease, retinitis pigmentosa.
5h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Discovery of novel biomarker with remarkable specificity to rheumatoid arthritisUniversity of Tsukuba-centered researchers identified the protein citrullinated ITIH4 as a new biomarker with high specificity in patients with rheumatoid arthritis (RA). Notably, citrullinated ITIH4 levels were specifically increased in sera of patients with RA and significantly correlated with disease activity. Citrullinated ITIH4 might be a novel biomarker to distinguish RA from other rheumatic
5h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Punching holes in graphene to boost hydrogen productionA research team led by the University of Tsukuba created an electrode for hydrogen evolution. A nickel-molybdenum (NiMo) catalyst is wrapped in a 'holey' graphene layer containing nanometer-sized holes. The fringes of the holes are chemically active sites, boosting hydrolysis by accelerating charge transfer and H atom adsorption. Meanwhile, graphene protects the NiMo core from dissolving. Through
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Science | The Guardian

Fourth most published book in English language to go onlineNatural History and Antiquities of Selborne (1789) by Rev Gilbert White inspired generations of naturalists including Darwin A book that influenced Charles Darwin and is reputedly the fourth most published work in the English language is to be made available online. The Natural History and Antiquities of Selborne by the Reverend Gilbert White , first published in 1789, has inspired generations of
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Viden

Hjemmefødsler hjælper fødestuerne på SjællandPå Sjælland er hjemmefødsler i kraftig stigning. De giver ro – også på fødestuerne, mener jordemødre.
5h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Facebook shares bounce back to pre-scandal levelWhile Facebook's practices leading up to the 2017 election are still under scrutiny, Wall Street appears to have moved on for now.
5h
Feed: All Latest

Something's Off With the Turbolaser Shots in *The Last Jedi*I'm OK with movies fudging science a bit—except when the rules of "physics" change within their universe.
5h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Key protein in sperm tail assembly identifiedA study, published in the Journal of Cell Biology, focuses on the development of the sperm tail, the structure that enables sperm cells to swim and is therefore critical for male fertility.
5h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Do we subconsciously judge face-likeness?The research team of the Visual Perception and Cognition Laboratory at the Toyohashi University of Technology has suggested that face-likeness is judged by early visual processing at around 100ms after viewing an object. The present study focused on the relation between face-likeness recognition and brain activity to suggest for the first time that face-likeness recognition is influenced by early
5h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Projecting climate change along the Millennium Silk Road in a warmer worldScientists projected both mean and extreme climate changes using the ensemble mean of CMIP5 models over western China and central Asia. The comparison of mean and extreme climate changes under 1.5°C and 2°C global warming scenarios highlights the impacts that can be avoided by achieving global warming of half a degree lower.
5h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Gadolinium deposition in the brain not dose dependentInvestigators at Children's Hospital Los Angeles have determined that in children receiving gadolinium as a contrast agent to enhance MRI examinations, signal changes attributed solely to deposition of this material in the brain are not dependent on the amount of gadolinium administered but rather these changes are seen in association with other factors such as the presence of brain tumors and tre
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The Atlantic

Why You Should Argue in Front of Your KidsIn this episode of Home School , Adam Grant, a psychologist at the Wharton School and New York Times best-selling author, explains why parents shouldn’t shield children from their disagreements. “We want to raise more kids who know how to argue… to solve differences and find creative solutions,” he says. In fact, exposing children to what Grant terms “thoughtful” conflict can have surprising long
5h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Symantec stock plunges on internal investigationShares of the security software company Symantec are plunging 30 percent at the opening bell after the company revealed an internal investigation that could delay its annual report.
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Science | The Guardian

Scientists to grow 'mini-brains' using Neanderthal DNAGeneticists hope comparing prehistoric and modern biology will help them understand what makes humans unique Scientists are preparing to create “miniature brains” that have been genetically engineered to contain Neanderthal DNA, in an unprecedented attempt to understand how humans differ from our closest relatives. In the next few months the small blobs of tissue, known as brain organoids, will b
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Ingeniøren

Regeringens lavere elafgift i modvindForslaget om en lavere elafgift er umiddelbart svær for regeringen at sælge til de andre partier i forhandlingerne om et energiforlig.
5h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

The evolution of conflict resolutionRecently published in the Journal of the Royal Society Interface, Assistant Professor Christoph Riedl's latest research examines a model that might explain how humans resolve conflict, and what these actions say about biological and social behavior, both now and into the future.
5h
Popular Science

How to brew worm teaDIY For fertilizer, not drinking. Jim Shaw has been in the worm business since he was a teenager. His favorite application of the creepy crawlers: turning their droppings into worm tea.
5h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Genetic analysis for certain childhood brain tumors soon a standard-of-care?An international team of researchers from the Hopp Children's Cancer Center at the NCT Heidelberg (KiTZ), the European Molecular Biology Laboratory (EMBL) and the German Cancer Consortium (DKTK) together with colleagues at the St. Jude Children's Research Hospital in Memphis and the Hospital for Sick Children in Toronto has summarized hereditary gene defects which can trigger the development of ce
6h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Isotopic evidence for enhanced fossil fuel sources of aerosol ammonium in the urban atmosphereIdentifying the sources of aerosol ammonium is essential because ammonium can impact the Earth's radiative balance, as well as human health and biological diversity. A new study suggests priority should be given to controlling non-agricultural sources to ammonia for haze regulation in urban regions.
6h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Microscale IR spectroscopy enabled by phase change materials and metasurfacesResearchers from the Singapore University of Technology and Design have demonstrated that tuneable phase change materials can be used to tune the response of microscale infrared transmissive 'metasurface' filters which can be tuned across the broad band of frequencies in the mid-infrared spectrum.
6h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Taurine deficiency in sperm causes male infertility, study findsSperm cells have a unique shape that allows them to travel. During fertilization, sperm pass through several physiological environments while still maintaining their shape, using poorly understood mechanisms. Researchers at the University of Tsukuba and Cornell University found that male mice lacking cysteine dioxygenase, a protein involved in taurine production, have severely impaired fertility,
6h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News

RNA molecules predict adverse heart growth and function that can lead to atrial fibrillationThe new study, conducted by researchers at the Intermountain Medical Center Heart Institute in Salt Lake City, is the first time this association has been connected to the human heart in a clinical setting.
6h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Fossil find solves questions around baleen whale evolutionA University of Otago palaeontologist's discovery of an ancient fossil whale that swam the Antarctica seas 34 million years ago has paved the way for new knowledge about the evolution of baleen whales.
6h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Energy quantization enhances the performance of single-atom heat machinesPhysicists have demonstrated that energy quantization can improve the efficiency of a single-atom heat engine to exceed the performance of its classical counterpart. Energy quantization, in which the energy levels of a system occur only in discrete values, is a quintessential feature of quantum systems and differs from the continuous energy levels that occur in classical systems.
6h
The Atlantic

A Lifeless Life of the PartyPro tip: When Melissa McCarthy’s husband, Ben Falcone, appears in one of her films, don’t worry about it. He has bit parts in most of her films, including the best ones. He was, for instance, the amorous air marshal in Bridesmaids , the movie that made McCarthy a star. The arrangement is actually rather endearing: He’s like the Stan Lee of the MMCU. (That’s the Melissa McCarthy Cinematic Universe
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Futurity.org

This automated greenhouse fits in an apartmentTo improve access to vegetables among urban apartment dwellers, engineering students have created an indoor, automated greenhouse. “This allows them to grow fresh produce, everything from leafy greens to herbs to root vegetables,” says Harrison Lin, a member of the team from Rice University. Växthus (Swedish for greenhouse) comes from the HSB Living Lab at Chalmers University of Technology in Got
6h
Futurity.org

Pill can battle deadly blood clots in cancer patientsA blood-thinning drug can help treat cancer patients for a potentially deadly condition, according to new research. People with cancer have an increased risk of developing blood clots, with roughly one in five experiencing venous thromboembolism (VTE)—either deep vein thrombosis (DVT) or pulmonary embolism (PE). Blood clots in the deep veins of the leg may travel to the lungs causing a pulmonary
6h
Futurity.org

Are anti-LGBTQ politics creating more religious ‘nones’?While there are many contributing factors to the rise of religious “nones”—people who don’t officially associate themselves with a specific religion—in the United States, new research suggests one reason is the merging of politics and conservative Christian beliefs. Researchers examined states that enacted policies against same-sex marriage, and found a correlation between these activities and a
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

The evolution of conflict resolutionNew research examines a model that might explain how humans resolve conflict, and what these actions say about biological and social behavior, both now and into the future.
6h
BBC News - Science & Environment

Red squirrels 'may have introduced' leprosy to BritainThe discovery supports the theory that squirrels may have spread the disease in medieval Europe.
6h
Science | The Guardian

Rare dinosaur skeleton for sale – along with the right to name speciesSkeleton of unknown therapod is 70% complete and expected to fetch more than €1.2m in Paris auction Anyone with a spare million euros or two will have the opportunity to not only own a unique species of dinosaur skeleton next month, but to name it. Scientists say the skeleton of the species of therapod – or three-toed dinosaur – dates from the late Jurassic period about 155m years ago, give or ta
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Key protein in sperm tail assembly identifiedA study published in the Journal of Cell Biology focuses on the development of the sperm tail, the structure that enables sperm cells to swim and is therefore critical for male fertility.
6h
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Uber's Flying Cars, Tesla's Troubles, and More Car News This WeekPlus: Rolls-Royce's $325,000 SUV, how street design can save lives, and Nashville says 'nope' to public transit.
6h
Latest Headlines | Science News

The recipes for solar system formation are getting a rewriteA new understanding of exoplanets and their stars is rewriting the recipes for planet formation.
6h
Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

Alcohol and tobacco are by far the biggest threat to human welfare of all addictive drugsA new review has compiled the best, most up-to-date source of information on alcohol, tobacco, and illicit drug use and the burden of death and disease. It shows that in 2015 alcohol and tobacco use between them cost the human population more than a quarter of a billion disability-adjusted life years, with illicit drugs costing a further tens of millions.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

Waterloo chemists create faster and more efficient way to process informationChemists have found a much faster and more efficient way to store and process information by expanding the limitations of how the flow of electricity can be used and managed.
6h
Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

Aggression at work can lead to 'vicious circle' of misconductNew research reveals that frequently being the target of workplace aggression not only affects the victim's health but can also cause them to behave badly towards others. Workplace aggression is a significant issue particularly in the healthcare sector, where nurses can be targeted by both their colleagues and co-workers through bullying, and by patients and their relatives through 'third-party' a
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

New link between gut microbiome and artery hardening discoveredThe level of diversity of the 'good bacteria' in our digestive systems has been found to be linked to a feature of cardiovascular disease -- hardening of the arteries -- in new research.
6h
Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

Eurovision Song Contest associated with increase in life satisfactionParticipating in the Eurovision Song Contest may be linked to an increase in a nation's life satisfaction, according to new research.
6h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Study finds new combined risk score more effectively predicts stroke risk in Afib patientsNew study finds that integrating two separate clinical risk score models more accurately assesses the stroke risk of patients with Afib.
6h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News

The evolution of conflict resolutionRecently published in the Journal of the Royal Society Interface, Assistant Professor Christoph Riedl's latest research examines a model that might explain how humans resolve conflict, and what these actions say about biological and social behavior, both now and into the future.
6h
Feed: All Latest

The Trump Administration Plays Catch-Up on Artificial IntelligenceAt the Trump White House's first major engagement with leaders in AI, the administration mostly watched and learned.
6h
Scientific American Content: Global

Why We Become So Attached to Our BelongingsLow emotional security can intensify our relationships to our belongings -- Read more on ScientificAmerican.com
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

A brief history of lion tamingBritain's last lion tamer, Thomas Chipperfield, was recently refused a licence to continue performing with his two lions and one tiger. The decision – which Chipperfield intends to appeal – marks the end of a long tradition of lion taming in Britain. It reflects a gradual shift in public attitudes towards circuses and a growing sense that making wild animals perform unnatural tricks is both danger
6h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Image: Columbia GlacierThe Copernicus Sentinel-2B satellite takes us over Alaska's Columbia Glacier, one of the most rapidly changing glaciers in the world.
6h
Ingeniøren

Derfor er biomassens CO2-aftryk så svært at opgøreEn rapport fra det rådgivende organ Klimarådet gør op med biomasse som CO2-neutral energikilde. Men det fremgår også af rapporten, at det ikke er nogen let opgave at fastslå det præcise klimaaftryk fra forskellige typer fast biomasse.
6h
Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

How turning down the heat makes a baby turtle maleScientists have started to crack the 50-year-old puzzle of how temperature turns baby turtles male or female. Researchers show that cooler egg incubation temperatures turn up a key gene called Kdm6b in the turtle's immature sex organs. This in turn acts as a biological 'on' switch, activating other genes that allow testes to develop without altering the underlying genetic code.
6h
Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

Broken nanodiamonds are forever: Self-generating dry lubricant for industryResearchers have created a self-generating, very-low-friction dry lubricant that lasts so long it could almost be confused with forever.
6h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

The secret agents protecting our crops and gardensInsect pests cause a huge amount of damage to crops globally. In Australia alone, pests are responsible for around A$360 million of crop losses a year. Controlling pest outbreaks is crucial for food security and human health. Since the 1940s, our primary defence against crop pests has been synthetic pesticides. But using pesticides comes at a huge cost.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Newly developed molecule to improve pharmaceuticals draws inspiration from nature's toolboxIn the race to create more potent and stable medicines, scientists know that adding fluorine can improve drug molecules.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Can artificial intelligence help find alien intelligence?In the search for extraterrestrial intelligence (SETI), we've often looked for signs of intelligence, technology and communication that are similar to our own.
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Dana Foundation

Art in the Eye of the BeholderThe expression, “Beauty is in the eye of the beholder,” has been used by many since it first appeared in print in the 19 th century by writer Margaret Wolfe Hungerford. Cliché as it may sound, the idea behind this colloquialism—that perception is a subjective experience—is one that researchers are still working to unravel today. We’ve learned that aspects of perception (auditory, time, etc.) can
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The Scientist RSS

Image of the Day: Cooking Up NeuronsUsing different combinations of transcription factors, researchers create a diverse array of neurons from mouse skin cells.
7h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

How a complex low-pressure system sent temperatures plummetingNew South Wales, Victoria, Tasmania and South Australia are currently affected by a massive complex low pressure system, dropping temperatures and bringing rain, hail, wind and snow.
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Popular Science

Which allergy medication is the best? It's complicated.Allergic Reaction But here's our best advice. We may not know much about allergies, but gosh darn it do we have some great drugs for them. In the United States, the allergy aisle in a typical pharmacy is a veritable…
7h
New Scientist - News

Measles cases in England are up 65 per cent on last yearThere have been 440 confirmed cases of measles in England so far this year. These cases are linked to ongoing outbreaks in Europe, according to Public Health England
7h
New Scientist - News

Trolley problem tested in real life for first time with miceWould you kill someone to save five others? The first lab enactment of this classic thought experiment raises issues for how we programme self-driving cars
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Ingeniøren

Hør ugens podcast om selvflyvende dronetaxierSnart kan du hoppe på en selvflyvende dronetaxi i Dubai. Biomasse i danske kraftværker leverer ikke altid CO2-neutral el og varme. Signalproblemer fordyrer elektrificering. Atomurets afløser er på vej. Det er nogle af emnerne i denne uges Transformator.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

U.S. boycott of Chinese researchers could 'stifle' global progressAcademics are warning that proposed measures by the Trump administration to restrict Chinese researchers from working in the US could 'stifle' global progress.
7h
The Atlantic

Professors Explain Why It's Hard to Write OnlineThere comes a time in every writing-inclined person’s life when they decide between a few paths. Two common paths are journalism and the academy. Do you want to write research that, though it’s less widely disseminated, is arguably more rigorous than most journalism? Or do you want to write journalistic pieces that, though less technical than academic work, often have more impact because of their
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The Atlantic

Chasing the Pearl of Lao TzuL egend says the diver drowned retrieving the pearl. Trapped in a giant Tridacna clam, his body was brought to the surface by his fellow tribesmen in Palawan, a province of the Philippines, in May 1934. When the clam was pried open, and the meat scraped out, the local chief beheld something marvelous: a massive pearl, its sheen like satin. In its surface, the chief discerned the face of the Proph
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Criminals can't easily edit their DNA out of forensic databasesThere have been a number of news articles over the last week or so reporting that to avoid being matched to criminal forensic databases, criminals could edit their genomes using cheap, online kits.
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Science : NPR

From Collards To Maple Syrup, How Your Identity Impacts The Food You LikeWhen people are reminded of their cultural roots, the food representing that culture tastes better. Scientists could harness that food and identity association to help people eat more healthfully. (Image credit: Glasshouse Images/Getty Images)
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Saying Goodbye to 'Halo Online,' the Fan Game That Recreated a Decade-Old ClassicHalo Online never officially came out outside of Russia, but thanks to a fan mod boasted a massive community for years. Now it's done.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Five residents win bid to buy Scottish islandResidents on a remote Scottish island of pristine beaches, lush hills and craggy coastlines celebrated on Friday after reaching an agreement to buy their home, fending off bids from tycoons.
7h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

China monthly car sales pick up in April; EV sales doubleChinese passenger car sales expanded at a faster pace last month as growth in the world's biggest auto market picked up steam, an industry group said Friday.
7h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Engineers studying nanodefects suspected of causing early failures of electrical materialsTiny defects in electrical insulating materials may lead to breakdowns, robbing the power grid and even cell phones of reliability and efficiency.
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Latest Headlines | Science News

These caterpillars march. They fluff. They scare London.Oak processionary moths have invaded England and threatened the pleasure of spring breezes.
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The Atlantic

Single Moms in College Spend 9 Hours a Day on HouseworkEvery year around this time—when commencement season and Mother’s Day collide—moms across the country are praised for their grit and resolve. It’s a tough job for just about anyone. But for 2.1 million single mothers, according to the latest federal data, the normal difficulties are compounded by the stresses of going to college. For these moms, there may not be enough hours in the day to do all
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

If the script for "Avengers: Infinity War" was peer-reviewedWarning: this article contains spoilers for Avengers: Infinity War.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Researchers track the ultrafast emergence of superconductivityUBC researchers have captured an unprecedented glimpse into the birth of high-temperature superconductivity in cuprates, settling a scientific debate and uncovering new avenues to explore the potential of other unconventional superconductors.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Suicidally-sexed marsupials listed as endangeredTwo small marsupial species, made famous for their suicidal mating habits, have been officially placed on Australia's Endangered list, following their discovery by a QUT mammalogist.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Legumes for a sustainable farming futureClimate change and food security are two of the greatest challenges facing humanity. At Swinburne, Professor Mark Adams is exploring how legumes can play a role in sustainable agriculture.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Self-awareness class inspires intention appInspired by a class on managing professional relationships, five recent University of Michigan graduates are developing an app that would mesh with Alexa to help nudge people when they're out of sync with what they want.
7h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

International research team finds 'staggering' number of fly species in small patch of tropical forestAn international study by 59 biologists, including a Faculty of Science entomologist at the University of Calgary, has found a "staggering" number of fly species in one small patch of forest in Costa Rica—many of them unknown to science.
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Live Science

Watch Out: This Robot Could Run After YouYou can run from Boston Dynamics' humanoid robot Atlas, but it wouldn't do you any good — the robot can run after you.
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BBC News - Science & Environment

UK space needs 'bold national plan'Report: A long-term national programme is required to unlock the UK space sector's full potential.
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Science | The Guardian

Measles cases in England linked to European outbreakHealth agency issues MMR reminder after 440 laboratory-confirmed cases this year Outbreaks of measles have been confirmed across England, health officials have said. More than 400 cases have been identified this year, linked to “ongoing large outbreaks in Europe”, according to Public Health England (PHE). Continue reading...
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

The U.S. needs a national strategy on artificial intelligenceChina, India, Japan, France and the European Union are crafting bold plans for artificial intelligence (AI). They see AI as a means to economic growth and social progress. Meanwhile, the U.S. disbanded its AI taskforce in 2016. Without an AI strategy of its own, the world's technology leader risks falling behind.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Removing predators doesn't guarantee bird safetyRemoving introduced predators might not provide greater protection of nesting birds in Australia's temperate forests and woodlands, according to a new University of Queensland study.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Probabilistic computing takes artificial intelligence to the next stepThe potential impact of Artificial Intelligence (AI) has never been greater—but we'll only be successful if AI can deliver smarter and more intuitive answers.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Researchers discover how corn breaks genetics lawsModern genetics is based on the idea that genes are passed on to progeny in a predictable fashion, as first described by 19th-century Austrian botanist Gregor Mendel. He determined that genes exist in pairs, and each one of the two has an equal chance of being transmitted to the next generation.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Google's Duplex should come with a caveat, says artificial intelligence expertGoogle Duplex AI I/OGoogle's artificial intelligence demonstration was amusing, but raised an important question: do you have the right to know you are talking to a machine?
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Science : NPR

Can A Cocktail Of Vitamins And Steroids Cure A Major Killer In Hospitals?Two big studies aim to rigorously test what could be a revolutionary treatment for a common and deadly disease: sepsis. Many doctors are awaiting the results before changing their practice. (Image credit: Jay Westcott for The Washington Post/Getty Images)
8h
Scientific American Content: Global

Why Does Ebola Keep Showing Up in the Democratic Republic of the Congo?The country has been roiled by nine outbreaks of the disease -- Read more on ScientificAmerican.com
8h
Ingeniøren

Brexit ryster Galileo-satellitprogram: Storbritannien vil lave ny konkurrentEU vil skubbe Storbritannien ud af det europæiske konkurrent til GPS-systemet, Galileo. Konsekvenserne vil være størst for Storbritannien, lyder det fra DTU Space.
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BBC News - Science & Environment

Massive wave is southern hemisphere record, scientists believeThe 23.8m (78ft) swell is the largest ever recorded below the equator, New Zealand scientists say.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

NICER mission finds an X-ray pulsar in a record-fast orbitScientists analyzing the first data from the Neutron star Interior Composition Explorer (NICER) mission have found two stars that revolve around each other every 38 minutes—about the time it takes to stream a TV drama. One of the stars in the system, called IGR J17062–6143 (J17062 for short), is a rapidly spinning, superdense star called a pulsar. The discovery bestows the stellar pair with the re
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Texas regulators: Crypto-related scams getting creativeThe cryptocurrency investment craze is bringing out the creativity in fraudsters, Texas regulators say.
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The Atlantic

The Burnout Crisis in American MedicineDuring a recent evening on call in the hospital, I was asked to see an elderly woman with a failing kidney. She’d come in feeling weak and short of breath and had been admitted to the cardiology service because it seemed her heart wasn’t working right. Among other tests, she had been scheduled for a heart-imaging procedure the following morning; her doctors were worried that the vessels in her he
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The Atlantic

The New Prince of PablumIt’s been said that the concept of the “guilty pleasure” is outdated. When cool-kid guitar-slinger Ryan Adams covers Taylor Swift’s plastic pop, when the Pulitzers lend their rarefied air to a platinum-selling rapper, when the musical subversive Grimes dates capitalist caricature Elon Musk, who are you to fret that any particular Max Martin song or any particular bag of Flamin’ Hot Cheetos is not
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The Atlantic

'Human Frailty' Is a Byproduct of Mass IncarcerationPrison is not a healthy place. It’s pretty well established that many who wind up there aren’t in great health to begin with, and their sentences can exacerbate underlying issues. Solitary confinement destroys already fragile minds. Incarceration robs men and women of their youth, regurgitating aged shadows back into the streets. Beatings and abuse at the hands of officers lead to injury and even
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Microsoft Enabling Javascript in Excel Has Security Pros AnxiousEnabling JavaScript should make Excel more powerful, but increasing access points makes it even more of a web security nightmare than it already is.
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Can This AI-Powered Baby Translator Help Diagnose Autism?With enough data from the Chatterbaby app, researchers could mine irregularities in cry patterns for signals about hunger, pain—and maybe one day, autism.
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Save Lives With Slower Streets—Not Self-Driving CarsAutonomous vehicles could save lots of lives, someday. Right now, we need better street design.
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Is Amazon Prime Still Worth It?Amazon Prime's price increase kicks in today—but it's still a bargain for most people.
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Feed: All Latest

How Facebook Binds—and Shatters—CommunitiesIf a platform can provide community, we’ll gladly give up privacy—as we have throughout human history.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

A giant 'singing' cloud in space will help us to understand how star systems formWe know that the birthplaces of stars are large molecular clouds of gas and dust found in space.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

UK's gender pay gap is narrowing, new research findsThe UK's gender pay gap is gradually narrowing—but women still have some way to go to match the earning level of their male counterparts, according to a new report published by the Department for Education.
8h
Live Science

Who Invented Bread?Unlike chocolate chip cookies or tomato soup, the invention of bread can't be pinned down to a single person or people; instead, it evolved to its present state over the course of millennia.
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New on MIT Technology Review

I lost a bet, and now I am going to let millions of strangers check whether we’re relatedHow this reporter ended up deciding to join the crowd and get his DNA tested.
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Scientific American Content: Global

Finland Is the Happiest Country in the World, and Finns Aren't Happy about ItThey tend to downplay positive emotions, which could paradoxically increase their satisfaction with life -- Read more on ScientificAmerican.com
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

The use of online banking by people over 60Experts from the Economics and Business Institute at the University of Seville have just published a study of the use of online banking by the over-60s, which shows that the digital divide of these users, far from being linked strictly to age, is more connected to psychographic characteristics, such as perceived self-sufficiency, anxiety levels, and the influence of social groups. This is what the
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

High efficiency synthesis of insulin by self-assembly based organic chemistryResearchers at Tokai, Osaka, Tohoku and Fukuoka Universities report in the journal Communications Chemistry on the synthesis of insulin based on the self-assembly of polypeptide chains at about 40 percent efficiency. This new approach is expected to enable flexibility in synthesizing order made insulin compounds that cannot be produced using conventional biological approaches based on genetic engi
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Neglected atom has top properties for atomic clocksLike watchmakers choosing superior materials to build a fine timepiece, physicists at the Centre for Quantum Technologies (CQT) at the National University of Singapore have singled out an atom that could allow them to build better atomic clocks. The CQT team report in Nature Communications that a previously neglected element—lutetium—could improve on today's best clocks. Lutetium (Lu) is a rare ea
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Method for synthesizing a novel polyester with alternating arrangementProfessor Hideto Tsuji and Assistant Professor Yuki Arakawa at the Toyohashi University of Technology have developed a method for synthesizing a "pure" alternating copolymer of L- and D-lactic acids in which L- and D-lactic acids are alternately arranged, i.e., a syndiotactic poly(lactic acid). The results of the present study were published on April 10 in Polymer Chemistry, a journal published by
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Scientists generate a high-quality wheat A genome sequenceBread wheat (Triticum aestivum L.), feeding more than 35 percent of the human population and providing about 20 percent of calories and proteins consumed by humans, is a globally important crop due to its enhanced adaptability to a wide range of climates and improved grain quality for the production of baker's flour. Due to its complex polyploidy nature (hexaploid, containing A, B and D three subg
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

New method of measuring internal stresses for aerospace and aircraft engineeringComposite materials have become integral to industry, used in aviation and space technologies, as well as auto manufacturing and mining. However, internal stress assessment with composite material designs has long been challenging. Scientists from the NUST MISIS Center of Composite Materials, led by Professor Sergey Kaloshkin, have now proposed a non-contact method of internal voltage control in p
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

'Kung Fu' red pandas settle into new Laos sanctuaryMunching on bamboo and lazing under a fan spraying cooling mist, "Jackie Chan" is in a relaxed mood, one of three red pandas once destined for the exotic wildlife trade but now instead settling into a new home in a leafy Laos sanctuary.
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Scientific American Content: Global

Hair Products Popular with Black Women May Contain Harmful ChemicalsSome cosmetics include compounds that have been linked with early puberty, obesity and increased breast cancer risk -- Read more on ScientificAmerican.com
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Which European firms stand to lose from US Iran sanctionsUS President Donald Trump's decision to quit the landmark nuclear deal with Iran is expected to see European economic heavyweights including Germany and France pay a hefty price.
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Ingeniøren

Skat udskifter 25 it-systemer: Et af statens største it-projekter nogensindeDen nye europæiske toldlovgivning betyder, at Skat skal udskifte en lang række vigtige it-systemer. Det kommer angiveligt til at koste omkring en milliard kroner i et af statens største udviklingsprojekter nogensinde.
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The Atlantic

A Promise So Big, Democrats Aren’t Sure How to Keep ItJawan Thompson still sounds incredulous at his luck: He has a job, and a good job. “My first time being incarcerated, I was 15 years old,” he said. “Since then, I’ve been incarcerated maybe four or five times—you know, getting out, being around bad influences and not making positive choices.” After he was released from his latest spell inside a few months ago—his charges over the years have inclu
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The Atlantic

Protecting Police Dogs From FentanylIn October 2016, three dogs in Broward County, Florida, showed symptoms of overdose after they assisted in a federal drug raid . The dogs were more lethargic than usual, and they refused water. In West Virginia, the Monongalia County Sheriff’s Department has also become concerned about dogs used in drug raids. Al Kisner, the department’s chief deputy, told WVNews.com that they no longer take dogs
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Latest Headlines | Science News

In honor of his centennial, the Top 10 Feynman quotationsNobel laureate Richard Feynman left many quotable observations on science and life.
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Ingeniøren

Fire persondroner til fremtidenTeknologivirksomheder verden over arbejder på at udvikle selvflyvende droner til persontransport. Her er fire eksempler på, hvad der er på vej.
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Ingeniøren

Dronerne har fået vokseværk – snart kan de bære menneskerLuftrummet er ikke blevet indtaget af flyvende biler, som fremtidsforskerne ellers spåede. Men måske er der udsigt til, at elektriske persondroner begynder at snurre over vores hoveder.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Homeless? This startup has an app for thatChris Sun was trying to persuade homeless people to accept free money, which, in this case, was harder than it seemed.
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New Scientist - News

Stem cells may reveal how Neanderthal DNA works in modern humansMany of us carry DNA inherited from Neanderthals, but we can’t be sure how it affects us. Stem cells with Neanderthal DNA could tell us
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Data privacy must be protected, Microsoft CEO Satya Nadella tells technologistsThe tech industry's mission shouldn't just be to invent new technology, but also to make sure that technology is responsible and ethical. That was Microsoft CEO Satya Nadella's opening message at the company's technology conference, Microsoft Build, in downtown Seattle on Monday.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Hawaii volcano could be building up to big eruption: scientistsA Hawaii volcano that has been oozing lava and burping steam for days may be gearing up for a huge eruption, scientists have warned, prompting the closure of Volcanoes National Park on Friday.
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Ingeniøren

Konsulentrapport: Umuligt at vurdere realismen i ny signalplanEn hidtil hemmeligholdt rapport afdækker store huller i Banedanmarks nye plan for Danmarks største jernbaneprojekt.
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Ingeniøren

Bagsiden: Mysterium: Hvad er mon det for et (landbrugs?)redskab?Ugens fremlysning
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Ingeniøren

Bagsiden BREAKING: Nyt armslængdeprincip i FredericiaUgens kassebedrøver
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Ingeniøren

Bagsiden: Ugens CPR-dialoger
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Viden

Sikkerhedshul på Skats hjemmeside: "Det er kritisk"Et godt råd om IT-sikkerhed er, at man skal holde øje med at forbindelsen er sikker. Det er den ikke for alle, der besøger Skats hjemmeside.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Uber fatal crash: Self-driving software reportedly set to ignore objects on roadA pedestrian struck and killed by an Uber self-driving vehicle in Arizona in March may have been ignored as a "false positive" by the car's software.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Scientists make a maze-running artificial intelligence program that learns to take shortcutsCall it an a-MAZE-ing development: A U.K.-based team of researchers has developed an artificial intelligence program that can learn to take shortcuts through a labyrinth to reach its goal. In the process, the program developed structures akin to those in the human brain.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Indonesia's most active volcano erupts, spews ash into skyIndonesia's most active volcano, Mount Merapi, erupted early Friday, spewing sand and pyroclastic material and sending an ash column as high as 5,500 meters (18,045 feet) into the sky.
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Dagens Medicin

Trods planer og milliarder: Medicinske afdelinger er stadig plaget af overbelægningOverbelægningen på de medicinske afdelinger tager til trods handlingsplaner og massive økonomiske tilskud. Ledende overlæger landet over beretter, at problemer kun løjer en smule af om sommeren. Det er tegn på, at en alt for stor del af det danske sundhedsvæsenet er koncentreret på sygehusene, mener sundhedsøkonomer.
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Dagens Medicin

Holbæk Sygehus: Smertegrænsen er nået – der ligger patienter overaltDen specialeansvarlige overlæge på den kardiologiske sektion opfordrer politikere og regionsledelse til at holde op med at lukke senge, hver gang de fusionerer afdelinger.
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Dagens Medicin

Overlæge om overbelægning under influenzaepidemien: »Det var helt vildt«Medicinsk afdeling på OUH Svendborg arbejder dagligt med overbelægning. De seneste tre måneder har været særligt slemme, og det har derfor været nødvendigt at flytte patienter over i senge på de kirurgiske afsnit.
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Dagens Medicin

Større og mere vedvarende overbelægning i NordjyllandRegionshospital Nordjylland har oplevet en kraftig vækst i overbelægning de seneste halve år. Tallene viser, at afdelingen er overbelagt over halvdelen af tiden.
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Dagens Medicin

Sygehus Lillebælt: Udgående stuegang skal nedbringe overbelægningMedicinsk afdeling på Sygehus Lillebælt har været ramt af voldsom overbelægning denne vinter. Afdelingen iværksætter en række tiltag i et forsøg på at forebygge ny overbelægning.
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Dagens Medicin

Ekstra senge har kun taget toppenInfluenzaepidemien fik medicinsk afdeling i Hobro til at åbne flere senge, men afdelingen har stadig overbelægning.
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Ingeniøren

Nordkoreansk atombombe fik bjerg til at ryste og kollapseForskere har ud fra satellitmålinger af forandringer i et bjergs form før og efter atomprøvesprængningen 3. september 2017 estimeret bombens størrelse til at svare til mellem 120 og 304 kiloton TNT.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Taking the stress out of residual stress mappingResearchers from the University of Virginia (UVA) are using neutrons to explore fundamental work in residual stress mapping that promises more precise science down the road for Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) and similar facilities around the world.
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Science-Based Medicine

The Great Outdoors (Debate)What are the health risks of letting your cat roam free?
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Volcano explosion won't be deadly if people stay out of parkA Hawaii volcano that sputtered lava for a week, forced around 2,000 residents to evacuate, destroyed some two dozen homes and threatened a geothermal plant now threatens to blow its top in the coming days or weeks.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

UN takes step toward global environment pact opposed by USThe UN General Assembly on Thursday took a first step to create a global pact for the environment, an initiative championed by French President Emmanuel Macron but opposed by the United States.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Monster ocean wave sets southern hemisphere record: scientistsScientists have recorded what is believed to be the largest wave ever in the southern hemisphere, a 23.8 metre (78 foot) monster the height of an eight-floor building.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

SpaceX postpones next-gen rocket launchWith less than a minute before launch Thursday, SpaceX aborted the liftoff of its new Falcon 9 Block 5 rocket, which the California-based company promises to be more powerful and easier to re-use.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

The challenge of space gardening: One giant 'leaf' for mankindIt's not easy having a green thumb in space.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Fiat-Chrysler and GM join Ford in cutting production after plant fireAfter Ford, US automakers General Motors and Fiat-Chrysler said Thursday they were cutting vehicle production following a factory fire at a major parts supplier last week.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Chemists create faster and more efficient way to process informationUniversity of Waterloo chemists have found a much faster and more efficient way to store and process information by expanding the limitations of how the flow of electricity can be used and managed.
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Science | The Guardian

They're out to get you: study finds cyclists face paranoia about driversStudy finds that 70% of London cyclists believe drivers mean them harm. But is it mainly the fault of the road system? As a cyclist in a busy urban environment, it can seem that some drivers are out to get you. And now a new study has concluded that for many bike riders, this is only too true: a sense of paranoia is a clinical reality. The research led by Lyn Ellet , a clinical psychology academi
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Ingeniøren

Datalæk: 1300 navne, adresser og kodeord i klartekst lækketNordsjællandsk LAN-party, også kaldet NL-Party, har fået lækket deltagernes navne, adresser, e-mailadresser, brugernavne og kodeord i klartekst. De over 1300 personers data ligger nu frit tilgængeligt på internettet.
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Science | The Guardian

Growing brains in labs – Science Weekly podcastThis week: Hannah Devlin explores how scientists are growing human brains in labs. Why are they so keen to explore the possibilities? What are the ethical concerns being raised by experts? Subscribe and review on Acast , Apple Podcasts , Soundcloud , Audioboom and Mixcloud . Join the discussion on Facebook and Twitter In the mid-1990s a special little mouse crept its way into media headlines. Pin
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Ingeniøren

Leder: Københavns miljøzone ligger i bunden af Europas 4. division
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The Guardian's Science Weekly

Growing brains in labs – Science Weekly podcastThis week: Hannah Devlin explores how scientists are growing human brains in labs. Why are they so keen to explore the possibilities? What are the ethical concerns being raised by experts?
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Dagens Medicin

USA godkender Darzalex til førstelinjebehandling af myelomatoseProfessor Torben Plesner forventer, at den amerikanske godkendelse af kræftmidlet Darzalex som førstelinjebehandling af patienter med nydiagnosticeret knoglemarvskræft vil bane vejen for en tilsvarende europæisk godkendelse inden for kort tid.
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Ingeniøren

Open source-software gør overbevisende filmmagi muligt på danske budgetterOpen source-programmer og Unity lader danske filmmagere skabe overbevisende magiske verdener på brøkdele af et Hollywood-budget.
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Dagens Medicin

Region Nordjylland opretter åben klinik for screening af livmoderhalskræftNordjyske kvinder kan i maj og juni blive screenet for livmoderhalskræft uden henvisning eller tidsbestilling. Det skal få flere kvinder til at deltage screeningsprogrammet.
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Waterloo chemists create faster and more efficient way to process informationUniversity of Waterloo chemists have found a much faster and more efficient way to store and process information by expanding the limitations of how the flow of electricity can be used and managed.
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Alcohol and tobacco are by far the biggest threat to human welfare of all addictive drugsA new review published online today in the journal Addiction has compiled the best, most up-to-date source of information on alcohol, tobacco, and illicit drug use and the burden of death and disease. It shows that in 2015 alcohol and tobacco use between them cost the human population more than a quarter of a billion disability-adjusted life years, with illicit drugs costing a further tens of mill
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Feed: All Latest

Bell Labs' 'Only Human' Art Project Brings People Together Through TechBell Labs has teamed up with a group of resident artists to explore the emotional and social elements of machine-human interactions.
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Dagens Medicin

Psykiatriprojekt udvider efter rekordstor bevillingPsykiatriprojektet iPSYCH modtager stor bevilling, der skal bruges på at udvide studiet og analysere projektets ‘supertanker’ af data.
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Ingeniøren

Signalproblemer breder sig til Nordjylland: Flere nye baner får gamle signalerForsinkelserne i det 23 milliarder kroner dyre signalprogram betyder, at nye baner omkring Aalborg midlertidigt må udstyres med gammelt signalsystem.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

Hostile teachers can lose students 5 percent on test scoresTeachers who antagonize their students by belittling them, showing favoritism, or criticizing their contributions can damage their learning potential, a new study warns.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

Many oncologists recommend medical marijuana clinically despite not feeling sufficiently knowledgeable to do soWhile a wide majority of oncologists do not feel informed enough about medical marijuana's utility to make clinical recommendations, most do in fact conduct discussions on medical marijuana in the clinic and nearly half recommend it to their patients, say researchers who surveyed a population-based sample of medical oncologists.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

Untangling brain neuron dysfunction in Parkinson's disease and dementia with Lewy bodiesIn Parkinson's disease and dementia with Lewy bodies, pathological aggregates of misfolded alpha-synuclein protein develop in brain neurons. Researchers have now described changes in hippocampal neurons early after the aggregates begin to appear. This understanding, combined with further exploration of the mechanisms underlying the neuronal changes, could point to novel therapeutic treatments to p
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New Scientist - News

Satellite images reveal how powerful North Korea’s nukes areStudying pictures of North Korea's nuclear test site has let researchers calculate its weapons are about 10 times more powerful than the bomb dropped on Hiroshima
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New Scientist - News

A plague from South Korea is killing frogs and toads worldwideThe world’s amphibians are dying in swathes because of the lethal chytrid fungus, and it seems the epidemic had its origins on the Korean peninsula
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New Scientist - News

Interstellar cloud mapped by listening to its magnetic wavesMagnetic waves vibrating through an interstellar cloud called Musca reveal its 3D shape. We though it was long and thin, but it’s actually flat like a pancake
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Eurovision Song Contest associated with increase in life satisfactionParticipating in the Eurovision Song Contest may be linked to an increase in a nation's life satisfaction, according to new research.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

New tool analyzes disease and drug effects with unprecedented accuracy and consistencyA new protein analysis tool could increase the quality and accuracy of medical diagnosis and quicken the pace of pharmaceutical development.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

Chemists develop molecular switch for on-demand cargo releaseChemists have found a molecular switch such that two compounds that would readily react with each other can be in the same solution, separated by a very thin membrane and kept from reacting with each other until a molecular switch is thrown.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

Prenatal marijuana use can affect infant size, behavior, study findsSmoking during pregnancy has well-documented negative effects on birth weight in infants and is linked to several childhood health problems. Now, researchers have found that prenatal marijuana use also can have consequences on infants' weight and can influence behavior problems, especially when combined with tobacco use.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

Scientists uncover brain circuits behind putting up a fight or freezing in placeIn a study of mice, researchers describe a new circuit involved in fine-tuning the brain's decision either to hide or confront threats.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

How do public 'report cards' affect physicians' treatment decisions?A new survey finds that two-thirds of interventional cardiologists have avoided potentially lifesaving procedures for high-risk patients when results are publicly reported.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

Depleted metabolic enzymes promote tumor growth in kidney cancerBy integrating data on the function of essential metabolic enzymes with genetic, protein, and metabolic abnormalities associated with 'clear cell' renal cell carcinoma (ccRCC), researchers have determined that enzymes important in multiple pathways are universally depleted in ccRCC tumors. Kidney cancer, one of the ten most prevalent malignancies in the world, has increased in incidence over the l
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

Patients who have had an irregular heart beat can't ever be considered 'cured'Patients with an abnormal heart rhythm that can leave them at a higher risk of suffering from stroke still need treatment even after their heart rhythm seems to have returned to normal, say researchers.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

Levitation yields better neutron-lifetime measurementBeing repulsive can have its advantages. In the case of an experiment at Los Alamos National Laboratory's linear accelerator, a repulsive magnetic field and a clever detector system are allowing ultracold neutrons to be levitated so their actual lifetimes can be more accurately measured.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

Profiling extreme beams: Scientists devise new diagnostic for particle acceleratorsThe world's cutting-edge particle accelerators are pushing the extremes in high-brightness beams and ultrashort pulses to explore matter in new ways. To optimize their performance -- and to prepare for next-generation facilities that will push these extremes further -- scientists have devised a new tool that can measure how bright these beams are, even for pulses that last only quadrillionths or e
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Futurity.org

Super low sounds let scientists monitor far-off volcanoesInfrasound sensors, which detect sound waves with frequencies below the lower limit of human hearing, can also track volcanic eruptions in remote locations, a new case study suggests. As part of the United Nations’ Comprehensive Nuclear-Test-Ban Treaty, an International Monitoring System was built to detect any nuclear explosion on Earth—underground, underwater, or in the atmosphere. Within that
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

A European origin for leprosy?New research by an international team has revealed that there was much more diversity in the leprosy strains circulating in Medieval Europe than previously thought. This finding, based on the sequencing of 10 new ancient genomes from the leprosy-causing bacterium Mycobacterium leprae, complicates prior assumptions about the origin and spread of the disease, and also includes the oldest M. leprae g
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

What gives bees their sweet tooth?Scientists have discovered bees linger on a flower, emptying it of nectar, because they have sugar-sensing taste neurons which work together to prolong the pleasure of the sweetness.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

Shooting the Achilles heel of drug-resistant cancerCancer cells that develop resistance to drugs, also develop a new vulnerability. If this can be identified, it may be exploited clinically. A team of cancer researchers has now exposed this acquired vulnerability in melanoma that has developed resistance to treatment with BRAF-inhibitors. The team then developed a new therapeutic strategy to selectively kill the drug-resistant cancer cells.
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Futurity.org

Want to look cool in photos? Crack a smileThe difference in appearing cool or not can hinge on something as simple as a smile, new research suggests. Caleb Warren, assistant professor of marketing in the University of Arizona’s Eller College of Management, has spent his career trying to answer the question: What makes things and people cool? When he started his research, many assumed that the way to become cool was by being different or
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Science : NPR

Massive Eradication Effort Ends Rodents' Reign Of Terror On Forbidding IsleSince humans came to South Georgia Island centuries ago, rats have terrorized rare native birds. But an ambitious project, using some plucky canine aides, has cleared the frigid wilderness. (Image credit: Oliver Prince/Courtesy of South Georgia Heritage Trust)
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Futurity.org

Marijuana during pregnancy may result in smaller babiesMarijuana use during pregnancy may have consequences for infants’ weight and behavior, particularly in combination with tobacco use. Smoking during pregnancy has well-documented negative effects on birth weight in infants and is linked to several childhood health problems. Now, researchers at the University at Buffalo Research Institute on Addictions have found that prenatal marijuana use also ca
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Futurity.org

Evidence shows animals can play back memoriesResearchers have found the first evidence that non-human animals can mentally replay past events from memory. The discovery could help advance the development of new drugs to treat Alzheimer’s disease. “The reason we’re interested in animal memory isn’t only to understand animals, but rather to develop new models of memory that match up with the types of memory impaired in human diseases such as
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Futurity.org

5 tips—and a new device—to keep your credit card safeResearchers have teamed up with the New York City Police Department’s Financial Crimes Task Force to deploy the “Skim Reaper,” a device that instantly detects the presence of a credit card skimmer, allowing law enforcement and merchants to take action before the theft of card’s data. Credit card skimmers are electronic devices criminals stick on ATMs and gas pumps to secretly suck up your sensiti
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Family doctors could better detect child neglect with increased dental health trainingNew research now suggests that GPs lack the awareness and training to identify dental neglect in children, and therefore could miss the opportunity to share potential cases of wider abuse or neglect to other health and welfare professionals. The study in The British Dental Journal was led by Sascha Colgan, consultant GP and visiting researcher at the University of Southampton in the UK, and was pu
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Aggression at work can lead to 'vicious circle' of misconductNew research led by the University of East Anglia reveals that frequently being the target of workplace aggression not only affects the victim's health but can also cause them to behave badly towards others. Workplace aggression is a significant issue particularly in the healthcare sector, where nurses can be targeted by both their colleagues and co-workers through bullying, and by patients and th
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News

New link between gut microbiome and artery hardening discoveredThe level of diversity of the 'good bacteria' in our digestive systems has been found to be linked to a feature of cardiovascular disease -- hardening of the arteries -- in new research by experts at the University of Nottingham and King's College London.
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Hostile teachers can lose students 5 percent on test scoresTeachers who antagonize their students by belittling them, showing favoritism, or criticizing their contributions can damage their learning potential, a new study warns.
20h
Big Think

VR vs AR: What's the difference?What's the difference between VR and AR? Find out what they are and what these emerging technologies are being used for around the world. Read More
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

Making next-generation preconception screening a reality for parentsFor those planning to become parents, advances in sequencing technologies could make preconception carrier screening more useful by looking at a much broader set of genes. A recent clinical study uncovered genetic variants that more targeted panels might have missed, but researchers believe interpretation challenges remain before this technology becomes more broadly available.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Hostile teachers can lose students 5 percent on test scoresTeachers who antagonize their students by belittling them, showing favoritism, or criticizing their contributions can damage their learning potential, a new study warns.
20h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Aggression at work can lead to 'vicious circle' of misconductNew research led by the University of East Anglia (UEA) reveals that frequently being the target of workplace aggression not only affects the victim's health but can also cause them to behave badly towards others.
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The Atlantic

The Atlantic Daily: Begin to ImagineWhat We’re Following Nuclear Negotiations: President Trump announced that he will hold talks with North Korea’s leader, Kim Jong Un, on June 12 in Singapore. The location has no symbolic connection to the Korean War or to the North Korean nuclear program, making it a safe diplomatic choice if not an especially striking one. Meanwhile, critics of the Iran nuclear deal say the U.S.’s withdrawal cou
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

News Corp reports loss on writedowns, weakness in newspapersRupert Murdoch's newspaper-focused News Corp on Thursday reported a loss in the past quarter, as results were hit by a writedown in the value of its Australian television operations and declines in print advertising revenues.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

NASA program to track greenhouse gas is canceled (Update)A NASA program that cost $10 million per year to track carbon and methane, key greenhouse gases that contribute to global warming, has been cancelled, a US space agency spokesman said Thursday.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

How turning down the heat makes a baby turtle maleBoy or girl? For those who want to influence their baby's sex, superstition and folk wisdom offer no shortage of advice whose effectiveness is questionable at best—from what to eat to when to make love. But some animals have a technique backed by scientific proof: In turtles and other reptiles, whether an egg hatches male or female depends on the temperature of its nest.
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NYT > Science

Trilobites: Frog-Killing Fungus Found to Have Origins on Korean PeninsulaBy studying a wide range of samples from all over the planet, researchers say the rise of global trade helped spread the disease that has wiped out many amphibians.
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NYT > Science

Charlie Russell, Who Befriended Bears, Dies at 76Mr. Russell challenged conventional, fear-based ideas of bear management by going to live among black bears in a remote part of Russia.
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Popular Science

Your forearm is a great place to grow a new earHealth A soldier who lost her left ear in an accident just got a handy replacement. Army private Shamika Burrage was lucky to survive a motor vehicle accident two years ago in Texas, but she lost her entire left ear in the process. Now a new, unorthodox…
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News

New study finds ginger proven to treat vomiting in children with acute gastroenteritisResearchers presenting at the 51st ESPGHAN Annual Meeting have today revealed the results of a new study which proves the efficacy and effectiveness of using ginger to treat vomiting in children with acute gastroenteritis -- one of the most common conditions resulting in admission to pediatric emergency departments.
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Half of all young children with a rare inherited liver disease need a liver transplantAn international research team has today reported the first results of a study investigating the natural history of progressive familial intrahepatic cholestasis (PFIC) -- a rare genetic liver disease that predominantly affects children. Most alarmingly, the team reported that, by the age of 10 years, approximately half of the children with two different forms of PFIC had already received a liver
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Scientific American Content: Global

Jupiter and Venus Squeeze Earth's OrbitSediment records have confirmed that Jupiter and Venus change Earth's orbit from virtually circular to noticeably elliptical and back every 405,000 years. Christopher Intagliata reports. -- Read more on ScientificAmerican.com
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Latest Headlines | Science News

A deadly frog-killing fungus probably originated in East AsiaThe disastrous form of Bd chytrid fungus could have popped up just 50 to 120 years ago.
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BBC News - Science & Environment

Origins of amphibian-killing fungus uncoveredA deadly fungus that has devastated amphibian populations worldwide probably originated in East Asia, new research suggests.
21h
The Atlantic

The Atlantic Politics & Policy Daily: Singapore Fling-Written by Elaine Godfrey ( @elainejgodfrey ) Today in 5 Lines Shortly after greeting three American prisoners just released from North Korea, President Trump announced that he will meet with Kim Jong Un on June 12 in Singapore. The summit will be the first meeting between a sitting U.S. president and North Korean leader. In an interview with NBC News, Vice President Mike Pence said he wants Spe
21h
The Atlantic

Spotify's Lonely Stance Against Alleged Abuse“With all artists who have challenges, I believe it’s about the music,” Thea Mitchem, a New York radio programmer, told Billboard recently about her station’s decision to play the song “Sad!” by XXXTentacion. Artists who have challenges is a euphemism, and the challenges in his particular case are accusations that XXXTentacion had beaten his then-pregnant girlfriend. The fact that the 20-year-old
21h
NYT > Science

Stanley Falkow, Who Saw How Bacteria Cause Disease, Dies at 84He found resistance to antibiotics spreading among bacteria and was hailed for his discoveries, though a Nobel Prize eluded him. (Not that he wanted one.)
21h
BBC News - Science & Environment

Red tide: Electric blue waves wash California shoreGlowing blue algae have transformed California's coast.
21h
Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

Researchers hide information in plain textComputer scientists have invented FontCode, a way to embed hidden information in ordinary text by imperceptibly changing the shapes of fonts in text. The hidden information persists even when documents or images with perturbed texts are printed or converted to another file type. Method could prevent document tampering, protect copyrights, as well as embed QR codes and other metadata without alteri
21h
Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

A holistic approach for mycetoma managementMycetoma, a neglected tropical disease, can cause severe disfigurement and disability if not treated early. A holistic, community-based approach to detection and case management is effective at boosting disease prognoses, researchers now report.
21h
Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

Food-carrying ants use collective problem solving to get through or around obstaclesAnts working together to carry a large piece of food get around obstacles by switching between two types of motion: one that favors squeezing the morsel through a hole and another to seek a path around the barrier.
21h
Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

Video of moving discs reconstructed from rat retinal neuron signalsUsing machine-learning techniques, a research team has reconstructed a short movie of small, randomly moving discs from signals produced by rat retinal neurons.
21h
Big Think

Can A.I. remove human bias from the hiring process?AI may help organizations overcome unconscious biases in hiring and increase diversity. Read More
22h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

SpaceX to launch next-gen reuseable Falcon 9 rocketSpaceX on Thursday prepared to launch its new Falcon 9 Block 5 rocket, which the California-based company promises to be more powerful and easier to re-use.
22h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Apple, Goldman Sachs collaborating on credit card: report (Update)Apple is working with financial giant Goldman Sachs on a credit card that would carry the iPhone maker's digital wallet logo, according to a report Thursday in the Wall Street Journal.
22h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Under-threat DR Congo national park bans tree-fellingThe threatened Virunga National Park in DR Congo announced on Thursday it has banned the felling of trees throughout the nature reserve.
22h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Death Dealer painting outshines Superman comic at auctionSuperman may be the Man of Steel, but he's no Death Dealer.
22h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News

How turning down the heat makes a baby turtle maleScientists have started to crack the 50-year-old puzzle of how temperature turns baby turtles male or female. In a study in the journal Science, researchers show that cooler egg incubation temperatures turn up a key gene called Kdm6b in the turtle's immature sex organs. This in turn acts as a biological 'on' switch, activating other genes that allow testes to develop without altering the underlyin
22h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Oral antibiotics may raise risk of kidney stonesPediatric researchers have found that children and adults treated with some oral antibiotics have a significantly higher risk of developing kidney stones. This is the first time that these medicines have been linked to this condition. The strongest risks appeared at younger ages and among patients most recently exposed to antibiotics.
22h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Oral antibiotics linked to increased kidney stone riskThe potential to promote antibiotic resistance in bacteria isn't the only reason to avoid using antibiotics when possible. A new study reveals that antibiotics are also linked with an increased risk of developing kidney stones, with the greatest risk among children. The findings appear in an upcoming issue of the Journal of the American Society of Nephrology.
22h
Popular Science

Aluminum production could get much better for the environmentTechnology The breakthrough is great news for your gadgets A new way of smelting aluminum releases oxygen, not carbon dioxide.
22h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Nanodiamonds are foreverSay goodbye to the slogan "diamonds are forever." For industries that use dry lubricant, the up-and-coming phrase is more likely to be "broken nanodiamonds are forever."
22h
Feed: All Latest

Kilauea and the Implacable Power of Volcanic LavaThe Hawaiian volcano continues to erupt. There’s not much anyone can do about it except watch.
22h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Nanodiamonds are foreverArgonne researchers have created a self-generating, very-low-friction dry lubricant that lasts so long it could almost be confused with forever.
22h
Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

Heat and sound wave interactions in solids could run engines, refrigeratorsA solid can serve as a medium for heat and sound wave interactions just like a fluid does for thermoacoustic engines and refrigerators -- resulting in leak-free machines that can stay operating longer.
22h
Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

Ancient skull shows early 'baleen whale' had teethToday's baleen whales (Mysticetes) support their massive bodies by filtering huge volumes of small prey from seawater using comb-like baleen in their mouths. But new evidence based on careful analysis of a 34-million-year-old whale skull from Antarctica -- the second-oldest 'baleen' whale ever found -- suggests that early whales actually didn't have baleen. Their had well-developed gums and teeth,
22h
Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

A new puzzle piece to control the aging and age-related diseasesScientists have made a basic discovery of how the cellular functions are connected to control aging. The study shows that an increasingly deteriorating communication between the cells' organelles is an important cause of aging.
22h
Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

Molecule could improve memory, reduce Alzheimer's degradation, study findsSERCA activator may improve memory and cognition for Alzheimer's patients by preserving calcium ion balance in neurons and offering a new therapeutic strategy for neurodegeneration drug development.
22h
Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

Purple districts elect the most extreme legislators, driving polarizationSo-called purple voting districts that change hands between Republicans and Democrats -- rather than reliably conservative and liberal districts -- are an underappreciated source of rising political polarization in state legislatures, according to a study led by a Princeton University researcher.
22h
Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

Would video games be better if you could play as yourself? Well, not exactlyA new study shows no gender difference or negative effect on a video game player's performance or subjective involvement based on whether a photorealistic avatar looked like them or like their friend.
22h
Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

Brain-computer interface based on mutual learning helps tetraplegics in avatar raceBrain-computer interfaces (BCIs) are seen as a potential means by which severely physically impaired individuals can regain control of their environment, but establishing such an interface is not trivial. A new study suggests the most dramatic improvements in computer-augmented performance are likely to occur when both human and machine are allowed to learn.
22h
Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

Discovery of how HIV hedges its bets opens the door to new therapiesHIV covers its bases in a volatile environment by generating both active and dormant infections. But if the virus is randomly switching between these two fates, how does it ever commit to remaining in one state? New research has now answered this longstanding question and potentially uncovered how biological systems make such decisions.
22h
Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

Neglected atom has top properties for atomic clocksLike watchmakers choosing superior materials to build a fine timepiece, physicists have singled out an atom that could allow us to build better atomic clocks.
22h
Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

YouTube videos help researchers study dog bitesResearchers have turned to the popular video-sharing site YouTube to study the complex issue of dog bites.
22h
Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

Boosting the effects of vitamin D to tackle diabetesA new study suggests new approach for treating type 2 diabetes and other diseases, including cancer.
22h
Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

15-minute 'daily mile' could enhance health of the world's childrenPolicymakers should consider introducing The Daily Mile to improve the health and fitness of schoolchildren around the world, according to new research.
22h
Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

Strain improves performance of atomically thin semiconductor materialMaterials scientists show conclusively for the first time that the properties of atomically thin materials can be mechanically manipulated to enhance their performance. The finding could lead to faster computer processors and more efficient optical sensors.
22h
Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

How the power of mathematics can help assess lung functionResearchers have developed a new computational way of analyzing X-ray images of lungs, which could herald a breakthrough in the diagnosis and assessment of chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) and other lung diseases.
22h
Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

Flexible work arrangements reduce wage gap for mothersAccess to flexible work arrangements reduces the wage gap for mothers compared to women who don't have children, new research suggests.
22h
Live Science

This Huge, Ancient Whale Would Have Ripped You to ShredsLlanocetus denticrenatus lived about 34 million years ago. It was big. It was an early ancestor of modern humpbacks and blue whales. And it had teeth.
22h
BBC News - Science & Environment

Trump White House axes Nasa research into greenhouse gas cutsCutting Nasa's research jeopardises the ability to measure climate change progress, a journal reveals.
23h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Most oncologists have discussed medical marijuana with patientsData from a new survey show that as many as 80 percent of oncologists have discussed medical marijuana use with their patients. According to the authors, this is the first nationally-representative survey to examine oncologists' practices and beliefs on the subject since the implementation of state medical marijuana laws. The research published online today in the Journal of Clinical Oncology.
23h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Untangling brain neuron dysfunction in Parkinson's disease and dementia with Lewy bodiesIn Parkinson's disease and dementia with Lewy bodies, pathological aggregates of misfolded alpha-synuclein protein develop in brain neurons. Researchers have now described changes in hippocampal neurons early after the aggregates begin to appear. This understanding, combined with further exploration of the mechanisms underlying the neuronal changes, could point to novel therapeutic treatments to p
23h
Science : NPR

Record Heat In The Gulf Fueled Hurricane Harvey's DelugeNew research shows how scorching temperatures in the Gulf of Mexico led to massive rainfall when the storm hit last year. The findings also suggest global warming will make the problem worse. (Image credit: Getty Images)
23h
Dana Foundation

2018 World Science FestivalThe annual World Science Festival is back in New York City, starting May 29 and continuing until June 3. Since 2008, the week-long festival has collectively drawn over 2.5 million visitors from all over the world with the mission of cultivating a general public informed and inspired by science. Offering an exciting series of programs featuring experts spanning science and the arts, the World Scie
23h
New on MIT Technology Review

Democrats have released thousands of Russian-linked Facebook adsFacebook Russian US
23h
Live Science

Nuclear Bomb Test Moved North Korea MountainSatellite images give scientists an idea of the aftereffects of North Korea's latest nuclear test.
23h
Latest Headlines | Science News

First 3-D map of a gas cloud in space shows it’s flat like a pancakeAn interstellar gas cloud dubbed the Dark Doodad Nebula looks like a wispy, thin cylinder. But it’s actually a flat sheet.
23h
Live Science

Ultrasonic Waves Are Everywhere. Can You Hear Them?There are horrible sounds all around us that most people cannot hear but some people can. And scientists don't know how bad the problem is.
23h
Live Science

Why Are People Still Getting Sick from the E. Coli Romaine Outbreak?The E. coli outbreak tied to romaine lettuce seems to keep getting bigger.
23h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Study reveals that many oncologists recommend medical marijuana clinically despite not feeling sufficiently knowledgeable to do soWhile a wide majority of oncologists do not feel informed enough about medical marijuana's utility to make clinical recommendations, most do in fact conduct discussions on medical marijuana in the clinic and nearly half recommend it to their patients, say researchers who surveyed a population-based sample of medical oncologists.
23h
Science : NPR

When Cancer Patients Ask About Weed, Many Doctors Say Go For ItAbout half of oncologists recommend medical marijuana to patients, though most feel ignorant of its proper medical use. (Image credit: Jupiterimages/Getty Images)
23h
Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

Neuroscientists find first evidence animals can mentally replay past eventsResearchers have reported the first evidence that non-human animals can mentally replay past events from memory. The discovery could help improve the development of drugs to treat Alzheimer's disease by providing a way to study memory in animals that more closely addresses how memory works in people.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

Marriage name game: What kind of guy would take his wife's last name?The study looked at whether a man's level of education -- both his own and relative to his wife's -- influences the likelihood that he chooses a nontraditional surname in marriage.
23h
Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

What is a species? Bird expert develops a math formula to solve the problemWhether co-habiting populations belong to the same species is only as tough as figuring out if they interbreed or produce fertile offspring. On the other hand, when populations are geographically separated, biologists often struggle to determine whether they represent different species or merely subspecies. To address the age-long issue, a British bird expert has developed a new universal mathemat
23h
Feed: All Latest

Lots of Doctors Recommend Weed Without Understanding ItHalf of oncologists who recommended marijuana did so without feeling they had sufficient knowledge of the drug.
23h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Heat and sound wave interactions in solids could run engines, refrigeratorsA solid can serve as a medium for heat and sound wave interactions just like a fluid does for thermoacoustic engines and refrigerators - resulting in leak-free machines that can stay operating longer.
23h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Racial or ethnic discrimination impacts Latinas' satisfaction with contraception servicesYoung Latina women who have experienced racial or ethnic discrimination are less satisfied overall with their contraceptive care, which could affect their access to more effective contraceptives, a new study from Oregon State University has found.
23h
Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

Radar reveals details of mountain collapse after North Korea's most recent nuclear testNorth Korea's Sept. 3, 2017, underground nuclear test -- it's latest and biggest -- created a 5.2 magnitude earthquake and 4.5 magnitude aftershock. Researchers combined synthetic aperture radar with seismic measurements to determine that the explosion pushed the mountain surface outward up to 11 feet and left it 20 inches shorter, probably after cavity collapse and subsequent compression of fract
23h
Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

Eyes in the back of the headA team has tested the human spatial ability to perceive our surroundings without actually seeing it.
23h
TED Talks Daily (SD video)

"Iyeza" / "Zabalaza" | Thandiswa MazwaiSelf-styled wild woman and rebel singer Thandiswa Mazwai rocks the TED stage with an electrifying performance of two songs: "Iyeza" and "Zabalaza."
23h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Racial-ethnic disparities in the quality of end-of-life care among lung cancer patientsSignificant disparities in the quality of end-of-life lung cancer care were found among racial-ethnic minorities, with higher odds of experiencing potentially preventable medical encounters during end-of-life as compared with non-Hispanic whites.
23h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Heat and sound wave interactions in solids could run engines, refrigeratorsA solid can serve as a medium for heat and sound wave interactions just like a fluid does for thermoacoustic engines and refrigerators -- resulting in leak-free machines that can stay operating longer.
23h
Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

Big fish produce disproportionately more and bigger eggsContrary to prevailing dogma, plus-sized female fish invest disproportionately more in making eggs than smaller females. Therefore, taking a single big fish has a bigger impact on the fish population than taking multiple small ones.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

Global trade spreads deadly frog disease from AsiaNew research has revealed a deadly disease that threatens the survival of the world's frogs originated from East Asia, and global trade was almost certainly responsible for the disease's spread.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

Divide and conquer: Creating better medicines with fewer side effectsA new study describes a breakthrough technology with the power to create drugs with fewer unwanted side effects.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

Tau-Microtubule and Neurological DiseasesResearchers have combined cutting-edge cryo-electron microscopy (cryo-EM) with computational molecular modeling to produce a near atomic-resolution model of the interaction between microtubules -- crucial components of eukaryotic cell ultrastructure -- and microtubule-associated proteins called tau.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Hawaii volcano could spew boulders the size of refrigeratorsIf Hawaii's Kilauea volcano blows its top in the coming days or weeks, as experts fear, it could hurl ash and boulders the size of refrigerators miles into the air, shutting down airline traffic and endangering lives in all directions, scientists said Thursday.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Sick pelicans mysteriously showing up in Southern CaliforniaThe number of sick and dying brown pelicans has surged for unknown reasons along the Southern California coast in the past week, a wildlife organization said Thursday.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Canada, Apple back development of carbon-free aluminum smelting techCanada and Quebec province, as well as tech giant Apple, announced Thursday their backing of aluminum producers Alcoa and Rio Tinto's new joint venture to develop a carbon-free smelting process.
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Popular Science

The case for burning our way to a cleaner planetNexus Media News A novel and unproven plan to fight climate change and feed humanity. An experimental approach to BECCS skips the controversy surrounding the technology and creates energy with a valuable byproduct—food.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Say goodbye to La Nina, maybe hello to a more normal summerU.S. scientists say this winter's brief La Nina has evaporated, meaning an increased likelihood of a more normal summer.
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New on MIT Technology Review

This company hopes its cryptocurrency can help the internet of things reach its true potentialHelium, a startup focused on connecting low-power devices, thinks a blockchain can seed the spread of cheap, ubiquitous connectivity.
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The Atlantic

The Selective Westernization of NYU's Abu Dhabi CampusAbu Dhabi’s Saadiyat Island gleams in promotional photographs. It is all glittering museums and hotels, green-grassed university campuses and golf courses, and smiling Emirati men and women. It is the home to branches of some of the Western world’s premier cultural and educational institutions: the Louvre, the Guggenheim, New York University. Officials in the United Arab Emirates tout the island
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Museum to display mummified monkey found in air ductA mummified monkey that was found in the air ducts of a former department store in downtown Minneapolis last month is going on display.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

China tech giant sidelined, US imports held amid trade spatA Chinese tech giant has been brought to its knees. Tougher inspections at Chinese ports are holding up cars, apples and lumber imported from the U.S. These are among the early signs that the widening trade dispute between China and the U.S. is exacting a toll on both sides.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Rising religious 'none' rates linked to conservative Christian politicsReligious "nones," people who do not officially associate themselves with a specific religion, are on the rise in the United States. While there are many contributing factors to this phenomenon, new research suggests one reason is the merging of politics and conservative Christian beliefs.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

How departure times impact airline competition and the role aviation authorities playNew research from the UBC Sauder School of Business is the first to explore how airlines compete using departure times, and reveals the impact that 'departure time competition' has on consumers' bottom line.
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Working overtime linked to less collaboration between nurses and doctorsWorking overtime may negatively influence nurses' collaboration with fellow nurses and physicians, finds a new study by researchers at NYU Rory Meyers College of Nursing.
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Live Science

How Did This Soldier 'Grow' an Ear on Her Forearm?When this soldier lost her left ear in a car crash, Army surgeons helped her grow a new one — on her forearm.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Record-breaking ocean heat fueled Hurricane HarveyIn the weeks before Hurricane Harvey tore across the Gulf of Mexico and plowed into the Texas coast in August 2017, the Gulf's waters were warmer than any time on record, according to a new analysis led by the National Center for Atmospheric Research (NCAR).
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Divide and conquer: Researchers find key to creating better medicines with fewer side effectsToday, a new study published in Science by Professors Yossi Paltiel of the Hebrew University of Jerusalem and Ron Naaman from the Weizmann Institute of Science describes a breakthrough technology with the power to create drugs with fewer unwanted side effects.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

New tool analyzes disease and drug effects with unprecedented accuracy and consistencyA new protein analysis tool developed at the University at Buffalo could vastly increase the speed and precision with which disease and drug effects are analyzed.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Profiling extreme beams: Scientists devise new diagnostic for cutting-edge and next-gen particle acceleratorsThe world's cutting-edge particle accelerators are pushing the extremes in high-brightness beams and ultrashort pulses to explore matter in new ways.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Structural model of physiological tau-microtubule interactions sheds light on neurological diseasesResearchers at Lawrence Berkeley National Lab (Berkeley Lab) and the University of California, Berkeley have combined cutting-edge cryo-electron microscopy (cryo-EM) with computational molecular modeling to produce a near atomic-resolution model of the interaction between microtubules—crucial components of eukaryotic cell ultrastructure—and microtubule-associated proteins called tau.
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The Atlantic

What Should MLB Do About the 'Juiced' Ball Debate?These days, everybody digs the long ball . Since halfway through the 2015 season, Major League Baseball has seen a sustained power surge that in 2017 broke the all-time record for home runs in a season. The spike has been not just unprecedented, but also unexpected. Just before the inflection point in 2015, offense was down so much that some writers began proposing rule changes to save the game.
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Researchers hide information in plain textColumbia Engineering computer scientists invent FontCode, a way to embed hidden information in ordinary text by imperceptibly changing the shapes of fonts in text. The hidden information persists even when documents or images with perturbed texts are printed or converted to another file type. Method could prevent document tampering, protect copyrights, as well as embed QR codes and other metadata
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Live Science

How 250 Siberians Became the First Native AmericansThe Americas are a big place, but the Native American group that first settled it was small — just about 250 people, according to a new genetic study.
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Live Science

What's the Most Massive Object in the Universe?Hint: It holds 3.3 trillion stars.
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Science | The Guardian

New technology could slash carbon emissions from aluminium productionDevelopment could transform how one of the world’s most common materials is made Technology has been unveiled that could drastically cut greenhouse gas emissions from aluminium production, in a development that could transform the way one of the world’s most common materials is made. Aluminium is used to make cars, construction materials, industrial machinery, electrical products, drinks cans, fo
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Rising religious 'none' rates linked to conservative Christian politicsA study published in April in the journal Political Research Quarterly examined states that enacted policies against same-sex marriage, and found a correlation between these activities and a rising number of people who do not affiliate with a specific religion.
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The Atlantic

The Danger of Imitating TrumpDonald Trump’s genius has always been his ability to capitalize, literally, on his fame—to use his celebrity as a vehicle to enrich himself, even when he didn’t have the accomplishments or knowledge or business prowess (or the cash) to back up what he claimed. Since his entry into politics, plenty of his hangers-on have attempted the same thing, hoping that Trump’s fame could prove their meal tic
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The Atlantic

Singapore: The Safe Choice for Trump's Meeting With Kim Jong UnSEOUL—Lee Kuan Yew, the founding father of Singapore, was often described as a big man on a small stage. Now that small stage will need to accommodate two big men. On Thursday, Donald Trump announced that he will hold nuclear negotiations with Kim Jong Un—the first encounter between a U.S. president and North Korean leader—on June 12 in the Southeast Asian city-state. It’s a safe choice over a sy
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Big Think

Afraid you’ll be revealed as an impostor? You’re not aloneMost people experience impostorism at least once. Certain groups however are more prone to it than others. Read More
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BBC News - Science & Environment

Temperature-controlled turtle sex gene foundScientists have isolated the gene responsible for temperature-controlled sex determination in turtles.
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Published study reports molecule could improve memory, reduce Alzheimer's degradationSERCA activator may improve memory and cognition for Alzheimer's patients by preserving calcium ion balance in neurons and offering a new therapeutic strategy for neurodegeneration drug development. A report on this study was published in the Bioorganic & Medicinal Chemistry Letters.
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Using proteomics to understand pathogensRecent studies in the journal Molecular & Cellular Proteomics have shed light on pathogenic mechanisms of the sexually-transmitted parasite Trichomonas vaginalis and the HIV-associated opportunistic lung fungus Aspergillus.
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Scientists uncover brain circuits behind putting up a fight or freezing in placeIn a study of mice, National Institutes of Health-funded researchers describe a new circuit involved in fine-tuning the brain's decision either to hide or confront threats. The study, published in Nature, was partially funded by the NIH's Brain Research through Advancing Innovative Neurotechnologies (BRAIN) Initiative.
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Tau-tolly microtubular!Researchers at Lawrence Berkeley National Lab (Berkeley Lab) and the University of California, Berkeley have combined cutting-edge cryo-electron microscopy (cryo-EM) with computational molecular modeling to produce a near atomic-resolution model of the interaction between microtubules--crucial components of eukaryotic cell ultrastructure--and microtubule-associated proteins called tau.
1d
EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Divide and conquer: Israeli researchers find key to creating better medicines with fewer side effectsA new study published in Science by professors Yossi Paltiel of the Hebrew University of Jerusalem and Ron Naaman from the Weizmann Institute of Science describes a breakthrough technology with the power to create drugs with fewer unwanted side effects.
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Levitation yields better neutron-lifetime measurementBeing repulsive can have its advantages. In the case of an experiment at Los Alamos National Laboratory's linear accelerator, a repulsive magnetic field and a clever detector system are allowing ultracold neutrons to be levitated so their actual lifetimes can be more accurately measured.
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Global trade spreads deadly frog disease from AsiaNew research has revealed a deadly disease that threatens the survival of the world's frogs originated from East Asia, and global trade was almost certainly responsible for the disease's spread.
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Radar reveals details of mountain collapse after North Korea's most recent nuclear testNorth Korea's Sept. 3, 2017, underground nuclear test -- it's latest and biggest -- created a 5.2 magnitude earthquake and 4.5 magnitude aftershock. Researchers from Singapore, UC Berkeley, Germany and China combined synthetic aperture radar with seismic measurements to determine that the explosion pushed the mountain surface outward up to 11 feet and left it 20 inches shorter, probably after cavi
1d
EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Big fish produce disproportionately more and bigger eggsContrary to prevailing dogma, plus-sized female fish invest disproportionately more in making eggs than smaller females. Therefore, taking a single big fish has a bigger impact on the fish population than taking multiple small ones.
1d
EurekAlert! - Breaking News

At long last, a 3D picture of an interstellar cloud, a clue to star formationA duo of astronomers has accomplished a difficult feat: determining the 3D structure of an interstellar cloud, the birth site of stars.
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News

A deadly fungus afflicting amphibians arose in Korea, spread via human tradeThe origins of a deadly fungus, which for decades has contributed to a global decline of numerous amphibian populations, has been traced to the Korean peninsula, a new study reports. The data provide a more complete picture of how the fungus spread from region to region, and underscore how, over the past century, human trade of amphibian species has accelerated the spread of the disease.
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Big mamma fish give proportionally bigger reproductive outputsEven accounting for their proportionate size, bigger female fish produce many more offspring than smaller fish, a new study reveals. The results hold implications for fisheries managers, since climate change is expected to reduce the size of fish (and thus the number of their offspring) in many regions around the globe.
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News

A new genetic 'map' of ancient human migration across AsiaThe analysis of dozens of ancient genomes extracted from across the vast expanse between Europe and East Asia is shedding light on historical human migration patterns, as well as the spread of Indo-European languages and horse domestication.
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News

A European origin for leprosy?New research by an international team has revealed that there was much more diversity in the leprosy strains circulating in Medieval Europe than previously thought. This finding, based on the sequencing of 10 new ancient genomes from the leprosy-causing bacterium Mycobacterium leprae, complicates prior assumptions about the origin and spread of the disease, and also includes the oldest M. leprae g
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Genetic clues reveal origins of killer fungus behind the 'amphibian plague'A deadly fungus responsible for the devastation of amphibian populations around the world may have originated in East Asia, new research has found.
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Video of moving discs reconstructed from rat retinal neuron signalsUsing machine-learning techniques, a research team has reconstructed a short movie of small, randomly moving discs from signals produced by rat retinal neurons. Vicente Botella-Soler of the Institute of Science and Technology Austria and colleagues present this work in PLOS Computational Biology.
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Food-carrying ants use collective problem solving to get through or around obstaclesAnts working together to carry a large piece of food get around obstacles by switching between two types of motion: one that favors squeezing the morsel through a hole and another to seek a path around the barrier. Jonathan Ron of the Weizmann Institute, Israel, and colleagues present these findings in PLOS Computational Biology.
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News

A holistic approach for mycetoma managementMycetoma, a neglected tropical disease, can cause severe disfigurement and disability if not treated early. A holistic, community-based approach to detection and case management is effective at boosting disease prognoses, researchers now report in PLOS Neglected Tropical Diseases.
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Brain-computer interface based on mutual learning helps tetraplegics in avatar raceBrain-computer interfaces (BCIs) are seen as a potential means by which severely physically impaired individuals can regain control of their environment, but establishing such an interface is not trivial. A study publishing May 10 in the open-access journal PLOS Biology, by a group of researchers at the École Polytechnique Fédérale de Lausanne in Geneva, Switzerland, suggests the most dramatic imp
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Science current issue

Handedness in shearing auxetics creates rigid and compliant structuresIn nature, repeated base units produce handed structures that selectively bond to make rigid or compliant materials. Auxetic tilings are scale-independent frameworks made from repeated unit cells that expand under tension. We discovered how to produce handedness in auxetic unit cells that shear as they expand by changing the symmetries and alignments of auxetic tilings. Using the symmetry and ali
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Science current issue

Magnetic seismology of interstellar gas clouds: Unveiling a hidden dimensionStars and planets are formed inside dense interstellar molecular clouds by processes imprinted on the three-dimensional (3D) morphology of the clouds. Determining the 3D structure of interstellar clouds remains challenging because of projection effects and difficulties measuring the extent of the clouds along the line of sight. We report the detection of normal vibrational modes in the isolated i
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Science current issue

Asymmetric nucleophilic fluorination under hydrogen bonding phase-transfer catalysisCommon anionic nucleophiles such as those derived from inorganic salts have not been used for enantioselective catalysis because of their insolubility. Here, we report that merging hydrogen bonding and phase-transfer catalysis provides an effective mode of activation for nucleophiles that are insoluble in organic solvents. This catalytic manifold relies on hydrogen bonding complexation to render
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Science current issue

Fish reproductive-energy output increases disproportionately with body sizeBody size determines total reproductive-energy output. Most theories assume reproductive output is a fixed proportion of size, with respect to mass, but formal macroecological tests are lacking. Management based on that assumption risks underestimating the contribution of larger mothers to replenishment, hindering sustainable harvesting. We test this assumption in marine fishes with a phylogeneti
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Science current issue

The histone demethylase KDM6B regulates temperature-dependent sex determination in a turtle speciesTemperature-dependent sex determination is a notable model of phenotypic plasticity. In many reptiles, including the red-eared slider turtle Trachemys scripta elegans ( T. scripta ), the individual’s sex is determined by the ambient temperature during egg incubation. In this study, we show that the histone H3 lysine 27 (H3K27) demethylase KDM6B exhibits temperature-dependent sexually dimorphic ex
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Science current issue

Rapid sea level rise in the aftermath of a Neoproterozoic snowball EarthEarth’s most severe climate changes occurred during global-scale "snowball Earth" glaciations, which profoundly altered the planet’s atmosphere, oceans, and biosphere. Extreme rates of glacioeustatic sea level rise are predicted by the snowball Earth hypothesis, but supporting geologic evidence has been lacking. We use paleohydraulic analysis of wave ripples and tidal laminae in the Elatina Forma
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Science current issue

Efficient coding explains the universal law of generalization in human perceptionPerceptual generalization and discrimination are fundamental cognitive abilities. For example, if a bird eats a poisonous butterfly, it will learn to avoid preying on that species again by generalizing its past experience to new perceptual stimuli. In cognitive science, the "universal law of generalization" seeks to explain this ability and states that generalization between stimuli will follow a
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Science current issue

Natural selection interacts with recombination to shape the evolution of hybrid genomesTo investigate the consequences of hybridization between species, we studied three replicate hybrid populations that formed naturally between two swordtail fish species, estimating their fine-scale genetic map and inferring ancestry along the genomes of 690 individuals. In all three populations, ancestry from the "minor" parental species is more common in regions of high recombination and where t
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Science current issue

An anatomic transcriptional atlas of human glioblastomaGlioblastoma is an aggressive brain tumor that carries a poor prognosis. The tumor’s molecular and cellular landscapes are complex, and their relationships to histologic features routinely used for diagnosis are unclear. We present the Ivy Glioblastoma Atlas, an anatomically based transcriptional atlas of human glioblastoma that aligns individual histologic features with genomic alterations and g
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Science current issue

Structural basis for recognition of frizzled proteins by Clostridium difficile toxin BClostridium difficile infection is the most common cause of antibiotic-associated diarrhea in developed countries. The major virulence factor, C. difficile toxin B (TcdB), targets colonic epithelia by binding to the frizzled (FZD) family of Wnt receptors, but how TcdB recognizes FZDs is unclear. Here, we present the crystal structure of a TcdB fragment in complex with the cysteine-rich domain of
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Science current issue

New Products
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Science current issue

Sponsored Collection | Humble Beginning, Bright Future: Institute of Physics (CAS) at 90
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Science current issue

Technology Feature | PCR: Thirty-five years and counting
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Science current issue

Pitch imperfect
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Science current issue

Structure, mechanism, and regulation of the chloroplast ATP synthaseThe chloroplast adenosine triphosphate (ATP) synthase uses the electrochemical proton gradient generated by photosynthesis to produce ATP, the energy currency of all cells. Protons conducted through the membrane-embedded F o motor drive ATP synthesis in the F 1 head by rotary catalysis. We determined the high-resolution structure of the complete cF 1 F o complex by cryo–electron microscopy, resol
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Science current issue

Metabolic regulation of transcription through compartmentalized NAD+ biosynthesisNAD + (nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide in its oxidized state) is an essential molecule for a variety of physiological processes. It is synthesized in distinct subcellular compartments by three different synthases (NMNAT-1, -2, and -3). We found that compartmentalized NAD + synthesis by NMNATs integrates glucose metabolism and adipogenic transcription during adipocyte differentiation. Adipogenic
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Science current issue

High-resolution cryo-EM analysis of the yeast ATP synthase in a lipid membraneMitochondrial adenosine triphosphate (ATP) synthase comprises a membrane embedded F o motor that rotates to drive ATP synthesis in the F 1 subunit. We used single-particle cryo–electron microscopy (cryo-EM) to obtain structures of the full complex in a lipid bilayer in the absence or presence of the inhibitor oligomycin at 3.6- and 3.8-angstrom resolution, respectively. To limit conformational he
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Science current issue

Backing up nuclear disarmament
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Science current issue

News at a glance
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Science current issue

Hungarian science troubled by nationalism
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Science current issue

Animal tests surge under new U.S. chemical law
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Science current issue

NASA cancels carbon monitoring research program
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Science current issue

Finding the first horse tamers
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Science current issue

A new cancer immunotherapy suffers a setback
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Science current issue

Fast stars point to supernovae, black holes
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Science current issue

A different animal
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Science current issue

Small but mighty
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Science current issue

How earthquakes are induced
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Science current issue

Energy powerhouses of cells come into focus
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Science current issue

How does temperature determine sex?
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Science current issue

Metabolite regulates differentiation
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Science current issue

The hidden biodiversity of amphibian pathogens
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Science current issue

Resolving the neutron lifetime puzzle
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Science current issue

A proposed global metric to aid mercury pollution policy
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Science current issue

Open minds
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Science current issue

Results roll in from the dinosaur renaissance
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Science current issue

Pesticides thwart condor conservation
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Science current issue

Europe's uneven laws threaten scavengers
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Science current issue

The hidden value of paper records
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Science current issue

A fast-melting snowball
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Science current issue

Toxic hijack of a cell signaling pathway
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Science current issue

Anatomically correct tumor genomics
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Science current issue

Tasting with ATP and mitochondria
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Science current issue

A vibrating molecular cloud in three dimensions
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Science current issue

Selection, recombination, and hybrid evolution
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Science current issue

Big mamas matter for fish
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Science current issue

Decoding brain-computer interfaces
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Science current issue

H-bond to deliver fluoride
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Science current issue

Integrating glucose and fat
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Science current issue

Protons find a path
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Science current issue

Panzootic chytrid fungus out of Asia
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Science current issue

How long does a neutron live?
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Science current issue

Giving a hand to metamaterials
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Science current issue

Making males and back again
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Science current issue

Balancing costs and performance
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Science current issue

Knowing how to prevent induced earthquakes
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Science current issue

Micromanaging NOD1 in T cells
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Science current issue

Spinal cord stem cell grafts in pigs
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Science current issue

Top-down or bottom-up?
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Science current issue

Stress granule transcription
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Science current issue

Stop the clock: Tenure, gender, and children
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Science current issue

Early warning about emerging contaminants
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Science current issue

Sensing the stress
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Science current issue

Dynamic fibrils drive protein assembly
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Science current issue

Scaling up textiles that cool down
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Science current issue

Recent Asian origin of chytrid fungi causing global amphibian declinesGlobalized infectious diseases are causing species declines worldwide, but their source often remains elusive. We used whole-genome sequencing to solve the spatiotemporal origins of the most devastating panzootic to date, caused by the fungus Batrachochytrium dendrobatidis , a proximate driver of global amphibian declines. We traced the source of B. dendrobatidis to the Korean peninsula, where on
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Science current issue

Measurement of the neutron lifetime using a magneto-gravitational trap and in situ detectionThe precise value of the mean neutron lifetime, n , plays an important role in nuclear and particle physics and cosmology. It is used to predict the ratio of protons to helium atoms in the primordial universe and to search for physics beyond the Standard Model of particle physics. We eliminated loss mechanisms present in previous trap experiments by levitating polarized ultracold neutrons above t
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Science | The Guardian

New study suggests leprosy came from EuropeSkeletal analysis shows the oldest strains of the disease came from Europe, the oldest from Greater Chesterford, Essex circa 500AD Leprosy may have originated in Europe rather than Asia, according to the largest study to date on ancestral strains of the disease. The study has revealed that more leprosy strains than expected were present in medieval Europe, prompting scientists to reconsider the o
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New Scientist - News

Cook’s voyages were always controversial, a new show revealsThe achievements of the eighteenth-century explorer stand up surprisingly well to modern scrutiny, finds Boyd Tonkin
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Big Think

Fundamental equations guide marine robots to optimal sampling sitesNew principled approach helps autonomous underwater vehicles explore the ocean in an intelligent, energy-efficient manner. Read More
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The Scientist RSS

Origin of Frog-Killing Chytrid Fungus FoundDNA evidence points to Asian amphibians as the source of a fatal disease that has been wiping out frogs across the globe.
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The Scientist RSS

Artificial Intelligence Mimics Navigation Cells in the BrainAn algorithm trained to move through a virtual environment spontaneously generated patterns of activity found in so-called grid neurons.
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The Scientist RSS

Head of Global Health Security Ousted from White HouseThe position was eliminated the same week a new Ebola outbreak was declared in the Democratic Republic of the Congo.
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The Atlantic

The Origins of the Killer Fungus Driving Frogs to ExtinctionThe arrival of a chytrid fungus can herald nothing short of catastrophe. In the past few decades, one particular type of the fungus, Batrachochytrium dendrobatidis , or Bd, has killed off so many frogs in Australia, Europe, and the Americas that scientists have warned of an impending mass extinction. “We’ll just see lakes surrounded by hundreds if not thousands of dead or dying amphibians,” says
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Big Think

Study: Pasta isn’t bad for you after allAn analysis of 32 randomized control studies showed that pasta, as part of a low-glycemic diet, didn't contribute to weight gain in participants. Read More
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Levitation yields better neutron-lifetime measurementBeing repulsive can have its advantages. In the case of an experiment at Los Alamos National Laboratory's linear accelerator, a repulsive magnetic field and a clever detector system are allowing ultracold neutrons to be levitated so their actual lifetimes can be more accurately measured. For the first time, the measurements are considered accurate enough that potential corrections are not larger t
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Genetic clues reveal origins of killer fungus behind the 'amphibian plague'A deadly fungus responsible for the devastation of amphibian populations around the world may have originated in East Asia, new research has found.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Big fish produce disproportionately more and bigger eggsWhat difference does it make whether an angler catches one big fish or two smaller fish, each half its weight? Experts assumed that big and small fish invest the same proportion of their energy to make eggs. But a new report in Science by a Smithsonian biologist and colleagues shows that plus-sized females invest disproportionately more in the number of eggs and the size of individual eggs. Theref
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Radar reveals details of mountain collapse after North Korea's most recent nuclear testAs North Korea's president pledges to "denuclearize" the Korean peninsula, an international team of scientists is publishing the most detailed view yet of the site of the country's latest and largest underground nuclear test on Sept. 3, 2017.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

DNA study reveals previously unknown diversity of leprosy strains in Medieval EuropeNew research by an international team of collaborators has revealed that there was much more diversity in the leprosy strains circulating in Medieval Europe than previously thought. This finding, based on the sequencing of 10 new ancient genomes from the leprosy-causing bacterium Mycobacterium leprae, complicates prior assumptions about the origin and spread of the disease, and also includes the o
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Food-carrying ants use collective problem solving to get through or around obstaclesAnts working together to carry a large piece of food get around obstacles by switching between two types of motion: one that favors squeezing the morsel through a hole and another to seek a path around the barrier. Jonathan Ron of the Weizmann Institute, Israel, and colleagues present these findings in PLOS Computational Biology.
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Science : NPR

The Bigger The Mother Fish, The More Babies She HasPlus-sized mama fish have a size advantage over their petite counterparts: They can produce more eggs, and those eggs produce larger fish. It's a reminder that protecting big fish matters. (Image credit: Education Images/UIG via Getty Images)
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Study finds prenatal marijuana use can affect infant size, behaviorSmoking during pregnancy has well-documented negative effects on birth weight in infants and is linked to several childhood health problems. Now, researchers at the University at Buffalo Research Institute on Addictions have found that prenatal marijuana use also can have consequences on infants' weight and can influence behavior problems, especially when combined with tobacco use.
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Latest Headlines | Science News

Satellite data backs theory of North Korean nuclear site collapseAfter North Korea’s most recent nuclear test, two underground cave-ins occurred, possibly rendering the facility unusable, a new study suggests.
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Latest Headlines | Science News

There’s a genetic explanation for why warmer nests turn turtles femaleScientists have found a temperature-responsive gene that controls young turtles’ sex fate.
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Discovery (uploads) on YouTube

Mantas Flying on the Edge | Racing Extinction (360 Video)A group of more than 50 Manta Rays feeding on plankton appeared, demonstrating their curiosity and grace. "Flying" through the waters off the coast of Mexico these aquatic wonders appeared while feeding near whale sharks. Join a conservation biologist on an interactive mission to learn how animals critical to the world’s ecosystem thrive and survive in the wild. For a more immersive experience do
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

Record-breaking ocean heat fueled Hurricane HarveyRecord-hot Gulf of Mexico waters supercharged Hurricane Harvey, fueling it with vast stores of water and setting the stage for devastating flooding after it stalled near Houston.
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Quanta Magazine

Vaccines Are Pushing Pathogens to EvolveAndrew Read became a scientist so he could spend more time in nature, but he never imagined that would mean a commercial chicken farm. Read, a disease ecologist who directs the Pennsylvania State University Center for Infectious Disease Dynamics, and his research assistant Chris Cairns meandered their way through a hot, humid, pungent-smelling barn teeming with 30,000 young broiler chickens deep
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News

How departure times impact airline competition and the role aviation authorities playNew UBC Sauder research has uncovered how low-cost carriers compete with big players in the fiercely competitive airline travel market.
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News

UMass Amherst chemists develop molecular switch for on-demand cargo releaseIn an unexpected finding, chemist Sankaran 'Thai' Thayumanavan and colleagues at the University of Massachusetts Amherst show for the first time how movement of a single chemical bond can compromise a membrane made up of more than 500 chemical bonds. Their system uses light as a switch to create a reversible, on-demand molecular control mechanism.
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News

New tool analyzes disease and drug effects with unprecedented accuracy and consistencyA new protein analysis tool developed at the University at Buffalo could increase the quality and accuracy of medical diagnosis and quicken the pace of pharmaceutical development.
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BBC News - Science & Environment

Network Rail tree felling faces review over wildlife concernsRemoving too much trackside vegetation harms the environment, wildlife charities say.
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NYT > Science

Trilobites: This Asteroid Shouldn’t Be Where Astronomers Found ItSpace rocks like 2004 EW95 are common between Mars and Jupiter. The discovery of the object near Neptune may provide insights into how the planets formed.
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NYT > Science

Out There: ‘2001: A Space Odyssey’ Is Still the ‘Ultimate Trip’The rerelease of Stanley Kubrick’s masterpiece encourages us to reflect again on where we’re coming from and where we’re going.
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Ingeniøren

100.000 frivillige deltog i verdens største kvanteeksperimentHavde Bohr eller Einstein ret i deres syn på kvantemekanikken? Det er testet af 13 samtidige eksperimenter på fem kontinenter styret af frivilliges mere eller mindre tilfældige input.
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The Atlantic

'All Is Shambles': The Days After the Iran DealRead some of the most prominent critics of the Iran nuclear deal and you’ll notice something: They seem to be preparing their alibis in case Donald Trump’s decision to withdraw from it proves a catastrophic mistake. Trump, wrote Bret Stephens on Tuesday in The New York Times , “was absolutely right” to leave the agreement, “assuming, that is, serious thought has been given to what comes next.” On
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The Atlantic

Russia’s Controversial Knockoff of The AmericansIf these were ordinary times, the Russian television series Sleepers might have received little attention. When it premiered on Russian network television, in October, it seemed like just another rip-off of a foreign show—in this case, the FX spy drama The Americans , now concluding its final season . But amid real-world election-interference campaigns and extraterritorial assassination attempts
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The Atlantic

The Battle Between Israel and Iran Is SpreadingIsrael Iran Syria GHWhen Israeli missiles rained down on multiple Iranian targets across Syria overnight, it was one of Israel’s largest military operations in Syria in decades. The bombing came after Israel said that Iran, too, had committed an action without recent precedent, when its forces in Syria launched some 20 rockets against Israeli forces in the Golan Heights. It was a dramatic escalation, but it also fit
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New on MIT Technology Review

The White House says a new AI task force will protect workers and keep America firstSaying the US is ahead of other nations in AI, the administration touts actions it has already taken to promote the technology.
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Scientific American Content: Global

AI Re-Creates Activity Patterns That Brain Cells Use in NavigationDeep-learning algorithm spontaneously mimicked the activity of specialized neurons that tell us where we are in space -- Read more on ScientificAmerican.com
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NeuWrite San Diego

A Bright Idea: Illuminating the Brain with GCaMPYou might’ve read stories about some brain region “lighting up” in response to some stimulus. But what does “lighting up” actually mean? Oftentimes it refers to scientists using a fMRI machine that applies sophisticated technology to translate changes in blood flow into pixels on a computer screen. Sometimes though the brain can literally light up, […]
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New Scientist - News

Eating all your meals before 3pm could be good for your healthEating all of your daily meals by mid-afternoon has been found to lower appetite and cut blood pressure, and may make you less likely to develop diabetes
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Big Think

An asteroid that nobody knew was coming flew very, very close to our planet. Gulp.Quick, what’s traveling at 106,000 kilometers per hour (66,000 mph) and is as big as a football field? Read More
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News

The use of online banking by people over 60The researchers state that the majority of over-60s access online banking when they understand its usefulness, although they assume certain risks because of a lack of competence, and that they also value very positively the influence that they exercise over younger family members, who are more used to using electronic services.
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News

High efficiency synthesis of insulin by self-assembly based organic chemistryResearchers have succeeded in efficiently synthesizing insulin by using only chemical processes based on organic synthesis.
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NYT > Science

Robert N. Hall, 96, Whose Inventions Are Everywhere, Is DeadHe came up with a semiconductor laser used in supermarket scanners, printers and remote controls. His magnetron was adapted for the microwave oven.
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Discovery of how HIV hedges its bets opens the door to new therapiesHIV covers its bases in a volatile environment by generating both active and dormant infections. But if the virus is randomly switching between these two fates, how does it ever commit to remaining in one state? Weinberger's laboratory has now answered this longstanding question and potentially uncovered how biological systems make such decisions. Their findings are published today in the prominen
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News

YouTube videos help researchers study dog bitesResearchers at the University of Liverpool have turned to the popular video-sharing site YouTube to study the complex issue of dog bites.Preventing dog bites is an increasingly important public health and political issue. However, it remains difficult for researchers to understand the circumstances leading up to dog bites, with most studies relying on evidence collected after bites happen.In a new
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Profiling extreme beams: Scientists devise new diagnostic for particle acceleratorsThe world's cutting-edge particle accelerators are pushing the extremes in high-brightness beams and ultrashort pulses to explore matter in new ways. To optimize their performance -- and to prepare for next-generation facilities that will push these extremes further -- scientists have devised a new tool that can measure how bright these beams are, even for pulses that last only quadrillionths or e
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Neglected atom has top properties for atomic clocksLike watchmakers choosing superior materials to build a fine timepiece, physicists at the Centre for Quantum Technologies (CQT) at the National University of Singapore have singled out an atom that could allow us to build better atomic clocks.
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Record-breaking ocean heat fueled Hurricane HarveyRecord-hot Gulf of Mexico waters supercharged Hurricane Harvey, fueling it with vast stores of water and setting the stage for devastating flooding after it stalled near Houston.
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News

What gives bees their sweet tooth?Scientists have discovered bees linger on a flower, emptying it of nectar, because they have sugar-sensing taste neurons which work together to prolong the pleasure of the sweetness.
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BBC News - Science & Environment

UN puts brave face as climate talks get stuckClimate talks in Bonn officially suspended as countries fail to resolve differences about the Paris agreement.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

Microbes from marine volcanic vents reveal how humans adjusted to a changing atmosphereScientists detail the structure of MBH, a molecular complex involved in microbial respiration. The near-atomic resolution images are the first ever of MBH and show that its structure is remarkably similar to its counterpart in humans, Complex I.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

Effects of physical activity during pregnancyIn a recent study, a combined lifestyle intervention including dietary counseling and twice-weekly exercise classes during pregnancy resulted in a slightly longer first stage of labor, without any other effects during labor or delivery.
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Scientific American Content: Global

4 Ways "Internet of Things" Toys Endanger ChildrenSuch toys wirelessly connect with online databases to recognize voices and images, identifying children’s queries, commands and requests and responding to them -- Read more on ScientificAmerican.com
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The Economist: The world this week

Politics this week
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The Economist: The world this week

KAL’s cartoon
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The Economist: The world this week

Business this week
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News

How do public 'report cards' affect physicians' treatment decisions?Researchers from the Smith Center for Outcomes Research in Cardiology at Beth Israel Deaconess Medical Center (BIDMC) provide a closer look at physicians' knowledge, attitudes and beliefs about public reporting on percutaneous coronary intervention (PCI).
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Obesity may worsen symptoms for patients with lupusIn a recent Arthritis Care & Research study of 148 women with lupus, obesity was linked with worse disease activity, depressive symptoms, and symptoms of pain and fatigue.
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Popular Science

What you need to know about the volcanic eruptions going on in Hawaii right nowEnvironment Volcanoes giveth, and volcanoes taketh away. Last week, a new eruption sprouted in the Leilani Subdivision on the sprawling volcano’s southeast flank, with fissures popping up along a 2.5 mile stretch and lava…
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

What gives bees their sweet tooth?Scientists have discovered bees linger on a flower, emptying it of nectar, because they have sugar-sensing taste neurons which work together to prolong the pleasure of the sweetness.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Italian researchers develop lighter, cheaper robotic handItalian researchers on Thursday unveiled a new robotic hand they say allows users to grip objects more naturally and featuring a design that will lower the price significantly.
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The Atlantic

Why Is Everybody Getting Married in a Barn?It’s early May. Which means it’s wedding season. Which means a whole lot of Americans will soon be partying in a barn. Millennials, in staggering numbers, are choosing to start their married lives under high eaves and exposed beams, looking out over long, stripped-down wooden benches and lines of mason jars. According to an annual survey from The Knot, an online wedding-planning platform and maga
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The Atlantic

The Atlantic Premieres Crazy/Genius - New Podcast Series with Senior Editor Derek Thompson on the Intersection of Technology and CultureWashington, D.C. (May 10, 2018)—Today The Atlantic premieres Crazy/Genius , the latest addition to its suite of podcast programming. Hosted by senior editor Derek Thompson , the new eight-episode series asks consequential questions and arrives at provocative conclusions about how technology is changing our lives. From blockchain to online dating to space exploration, the series will debate whethe
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

Gene disruption signals cerebral palsy and autism linkResearchers have uncovered a genetic signal common to both cerebral palsy and autism. The finding comes from the first large-scale study of gene expression in children with cerebral palsy.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

Women seeking crowdfunding financing for start-ups are perceived as more trustworthyWhile men have benefited from a gender bias against women when seeking financing for business start-ups, the opposite may be true for female entrepreneurs seeking initial investment through crowdfunding efforts, according to research.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

Developing a method for synthesizing a novel polyester with alternating arrangementResearchers have developed a method for synthesizing a 'pure' alternating copolymer of L-- and D-lactic acids in which L-- and D-lactic acids are alternately arranged, i.e., a 'syndiotactic' poly(lactic acid). With this method, it is possible to synthesize syndiotactic polyesters in which L- and D-type monomers are arranged alternately. These polyesters are conventionally difficult to synthesize.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

The Yogi masters were right -- meditation and breathing exercises can sharpen your mindIt has long been claimed by Yogis and Buddhists that meditation and ancient breath-focused practices, such as pranayama, strengthen our ability to focus on tasks. A new study explains for the first time the neurophysiological link between breathing and attention.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

'Bisexual' beetles are simply inept, new study findsNew research shows that same-sex mating among male insects is more likely to be due to incompetence rather than sexual preference. More than 100 species of insects engage in same-sex mating behavior, and in some species the same-sex mating is more common than heterosexual mating. The research team studied the red flour beetle to find out why.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

Cocoa CRISPR: Gene editing shows promise for improving the 'chocolate tree'Use of the powerful gene-editing tool CRISPR-Cas9 could help to breed cacao trees that exhibit desirable traits such as enhanced resistance to diseases.
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New on MIT Technology Review

Net neutrality rules in the US aren’t quite dead yetFCC Senate Ajit Pai
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Eyes in the back of the headA team from RIEC has tested the human spatial ability to percieve our surroundings without actually seeing it.
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Marriage name game: What kind of guy would take his wife's last name?The study looked at whether a man's level of education -- both his own and relative to his wife's -- influences the likelihood that he chooses a nontraditional surname in marriage.
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Study examines the effects of physical activity during pregnancyIn a recent Acta Obstetricia et Gynecologica Scandinavica study, a combined lifestyle intervention including dietary counseling and twice-weekly exercise classes during pregnancy resulted in a slightly longer first stage of labor, without any other effects during labor or delivery.
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Would Super Mario Bros. be better if you could play as yourself? Well, not exactlyA new study by USC Institute for Creative Technologies and University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign shows no gender difference or negative effect on player's performance or subjective involvement based on whether a photorealistic avatar looked like them or like their friend.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

With deadline looming, UN climate talks fall shortUN talks ending Thursday failed to hammer out a draft of the "operating manual" that would bring the landmark Paris climate treaty to life, forcing governments to add an emergency negotiating session ahead of a December climate summit.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Marriage name game: What kind of guy would take his wife's last name?It's rare for men who get married to change their last names - whether they take their wife's, adopt a hyphenated version or create a combination of the two. But those that do tend to be less educated, according to a new Portland State University study.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

UK lawmakers summon ex-Cambridge Analytica chief to testifyBritish lawmakers investigating the use of Facebook users' information in political campaigns issued a summons Thursday for the former head of data firm Cambridge Analytica after he declined to answer their questions.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Big jump in job program for foreign graduates of US collegesA program that allows foreign students to stay in the United States for temporary employment after graduation has expanded significantly over a dozen years as technical companies stepped up hiring of science and engineering majors, according to a report released Thursday.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Carnegie Mellon offers new artificial intelligence majorCarnegie Mellon University in Pittsburgh will offer the nation's first undergraduate degree program in artificial intelligence.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Spotify cuts R. Kelly music from playlists, cites new policyR. Kelly Spotify R KellySpotify has removed R. Kelly's music from its playlists, citing its new policy on hate content and hateful conduct.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

How parents cause children's friendships to endA new study reveals why childhood friendships fall apart and is the first to demonstrate that parents are an important source of these breakups. Using data from 1,523 children, researchers examined parenting styles as well as mother and father self-reported depressive symptoms to predict the occurrence and timing of best friendships breaking up from the start to the end of elementary school (grade
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

A vital pause: Neurons in the brain's striatum may help regulate response to unexpected stimuliUsing light to control the activity of a specific group of nerve cells, researchers have revealed a possible brain mechanism for responding to surprising or important cues.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

Putting distinct memories of similar events in their placeNeuroscientists have found new evidence on how distinct memories of similar events are represented in the brain.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Purple districts elect the most extreme legislators, driving polarizationSo-called purple voting districts that change hands between Republicans and Democrats—rather than reliably conservative and liberal districts—are an underappreciated source of rising political polarization in state legislatures, according to a study led by a Princeton University researcher.
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The Atlantic

The Jaguar Is Made for the Age of Humans“T here’s a jaguar in the baño ,” George Olah told me with a small smile. “Um?” I managed, squinting into the dusky Amazon forest surrounding our camp. “She’s behind that tree. Look for spots,” Olah said. Then: “No. That tree,” pointing to a trunk between 30 and 40 feet away. In an instant, I registered that, yes, the bathroom trail we had cut through the Peruvian jungle was indeed occupied by a
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

NASA eyes versatile carbon-nanotube technology for spaceflight applicationsAn ultra-dark coating comprised of nearly invisible shag rug-like strands made of pure carbon is proving to be highly versatile for all types of spaceflight applications.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Flexible work arrangements reduce wage gap for mothersAccess to flexible work arrangements reduces the wage gap for mothers compared to women who don't have children, new UBC research suggests.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

People, power costs keep indoor farming down to EarthThere's a budding industry that's trying to solve the problem of the limp lettuce and tasteless tomatoes in America's supermarkets.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Video: Does melatonin do anything?Melatonin is a widely used supplement. Many people turn to the hormone hoping it will improve their sleep, but do claims of its efficacy have any merit?
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Study paves the way for better treatment of prostate cancerA new study published today has found a way to identify men with locally advanced prostate cancer who are less likely to respond well to radiotherapy.Led by Professor Catharine West, the University of Manchester team created a method of selecting prostate cancer patients who would benefit from treatments which target oxygen deficient tumors.The study was funded by Prostate Cancer UK and NIHR Manch
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Boosting the effects of vitamin D to tackle diabetesA Salk Institute study suggests new approach for treating type 2 diabetes and other diseases, including cancer.
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Depleted metabolic enzymes promote tumor growth in kidney cancerBy integrating data on the function of essential metabolic enzymes with genetic, protein, and metabolic abnormalities associated with 'clear cell' renal cell carcinoma (ccRCC), researchers have determined that enzymes important in multiple pathways are universally depleted in ccRCC tumors. Kidney cancer, one of the ten most prevalent malignancies in the world, has increased in incidence over the l
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Receptor related to neurotransmitter serotonin to boost memory formationIn a breakthrough that could one day help individuals with cognitive impairment, researchers at Columbia University Irving Medical Center (CUIMC) identified a specific receptor related to the neurotransmitter serotonin that could be targeted with drugs to boost memory.
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Shooting the Achilles heel of drug-resistant cancerCancer cells that develop resistance to drugs, also develop a new vulnerability. If this can be identified, it may be exploited clinically. A team of cancer researchers, led by Rene Bernards of the Netherlands Cancer Institute and Oncode Institute, now exposed this acquired vulnerability in melanoma that has developed resistance to treatment with BRAF-inhibitors. The team then developed a new ther
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Microbes from marine volcanic vents reveal how humans adjusted to a changing atmosphereThe findings, published today in Cell by scientists at Van Andel Research Institute (VARI), University of Georgia (UGA) and Washington State University, detail the structure of MBH, a molecular complex involved in microbial respiration. The near-atomic resolution images are the first ever of MBH and show that its structure is remarkably similar to its counterpart in humans, Complex I.
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News

A new puzzle piece to control the aging and age-related diseasesA basic discovery of how the cellular functions are connected to control aging is presented in the journal Cell Metabolism. The study shows that an increasingly deteriorating communication between the cells' organelles is an important cause of aging. The discovery is the result of a collaboration between five research groups at the universities of Stockholm and Gothenburg.
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Body's 'natural opioids' affect brain cells much differently than morphineA new study led by UC San Francisco scientists shows that brain cells, or neurons, react differently to opioid substances created inside the body -- the endorphins responsible for the 'natural high' that can be produced by exercise, for example -- than they do to morphine and heroin, or to purely synthetic opioid drugs, such as fentanyl. The researchers say their findings may help explain why the
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Multigene testing replacing BRCA tests for breast cancer risk, Stanford researcher saysThe use of genetic tests aimed at detecting the presence of mutations in the BRCA1 and BRCA2 genes in women with breast cancer is rapidly declining in favor of tests that can detect multiple cancer-associated mutations, according to researchers at the Stanford University School of Medicine and five other US medical centers.
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News

How the germ behind flesh-eating disease hijacks neurons to avoid immune destructionA study conducted in mice reveals that neurons play key role in the development of flesh-eating disease.The findings show that a bacterium that causes flesh-eating disease hijacks the normal crosstalk between nervous and immune systems to avoid immune destruction, thus ensuring its own survival.Two approaches prevent infections, halt disease progression in mice.
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Free eyeglasses improve student math scoresProviding free eyeglasses through a hospital-based vision center to students in rural China with poor vision helped to improve student math scores.
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News

New technique using computer algorithm, 3D printing shows promise for creating prosthetic noseA computer algorithm and 3D printer created prosthetic noses rated similar to those pictured in photographs, and the technology could be a low-cost option for temporary prostheses or models for reconstructive surgeons.
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News

New cancer immunotherapy drugs rapidly reach patients after approvalThe majority of patients eligible for cancer immunotherapy drugs known as checkpoint inhibitors received treatment within a few months of FDA approval, according to a new Yale-led study. The finding suggests that cancer immunotherapies are adopted at a much quicker pace than is typical for newly approved medical treatments, the researchers said.
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Neuroscientists find first evidence animals can mentally replay past eventsIndiana University researchers have reported the first evidence that non-human animals can mentally replay past events from memory. The discovery could help improve the development of drugs to treat Alzheimer's disease by providing a way to study memory in animals that more closely addresses how memory works in people.
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Making next-generation preconception screening a reality for parentsFor those planning to become parents, advances in sequencing technologies could make preconception carrier screening more useful by looking at a much broader set of genes. A recent clinical study published May 10 in the American Journal of Humans Genetics uncovered genetic variants that more targeted panels might have missed, but researchers at Oregon Health & Science University believe interpreta
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Ancient skull shows early 'baleen whale' had teethToday's baleen whales (Mysticetes) support their massive bodies by filtering huge volumes of small prey from seawater using comb-like baleen in their mouths. But new evidence reported in the journal Current Biology on May 10 based on careful analysis of a 34-million-year-old whale skull from Antarctica -- the second-oldest 'baleen' whale ever found -- suggests that early whales actually didn't hav
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Big Think

Are A.I. churches and 'tech faith' cults the future of religion?A.I. churches are springing up, even if just online, yet they're speaking a very old language. Read More
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Big Think

This augmented reality game helps stroke victims recover fasterA new augmented reality game is being developed to help stroke victims stick to their rehabilitation regimen. Read More
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

Changing students' attitudes to mathematics improves test scoresA new study finds a free 'massive, open, online course' (MOOC) led to students feeling more positive about math, more engaged during math class, and scoring significantly higher in mathematics assessments. This is the first of its kind to focus on changing students' mindsets and beliefs about their mathematics potential.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

Underwater acoustic ground cloak designedScientists are now working to take cloaking devices from the dramatic realm of science fiction and make them real. Researchers are taking the introductory steps to make acoustic ground cloaks. These materials redirect approaching waves around an object without scattering the wave energy, concealing the object from the sound waves.
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BBC News - Science & Environment

Device could make underwater objects appear invisible to sonarResearchers have developed a device that could make objects appear invisible to sonar detection.
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Scientific American Content: Global

Climate Science Can Be More Transparent, Researchers SayMaking data more publicly available is complicated by the large volume -- Read more on ScientificAmerican.com
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Science | The Guardian

The answer to life, the universe and everything might be 73. Or 67A new estimate of the Hubble constant – the rate at which the universe is expanding – is baffling many of the finest minds in the cosmology community A crisis of cosmic proportions is brewing: the universe is expanding 9% faster than it ought to be and scientists are not sure why. The latest, most precise, estimate of the universe’s current rate of expansion - a value known as the Hubble constant
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Image: InSight in sightOn 5 May 2018, ESA's 35 m-diameter deep-space radio dish at New Norcia, Western Australia, monitored NASA's InSight spacecraft providing critical tracking support during launch and early operations on its journey to Mars.
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Live Science

Congress Wants to Spend $10 Million to Search for Aliens and Texas Is to ThankAfter a 25-year gap, the federal government may fund the search for intelligent aliens with $10 million for the next two years.
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Live Science

Kilauea Volcano Could Launch 10-Ton Ballistic Boulders in a Dramatic ExplosionGeologists warn that Hawaii's Kilauea volcano could start spewing rocks
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

What is a species? British bird expert develops a math formula to solve the problemNature is replete with examples of identifiable populations known from different continents, mountain ranges, islands or lowland regions. While, traditionally, many of these have been treated as subspecies of widely-ranging species, recent studies relying on molecular biology have shown that many former "subspecies" have in fact been isolated for millions of years, which is long enough for them to
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MoviePass Rival Sinemia Is in It for the Long HaulSinemia may have an awkward name, but its movie subscription plans are priced for sustainable growth.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Ancient skull shows early 'baleen whale' had teethToday's baleen whales (Mysticetes) support their massive bodies by filtering huge volumes of small prey from seawater using comb-like baleen in their mouths much like a sieve. But new evidence reported in the journal Current Biology on May 10 based on careful analysis of a 34-million-year-old whale skull from Antarctica—the second-oldest "baleen" whale ever found—suggests that early whales actuall
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Neuroscientists find first evidence animals can mentally replay past eventsNeuroscientists at Indiana University have reported the first evidence that non-human animals can mentally replay past events from memory. The discovery could help advance the development of new drugs to treat Alzheimer's disease.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Microbes from marine volcanic vents reveal how humans adjusted to a changing atmosphereAncient microbes that thrive in some of the world's most extreme environments and modern-day humans have more in common than meets the eye—namely, they both respire and conserve energy using a similar molecular mechanism, one that has adapted to changing environmental conditions over billions of years.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Video: Fly over Neukum craterThis movie, based on images taken by ESA's Mars Express, showcases the 102 km wide Neukum Crater in the southern hemisphere of Mars.
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NYT > Science

Trilobites: The Green-Feathered Terror That Slaughtered Bats in SpainThe largest bat in Europe, a vulnerable species, found shelter in a city park’s trees. Then they started to turn up dead.
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Flexible work arrangements reduce wage gap for mothersAccess to flexible work arrangements reduces the wage gap for mothers compared to women who don't have children, new UBC research suggests.
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News

How the power of mathematics can help assess lung functionResearchers at the University of Southampton have developed a new computational way of analyzing X-ray images of lungs, which could herald a breakthrough in the diagnosis and assessment of chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) and other lung diseases.
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Strain improves performance of atomically thin semiconductor materialUConn materials scientists show conclusively for the first time that the properties of atomically thin materials can be mechanically manipulated to enhance their performance. The finding could lead to faster computer processors and more efficient optical sensors.
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Simple walking test helps predict risk for cognitive issues after heart surgeryThe distance a patient can walk in 6-minutes before a heart operation may be a clue to whether that patient will develop problems with memory, concentration, and attention after the procedure, according to a study published online today in The Annals of Thoracic Surgery.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

Bubbly graphene: how cool or hot are you?Scientists have measured and controlled the temperature of individual graphene bubbles with a single laser beam for the first time. The strain and curvature introduced by the bubbles is known to tune the electronic, chemical, and mechanical properties of this material. Generally, graphene bubbles are more reactive than flat graphene, so they might be more prone to be decorated with chemical groups
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

Artificial intelligence needs to be socially responsible, says new policy reportThe development of new artificial intelligence (AI) technology is often bias, and the resulting systems can be discriminatory, meaning more should be done by policymakers to ensure its development is democratic and socially responsible. This is according to a new policy report on the role of AI and robotics in society.
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cognitive science

A new paper in JEP:General looks at the relationship between accuracy of judgments and confidence.submitted by /u/markmana [link] [comments]
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Changing students' attitudes to mathematics improves test scoresA free 'massive, open, online course' (MOOC) designed to change students' attitudes towards mathematics makes them more engaged in class—leading to significantly higher test scores. Published in open-access journal Frontiers in Education, these findings go against the discouraging results of previous studies. It is the first of its kind to show the impact of an online course in changing students'
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TED Talks Daily (SD video)

What it's like to be a transgender dad | LB HannahsLB Hannahs candidly shares the experience of parenting as a genderqueer individual -- and what it can teach us about authenticity and advocacy. "Authenticity doesn't mean 'comfortable.' It means managing and negotiating the discomfort of everyday life," Hannahs says.
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New Scientist - News

Eye scanner can tell if you’ve mastered a foreign languageBy monitoring unconscious eye movements while reading, an algorithm can predict the proficiency of someone learning English as a second language
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The Atlantic

Madame Pele's Grip on HawaiiOf all the Hawaiian deities, Pele is perhaps the most formidable. The goddess of fire (and volcanoes and lightning and wind), she has a reputation for being as fickle as she is fervent. From her home in the Halemaʻumaʻu crater at the summit of the Kīlauea volcano, the legend goes, Madame Pele determines when and where the lava flows. She is the goddess who “ shapes the sacred land .” Pele’s prese
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The Atlantic

Trump's High-Pressure EconomySteve Mnuchin is not exactly a tribune of the people. A wealthy financier with a taste for the high life, he is better known for his glamorous spouse than for his commitment to public service. One could argue that Mnuchin’s chief qualification as treasury secretary is simply that while other more distinguished Goldman Sachs veterans refused to back Donald Trump’s seemingly quixotic presidential c
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

A new approach to social resilience through landscape architectureLandscape architecture is not a subject commonly associated with refugee settlements. But in a field of study where resilience is often applied to help fortify coasts against erosion or to safeguard habitats against loss, UConn landscape architecture researchers have begun using their expertise to encourage resilience in a different form.
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Futurity.org

For some tough depression, ‘shock therapy’ may beat drugsIf people with depression fail to find relief with two other kinds of treatment, such as antidepressants and talk therapy, a modern form of the treatment once called “shock therapy” should be more available, say researchers. “We shouldn’t allow the stigma attached to the past incarnations of this approach to prevent its modern form from being seriously considered for appropriate patients.” Curren
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Cost savings from integrative medicine via pain reduction in hospitalized patientsResearchers at Allina Health conducted a large NIH-funded observational study to examine pain treatment outcomes of integrative medicine in hospitalized patients.
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Purple districts elect the most extreme legislators, driving polarizationSo-called purple voting districts that change hands between Republicans and Democrats -- rather than reliably conservative and liberal districts -- are an underappreciated source of rising political polarization in state legislatures, according to a study led by a Princeton University researcher.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Artificial intelligence needs to be socially responsible says new policy reportThe development of new artificial intelligence (AI) technology is often subject to bias, and the resulting systems can be discriminatory, meaning more should be done by policymakers to ensure its development is democratic and socially responsible.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

'New views of Jupiter' showcases swirling clouds on giant planetMembers of NASA's Juno mission team, some of the world's leading observers of Jupiter, and citizen scientists from across the globe will attend a workshop 'New Views of Jupiter: Pro-Am Collaborations during and beyond the NASA Juno Mission' at the Royal Astronomical Society in London on 10-11 May.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Improving the sound insulation of building materialsResearcher Alberto Esteban-González has developed a method for measuring the soundproofing performance of building materials by means of small samples, thus reducing costs and resources.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Strain improves performance of atomically thin semiconductor materialResearchers in UConn's Institute of Materials Science significantly improved the performance of an atomically thin semiconductor material by stretching it, an accomplishment that could prove beneficial to engineers designing the next generation of flexible electronics, nano devices, and optical sensors.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

YouTube videos help researchers study dog bitesResearchers at the University of Liverpool have turned to the popular video-sharing site YouTube to study the complex issue of dog bites.
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Research suggests a 15-minute 'daily mile' could enhance health of the world's childrenPolicymakers should consider introducing The Daily Mile to improve the health and fitness of schoolchildren around the world, according to new research led by the Universities of Stirling and Edinburgh.
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Patients who have had an irregular heart beat can't ever be considered 'cured'Patients with an abnormal heart rhythm that can leave them at a higher risk of suffering from stroke still need treatment even after their heart rhythm seems to have returned to normal, say researchers at the University of Birmingham.
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Food recognition in hundred-year-olds: this explains how our semantic memory worksA study by SISSA shows that, differently from younger individuals, centenarians recognise natural foods more accurately than processed foods, because they have eaten them with greater frequency during their lifetime. This result clarifies the mechanisms at the root of our semantic memory, that do not appear to depend on the characteristics of food alone but also on experience and eating habits thr
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News

What is a species? British bird expert develops a math formula to solve the problemWhether co-habiting populations belong to the same species is only as tough as figuring out if they interbreed or produce fertile offspring. On the other hand, when populations are geographically separated, biologists often struggle to determine whether they represent different species or merely subspecies. To address the age-long issue, a British bird expert has developed a new universal mathemat
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Cocoa CRISPR: Gene editing shows promise for improving the 'chocolate tree'Use of the powerful gene-editing tool CRISPR-Cas9 could help to breed cacao trees that exhibit desirable traits such as enhanced resistance to diseases, according to Penn State plant scientists.
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News

The BIG Bell TestOn Nov. 30, 2016, more than 100,000 people around the world contributed to a suite of first-of-a-kind quantum physics experiments known as the BIG Bell Test. The results have now been analyzed, and are reported in this week's Nature.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

4 ways 'internet of things' toys endanger childrenAs Amazon releases an Echo Dot smart-home device aimed at children, it's entering a busy and growing marketplace. More than one-third of U.S. homes with children has at least one "internet of things" connected toy – like a cuddly creature who can listen to and respond to a child's inquiries. Many more of these devices are on the way, around the world and in North America specifically.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Postponing Day Zero: Investment in water efficiency will keep taps runningCalifornia, Brazil and South Africa have all recently experienced major drought, threatening serious disruption to supplies for major cities ('Day Zero' events). How can England prepare for drought without harming the environment or driving up water charges?
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Eco-friendly composting toilets already bring relief to big cities – just ask London's canal boatersEvery day in central London, some 5,000 people manage without access to basic amenities such as piped water, sewerage or electricity. They are London's boaters; the people who call the city's network of canals and waterways home. Living on a canal boat is often cheaper than renting a flat, and a growing number of people are being won over by the beauty of the waterways, and the promise of a slower
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Gene editing shows promise for improving the 'chocolate tree'Use of the powerful gene-editing tool CRISPR-Cas9 could help to breed cacao trees that exhibit desirable traits such as enhanced resistance to diseases, according to Penn State plant scientists.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Copernicus Sentinel-3B delivers first imagesLess than two weeks after it was launched, the Copernicus Sentinel-3B satellite has delivered its first images of Earth. Exceeding expectations, this first set of images include the sunset over Antarctica, sea ice in the Arctic and a view of northern Europe.
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New on MIT Technology Review

An AI learns to spot tree species, with help from a drone
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Futurity.org

Special crops aren’t what make leafcutter ants uniqueHumans developed agriculture about 10,000 years ago, but leafcutter ants began cultivating massive subterranean fungus gardens more than 10 million years ago. A complex genetic analysis has biologists re-evaluating some long-held beliefs about the way societies evolved following the invention of agriculture by these six-legged farmers. Like humans, leafcutter ants grow crops, and like humans, far
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The Atlantic

I Played Fortnite and Figured Out the UniverseIn Fortnite Battle Royale, the world’s most popular video game, released last September and today being played by millions of people at a time, you’re dropped into the sky above a richly rendered island, 99 other players all parachuting down alongside you. You angle toward your preferred terrain and as soon as you touch down, you are searching for a weapon—any weapon. The island is ringed by a gl
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News

The Yogi masters were right -- meditation and breathing exercises can sharpen your mindIt has long been claimed by Yogis and Buddhists that meditation and ancient breath-focused practices, such as pranayama, strengthen our ability to focus on tasks. A new study by researchers at Trinity College Dublin explains for the first time the neurophysiological link between breathing and attention.
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Bubbly graphene: how cool or hot are you?IBS scientists have measured and controlled the temperature of individual graphene bubbles with a single laser beam for the first time. The strain and curvature introduced by the bubbles is known to tune the electronic, chemical, and mechanical properties of this material. Generally, graphene bubbles are more reactive than flat graphene, so they might be more prone to be decorated with chemical gr
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News

'Bisexual' beetles are simply inept, new study findsNew research shows that same-sex mating among male insects is more likely to be due to incompetence rather than sexual preference. More than 100 species of insects engage in same-sex mating behavior, and in some species the same-sex mating is more common than heterosexual mating. The research team studied the red flour beetle to find out why.
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News

New method of measuring internal stresses for aerospace and aircraft engineeringComposite materials have become an integral part of our lives: they are used in aviation and space technologies, as well as the automobile and mining industries. However, there has been a problem of internal stress assessment with composite material designs since their inception.
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Scientific American Content: Global

Life beyond the Laboratory BenchA panel discussion at Memorial Sloan Kettering explores the issues scientists (especially women) face in advancing their careers -- Read more on ScientificAmerican.com
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House Democrats Release 3,500 Russia-Linked Facebook AdsFacebook Russian USIn the most extensive look yet at the IRA troll factory's Facebook efforts, familiar themes emerge.
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The Brutal Normalcy of the War on TerrorSeemingly mundane images tell the story of our two-decade-long battle.
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The Atlantic

Why Can’t Facebook Tell the Truth?When I signed up for Facebook during my freshman year of college, I knew exactly what it was: an online college directory. Thirteen years and 1 billion users later, nobody seems to have any clue what it is. Facebook has launched a thousand metaphors, earning comparisons to a cable company , a railroad , a virtual supranational government , and a grapevine for lies. In the past 18 months—perhaps t
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The Atlantic

Settlers in the 'Most Contentious Place on Earth'“Why would an Israeli Jew choose to live in the West Bank?” That’s the question that motivates writer Wajahat Ali to travel to Israel in a new documentary from The Atlantic . Ali, who has been critical of Israel, embarks on a personal quest to understand the perspectives of some of the 600,000 Israeli Jews who live in the occupied territory in defiance of international law—and to hear from the Pa
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Popular Science

How to keep your body cool when the weather is scorchingDIY Four scientific tricks for temperature control. The weather's heating up, but don’t sweat. We have four scientific ways to cool down your body without resorting to a portable AC unit.
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Artificial intelligence needs to be socially responsible, says new policy reportThe development of new artificial intelligence (AI) technology is often bias, and the resulting systems can be discriminatory, meaning more should be done by policymakers to ensure its development is democratic and socially responsible. This is according to a new policy report on the role of AI and robotics in society, being published today by the University of Manchester and Policy@Manchester.
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Developing a method for synthesizing a novel polyester with alternating arrangementToyohashi University of Technology researchers have developed a method for synthesizing a 'pure' alternating copolymer of L- and D-lactic acids in which L- and D-lactic acids are alternately arranged, i.e., a 'syndiotactic' poly(lactic acid). With this method, it is possible to synthesize syndiotactic polyesters in which L- and D-type monomers are arranged alternately. These polyesters are convent
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Changing students' attitudes to mathematics improves test scoresA new study finds a free 'massive, open, online course' (MOOC) led to students feeling more positive about math, more engaged during math class, and scoring significantly higher in mathematics assessments. This is the first of its kind to focus on changing students' mindsets and beliefs about their mathematics potential.
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News

New research puts distinct memories of similar events in their placeNeuroscientists have found new evidence on how distinct memories of similar events are represented in the brain.
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Do the elderly want technology to help them take their medication?Over 65s say they would find technology to help them take their medications helpful, but need the technology to be familiar, accessible and easy to use, according to research by Queen Mary University of London and University of Cambridge.
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News

A vital pause: Neurons in the brain's striatum may help regulate response to unexpected stimuliOkinawa Institute of Science and Technology Graduate University, JapanUsing light to control the activity of a specific group of nerve cells, OIST researchers have revealed a possible brain mechanism for responding to surprising or important cues.
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Pterocarpanquinones and carbapterocarpans with anti-tumor activity against MDR leukemiasThe pterocarpanquinone LQB-118 and the carbapterocarpan LQB-223 were evaluated on models of human hematological neoplasias and solid tumors. Both compounds presented great selectivity and anti-MDR capabilities, seeming to 'adapt' their mode of action to circumvent diverse phenotypes of drug resistance, especially on leukemic cells.
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Kenyan cave sheds new light on dawn of modern manForty-eight thousand year-old crayons and shell beads were among a treasure trove of items unearthed by archaeologists at a cave in Kenya. Archaeologists have discovered more than 30,000 items at the site which is shedding new light on the crucial time period when Homo sapiens first started showing signs of modern behavior.
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How parents cause children's friendships to endA new study reveals why childhood friendships fall apart and is the first to demonstrate that parents are an important source of these breakups. Using data from 1,523 children, researchers examined parenting styles as well as mother and father self-reported depressive symptoms to predict the occurrence and timing of best friendships breaking up from the start to the end of elementary school (grade
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Diabetes-associated pain linked to disrupted insulin signallingChronic pain hypersensitivity is commonly experienced by individuals with diabetes, and is difficult to treat. The origin of this pain was previously assumed to be damaged blood vessels or the effect of high blood sugar on tissue surrounding neurons. Now, new research in fruit flies indicates that the pain results instead from disrupted insulin signalling in pain sensory neurons, and demonstrates
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TGen develops quality-control test for detecting cancer in bloodThere is vast potential in precision-medicine methods of both detecting and monitoring disease by looking for indications of cancer mutations in cell-free DNA (cfDNA), found floating in the blood. To help ensure the quality of these molecular biomarkers, a scientific team led by the Translational Genomics Research Institute (TGen) has devised a rapid test -- a droplet digital PCR (ddPCR) assay --
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Gene disruption signals cerebral palsy and autism linkUniversity of Adelaide researchers have uncovered a genetic signal common to both cerebral palsy and autism. The finding comes from the first large-scale study of gene expression in children with cerebral palsy.
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Chinese scientists generate a high-quality wheat A genome sequenceA joint research team from the Institute of Genetics and Developmental Biology, BGI Shenzhen and Keygene in the Netherlands generated a high-quality genome sequence of T. urartu by combining BAC-by-BAC sequencing, single molecule real-time whole-genome shotgun sequencing and next-generation mapping technologies.
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Photo of the Week: Hawaii's Massive Volcano Seen From AbovePhotographer Demian Barrios used a drone to capture the stunning image of Kilauea's fissure.
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Scientific American Content: Global

Mysterious Insect Fossil Gap ExplainedA lack of diverse, winged hexapods—not low oxygen levels—could explain the gap in the fossil record -- Read more on ScientificAmerican.com
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Polymer researchers discover path to sustainable and biodegradable polyestersThere's a good chance you've touched something made out of the polyolefin polymer today. It's often used in polyethylene products like plastic bags or polypropylene products like diapers.
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UTA study finds art therapy helps veterans cope with traumaResearchers at The University of Texas at Arlington have found that 98 percent of veterans participating in the University's Artopia program consider that art therapy helped them cope with service-related trauma or disability. An equal percentage reported that art therapy helped them cope with everyday life.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Cloaking devices—it's not just 'Star Trek' anymoreCloaking devices play a pivotal role in many sci-fi television programs. Scientists are now working to take this technology from the dramatic realm of science fiction and make it real. Amanda D. Hanford, at Pennsylvania State University, is taking the introductory steps to make acoustic ground cloaks. These materials redirect approaching waves around an object without scattering the wave energy, c
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Tracking the clouded leopardSatellite collars have provided researchers in Borneo with a new insight into the mysterious movements of the Sunda clouded leopard, helping to ensure the future of this vulnerable species.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

'Bisexual' beetles are simply inept, new study findsSame-sex mating behaviour amongst male insects is much more likely to be due to incompetence, than sexual preference, male-male competition or evolutionary motivation—according to new research from the University of East Anglia.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

An example of plasmons directly impacting moleculesA team of researchers from Japan, Korea and the U.S. has found a way to demonstrate an example of plasmons directly causing changes to a molecule. In their paper published in the journal Science, the group describes their technique and what they learned from it.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

'Sanitised' nightlife precincts become places where some are not welcomeNightlife precincts in Australian cities have come under intense scrutiny in recent years following a spate of "one punch" assaults and other incidents. Places like Sydney's Kings Cross, Brisbane's Fortitude Valley and Perth's Northbridge have been framed as unsafe and unruly "problem spaces" – the kind of places that parents warn their teenage children to avoid.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

The talking AI story since '2001: A Space Odyssey'Almost everyone knows the story of HAL 9000, the killer supercomputer in Stanley Kubrick's landmark film 2001: A Space Odyssey, whose 50th anniversary will be celebrated on May 12, 2018 at the 71st Cannes Film Festival. In an intriguing scheduling coincidence, IBM, Kubrick's partner during the filming of A Space Odyssey, and Airbus have just unveiled the CIMON (Crew Interactive Mobile Companion) p
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Stone Age hepatitis B virus decodedAn international team of scientists led by researchers at the Max Planck Institute for the Science of Human History and the University of Kiel has successfully reconstructed genomes from Stone Age and Medieval European strains of the hepatitis B virus. This unprecedented recovery of ancient virus DNA indicates that hepatitis B was circulating in Europe at least 7000 years ago. While the ancient vi
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Alexa, check my security settingsDo you trust the Internet of Things? More to the point, do you trust "Alexa" the voice-activated software in the Amazon Echo and related IoT devices? There is not necessarily any particular reason not to trust Alexa and Amazon, although one must always remember that data held by any company on its servers may be compromised by hackers or malware. In addition, might your "conversations" with Alexa
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

Stone Age hepatitis B virus decodedScientists have successfully reconstructed genomes from Stone Age and Medieval European strains of the hepatitis B virus. This unprecedented recovery of ancient virus DNA indicates that hepatitis B was circulating in Europe at least 7,000 years ago.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

Angry birds: Size of jackdaw mobs depends on who calls warningJackdaws recognize each other's voices and respond in greater numbers to warnings from familiar birds than strangers, new research shows.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

New shrew species discovered on 'sky island' in PhilippinesA team of scientists recently identified Palawanosorex muscorum, a new species of shrew known more informally as the Palawan moss shrew. This shrew, found on what Heaney calls a 'sky island,' may help explain why the Philippines is such a hotbed for mammalian biodiversity.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

DNA found in lake bottom offers historical clues regarding impact of an invasive speciesA team of researchers from France, Italy and Norway has found a natural historical record of the impact of an invasive species of rabbit on a remote Indian Ocean island. In their paper published on the open access site Science Advances, the researchers describe their efforts to learn more about the environmental impact of an invasive species.
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Scientific American Content: Global

The New Era of Multimessenger AstronomyAstronomers' newfound ability to see the same cosmic events in light, particles and gravitational waves—a synthesis called multimessenger astronomy—gives them a fuller picture of some of... -- Read more on ScientificAmerican.com
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Team of atmospheric scientists goes to work in an evolving arcticLast spring, University of Colorado, Boulder research scientist Jessie Creamean spent a few weeks in frigid and windy Oliktok Point, Alaska. Within sight of the ice-bound Beaufort Sea and North Slope oil rigs and refineries, she set up an aerosol sampling system for a project on ice nucleating particles (INPs).
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Futurity.org

World’s most powerful camera can spot planets drowned by starlightA new, incredibly powerful camera called DARKNESS can take pictures of planets close to bright, nearby stars that would normally obscure them. Somewhere in the vastness of the universe another habitable planet likely exists. And it may not be that far—astronomically speaking—from our own solar system. Distinguishing that planet’s light from its star, however, can be problematic. “Taking a picture
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Popular Science

Why do I get congested when I drink alcohol?Allergic Reaction Alcohol allergies are pretty rare, but intolerance is a lot more common Every time I enjoy a cold hard cider, I feel nauseated. Not immediately—first comes the congestion. Then I feel woozy. Then, hours later, my stomach churns. I wanted to…
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Cassava breeding hasn't improved photosynthesis or yield potentialUniversity of Illinois researchers analyzed four African cultivars to find out how breeding has impacted photosynthesis -- the process that transforms light energy and carbon dioxide into yield. They found that unimproved landraces of cassava - cultivars that have not been bred for improvements like pest and disease resistance - are actually 20 percent better at photosynthesizing than their improv
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Cloaking devices -- it's not just 'Star Trek' anymoreScientists are now working to take cloaking devices from the dramatic realm of science fiction and make them real. Amanda D. Hanford, at Pennsylvania State University, is taking the introductory steps to make acoustic ground cloaks. These materials redirect approaching waves around an object without scattering the wave energy, concealing the object from the sound waves. During the 175th ASA Meetin
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BBC News - Science & Environment

Hun migrations 'linked to deadly Justinian Plague'Scientists find a deadly plague may have been spread to Europe and western Asia by the Huns.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Cassava breeding hasn't improved photosynthesis or yield potentialCassava is a staple in the diet of more than one billion people across 105 countries, yet this "orphaned crop" has received little attention compared to popular crops like corn and soybeans. While advances in breeding have helped cassava withstand pests and diseases, cassava yields no more today than it did in 1963. Corn yields, by comparison, have more than doubled.
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Live Science

What Are the Preferred Jobs of Serial Killers?The recent and startling arrest of the elusive Golden State Killer in what was arguably the most vexing and disturbing constellation of interlinked cold cases in American history, has raised more questions than answers.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

A study of pollen reconstructs the landscape of Madrid during 400,000 yearsSusana Rubio, Joaquín Panera and Alfredo Pérez González, scientists at the Centro Nacional de Investigación sobre la Evolución Humana (CENIEH), have published a study in the journal Quaternary International on the changes to vegetation and climate over the last 400,000 years in the region of Madrid, a Mediterranean area subject to an important continental influence key to understanding global clim
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Counting perovskitesMarina Filip, Postdoctoral Research Assistant, and Feliciano Giustino, Professor of Materials, both in the Department of Materials, explain how elementary geometry and modern data analytics can be combined to predict the existence of thousands of new materials called 'perovskites', as shown in their recent publication in PNAS.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Raman spectral band oscillations in large graphene bubblesA team of researchers at the Center for Multidimensional Carbon Materials, within the Institute for Basic Science (IBS) have measured and controlled the temperature of individual graphene bubbles with a single laser beam for the first time. The study is now available from Physical Review Letters.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

How we're using fish ear bones as 'time capsules' of past river healthFish have ears. They also have ear bones, known as otoliths. Recent research has focused on otoliths of fish from Australia's inland waters. These unique structures act as a kind of scientific time capsule, telling us about environmental conditions of the past.
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The Atlantic

Remembering the Cinematic Prowess of Anne V. CoatesThe art of film editing is arguably the most unheralded, most crucial part of filmmaking—a craft that can rescue a difficult production process, reshape a tortured performance, or hone an already great work into something perfect. It’s a quiet and hermetic activity, largely performed in tiny studios for weeks and months on end, lacking in Hollywood glitz and glamor but pivotal to packaging someon
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The Atlantic

A Muslim Among Israeli SettlersImage above: A Palestinian worker in Shiloh tends to the grounds of what some Jews believe was the first capital of the Israelite kingdom. I was here to report on Jewish settlers, the 600,000 citizens of Israel living beyond its pre-1967 borders. My main concern was whether the normally guarded and cautious settler community would open up and talk to me: a brown-skinned, practicing Muslim from th
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New Scientist - News

Napoleon Complex: Are smaller men really more aggressive?A study investigating short-man syndrome suggests that smaller men may behave more aggressively than others, providing there are no likely repercussions
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

New techniques to improve the shelf life of our food could help minimize harvest lossA new technique to dry cocoa beans, fruits, herbs and edible birds nests is helping to improve quality and increase the shelf life of our food.
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Feed: All Latest

Are Air Fryers Worth It?Can the trendy, expensive countertop air fryer outperform a simple sheet pan in an oven?
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T-Mobile-Sprint Merger: Promises Mean Little for ConsumersOpinion: The proposed merger of two wireless giants will reduce competition and should be blocked.
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Inside the Arena Where Drones Battle a Wall of 1,300 Computer FansIn Caltech’s fancy new drone arena, the machines face terrifying atmospheric disturbances, all to help shape the future of flight.
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The Scientist RSS

Image of the Day: Glowing TideEach year, bioluminescent microorganisms create striking displays on the beaches of San Diego.
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Scientific American Content: Global

Building Sails for Interstellar Probes Will Be Tough, but Not ImpossibleA new study validates the feasibility of constructing gossamer-thin light sails for propelling spacecraft to other stars -- Read more on ScientificAmerican.com
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Spinning data into soundIt could be the background soundtrack for a science fiction movie. Some sounds bubble up like prehistoric chirps from primordial ooze. Others whirl up and down octaves, quickly joined by a progressive rattling that slinks across the sound landscape.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Light could make semiconductor computers a million times faster or even go quantumA technique to manipulate electrons with light could bring quantum computing up to room temperature.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Archaeologists find remains of Roman-era temple in EgyptEgypt says archaeologists have uncovered the remains of a temple dating back to the second century.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Telecom Italia reaches content-sharing deal with MediasetTelecom Italia has announced a content-sharing agreement with Mediaset, Italy's largest private broadcaster, as the former telecom monopoly pushes ahead with its plan to improve digital content after a boardroom shakeup.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Apple fells plans for Ireland data centre over treesUS tech giant Apple announced Thursday it had shelved plans to build an 850-million-euro ($1.0-billion) data centre in Ireland over a court battle with conservationists seeking to preserve a forest.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Panasonic profit soars on automotive business growthJapanese electronics giant Panasonic on Thursday said its full-year net profit surged, helped by growth in its automative-related business.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Volunteers work to save vintage train simulator in BerlinHydraulic systems jerk and pull the metal train cab back and forth as the driver pilots it along the tracks of Berlin's commuter rail system, as images of the city just after the fall of the Berlin Wall whiz by.
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Science | The Guardian

David Goodall, Australia's oldest scientist, ends his own life aged 104Goodall ate fish and chips and cheesecake and listened to Beethoven’s Ninth Symphony in final hours Australia’s oldest scientist, David Goodall, has ended his own life at a clinic in Switzerland, surrounded by family and while listening to Beethoven’s Ode to Joy. The British-born 104-year-old professor was forced to travel on a one-way ticket from his home in Western Australia to Switzerland wher
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

World-first study aims to keep emissions targets on trackA simple method to determine if fossil fuel producers are on track to meet global emission reduction targets has been developed by University of Queensland researchers.
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Scientific American Content: Global

Global Infections by the Numbers-- Read more on ScientificAmerican.com
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Science | The Guardian

Avengers remembered: why franchises can be so popular | Dean BurnettThe success of Avengers: Infinity War shows just how much people enjoy seeing familiar faces doing vaguely new things. Why is this so appealing? Current data suggest that Avengers: Infinity War is well on course to being Marvel’s biggest UK hit to date. Given how many successful movies Marvel has produced over the last decade , that’s really saying something. But the current glut of superhero mov
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Stone Age hepatitis B virus decodedAn international team of scientists led by researchers at the Max Planck Institute for the Science of Human History and the University of Kiel has successfully reconstructed genomes from Stone Age and Medieval European strains of the hepatitis B virus. This unprecedented recovery of ancient virus DNA indicates that hepatitis B was circulating in Europe at least 7,000 years ago.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Understanding Kilauea—a different flavor of volcanoHawaii's Kilauea volcano has been oozing lava for more than three decades. But in recent days fountains of lava hundreds of feet high, a dozen new fissures and plumes of steam, ash, and gases have struck the area around Kilauea and forced more than 1,700 people to flee their homes. Hundreds of earthquakes and changes in the shape of Kilauea foretold the eruption and facilitated early warnings for
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Caterpillar 'road rage' could affect migrationMonarch butterfly caterpillars living next to roads may be stressed by the sound of passing cars and trucks, according to a new study from the University of Georgia.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Researchers invent tiny, resealable packets to deliver materials on cueYour body keeps its neurons firing, immune system working and serotonin flowing with a clever bit of engineering: tiny capsules that deliver signaling molecules from place to place in the body.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Image: Full moon over NewfoundlandThe crew of the International Space Station snapped this image of the full Moon on April 30, 2018, as the station orbited off the coast of Newfoundland, Canada.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Scientists taught fluorescent microscope to automatically adapt to any sampleAn international team of physicists found a new way to improve images obtained by fluorescence microscopy. The method is based on adaptive optics and implies an automatic correction of aberrations. Moreover, this correction is based on the quality of individual pixels, rather than the image as a whole. This helps avoid re-calibration of microscope in case of changing the sample. As a result, micro
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The Atlantic

Patrick Melrose Is a Lacerating Tour de ForceThe genius of Edward St. Aubyn’s five Patrick Melrose novels is in how relentlessly they amalgamate horror and beauty. The loosely autobiographical series—once named the Melrosiad by a Guardian reviewer—depicts child sexual abuse, drug addiction, alcoholism, and a smorgasbord of emotional torture, but does so in such entrancing prose that it insulates the reader from the unbearable. Heroin, in St
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Estimating species loss from habitat clearingNUS ecologists have developed improved methods for estimating biodiversity loss from habitat-clearing activities, to aid conservation planning.
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The Catch-22 of Mass Prescribing AntibioticsResearchers have found that seemingly unnecessary drugs are saving lives in the developing world. Is that worth the threat of antibiotic resistance?
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Who Pays the Most, and Least, in Silicon Valley?Median pay at Facebook tops $240,000 a year, more than eight times the $28,446 median at Amazon.
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Rolls-Royce Reveals the $325,000 Cullinan, Its Rowdy, Regal SUVThe luxury carmaker's new behemoth combines a massive engine and clever suspension to take the fancy folk absolutely anywhere they care to go.
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Feed: All Latest

Watch the New SpaceX Reusable Rocket Make Its DebutThe Block 5 version of the Falcon 9 is designed to re-fly as soon as 48 hours after landing.
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Scientific American Content: Global

A Hangover Pill? Tests on Drunk Mice Show PromiseThe treatment decreased rodents’ blood alcohol level by 45 percent -- Read more on ScientificAmerican.com
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Satellite pair arrive for Galileo's next rumble in the jungleThe next two satellites in Europe's Galileo satellite navigation system have arrived at Europe's Spaceport in Kourou, French Guiana, ahead of their planned launch from the jungle space base in July.
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Live Science

Aw, Shucks: How Oysters Gave One Man a Rare Bacterial InfectionA rare oyster-shucking hazard.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Liquid crystals self-regulate the release of drugs in precise, repeating doses with simple nudge from their environmentLiquid crystals—much like the ones forming these words on computer monitors—could be tuned to fight bacteria or scuttle compromised electronics by reacting to subtle changes in their environment with tiny, measured doses of liquid or solids.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Protonic ceramic fuel cells are highly durable, fuel flexibleProtonic ceramic fuel cells could one day be used to power off-the-grid cabins in remote locations, backup generators during natural disasters and more.
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Scientific American Content: Global

Could Future Nerve Implants Detect and Monitor Illness?Researchers are intent on decoding body-brain nerve signals to diagnose ailments -- Read more on ScientificAmerican.com
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Elucidation of vibration energy of a single molecule in an external force fieldThe vibration of a molecule on a surface contains critical information on the molecule-surface interaction, crucial for understanding surface phenomena and for important processes like catalysis. It was previously investigated with a scanning probe microscopy, but the probe tip appeared to exert a force on the molecule, affecting the vibration. Here, by combining STM, AFM and model calculations, t
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Topic-adjusted visibility metric for scientific articlesAn NUS statistician has developed a metric that automatically accounts for citation variations in different disciplines for measuring the research merit of scientific articles.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Identification of bovine IVF embryos without chromosome abnormalities by live-cell imagingIn vitro fertilized (IVF) embryo transfer has become an important innovation in the agricultural sectors, such as in cattle production. Approximately half of all bovine embryos produced worldwide were derived from IVF. However, the pregnancy success rate of IVF embryos transplanted into recipients remains low. To increase the success of pregnancy, key technological issues affecting the in vitro pr
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Climate geoengineering research should include developing countriesPlacing giant mirrors in orbit to reflect sunlight before it reaches Earth and launching millions of tons of sulfur into the stratosphere to simulate the effects of a major volcanic eruption are among the mind-boggling climate geoengineering projects that are under consideration as ways to mitigate the global warming caused by greenhouse gases.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Mixed forests: Ecologically and economically superiorMixed forests are more productive than monocultures. This is true on all five continents, and particularly in regions with high precipitation. These findings from an international overview study, in which the Technical University of Munich (TUM) participated, are highly relevant for forest science and forest management on a global scale.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

For how long will the USA remain the Nobel Prize leader?Since first being awarded in 1901, most Nobel Prizes for science have gone to the U.S., the United Kingdom, Germany and France. An empirical study by Professor Claudius Gros from the Institute for Theoretical Physics at the Goethe University in Frankfurt has now shown that the Nobel Prize productivity in these countries is primarily determined by two factors: a long-term success rate, and periods
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Brood parasitism in fishThere are other animals besides the cuckoo who smuggle their offspring into another animal's nest. The synodontis multipunctatus, which lives in Lake Tanganyika in Africa and is better known as the cuckoo catfish, is just as cunning as the cuckoo. This savvy parasite, like the cuckoo bird, places its eggs among those of cichlids. To protect their eggs, cichlids carry their eggs in their mouths.
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Combining GANs and reinforcement learning for drug discoveryInsilico Medicine publishes a new research paper in Molecular Pharmaceutics journal titled 'Adversarial Threshold Neural Computer for Molecular De Novo Design.' The described Adversarial Threshold Neural Computer (ATNC) model based on the combination of Generative Adversarial Networks (GANs) with Reinforcement Learning (RL) is intended for the design of novel small organic molecules with the desir
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News

OSA in older adults: Often present, seldom investigatedResearch finds more than half of Medicare beneficiaries have a high risk of obstructive sleep apnea, but few have been assessed for the sleep disorder.
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Ingeniøren

Københavns grundejere vil etablere et renovationsselskabTrætønder skal afløses af ståltønder, al omhældning af latrin i gårdene skal undgås, og tønderne skal tømmes senest hver 10. dag. Det er nogle af punkterne i det ‘Forslag til Udførsel af Natrenovationen’, som Kjøbenhavns Grundejerforeninger har fremsat.
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Ingeniøren

Nissan dropper dieselmotoren i EuropaNissan vil gradvist trække dieselmodeller ud af verdens største marked for dieselbiler: Det euopæiske.
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The Atlantic

The Defense That Failed White NationalistsThe photographs of the beating show DeAndre Harris curled up in a ball on the floor of a parking lot trying to protect his face and body as the men around him, some armed with boards or pipes, strike him repeatedly. The men beating Harris were there to attend the white-nationalist rally in Charlottesville last August, where one counter-protester, Heather Heyer, was killed when a car drove into th
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The Atlantic

Will Facebook's New Ad-Transparency Tools Protect Democracy?Time and again, when facing criticism about Facebook’s role in elections, the company’s executives have promised to provide maximal transparency about the advertising that runs on their services. The digital tools will ensure this transparency will be unprecedented for not just Facebook and the digital advertising industry, Facebook CEO Mark Zuckerberg has repeatedly contended, but for any medium
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NYT > Science

Alexa and Siri Can Hear This Hidden Command. You Can’t.Researchers can now send secret audio instructions undetectable to the human ear to Apple’s Siri, Amazon’s Alexa and Google’s Assistant.
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Science | The Guardian

Sharks love jazz but are stumped by classical, say scientistsA study at Macquarie University in Sydney found that sharks could recognise jazz – if there was food on offer Researchers at Sydney’s Macquarie University have discovered that sharks can recognise jazz music. In a paper published in Animal Cognition , the researchers, led by Catarina Vila Pouca, trained juvenile Port Jackson sharks to swim over to where jazz was playing, to receive food. It has b
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Identification of bovine IVF embryos without chromosome abnormalities by live-cell imagingResearch groups of Tokyo University of Agriculture and Technology, Kindai University, FUSO Pharmaceutical Industries, Ltd. and NARO succeeded in selecting viable bovine IVF embryos by long-term live cell imaging. This technique revealed that bovine IVF embryos judged morphologically transferable according to the criteria of the International Embryo Technology Society have chromosomal abnormalities
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Scientists identify cause of resistance to breakthrough breast and ovarian cancer drugFindings could allow doctors to predict resistance and lead to changes in treatment. New gene editing technique used to unearth mutation linked to resistance to targeted PARP inhibitor treatments. Scientists have identified a mutation that gives cancer cells resistance to the breakthrough cancer treatment olaparib and other PARP inhibitors.
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Annual well woman visit to the OB/GYN can keep your heart healthyYearly well woman exams by OB/GYNs should include a heart disease risk assessment.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Team develops optically controlled, non-reciprocal multifunctional photonic devicesThe USTC Microcavity Research Group in the Key Laboratory of Quantum Information has perfected a 4-port, all-optically controlled non-reciprocal multifunctional photonic device based on a magnetic-field-free optomechanical resonator. This achievement is published in Nature Communications .
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Visualization of molecular soccer ballsFullerenes are composed of 60 carbon atoms joined together in hexagonal rings to form a sphere that resembles a soccer ball. Fullerenes are of great interest to materials scientists because their interesting electronic properties make them attractive for use in advanced electronics and nanotechnology.
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The Atlantic

Iraq's Looming Election Has ISIS SpookedThe Islamic State has issued a stern warning to any Sunni Muslims planning to taking part in Iraq’s upcoming general elections—don’t. On April 22, Abu al-Hassan al-Muhajir, the spokesman of ISIS, delivered a speech filled with lengthy Koranic verses and fiery religious rhetoric. He celebrated European and American “unbelievers being run over, stabbed, or killed in the streets of Paris, London, an
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Science | The Guardian

They can keep their ‘cure’ for baldness. I love my hairless head | Tom UsherWhen I started losing my long, obsidian, Linkin Park hair, I shaved it all off. It’s one of the best decisions I’ve ever made In news that will be mostly of no use to anyone but ennui-ridden middle-aged men now contemplating their lost youth in the wake of their own fading good looks, it looks like a potential cure for baldness has been found . Scientists from the University of Manchester used a d
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Science | The Guardian

Shapeshifters by Gavin Francis review – bristling with insight into our bodiesThe award-winning writer and Edinburgh GP combines patient case studies with cultural history in this profound study of how humans change “My aim is to sing of the ways bodies change.” Ovid, in The Metamorphoses , provides one of six epigraphs to Gavin Francis’s ambitious book on the same theme. Among the other authors Francis quotes at the outset are Hume, Thoreau and Marina Warner , who writes:
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Science | The Guardian

Aged-care providers to face inquiry over alleged tax avoidanceFor-profit nursing-home providers to answer allegations they are shifting profits offshore while receiving vast sums of government funding • Sign up to receive the top stories in Australia every day at noon A Senate inquiry has been announced into allegations of multinational tax avoidance among Australia’s largest for-profit nursing home providers. The inquiry comes on the back of a damning repo
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Lightning strikes kill dozens across BangladeshDozens of Bangladeshis were killed in lightning strikes as pre-monsoon thunderstorms wreaked havoc across the South Asian country, an official said Thursday.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

US investigating battery fire in fatal Tesla crashThe US National Transportation Safety Board on Wednesday sent a team to investigate a Tesla Model S crash that left two people dead and another injured in Florida.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Human-sounding Google Assistant sparks ethics questionsThe new Google digital assistant converses so naturally it may seem like a real person.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

China's ZTE teeters as US ban hits operations (Update)Chinese telecom giant ZTE faces a grim future after ceasing major operations due to a US ban on American sales of critical technology to the company, raising the stakes in a trade spat between the world's two largest economies.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

UK telecoms giant BT axes 13,000 jobsBritish telecoms and television broadcasting company BT announced Thursday that it will axe 13,000 jobs in administration and management.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

General Motors, Seoul agree to $7 billion bailout for S. Korea unitUS auto giant General Motors and Seoul have agreed on a multi-billion-dollar bailout for the firm's troubled South Korean unit, a government minister said Thursday.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

White House hosts AI summit with tech firmsTop U.S. tech executives and researchers are planning to press the Trump administration to invest in artificial intelligence and craft policies they hope will strengthen the economy without displacing jobs.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Scientists: Explosive eruption possible at Hawaii volcanoHawaii's Kilauea volcano could soon send boulders and ash shooting out of its summit crater in the kind of explosive eruption last displayed nearly a century ago.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Aide to Iowa governor touts Apple deal, gets job at companyA top aide to Gov. Kim Reynolds took a management job with tech giant Apple months after helping promote a $208 million incentive package for the company's planned Iowa data center as a good deal for taxpayers.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

New film highlights human pressures of diamond industry in Sierra LeoneEnormous wealth and power inequalities mean that people making a living out of mining diamonds in Sierra Leone continue to face huge economic and social challenges, in spite of international efforts to improve the diamond trade over the past decade.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Angry birds: Size of jackdaw mobs depends on who calls warningJackdaws recognise each other's voices and respond in greater numbers to warnings from familiar birds than strangers, new research shows.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Women seeking crowdfunding financing for start-ups are perceived as more trustworthyWhile men have benefited from a gender bias against women when seeking financing for business start-ups, the opposite may be true for female entrepreneurs seeking initial investment through crowdfunding efforts, according to research from Indiana University's Kelley School of Business.
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Viden

Næsehorn lader livet for at trøste døende vietnamesereDansk-vietnamesisk studie afslører nye årsager til, at truede næsehorn bliver skudt.
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Ingeniøren

Tobakspartikler i tøj og vægge forurener luften i røgfrie rumForskere opdager ny vej til at blive udsat for skadelig ’rygning på tredje hånd’.
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Science : NPR

Scientists Warn That Hawaii's Kilauea Volcano Could Erupt 'Ballistic Rocks'The U.S. Geological Survey says that as magma in the volcano drops below the water table, it could create steam pressure and a sudden eruption that would spew toxic gas and "ballistic rocks." (Image credit: U.S. Geological Survey via AP)
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Science-Based Medicine

Crowdfunding unproven stem cell treatments: overstated efficacy, unstated risksCrowdfunding campaigns for unproven stem cell treatments exaggerate the benefits and underemphasize the risks, all the while raising considerable funds and generating social media buzz.
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Women seeking crowdfunding financing for start-ups are perceived as more trustworthyWhile men have benefited from a gender bias against women when seeking financing for business start-ups, the opposite may be true for female entrepreneurs seeking initial investment through crowdfunding efforts, according to research from Indiana University's Kelley School of Business.
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Angry birds: Size of jackdaw mobs depends on who calls warningJackdaws recognize each other's voices and respond in greater numbers to warnings from familiar birds than strangers, new research shows.
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Elucidation of vibration energy of a single molecule in an external force fieldThe vibration of a molecule on a surface contains critical information on the molecule-surface interaction, crucial for understanding surface phenomena and for important processes like catalysis. It was previously investigated with a scanning probe microscopy, but the probe tip appeared to exert a force on the molecule, affecting the vibration. Here, by combining STM, AFM and model calculations, t
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Treatment for MRSA no longer more costly than for susceptible Staph aureus infectionsA new study found that infections caused by one of the most common drug resistant bacteria in the US -- methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus, known as MRSA -- are no more expensive to treat than MSSA, the methicillin-susceptible version of the same bacteria. These findings are contrary to earlier studies that have found that MRSA was much more expensive to treat than MSSA.
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News

New film highlights human pressures of diamond industry in Sierra LeoneA new feature film from the University of Bath, 'Voices from the Mine,' highlights what happens when a diamond journeys from mine to market and who really benefits.
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Study shows prolonged NAS treatment for infants discharged earlyInfants who are diagnosed with drug withdrawal after birth who are treated with medication as outpatients at home are treated three times longer than infants treated solely as inpatients, according to a new Vanderbilt study.
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BBC News - Science & Environment

Volcano erupts at end of man's gardenThis Hawaii resident had a surprise when he returned home after fleeing the Kilauea eruption.
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New on MIT Technology Review

The scientist still fighting for the clean fuel the world forgotA decade of investment in advanced biofuels led nowhere, but Jay Keasling remains undaunted.
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Science | The Guardian

Richard Dawkins wants to move to New Zealand to get away from Brexit 'madness'Scientist says half the population of Britain and US would prefer a country ‘where intellect might be appreciated’ The British scientist Richard Dawkins has said he would like to move to New Zealand as a refuge from the “madness” of a post-Trump, post-Brexit northern hemisphere. “America had just gone mad, and Britain had gone mad in a slightly less dramatic way with Brexit,” he told The Project,
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Live Science

Thymus: Facts, Function & DiseasesThe thymus is the source of T-cells. The body uses T-cells to help destroy infected or cancerous cells.
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NYT > Science

F.D.A. Moves to Stop Rogue Clinics From Using Unapproved Stem Cell TherapiesThe agency is seeking permanent injunctions against companies in Florida and California that are marketing unregulated uses of stem cells.
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New Scientist - News

China is building a huge weather-control machine – will it work?Water shortages are a huge problem for Chinese agriculture, so the country has just begun the world's largest ever weather control experiment
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New Scientist - News

DeepMind AI developed navigation neurons to solve a maze like usHumans have neurons called “grid cells” that help us find our way as we navigate our surroundings. DeepMind's AI has developed something similar as it learned to navigate a maze
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Feed: All Latest

Struggling Tesla Faces an Investor InsurrectionAmid a pile of crises and slow Model 3 production, one investor is calling for a shakeup of Tesla’s board of directors—and for more oversight over CEO Elon Musk.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

Operating on brain gliomas by detecting the 'glow'Scientists report on novel imaging technology for malignant brain tumors.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

Depression linked to memory problems and brain agingDepression in older adults may be linked to memory problems, according to new research. The study also showed that older people with greater symptoms of depression may have structural differences in the brain compared to people without symptoms.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

Idle talk or fierce competition? Research finds women use gossip as a weapon in rivalriesNew research investigating how women use gossip to compete in the realm of romance offers insights that aim to reduce bullying and enhance women's friendships.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

'Top-ranked' reviewers aren't the top influencers when it comes to online salesTop-ranked reviewers on online retail sites such as Amazon.com may influence purchases, but a new study finds that those who post reviews less often and more informally can be seen as more trustworthy and have more of an impact on sales.
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Science | The Guardian

New moon mission will not distract from effort to reach Mars, Nasa boss saysTwo missions ‘are supportive of each other’, says agency’s new head after Trump signed directive aimed at returning to moon The US effort to return to the moon will not undermine its mission to be the first country to put a human on Mars, the new head of Nasa insisted on Wednesday. In December, Donald Trump signed a policy directive instructing Nasa to send astronauts back to the moon, half a cen
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Feed: All Latest

FAA Relaxes Drone Restrictions With 10 New ProgramsSelected local authorities can use drones for defibrillator deliveries, runway inspections, and mosquito control.
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