Futurity.org

Big data tool predicts best lung cancer treatmentResearchers have developed a personalized risk assessment tool that can potentially predict the survival rate and treatment outcomes of early-stage lung cancer patients. The tool uses a panel of 29 unique extracellular matrix (ECM) genes that the researchers identified based on their abnormal expression in lung cancers compared to healthy lung tissues. ECM is the space that surrounds cells and pr
23min

Futurity.org

Diverting diesel trucks spared lungs in Sao PauloA beltway that diverts heavy-duty diesel vehicles in the Brazilian city of Sao Paulo has reduced public health damage associated with exposure to diesel emissions. The positive health outcomes of the intervention could guide the formulation of similar transport polices in other cities. In densely populated cities like Sao Paulo, many vehicles running on diesel such as commercial trucks, vans, and
45min

Big Think

The history of VR: How virtual reality sprang forth from science fictionFor many years the concept of virtual worlds and far flung digital realities was the stuff of speculative fiction and philosophy. But it may soon take over the world. Read More
55min

The Neurocritic

“My family say they grieve for the old me” – profound personality changes after deep brain stimulationOkun (2012) . New England Journal of Medicine . Deep brain stimulation (DBS) of the subthalamic nucleus in Parkinson's disease (PD) has been highly successful in controlling the motor symptoms of this disorder, which include tremor, slowed movement (akinesia), and muscle stiffness or rigidity. The figure above shows the electrode implantation procedure for PD, where a stimulating electrode is pla
56min

Big Think

Will virtual reality become a political tool?We've always used media as a means of framing reality. How will this affect our relationship with VR? Read More
2h

Science | The Guardian

Brain cancer to get more funding in tribute to Tessa Jowell, says No 10Research funding will double to £40m and all NHS hospitals will perform gold standard tumour diagnosis tests Brain cancer research will have its government funding doubled to £40m and gold standard tumour diagnosis tests will be rolled out to all NHS hospitals, in tribute to Dame Tessa Jowell , Downing Street announced on Sunday. No 10 announced it would fulfil two key campaign aims of the late f
2h

NYT > Science

An Australian Environmentalist’s Next Act: ‘Frugal Hedonism’David Holmgren, who decades ago encouraged homeowners to turn their backyards into gardens, is now calling for suburbanites to go further off the grid.
2h

Science | The Guardian

Starwatch: the evening star meets the new moonAnother lunar cycle begins on Thursday as the thin crescent moon shares the evening sky with glittering Venus There is a beautiful sight to keep an eye open for after sunset on 17 May. Venus is visible in the evening sky as a glittering, unmistakeable “evening star”. It will be joined by the thin crescent of the new moon, creeping eastward from the sun to begin a new lunar month. Continue reading
3h

Big Think

Counter-terrorism police are now training with virtual terroristsWhat if you could save an airport from terrorists, escape insurgents in South Sudan, and rescue civilians in an underground station all in one morning? With modern technology, the ability to recreate these scenarios within virtual and augmented reality is here, and we’re using it to help train ... Read More
3h

Big Think

Study: You're breathing wrongSimple 1:2 breathing is where it's at, according to a major university study. Read More
3h

Big Think

Scientists create holographic projections in the brain that can create false memoriesResearchers say they’ll someday be able to recreate experiences, perceptions, and sensations with a device the size of a backpack. Read More
5h

Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Noisy Hawaii volcano lava fissure spurs more evacuationsA new fissure emitting steam and lava spatter spurred Hawaii officials to call for more evacuations on Sunday as residents braced for an expected eruption from the Kilauea volcano.
5h

Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

UAE launches $45 bn investment to boost refineriesAbu Dhabi National Oil Co. on Sunday announced a $45-billion ($38-billion-euro) investment to modify an existing facility into one of the world's largest integrated refining and petrochemicals plants.
5h

Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Trump pledges to safeguard Chinese telecoms jobs (Update)ZTE Chinese Trump USUS President Donald Trump said Sunday he was working with his Chinese counterpart Xi Jinping to prevent telecom giant ZTE from going out of business after it was hit by an American technology sales ban.
5h

Science | The Guardian

Politicians pay tribute to Tessa Jowell after death from cancerFormer Labour cabinet minister praised for Sure Start, London Olympics and campaigning for cancer research The dignity and courage of Tessa Jowell was praised by politicians across the spectrum on Sunday, after her family revealed she had died of brain cancer. Paying tribute to Jowell, Downing Street announced it would double its investment in brain cancer research to £40m and roll out a new gold
5h

The Atlantic

Autism’s Dark Roots in Nazi Vienna“F or success in science and art,” the Austrian pediatrician Hans Asperger once proposed, “a dash of autism is essential.” For success in medicine during the heyday of the Third Reich, as Edith Sheffer’s account of his career shows, the requirement was different. More than a dash of Gemüt —which Nazi psychiatrists defined as commitment to community (just what autistic children were said to lack)—
6h

Scientific American Content: Global

High Percentage of Kindergartens Exposed to Transport PollutantsWorsening air pollution from coal power and urban transport are threatening a high percentage of children across the world -- Read more on ScientificAmerican.com
6h

BBC News - Science & Environment

Stephen Hawking service: Possibility of time travellers 'can't be excluded'Anyone born in the next 20 years is eligible to apply for a seat at the Westminster Abbey service.
7h

cognitive science

New paper out in Science: Efficient coding explains the universal law of generalization in human perceptionsubmitted by /u/ProfChrisSims [link] [comments]
7h

BBC News - Science & Environment

'Oldest' turtle, 80, returns to Blackpool after 15 yearsThe giant green sea turtle is thought to be oldest of its kind in captivity in the UK.
8h

Viden

Klimarådet: Vi burde starte forfra med den grønne omstillingDanmark har muligvis spillet på den forkerte hest i hele omstillingskapløbet, når vi har satset på biomasse, mener rådet.
9h

EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Research leads to medication reduction in aged care facilitiesEffective intervention can reduce medication overuse in Residential Aged Care Facilities (RACFs), the latest University of Tasmania research shows.
9h

Feed: All Latest

The Vehicle of the Future Has Two Wheels, Handlebars, and Is a BikeThe future of transportation looks to be merging with sci-fi. But the bike-tech revolution reminds us that innovation isn’t always about the totally new.
9h

Ingeniøren

Kerneuret kan slå atomuret i nøjagtighed og stabilitetEnergiovergange i atom­kerner kan danne basis for ultrapræcise ure. De kan f.eks. bruges til at teste, om naturkonstanterne nu også i virkeligheden er konstante.
9h

Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

VW 'contests' report boss knew of diesel cheating riskGerman carmaker Volkswagen rejected Sunday a report that chief executive Herbert Diess knew of the financial risks from the firm's massive diesel cheating earlier than he has so far acknowledged.
9h

Scientific American Content: Global

Girl Subject? No Such ThingTechbridge Girls believes in the power of creating a space where students feel like they belong -- Read more on ScientificAmerican.com
9h

Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Lobster industry fears weaker shells, but evidence is mixedMore people outside the U.S. are enjoying the New England tradition of cracking open a freshly cooked American lobster, and that experience hinges on one thing—the lobster getting there alive.
9h

Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Airbus, Boeing fly into lucrative services marketAirbus and Boeing may have built their global success on the back of the transcontinental airliners but they are now eyeing a lucrative if rather less glamorous side of the aviation sector in their battle to dominate the skies—parts and repairs.
9h

Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Existential debate in US food industry: What is meat?Can a hamburger or steak be labeled "meat" if it is plant-based?
9h

Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

In Madagascar, fishermen plant mangroves for the futureHunched over the soil, Malagasy villagers work feverishly—deft fingers planting stalks of mangrove to replace the swathes destroyed for firewood and building material.
9h

Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

ZTE woes loom as US-China trade tensions riseWith a major Chinese smartphone maker on the rocks following US sanctions, the trade spat between Washington and Beijing appears to be taking a turn for the worse for tech firms in the two global economic powerhouses.
9h

Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Microchips get under the skin of technophile SwedesIt's the size of a grain of rice but could hold the key to many aspects of your life.
10h

Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

China's first home-built aircraft carrier begins sea trialsChina's first entirely home-built aircraft carrier began sea trials Sunday in a sign of the growing sophistication of the country's domestic arms industry.
10h

Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Dutch firm ASML perfecting 'microchip shrink' for tech giantsThey call it "the shrink"—it's the challenge of how to pack more circuits onto the microchips which power everything from our phones to our computers, even our coffee machines.
10h

The Atlantic

The Curious History of Mommy-and-Me Fashion“Every woman becomes like their mother,” Oscar Wilde once quipped. “That’s their tragedy.” For some women, “tragedy” strikes early in the form of mommy-and-me outfits, those often creepy-cute clothing clones that tend to leave at least one party looking age-inappropriate. In recent years, celebrity offspring like Blue Ivy Carter and North West have taken “twinning” with their famous moms to strat
10h

The Atlantic

The Wisdom of Running a 2,189-Mile MarathonOf all the things that could have broken Scott Jurek on a 2,189-mile run, it was a small tree root that crushed his spirit. He was 38 days into an attempt to beat the speed record for completing the full length of the Appalachian Trail, the mountainous hiking path that snakes along America’s East Coast, from northern Georgia to the top of Mount Katahdin, in Maine. Jurek, one of the greatest ultra
10h

Feed: All Latest

The Ongoing Saga of Michael Cohen Tops This Week's Internet NewsPresident Trump's personal lawyer continued to dominate the news last week. Here's why.
10h

Scientific American Content: Global

A New Book Looks at What Life Is Like for Moms across the Animal KingdomSome moms can be murder on the family -- Read more on ScientificAmerican.com
10h

Viden

Forskere finder plast, malebøtter og dåseøl i dybhavsgraveSelv i Marianergraven i 11 kilometers dybde er der fundet en plastikpose.
11h

The Atlantic

How the 50-mm Lens Became ‘Normal’It was the curved shape of the lens that led to its name being borrowed, in the late 17th century, from the Latin name of the lentil plant, lens culinaris . In French, another word for lens is objectif —suggesting truth and impartiality . While objectif had been used since the 17th century to describe the optical glass of scientific instruments like telescopes and microscopes, one of its earliest
11h

The Atlantic

The Decline of American MotherhoodAs the American population grows, so does the number of American moms. But, more than a century after Mother’s Day became an official holiday, even as that number increases, the share of the American population who are mothers is at the lowest point it’s been in a quarter century. It’s frequently noted that fertility rates are falling sharply in richer countries , but the less observed consequenc
11h

Science : NPR

Trump's 'Energy Dominance' Gets Slow Start On Federal LandDespite President Trump's pledge to boost oil and gas drilling on federal land, some statistics show there was more activity during the Obama administration. (Image credit: Susan Walsh/AP)
11h

Ingeniøren

Maskinlæringsalgoritmer kalibrerer CNC-maskine 30 gange hurtigere end et menneskeI et pilotprojekt er det lykkedes Siemens og en amerikansk AI-virksomhed at kalibrere en femakset CNC-maskine 30 gange hurtigere, end en operatør kan gøre det. Siemens håber, at teknologien kan reducere behovet for dyre kalibreringsspecialister.
11h

Scientific American Content: Global

Chemotherapy Timing Could Influence How Well the Treatment WorksCircadian clocks influence DNA repair processes -- Read more on ScientificAmerican.com
11h

cognitive science

Do we subconsciously judge face-likeness? Keys to uncovering the face-likeness recognition mechanism using brain wavessubmitted by /u/thedabarry [link] [comments]
11h

The Atlantic

The Art of Parenthood“I’m going to give you some advice,” a famous writer once told the young Michael Chabon. “Don’t have children. That’s it. Do not.” Chabon recalls this episode in his new book, Pops: Fatherhood in Pieces , a slim collection of essays whose title reveals that he was not swayed by the somber warning. He went on to have four children and write 14 books. “Should there be 18?” he asks, thinking of a sa
12h

Feed: All Latest

Artificial Neural Nets Grow Brainlike Cells to Find Their WayFaced with a navigational challenge, neural networks spontaneously evolved units resembling the brain cells that help living animals track their location.
12h

Feed: All Latest

California Cannabis Regulations Make Shippers Report to the FedsTo truck marijuana around the Golden State, you might have to register your vehicle with a federal government that's not too keen on your new small business.
12h

Viden

Intelligente robot-bier skal udforske MarsI fremtiden skal udforskningen af solsystemet også ske med flyvende robotter og intelligente helikoptere
13h

Ingeniøren

Svenske højhastighedstog skal køre mindst 320 km/tSvenske SJ efterlyser hurtigtog, der med en hastighed på 320 km/t eller mere skal komme fra Stockholm til Malmø på 2,5 timer. Forskere er uenige om gevinsten.
13h

Ingeniøren

Video: Sådan byggede ingeniører en flugttunnel under AmalienborgUnder 2. Verdenskrig var man bekymret for kongefamilien, så i al hemmelighed blev der anlagt en underjordisk flugttunnel under Amalienborg. Hør og se, hvordan det foregik. Vi er dykket ned i Ingeniørens arkiver, og det kan du også.
15h

Science | The Guardian

The 'people politician': Tessa Jowell obituaryFormer Labour cabinet minister, described as ‘the ultimate sensible loyalist’ by Tony Blair, was not afraid to speak her mind Until the revelation of her brain tumour last September, Tessa Jowell, Lady Jowell, the former secretary of state for culture, media and sport, who has died aged 70, was best known outside Westminster as the minister for the Olympics in the run-up to the hugely successful
15h

cognitive science

People tend to remember negative events and comments better than they do positive ones.submitted by /u/randomusefulbits [link] [comments]
16h

Science | The Guardian

‘When I think of Matt Damon, I think of gene editing’: scientists on their favourite sci-fiSpeculative fiction and real research have long fed into each other. Here, five leading scientists tell us about books and films that inspire them Professor of Palaeobiology, University of Leicester Nausicaä of the Valley of the Wind (Hayao Miyazaki, 1984) Continue reading...
16h

Science | The Guardian

Palaeontologist Steve Brusatte: we owe Jurassic Park a debt of gratitudeThe leading fossils expert says we are learning new things daily about the dinosaurs thanks to technological advances – and that film… There are a few precautions to bear in mind when approaching a palaeontologist. The first, and perhaps most crucial, is don’t mention Ross from Friends . It’s not funny and it’s not clever and it really won’t be appreciated. Don’t suggest that dinosaurs couldn’t ha
17h

Science | The Guardian

Revealed: the surprising scientific passion of Charles DickensNew exhibition shows how the writer used his medical knowledge to help change Victorian attitudes In the opening paragraph of his novel Bleak House , Charles Dickens envisages meeting “a Megalosaurus, forty feet long or so, waddling like an elephantine lizard up Holborn Hill”. It is a startling image, one that depicts Victorian London as a place of mud, corruption and disease. Prehistoric concerns
17h

Science | The Guardian

Carnivorous plants: so you thought the triffids were make-believe…A guide to flora with a hunger for flesh – and the intriguing and elaborate ways in which they get hold of it Scientists at the University of Freiburg in Germany have for the first time characterised the snapping movement of this rare aquatic carnivorous plant, found in wetlands around the world. Aldrovanda vesiculosa snaps its “trap” shut 10 times faster than the much larger Venus flytrap, using
17h

Science | The Guardian

Scott Hutchison and Frightened Rabbit evoked a golden time | Charlie Brinkhurst-CuffThe death of the lead singer hits hard those who loved the band’s bittersweet music The death of Frightened Rabbit’s frontman, Scott Hutchison, has torn a hole in the Scottish creative scene. For someone like myself who grew up in Edinburgh, his music always had that beautiful, distinct element of nostalgia, even before it became the music of my past – evoking messy 2010 nights at T in the Park,
18h

Science | The Guardian

From the archive: To the moon and backIn 1973, the Observer tracked down the 12 men who had once stood on the moon What is there to do after you’ve walked on the moon? Other than confirm once and for all that it is not made of cheese, not a lot. In 1973 the Observer Magazine tracked down the 12 space heroes who had gained international acclaim for being the only mortals to walk on the moon and, it seems, it wasn’t just their spacecra
18h

Science | The Guardian

'He was gone': fentanyl and the opioid deaths destroying Australian familiesInvestigators feared the deaths might have been linked to a bad batch of imported opiates. The truth may be more unsettling A few days before he died of a drug overdose, Sally’s (not her real name) younger brother called her to make plans. “Someone had given him gold-class movie tickets and he wanted to take me to see Batman v Superman,” she told a coroners court this week. “He was looking forwar
22h

Big Think

Silicon Valley's long obsession with LSDThe masterminds behind Silicon Valley were doing more than coding. Read More
23h

Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

Oral antibiotics may raise risk of kidney stonesPediatric researchers have found that children and adults treated with some oral antibiotics have a significantly higher risk of developing kidney stones. This is the first time that these medicines have been linked to this condition. The strongest risks appeared at younger ages and among patients most recently exposed to antibiotics.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

Alignment of mother and offspring body clock could prevent diseases such as heart disease and obesityThe care provided by a mother can impact the body clock and health of offspring after birth, according to new research. By reducing abnormalities in the body clock of offspring, it may be possible to develop therapies for serious lifestyle-related diseases, such as heart disease and obesity.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

During disasters, active Twitter users likely to spread falsehoodsDuring disasters, active Twitter users are likely to spread falsehoods. That's according to new research that examined false tweets from Hurricane Sandy and the Boston Marathon bombing. Researchers found that 86 to 91 percent of active Twitter users spread misinformation, and that nearly as many did nothing to correct it.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

Genome surgery for eye disease moves closer to realityResearchers have developed a new technique for the powerful gene editing tool CRISPR to restore retinal function in mice afflicted by a degenerative retinal disease, retinitis pigmentosa. This is the first time researchers have successfully applied CRISPR technology to a type of inherited disease known as a dominant disorder. This same tool might work in hundreds of diseases, including Huntington'
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