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EurekAlert! - Breaking News

New tool predicts eye, hair and skin color from a DNA sample of an unidentified individualAn international team has developed a novel tool to accurately predict eye, hair and skin color from human biological material -- even a small DNA sample -- left, for example, at a crime scene or obtained from archeological remains. This all-in-one pigmentation profile tool provides a physical description of the person in a way that has not previously been possible by generating all three pigment
8h
Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

Memory transferred between snailsMemories can be transferred between organisms by extracting ribonucleic acid (RNA) from a trained animal and injecting it into an untrained animal, as demonstrated in a study of sea snails.
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Ingeniøren

Står forskernes behov for data højere end borgernes krav om privatliv?Fromme ønsker om bedre forskning står bag indsamling af borgernes private data. Men er der bagvedliggende hensigter, og andre muligheder for forskerne at arbejde med - og hvor går grænsen i det hele taget?
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LATEST

EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Homeless veterans at increased risk of hospital readmission after surgeryFor veterans undergoing surgery in the VA healthcare system, homelessness is an important risk factor for unplanned hospital readmission, reports a study in the June issue of Medical Care, published in the Lippincott portfolio by Wolters Kluwer.
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Research examines wing shapes to reduce vortex and wakeRecent research at the University of Illinois demonstrated that, although most wing shapes used today create turbulent wake vortices, wing geometrics can be designed to reduce or eliminate wingtip vortices almost entirely. In the study, the vortex and wake characteristics were computed for three classic wing designs: the elliptic wing, and wing designs developed in classic studies by R.T. Jones an
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Scientific American Content: Global

Memory Transferred Between Snails, Challenging Standard Theory of How the Brain RemembersResearch finding hints at the possibility of new treatments to restore lost memories -- Read more on ScientificAmerican.com
6min
Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

Wearable ring, wristband allow users to control smart tech with hand gesturesNew technology could make controlling text or other mobile applications as simple as '1-2-3.' Using acoustic chirps emitted from a ring and received by a wristband, like a smartwatch, the system is able to recognize 22 different micro finger gestures that could be programmed to various commands -- including a T9 keyboard interface, a set of numbers, or application commands like playing or stopping
13min
Scientific American Content: Global

Is Malaria's Peculiar Odor the Key to Its Conquest?The smell attracts mosquitoes, and may help identify hidden cases -- Read more on ScientificAmerican.com
16min
Live Science

Lasers Could Make Computers 1 Million Times FasterPulses of light from infrared lasers can speed up computer operations by a factor of 1 million, and may have opened the door to room-temperature quantum computing.
19min
The Atlantic

Trump Keeps Claiming That the Jerusalem Embassy Will Bring PeaceMoving the United States embassy in Israel from Tel Aviv to Jerusalem, as President Trump did on Monday, constitutes a momentous show of support and friendship to Israelis. It is a recognition of the importance that Jews have attached to Jerusalem for millennia. It grants Israel the same legitimacy to establish its own capital that is taken as a given by every other country in the world. It is a
23min
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

What happens after launch: Two NASA educational CubeSatsA small group of students recently got to experience a rare, spaceflight thrill: seeing if the tiny satellite, called a CubeSat, they designed and built not only survived a rock
28min
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Using MRSA's strength against itAntibiotic-resistant infections cause more than 30,000 deaths annually in the U.S. alone. The majority of those are caused by methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus, more commonly known as MRSA, which can turn routine medical operations into near-death battles.
40min
EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Caring, accountability, and continuity: What patients and caregivers want during hospital care transitionFor the first time on a large scale, researchers have investigated what patients and caregivers want from providers during a care transition. A new study from Boston Medical Center (BMC) found caring attitudes, accountability from the health system, and continuity of care were the most sought after outcomes.
44min
EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Altered body odor indicates malaria even if microscope doesn'tTyphoid Mary may have infected a hundred or more people, but asymptomatic carriers of malaria infect far more people every year. An international team of researchers is working toward a way to identify malaria patients including infected individuals who show no malaria symptoms.
44min
EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Hungry, hungry hipposCommunity ecologist Keenan Stears finds that global change may alter the way that hippos shape the environment around them.
44min
EurekAlert! - Breaking News

ACP tells Congress: Spending cuts would hurt public healthIn a letter to congressional leadership, the American College of Physicians (ACP) said that proposed spending cuts would damage children's access to health coverage, medical innovation, and public health.
44min
The Atlantic

The Supreme Court Says Congress Can't Make States Dance to Its TuneSupreme Court NJ USIn Thomas Mann’s haunting short story, “ Mario and the Magician ,” a young Italian man challenges a traveling hypnotist to a contest. Can the sinister Cavaliere Cipolla make him dance against his will? The young man loses. After a few passes by Cipolla, “he lifted his arms, then his knees, his joints quite suddenly relaxed, he flung his legs and danced, and amid bursts of applause the Cavaliere l
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Scientists find missing factor in gene activationUntil human genes are activated, they are blocked by structures known as nucleosomes, components that serve to package DNA inside cells.
46min
New Scientist - News

Worst-case climate change scenario is even worse than we thoughtA possible future that climatologists treat as the worst of the worst, because it would produce huge greenhouse gas emissions, might lead to even more emissions than believed
49min
New Scientist - News

We’ve lost track of more than 900 near-Earth asteroidsMore than 900 asteroids hurtling close to Earth were seen just once and then lost. Some may be kilometres across, and they could be just about anywhere
49min
The Scientist RSS

Experimental Ebola Vaccine to be Used in DRC OutbreakAs the virus spreads in Democratic Republic of Congo, the World Health Organization is preparing to immunize people as soon as this week.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

American tropics, Amazon originsA new study is suggesting many of the plants and animals that call Latin America home may actually have their roots in the Amazon. Researchers found that a dynamic process of colonization and speciation led to the formation of the American tropics, which is today the most species-rich region on the planet.
1h
Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

Where hominid brains are concerned, size doesn't matterResearchers pieced together traces of Homo naledi's brain shape from an extraordinary collection of skull fragments and partial crania, from at least five adult individuals. One of these bore a very clear imprint of the convolutions on the surface of the brain's left frontal lobe.
1h
Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

Nouns slow down our speechSpeakers hesitate or make brief pauses filled with sounds like 'uh' or 'uhm' mostly before nouns. Such slow-down effects are far less frequent before verbs, as researchers working together with an international team have now discovered by looking at examples from different languages.
1h
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EFail: Encrypted Email Has a Major, Divisive FlawEFAIL PGP OpenPGP S/MimeAn attack called eFail overcomes the protections of encrypted email standards PGP and S/MIME.
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Early BPA exposure may influence cardiac function, according to new study in neonatal ratsA new study in Scientific Reports paves the way for translational research examining cardiovascular disease risk factors associated with short-term BPA exposure in infancy. By examining neonatal rat heart cells, Children's National researchers find the immature heart may respond to BPA with a slowed heart rate, irregular heart rhythm and calcium instabilities. The significance of this research is
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Using MRSA's strength against itMRSA evolved to become a deadly killer because it's wily and resilient. A new Michigan State University study, however, is figuring out how to turn one of its strengths against it.
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Consumer sleep technology is no substitute for medical evaluationAccording to a position statement from the American Academy of Sleep Medicine (AASM), consumer sleep technology must be cleared by the Food and Drug Administration (FDA) and rigorously tested if it is intended to diagnose or treat sleep disorders.
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Early depression diagnosis is deadly serious for patients with coronary artery diseaseWhile clinicians caring for patients with coronary artery disease may not always prioritize depression screening, an early diagnosis could be a matter of life and death.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

Biologists 'transfer' a memory through RNA injectionBiologists report they have transferred a memory from one marine snail to another, creating an artificial memory, by injecting RNA from one to another. This research could lead to new ways to treat traumatic memories with RNA -- perhaps a traumatic memory could be altered -- and perhaps new ways to restore lost memories.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

High-sensitivity microsensors on the horizonA new article explains how scientists borrowed concepts from quantum mechanics to build new microsensors that can enable data gathering from hard-to-monitor environments.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

Minority children develop implicit racial bias in early childhoodNew research suggests that minority children as young as six years old show an implicit pro-White racial bias when exposed to images of both White and Black children. But how ingrained these biases become and whether they persist into late childhood and adulthood might depend on their social environment.
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Big Think

‘Be fearless’: Tim Cook praises #MeToo, Parkland students in Duke commencement speechIn a commencement speech at Duke University, Apple CEO Tim Cook praised the "fearlessness" of the #MeToo movement and students in Parkland, Florida. Read More
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

Long-term and short-term relationships initially indistinguishableResearch shows that long- and short-term relationships look almost identical in the beginning. At some point, romantic interest tends to plateau and decline in short-term relationships.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

Gene variant may increase psychiatric risk after traumatic brain injuryA gene variant known to predict Alzheimer's risk was linked to worse psychiatric symptoms in those with a traumatic brain injury. Study participants with the gene variant and at least one TBI had more severe PTSD, anxiety, and depression, compared with TBI patients without the same variant.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

Engineers on a roll toward smaller, more efficient radio frequency transformersThe future of electronic devices lies partly within the 'internet of things' -- the network of devices, vehicles and appliances embedded within electronics to enable connectivity and data exchange. Engineers are helping realize this future by minimizing the size of one notoriously large element of integrated circuits used for wireless communication -- the transformer.
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News

High-sensitivity microsensors on the horizonA new paper published today in Nature Electronics explains how scientists borrowed concepts from quantum mechanics to build new microsensors that can enable data gathering from hard-to-monitor environments.
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Uncertainty in long-run economic growth likely points toward greater emissions, climate change costsA challenge in estimating the extent and cost of damages from climate change over the next 100 years is developing forecasts of long-run economic growth. In a new study published in the Proceedings of the National Academy of Science, researchers from the University of Illinois and Yale University present a systematic method of integrating current models to develop forecasts of uncertainty in globa
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Study reveals how the brain decides to make an effortThe experimental design allowed the researchers to tease apart the effects of recent choices on the formation of value expectations of future decisions.
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Plant peptide spells relief from salty stressResearchers at the RIKEN Center for Sustainable Resource Science (CSRS) have discovered a hormone-like peptide in plants that helps increase their tolerance to excessive salt. Published in the Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences USA, the study found several genes that can increase salinity tolerance, the most effective being a small gene that codes for the peptide AT13.
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News

World's fastest water heater -- 100,000 degrees in 0.000 000 000 000 075 secondsScientists have turned a powerful X-ray laser into the world's fastest water heater, reaching 100,000 degrees Celsius in less than a tenth of a picosecond (millionth of a millionth of a second). The experiment produced an exotic state of water, from which researchers hope to learn more about the peculiar characteristics of Earth's most important liquid, as the team reports in the journal Proceedin
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Where hominid brains are concerned, size doesn't matterResearchers pieced together traces of Homo naledi's brain shape from an extraordinary collection of skull fragments and partial crania, from at least five adult individuals. One of these bore a very clear imprint of the convolutions on the surface of the brain's left frontal lobe.
1h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Nouns slow down our speechSpeakers hesitate or make brief pauses filled with sounds like 'uh' or 'uhm' mostly before nouns. Such slow-down effects are far less frequent before verbs, as UZH researchers working together with an international team have now discovered by looking at examples from different languages.
1h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Organization of cells in the inner ear enables the sense and sensitivity of hearingA research team from Mass. Eye and Ear has shown that the 'outer hair cells' within the ear can only be effective in amplifying sound when they are configured in a Y-shaped arrangement with respect to their supporting cells.
1h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News

New pig virus found to be a potential threat to humansA recently identified pig virus can readily find its way into laboratory-cultured cells of people and other species, a discovery that raises concerns about the potential for outbreaks that threaten human and animal health.
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News

American tropics, Amazon originsA new study, co-authored by Harvard Visiting Scholar Alexandre Antonelli and an international team of researchers, is suggesting many of the plants and animals that call Latin America home may actually have their roots in the Amazon. Researchers found that a dynamic process of colonization and speciation led to the formation of the American tropics, which is today the most species-rich region on t
1h
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‘Silicon Valley’ Finale Roundtable: Can the Show Go Anywhere From Here?Previous seasons have left Pied Piper in various stages, but Unmitigated Success has never been one of them. What now?
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The Atlantic

In Photos: Chaos and Bloodshed in GazaJerusalem PalestiniansProtests along the Gaza-Israel border were met with tear gas and live fire from Israeli forces, leaving dozens dead and hundreds wounded on Monday. The Palestinian demonstrations marked a confluence of events, including the opening of the new U.S. Embassy in Jerusalem, (moved from Tel Aviv after President Donald Trump’s decision to recognize Jerusalem as the capital of Israel), and the upcoming 7
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New Scientist - News

Rich nations restore their own forests but trash those elsewhereAs countries get richer, they start replanting their forests – but this is not a big environmental gain because they “export” the deforestation to poor countries
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NYT > Science

Tiny Brains of Homo Naledi Had Complex FeaturesScientists studying skull fragments from the extinct human relative recently discovered in South Africa suggest that it may have exhibited complex behavior.
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NYT > Science

An Ice Core Reveals the Economic Health of the Roman EmpireLead pollution embedded in a Greenland glacier recorded peak periods of wealth as well as crises, like the Cyprian plague.
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NYT > Science

Books of The Times: A Strait-Laced Writer Explores Psychedelics, and Leaves the Door of Perception AjarIn “How to Change Your Mind,” Michael Pollan writes about the history, science and lessons of LSD and other psychedelic substances.
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Popular Science

Data from 1998 just gave us new insight into Europa—our best chance at finding alien lifeEuropa Jupiter GalileoSpace Confirming hints picked up by the Hubble just a few years ago. Those readings now are getting their due, and, over 20 years after they were taken, may confirm the existence of water plumes stretching up from Europa’s icy surface…
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Latest Headlines | Science News

With a little convincing, rats can detect tuberculosisTB-sniffing rats prove more accurate in detecting infection, especially in children, than the most commonly used diagnostic tool.
1h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

World's fastest water heater—100,000 degrees in under a 10th of a picosecondScientists have used a powerful X-ray laser to heat water from room temperature to 100,000 degrees Celsius in less than a 10th of a picosecond (millionth of a millionth of a second). The experimental setup, which can be seen as the world's fastest water heater, produced an exotic state of water from which researchers hope to learn more about the peculiar characteristics of water. The observations
1h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Uncertainty in long-run economic growth likely points toward greater emissions, climate change costsFor scientists, estimating the extent of and cost of damages from climate change over the next 100 years is a challenging task. A primary challenge is developing forecasts of long-run economic growth, which is highly uncertain and directly affects projections of greenhouse gas emissions concentrations in major climate models.
1h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Study finds Amazonian rainforests gave birth to the world's most diverse tropical regionA new study is suggesting many of the plants and animals that call Latin America home may actually have their roots in the Amazon.
1h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Plant peptide spells relief from salty stressResearchers at the RIKEN Center for Sustainable Resource Science (CSRS) have discovered a hormone-like peptide in plants that helps increase their tolerance to excessive salt. Published in the Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences, the study found several genes that can increase salinity tolerance, the most effective being a small gene that codes for the peptide AT13.
1h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Where hominid brains are concerned, size doesn't matterThe recently discovered species Homo naledi may have had a pint-sized brain, but that brain packed a big punch. New research by Ralph Holloway and colleagues—that include researchers from the University of the Witwatersrand, Johannesburg, South Africa—published in the Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences examines the imprints of the brain upon the skulls of this species, called endocast
1h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Nouns slow down our speechSpeakers hesitate or make brief pauses filled with sounds like "uh" or "uhm" mostly before nouns. Such slow-down effects are far less frequent before verbs, as UZH researchers working together with an international team have now discovered by looking at examples from different languages.
1h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Lead pollution in Greenland ice shows rise and fall of ancient European civilizationsTo learn about the rise and fall of ancient European civilizations, researchers sometimes find clues in unlikely places: deep inside of the Greenland ice sheet, for example.
1h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Biologists ID temporal logic of regulatory genes affecting nitrogen use efficiency in plantsA team of biologists and computer scientists has adopted a time-based machine-learning approach to deduce the temporal logic of nitrogen signaling in plants from genome-wide expression data. The work potentially offers new ways to monitor and enhance crop growth using less nitrogen fertilizer, which would benefit human nutrition and the environment.
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Wearable ring, wristband allow users to control smart tech with hand gesturesNew technology created by a team of Georgia Tech researchers could make controlling text or other mobile applications as simple as '1-2-3.' Using acoustic chirps emitted from a ring and received by a wristband, like a smartwatch, the system is able to recognize 22 different micro finger gestures that could be programmed to various commands -- including a T9 keyboard interface, a set of numbers, or
2h
Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

Molecule that acts on human cells might provide hope for 'irresistible' cold cureResearchers have lab-tested a molecule that can combat the common cold virus by preventing it from hijacking human cells.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

Virtual avatar-to-avatar interviews may improve eyewitness testimonyVirtual avatar-to-avatar eyewitness interviews may increase the quantity and quality of recalled information compared to face-to-face interviews. A first-of-its-kind study shows that eyewitnesses of a mock car theft provided as much as 60 percent more information when interviewed in an avatar-to-avatar context compared to face-to-face interviews. Study participants also found it easier to talk to
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

New computational strategy designed for more personalized cancer treatmentMathematicians and cancer scientists have found a way to simplify complex biomolecular data about tumors, in principle making it easier to prescribe the appropriate treatment for a specific patient.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

Scientists discover a variation of the genome predisposing to Alzheimer's diseaseA new article shows that the inheritance of small changes in DNA alters the expression of the PM20D1 gene and is associated with an increased risk of developing Alzheimer's disease.
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The Scientist RSS

Minibrains May Soon Include Neanderthal DNABrain organoids engineered to carry the genetic material could reveal how our brains are similar to and different from those of our closest relatives.
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Live Science

Scientists Sucked a Memory Out of a Snail and Stuck It in Another Snail.The researchers have no idea how the memory actually moved from one snail to another, but it happened.
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Futurity.org

How dying relatives spur market for illegal rhino hornA new study uncovers why people in Vietnam buy illegal rhino horn—information that could be useful in campaigns to save the endangered animals. From treating cancer and erectile dysfunction to managing hangovers, the horns of endangered wild rhinoceroses are common as a medical cure-all in parts of Asia. Powdered horn is believed to have healing properties and can fetch up to 500,000 kroner per k
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Viden

Forskere vil dyrke neandertalhjerner i laboratorietKunstigt dyrkede mini-hjerner skal afsløre forskellen på hvordan mennesker og neandertalere tænkte.
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The Atlantic

Celebration in Jerusalem, Bloodshed in GazaJERUSALEM—The signs are plastered all over the city, on buses and street lamps and buildings and thoroughfares: Trump Make Israel Great and Trump Is A Friend of Zion . These messages, celebrating the opening of the new U.S. embassy in Jerusalem, however, are somewhat misleading. Although they may look like Israeli praise for President Donald Trump and his decision to move the facility from Tel Av
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

'Giant' problem looms for aging populationUrgent attention needs to be paid to frail older New Zealanders' oral health, a study has highlighted.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

Deeper understanding of quantum chaos may be the key to quantum computersNew research gives insight into a recent experiment that was able to manipulate an unprecedented number of atoms through a quantum simulator. This new theory could provide another step on the path to creating the elusive quantum computers.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

Robot teaches itself how to dress peopleA robot is successfully sliding hospital gowns on people's arms. The machine doesn't use its eyes as it pulls the cloth. Instead, it relies on the forces it feels as it guides the garment onto a person's hand, around the elbow and onto the shoulder.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

A new drug shows preclinical efficacy in Rett syndromeA new article describes how a new drug is able to reduce the symptoms and activate the dormant neurons characteristic of Rett Syndrome in preclinical models.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

How bacteria guide electron flow for efficient energy generationBiochemists have isolated a protein supercomplex from a bacterial membrane that, like a battery, generates a voltage across the bacterial membrane. The voltage is used to make ATP, a key energy currency of life. The new findings will inform future efforts to obtain the atomic structures of large membrane protein supercomplexes.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

Very obese women should lose weight during pregnancy for a healthy babyVery obese women should actually lose weight during pregnancy in order to have a healthy baby, contrary to current recommendations, according to a new study. The researchers behind the study say the current guidelines for weight gain in pregnancy should be adjusted for better outcomes in underweight and very obese women and their babies.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

Are your children overdoing it? Too many extracurricular activities can do more harm than goodThe growing demand for children to get involved in organized activities outside of school is placing unprecedented strain upon families.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

European cities soon to be ready for autonomous vehiclesAutonomous vehicles promise to be the next revolution in public transport. They should find their first users in suburban areas, which are less well served by traditional transportation networks. A new project will identify the needs and motivations of their future users, meet many of the technological and regulatory challenges, and design new business models, allowing these new services to develo
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New on MIT Technology Review

Inside the business model for botnetsOperating a botnet is expensive and risky. But it’s all worth it if you’re making $20 million a month from click fraud.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

Heart disease severity may depend on nitric oxide levelsThe most common heart medications may get an assist from nitric oxide circulating in the body, according to a new study. Researchers showed that nitric oxide may help commonly used heart drugs maximize their benefits while improving heart function. In turn, the study found nitric oxide deficiencies could underlie heart failure while tilting drug effects toward more harmful pathways and side effect
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

Multiple resistance genes found in commercially farmed chickens and in hospitalA team of investigators has isolated colistin-resistant Escherichia coli from a commercial poultry farm in China. Colistin is an antibiotic of last resort against certain bacteria.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

Marketing to physicians by opioid pharma companies leads to more opioid prescriptionsResearchers examined pharmaceutical payments from 2014, ranging from consulting fees to meals, and found that doctors who received any opioid pharmaceutical marketing increased their prescribing in 2015, writing nine percent more opioid prescriptions than doctors who received no marketing.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

Better equipped in the fight against lung cancerLung cancer is the third most common type of cancer in Germany and the disease affects both men and women. However, immunotherapies are successful in only 20 percent of cases. Researchers have now discovered a special mechanism that regulates tumor growth in lung cancer. This opens up new possibilities in the treatment of lung cancer patients.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

Motivation to move may start with being mindfulA meditation and stress reduction program may be as effective at getting people to move more as structured exercise programs, according to a new study. This is part of another study that found resistance training reduces symptoms of depression.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

The digital doctor's visit: Enormous potential benefits with equally big riskOne out of at least 10 patients records doctors' visits, usually on a cell phone; Apple recently released a new Health Records feature built into the Health app as part of iOS 11.3. No longer a wave of the future researchers have analyzed the benefits of digital recordings of healthcare visits, the need to create a new model of health data ownership, and potential cybersecurity threats.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

Email encryption standards hackedA research team has demonstrated that the two most common email encryption standards are vulnerable to attacks. Their attack, referred to as Efail, proved successful in 25 out of 35 tested email programs using the S/MIME encryption standard and in 10 out of 28 tested programs using OpenPGP.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

Frequency-stable laser systems for spaceFor the first time a frequency reference based on molecular iodine was successfully demonstrated in space! What sounds a bit like science fiction is an important step towards laser interferometric distance measurements between satellites as well as for future global navigation satellite systems based on optical technologies. The frequency reference tests were carried out on May 13 on board the sou
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

Researchers uncover up to 100 potential drug targets for cancerIn a new study based on mouse cells internationally leading protein researchers have identified several new potential targets using state-of-the-art technology, many of which could be employed for future treatment of different types of cancers and diseases.
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Centralized infrastructure facilitates medical education researchThe Council of Academic Family Medicine Educational Research Alliance has enabled a large number of research teams to conduct meaningful scholarship with a fraction of the usual time and energy. CERA regularly conducts omnibus surveys of key family medicine education leaders, a process that includes collaboration with experienced mentors, centralized institutional review board clearance, pilot tes
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Antibodies against one hemorrhagic fever virus found to disarm a related virusResearch conducted in vitro shows two human antibodies made in response to vaccination against one hemorrhagic fever virus can disarm a related virus, for which there is currently no vaccine.The proof-of-principle finding identifies a common molecular chink in the two viruses' armor that renders both vulnerable to the same antibodies.The results set the stage for a single vaccine and other antibod
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Roles and functions of community health workers in primary careCommunity health workers in primary care provide clinical services, community resource connections, and health education and coaching. As trained individuals with limited or no formal medical education, they are widely considered to have the potential to enhance primary care access and quality, but remain underutilized.
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News

A theoretical model to alleviate primary care strainCo-management of patients by more than one primary care clinician is among new models of care designed to meet the demand for high quality patient care. A new co-management model lays the groundwork for potential care partnerships between nurse practitioners and physicians. It finds that effective nurse practitioner-physician co-management requires three core attributes: effective communication, m
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Free children's visits increase care and workforce burdenIn July 2015, all children under six years of age gained free access to daytime and out-of-hours general practice services in the Republic of Ireland, resulting in a 25 percent increase in utilization.
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Science | The Guardian

UK not being pushed out of EU satellite programme, Barnier saysEU’s chief negotiator says Galileo participation will continue after Brexit but ‘on a new basis’ The EU’s chief Brexit negotiator, Michel Barnier, has said Britain is not being pushed out of the Galileo satellite navigation programme, but that only “a little progress” had been made in recent talks on the UK’s EU exit. Barnier said British participation in the EU satellite programme would have to
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Ingeniøren

Bekæmpelse af varroamiden – biens snylter – vinder årets Science CupTre gymnasieelever fra Borupgaard Gymnasium i Ballerup vinder IDAs naturvidenskabelige opfinderkonkurrence med et produkt, der løser et enormt problem for biavlere globalt.
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Scientific American Content: Global

Nuclear Bomb Test Moved North Korea MountainA new analysis of a seismic signal suggests the entire mountain didn’t collapse -- Read more on ScientificAmerican.com
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Expansion of global forests reflects well-being, not rising CO2, experts sayThe surprising, steady expansion of forests in many countries is a reflection of national well-being and does not constitute a benefit of rapidly rising levels of atmospheric carbon dioxide, experts say. On the planet as a whole, forests and other terrestrial ecosystems have become greener, which several global climate change models attribute to CO2 fertilization, says the study, published today b
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Case management reduces psychological distress in frequent users of health careResearch has shown that frequent users of health care services tend to have higher levels of psychological distress. A new study finds that case management reduces psychological distress and creates a sense of security in patients who frequently use health services.
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Patients and caregivers value caring, continuity, and accountability in care transitionsIn the transition from hospital to home, patients and caregivers seek clear accountability, continuity, and caring attitudes across the care continuum. One-hundred and thirty-eight patients and 110 family caregivers participating in focus groups and interviews identified three desired outcomes of care transition services: feeling prepared and able to implement care plans, unambiguous accountabilit
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Long-term and short-term relationships initially indistinguishableResearch shows that long- and short-term relationships look almost identical in the beginning. At some point, romantic interest tends to plateau and decline in short-term relationships.
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Social challenges are associated with poorer health outcomesAmong more than 600,000 primary care patients, half live with some degree of social challenge, which has a negative effect on the quality of care they receive.
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The Scientist RSS

RNA Moves a Memory From One Snail to AnotherInjecting molecules from a sea slug that received tail shocks into one that didn't made the recipient animal behave more cautiously.
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Inside Science

Brain Activity Alternates While WalkingBrain Activity Alternates While Walking Insights into natural brain rhythm could help people with Parkinson's disease. Crosswalk.jpg Image credits: Ryan DeBerardinis / shutterstock Human Monday, May 14, 2018 - 13:15 James Gaines, Contributor (Inside Science) – Left foot. Right foot. Left foot. Right foot. Even if you’re sitting down, you can imagine the rhythm of walking, almost feel the tension
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

Details of brain networks in autismA new study analyzing more than 1,000 brain scans reveals surprising new insights into brain networks in people with autism, after applying a new personalized approach to brain mapping. The new approach provides a way to examine the location of individual brain networks with more precision.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

'Universal antibodies' disarm various pathogensScientists have been studying how the immune system succeeds in keeping pathogens in check. For the first time, the researchers have now discovered antibodies that are capable of disarming not only one specific bacterium but a whole variety of microorganisms at once. The newly discovered antibodies recognize a tiny sugar structure found on the surface of various germs. Thus, a limited number of an
3h
Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

Simple equation directs creation of clean-energy catalystsNew guidelines could steer the design of less costly, more efficient catalysts geared toward revving up the production of hydrogen as a renewable fuel. Using its equation, the team discovered several atom-framework combinations that approximate the performance of precious-metal catalysts - platinum, gold, iridium - at mere thousandths of the cost.
3h
Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

Restoring epigenetic balance reinstates memory in flies with Alzheimer's disease symptomsA study showed that restoring a balance between two epigenetic regulator enzymes restored learning and memory function in flies that displayed symptoms of Alzheimer's disease.
3h
Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

New molecule to improve pharmaceuticals draws inspiration from nature's toolboxIn the race to create more potent and stable medicines, scientists know that adding fluorine can improve drug molecules. However, there is only one fluorination reaction known to occur in nature. And this process is performed by complex and highly specialized enzymes that are difficult to replicate. Now, scientists have developed a new, streamlined molecule that can do the work of enzymes but be d
3h
Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

Lignin: A supergreen fuel for fuel cellsResearchers have developed a fuel cell that uses lignin, a cheap by-product from paper manufacture and one of the most common biopolymers.
3h
Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

Snorers suffer from nerve and muscle damage in the palatePeople who snore may have extensive tissue damage in the nerves and muscles of the soft palate. This can in turn create problems with swallowing and contribute to development of sleep apnea. Treatment strategies aimed at early intervention to stop snoring might have beneficial effects in healing or preventing development of sleep apnea.
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Latest Headlines | Science News

RNA injected from one sea slug into another may transfer memoriesLong-term memories might be encoded in RNA, a controversial study in sea slugs suggests.
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Two family physicians reflect on white privilege in health care and the need for action'Our medical system is structured to individually and systemically favor white physicians and patients in ways that white people are trained to ignore,' states family medicine resident Max Romano, M.D., M.P.H. In a related editorial, Joseph Hobbs, M.D., chair of family medicine at the Medical College of Georgia, cautions against allowing concepts such as white privilege, unconscious and implicit b
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Physician burnout: Resilience training is only part of the solutionAlthough many health systems have turned to resilience training as a solution to physician burnout, quality/safety researcher Alan Card, Ph.D., MPH, argues that such training alone is not enough.
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Scientists find missing factor in gene activationScientists have unraveled a mystery on how genes are activated. Human genes are blocked by structures known as nucleosomes, components that package DNA inside cells. How do these roadblocks clear out to allow genes to be turned on? Scientists have identified a key factor that unravels nucleosomes and clears the way for gene activation. They say the finding is useful in understanding diseases such
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Burnout and scope of practice in new family physiciansAmong physicians, family physicians report some of the highest levels of burnout. According to a new study, however, early career family physicians who provide a broader scope of practice report significantly lower rates of burnout.
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News

An updated analysis of direct-to-consumer television advertisements for prescription drugsAlthough proponents suggest that direct-to-consumer prescription drug advertising is educational and motivating, a new analysis finds that the potential educational value of such advertising has declined.
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Screening tool improves prediction of developing dementiaIn people with a minor decline on the Mini-Mental-State-Examination -- a widely used but limited test to screen for cognitive defects -- follow-up with a simple visual screening tool can help identify those at increased risk for dementia.
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Job strain linked to onset of common mental illnessWorkplaces that reduce job strain could prevent up to 14 percent of new cases of common mental illness from occurring, according to new research led by the Black Dog Institute in Sydney, Australia.
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News

May/June 2018 Annals of Family Medicine tip sheetAnnals of Family Medicine is a peer-reviewed, indexed research journal that provides a cross-disciplinary forum for new, evidence-based information affecting the primary care disciplines.
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Study: minority children develop implicit racial bias in early childhoodNew research from York University suggests that minority children as young as six years old show an implicit pro-White racial bias when exposed to images of both White and Black children. But how ingrained these biases become and whether they persist into late childhood and adulthood might depend on their social environment.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

Revealed: Why drug users prefer heroin at home, but cocaine while outNew research shows that response of brain and emotions to addictive drugs depends on both the setting and the substance of use. The findings could change treatments for drug users to help prevent relapses.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

Discovery of differences in the brains of rats classified as workers vs. slackersNeurologists have uncovered a network of regions in the brain that are involved in determining the choice of being a 'hard-worker' or a 'slacker.' Understanding how the brain makes such decisions is one of the most fundamental questions in neuroscience and psychology, and sophisticated animal behavioral testing, coupled with advance brain imaging and stimulation techniques are shedding light on th
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BBC News - Science & Environment

'Memory transplant' achieved in snailsMemories are transferred from one snail to another in a laboratory.
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Live Science

Why Some People Just Can't Have a Boss: Study Reveals Brain DifferencesA curious brain connection may explain why some people are more control-averse than others.
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Marketing to physicians by opioid pharma companies leads to more opioid prescriptionsResearchers from Boston Medical Center's Grayken Center for Addiction examined pharmaceutical payments from 2014, ranging from consulting fees to meals, and found that doctors who received any opioid pharmaceutical marketing increased their prescribing in 2015, writing nine percent more opioid prescriptions than doctors who received no marketing.
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News

CAMH study shows details of brain networks in autismA CAMH study analyzing more than 1,000 brain scans reveals surprising new insights into brain networks in people with autism, after applying a new personalized approach to brain mapping. The new CAMH-developed approach, published in Biological Psychiatry, provides a way to examine the location of individual brain networks with more precision.
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Heart disease severity may depend on nitric oxide levelsThe most common heart medications may get an assist from nitric oxide circulating in the body, according to a new study out of Case Western Reserve University School of Medicine. Researchers showed that nitric oxide may help commonly used heart drugs maximize their benefits while improving heart function. In turn, the study found nitric oxide deficiencies could underlie heart failure while tilting
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News

First description of mEAK-7 gene could suggest path toward therapies for cancerUCLA-led study has characterized the mechanism of the human equivalent of the gene, EAK-7, that plays a role in determining how long worms will live. Researchers are calling it mammalian EAK-7, or mEAK-7, and have shown that it regulates the process that dictates cell growth and human development. Findings could lead to new therapies that would work by slowing or blocking mEAK-7's process, which c
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News

UCLA biologists 'transfer' a memoryUCLA biologists report they have transferred a memory from one marine snail to another, creating an artificial memory, by injecting RNA from one to another. This research could lead to new ways to treat traumatic memories with RNA -- perhaps a traumatic memory could be altered -- and perhaps new ways to restore lost memories.
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Revealed: Why drug users prefer heroin at home, but cocaine while outUniversity of Sussex research shows that response of brain and emotions to addictive drugs depends on both the setting and the substance of use. The findings could change treatments for drug users to help prevent relapses.
3h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Study shows yogurt may dampen chronic inflammation linked to multiple diseasesA recent study from the University of Wisconsin-Madison provides new evidence that yogurt may help dampen chronic inflammation.
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Multiple resistance genes found in commercially farmed chickens and in hospitalA team of investigators has isolated colistin-resistant Escherichia coli from a commercial poultry farm in China. Colistin is an antibiotic of last resort against certain bacteria. The research is published May 14 in Antimicrobial Agents and Chemotherapy.
3h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Discovery of differences in the brains of rats classified as workers vs. slackersDr. Catharine Winstanley at the University of British Columbia have uncovered a network of regions in the brain that are involved in determining the choice of being a 'hard-worker' or a 'slacker.' Understanding how the brain makes such decisions is one of the most fundamental questions in neuroscience and psychology, and sophisticated animal behavioral testing, coupled with advance brain imaging a
3h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Memory transferred between snailsMemories can be transferred between organisms by extracting ribonucleic acid (RNA) from a trained animal and injecting it into an untrained animal, as demonstrated in a study of sea snails published in eNeuro. The research provides new clues in the search for the physical basis of memory.
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Keto diet protects optic nerve in glaucoma mouse modelSwitching mice destined to develop glaucoma to a low carbohydrate, high fat diet protects the cells of the retina and their connections to the brain from degeneration, according to research published in JNeurosci. The study adds to others that have found this type of diet to have neuroprotective effects in conditions such as Alzheimer's disease, Parkinson's disease, and amyotrophic lateral scleros
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Why some people resist authorityControl aversion -- the urge to rebel against control over one's decisions -- can be explained by connectivity between two regions of the brain as well as behavioral measures of distrust and lack of understanding, according to a study of university students published in JNeurosci.
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Feeding schedule maintains normal food intake in obese miceA mouse study published in JNeurosci finds that restricting food availability to one half of the day resets the normal timing of the signals that regulate food intake and reduces weight gain in mice fed a high-fat diet.These findings could inform future obesity research in humans.
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Setting affects pleasure of heroin and cocaineDrug users show substance-specific differences in the rewarding effects of heroin versus cocaine depending on where they use the drugs, according to a study published in JNeurosci. Considering this interaction between drug type and location in the treatment of addiction could help to prevent relapse.
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Stress regulates self-harm in ratsA stress hormone modulates compulsive biting in a rat model of self-injurious behavior (SIB), according to new research published in JNeurosci. Manipulating the activity of the brain circuitry underlying SIB could create new possibilities for treating this symptom of stress and neuropsychiatric disorders.
3h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Brain activity alternates while steppingHuman steps are associated with neural activity that alternates between the left and right sides of the brain, finds a study of Parkinson's disease patients published in JNeurosci. The research recommends future investigations address whether alternating deep brain stimulation accordingly may improve gait in movement disorders.
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Popular Science

Last week in tech: Did artificial intelligence write this post? Maybe.Technology Hear a robot make a call, see a robot go for a run, and make fun of old tech in this week's collection of tech stories. Download the latest episode of the Last Week in Tech podcast where we talk about Google, AI, self-driving cars, and Sony MiniDisc players.
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The Atlantic

When Mother's Day Means a Trip to PrisonIf a picture is worth a thousand words, a cinéma vérité documentary is worth ten thousand. Such is the case with Mother’s Day , a heartbreaking observational film from Elizabeth Lo and R.J. Lozada, which follows groups of children as they travel long distances by bus to visit their mothers in prison on Mother’s Day. The documentary’s fly-on-the-wall approach conveys a depth of emotion that statis
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The Atlantic

Can Abigail Allwood Find Life on Mars?From 2003 to 2005 , when Abigail Allwood was a graduate student in earth science at Macquarie University, in Australia, she made a series of remarkable discoveries. She was doing fieldwork in the country’s Pilbara region, where she was charged with studying fossilized stromatolites, or columns of sedimentary rock originally created by layers of microbes—some of the planet’s first known life. The
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Science | The Guardian

Scientists 'transplant memories' between sea snails via injectionExperiment shows some memories are encoded in molecules that form part of an organism’s genetic machinery, researchers say Science may never know what wistful memories play on the mind of the California sea hare, a foot-long hermaphrodite marine snail, as it munches on algae in the shallow tide pools of the Pacific coast. But in a new study, researchers claim to have made headway in understanding
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Viden

Alvorlig sikkerhedsfejl opdaget i kryptering af emailsHvis du troede, at din email var krypteret og sikker, så tager du fejl, siger tysk forsker.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

University of Alberta cyclotron could supply province's demand for medical isotopesUniversity of Alberta scientists have taken a critical step towards supplying Alberta's demand for medical isotopes. Their newly published findings could have major implications for other health jurisdictions across North America as well.
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Quanta Magazine

A Chemist Shines Light on a Surprising Prime Number PatternAbout a year ago, the theoretical chemist Salvatore Torquato met with the number theorist Matthew de Courcy-Ireland to explain that he had done something highly unorthodox with prime numbers, those positive integers that are divisible only by 1 and themselves. A professor of chemistry at Princeton University, Torquato normally studies patterns in the structure of physical systems, such as the arr
3h
The Atlantic

Rita Ora's 'Girls': The Same-Sex Pop of the PastWhen girls kiss girls in pop music, it’s for a drunken taste of chapstick. Or out of jealousy for an ex-boyfriend. Or to shock a TV-viewing audience. Whether the example is Katy Perry or Little Big Town or Madonna, music’s most famous depictions of same-sex female romance typically treat it as a dare, a dalliance, a performance—rather than an expression of real desire. It speaks to a transitional
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News

University of Alberta cyclotron could supply province's demand for medical isotopesUniversity of Alberta scientists have taken a critical step towards supplying Alberta's demand for medical isotopes. Their newly published findings could have major implications for other health jurisdictions across North America as well.Researchers at the university's Medical Isotope and Cyclotron Facility used a particle accelerator known as a cyclotron to produce enough isotopes for up to 1,000
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News

University of Cincinnati study examines impact of poor functional kidney statusResearch out of the University of Cincinnati finds poor functional kidney status in elderly patients with end stage renal disease is associated with a higher incidence of initiating hemodialysis, increased the risk of central venous catheter use and is an independent predictor of one-year mortality.
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News

NIH scientists develop novel technique to study brain diseaseA new tool developed by researchers at the National Institutes of Health has determined, for the first time, how two distinct sets of neurons in the mouse brain work together to control movement.
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News

CU researchers: infant growth patterns affected by type of protein consumedA new study by CU School of Medicine researchers has determined that choices of protein intake from solid foods has a significant impact on infant growth during the first year of life.
4h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Restoring epigenetic balance reinstates memory in flies with Alzheimer's disease symptomsA study from Drexel University showed that restoring a balance between two epigenetic regulator enzymes restored learning and memory function in flies that displayed symptoms of Alzheimer's disease.
4h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News

New molecule to improve pharmaceuticals draws inspiration from nature's toolboxIn the race to create more potent and stable medicines, scientists know that adding fluorine can improve drug molecules.However, there is only one fluorination reaction known to occur in nature. And this process is performed by complex and highly specialized enzymes that are difficult to replicate. Now, scientists have developed a new, streamlined molecule that can do the work of enzymes but be de
4h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Multiple resistance genes found in commercially farmed chickens and in hospitalA team of investigators has isolated colistin-resistant Escherichia coli from a commercial poultry farm in China. Colistin is an antibiotic of last resort against certain bacteria. The research is published May 14 in Antimicrobial Agents and Chemotherapy.
4h
New on MIT Technology Review

Millions more Facebook users’ data was left open for anyone to accessFacebook Cambridge
4h
New on MIT Technology Review

An “efail” in email could let hackers read your encrypted messages
4h
Big Think

Disable email encryption tools immediately, say researchers who found ‘critical vulnerabilities’EFAIL PGP OpenPGP S/MimeIn a paper published Monday, security experts outline two attacks that malicious parties could use to gain access to a target's entire inbox. Read More
4h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Simple equation directs creation of clean-energy catalystsNew guidelines laid down by Nebraska and Chinese researchers could steer the design of less costly, more efficient catalysts geared toward revving up the production of hydrogen as a renewable fuel.
4h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News

'Universal antibodies' disarm various pathogensScientists from the German Cancer Research Center (DKFZ) have been studying how the immune system succeeds in keeping pathogens in check. For the first time, the researchers have now discovered antibodies that are capable of disarming not only one specific bacterium but a whole variety of microorganisms at once. The newly discovered antibodies recognize a tiny sugar structure found on the surface
4h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Gene variant may increase psychiatric risk after traumatic brain injuryIn a Veterans Affairs, study, a gene variant known to predict Alzheimer's risk was linked to worse psychiatric symptoms in those with a traumatic brain injury. Study participants with the gene variant and at least one TBI had more severe PTSD, anxiety, and depression, compared with TBI patients without the same variant.
4h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Simple equation directs creation of clean-energy catalystsNew guidelines laid down by Nebraska and Chinese researchers could steer the design of less costly, more efficient catalysts geared toward revving up the production of hydrogen as a renewable fuel. Using its equation, the team discovered several atom-framework combinations that approximate the performance of precious-metal catalysts -- platinum, gold, iridium -- at mere thousandths of the cost.
4h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Nanomedicine -- Targeting cancer cells with sugarsGlobally, cancer is the second leading cause of death, also because the efficiency of chemotherapeutics is inadequate due to poor delivery to the tumor. Professor Olivia Merkel and her team develop targeted nanocarrier systems to increase the delivery rates of therapeutic formulations and their specific uptake into the target cells.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

Understanding steam burnsEven if the wound looks superficially harmless, steam burns must be cooled persistently. Researchers have now been able to show for the first time how hot steam achieves its vicious effect: it penetrates the upper skin layer and can cause severe burns in the lower skin layers -- initially almost invisible.
4h
Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

How our ancestors with autistic traits led a revolution in Ice Age artThe ability to focus on detail, a common trait among people with autism, allowed realism to flourish in Ice Age art. Around 30,000 years ago realistic art suddenly flourished in Europe. Extremely accurate depictions of bears, bison, horses and lions decorate the walls of Ice Age archaeological sites such as Chauvet Cave in southern France. Why our ice age ancestors created exceptionally realistic
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BBC News - Science & Environment

UK ups the ante on Galileo sat-nav projectLondon warns Brussels that it is prepared to block Galileo technologies from leaving the UK.
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Live Science

Aliens May Well Exist in a Parallel Universe, New Studies FindCould alien life be hiding in the multiverse? New studies say, "sure!"
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cognitive science

A paper in PSPB explores the proposal that giving advice gives people a sense of power.submitted by /u/markmana [link] [comments]
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NYT > Science

As D.I.Y. Gene Editing Gains Popularity, ‘Someone Is Going to Get Hurt’After researchers created a virus from mail-order DNA, geneticists sound the alarm about the genetic tinkering carried out in garages and living rooms.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

US Supreme Court strikes down federal ban on sports gamblingSupreme CourtThe US Supreme Court on Monday overturned a ban on sports gambling in 46 of the union's 50 states, paving the way to legalize a business worth tens of billions of dollars annually.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Picasso 'accidentally' damaged, withdrawn from saleA Picasso self-portrait estimated to be worth $70 million and due to go under the hammer in New York on Tuesday, has been "accidentally damaged" and withdrawn from auction, Christie's said.
4h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Engineers on a roll toward smaller, more efficient radio frequency transformersThe future of electronic devices lies partly within the 'internet of things' -- the network of devices, vehicles and appliances embedded within electronics to enable connectivity and data exchange. University of Illinois engineers are helping realize this future by minimizing the size of one notoriously large element of integrated circuits used for wireless communication -- the transformer.
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Better equipped in the fight against lung cancerLung cancer is the third most common type of cancer in Germany and the disease affects both men and women. However, immunotherapies are successful in only 20 percent of cases. Researchers at Friedrich-Alexander-Universität Erlangen-Nürnberg (FAU) have now discovered a special mechanism that regulates tumour growth in lung cancer. This opens up new possibilities in the treatment of lung cancer pati
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News

The digital doctor's visit: Enormous potential benefits with equally big riskOne out of at least 10 patients records doctors' visits, usually on a cell phone, Apple recently released a new Health Records feature built into the Health app as part of iOS 11.3. No longer a wave of the future, Dartmouth Institute researchers, and their patient co-author, analyze the benefits of digital recordings of healthcare visits, the need to create a new model of health data ownership, an
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Motivation to move may start with being mindfulA meditation and stress reduction program may be as effective at getting people to move more as structured exercise programs, according to a new study led by an Iowa State University researcher. Jacob Meyer, an assistant professor of kinesiology, is part of another study that found resistance training reduces symptoms of depression.
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Are your children overdoing it? Too many extracurricular activities can do more harm than goodThe growing demand for children to get involved in organized activities outside of school is placing unprecedented strain upon families.
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Majorities see government efforts to protect the environment as insufficientMajorities of Americans say the federal government is doing too little to protect key aspects of the environment, according to a new study released today by Pew Research Center. In a national survey of 2,541 US adults, 69 percent of Americans say the federal government isn't doing enough to protect water quality of lakes, rivers and streams and 64 percent say the same about air quality. Two-thirds
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The Atlantic

It's Time for Police to Start SnitchingA 911 caller living in a nonwhite neighborhood snitches. A man wearing a black hoodie “busted both my truck windows out,” the caller reported on March 18, “and he’s in people’s backyards right now.” Two officers , Terrence Mercadal, a black man, and Jared Robinet, a white man, arrived on the nighttime scene in South Sacramento. Several minutes later, Mercadal and Robinet were running up a dark dr
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The Atlantic

Younger Republicans Are Slightly More Liberal on Climate ChangeThe newest version of the Pew Research Center’s annual environmental poll covers a lot of familiar ground. It finds that most Americans believe the government should be doing more to protect air and water quality, and the climate. But when it comes to deciding how to accomplish those goals, Democrats and Republicans are divided—except on the topic of building more wind and solar energy, which jus
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Study shows how bacteria guide electron flow for efficient energy generationBiochemists at the University of Illinois have isolated a protein supercomplex from a bacterial membrane that, like a battery, generates a voltage across the bacterial membrane. The voltage is used to make ATP, a key energy currency of life.The new findings, reported in the journal Nature, will inform future efforts to obtain the atomic structures of large membrane protein supercomplexes.
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New Scientist - News

Cause of polycystic ovary syndrome discovered at lastPolycystic ovary syndrome, which affects one in five women, seems to be caused by a hormonal imbalance. An IVF drug may fix this, and will be trialled soon
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New Scientist - News

We messed up our figures on how much carbon dioxide is too muchClimatologists have tried to set a “carbon budget” that tells us how much greenhouse gas we can emit and stay below 2°C, but their efforts have only caused confusion
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New Scientist - News

Probe saw plumes on Europa 20 years ago – we just didn’t noticeEuropa Jupiter GalileoWe weren’t sure whether Jupiter’s moon Europa spews plumes of water, but evidence for them has just been found in 20-year-old data from the Galileo spacecraft
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Majorities see government efforts to protect the environment as insufficientMajorities of Americans say the federal government is doing too little to protect key aspects of the environment, according to a new study released today by Pew Research Center.
4h
Big Think

Why some Google employees are quitting over the military's 'Project Maven' contractIs Google's moral compass broken? Read More
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Big Think

Top 10 jobs of serial killers and psychopathsThe occupations that attract the most serial killers and psychopaths. Read More
5h
Scientific American Content: Global

NASA Will Send a Helicopter to Mars in 2020The autonomous rotorcraft will fly to the Red Planet with the Mars 2020 rover -- Read more on ScientificAmerican.com
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News

New approach to cancer research aims to accelerate studies and reduce costA new model for improving how clinical trials are developed and conducted by bringing together academic cancer experts and pharmaceutical companies is being tested by research experts at The University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center.
5h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Study shows how bacteria guide electron flow for efficient energy generationBiochemists at the University of Illinois have isolated a protein supercomplex from a bacterial membrane that, like a battery, generates a voltage across the bacterial membrane. The voltage is used to make ATP, a key energy currency of life. The new findings, reported in the journal Nature, will inform future efforts to obtain the atomic structures of large membrane protein supercomplexes.
5h
Scientific American Content: Global

Dismal Western Snowpack Is a Climate "Warning Sign"The potential for drought and large wildfires looms over the summer -- Read more on ScientificAmerican.com
5h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News

A new drug shows preclinical efficacy in Rett syndromeA new article published in the Cell Reports describes how a new drug is able to reduce the symptoms and activate the dormant neurons characteristic of Rett syndrome in preclinical models.
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Science | The Guardian

New chemical compound 'stops common cold in its tracks'Scientists working on human cells in a dish find new way to tackle rhinovirus – though a cure is a long way off It’s a conundrum that has stumped scientists for centuries , but now researchers say they have taken a tantalising step forward in the quest to tackle the common cold. The scourge of workplace, home and school playground, the common cold is predominantly caused by the rhinovirus. But at
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Science : NPR

On East Coast Oyster Farms, 'Women Are Rising Up From The Bay In A Big Way'Supreme Court CubanMore women are joining their male peers among the ranks of oyster farmers. This could be because of growing marine science programs — and a desire to have a hands-on connection with the food system. (Image credit: Jenn Hall/NPR)
5h
Big Think

10 brilliant documentaries you can watch online for freeFrom the history of LSD to the origins of hip-hop, these 10 documentaries will educate and inspire. Read More
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

CBS sues to block effort to 'force' merger with ViacomUS media giant CBS filed suit Monday, alleging that majority shareholder Shari Redstone is seeking to "force" a merger with rival Viacom on unfavorable terms.
5h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

New evidence for water plumes on Jupiter's moon, EuropaEuropa Jupiter GalileoScientists presented further evidence Monday for water plumes on the surface of Jupiter's moon Europa, raising hopes of probing the jets for signs of life around the second planet from Earth.
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Futurity.org

These two activities can improve the mind and bodyA meditation and stress reduction program may be as effective at getting people to move more as structured exercise programs, according to new research. And for people with depression, a second study points to the benefits of resistance training. The research suggests a shift from “thinking we need to be in a gym for an hour at a time to thinking about being more active throughout the day.” The f
5h
Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

How a pinch of salt can improve battery performanceResearchers have discovered how a pinch of salt can be used to drastically improve the performance of batteries.
5h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Understanding steam burnsEven if the wound looks superficially harmless, steam burns must be cooled persistently. Empa researchers have now been able to show for the first time how hot steam achieves its vicious effect: it penetrates the upper skin layer and can cause severe burns in the lower skin layers -- initially almost invisible.
5h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Deeper understanding of quantum chaos may be the key to quantum computersNew research gives insight into a recent experiment that was able to manipulate an unprecedented number of atoms through a quantum simulator. This new theory could provide another step on the path to creating the elusive quantum computers.
5h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Molecule that acts on human cells might provide hope for 'irresistible' cold cureResearchers have lab-tested a molecule that can combat the common cold virus by preventing it from hijacking human cells.
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Study picks out children with incurable brain cancer who could benefit from adult therapyChildren with incurable brain tumors could benefit from potentially life-extending treatment if genetic testing was used to personalize therapy as it is in many adults, major new research reports.Scientists analyzed the DNA of children taking an adult cancer drug on a clinical trial deemed to have 'failed,' and found that many with particular genetic traits had actually responded well to treatment
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Less is more when it comes to prescription opioids for hospital patients, study findsIn a pilot study published in JAMA Internal Medicine, Yale researchers significantly reduced doses of opioid painkillers given to hospital patients. By delivering the opioids with a shot under the skin or with a pill instead of an IV, the research team found they could decrease patient exposure to the medications while also maintaining or improving pain relief, they said.
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Chemotherapy-induced peripheral neuropathy in long-term survivors of childhood cancerA new study assesses chemotherapy-induced peripheral neuropathy in 121 long-term survivors of childhood cancer to detail clinical, functional, neurophysiological and patient-reported outcomes of the condition.
5h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Are pharmaceutical marketing payments to physicians for opioids associated with prescribing?Pharmaceutical industry marketing of opioid products to physicians through nonresearch payments, which can include speaking fees and meals, was associated with greater opioid prescribing.
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Popular Science

When there's a hurricane between you and the hospital, telemedicine could save the dayNexus Media News Videoconferencing offers the possibility of uninterrupted care during disasters. Advances in healthcare technology could mean major improvements in treating victims of extreme weather disasters.
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The Atlantic

The Solar System's Icy Secret KeeperEuropa Jupiter NASAIn 2003, a NASA spacecraft plunged into the swirling atmosphere of Jupiter and vaporized. Galileo, named for the astronomer who discovered the planet’s biggest moons, had spent more nearly eight years in orbit, collecting data about the Jovian environment and relaying it back to Earth. “We learned mind-boggling things,” said Claudia Alexander, the mission’s project manager, after the probe sent i
5h
Live Science

Malaysia Airlines Flight 370 Pilot Crashed Plane Deliberately, '60 Minutes' Panel SaysAviation experts think they know what happened to Malaysia Airlines flight MH370, according to a report from "60 Minutes Australia."
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Science | The Guardian

Moon of Jupiter prime candidate for alien life after water blast foundNasa’s Galileo spacecraft flew through a giant plume of water that erupted from the icy surface of Europa, new analysis shows A Nasa probe that explored Jupiter’s moon Europa flew through a giant plume of water vapour that erupted from the icy surface and reached a hundred miles high, according to a fresh analysis of the spacecraft’s data. The discovery has cemented the view among some scientists
5h
NYT > Science

NASA Data From 1990s Shows Evidence of Plumes From Jupiter’s Moon EuropaEuropa Jupiter NASAA re-examination of old data shows a NASA spacecraft may have flown through a plume in 1997. The plumes could offer hints of life on the ice-encrusted moon.
5h
Science : NPR

Icy Moon Of Jupiter Spews Water Plumes Into SpaceEuropa Jupiter GalileoResearchers have evidence supporting the existence of plumes of water shooting up from the interior of Jupiter's icy moon Europa. (Image credit: NASA, ESA, and K. Retherford)
5h
Latest Headlines | Science News

Another hint of Europa’s watery plumes found in 20-year-old Galileo dataA fresh look at old data suggests that NASA’s Galileo spacecraft may have seen a plume from Jupiter’s icy moon Europa in 1997.
5h
The Atlantic

The New Hollywood Speed Racer Didn't See ComingThe opening seven minutes of the Wachowskis’ Speed Racer are the definition of sensory overload. The audience processes a colossal amount of storytelling at once, as our hero, Speed (Emile Hirsch), prepares for a pivotal race. The film cuts between his childhood, when he’s already obsessing over cars and his older brother’s star racing career; his adolescence, falling in love with the girl next d
6h
The Atlantic

How China's Tech Revolution Threatens Silicon Valley“The spring of investment has come,” declares a banner hanging over Zhongguancun Inno Way, a pedestrian walkway tucked behind the high-rise superstores of Beijing’s high-tech electronics zone in the city’s northwest. Twenty-somethings bustle by clutching coffee and take-out KFC, only the tops of their heads visible as they bury their attention in Chinese-made smartphones. Now the alley—whose Chin
6h
The Atlantic

The Real Dispute Driving the Israeli-Palestinian ConflictAs the U.S. moves its embassy to Jerusalem, and the tragedy at the Gaza border escalates, Israelis and Palestinians continue to contest each other’s rights not just to that city, but to legitimacy itself. On April 30, Mahmoud Abbas, head of the Palestinian Authority, provoked an international uproar when he delivered a speech before the Palestinian National Council in which he blamed the Holocaus
6h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Very obese women should lose weight during pregnancy for a healthy babyVery obese women should actually lose weight during pregnancy in order to have a healthy baby, contrary to current recommendations, according to a new study in the journal Heliyon. The researchers behind the study, from Centre Hospitalier Universitaire Sud Réunion in France, say the current guidelines for weight gain in pregnancy should be adjusted for better outcomes in underweight and very obese
6h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Scientists discover a variation of the genome predisposing to Alzheimer's diseaseAn article published in Nature Medicine shows that the inheritance of small changes in DNA alters the expression of the PM20D1 gene and is associated with an increased risk of developing Alzheimer's disease.
6h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News

News from the Journal of Lipid ResearchRecent articles in the Journal of Lipid Research found a surprising insight into healthy octogenarians' arteries; a microRNA key to the puzzle of killing fat cells; and a change in cultured cell signaling that may affect experimental outcomes.
6h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Molecule that acts on human cells might provide hope for 'irresistible' cold cureResearchers have lab-tested a molecule that can combat the common cold virus by preventing it from hijacking human cells.
6h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Deeper understanding of quantum chaos may be the key to quantum computersNew research gives insight into a recent experiment that was able to manipulate an unprecedented number of atoms through a quantum simulator. This new theory could provide another step on the path to creating the elusive quantum computers.
6h
Scientific American Content: Global

Experimental Vaccine Will be Used against Ebola Outbreak in the DRCThe inoculation, called V920, was developed by Merck -- Read more on ScientificAmerican.com
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Scientific American Content: Global

Decades-Old Data Unveils Plumes Spewing from EuropaArchived observations from NASA’s Galileo spacecraft all but confirm the Jovian moon’s subsurface ocean is within reach of future life-seeking missions -- Read more on ScientificAmerican.com
6h
Futurity.org

Team discovers roughly 100 potential cancer culpritsResearchers have uncovered a number of proteins that could play a critical role propagating signals within cells that can lead to uncontrolled cell growth—one of the hallmarks of cancer. The study, which appears in Cell Reports , used mouse fibroblast cells. The researchers behind the study believe the results may prove important to the development of new so-called tyrosine phosphatase-inhibiting
6h
TED Talks Daily (SD video)

A healthy economy should be designed to thrive, not grow | Kate RaworthWhat would a sustainable, universally beneficial economy look like? "Like a doughnut," says Oxford economist Kate Raworth. In a stellar, eye-opening talk, she explains how we can move countries out of the hole -- where people are falling short on life's essentials -- and create regenerative, distributive economies that work within the planet's ecological limits.
6h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Robot teaches itself how to dress peopleA robot at the Georgia Institute of Technology is successfully sliding hospital gowns on people's arms. The machine doesn't use its eyes as it pulls the cloth. Instead, it relies on the forces it feels as it guides the garment onto a person's hand, around the elbow and onto the shoulder.
6h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News

New computational strategy designed for more personalized cancer treatmentMathematicians and cancer scientists have found a way to simplify complex biomolecular data about tumors, in principle making it easier to prescribe the appropriate treatment for a specific patient.
6h
Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

Ecological systems research: What do disturbances in the system result in?The effects of disturbances such as flooding or increasing drought on an ecosystem have been difficult to predict in the past. Researchers have demonstrated the complexity with which even simple model ecosystems respond to disturbances and have uncovered underlying mechanisms that may play a role in natural ecosystems.
6h
Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

Parents say intense gun violence in PG-13 movies appropriate for teens 15 and olderParents are more willing to let their children see PG-13 movies with intense gun violence when the violence appears to be 'justified' than when it has no socially redeeming purpose, a study finds. But even when the violence in PG-13 movies appears justified, parents think it is more appropriate for teens at least 15 years old, two years older than the PG-13 rating suggests.
6h
Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

Serving smaller alcoholic drinks could reduce the UK's alcohol consumptionNew research published in Addiction, conducted by researchers from the universities of Liverpool and Sheffield, highlights the potential benefits of reducing the standard serving size of alcoholic beverages.
6h
The Atlantic

Little Women for the Instagram GenerationIt’s hard to describe the aesthetic of PBS’s new two-part miniseries Little Women other than to say it’s Louisa May Alcott by way of Blake Lively’s dearly departed rustic Americana lifestyle-website, Preserve . There are flowers and kittens and snow angels and rowboats and handmade paper chains and maple syrup in mason jars. It’s Masterpiece for the Instagram generation, where sunbeams filter thr
6h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

New volcanic lava fissure in Hawaii prompts more evacuationsA new volcanic fissure on Hawaii's Big Island sent gases and lava exploding into the air, prompting officials to issue calls for more evacuations as residents awaited a possible major eruption at Kilauea volcano's summit.
6h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Zimbabwe warns against cryptocurrenciesZimbabwe's central bank on Monday warned against trading in cryptocurrencies, saying virtual currencies such as bitcoin were not regulated in the country.
6h
Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

Brain size mediates the association between height and cognitive abilitySeveral studies have found that height and general cognitive ability, or intelligence, are positively associated. A recent study reveals a biological factor underlying this relationship: the size of the cerebral cortex.
6h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News

New method of marine alkaloid synthesis has discovered by FEFU scientistsThe development of this method will allow one to get previously inaccessible compounds and to study their biological activity. The work of the young researcher has been published in the authoritative international journal Tetrahedron Letters, which presents the latest achievements in organic synthesis, biochemistry, and medicinal chemistry.
6h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Virtual avatar-to-avatar interviews may improve eyewitness testimonyVirtual avatar-to-avatar eyewitness interviews may increase the quantity and quality of recalled information compared to face-to-face interviews. A first-of-its-kind study shows that eyewitnesses of a mock car theft provided as much as 60 percent more information when interviewed in an avatar-to-avatar context compared to face-to-face interviews. Study participants also found it easier to talk to
6h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Scientists in Russia and Singapore investigate inorganic biomaterials with antimicrobial propertiesA team of scientists from the Lobachevsky University Department of Solid State Chemistry under Dr. Evgeny Bulanov has developed a new method for obtaining bismuth-containing apatite and has studied its crystal structure and thermodynamic properties with the purpose of modeling the behavior of this material under service conditions.
6h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Measuring the hardness of living tissues without damageIn order to understand the process of tissue and organ formations, it is essential to understand how physical characteristics of tissues responding to mechanical stresses influence the process of organogenesis. A research team from the National Institute for Basic Biology (NIBB) and Kyoto University has proposed a unique non-invasive (i.e. without leaving any damage behind) way of measuring the ha
6h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News

ECDC: First cases of extensively drug-resistant gonorrhea threaten future treatmentWithin a matter of weeks, three cases of gonorrhea that are resistant to the recommended first-line antibiotic treatment have been detected in Europe and Australia. At a time with limited alternatives to the current dual therapy, lack of a vaccine and insufficient surveillance capacity in some regions, these cases highlight the growing threat of drug-resistance -- which could lead to untreatable g
6h
The Atlantic

A 'Catastrophe' That Defines Palestinian IdentityViolence is intensifying in Gaza as the United States opens its new embassy in Jerusalem, a convergence of current politics and long-simmering tensions in the region. Israeli forces opened fire on demonstrators, killing dozens and wounding hundreds more, Palestinian officials said. May 14 marks the 70th anniversary of Israel’s founding; May 15 is a day Palestinians know as their nakba , or “catas
6h
Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

Eco-friendly water treatment works best with experienced bacterial floraSustainable, biological filters called slow sand filters have been used to filter drinking water since the 1800s. They don't use any chemicals, create no waste and use very little energy. New research shows that not only are the older filters more efficient cleaners -- they could be making a comeback soon with the help of new technology.
7h
Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

Tumor-like spheres help scientists discover smarter cancer drugsThe technique makes use of tiny, three-dimensional ball-like aggregates of cells called spheroids.
7h
Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

Researchers may be underestimating roadkill numbersA new study indicates that the number of wild animals killed by motor vehicles may be much higher than is generally reported or understood.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

Trial shows chemotherapy is helping kids live with pulmonary vein stenosisA clinical trial shows that adding chemotherapy to a treatment regimen including catheterization and surgery can deter abnormal cellular growth and finally give children with pulmonary vein stenosis a chance to grow up.
7h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Otago study shows 'giant' problem looms for aging populationUrgent attention needs to be paid to frail older New Zealanders' oral health, a University of Otago study has highlighted.
7h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Ecological systems research: What do disturbances in the system result in?The effects of disturbances such as flooding or increasing drought on an ecosystem have been difficult to predict in the past. UFZ researchers have demonstrated the complexity with which even simple model ecosystems respond to disturbances and have uncovered underlying mechanisms that may play a role in natural ecosystems. The study was recently published in the journal Scientific Reports.
7h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Researchers uncover up to 100 potential drug targets for cancerIn a new study based on mouse cells internationally leading protein researchers have identified several new potential targets using state-of-the-art technology, many of which could be employed for future treatment of different types of cancers and diseases.
7h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Email encryption standards hackedA research team from the University of Applied Sciences (FH) in Münster, Horst Görtz Institute for IT Security at Ruhr-Universität Bochum (RUB), and Katholieke Universiteit Leuven has demonstrated that the two most common email encryption standards are vulnerable to attacks. Their attack, referred to as Efail, proved successful in 25 out of 35 tested email programs using the S/MIME encryption stan
7h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Rhino horn used to comfort the terminally ill in VietnamFrom treating cancer and erectile dysfunction to managing hangovers, the horns of endangered wild rhinoceros are widely used as a medical cure-all in parts of Asia. A new Danish-Vietnamese study from the University of Copenhagen uncovers new reasons for why Vietnamese consumers buy illegal rhino horn. This knowledge can now be used in campaigns to save endangered rhinoceros.
7h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Lignin -- A supergreen fuel for fuel cellsResearchers from the Laboratory of Organic Electronics at Linköping University have developed a fuel cell that uses lignin, a cheap by-product from paper manufacture and one of the most common biopolymers.
7h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Why older workers might be more stressed than younger onesOlder workers tend to feel more stress than younger workers when their employers don't provide them with the support and resources needed to do their jobs well, according to a new Portland State University study.
7h
The Atlantic

The 'Black Hole' That Sucks Up Silicon Valley's MoneyThe San Francisco Bay Area has rapidly become the richest region in the county—the Census Bureau said last year that median household income was $96,777. It’s a place where $100,000 Teslas are commonplace, “raw water” goes for $37 a jug , and injecting clients with the plasma of youth —a gag on the television show Silicon Valley —is being tried by real companies for just $8,000 a pop. Yet Sacred
7h
New Scientist - News

Huge new Facebook data leak exposed intimate details of 3m usersFacebook CambridgeData from millions of Facebook users, including their answers to intimate questionnaires, was left exposed online for anyone to access, a New Scientist investigation has found
7h
Dagens Medicin

Rathcke: Lægen på gulvet vil ikke mærke den store forskelCamilla Rathcke er tilfreds med det OK-resultat, der er blevet forhandlet hjem. Men for lægen på gulvet kommer der ikke til at være en mærkbar forskel.
7h
Dagens Medicin

Urafstemning om OK18: Det mener lægerne om aftalenBliver det et ja eller nej, når der skal stemmes om overenskomstaftalen? Dagens Medicin har spurgt tre læger, hvad de mener om aftalen mellem lægerne og regionerne.
7h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Earthquake science could have predicted North Korea's nuclear climbdownJust days after North Korea announced it was suspending its testing programme, scientists revealed that the country's underground nuclear test site had partially collapsed. This assessment was based on data gathered from smaller earthquakes that followed North Korea's biggest nuclear test in 2017. A new study published in Science has now confirmed the collapse using satellite radar imaging.
7h
Big Think

“Wonderfully unimpressive”: hill-climbing in LondonFor urban exploration with an ironic twist, go 'bag' all 32 London Borough Tops Read More
7h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News

European cities soon to be ready for autonomous vehiclesAutonomous vehicles promise to be the next revolution in public transport. They should find their first users in suburban areas, which are less well served by traditional transportation networks. The AVENUE project consortium, led by the University of Geneva (UNIGE) and funded by the European Commission, will identify the needs and motivations of their future users, meet many of the technological
7h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Frequency-stable laser systems for spaceFor the first time a frequency reference based on molecular iodine was successfully demonstrated in space! What sounds a bit like science fiction is an important step towards laser interferometric distance measurements between satellites as well as for future global navigation satellite systems based on optical technologies. The frequency reference tests were carried out on May 13 on board the sou
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News

How our ancestors with autistic traits led a revolution in Ice Age artAround 30,000 years ago realistic art suddenly flourished in Europe. Extremely accurate depictions of bears, bison, horses and lions decorate the walls of Ice Age archaeological sites such as Chauvet Cave in southern France.The authors of a new study argue that individuals with 'detail focus,' a trait linked to autism, kicked off an artistic movement that led to the proliferation of realistic cave
7h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Parents say intense gun violence in PG-13 movies appropriate for teens 15 and olderParents are more willing to let their children see PG-13 movies with intense gun violence when the violence appears to be 'justified' than when it has no socially redeeming purpose, a study finds. But even when the violence in PG-13 movies appears justified, parents think it is more appropriate for teens at least 15 years old, two years older than the PG-13 rating suggests.
7h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Scientists discover how a pinch of salt can improve battery performanceResearchers at Queen Mary University of London, University of Cambridge and Max Planck Institute for Solid State Research have discovered how a pinch of salt can be used to drastically improve the performance of batteries.
7h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Lignin – a supergreen fuel for fuel cellsResearchers from the Laboratory of Organic Electronics at Linköping University have developed a fuel cell that uses lignin, a cheap by-product from paper manufacture and one of the most common biopolymers.
7h
NYT > Science

‘Man With the Golden Arm’ Saved Millions of Australian Babies With His BloodAfter six decades of giving blood, James Harrison, 81, has made his final donation. A rare antibody in his blood helped save more than two million babies, officials said.
7h
Ingeniøren

OK18-afstemning begynder i dag: De Ansattes Råd anbefaler et jaMedlemmer i IDA kan fra i dag stemme på den nye overenskomst for offentligt ansatte. De Ansattes Råd (AR) anbefaler et ja og er tilfreds med forliget.
7h
Ingeniøren

Vibrationer stoppede blæser på Fynsværket: Måtte lukke røg ud af ovenlysvinduerneBorgere kunne lørdag morgen se sort røg vælte ud fra vinduerne på Fynsværket i Odense. En sugetræksblæser var slået fra, så røgen ikke kunne blive ledt op i skorstenen.
7h
Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

Why older workers might be more stressed than younger onesOlder workers tend to feel more stress than younger workers when their employers don't provide them with the support and resources needed to do their jobs well, according to a new study.
7h
Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

Shedding light on a cyclic molecule with a twistAs suggested by their name, Möbius molecules have a twisted loop structure, a special characteristic with many potential applications. A research team has revealed the properties of a type of Möbius aromatic molecule that expresses magnetism and retains high energy levels when exposed to light. These characteristics could potentially be applied in organic solar batteries, lights, and conductive ma
7h
Popular Science

These six products only get better with ageTechnology Your smartphone will be worthless in a few years, but these buys improve as they get older. Technology doesn't age gracefully. Your smartphone will be worthless in a few years, but these products only get better with time.
7h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

New quantum probability rule offers novel perspective of wave function collapseQuantum theory is based heavily on probabilities, since measuring a quantum system doesn't produce the same outcome every time, but instead yields one of many outcomes that each occur with a certain probability. Now in a new paper, physicists have presented a new quantum probability rule for assigning probabilities to measurement outcomes, or events, that essentially combines two of the most impor
7h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Email encryption standards hackedA research team from the University of Applied Sciences (FH) in Münster, Horst Görtz Institute for IT Security at Ruhr-Universität Bochum (RUB), and Katholieke Universiteit Leuven has demonstrated that the two most common email encryption standards are vulnerable to attacks. Their attack, referred to as Efail, proved successful in 25 out of 35 tested email programs using the S/MIME encryption stan
7h
Futurity.org

Bacteria could make cheaper biofuel without so much landA bacterium in mushroom crop residue can contribute to greener and cheaper biofuel production, according to new research. A team of engineers recently discovered that a naturally occurring bacterium, Thermoanaerobacterium thermosaccharolyticum TG57, can directly convert cellulose, a plant-based material, to biobutanol. “The production of biofuels using non-food feedstocks can improve sustainabili
7h
New on MIT Technology Review

Here comes a more precise version of CRISPR
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

In-womb air pollution exposure associated with higher blood pressure in childhoodChildren who were exposed to higher levels air pollution while in the womb had a higher risk of elevated blood pressure in childhood. This is one of the first studies to show that air pollution may have negative health effects on offspring exposed during pregnancy.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

Optical tweezers -- mini 'tractor beams' -- help arrange artificial cells into tissue structuresResearchers have used lasers to connect, arrange and merge artificial cells, paving the way for networks of artificial cells that act like tissues.
7h
Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

Elastic microspheres expand understanding of embryonic development and cancer cellsA new technique that uses tiny elastic balls filled with fluorescent nanoparticles aims to expand the understanding of the mechanical forces that exist between cells, researchers report. The team has demonstrated the quantification of 3D forces within cells living in petri-dishes as well as live specimens. This research may unlock some of the mysteries related to embryonic development and cancer s
7h
Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

New phase of globalization could undermine efforts to reduce CO2 emissionsNew research reveals the growth of carbon production from Chinese exports has slowed or reversed, reflecting a 'new phase of globalization' between developing countries that could undermine international efforts to reduce emissions. The study found that trade among developing nations -- known as South-South trade -- more than doubled between 2004 and 2011.
7h
Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

Ice stream draining Greenland Ice Sheet sensitive to changes over past 45,000 yearsA ribbon of ice more than 600 kilometers long that drains about 12 percent of the gigantic Greenland Ice Sheet has been smaller than it is today about half of the time over the past 45,000 years, a new study suggests.
7h
Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

Fungi may help restore native plant populationsTransplanting fungi to restore native plant populations in the Midwest and Northwest is a new focus of efforts by conservationists. Mycorrhizal fungi form a symbiotic relationship with many plant roots, which helps stabilize the soil, conserve water and provides a habitat for many birds and insects, said one of the authors of the new study.
7h
Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

Preparing for the 'silver tsunami'A law professor suggests how to address nation's looming health-care and economic crisis caused by surging baby-boom population.
7h
Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

What financial markets, cancer cells, and global warming have in commonA team of biophysicists presents a mathematically concise method for comparing different pricing models. This enables researchers to predict more accurately how parameters such as the volatility of stock prices change over time.
7h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News

A new material quickly identifies the presence of harmful ions in food productsA team of scientists from MSU developed a new material based on silicon-titanium gel and a dye agent. The material is able to quickly identify the presence of harmful oxalate ions in food products even in field conditions. No additional operations with the subject of study are required to conduct such analysis. To analyze a sample, one simply has to touch it with the new material, and this is what
7h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Serving smaller alcoholic drinks could reduce the UK's alcohol consumptionNew research published in Addiction, conducted by researchers from the universities of Liverpool and Sheffield, highlights the potential benefits of reducing the standard serving size of alcoholic beverages.
7h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Eco-friendly water treatment works best with experienced bacterial floraSustainable, biological filters called slow sand filters have been used to filter drinking water since the 1800s. They don't use any chemicals, create no waste and use very little energy. New research from Lund University in Sweden shows that not only are the older filters more efficient cleaners -- they could be making a comeback soon with the help of new technology.
7h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Why older workers might be more stressed than younger onesOlder workers tend to feel more stress than younger workers when their employers don't provide them with the support and resources needed to do their jobs well, according to a new Portland State University study.
7h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Shedding light on a cyclic molecule with a twistAs suggested by their name, Möbius molecules have a twisted loop structure, a special characteristic with many potential applications. A Japanese research team has revealed the properties of a type of Möbius aromatic molecule that expresses magnetism and retains high energy levels when exposed to light. These characteristics could potentially be applied in organic solar batteries, lights, and cond
7h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Cystitis treatment: Back to the 1950sDoctors prescribe antibiotic treatments from the 1950s to fight antibiotic resistance. But these 'old' antibiotics were not tested in the same way as their modern counterparts before being put on the market. Doctors from UNIGE and HUG analyzed two antibiotics used against uncomplicated urinary tract infections. They discovered that the most widely prescribed antibiotic today does not meet the expe
7h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News

New research says location of protected areas vital to wildlife survivalA new study, by 17 conservation scientists and environmental scholars, say the exact location of protective wild spaces is just as vital as committing to set these areas aside.
7h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Brain size mediates the association between height and cognitive abilitySeveral studies have found that height and general cognitive ability, or intelligence, are positively associated. A recent study reveals a biological factor underlying this relationship: the size of the cerebral cortex.
7h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Mapping movements of ocean creatures great and smallBig data shows that large marine vertebrates move differently, but consistently, through coastal and ocean waters.
7h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News

A clearer future for underwater explorationAn optical communication system could revolutionize underwater exploration and discovery.
7h
Dagens Medicin

Ekspert: Lidt flere penge på vej til regionerneRegionerne kan formentlig se frem til en smule ekstra penge ved årets økonomiforhandlinger, hvor der også skal snakkes styring og det nære og sammenhængende sundhedsvæsen, vurderer sundhedsøkonom Jakob Kjellberg,
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

The next big discovery in astronomy? Scientists probably found it years ago – but they don't know it yetEarlier this year, astronomers stumbled upon a fascinating finding: Thousands of black holes likely exist near the center of our galaxy.
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Science | The Guardian

Industrial trans fats must be removed from food supply, WHO saysUN health agency says trans fats in snack foods, baked foods and fried foods are responsible for 500,000 deaths each year Trans fats used in snack foods, baked foods and fried foods are responsible for half a million deaths worldwide each year and must be eliminated from the global food supply, the World Health Organization says today. Most of western Europe has already acted to reduce industrial
7h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Race is on to set up Europe's electric car charging networkCharging an electric car away from home can be an exercise in uncertainty—hunting for that one lonely station at the back of a rest-area parking lot and hoping it's working.
7h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

New research says location of protected areas vital to wildlife survivalLocation, location, location is not just a buzzword for homebuyers. A new study, by 17 conservation scientists and environmental scholars, say the exact location of protective wild spaces is just as vital as committing to set these areas aside.
7h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Observations reveal complex environment of HD 50138Using European Southern Observatory's Very Large Telescope (VLT) European astronomers have uncovered a complex circumstellar environment of the star HD 50138. The finding, which could provide important clues about the evolutionary status of this star, was presented in a paper published May 3 on the arXiv pre-print repository.
7h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

'Super-cool' observatory to explore hidden universeA space mission designed to solve fundamental questions about how galaxies and forming planetary systems grow and evolve will be considered by the European Space Agency (ESA).
7h
Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

Cannabis use up among parents with children in the homeCannabis use increased among parents who smoke cigarettes, as well as among non-smoking parents, according to a new study. Cannabis use was nearly four times more common among cigarette smokers compared with non-smokers. Until now, little had been known about current trends in the use of cannabis among parents with children in the home, the prevalence of exposure to both tobacco and cannabis, and
7h
Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

A micro-thermometer to record tiny temperature changesScientists have developed a micrometer-wide thermometer that is sensitive to heat generated by optical and electron beams, and can measure small and rapid temperature changes in real time. This new device can be used to explore heat transport on the micro- and nano-scales, and in optical microscopy and synchrotron radiation experiments.
7h
Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

Forensics: New tool predicts eye, hair and skin color from a DNA sample of an unidentified individualAn international team has developed a novel tool to accurately predict eye, hair and skin color from human biological material -- even a small DNA sample -- left, for example, at a crime scene or obtained from archeological remains. This all-in-one pigmentation profile tool provides a physical description of the person in a way that has not previously been possible by generating all three pigment
7h
Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

Could a multiverse be hospitable to life?A multiverse -- where our universe is only one of many -- might not be as inhospitable to life as previously thought, according to new research.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Norway artists file complaint against Tidal over false streamingNorwegian songwriters, composers and music publishers on Monday said they had lodged a complaint against Jay Z's music platform Tidal after a media report said its streaming statistics had been manipulated.
7h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

HSBC, ING banks announce blockchain firstBanking giants HSBC and ING on Monday said they had carried out a landmark blockchain transaction aimed at speeding up payment processes and making them more secure.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Tesla sets up Shanghai firm as it expands China presenceTesla has set up a company in Shanghai focusing on technology development in China, a crucial market for the US firm as the country plans to scrap ownership limits for foreign automakers.
7h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Facebook suspends 200 apps over data misuseFacebook CambridgeFacebook said Monday it has suspended "around 200" apps on its platform as part of an investigation into misuse of private user data.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Image: Our galaxy's heartAt first glance, this image may resemble red ink filtering through water or a crackling stream of electricity, but it is actually a unique view of our cosmic home. It reveals the central plane of the Milky Way as seen by ESA's Planck satellite and the Atacama Pathfinder Experiment (APEX), which is located at an altitude of around 5100m in the Chilean Andes and operated by the European Southern Obs
8h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Researcher pinpoints optimal age of puppy cutenessThe popular meme proclaiming that all dogs are puppies assumes that humans' adoration of canines is not conditional on their age. But a new study led by Clive Wynne, professor of psychology and director of Arizona State University's Canine Science Collaboratory, suggests otherwise.
8h
Scientific American Content: Global

The Race Is on to Mine and Protect the Deep SeafloorThe race is on to exploit—and protect—the ocean floor -- Read more on ScientificAmerican.com
8h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Preparing for the 'Silver Tsunami'Skyrocketing drug prices and the looming insolvency of Social Security and Medicare are just two of many pressing issues caused by America's surging baby-boom population, often referred to as the "Silver Tsunami."
8h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

How our ancestors with autistic traits led a revolution in Ice Age artThe ability to focus on detail, a common trait among people with autism, allowed realism to flourish in Ice Age art, according to researchers at the University of York.
8h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Eco-friendly water treatment works best with experienced bacterial floraSustainable biological filters called slow sand filters have been used to filter drinking water since the 1800s. They don't use any chemicals, create no waste and use very little energy. However, technologies that meet modern requirements for control, monitoring and time-efficiency have become popular, while biological water treatment has been less favoured, since little has been understood about
8h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Sustainable crop certification helps people and nature, but it could do more to help world's poorest farmersSustainable crop certification schemes could be missing the poorest farmers who are most in need of their benefits, according to a new Atlas Award-winning paper in Biological Conservation.
8h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

New series of proofs toward proving the Unique Games ConjectureA paper posted online in January takes theoretical computer scientists halfway toward proving one of the biggest conjectures in their field. The new study, when combined with three other recent papers, offers the first tangible progress toward proving the Unique Games Conjecture since it was proposed in 2002 by Subhash Khot, a computer scientist now at New York University.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Frequency-stable laser systems for spaceJOKARUS experiment on sounding rocket successfully completed. Corner stone for laser ranging measurements with the highest precision and precursor for optical satellite navigation systems.
8h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Scientists discover how a pinch of salt can improve battery performanceResearchers at Queen Mary University of London, University of Cambridge and Max Planck Institute for Solid State Research have discovered how a pinch of salt can be used to drastically improve the performance of batteries.
8h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

How weakened U.S. fossil fuel regulations threaten environmental justice in ColoradoFrom the start, President Donald Trump's administration has made dismantling regulations, especially for the oil, gas and coal industries, a top priority.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Ultrasound scans for damage to concrete bridgesThe concrete Pantheon in Rome is in excellent condition after 2,000 years. Steel reinforcement can dramatically reduce lifespan of concrete structures however and deterioration can begin after only 10 years.
8h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Coastline flooding threat assessed from spaceOne of the greatest challenges facing human society, the risk of future flooding, continues to grow due to climate change and increasing population pressures on deltas and floodplains. Adequate monitoring, improved management and the restoration of ecosystems and vegetated foreshores are urgently needed.
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Ingeniøren

Dekaner i fælles front mod forslag til nyt erhvervsfremmesystemEn centralisering af vil svække erhvervsfremmesystemet markant, advarer dekaner fra de danske universiteter i samlet flok.
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Ingeniøren

Kronik: Centralisering af erhvervsfremme vil svække forbindelse til videnmiljøer
8h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Focusing on microplastic in honey or beer masks a much bigger problemIn recent years microplastics have been found in everything from honey to beer and drinking water.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

A chip that allows for two-dimensional quantum walksA team of researchers from Shanghai Jiao Tong University and the University of Science and Technology of China has developed a chip that allows for two-dimensional quantum walks of single photons on a physical device. In their paper published on the open access site, Science Advances the group describes the chip and why they believe developing it was important.
8h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Endangered chuditch takes biggest predator crownConservation efforts have brought Western Australia's biggest native mammal predator, the chuditch, back from the brink of extinction.
8h
Scientific American Content: Global

How Climate Change Is Making It Harder to Predict OutbreaksClimate change is accelerating the spread of disease—and making it much harder to predict outbreaks -- Read more on ScientificAmerican.com
8h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News

HSS anesthesia education program sees sustainable results in VietnamTraining local clinicians with regional anesthesia techniques has helped the Vietnamese medical community improve their approach to anesthesia care, results of a survey conducted by the Global Health Initiative at Hospital for Special Surgery (HSS) indicate.
8h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News

New 'Scoring' System for Advanced Colorectal CancerGeorgios Margonis, M.D., Ph.D., a surgical oncology fellow at the Johns Hopkins University School of Medicine, and Matthew Weiss, M.D., surgical director of the Johns Hopkins Liver and Pancreas Cancer Multidisciplinary Clinics, report advances in efforts to improve the treatment and prognosis of colorectal cancers that have spread to the liver.
8h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Preparing for the 'silver tsunami'Case Western Reserve University law professor suggests how to address nation's looming health-care and economic crisis caused by surging baby-boom population.
8h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Identifying PTSD could be affected under proposed changes to global diagnostic toolFewer individuals across the globe would be diagnosed with post-traumatic stress disorder (PTSD) under proposed changes to the most widely used diagnostic tool -- potentially impacting clinical practice, national data reporting and research.
8h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

How eating turtles could help species conservationUsing genetic methods, Senckenberg scientists have discovered that there are more species and genetic lineages of the Chinese softshell turtles Pelodiscus than previously assumed. These turtles are an important food source in Asia – in China alone, more than 340,000 tons are grown and eaten every year. In their study, recently published in the scientific journal The Science of Nature, the internat
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

20th anniversary of first light for SDSS telescopeThis week marks the twentieth anniversary of "first light" for the telescope behind the Sloan Digital Sky Survey (SDSS), which has gone on to create by far the largest three-dimensional map of the Universe ever made. Early in the morning of May 10th, 1998, the observers and engineers pointed the Sloan Foundation Telescope to the celestial equator and light went through to the survey's exquisitely
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Futurity.org

What’s going on with that Kilauea volcano in Hawaii?Hawaii’s Kilauea volcano has been oozing lava for more than three decades. But in recent days, fountains of lava hundreds of feet high, a dozen new fissures, and plumes of steam, ash, and gases have struck the area around Kilauea and forced more than 1,700 people to flee their homes. Hundreds of earthquakes and changes in the shape of Kilauea foretold the eruption and facilitated early warnings f
8h
Dagens Medicin

Ny professor vil behandle multisygdomme ved hjælp af kostOverlæge Steen Bendix Haugaard tiltræder som klinisk professor i multisygdomme inden for medicinsk endokrinologi og intern medicin. Her skal han kigge på, hvordan kost kan erstatte piller.
8h
The Atlantic

Assad Is Desperate for SoldiersTRIPOLI, Lebanon—In late March, the Assad regime released a propaganda video aimed at the young men of Syria. In the video, titled “Braids of Fire,” Asma al-Assad, the wife of Bashar al-Assad, the president of Syria, stands before a squad of female army volunteers dressed in camouflage and army boots. “You are far stronger and more courageous than many men because when the going got tough, you we
8h
The Atlantic

An SAT for CEOsThe private-equity firm Vista Equity Partners owns a sprawling portfolio of technology companies, from Automated Insights to the Xactly Corporation. Together, they provide software to just about every major industry. Since its founding, in 2000, Vista has engineered a nearly unbroken string of profitable acquisitions, a run of success that has made Robert Smith—a co-founder, and its chairman and
8h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Sugar ants lead to sweet rediscoveryThe rediscovery of the arid bronze azure butterfly has scientists racing to save them from extinction.
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Popular Science

Purebred dogs are helping us cure cancerHealth We share more than just a bond with our canine friends. The idea of a dog helping to find a cure for cancer probably conjures images of golden retrievers sniffing blood samples and sitting dutifully in front of the cancerous…
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

If we can't recycle it, why not turn our waste plastic into fuel?Australia's recycling crisis needs us to look into waste management options beyond just recycling and landfilling. Some of our waste, like paper or organic matter, can be composted. Some, like glass, metal and rigid plastics, can be recycled. But we have no immediate solution for non-recyclable plastic waste except landfill.
8h
NYT > Science

Trans Fats Should be Eliminated Worldwide by 2023, W.H.O. SaysEradicating the artery-clogging oils from the food supply could save millions of lives, especially in developing countries, the global health agency said.
8h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Carbon dioxide and iron at the origin of lifeResearchers at the University of Strasbourg have discovered a striking similarity between the way carbon dioxide (CO2) reacts with metals and the way that ancient microbes use CO2 to build their biomass, providing potential insight into how chemistry on the early Earth foreshadowed biochemistry in the first organisms.
8h
Feed: All Latest

Lessons from California Mudslides: Science's Credibility Is At StakeOpinion: Residents' failure to follow evacuation orders in Montecito signal a loss of faith in science.
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Feed: All Latest

The Race to Save Arctic Cities As Permafrost MeltsAs the ground shifts beneath their feet, officials in Canada’s Nunavut turn to creative engineering to save scarce homes—and plan for a future built on bedrock.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Is that selfie really worth it? Why face time with wild animals is a bad ideaThe phenomenon of kangaroo selfies hit the headlines earlier this month, when several tourists were injured while feeding wild kangaroos in Lake Macquarie, north of Sydney. They may have wanted a memorable holiday snap, but ended up with rather more than they bargained for.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

First description of mEAK-7 gene could suggest path toward therapies for cancer, other diseasesFor years, researchers have known that a gene called EAK-7 plays an important role in determining how long worms will live. But it remained unclear whether the gene had a counterpart in humans and – if it did – how that human version would work.
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Scientific American Content: Global

Exoplanet Everests May Be Detectable When Giant Telescopes Come OnlineAstronomers have proposed a way of finding mountains, oceans and volcanoes on distant planets that are much too small to observe directly -- Read more on ScientificAmerican.com
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Futurity.org

To bring out the best in your next meeting, serve coffeeServing coffee at a meeting can focus group discussion, boost involvement, and leave members feeling better about their own and others’ participation, according to new research. Decades of coffee research have explored its effects on the individual, but this study is the first on the effects on performance in group tasks. Participants who drank coffee before the discussion more positively rated t
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Let's get moving with the affordable medium-speed alternatives to the old dream of high-speed railMore than half a century has passed since high-speed rail (HSR) effectively began operating, in Japan in 1964, and it has been mooted for Australia since 1984. I estimate that the cost of all HSR studies by the private and public sectors in Australia exceeds $125 million, in today's dollars. But the federal government is now less interested in high-speed rail (now defined as electric trains operat
9h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Higher temperature, heavier rainAn evaluation of weather radar measurements reveals that in the eastern Mediterranean the total amount of rain decreases with increasing temperatures. But while storms are weakening, convective rain cells – the chief cause of natural hazards in the region – are intensifying.
9h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

New research sheds light on why certain oaks are found togetherNorth America is home to 91 species of oak trees. Astoundingly, the various species rarely, if ever, occur alone. Where one kind of oak is found, invariably at least one more will be found. How can nature support a setup like that when it operates on the principle that only the fittest survive in any one setting?
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Smart drones and deep learning deliver low-cost precision agriculture for Aussie farmersNew aerial drone technology could change the landscape of Australia's billion-dollar wheat industry by delivering cost-effective mechanisms for farmers to plan and deliver precise water and nutrients to their crops on a need-by-need basis.
9h
Live Science

Here's Why You Hate Movie Spoilers (But You Shouldn't)Recently I did something that many people would consider unthinkable, or at least perverse. Before going to see "Avengers: Infinity War," I deliberately read a review that revealed all of the major plot points, from start to finish.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Projecting climate change along the Millennium Silk Road in a warmer worldWestern China and central Asia are positioned centrally along the Millennium Silk Road—a core region bridging the east and west. Understanding the potential changes in climate over this core region is important to the successful implementation of the Belt and Road Initiative, a $1 trillion regional investment in infrastructure. In a recently published study in Atmospheric and Oceanic Science Lette
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Can anyone learn to sing? For most of us, the answer is yesDo you have a pair of vocal folds that can produce sound? Can you tell the difference between a higher note and a lower note? Good news! You and about 98.5% of the population absolutely can be taught how to sing.
9h
Ingeniøren

Rosling: Her er 1900-tallets mest betydningsfulde teknologiske opfindelseDen afdøde svenske professor i folkesundhed og statistik, Hans Rosling, argumenterer for, at vaskemaskinen er henvist til en ufortjent, overset tilværelse i opgørelserne over de vigtigste teknologiske påfund de seneste 200 år.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

What you can do to fight plastic pollutionPlastic permeates just about every aspect of our lives. And because plastic is everywhere, plastic pollution is also everywhere. Eight million metric tons of plastic waste enter the oceans each year, and it's estimated that by 2050, the amount of plastic in the ocean will weigh more than all the fish. Plastic ends up inside animals, too; a sperm whale that recently washed up in Spain had 64 pounds
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Shedding light on a cyclic molecule with a twistAs suggested by their name, Möbius molecules have a twisted loop structure, a special characteristic with many potential applications. A Japanese research team has revealed the properties of a type of Möbius aromatic molecule that expresses magnetism and retains high energy levels when exposed to light. These characteristics could potentially be applied in organic solar batteries, lights, and cond
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Earthquakes and eruptionsResearchers can't predict when the next cataclysmic natural disaster is going to occur, but Adam Bourassa can give you a good idea of how it could affect us.
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Scientific American Content: Global

A New Push for a Universal Flu VaccineOne experimental shot is slated for human testing -- Read more on ScientificAmerican.com
9h
Live Science

Is Pluto a Planet? That Is the Question ... Again.The long-simmering argument about Pluto's planethood has just flared up again.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Tracking the threat of asteroids and cometsIn 1994, astronomers watched in awe as the comet Shoemaker-Levy 9 crashed into the planet Jupiter, creating massive fireballs exploding with the force of six million megatons of TNT—equivalent to 600 times the world's nuclear arsenal.
9h
The Atlantic

Mueller's Probe Is Even More Expansive Than It SeemsFBI agents working for special counsel Robert Mueller allegedly detained a lawyer with ties to Russia who is closely associated with Joseph Mifsud, the shadowy professor who claimed during the election that Russia had “dirt” on Hillary Clinton. The revelation was made in a book co-written by that lawyer, Stephan Roh, and set to be published next month. “The Faking of RUSSIA-GATE: The Papadopoulos
9h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

A seismic shift in oil explorationAn advanced computational method for processing seismic data developed by KAUST researchers allows the detailed structure of deep oil reservoirs to be imaged at unprecedented resolution, opening new possibilities in the increasingly challenging search for new reserves.
9h
Live Science

Where Is the Center of the Universe?It's a trick question.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Counter-terrorism police are now training with virtual terroristsWhat if you could save an airport from terrorists, escape insurgents in South Sudan, and rescue civilians in an underground station all in one morning? With modern technology, the ability to recreate these scenarios within virtual and augmented reality is here, and we're using it to help train counter-terrorism officers and aid workers.
9h
Feed: All Latest

The Japanese Space Bots That Could Build ‘Moon Valley’The Lunar X Prize may be dead, but this startup still wants to go to the moon.
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Feed: All Latest

Tech Addiction and the Business of MindfulnessMeditation isn’t for you? These phone-free social media workshops promise to build the mindfulness right into your technology.
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Feed: All Latest

'Westworld' Is Turning Into 'Lost'—for Better or for WorseSeason 2 has already introduced more weird symbols, hidden bunkers, and beaches. Anyone else feel like they’ve heard this song before?
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Scientific American Content: Global

Can We Read a Person's Character from Facial Images?The discredited “science” of physiognomy is making an unfortunate comeback -- Read more on ScientificAmerican.com
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Could resurrecting mammoths help stop Arctic emissions?If you managed to time travel back to Ice-Age Europe, you might be forgiven for thinking you had instead crash landed in some desolate part of the African savannah. But the chilly temperatures and the presence of six-ton shaggy beasts with extremely long tusks would confirm you really were in the Pleistocene epoch, otherwise known as the Ice Age. You'd be visiting the mammoth steppe, an environmen
10h
New Scientist - News

It is worth valuing trees, but all deserve our respectThe benefits trees bring to our lives are now being quantified by a band of treeconomists, an approach that could help us give trees the respect they deserve
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Regulating social platforms has dangers, like punishing content creatorsBy harnessing social media, the teenage survivors of the Parkland, Florida massacre in the United States have started a movement that might finally shift the dial on gun control.
10h
Science : NPR

Scientific Debate Centers On Giant Crack In Africa's Rift ValleyA deep, wide gash has slashed across the Great Rift Valley floor in a geologically hot part of Kenya. Some wonder if East Africa will eventually separate from the continent.
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Scientific American Content: Global

Antarctic Quest Seeks to Predict the Fate of a Linchpin GlacierAdventurer scientists swarm the melting Thwaites Glacier for clues to how fast sea level will rise -- Read more on ScientificAmerican.com
10h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Hot temperatures could mean swan song for tropical birdsNon-migratory songbirds could be under threat from a warming climate, according to the findings of a 15-year study.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Teenagers shun homework for social media and video gamesTeenagers are far more likely to spend their time on social media and gaming after school than they are to be doing homework, according to a new UCL-led study.
10h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Veterinary surgeon tests an experimental imaging technology on dogs being treated for cancerUp until October 2017, Dutchess's worst health issue was an accidental collision with a tree while chasing a squirrel. So the eight-year-old rescue dog's owner, Lisa Correa, was shocked when a wellness exam at Tufts at Tech Community Veterinary Clinic in Worcester turned up a sign of a serious problem. "They told me they found a lump on her left mammary gland," said Correa. "And my world pretty mu
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

94% of Australians do not read all privacy policies that apply to them – and that's rational behaviourAustralians are agreeing to privacy policies they are not comfortable with and would like companies only to collect data that is essential for the delivery of their service. That's according to new, nation-wide research on consumer attitudes to privacy policies released by the Consumer Policy Research Centre (CPRC) today.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Embryonic patterning system reveals cell coordination to create astonishingly precise patternsAs an embryo develops from a little glob of primitive cells, it patterns itself into precise, spatially organized regions and tissues. This requires that individual cells coordinate with one another over long distances by releasing and detecting specialized signaling molecules. How can cells, communicating only in this indirect manner, create such precise patterns?
10h
Ingeniøren

Folketingspolitikere nervøse for cyberangrebEfter henvendelser fra bekymrede folketingspolitikere har Folketingets formand holdt møde med Center for Cybersikkerhed.
10h
Ingeniøren

Svamp fra Korea udløser hjerteanfald hos frøer verden overEn tredjedel af verdens frøarter er forsvundet på grund af en særlig piskesvamp, som forskere nu har sporet til klokkefrøer i Korea. Stop handel med frøer og tudser, lyder det.
10h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Researchers offer new technology for liquid-crystal displaysAn international research team from Russia, France and Germany has proposed a new method for orienting liquid crystals. It could be used to increase the viewing angle of liquid-crystal displays. The paper was published in the journal ACS Macro Letters.
10h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Largest-ever 3-D quantum chip for boosting analog quantum computingChinese scientists Xianmin Jin and his colleagues from Shanghai Jiao Tong University have successfully fabricated the largest-scaled quantum chip and demonstrated the first two-dimensional quantum walks of single photons in real spatial space, which may provide a powerful platform to boost analog quantum computing for quantum supremacy.
10h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Why your smartphone may soon start scanning your veinsManufacturers may be favouring fingerprints over passcodes to allow access to smartphones, but Edith Cowan University (ECU) researchers already see the technology as nearing obsolescence.
10h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Researchers develop method to compare pricing modelsA team of biophysicists from Friedrich-Alexander-Universität Erlangen-Nürnberg (FAU) presents a mathematically concise method for comparing different pricing models in their latest publication in Nature Communications. This enables researchers to predict more accurately how parameters such as the volatility of stock prices change over time.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

A micro-thermometer to record tiny temperature changesScientists at Tokyo Institute of Technology (Tokyo Tech) and their collaborators have developed a micrometer-wide thermometer that is sensitive to heat generated by optical and electron beams, and can measure small and rapid temperature changes in real time. This new device can be used to explore heat transport on the micro- and nano-scales, and in optical microscopy and synchrotron radiation expe
10h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Stillborn fawns first known conjoined deer to be fully deliveredA Minnesota mushroom hunter on the prowl for some fungi stumbled across an unbelievable find: two deer fawns sharing one body.
10h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Supercharged biomacromolecules can maintain their reordered structures induced, for example, by a fingertip touchStimuli-sensitive materials can respond to physical forces with structural phase transitions. This also applies to biopolymer–surfactant mixtures, a study by German and Chinese scientists now reports. Surprisingly, the newly adopted phases persist after removal of the stress and can be detected by a simple optical read-out technology. Biometric fingerprint detection is an attractive application fo
10h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Nano-ribbons from speeding nano-dropletsNational University of Singapore scientists have discovered a unique growth mechanism to produce atomically thin semiconductor ribbons that can serve as a building block for high-performance nanoelectronic devices.
10h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

We asked people if they would trust driverless carsWe're promised a future with driverless cars on our roads, but do people really trust the technology to take us safely on journeys?
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Ingeniøren

Techtopia #52: Hvad laver Uber i Aarhus?Podcast: Du tror måske, at Uber har forladt Danmark? Men du tager fejl. Selvom der ikke kører Uber biler i gaderne, så er firmaet stadig i Danmark.
10h
Ingeniøren

FE: Cybertrussel mod Danmark er fortsat meget højDen nyeste trusselsvurdering, som Center for Cybersikkerhed netop har offentliggjort, vurderer den generelle cybertrussel mod Danmark som værende meget høj. Det er det højeste trusselsniveau, CFCS arbejder med.
10h
Ingeniøren

Kunstig intelligens komponerer musik: Er den næste Mozart en algoritme?Musik er svær at beskrive præcist indenfor matematikkens rammer, men den udfordring gør kun problemet mere spændende, mener François Pachet, der har udgivet et album med numre komponeret af en kunstig intelligens.
10h
Ingeniøren

Cyberangreb ramte DSB søndagSøndag aften var der ikke muligt at købe billet til afgange med DSB. Statsbanerne var blevet ramt af et DDoS-angreb, som lagde deres billettjenester ned.
11h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

The photoexcited graphene puzzle solvedLight detection and control lies at the heart of many modern device applications, such as the cameras in phones. Using graphene as a light-sensitive material for light detectors offers significant improvements with respect to materials being used nowadays. For example, graphene can detect light of almost any colour, and it gives an extremely fast electronic response within one millionth of a milli
11h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Ice stream draining Greenland Ice Sheet sensitive to changes over past 45,000 yearsA ribbon of ice more than 600 kilometers long that drains about 12 percent of the gigantic Greenland Ice Sheet has been smaller than it is today about half of the time over the past 45,000 years, a new study suggests.
11h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News

New phase of globalization could undermine efforts to reduce CO2 emissionsNew research reveals the growth of carbon production from Chinese exports has slowed or reversed, reflecting a 'new phase of globalization' between developing countries that could undermine international efforts to reduce emissions.The study, involving researchers from the University of East Anglia and colleagues in China and the United States, found that trade among developing nations -- known as
11h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Elastic microspheres expand understanding of embryonic development and cancer cellsA new technique that uses tiny elastic balls filled with fluorescent nanoparticles aims to expand the understanding of the mechanical forces that exist between cells, researchers report. A University of Illinois-led team has demonstrated the quantification of 3D forces within cells living in petri dishes as well as live specimens. This research may unlock some of the mysteries related to embryonic
11h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Mini tractor beams help arrange artificial cells into tissue structuresResearchers have used lasers to connect, arrange and merge artificial cells, paving the way for networks of artificial cells that act like tissues.
11h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News

In-womb air pollution exposure associated with higher blood pressure in childhoodChildren who were exposed to higher levels air pollution while in the womb had a higher risk of elevated blood pressure in childhood. This is one of the first studies to show that air pollution may have negative health effects on offspring exposed during pregnancy.
11h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Isotopic evidence for enhanced fossil fuel sources of aerosol ammonium in the urban atmosphereIdentifying the sources of aerosol ammonium is essential because ammonium can impact the Earth's radiative balance, as well as human health and biological diversity. The sources of ambient ammonia concentrations can be quantified based on the stable isotopic composition of ammonia for various endmembers. However, isotopic source apportionment of aerosol ammonium is challenging in the urban atmosph
11h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Microscale IR spectroscopy enabled by phase change materials and metasurfacesThe mid-infrared is an interesting part of the electromagnetic spectrum composed of colours that cannot be seen by the human eye. Many chemical molecules resonate when illuminated by infrared light. This infrared resonance can then be used to identify or "fingerprint" the molecules. The infrared is, therefore, useful for a range of applications, including atmospheric pollution monitoring, detectin
11h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Taurine deficiency in sperm causes male infertility, study findsSperm are highly specialized cells adapted to achieve a single goal: fertilize an egg. Along the road to fertilization, sperm must embark on a lengthy journey to the female oviduct, avoiding several fatal stresses that occur when they pass through different physiological environments. However, the events that allow sperm cells to achieve fertilization under these conditions are only partially unde
11h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

China hails Trump's ZTE olive branch ahead of trade talksZTE Chinese Trump USChina on Monday hailed President Donald Trump's offer to prevent Chinese telecom giant ZTE from collapsing due to a US technology ban, as the two sides prepare for new negotiations this week to avert a trade war.
11h
Ingeniøren

Usynlighedskappe under vand snyder sonarAmerikanske forskere har udviklet et akustisk skjold med et metamateriale, der slører tilstedeværelsen af objekter under vand.
11h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Mini tractor beams help arrange artificial cells into tissue structuresResearchers have used lasers to connect, arrange and merge artificial cells, paving the way for networks of artificial cells that act like tissues.
11h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

New phase of globalization could undermine efforts to reduce CO2 emissionsNew research reveals the growth of carbon production from Chinese exports has slowed or reversed, reflecting a "new phase of globalisation" between developing countries that could undermine international efforts to reduce emissions.
11h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Elastic microspheres expand understanding of embryonic development and cancer cellsA new technique that uses tiny elastic balls filled with fluorescent nanoparticles aims to expand the understanding of the mechanical forces that exist between cells, researchers report. A University of Illinois-led team has demonstrated the quantification of 3-D forces within cells living in petri dishes as well as live specimens. This research may unlock some of the mysteries related to embryoni
11h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Ice stream draining Greenland Ice Sheet sensitive to changes over past 45,000 yearsA ribbon of ice more than 600 kilometers long that drains about 12 percent of the gigantic Greenland Ice Sheet has been smaller than it is today about half of the time over the past 45,000 years, a new study suggests.
11h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

California coastline stripped of plants prized in AsiaThe tip came from a woman standing in line at a post office in a small town in northern California.
12h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Nissan reports record full-year profit but warns on outlookJapanese car giant Nissan on Monday reported a record full-year net profit thanks to US tax cuts but warned about the outlook for the next 12 months owing to a strong yen.
12h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Australian breaks world record with Everest summitAn Australian climber reached the top of Mount Everest Monday, becoming the fastest person to summit the highest mountain on each of the world's seven continents.
12h
Ingeniøren

Den flyvende bil findes alleredeUtallige projekter har gennem tiderne forsøgt at gøre biler flyvende. Her er tre eksempler på køretøjer, som også kan indtage luftrummet. Men prisen er høj, og der er stadig brug for en start- og landingsbane.
12h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Forensic accounting can predict future food fraudFood fraud, where different or low-quality food is deliberately mislabelled and sold as high-quality goods, risks the health of consumers as well as the economic viability of producers and manufacturers. To combat this, researchers have figured out that analysing the past and present behaviour of criminal activity could predict what they might target in the future.
12h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

EU data laws set to bite after Facebook scandalNew European Union data protection laws take effect on May 25 to protect users' online information, in what Brussels touts as a global benchmark after the Facebook scandal.
13h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

In DR Congo, home-grown digital entrepreneurs defy oddsBeing a digital entrepreneur in the Democratic Republic of Congo comes with many challenges, not least that internet access is very limited in a vast country of more than 80 million people.
13h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Rights for citizens, duties for firms under new EU data rulesThe EU's new data protection rules are set to bolster European citizens' rights while imposing new responsibilities on companies.
13h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

JAL to launch low-cost carrier ahead of 2020 Tokyo OlympicsJapan Airlines (JAL) on Monday announced plans to launch a budget airline, hoping to take advantage of an expected expansion in the nation's low-cost market ahead of the 2020 Tokyo Olympics.
13h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Xerox ends merger with Fujifilm in victory for shareholdersUS photocopier and printer maker Xerox on Sunday announced it was terminating a merger with Fujifilm and appointing a new chief executive after entering into a settlement with activist shareholders who had contested the takeover.
13h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

No crisis for Panini stickers as World Cup fever buildsBetween eight and ten million packets a day, each with five cards, perhaps including the coveted ones of Lionel Messi, Neymar or Cristiano Ronaldo—as World Cup fever builds the Panini sticker factory in Italy is working flat out.
13h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Researchers may be underestimating roadkill numbersA new study in the Journal of Urban Ecology, published by Oxford University Press, indicates that the number of wild animals killed by motor vehicles may be much higher than is generally reported or understood.
13h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

WSU Tri-Cities team researching use of fungi to restore native plant populationsTransplanting fungi to restore native plant populations in the Midwest and Northwest is the focus of efforts by a team of WSU Tri-Cities researchers.
13h
Science-Based Medicine

The Null hypothesis: Gary Null attacks science-based medicineOver the last couple of weeks, one of the old men of quackery, Gary Null, has decided (yet again) that he really, really doesn't like science-based medicine. That includes Steve Novella, Susan Gerbic, and...me. As is his usual habit, Null teamed up with his producer Richard Gale and wrote some seriously off-base screeds against Wikipedia, skeptics, and science-based medicine, basically the forces
13h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Could a multiverse be hospitable to life?A Multiverse—where our Universe is only one of many—might not be as inhospitable to life as previously thought, according to new research.
13h
Science | The Guardian

Inside Shanghai's robot bank: China opens world's first human-free branch‘Little Dragon’ can chat to customers, accept bank cards and check accounts. She joins a growing army of robot workers in China’s cities Xiao Long, the latest employee at the Jiujiang Road branch of the China Construction Bank is never late for work. “Welcome to China Construction Bank,” she chirps to customers arriving at the Shanghai branch, flashing her white teeth. “What can I help you with t
14h
BBC News - Science & Environment

Plant 'thugs' crowd roadside flowersIt is claimed the UK's roadside wild flowers are suffering because of pollution and poor management.
15h
Feed: All Latest

'Westworld' Recap, Season 2 Episode 4: More Human Than HumanThis week’s episode went in a direction many fans predicted—and planted more explosives in its philosophical minefield.
15h
NeuWrite West

A Pathway Towards Alzheimer’s Disease Treatments: Understanding the Role of ApoE in Human Neuron PhysiologyHuang YWA, Zhou B, Wernig M, Sudhof TC (2017). “ApoE2, ApoE3, and ApoE4 Differentially Stimulate APP Transcription and Aβ Secretion.” Cell 168(3): 427-441. http://www.cell.com/cell/fulltext/S0092-8674(16)31760-3 More than five million individuals are affected by Alzheimer’s Disease (AD) in the United States. This dementia is the sixth leading cause of death nationwide, and one of every three seni
16h
The Scientist RSS

Our Top 10 Innovations Contest is Now Accepting SubmissionsEnter your new product to have a chance at being selected for a coveted spot in The Scientist's 2018 competition.
16h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Tumor-like spheres help scientists discover smarter cancer drugsThe technique makes use of tiny, three-dimensional ball-like aggregates of cells called spheroids.
16h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News

A micro-thermometer to record tiny temperature changesScientists at Tokyo Institute of Technology (Tokyo Tech) and their collaborators have developed a micrometer-wide thermometer that is sensitive to heat generated by optical and electron beams, and can measure small and rapid temperature changes in real time. This new device can be used to explore heat transport on the micro- and nano-scales, and in optical microscopy and synchrotron radiation expe
16h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News

WSU Tri-Cities team researching use of fungi to restore native plant populationsTransplanting fungi to restore native plant populations in the Midwest and Northwest is the focus of efforts by a team of WSU Tri-Cities researchers.Mycorrhizal fungi form a symbiotic relationship with many plant roots, which helps stabilize the soil, conserve water and provides a habitat for many birds and insects, said Tanya Cheeke, assistant professor of biology.
16h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News

What financial markets, cancer cells, and global warming have in commonA team of biophysicists from Friedrich-Alexander-Universität Erlangen-Nürnberg (FAU) presents a mathematically concise method for comparing different pricing models in their latest publication in Nature Communications. This enables researchers to predict more accurately how parameters such as the volatility of stock prices change over time.
16h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Researchers may be underestimating roadkill numbersA new study in the Journal of Urban Ecology indicates that the number of wild animals killed by motor vehicles may be much higher than is generally reported or understood.
16h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Cannabis use up among parents with children in the homeCannabis use increased among parents who smoke cigarettes, as well as among non-smoking parents, according to a new study. Cannabis use was nearly four times more common among cigarette smokers compared with non-smokers. Until now, little had been known about current trends in the use of cannabis among parents with children in the home, the prevalence of exposure to both tobacco and cannabis, and
16h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Screening for impaired vision in older adults: New Canadian guidelineA new Canadian guideline for impaired vision in older adults recommends against primary care screening of older adults not reporting concerns about their vision. The guideline, published in English and French in CMAJ (Canadian Medical Association Journal) by the Canadian Task Force on Preventive Health Care (CTFPHC), is aimed at primary care practitioners.
16h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Genetic Non-Discrimination Act challenge from Quebec may open doors to genetic discriminationIf Canada's Genetic Non-Discrimination Act (GNA) is overturned by a challenge from the Province of Quebec, it will open the doors to genetic discrimination, argue authors in a commentary in CMAJ (Canadian Medical Association Journal).
16h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Gout not associated with increased risk of fracture, study findsGout, a painful inflammatory arthritis, is not associated with an increased risk of fracture, according to a large study led by Keele University, and published in CMAJ (Canadian Medical Association Journal).
16h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Meeting with OBGYN prior to first exam empowers young women in medical settingsA new national survey by Orlando Health found that nearly 40 percent of women were at least somewhat concerned about what would happen during their first OBGYN exam. That's why experts at Orlando Health are encouraging girls and their parents to speak with their OBGYN in a non-clinical setting before their first exam.
16h
Feed: All Latest

Acura's RDX Comes With an Easy-to-Use Infotainment SystemThe 2019 RDX SUV comes with a 'True Touchpad' interface that takes the best parts of touchscreens and touchpads, to make life on the road easier than ever.
17h
Ingeniøren

Premieren på jernbanens nye signalsystem bliver udskudtProblemerne i signalprogrammet har på under et halvt år ædt sig igennem store dele af programmets store tidsmæssige buffer, så den første ERTMS-strækning i Østdanmark indvies alligevel ikke i år.
17h
The Atlantic

No, That Episode of Westworld Was Not an Homage to LostThere are precisely two times that a TV show has completely blown my mind. One was, of course, when Ned Stark lost his head in the first season of Game of Thrones in 2011. (By the time of subsequent shocks, such as the Red Wedding, I’d read the novels.) The other was the Season 2 opener of Lost , back in 2005. In what appeared to be a flashback , Desmond (played by the Scottish Peruvian actor Hen
18h
The Atlantic

Westworld and the Question of ImmortalityEvery week for the second season of Westworld , three Atlantic staffers will discuss new episodes of HBO’s cerebral sci-fi drama. David Sims: Westworld ’s first season was largely focused on the abuse of artificial life, given that the park hosts’ purpose almost exclusively revolved around sex, violence, and suffering. The freedom Dolores and her ilk were fighting for was simple consciousness—a r
18h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Could a multiverse be hospitable to life?A multiverse -- where our universe is only one of many -- might not be as inhospitable to life as previously thought, according to new research.
20h
Futurity.org

‘Black box’ chip makes hacking impossibleResearchers have created a chip that deploys ionic memristor technology to solve the digital problem of security with an analog memory hardware solution. While we embrace the way the Internet of Things already is making our lives more streamlined and convenient, the cybersecurity risk posed by millions of wirelessly connected gadgets, devices, and appliances remains a huge concern. Even single, t
21h

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