Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Astronomers find fastest-growing black hole known in spaceAstronomers at ANU have found the fastest-growing black hole known in the Universe, describing it as a monster that devours a mass equivalent to our sun every two days.
8h
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Wildfires may cause long-term health problems for endangered orangutansOrangutans, already critically endangered due to habitat loss from logging and farming, may face another threat in the form of smoke from natural and human-caused fires, a Rutgers University-New Brunswick study finds. The study appears in the journal Scientific Reports.
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Ingeniøren

Københavnske bioposer er lavet af 70 pct. fossil plastDe grønne poser i de københavnske biospande er først og fremmest grønne af udseende, viser nye undersøgelser. Kommunen er overrasket.
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The Atlantic

Solo: Finally a Star Wars Movie That's Not a Rehash of Star WarsI saw Star Wars on opening night in 1977 when I was 10 years old, one of a small number of occasions on which history’s timeline and my own have aligned perfectly. (And no, don’t even start with your “A New Hope” or “Episode IV”; the movie’s title was, and remains, “ Star Wars ,” no matter what retroactive nonsense George Lucas may have spent years peddling.) My 10-year-old self had precisely one
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New on MIT Technology Review

The cryptocurrency industry is going mainstream—time for some self-regulation
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

Orbital variations can trigger 'snowball' states in habitable zones around sunlike starsAspects of an otherwise Earthlike planet's tilt and orbital dynamics can severely affect its potential habitability -- even triggering abrupt 'snowball states' where oceans freeze and surface life is impossible, according to new research from astronomers.
6min
Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

The first wireless flying robotic insect takes offEngineers have created RoboFly, the first wireless flying robotic insect. RoboFly is slightly heavier than a toothpick and is powered by a laser beam.
6min
Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

New robot concept uses responsive materials to swim through waterEngineers have created a soft robot that does not rely on a motor to propel itself through the water.
6min
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Thoreau's 'Walden' gets new life as a video gameA team at the University of Southern California's Game Innovation Lab has adapted Henry David Thoreau's "Walden" into a video game.
13min
Live Science

What the Heck Is This Hairy 'Sea Monster'?It came from the depths of the ocean and has since mystified onlookers: the decaying, truck-size body of a hairy sea monster.
16min
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Texas city of Arlington says it's out of bid for Amazon HQ2The city of Arlington says it's "no longer moving forward" in the competition to become Amazon's second headquarters, and released details of the incentives it offered the online retailer.
19min
The Atlantic

What 'The Age of the Twink' Actually MeansThe New York Times article “Welcome to the Age of the Twink” that Twitter has gleefully torn apart this week is a bit too slight to sustain a full reckoning with the very real questions it raises. In just 600 words for T Magazine , Nick Haramis asserts that youthful scrawniness characterizes a new class of celebrity male dreamboat, illustrated partly by the rise of Call Me by Your Name actor Timo
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The Atlantic

How Hungary Ran George Soros Out of TownGeorge Soros HungaryPARIS—Has Hungary’s Viktor Orbán won this round against the European Union? The announcement Tuesday that George Soros’s Open Society Foundations (OSF) will move its headquarters out of Budapest and set up shop in Berlin, a victim of the Orbán government’s crackdown on foreign NGOs, certainly seems to indicate as much. The question now is will the European Union push back? And how? Orbán, whose r
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NYT > Science

Books of The Times: Essays That Make Sense of the Infinite and the Infinitesimal“When Einstein Walked with Gödel” is a collection of Jim Holt’s elegant essays, which make big subjects — like the illusion of time — both intelligible and enticing.
22min
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Lawsuit contends energy lease sales will affect environmentEnvironmental groups and three Montana landowners sued Tuesday to cancel hundreds of recent oil and gas lease sales, saying the U.S. government's leasing of public lands is skyrocketing without understanding how all that drilling will affect water quality and climate change.
25min
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Facebook shut 583 million fake accountsFacebook axed 583 million fake accounts in the first three months of 2018, the social media giant said Tuesday, detailing how it enforces "community standards" against sexual or violent images, terrorist propaganda or hate speech.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Tesla chief defends self-driving cars after new crashTesla chief Elon Musk defended self-driving car technology on Tuesday after reports about the latest crash involving one of the electric carmaker's vehicles.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Whites distrust biracial people when their racial presentation varies, study findsWhites consider biracial people to be less trustworthy if they change their racial presentation depending on circumstances, Rutgers University-New Brunswick researchers find.
43min
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Not quite a 'double bind' for minority women in scienceMany studies have shown that both minority and women scientists face disadvantages in reaching the highest levels of their careers.
49min
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Researchers find new way to stimulate cellular recycling processBrown University researchers studying the biology of aging have demonstrated a new strategy for stimulating autophagy, the process by which cells rebuild themselves by recycling their own worn-out parts.
49min
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Making carbon nanotubes as usable as common plasticsNorthwestern University's Jiaxing Huang is ready to reignite carbon nanotube research. And he's doing so with a common chemical that was once used in household cleaners.
55min
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Monitoring lava lake levels in Congo volcanoNyiragongo in the Democratic Republic of the Congo is among the world's most active volcanoes, with a persistent lava lake as one of its defining features. In a talk at the 2018 SSA Annual Meeting, Adrien Oth of the European Center for Geodynamics and Seismology discussed how he and his colleagues are using multiple methods to monitor lava lake levels at the volcano.
55min
Popular Science

NASA just added a tiny autonomous helicopter to its next Mars missionSpace One small flight for drones The Mars 2020 rover will have a flying companion—a helicopter designed to take short flights on Mars.
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Inside Science

The Challenges of Bringing Native Bees to Almond OrchardsCreature Farmers, scientists and beekeepers are working to raise blue orchard mason bees to pollinate valuable orchard crops. 05/15/2018 Anna Katrina Hunter, Contributor https://www.insidescience.org/news/challenges-bringing-native-bees-almond-orchards
58min
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Cultivating corrupt ties in post-Mao ChinaIn "Making Business Personal: Corruption, Anti-corruption, and Elite Networks in Post-Mao China," published in Current Anthropology, John Osburg argues that the implementation of reforms to promote market competition and accountability in post-Mao China fostered the creation of corrupt business networks during this period. Osburg examines how economic reforms and anti-corruption campaigns led entr
1h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News

National trial: EEG brain tests help patients overcome depressionA UT Southwestern study -- to be published in the June edition of the Journal of the American Medical Association Psychiatry -- found that measuring electrical activity in the brain can help predict a patient's response to an antidepressant.
1h
Live Science

Could Reviving Woolly-Mammoth Genes Fight the Effects of Global Warming?Scientists hope to mingle woolly mammoth genes with those of today's elephants to help permafrost from melting.
1h
New on MIT Technology Review

Facebook is getting better at detecting hate speech, but it still has a long way to go
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Not quite a 'double bind' for minority women in scienceMany studies have shown that both minority and women scientists face disadvantages in reaching the highest levels of their careers. So it would make sense that minority women would face a 'double bind' that would particularly disadvantage them. But a new study using a massive database of scientific articles suggests that minority women actually face what might be called a 'one-and-a-half bind.'
1h
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New 'Silk Road' brings challenges and opportunities for biodiversity conservationIn an article published in Nature Sustainability, scientists argues that environmental protection should be a priority for the 'Belt and Road' initiative. This Chinese project would then represent not only an investment to foster international trade but also an opportunity for sustainable development leadership. Among the team, who calls for rigorous strategic environmental and social assessments,
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Making carbon nanotubes as usable as common plasticsBy using an inexpensive, already mass produced, simple solvent called cresol, Northwestern University's Jiaxing Huang has discovered a way to make disperse carbon nanotubes at unprecedentedly high concentrations without the need for additives or harsh chemical reactions to modify the nanotubes. In a surprising twist, Huang also found that as the nanotubes' concentrations increase, the material tra
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The Atlantic

The Lexicon of Tom WolfeTom Wolfe AmericanThe paeans to Tom Wolfe, who died on Monday at the age of 88, inevitably extol his colorfully inventive use of language across his decades of fiction and nonfiction writing. As the New York Times obituary observes , “He had a pitiless eye and a penchant for spotting trends and then giving them names, some of which—like ‘Radical Chic’ and ‘the Me Decade’—became American idioms.” Wolfe’s contributi
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Science : NPR

The Push To Reverse America's Rising Maternal Mortality RatesMost maternal deaths in the U.S. are preventable. So why are American moms at such a high risk? (Image credit: Joe Raedle/Getty Images)
1h
Inside Science

The Challenges of Bringing Native Bees to Almond OrchardsThe Challenges of Bringing Native Bees to Almond Orchards Farmers, scientists and beekeepers are working to raise blue orchard mason bees to pollinate valuable orchard crops. BlueOrchardBee.jpg Blue Orchard Bee (Osmia) Image credits: USGS Bee Inventory and Monitoring Lab via Flickr (Homepage Image Credit: Suzi Rosenberg via Flickr) Rights information: Public Domain Creature Tuesday, May 15, 2018
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Source of Potential Bias Widespread in Large Genetic StudiesA new statistical method finds that many genetic variants used to determine trait-disease relationships may have additional effects that GWAS analyses don't pick up.
1h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News

LGBTQ teens experiencing high levels of stress, says national surveyThis survey comes five years after HRC's groundbreaking 2012 study of LGBTQ youth -- one of the first initiatives launched by the organization under Griffin's leadership. They comprise the most reliable data collected about the experiences of LGBTQ young people in America.
1h
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VA health care successfully reduces 'rush to treatment' rates for low-risk prostate cancerIncreasing numbers of male veterans are opting out of immediate surgery or radiation to treat low-risk prostate cancer, postponing treatment unless the cancer worsen.
1h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Orbital variations can trigger 'snowball' states in habitable zones around sunlike starsAspects of an otherwise Earthlike planet's tilt and orbital dynamics can severely affect its potential habitability -- even triggering abrupt 'snowball states' where oceans freeze and surface life is impossible, according to new research from astronomers at the University of Washington.
1h
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Uber Is Harnessing the Sexual Harassment Crisis to Rebuild Its BrandUber LyftCEO Dara Khosrowshahi is trying to make Uber seem trustworthy. Ending forced arbitration is a savvy first step.
1h
NYT > Science

Why Alaska Is Crafting a Plan to Fight Climate Change: It’s Impossible to IgnoreMany solidly Republican states have resisted aggressive climate policies, but Alaska is already seeing the dramatic effects of global warming.
1h
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Tax Compromise Gives Amazon’s Latest Seattle Office New LifeSeattle Amazon HQ2The city council cut a proposed per-employee fee nearly in half, after Amazon and more than 100 other companies opposed the original plan.
1h
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Monitoring lava lake levels in Congo volcanoNyiragongo in the Democratic Republic of the Congo is among the world's most active volcanoes, with a persistent lava lake as one of its defining features. In a talk at the 2018 SSA Annual Meeting, Adrien Oth of the European Center for Geodynamics and Seismology will discuss how he and his colleagues are using multiple methods to monitor lava lake levels at the volcano.
1h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Researchers find new way to stimulate cellular recycling processIn research that could lead to future therapies for age-related diseases, Brown University researchers have found a new way to stimulate the process by which cells recycle their spare parts.
1h
The Atlantic

Spectacular Images of the Recent Eruptions in HawaiiHawaii Kilauea volcanoThe newest phase of Kilauea volcano’s ongoing eruption has opened as many as 20 new fissures on Hawaii's Big Island over the past two weeks, spewing lava and volcanic gases, forcing the evacuation of nearly 2,000 residents, and destroying dozens of homes near the town of Pahoa. Officials from the U.S. Geological Survey have been watching a recent lowering of the lava lake in Kilauea’s Halemaumau
1h
The Atlantic

Ancient Rome’s Collapse Is Written Into Arctic IceOn March 15, some time ago, several dozen famous politicians—sturdy men, duly elected senators who claimed to love their republic—attacked their chief executive while he walked into the Senate. They stabbed Gaius Julius Caesar 23 times, as he fell to the floor, defenseless, and bled to death, setting off a chain of wars that formally ended the Roman Republic and initiated the Roman Empire. Some 2
1h
Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

Optimal age of puppy cuteness optimizedCanine researchers reveals more about the depth and origin of the human-dog relationship.
2h
Live Science

'Lost' Asteroid 2010 WC9 Will Make an Unusually Close Flyby of Earth TodayA jumbo-jet-size asteroid will give Earth a close shave today (May 15), whizzing past our planet at a safe distance of 126,000 miles (203,000 kilometers) — or about half the distance between Earth and the moon.
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New Scientist - News

Falling mini-moons may have created Earth’s first continentsThe early Earth was likely orbited by lots of small moons, which rained down onto the surface and could have built up ancient continents
2h
New Scientist - News

A new synthetic molecule may solve a paradox about life’s originMany scientists suspect life began with a molecule called RNA, but there has long been a big problem with this idea. Now there is a solution
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New Scientist - News

We’ve only just realised the huge power and value of our dataPeople signup to Facebook personality apps for fun but few read the terms and conditions. Once, this may have seemed reasonable, but the climate has changed
2h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Researchers identify method to overcome false positives in CT imaging for lung cancerA team of researchers including investigators from Mayo Clinic has identified a technology to address the problem of false positives in CT-based lung cancer screening.
2h
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Keeping kids with asthma out of the hospitalOnly multimodal interventions that combined multiple categories were effective at reducing the risk of readmission for pediatric asthma between 30 days and one year after initial discharge, Children's research finds.
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cognitive science

Lie-detecting computers equipped with artificial intelligence look like the future of border securitysubmitted by /u/trot-trot [link] [comments]
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The Atlantic

The Legal 'Pet-Poaching' ProblemIt’s easy to spot a wild parrot in Miami, as in San Francisco, San Diego, and several other metropolitan areas in the U.S. But in Florida, “technically, it’s not illegal to take wild parrots, according to Florida Fish & Wildlife,” says Daria Feinstein, a parrot conservationist, in Neil Losin’s short documentary, Parrots in Peril. The film examines the threat that poaching poses to Miami’s wild ma
2h
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Research pinpoints optimal age of puppy cutenessCanine researcher Clive Wynne's research reveals more about the depth and origin of the human-dog relationship.
2h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News

No motor, no battery, no problemEngineers have created a soft robot that does not rely on a motor to propel itself through the water.
2h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News

The first wireless flying robotic insect takes offEngineers at the University of Washington have created RoboFly, the first wireless flying robotic insect. RoboFly is slightly heavier than a toothpick and is powered by a laser beam.
2h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Some calories more harmful than othersWhile calories from any food have the potential to increase the risk of obesity and other cardiometabolic diseases, 22 nutrition researchers agree that sugar-sweetened beverages play a unique role in chronic health problems.
2h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Whites distrust biracial people when their racial presentation varies, rutgers study findsWhites consider biracial people to be less trustworthy if they change their racial presentation depending on circumstances, Rutgers University-New Brunswick researchers find.
2h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Randomized trial finds ibuprofen not a safe alternative to antibiotics for UTIsIbuprofen, given instead of antibiotics to women with uncomplicated urinary tract infection (cystitis), leads to longer duration of symptoms and more serious adverse events related to the spread of the primary infection, according to a new study in PLOS Medicine by Ingvild Vik and colleagues from the University of Oslo, Norway.
2h
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High civilian mortality rates during the liberation of Mosul from ISISMortality rates were higher during the nine months of military liberation of Mosul, Iraq, than during the 29 months of exclusive Islamic State of Iraq and Syria (ISIS) control, according to a study published this week in PLOS Medicine. The population-based survey demonstrated that high mortality rates resulted from the military offensive despite the use of modern precision-targeted ordnance.
2h
New on MIT Technology Review

Insect-size robots are breaking their tethers
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The Sports Betting Revolution Will Be a Slow Play OnlineThe Supreme Court has ruled that states can legalize sports betting if they want to. So what does that mean for the internet?
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Scientific American Content: Global

Kilauea's Next Eruptions May Mirror a Big One in Its PastA giant 1924 explosion, when steam jets blew boulders from the summit, had many of the precursors we see now -- Read more on ScientificAmerican.com
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The Atlantic

How Bill Clinton Stopped White House LeaksAll happy families are alike, Tolstoy could have said , but all unhappy families are aleak. This is the challenge for the Trump administration this week, as it faces the latest series of embarrassing disclosures from within. First, someone revealed to reporters that press aide Kelly Sadler had dismissed Senator John McCain’s opposition to CIA Director-select Gina Haspel, saying, “It doesn’t matte
3h
Live Science

Two-Headed Deer Found Dead in Minnesota WoodsA mushroom hunter found more than he was looking for when he stumbled upon a two-headed deer, which was actually a pair of conjoined, stillborn fawns.
3h
Science : NPR

Asteroid Will Pass Between The Earth And The Moon Tuesday (Don't Panic)First spotted in 2010, a space rock is zooming toward Earth, making a close pass on Tuesday that will see it fly safely by — about halfway between our planet and the moon. (Image credit: NASA/Jet Propulsion Laboratory)
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

Carnivorous plants: How the waterwheel plant snapsBiologists and civil engineers have analyzed the rapid movement of the snap-trap with which the carnivorous plant catches its prey.
3h
Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

Attentive adults increase children's ability to empathizeFor human beings to function socially, they need to be able to perceive, understand, and talk about others' mental states, such as beliefs, desires and intentions. There is no consensus among researchers as to when children develop this ability. Previous research indicates that it emerges around the age of four, but research shows that children can demonstrate this ability earlier - within social
3h
Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

Antarctic seals can help predict ice sheet meltTwo species of seal found in Antarctic seas are helping scientists collect data about the temperature and salinity of waters around vulnerable ice sheets in West Antarctica. Understanding more about how this water gets towards the ice shelves by measuring its temperature, salinity and depth, will help climate change modellers make more accurate predictions about how rapidly the Antarctic ice sheet
3h
Big Think

Trump admin scraps NASA program that tracks global greenhouse gasesThe Trump administration is quietly bringing an end to NASA's Carbon Monitoring System, which builds high-resolutions maps of the world's carbon flow. Read More
3h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Cultivating corrupt ties in post-Mao ChinaThis paper examines the unintended consequences of governance and economic reform efforts in post-Mao China through ethnographic examination of state audits, market reforms, and the recent anti-corruption campaign.
3h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Study shows targeted biopsy for prostate cancer more effective than traditional methodResearchers at the University of Cincinnati have found that MRI fusion biopsy -- coupling MRI and ultrasound to visualize suspicious lesions in the prostate gland and targeting the biopsy to that particular area -- outperformed standard prostate biopsy in patients with a prior negative prostate biopsy.
3h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Study shines light on gut microbiome in colon cancerResearchers have identified a correlation between gut microbial composition and microRNA expression in human colorectal cancer, according to a recent study published in the journal mSystems. The study is the first to demonstrate that the interaction between microRNA and the gut microbiome may play a role in colorectal cancer.
3h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News

An energy dense diet changes the brain and increases urge to eatGiving unrestricted access to a high-fat, high-sugar 'cafeteria-diet' to rats leads to obesity and to changes in a brain region called the orbitofrontal cortex, which integrates information about food and determines eating behavior. These changes make food more attractive to rats, even when their hunger should be satisfied, explains Dr. Stephanie Borgland's at the University of Calgary. These find
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Popular Science

The Logitech G305 wireless gaming mouse is like a family sedan with a sports car engineGadgets This $60 mouse has the same motion tracking skills as pro gaming inputs. Logitech's 6305 wireless gaming mouse is a solid performer in a plastic body.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Biologists find mechanisms that control where transcription factors bindA team of biologists has determined how transcription factors (TFs), which guide gene regulation, function differently in embryonic development. The results help illuminate how cells acquire distinct functions as the embryo matures.
3h
Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences current issue

Asking endosymbionts to do an enzyme’s ȷob [Biological Sciences]Zachar et al. (1) present a mathematical model for the origin of mitochondria in which the initial role of the mitochondrial symbiont was that of a food particle for its host. In their model, the bacterial endosymbiont can be freely acquired by a phagocytosing, amitochondriate host cell [an archezoan, in...
3h
Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences current issue

Reply to Garg and Martin: The mechanism works [Biological Sciences]Garg and Martin (1) formulate two problems regarding our recent modeling paper (2), demonstrating how prudent predation and farming by a phagotrophic host could lead to endosymbiotic establishment and how they might have had a role in the origin of mitochondria. We see three main problematic items in Garg and...
3h
Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences current issue

Diet influences host-microbiota associations in Drosophila [Biological Sciences]Gut microbes were previously suggested to influence mate preference in Drosophila melanogaster (1). Mate selectivity depended on the microbiota associated with flies after prior generations were maintained on different diets [cornmeal–molasses–yeast (CMY) versus starch] (1). Subsequent studies attempted to repeat these findings with contrasting success (2, 3). We suggest that...
3h
Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences current issue

Reply to Obadia et al.: Effect of methyl paraben on host-microbiota interactions in Drosophila melanogaster [Biological Sciences]Obadia et al. (1) suggest that variation in the concentration of the fly media fungicide methyl paraben (mp) (also known as Tegosept or Nipagin) can restrict gut microbial growth and diversity (2, 3), and that this could provide insight into conflicting data on the role of the gut microbiome in...
3h
Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences current issue

Quantum indistinguishability in chemical reactions [Applied Physical Sciences]Quantum indistinguishability plays a crucial role in many low-energy physical phenomena, from quantum fluids to molecular spectroscopy. It is, however, typically ignored in most high-temperature processes, particularly for ionic coordinates, implicitly assumed to be distinguishable, incoherent, and thus well approximated classically. We explore enzymatic chemical reactions involving small symmetri
3h
Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences current issue

Green function of correlated genes in a minimal mechanical model of protein evolution [Biophysics and Computational Biology]The function of proteins arises from cooperative interactions and rearrangements of their amino acids, which exhibit large-scale dynamical modes. Long-range correlations have also been revealed in protein sequences, and this has motivated the search for physical links between the observed genetic and dynamic cooperativity. We outline here a simplified theory...
3h
Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences current issue

Local initiation conditions for water autoionization [Chemistry]The pH of liquid water is determined by the infrequent process in which water molecules split into short-lived hydroxide and hydronium ions. This reaction is difficult to probe experimentally and challenging to simulate. One of the open questions is whether the local water structure around a slightly stretched OH bond...
3h
Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences current issue

Tunneling explains efficient electron transport via protein junctions [Chemistry]Metalloproteins, proteins containing a transition metal ion cofactor, are electron transfer agents that perform key functions in cells. Inspired by this fact, electron transport across these proteins has been widely studied in solid-state settings, triggering the interest in examining potential use of proteins as building blocks in bioelectronic devices. Here,...
3h
Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences current issue

Histone demethylase JMJD1A promotes alternative splicing of AR variant 7 (AR-V7) in prostate cancer cells [Biochemistry]Formation of the androgen receptor splicing variant 7 (AR-V7) is one of the major mechanisms by which resistance of prostate cancer to androgen deprivation therapy occurs. The histone demethylase JMJD1A (Jumonji domain containing 1A) functions as a key coactivator for AR by epigenetic regulation of H3K9 methylation marks. Here, we...
3h
Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences current issue

An endogenous dAMP ligand in Bacillus subtilis class Ib RNR promotes assembly of a noncanonical dimer for regulation by dATP [Biochemistry]The high fidelity of DNA replication and repair is attributable, in part, to the allosteric regulation of ribonucleotide reductases (RNRs) that maintains proper deoxynucleotide pool sizes and ratios in vivo. In class Ia RNRs, ATP (stimulatory) and dATP (inhibitory) regulate activity by binding to the ATP-cone domain at the N...
3h
Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences current issue

Mechanistic studies of a small-molecule modulator of SMN2 splicing [Biochemistry]RG-7916 is a first-in-class drug candidate for the treatment of spinal muscular atrophy (SMA) that functions by modulating pre-mRNA splicing of the SMN2 gene, resulting in a 2.5-fold increase in survival of motor neuron (SMN) protein level, a key protein lacking in SMA patients. RG-7916 is currently in three interventional...
3h
Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences current issue

KIF15 nanomechanics and kinesin inhibitors, with implications for cancer chemotherapeutics [Biophysics and Computational Biology]Eg5, a mitotic kinesin, has been a target for anticancer drug development. Clinical trials of small-molecule inhibitors of Eg5 have been stymied by the development of resistance, attributable to mitotic rescue by a different endogenous kinesin, KIF15. Compared with Eg5, relatively little is known about the properties of the KIF15...
3h
Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences current issue

Distinct gating mechanism of SOC channel involving STIM-Orai coupling and an intramolecular interaction of Orai in Caenorhabditis elegans [Cell Biology]Store-operated calcium entry (SOCE), an important mechanism of Ca2+ signaling in a wide range of cell types, is mediated by stromal interaction molecule (STIM), which senses the depletion of endoplasmic reticulum Ca2+ stores and binds and activates Orai channels in the plasma membrane. This inside-out mechanism of Ca2+ signaling raises...
3h
Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences current issue

Insulin promoter in human pancreatic {beta} cells contacts diabetes susceptibility loci and regulates genes affecting insulin metabolism [Cell Biology]Both type 1 and type 2 diabetes involve a complex interplay between genetic, epigenetic, and environmental factors. Our laboratory has been interested in the physical interactions, in nuclei of human pancreatic β cells, between the insulin (INS) gene and other genes that are involved in insulin metabolism. We have identified,...
3h
Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences current issue

Escherichia coli cultures maintain stable subpopulation structure during long-term evolution [Evolution]How genetic variation is generated and maintained remains a central question in evolutionary biology. When presented with a complex environment, microbes can take advantage of genetic variation to exploit new niches. Here we present a massively parallel experiment where WT and repair-deficient (∆mutL) Escherichia coli populations have evolved over 3...
3h
Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences current issue

Metabolic control of T cell immune response through glycans in inflammatory bowel disease [Immunology and Inflammation]Mucosal T lymphocytes from patients with ulcerative colitis (UC) were previously shown to display a deficiency in branched N-glycosylation associated with disease severity. However, whether this glycosylation pathway shapes the course of the T cell response constituting a targeted-specific mechanism in UC remains largely unknown. In this study, we demonstrated...
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Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences current issue

Distinct roles of resident and nonresident macrophages in nonischemic cardiomyopathy [Medical Sciences]Nonischemic cardiomyopathy (NICM) resulting from long-standing hypertension, valvular disease, and genetic mutations is a major cause of heart failure worldwide. Recent observations suggest that myeloid cells can impact cardiac function, but the role of tissue-intrinsic vs. tissue-extrinsic myeloid cells in NICM remains poorly understood. Here, we show that cardiac resident...
3h
Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences current issue

Structural homo- and heterosynaptic plasticity in mature and adult newborn rat hippocampal granule cells [Neuroscience]Adult newborn hippocampal granule cells (abGCs) contribute to spatial learning and memory. abGCs are thought to play a specific role in pattern separation, distinct from developmentally born mature GCs (mGCs). Here we examine at which exact cell age abGCs are synaptically integrated into the adult network and which forms of...
3h
Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences current issue

Cell-specific discrimination of desmosterol and desmosterol mimetics confers selective regulation of LXR and SREBP in macrophages [Physiology]Activation of liver X receptors (LXRs) with synthetic agonists promotes reverse cholesterol transport and protects against atherosclerosis in mouse models. Most synthetic LXR agonists also cause marked hypertriglyceridemia by inducing the expression of sterol regulatory element-binding protein (SREBP)1c and downstream genes that drive fatty acid biosynthesis. Recent studies demonstrated that...
3h
Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences current issue

Loss of a highly conserved sterile alpha motif domain gene (WEEP) results in pendulous branch growth in peach trees [Plant Biology]Plant shoots typically grow upward in opposition to the pull of gravity. However, exceptions exist throughout the plant kingdom. Most conspicuous are trees with weeping or pendulous branches. While such trees have long been cultivated and appreciated for their ornamental value, the molecular basis behind the weeping habit is not...
3h
Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences current issue

Comparative genomics of the nonlegume Parasponia reveals insights into evolution of nitrogen-fixing rhizobium symbioses [Plant Biology]Nodules harboring nitrogen-fixing rhizobia are a well-known trait of legumes, but nodules also occur in other plant lineages, with rhizobia or the actinomycete Frankia as microsymbiont. It is generally assumed that nodulation evolved independently multiple times. However, molecular-genetic support for this hypothesis is lacking, as the genetic changes underlying nodule...
3h
Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences current issue

MYB30 links ROS signaling, root cell elongation, and plant immune responses [Plant Biology]Reactive oxygen species (ROS) are known to be important signal molecules that are involved in biotic and abiotic stress responses as well as in growth regulation. However, the molecular mechanisms by which ROS act as a growth regulator, as well as how ROS-dependent growth regulation relates to its roles in...
3h
Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences current issue

FACT complex is required for DNA demethylation at heterochromatin during reproduction in Arabidopsis [Plant Biology]The DEMETER (DME) DNA glycosylase catalyzes genome-wide DNA demethylation and is required for endosperm genomic imprinting and embryo viability. Targets of DME-mediated DNA demethylation reside in small, euchromatic, AT-rich transposons and at the boundaries of large transposons, but how DME interacts with these diverse chromatin states is unknown. The STRUCTURE...
3h
Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences current issue

Imaging mycobacterial growth and division with a fluorogenic probe [Chemistry]Control and manipulation of bacterial populations requires an understanding of the factors that govern growth, division, and antibiotic action. Fluorescent and chemically reactive small molecule probes of cell envelope components can visualize these processes and advance our knowledge of cell envelope biosynthesis (e.g., peptidoglycan production). Still, fundamental gaps remain in...
3h
Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences current issue

Quantifying ecological impacts of mass extinctions with network analysis of fossil communities [Earth, Atmospheric, and Planetary Sciences]Mass extinctions documented by the fossil record provide critical benchmarks for assessing changes through time in biodiversity and ecology. Efforts to compare biotic crises of the past and present, however, encounter difficulty because taxonomic and ecological changes are decoupled, and although various metrics exist for describing taxonomic turnover, no methods...
3h
Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences current issue

Genomic adaptation to drought in wild barley is driven by edaphic natural selection at the Tabigha Evolution Slope [Evolution]Ecological divergence at a microsite suggests adaptive evolution, and this study examined two abutting wild barley populations, each 100 m across, differentially adapted to drought tolerance on two contrasting soil types, Terra Rossa and basalt at the Tabigha Evolution Slope, Israel. We resequenced the genomes of seven and six wild...
3h
Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences current issue

Symbiont switching and alternative resource acquisition strategies drive mutualism breakdown [Evolution]Cooperative interactions among species, termed mutualisms, have played a crucial role in the evolution of life on Earth. However, despite key potential benefits to partners, there are many cases in which two species cease to cooperate and mutualisms break down. What factors drive the evolutionary breakdown of mutualism? We examined...
3h
Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences current issue

CRISPR/Cas9-mediated genome editing in a reef-building coral [Genetics]Reef-building corals are critically important species that are threatened by anthropogenic stresses including climate change. In attempts to understand corals’ responses to stress and other aspects of their biology, numerous genomic and transcriptomic studies have been performed, generating a variety of hypotheses about the roles of particular genes and molecular...
3h
Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences current issue

Mechanism for survival of homozygous nonsense mutations in the tumor suppressor gene BRCA1 [Genetics]BRCA1 is essential for repair of DNA double-strand breaks by homologous recombination, and hence for survival. Complete loss of its function is lethal during early embryonic development. Patients who are compound heterozygous for BRCA1 truncating mutations and missense alleles that retain some DNA repair capacity may survive, albeit with very...
3h
Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences current issue

Systematic analysis of copy number variation associated with congenital diaphragmatic hernia [Genetics]Congenital diaphragmatic hernia (CDH), characterized by malformation of the diaphragm and hypoplasia of the lungs, is one of the most common and severe birth defects, and is associated with high morbidity and mortality rates. There is growing evidence demonstrating that genetic factors contribute to CDH, although the pathogenesis remains largely...
3h
Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences current issue

Revisiting the role of IRF3 in inflammation and immunity by conditional and specifically targeted gene ablation in mice [Immunology and Inflammation]IFN regulatory factor 3 (IRF3) is a transcription regulator of cellular responses in many cell types that is known to be essential for innate immunity. To confirm IRF3’s broad role in immunity and to more fully discern its role in various cellular subsets, we engineered Irf3-floxed mice to allow for...
3h
Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences current issue

Less immune activation following social stress in rural vs. urban participants raised with regular or no animal contact, respectively [Immunology and Inflammation]Urbanization is on the rise, and environments offering a narrow range of microbial exposures are linked to an increased prevalence of both physical and mental disorders. Human and animal studies suggest that an overreactive immune system not only accompanies stress-associated disorders but might even be causally involved in their pathogenesis....
3h
Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences current issue

Revealing the specificity of regulatory T cells in murine autoimmune diabetes [Immunology and Inflammation]Regulatory T cells (Tregs) control organ-specific autoimmunity in a tissue antigen-specific manner, yet little is known about their specificity in a natural repertoire. In this study, we used the nonobese diabetic (NOD) mouse model of autoimmune diabetes to investigate the antigen specificity of Tregs present in the inflamed tissue, the...
3h
Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences current issue

Structured networks support sparse traveling waves in rodent somatosensory cortex [Neuroscience]Neurons responding to different whiskers are spatially intermixed in the superficial layer 2/3 (L2/3) of the rodent barrel cortex, where a single whisker deflection activates a sparse, distributed neuronal population that spans multiple cortical columns. How the superficial layer of the rodent barrel cortex is organized to support such distributed...
3h
Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences current issue

Lipidomic profiling reveals soluble epoxide hydrolase as a therapeutic target of obesity-induced colonic inflammation [Pharmacology]Obesity is associated with enhanced colonic inflammation, which is a major risk factor for colorectal cancer. Considering the obesity epidemic in Western countries, it is important to identify novel therapeutic targets for obesity-induced colonic inflammation, to develop targeted strategies for prevention. Eicosanoids are endogenous lipid signaling molecules involved in regulating...
3h
Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences current issue

Symbiotic root infections in Medicago truncatula require remorin-mediated receptor stabilization in membrane nanodomains [Plant Biology]Plant cell infection is tightly controlled by cell surface receptor-like kinases (RLKs). Like other RLKs, the Medicago truncatula entry receptor LYK3 laterally segregates into membrane nanodomains in a stimulus-dependent manner. Although nanodomain localization arises as a generic feature of plant membrane proteins, the molecular mechanisms underlying such dynamic transitions and...
3h
Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences current issue

Comparative terrestrial feed and land use of an aquaculture-dominant world [Sustainability Science]Reducing food production pressures on the environment while feeding an ever-growing human population is one of the grand challenges facing humanity. The magnitude of environmental impacts from food production, largely around land use, has motivated evaluation of the environmental and health benefits of shifting diets, typically away from meat toward...
3h
Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences current issue

Correction for Jenkitkasemwong et al., SLC39A14 deficiency alters manganese homeostasis and excretion resulting in brain manganese accumulation and motor deficits in mice [Correction]BIOCHEMISTRY Correction for “SLC39A14 deficiency alters manganese homeostasis and excretion resulting in brain manganese accumulation and motor deficits in mice,” by Supak Jenkitkasemwong, Adenike Akinyode, Elizabeth Paulus, Ralf Weiskirchen, Shintaro Hojyo, Toshiyuki Fukada, Genesys Giraldo, Jessica Schrier, Armin Garcia, Christopher Janus, Benoit Giasson, and Mitchell D. Knutson, which was first
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Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences current issue

Correction for Martin-Sanchez et al., TWEAK and RIPK1 mediate a second wave of cell death during AKI [Correction]CELL BIOLOGY Correction for “TWEAK and RIPK1 mediate a second wave of cell death during AKI,” by Diego Martin-Sanchez, Miguel Fontecha-Barriuso, Susana Carrasco, Maria Dolores Sanchez-Niño, Anne von Mässenhausen, Andreas Linkermann, Pablo Cannata-Ortiz, Marta Ruiz-Ortega, Jesus Egido, Alberto Ortiz, and Ana Belen Sanz, which was first published March 27, 2018;...
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Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences current issue

Correction for Sanjak et al., Evidence of directional and stabilizing selection in contemporary humans [Correction]EVOLUTION Correction for “Evidence of directional and stabilizing selection in contemporary humans,” by Jaleal S. Sanjak, Julia Sidorenko, Matthew R. Robinson, Kevin R. Thornton, and Peter M. Visscher, which was first published December 18, 2017; 10.1073/pnas.1707227114 (Proc Natl Acad Sci USA 115:151–156). The authors note that on page 152, right...
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Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences current issue

In This Issue [This Week in PNAS]Habitat degradation and coral reef fish behavior Degraded coral reef at Lizard Island. Widespread damage to coral reefs is exacerbated by the absence of fish communities that could potentially promote reef recovery. Reef fish populations rely on acoustic cues to guide habitat selection and settlement, but degraded reefs have altered...
3h
Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences current issue

QnAs with Nicholas C. Spitzer [QnAs]The developing human brain is known for its remarkable plasticity, whereas the adult brain has been considered relatively unchanging. However, learning and memory continue throughout adult life, as do changes in synapse strength and synapse number. Adding to these facets of adult brain plasticity is the phenomenon of neurotransmitter switching,...
3h
Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences current issue

Jack Halpern (1925-2018): Pioneer of homogeneous catalysis [Retrospectives]Jack Halpern, a preeminent scholar and father of modern organometallic chemistry and homogeneous catalysis, died January 31, 2018 at the age of 93. Homogeneous catalysis by transition metal complexes, a field that has many important scientific and technological applications, can be traced to his early contributions. Jack developed methodologies to...
3h
Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences current issue

Rational application of macrophage-specific LXR agonists avoids the pitfalls of SREBP-induced lipogenesis [Physiology]While 92 million Americans are currently estimated to have some form of cardiovascular disease (CVD), nearly one-half of adults in the United States are projected to develop CVD by 2030, annually eclipsing all other causes of death for the past century (1). Coronary heart disease, which confers a plurality of...
3h
Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences current issue

Incorporating light atoms into synthetic analogues of FeMoco [Chemistry]Nitrogen is an essential element for all life on Earth. However, the elemental form of dinitrogen (N2) is typically inert, and must be converted to the more reactive and biologically accessible ammonia (NH3) before incorporation into proteins, nucleic acids, and other biomolecules. In nature, the only enzymes capable of the...
3h
Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences current issue

Adaptive and nonadaptive changes in phenological synchrony [Ecology]Organisms in seasonal environments are known to adjust their phenology in response to climate change (1, 2), that is, they change their schedules of seasonal occurrence and annual life-history events. In particular, the advancement of spring emergence and activities is one of the strongest and best-documented ecological responses to climate...
3h
Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences current issue

Symbolic emblems of the Levantine Aurignacians as a regional entity identifier (Hayonim Cave, Lower Galilee, Israel) [Anthropology]The Levantine Aurignacian is a unique phenomenon in the local Upper Paleolithic sequence, showing greater similarity to the West European classic Aurignacian than to the local Levantine archaeological entities preceding and following it. Herewith we highlight another unique characteristic of this entity, namely, the presence of symbolic objects in the...
3h
Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences current issue

Mass-correlated rotational Raman spectra with high resolution, broad bandwidth, and absolute frequency accuracy [Applied Physical Sciences]We present mass-correlated rotational alignment spectroscopy, based on the optical excitation of a coherent rotational quantum wave and the observation of temporal wave interferences in a mass spectrometer. Combined electronic and opto-mechanical delays increased the observation time and energy resolution by an order of magnitude compared with preceding time-domain measurements....
3h
Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences current issue

Site-selective measurement of coupled spin pairs in an organic semiconductor [Applied Physical Sciences]From organic electronics to biological systems, understanding the role of intermolecular interactions between spin pairs is a key challenge. Here we show how such pairs can be selectively addressed with combined spin and optical sensitivity. We demonstrate this for bound pairs of spin-triplet excitations formed by singlet fission, with direct...
3h
Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences current issue

Ribosome protection by antibiotic resistance ATP-binding cassette protein [Biochemistry]The ribosome is one of the richest targets for antibiotics. Unfortunately, antibiotic resistance is an urgent issue in clinical practice. Several ATP-binding cassette family proteins confer resistance to ribosome-targeting antibiotics through a yet unknown mechanism. Among them, MsrE has been implicated in macrolide resistance. Here, we report the cryo-EM structure...
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Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences current issue

Tertiary structure of apolipoprotein A-I in nascent high-density lipoproteins [Biophysics and Computational Biology]Understanding the function of high-density lipoprotein (HDL) requires detailed knowledge of the structure of its primary protein, apolipoprotein A-I (APOA1). However, APOA1 flexibility and HDL heterogeneity have confounded decades of efforts to determine high-resolution structures and consistent models. Here, molecular dynamics simulations totaling 30 μs on two nascent HDLs, each...
3h
Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences current issue

Butane dihedral angle dynamics in water is dominated by internal friction [Biophysics and Computational Biology]The dihedral dynamics of butane in water is known to be rather insensitive to the water viscosity; possible explanations for this involve inertial effects or Kramers’ turnover, the finite memory time of friction, and the presence of so-called internal friction. To disentangle these factors, we introduce a method to directly...
3h
Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences current issue

Ligand metathesis as rational strategy for the synthesis of cubane-type heteroleptic iron-sulfur clusters relevant to the FeMo cofactor [Chemistry]Molybdenum-dependent nitrogenases catalyze the transformation of dinitrogen into ammonia under ambient conditions. The active site (FeMo cofactor) is the structurally and electronically complex weak-field metal cluster [MoFe7S9C] built of Fe4S3 and MoFe3S3C portions connected by three sulfur bridges and containing an interstitial carbon atom centered in an Fe6 trigonal prism....
3h
Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences current issue

Catalytic amino acid production from biomass-derived intermediates [Chemistry]Amino acids are the building blocks for protein biosynthesis and find use in myriad industrial applications including in food for humans, in animal feed, and as precursors for bio-based plastics, among others. However, the development of efficient chemical methods to convert abundant and renewable feedstocks into amino acids has been...
3h
Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences current issue

A comprehensive omics analysis and functional survey of cuticular proteins in the brown planthopper [Developmental Biology]Cuticle, mainly composed of chitin and cuticular proteins (CPs), is a multifunctional structure of arthropods. CPs usually account for >1% of the total insect proteins. Why does an insect encode so many different CP genes in the genome? In this study, we use comprehensive large-scale technologies to study the full...
3h
Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences current issue

Unexpected slowdown of US pollutant emission reduction in the past decade [Earth, Atmospheric, and Planetary Sciences]Ground and satellite observations show that air pollution regulations in the United States (US) have resulted in substantial reductions in emissions and corresponding improvements in air quality over the last several decades. However, large uncertainties remain in evaluating how recent regulations affect different emission sectors and pollutant trends. Here we...
3h
Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences current issue

Quantifying flow and stress in ice melange, the world’s largest granular material [Earth, Atmospheric, and Planetary Sciences]Tidewater glacier fjords are often filled with a collection of calved icebergs, brash ice, and sea ice. For glaciers with high calving rates, this “mélange” of ice can be jam-packed, so that the flow of ice fragments is mostly determined by granular interactions. In the jammed state, ice mélange has...
3h
Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences current issue

Earth’s magnetic field is probably not reversing [Earth, Atmospheric, and Planetary Sciences]The geomagnetic field has been decaying at a rate of ∼5% per century from at least 1840, with indirect observations suggesting a decay since 1600 or even earlier. This has led to the assertion that the geomagnetic field may be undergoing a reversal or an excursion. We have derived a...
3h
Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences current issue

Plant acclimation to long-term high nitrogen deposition in an N-rich tropical forest [Ecology]Anthropogenic nitrogen (N) deposition has accelerated terrestrial N cycling at regional and global scales, causing nutrient imbalance in many natural and seminatural ecosystems. How added N affects ecosystems where N is already abundant, and how plants acclimate to chronic N deposition in such circumstances, remains poorly understood. Here, we conducted...
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Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences current issue

Habitat degradation negatively affects auditory settlement behavior of coral reef fishes [Ecology]Coral reefs are increasingly degraded by climate-induced bleaching and storm damage. Reef recovery relies on recruitment of young fishes for the replenishment of functionally important taxa. Acoustic cues guide the orientation, habitat selection, and settlement of many fishes, but these processes may be impaired if degradation alters reef soundscapes. Here,...
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Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences current issue

Symbiotic polydnavirus of a parasite manipulates caterpillar and plant immunity [Ecology]Obligate symbioses occur when organisms require symbiotic relationships to survive. Some parasitic wasps of caterpillars possess obligate mutualistic viruses called “polydnaviruses.” Along with eggs, wasps inject polydnavirus inside their caterpillar hosts where the hatching larvae develop inside the caterpillar. Polydnaviruses suppress the immune systems of their caterpillar hosts, which enables.
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Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences current issue

Symbiotic polydnavirus and venom reveal parasitoid to its hyperparasitoids [Ecology]Symbiotic relationships may provide organisms with key innovations that aid in the establishment of new niches. For example, during oviposition, some species of parasitoid wasps, whose larvae develop inside the bodies of other insects, inject polydnaviruses into their hosts. These symbiotic viruses disrupt host immune responses, allowing the parasitoid’s progeny...
3h
Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences current issue

Global shifts in the phenological synchrony of species interactions over recent decades [Ecology]Phenological responses to climate change (e.g., earlier leaf-out or egg hatch date) are now well documented and clearly linked to rising temperatures in recent decades. Such shifts in the phenologies of interacting species may lead to shifts in their synchrony, with cascading community and ecosystem consequences. To date, single-system studies...
3h
Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences current issue

Roughness-dependent tribology effects on discontinuous shear thickening [Engineering]Surface roughness affects many properties of colloids, from depletion and capillary interactions to their dispersibility and use as emulsion stabilizers. It also impacts particle–particle frictional contacts, which have recently emerged as being responsible for the discontinuous shear thickening (DST) of dense suspensions. Tribological properties of these contacts have been rarely...
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Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences current issue

Optimizing the impact of low-efficacy influenza vaccines [Environmental Sciences]The efficacy of influenza vaccines varies from one year to the next, with efficacy during the 2017–2018 season anticipated to be lower than usual. However, the impact of low-efficacy vaccines at the population level and their optimal age-specific distribution have yet to be ascertained. Applying an optimization algorithm to a...
3h
Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences current issue

The C-terminal extension landscape of naturally presented HLA-I ligands [Immunology and Inflammation]HLA-I molecules play a central role in antigen presentation. They typically bind 9- to 12-mer peptides, and their canonical binding mode involves anchor residues at the second and last positions of their ligands. To investigate potential noncanonical binding modes, we collected in-depth and accurate HLA peptidomics datasets covering 54 HLA-I...
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Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences current issue

Support for the value 5/2 for the spin glass lower critical dimension at zero magnetic field [Physics]We study numerically various properties of the free energy barriers in the Edwards–Anderson model of spin glasses in the low-temperature region in both three and four spatial dimensions. In particular, we investigated the dependence of height of free energy barriers on system size and on the distance between the initial...
3h
Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences current issue

High-order fractal states in graphene superlattices [Physics]Graphene superlattices were shown to exhibit high-temperature quantum oscillations due to periodic emergence of delocalized Bloch states in high magnetic fields such that unit fractions of the flux quantum pierce a superlattice unit cell. Under these conditions, semiclassical electron trajectories become straight again, similar to the case of zero magnetic...
3h
Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences current issue

Doped Kondo chain, a heavy Luttinger liquid [Physics]The doped 1D Kondo Lattice describes complex competition between itinerant and magnetic ordering. The numerically computed wave vector-dependent charge and spin susceptibilities give insights into its low-energy properties. Similar to the prediction of the large N approximation, gapless spin and charge modes appear at the large Fermi wave vector. The...
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Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences current issue

Gravisensors in plant cells behave like an active granular liquid [Plant Biology]Plants are able to sense and respond to minute tilt from the vertical direction of the gravity, which is key to maintain their upright posture during development. However, gravisensing in plants relies on a peculiar sensor made of microsize starch-filled grains (statoliths) that sediment and form tiny granular piles at...
3h
Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences current issue

Neuronal activity regulates neurotransmitter switching in the adult brain following light-induced stress [Psychological and Cognitive Sciences]Neurotransmitter switching in the adult mammalian brain occurs following photoperiod-induced stress, but the mechanism of regulation is unknown. Here, we demonstrate that elevated activity of dopaminergic neurons in the paraventricular nucleus of the hypothalamus (PaVN) in the adult rat is required for the loss of dopamine expression after long-day photoperiod...
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Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences current issue

Opinion: Reproducibility failures are essential to scientific inquiry [Social Sciences]Current fears of a “reproducibility crisis” have led researchers, sources of scientific funding, and the public to question both the efficacy and trustworthiness of science (1, 2). Suggested policy changes have been focused on statistical problems, such as p-hacking, and issues of experimental design and execution (3, 4). However, “reproducibility”...
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Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences current issue

Hidden collapse is driven by fire and logging in a socioecological forest ecosystem [Sustainability Science]Increasing numbers of ecosystems globally are at risk of collapse. However, most descriptions of terrestrial ecosystem collapse are post hoc with few empirically based examples of ecosystems in the process of collapse. This limits learning about collapse and impedes development of effective early-warning indicators. Based on multidecadal and multifaceted monitoring,...
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Biologists find mechanisms that control where transcription factors bindA team of biologists has determined how transcription factors, which guide gene regulation, function differently in embryonic development. The results help illuminate how cells acquire distinct functions as the embryo matures.
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The Atlantic

Is Television Ready for Angry Women?O n a soundstage in Queens, New York, the crew for Marti Noxon’s new TV series Dietland has built an extremely realistic replica of the offices of a modern women’s magazine. Covers from previous issues decorate the hallway, featuring an array of beautiful young white women and taglines such as “Scarves That Slim.” The kitchen wall, a violent, appetite-diminishing shade of green, is painted with t
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Scientific American Content: Global

Can Gender Be Computed?The use of algorithms to guess a person’s gender based on images, video or audio raise significant social and ethical concerns yet to be fully explored -- Read more on ScientificAmerican.com
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Facebook: We're better at policing nudity than hate speechGetting rid of racist, sexist and other hateful remarks on Facebook is challenging for the company because computer programs have difficulties understanding the nuances of human language, the company said Tuesday.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

Wasps drum to alert one another of food nearbyNew research shows wasps have their own way of communicating to each other about mealtimes -- drumming on their gaster (or abdomen) to let each other know that there's food nearby. For nearly five decades, researchers thought the gastral drumming was a signal of hunger. These findings are the first evidence that wasps have complex communication about food, just as ants, bees, termites, and other s
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

Explanation for puzzling quantum oscillations has been foundExperiments in a system of 53 trapped atoms, presented in 2017 researchers from Harvard and MIT, revealed completely unexpected periodic oscillations in the dynamics of the interacting atoms. Now, an international team of researchers has solved the mystery of these previously inexplicable oscillations.
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Science : NPR

Asteroid Will Pass Between The Earth And Sun Tuesday (Don't Panic)First spotted in 2010, a space rock is zooming toward Earth, making a close pass on Tuesday that will see it fly safely by - about halfway between our planet and the moon. (Image credit: NASA/Jet Propulsion Laboratory)
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Poland ready to end extensive logging in pristine old forestPoland's environment minister has decided to stop the extensive logging in one of Europe's oldest forests that has been declared illegal by a top European Union court, authorities said Tuesday.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Mexico acknowledges banks were hacked; losses unknownMexico established a one-day waiting period on electronic money transfers of over $2,500 in the wake of a hacking attack that may have taken as much as $20 million from several Mexican banks.
4h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Swiss police investigate fatal crash, fire involving TeslaPolice in southern Switzerland say they are investigating the death of a German man after a Tesla car he was driving crashed into a guardrail and burst into flames last week.
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Live Science

What Did Michael Pollan Experience on a Mind-Altering Psychedelic Trip?In a new book, bestselling author Michael Pollan explores psychedelics and the mind.
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Feed: All Latest

The VFX Tricks That Made Black Panther's Suit So AwesomeAnimators used digital tools to improve T'Challa's fight choreography, too.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

WTO says EU has failed to stop illegal Airbus subsidiesThe European Union has failed to remove its illegal subsidies for Airbus, the World Trade Organization said Tuesday, in a major victory for the United States and its national aviation giant, Boeing.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Something new to binge-watch: TV's rich history of itselfDiahann Carroll recalls a date with Marlon Brando that yielded a slap and career advice. Robert Adler tells how he co-invented the TV remote control. Walter Cronkite shares his dismay over learning that White House pressure trimmed a CBS report on Watergate.
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Big Think

NASA finds best evidence yet of a water vapor plume on EuropaThe evidence of water vapor plumes on Europa is enough for NASA to plan a probe that will take samples in 5 to 10 years. Read More
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Two cool: A pair of patents filed on breakthrough materials for next-gen refrigeratorsScientists at the research consortium CaloriCool are closer than ever to the materials needed for a new type of refrigeration technology that is markedly more energy efficient than current gas compression systems.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Savanna chimpanzees suffer from heat stressDuring their evolutionary history hominins underwent physiological and behavioral changes to cope with and adapt to more open and hotter environments. These changes include increased sweat capacity and loss of hair coverage, but are difficult to pinpoint using the fossil record as such changes do not fossilize. Even bipedalism, the defining hominid characteristic, has been argued by some to be lin
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Traditional knowledge sheds light on changing East Greenland climate and polar bear huntInuit polar bear subsistence hunters from two East Greenland regions, Tasiilaq and Ittoqqortoormiit, report changes to their hunting patterns as well as polar bear distribution and behavior due to decreasing sea ice and the introduction of hunting quotas in 2006. The hunters have observed large climate changes in their hunting areas—including warmer weather, less sea ice and disappearing glaciers—
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Scientists crack how primordial life on Earth might have replicated itselfScientists have created a new type of genetic replication system which demonstrates how the first life on Earth—in the form of RNA—could have replicated itself. The scientists from the Medical Research Council (MRC) Laboratory of Molecular Biology say the new RNA utilises a system of genetic replication unlike any known to naturally occur on Earth today.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

A green approach to making ammonia could help feed the worldA UCF research team with collaborators at Virginia Tech have developed a new "green" approach to making ammonia that may help make feeding the rising world population more sustainable.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

A high-fiber diet protects mice against the flu virusDietary fiber increases survival in influenza-infected mice by setting the immune system at a healthy level of responsiveness, according to a preclinical study published May 15 in the journal Immunity. A high-fiber diet blunts harmful, excessive immune responses in the lungs while boosting antiviral immunity by activating T cells. These dual benefits were mediated by changes in the composition of
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

New findings explain how melatonin promotes sleepResearchers have discovered how melatonin suppresses neurons in the brain that keeps you awake and alert. These findings could lead to new therapies for those who suffer from insomnia.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

How REM and non-REM sleep may work together to help us solve problemsSleep is known to be important for creative thinking, but exactly how it helps and what role each sleep stage -- REM and non-REM -- plays remains unclear. A team of researchers have now developed a theory to explain how the interleaving of REM and non-REM sleep might facilitate creative problem solving in different but complementary ways.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

Fertility study finds acupuncture ineffective for IVF birth ratesA study of over 800 Australian and New Zealand women undergoing acupuncture treatment during their IVF (in vitro fertilization) cycle has confirmed no significant difference in live birth rates.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

Gun safety programs do not prevent children from handling firearmsResearchers have found that children who participate in gun safety programs do not retain the skills they learned and that most still will approach a firearm in an unsupervised setting. While confirming that such programs are still essential, they stress that parents are the front line of defense when it comes to safeguarding their children from accidental shootings -- and that they cannot rely on
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Science : NPR

Battered By Bleaching, Florida's Coral Reefs Now Face Mysterious DiseaseFlorida's coral reefs are being decimated by a mysterious disease. It comes after years of warming waters have bleached coral reefs around the world, leaving them weakened. (Image credit: Florida Fish and Wildlife Conservation Commission)
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Traditional knowledge sheds light on changing East Greenland climate and polar bear huntInuit polar bear hunters in East Greenland report changes to their subsistence hunting patterns as well as polar bear distribution and behavior due to decreasing sea ice and the introduction of hunting quotas in 2006. The study is the first in nearly 20 years to document traditional knowledge in East Greenland -- providing a valuable baseline for monitoring future changes and the polar bear popula
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Zebrafish heart development reveals key insight into inherited heart defectsScientists have shown for the first time that the blueprint for the four chambers of the human heart exists in the humble zebrafish.
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Study: Superbug MRSA infections less costly, but still deadlyDrug-resistant staph infections continue to be deadlier than those that are not resistant and treatable with traditional antibiotics, but treatment costs surprisingly are the same or slightly less, a new national analysis shows.
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Neutrons measured with unprecedented precision using a 'magneto-gravitational trap'Researchers at the IU Center for the Exploration of Energy and Matter have developed a highly accurate way to measure neutron decay rates. It could provide new insight into the state of the universe after the Big Bang.
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New Scientist - News

Fertiliser feeds us but trashes the climate – now there’s a fixThe way we make ammonia for fertilizer was developed a century ago and produces more than 1 per cent of all carbon emissions. Now we may have a replacement
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Big Think

Big "scary" asteroid flying between Earth and Moon tonight, 5/15/18An asteroid about the size of a New York City block is flying between the Earth and the Moon today. How close, though? Read More
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Big Think

Is there a scientific law stating that inequality is a fact of the universe?The Matthew effect or Price's law shows us how inequality can be a fact of nature. What does this mean for our debate on inequality in our society? Read More
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Science | The Guardian

Mental health: awareness is great, but action is essential | Dean BurnettRaising awareness of mental health problems should be the start of the process of tackling them, not the end It’s mental health awareness week, 2018 . And that’s good. It’s important to be aware of something that affects literally everyone, and that a quarter of the population regularly struggle with . It’s weird that anyone wouldn’t be when you put it in those terms, but that does seem to the ca
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Big Think

Poll shows 66% of Brits could care less about royal weddingMillions will watch on Saturday as Prince Harry marries retired American actress Meghan Markle, but a new poll suggests most Britons aren't interested in the affair. Read More
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The Atlantic

Rumaan Alam Ponders the Limits of Parental LoveRumaan Alam writes women who bond over their worry. About themselves, about each other, about the world, and often about their children. In Rich and Pretty , his sharp-witted 2016 debut novel, childhood friends Sarah and Lauren fear the unraveling of their closeness as they grow older. In Alam’s ambitious second book, That Kind of Mother , two women—Rebecca, who is white, and Cheryl, who is black
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News

A green approach to making ammonia could help feed the worldA UCF research team with collaborators at Virginia Tech have developed a new 'green' approach to making ammonia that may help make feeding the rising world population more sustainable.
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Scientists crack how primordial life on Earth might have replicated itselfScientists have created a new type of genetic replication system which demonstrates how the first life on Earth -- in the form of RNA -- could have replicated itself. The scientists from the Medical Research Council Laboratory of Molecular Biology say the new RNA utilizes a system of genetic replication unlike any known to naturally occur on Earth today.
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Genetic fixer-uppers may help predict bladder cancer prognosisMutations in genes that help repair damage to DNA may aid in predicting the prognosis of patients with bladder and other related cancers, according to researchers, who found that bladder cancer patients who had mutations in their ATM or RB1 genes -- proteins that help repair DNA damage when they're functioning normally -- tended not to live as long as patients without the mutations.
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Love hurts: Spats with spouse may worsen chronic pain, other symptomsFor patients with chronic conditions like arthritis or diabetes, arguments with a spouse may have physical repercussions, according to researchers. They found that in two groups of older individuals -- one group with arthritis and one with diabetes -- the patients who felt more tension with their spouse also reported worse symptoms on those days.
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Savanna chimpanzees suffer from heat stressAn international team of scientists from the Max Planck Institute for Evolutionary Anthropology in Leipzig, Germany, has studied the physiological parameters of savanna and rainforest chimpanzees and compared their water and energy budgets as well as their stress levels. They found that the stress of maintaining their body temperature is a tremendous burden on chimpanzees living in the savanna.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

New approach to global-warming projections could make regional estimates more preciseA new method for projecting how the temperature will respond to human impacts supports the outlook for substantial global warming throughout this century—but also indicates that, in many regions, warming patterns are likely to vary significantly from those estimated by widely used computer models.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Tiny satellite's first global map of ice cloudsLooking at Earth from the International Space Station, astronauts see big, white clouds spreading across the planet. They cannot distinguish a gray rain cloud from a puffy white cloud. While satellites can see through many clouds and estimate the liquid precipitation they hold, they can't see the smaller ice particles that create enormous rain clouds.
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Science | The Guardian

Did Tom Wolfe's bold predictions about human nature come true?Twenty years ago, Tom Wolfe made predictions about how advances in neuroscience would transform our understanding of human behaviour. So, how much did he get right? This article was published in February 2016 Exactly 20 years ago, Tom Wolfe wrote one of the most influential articles in neuroscience. Titled Sorry, But Your Soul Just Died, the 1996 article explores how ideas from brain science were
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

New research shows that wasps drum to alert one another of food nearbyHave you ever had to shout to call your family to the dinner table?
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New on MIT Technology Review

Throwing robots at an assembly line won’t solve a factory’s problems
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News

New research shows that wasps drum to alert one another of food nearbyNew research shows wasps have their own way of communicating to each other about mealtimes -- drumming on their gaster (or abdomen) to let each other know that there's food nearby. For nearly five decades, researchers thought the gastral drumming was a signal of hunger. These findings are the first evidence that wasps have complex communication about food, just as ants, bees, termites, and other s
5h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News

New approach to global-warming projections could make regional estimates more preciseA new method for projecting how the temperature will respond to human impacts supports the outlook for substantial global warming throughout this century -- but also indicates that, in many regions, warming patterns are likely to vary significantly from those estimated by widely used computer models.
5h
Blog » Languages » English

Stalactites vs StalagmitesYou probably learned about these cave formations in school, but we’ve certainly all mixed up the names of these two very close family members before. So let’s do a bit of review! Stalactites, which form on a cave’s ceiling get their name from the Greek “stalaktos,” which means ‘that which drips.’ Stalagmites, which form on a cave’s floor get their name from the Greek word for “stalagma, ” which m
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

Carbon-recycling system: Two-electron chemical reactions using light energy, goldScientists are one step closer to building a carbon-recycling system that can harvest solar energy to efficiently convert CO2 and water into liquid fuels. By optimizing many parts of the system, the researchers say, they can now drive two-electron chemical reactions, a substantial advance over one-electron reactions, which are energy inefficient.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

How can we help children with brain injuries transition back to school?Children with brain injuries face significant challenges when transitioning from hospital or home to school where they face issues such as lack of educator understanding and catching up with missed work. Leading researchers in the field of pediatric brain injury from across the globe identify today's key issues in supporting children and youth with brain injuries as they transition to school or co
5h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Tiny satellite's first global map of ice cloudsLooking at Earth from the International Space Station, astronauts see big, white clouds spreading across the planet. They cannot distinguish a gray rain cloud from a puffy white cloud. While satellites can see through many clouds and estimate the liquid precipitation they hold, they can't see the smaller ice particles that create enormous rain clouds.
5h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Key enzyme for production of second-generation ethanol discovered in Brazilian AmazonProtein encoded by gene found in microorganisms living in Amazon lake could boost efficiency on the sugarcane bagasse saccharification process, which makes for up to 50% of the global costs of cellulosic ethanol production.
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Changes in e-cigarette use among US adultsNational survey data suggests an increase in US adults who have ever used electronic cigarettes, even trying them just once, from 2014 to 2016, while reported current use among adults declined during that same period.
5h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News

New findings explain how melatonin promotes sleepResearchers from the University of Missouri School of Medicine have discovered how melatonin suppresses neurons in the brain that keeps you awake and alert. These findings could lead to new therapies for those who suffer from insomnia.
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Penn study finds that different diseases elicit distinct sets of exhausted T cellsThe battle between the human immune system and long-term, persisting infections and other chronic diseases such as cancer results in a prolonged stalemate. Over time battle-weary T cells become exhausted, giving germs or tumors an edge. Using data from multiple molecular databases, researchers have found nine distinct types of exhausted T cells, which could have implications for fighting chronic i
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Peatland contributions to UK water securityScientists from the University of Leeds have developed a new global index that identifies water supplied from peatlands as a significant source of drinking water for the UK and the Republic of Ireland.
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Fertility study finds acupuncture ineffective for IVF birth ratesA study of over 800 Australian and New Zealand women undergoing acupuncture treatment during their IVF (in vitro fertilization) cycle has confirmed no significant difference in live birth rates. The findings published today in JAMA support recent guidelines from the American Society for Reproductive Medicine and two high-quality meta-analyses.
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Does acupuncture increase the likelihood of a birth in women undergoing in vitro fertilization?Acupuncture among women undergoing in vitro fertilization didn't affect live birth rates.
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News

What are the trends in prescription medication use among US children and teens?Estimates of prescription medication use by US children and adolescents declined overall from 1999 to 2014 and patterns of use varied by medication class.
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Taming random gene changes as our bodies start to formScientists exploring how to tame random gene fluctuations as the embryos that become our bodies start to form have identified a control switch in the vertebrate segmentation clock of developing zebrafish. The researchers report in Cell Reports their findings could uncover methods for modulating genetic signals to prevent birth defects or cancers rooted at the earliest stages of development.
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Researchers propose how REM and non-REM sleep may work together to help us solve problemsSleep is known to be important for creative thinking, but exactly how it helps and what role each sleep stage -- REM and non-REM -- plays remains unclear. A team of researchers have now developed a hypothesis, outlined in an Opinion published May 15 in the journal Trends in Cognitive Sciences, to explain how the interleaving of REM and non-REM sleep might facilitate creative problem solving in dif
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News

A high-fiber diet protects mice against the flu virusDietary fiber increases survival in influenza-infected mice by setting the immune system at a healthy level of responsiveness, according to a preclinical study published May 15 in the journal Immunity. A high-fiber diet blunts harmful, excessive immune responses in the lungs while boosting antiviral immunity by activating T cells. These dual benefits were mediated by changes in the composition of
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News

First clues to the causes of multiple sclerosisThere is still no cure for multiple sclerosis, with current treatments largely based on managing symptoms, especially accelerating recovery phases following a relapse and reducing the number and severity of relapses. Researchers at the University of Geneva (UNIGE), Switzerland, and Geneva University Hospitals (HUG) have identified a DNA-binding factor called TOX that might play a role in triggerin
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Popular Science

This croco-dolphin has it allAnimals The 180 million-year-old fossil points to a missing link. An ancient fossil fills a missing link in the crocodile family tree—where they branched out and either evolved into armored creatures with limbs made for walking, or…
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Scientific American Content: Global

Interior's Handling of Science Gives Climate Advocates a Sense of Déjà VuClimate science is being sidelined and ignored at the department, watchdogs say -- Read more on ScientificAmerican.com
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Science : NPR

Kids Are Taking Fewer Antibiotics, More ADHD MedsDoctors are prescribing fewer drugs to children, especially antibiotics. But use of certain drugs, including ADHD medications, has increased. (Image credit: Towfiqu Photography/Getty Images)
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Taming random gene changes as our bodies start to formScientists exploring how to tame random gene fluctuations as the embryos that become our bodies start to form have identified a control switch in the vertebrate segmentation clock of developing zebrafish. The researchers report in Cell Reports their findings could uncover methods for modulating genetic signals to prevent birth defects or cancers rooted at the earliest stages of development.
5h
Futurity.org

Listen: Gigantic telescope to hunt for universe’s birthWendy Freedman, who spent much of her career measuring the age of the universe, is now working on a project that may very well give scientists a chance to glimpse into its birth. Freedman, a professor of astronomy & astrophysics at the University of Chicago, works in the field of observational cosmology, measuring the expansion rate of the universe. In 2001, she and a team of scientists found tha
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Feed: All Latest

Unreal Views of the Trippy Colors in Ethiopia's Danakil DesertThis hydrothermal field in Dallol puts on a hell of a show.
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The Atlantic

A New Theory Linking Sleep and CreativityIn 1920, the night before Easter Sunday, Otto Loewi woke up, seemingly possessed of an important idea . He wrote it down on a piece of paper and promptly returned to sleep. When he reawakened, he found that his scribbles were illegible. But fortunately, the next night, the idea returned. It was the design of a simple experiment that eventually proved something Loewi had long hypothesized: Nerve c
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The Atlantic

Sean Hannity Failed to Tell His Viewers the TruthSean Hannity, the Fox News commentator and talk-radio host, is perfectly entitled to support President Donald Trump, to defend Trump’s allies, and to attack Trump’s enemies. But his audience deserves the truth about his relationship to this presidency. He has yet to level with them. Oh, viewers know that Hannity is a right-wing populist who calls himself a conservative and votes Republican. No on
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Gun safety programs do not prevent children from handling firearms, Rutgers study findsResearchers at Rutgers School of Nursing have found that children who participate in gun safety programs do not retain the skills they learned and that most still will approach a firearm in an unsupervised setting. While confirming that such programs are still essential, they stress that parents are the front line of defense when it comes to safeguarding their children from accidental shootings --
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Researchers use LiDAR to locate invasive fish and preserve a national treasureAccording to new research, an aircraft-mounted instrument could offer a faster way to locate and capture the non-native fish at Yellowstone National Park during the brief weeks each year when they come into shallow water to spawn.
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Explanation for puzzling quantum oscillations has been foundExperiments in a system of 53 trapped atoms, presented in 2017 researchers from Harvard and MIT, revealed completely unexpected periodic oscillations in the dynamics of the interacting atoms. Now, an international team of researchers has solved the mystery of these previously inexplicable oscillations. The theoretical explanation they proposed introduces a concept of a 'quantum many-body scar' and
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Peatland contributions to UK water securityPeatlands are vital to UK water security and must be protected to preserve the UK's water supply, say scientists.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Researchers use LiDAR to locate invasive fish and preserve a national treasureFor decades the National Park Service has been locked in a battle against lake trout, an invasive fish with a voracious appetite that has overtaken Yellowstone Lake and upended its formerly thriving ecosystem. According to new research, an aircraft-mounted instrument could offer a faster way to locate and capture the non-native fish during the brief weeks each year when they come into shallow wate
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Team achieves two-electron chemical reactions using light energy, goldScientists are one step closer to building a carbon-recycling system that can harvest solar energy to efficiently convert CO2 and water into liquid fuels. By optimizing many parts of the system, the researchers say, they can now drive two-electron chemical reactions, a substantial advance over one-electron reactions, which are energy inefficient.
6h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

437 million tons of fish, $560 billion wasted due to destructive fishing operationsIndustrial fisheries that rely on bottom trawling wasted 437 million tonnes of fish and missed out on $560 billion in revenue over the past 65 years, new UBC research has found.
6h
New on MIT Technology Review

Subcutaneous Fitbits? These cows are modeling the tracking technology of the futureLivestock Labs is getting bio-monitors under cows’ skin in hopes of helping farmers spot disease earlier, and it wants to bring its tech to people, too.
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TED Talks Daily (SD video)

The doctors, nurses and aid workers rebuilding Syria | Rola HallamLocal humanitarians are beacons of light in the darkness of war, says humanitarian aid entrepreneur and TED Fellow Rola Hallam. She's working to help responders on the ground in devastated communities like Syria, where the destruction of health care is being used as a weapon of war. One of her campaigns achieved a global first: a crowdfunded hospital. Since it opened in 2017, the aptly named Hope
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New Scientist - News

Hawaii’s erupting volcano may blast out ‘10-tonne cannonballs’As Kilauea continues erupting, lava is mixing with water, creating steam that could trigger massive explosions and throw large rocks up to a kilometre away
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Impact of weather and well-timed cultural management techniques on organic weed controlWeed management can be a tough challenge in organic cropping systems since growers don't have herbicides in their weed control arsenal. New research published in the journal Weed Science, though, shows that weather conditions and well-timed cultural management techniques can help fill the void by making crops more competitive.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Eyewitness accounts fill in details of 1946 Dominican Republic tsunamiAlmost 70 years later, the man remembers the August day in Playa Rincon, when he clung to the top of an almond tree to survive a tsunami where the waters rushed about 700 meters inland after a magnitude 8.1 earthquake.
6h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Impact of weather and well-timed cultural management techniques on organic weed controlWeed management can be a tough challenge in organic cropping systems since growers don't have herbicides in their weed control arsenal. New research published in the journal Weed Science, though, shows that weather conditions and well-timed cultural management techniques can help fill the void by making crops more competitive.
6h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News

How can we help children with brain injuries transition back to school?Children with brain injuries face significant challenges when transitioning from hospital or home to school where they face issues such as lack of educator understanding and catching up with missed work. In the current issue of NeuroRehabilitation, leading researchers in the field of pediatric brain injury from across the globe identify today's key issues in supporting children and youth with brai
6h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Team achieves two-electron chemical reactions using light energy, goldScientists are one step closer to building a carbon-recycling system that can harvest solar energy to efficiently convert CO2 and water into liquid fuels. By optimizing many parts of the system, the researchers say, they can now drive two-electron chemical reactions, a substantial advance over one-electron reactions, which are energy inefficient.
6h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Lifting the economy on hawks' wingsWhat can help boost Michigan's economy? American kestrels.
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News

New study sheds light on how we perceive colorWhen we view natural images the colours we perceive are due to colour information at every local patch of an image, rather than how colours interact when they transition from one point to another, according to a new study from researchers at City, University of London.
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Mathematical methods for diagnosing breast cancerThe team of researchers at Kaunas University of Technology, Lithuania are developing mathematical methods which could help diagnose breast cancer. Applying deep learning method, the researchers are aiming to 'teach' computers to recognize malignant lesions, which would allow at least partially automatize and enhance the accuracy of diagnosing breast cancer.
6h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News

437 million tons of fish, $560 billion wasted due to destructive fishing operationsIndustrial fisheries that rely on bottom trawling wasted 437 million tonnes of fish and missed out on $560 billion in revenue over the past 65 years, new UBC research has found.
6h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Drug companies selling more 'lifestyle,' less 'symptom'More prescription drug commercials are promoting how certain medications can improve a user's lifestyle rather than curing symptoms and the negative emotions connected to their health condition.
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NYT > Science

Trilobites: Scientists Made Snails Remember Something That Never Happened to ThemWhen scientists injected RNA from the brain cells of trained snails to untrained snails, the animals behaved as if they remembered the trained snails’ experiences.
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Ingeniøren

Bakterier omdanner sukker-spildevand til kostbart produktForskere på DTU har taget patent på en ny metode til at binde CO2 fra biogas med sukker. Dermed kan sukkerindustriens spildevand omdannes til bio-ravsyre, der bl.a. anvendes i plastic og medicin.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Scientists develop method to tweak tiny 'antenna' on cellsScientists at Johns Hopkins Medicine and the National Tsing Hua University in Taiwan say they have found a fast way to manipulate a cell's cilia, the tiny, fingerlike protrusions that "feel" and sense their microscopic environment. The experiments, performed in mouse cells, may advance scientists' efforts to not only understand how the nanosized antennae work, but also how to repair them.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Preparatory works start on disputed Russian gas pipelinePreparatory work for the construction of a controversial Russian gas pipeline began off the German coast on Tuesday, said a consortium led by Russia's Gazprom, days ahead of a visit by German chancellor Angela Merkel to Russia.
6h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Understanding Andean concepts of death and renewalResearch in the Andes has yielded evidence for a complex association between settlement sites and mortuary monuments, tied to concepts of death, ancestor veneration and water.
6h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Monitoring the tremble—and potential fall—of natural rock archesScientists monitoring the vibrations of natural rock arches have found that the resonant frequencies of arches undergo dynamic changes from day to day, according to research presented at the 2018 SSA Annual Meeting.
6h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Prized data, free and open to allThe first official account of the electronic Rothamsted Archive and what it offers, published today, highlights how this unique historical repository of agricultural and meteorological data, which date back to 1843, is the result of some remarkable forward thinking.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

NASA's emerging microgap cooling to be tested aboard reusable launch vehicleAn emerging technology for removing excessive, potentially damaging heat from small, tightly packed instrument electronics and other spaceflight gear will be demonstrated for the first time during an upcoming suborbital flight aboard a reusable launch vehicle.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Facebook details policing for sex, terror, hate contentFacebook CambridgeFacebook pulled or slapped warnings on nearly 30 million posts containing sexual or violent images, terrorist propaganda or hate speech in the first three months of 2018, the social media giant said Tuesday.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Dutch govt dropping Kaspersky software over spying fearsThe Dutch government is phasing out the use of anti-virus software made by Russian firm Kaspersky Lab amid fears of possible spying, despite vehement denials by the Moscow-based cyber security company.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Dutch researchers uncover dirty jokes in Anne Frank's diaryResearchers using digital technology deciphered the writing on two pages of Anne Frank's diary that she had covered over with brown masking paper, discovering four risque jokes and a candid explanation of sex, contraception and prostitution.
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Quanta Magazine

To Build Truly Intelligent Machines, Teach Them Cause and EffectArtificial intelligence owes a lot of its smarts to Judea Pearl. In the 1980s he led efforts that allowed machines to reason probabilistically. Now he’s one of the field’s sharpest critics. In his latest book, “ The Book of Why: The New Science of Cause and Effect ,” he argues that artificial intelligence has been handicapped by an incomplete understanding of what intelligence really is. Three de
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The Atlantic

Why My Father Made Me Forget Our Palestinian CatastropheWhen the creation of the State of Israel 70 years ago led to a mass Palestinian exodus, only about 150,000 Palestinians out of nearly 1 million who had lived on the territory managed to remain within the new state. Among them were my grandparents. And yet, it wasn’t until I was 20 years old that I first heard of the nakba , an Arabic term meaning “catastrophe” that many Palestinians use to mark t
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News

IgG antibodies activate blood platelets and contribute to the severity of anaphylaxisWhile it was already known that IgE antibodies can trigger allergic reactions, scientists recently demonstrated that IgG antibodies play an active role in the severity of anaphylactic shock by unexpectedly activating blood platelets.
6h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Monitoring the tremble -- and potential fall -- of natural rock archesScientists monitoring the vibrations of natural rock arches have found that the resonant frequencies of arches undergo dynamic changes from day to day, according to research presented at the 2018 SSA Annual Meeting.
6h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Scientists develop method to tweak tiny 'antenna' on cellsScientists at Johns Hopkins Medicine and the National Tsing Hua University in Taiwan say they have found a fast way to manipulate a cell's cilia, the tiny, fingerlike protrusions that 'feel' and sense their microscopic environment. The experiments, performed in mouse cells, may advance scientists' efforts to not only understand how the nanosized antennae work, but also how to repair them.
6h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Eyewitness accounts fill in details of 1946 Dominican Republic tsunamiAlmost 70 years later, the man remembers the August day in Playa Rincon, when he clung to the top of an almond tree to survive a tsunami where the waters rushed about 700 meters inland after a magnitude 8.1 earthquake.His recollections and other astonishing eyewitness accounts of the tsunami that struck the Dominican Republic in 1946 are being used to reconstruct the tsunami's heights and inundati
6h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Prized data, free and open to allThe first official account of the electronic Rothamsted Archive and what it offers, published today, highlights how this unique historical repository of agricultural and meteorological data, which date back to 1843, is the result of some remarkable forward thinking.
6h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Understanding Andean concepts of death and renewalResearch in the Andes has yielded evidence for a complex association between settlement sites and mortuary monuments, tied to concepts of death, ancestor veneration and water.
6h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Study provides further insight into how Ebola affects the eyeA new study, conducted by the researchers from the University of Liverpool, published in JAMA Ophthalmology identifies the specific characteristics of Ebola retinal lesions, which provide further clues as to how the virus travels to the retina and causes damage.
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Antarctic seals can help predict ice sheet meltTwo species of seal found in Antarctic seas are helping scientists collect data about the temperature and salinity of waters around vulnerable ice sheets in West Antarctica. Understanding more about how this water gets towards the ice shelves by measuring its temperature, salinity and depth, will help climate change modellers make more accurate predictions about how rapidly the Antarctic ice sheet
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Nature publishes the results of the global experiment The Big Bell testFor the first time, the thousands of decisions which each experiment requires were taken directly by humans, and not by machines. For this, the thirteen experiments had the help of more than 100,000 people. The Big Bell Test experiments will make it possible to communicate in a way that is impossible to spy on in the future.
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Attentive adults increase children's ability to empathiseFor human beings to function socially, they need to be able to perceive, understand, and talk about others' mental states, such as beliefs, desires and intentions. There is no consensus among researchers as to when children develop this ability. Previous research indicates that it emerges around the age of four, but research at Lund University in Sweden shows that children can demonstrate this abi
6h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Prenatal testing of the fetal rhesus factor: Test is reliable, but benefit is unclearThe new noninvasive test, using a blood sample of the pregnant woman, is as reliable as the conventional test using a blood sample of the newborn. Studies on benefit and harm are still lacking.
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Futurity.org

Ring, wristband combo could make texting really subtleA new way to control text or other mobile apps involves acoustic chirps that go from ring to wristband, like a smartwatch. The system can recognize 22 different micro finger gestures that could be programmed to various commands—including a T9 keyboard interface, a set of numbers, or application commands like playing or stopping music. A video demonstration of the technology shows how, at a high r
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Ingeniøren

Kraftige orkaner bliver hurtigt vildere end for 30 år sidenForklaringen skyldes ifølge forskerne et naturligt klimafænomen – og ikke global opvarmning.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Even low concentrations of silver can foil wastewater treatmentResearch at Oregon State University has shed new light how an increasingly common consumer product component—silver nanoparticles—can potentially interfere with the treatment of wastewater.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

In era of #MeToo, majority of employees say their employers fail to take new steps addressing sexual harassmentThe spotlight on workplace sexual harassment since fall 2017 has led to high-profile resignations, terminations and lawsuits. And while the revelations and consequences have prompted ongoing, national conversations about appropriate behavior, only 32 percent of working Americans said that their employer has taken new steps to prevent and address sexual harassment in the workplace, according to a s
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Feed: All Latest

How Much Sex, Violence, and Hate Speech Is on Facebook?Facebook issued its first report on objectionable content, showing the prevalence of graphic violence is rising, as is Facebook’s ability to detect it.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Enzyme's movement may be key to new cancer drugsRevealing all the steps required to activate an enzyme called a protein kinase may identify new ways to target cancer, according to new University of Arizona-led research.
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Flowing cells in a wavy microchannel for effective size-based cell sortingResearchers from SUTD developed a precise microscale manipulation method by rapidly flowing cell suspensions through a specially designed microchannel. This novel microfluidic device enables high-throughput sized-based cell sorting of a large amount of biological samples, which has broad applications in practical biomedical research and pharmaceutical fields.
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News

How the waterwheel plant snapsBiologists and civil engineers have analyzed the rapid movement of the snap-trap with which the carnivorous plant catches its prey.
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Astonishing effect enables better palladium catalystsThe taste of the chocolate cake's icing should not depend on whether it is served on a porcelain or a silver plate. Similarly, for chemical reactions on the surface of large precious metal grains, the substrate (the so-called support) should not play a crucial role. Experimental studies performed at TU Wien led to surprising findings. Chemical processes on palladium grains, which are also used for
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News

3D images of cancer cells in the bodyMaking tumor cells glow: medical physicists at Martin Luther University Halle-Wittenberg have developed a new method that can generate detailed three-dimensional images of the body's interior. This can be used to more closely investigate the development of cancer cells in the body. The research group presents its findings in Communication Physics, a journal published by the Nature Publishing Group
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Researchers call for transgender-inclusive healthcare providersMore should be done to take care of the mental health of transgender people in the US, a new survey carried out in Colorado indicates. The survey results show that four in every ten respondents suffered from depression, while one in every 10 tried to commit suicide in the year prior to the survey being conducted.
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Magnetic stimulation dampens brain response to drug cues in addictionIn a study investigating the use of transcranial magnetic stimulation (TMS) for drug addiction, researchers at Medical University of South Carolina are the first to demonstrate that the noninvasive brain stimulation technique can dampen brain activity in response to drug cues in chronic alcohol users and chronic cocaine users. The findings are published in Biological Psychiatry: Cognitive Neurosci
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The Atlantic

Identical Twins Hint at How Environments Change Gene ExpressionMonica and Erika Hoffman stand barefoot, side by side near a sign that reads “Twin Studies Center” at California State University at Fullerton. Their glasses removed, both have auburn eyes, softly jutted chins, light freckles, and perky noses. Both wear black shirts and small sparkly earrings (Erika’s are flowers, Monica’s, bows). The identical twin sisters turned 39 the day before this lab visit
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Latest Headlines | Science News

How a deep-sea geology trip led researchers to a doomed octopus nurseryA healthy population of cephalopods could be hiding nearby, though, a new study contends.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Physicists developing quantum-enhanced sensors for real-life applicationsA University of Oklahoma physicist, Alberto M. Marino, is developing quantum-enhanced sensors that could find their way into applications ranging from biomedical to chemical detection.
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cognitive science

STEM POWER: Suzanne Gildert -- "We don't want the things we create to become slaves, or entities that end up being tortured or treated like playthings. We want them to be eventually thought of as being the same as we are, like having citizenship and rights," says Sanctuary AI co-founder Dr. Gildert.submitted by /u/trot-trot [link] [comments]
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Air France-KLM names interim leaders after CEO's quick exitAir France-KLM named chief financial officer Frederic Gagey as its interim CEO on Tuesday following Jean-Marc Janaillac's sudden exit in a bitter dispute over salaries in the group's French wing.
7h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Uber shifts policy for alleged sexual misconduct on serviceUber LyftUber's ride-hailing service will give its U.S. passengers and drivers more leeway to pursue claims of sexual misconduct, its latest attempt to shed its reputation for brushing aside bad behavior.
7h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

How a 'smart countryside' can use technology for greener endsSmart cities are often discussed as being the key to future urban living. The increase in capacity for more complex information can help solve human and environmental problems by saving energy and regulating traffic flow. A study has now highlighted the potential of adapting the concept of "smart" for national parks.
7h
Popular Science

How to get the most space in your cloud storage—without paying to upgradeDIY Free up some spare room. As your cloud storage fills up with files, you might feel the urge to pay for more space. Ignore it. Instead, clear out the junk taking up room in your account.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

How the waterwheel plant snapsThe midrib of the leaf (which has been transformed into a snap trap) bends slightly downwards in a flash, the trap halves fold in, and the water flea can no longer escape – as part of an interdisciplinary team Anna Westermeier, Dr. Simon Poppinga and Prof. Dr. Thomas Speck from the Plant Biomechanics Group at the Botanic Garden of the University of Freiburg have discovered how this snapping mechan
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Gender is personal – not computationalImagine walking down the street and seeing advertising screens change their content based on how you walk, how you talk, or even the shape of your chest. These screens rely on hidden cameras, microphones and computers to guess if you're male or female. This might sound futuristic, but patrons in a Norwegian pizzeria discovered it's exactly what was happening: Women were seeing ads for salad and me
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Is bigger really better?The United States is facing a housing crisis: Affordable housing is inadequate, while luxury homes abound. Homelessness remains a persistent problem in many areas of the country.
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Futurity.org

The way MRSA ‘eats’ our fat could be used against itNew research takes a step towards using one of MRSA’s strengths against it. Antibiotic-resistant infections cause more than 30,000 deaths annually in the United States alone. The majority of those are caused by methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus , more commonly known as MRSA, which can turn routine medical operations into near-death battles. “Attacking the cell membrane and inhibiting it
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cognitive science

long-term memory transfer through RNA transfer in sea slugssubmitted by /u/stefantalpalaru [link] [comments]
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Ingeniøren

Cybersikkerhedsstrategi: Statens It bliver døgnbemandetRegeringen vil overtage samfundskritiske it-systemer fra private leverandører, hvis de ikke har styr på it-sikkerheden. Samtidig får Statens It et døgnåbent overvågningscenter. Det er blandt de 25 initiativer i regeringens nationale strategi for cyber- og informationssikkerhed.
7h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Analysis of causality principle for the conductivity of grapheneGraphene's unusual qualities led to speculation that the causality principle may not be observed for it. The authors, Vladimir Mostepanenko and Galina Klimchitskaya, proved that the principle is preserved for graphene. Through the direct analytic calculation it was shown that the real and imaginary parts of graphene conductivity, found recently on the basis of first principles of thermal quantum f
7h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Expert consensus finds that higher protein intake benefits adult bone healthA new expert consensus endorsed by the European Society for Clinical and Economical Aspects of Osteoporosis, Osteoarthritis, and Musculoskeletal Diseases (ESCEO) and the International Osteoporosis Foundation (IOF) has reviewed the benefits and safety of dietary protein for bone health, based on analyses of major research studies.
7h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Malaria detectable in olfactory cocktailETH researchers have discovered odor profiles typical of people infected with acute or asymptomatic malaria. This is a first promising step towards a low-cost diagnostic test that can be used in the field in developing countries.
7h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News

A new method for studying semiconductor nanoparticles has been testedA team from Siberian Federal University and Kirensky Institute of Physics (Siberian Department of the Russian Academy of Sciences) applied a new method to study nanoparticles made of cadmium telluride (CdTe). They used a peculiar feature of this compound: its interaction with light differs depending on the magnetic field. The results of the study were published in the Physics Letters A journal.
7h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News

How far to go for satellite cloud image forecasting into operationSimulated satellite cloud images not only have the visualization of cloud imagery, but also can reflect more information about the model. Using the atmospheric radiation transfer model and high-resolution numerical weather forecast results, researchers from Beijing have achieved the FY-2D infrared bright-temperature simulation and also studied the impact of errors in macro and micro cloud paramete
7h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Aiming low: Landmark study optimizes steroid use in pregnancyResearch which aims to optimize steroid use in pregnancy is set to benefit millions of families worldwide who will have babies born prematurely.
7h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Even low concentrations of silver can foil wastewater treatmentResearch has shed new light how an increasingly common consumer product component -- silver nanoparticles -- can potentially interfere with the treatment of wastewater.
7h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Scientists' discovery in Yellowstone 'extremely relevant' to origin of lifeMontana State University professor William Inskeep and his team of researchers published their findings May 14 in the scientific journal Nature Microbiology.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

How artificial intelligence is reimagining workPaul Daugherty, chief technology and innovation officer at Accenture, sees three myths surrounding artificial intelligence: Robots are coming for us, machines will take our jobs, and current approaches to business processes will still apply.
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cognitive science

Study shows that "unfair lineups" in which the police-identified suspect stands out, make witnesses more willing to identify that suspect.submitted by /u/randomusefulbits [link] [comments]
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Forests are growing again where human well-being is increasing, finds new studyCountries with high levels of human well-being are more likely to show increasing forest growth. That's the finding of a new study by a group of Finnish scientists, published in PLOS ONE. Their work shows that countries exhibiting annual increases in the amount of trees typically score highly on the UN's Human Development Index (HDI), a scoring system that uses measures of life expectancy, educati
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Scientific American Content: Global

The Biggest Questions in Science-- Read more on ScientificAmerican.com
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Scientific American Content: Global

The Sun, Supercharging Babies and the Eternal Search for Knowledge-- Read more on ScientificAmerican.com
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

Water plumes on Jupiter's moon Europa?Scientists re-examining data from an old mission bring new insights to the tantalizing question of whether Jupiter's moon Europa has the ingredients to support life. The data provide independent evidence that the moon's subsurface liquid water reservoir may be venting plumes of water vapor above its icy shell.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Using IoT, AI and cloud technologies to advance home-based integrated careOne of the largest growing demographics in the EU is individuals aged 65 and over, and two thirds of this group are in situation of multimorbidity, i.e., perons who suffer from two or more chronic diseases. The ineffective treatment of multimorbidity has been pointed out as an urgent problem to address by the Academy of Medical Sciences in a recently released report. As part of an EU H2020 funded
7h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Producing beneficial propylene while consuming a major greenhouse gasWhat if a major heat-trapping greenhouse gas could be consumed to produce a valuable chemical that is in short supply? Chemists at the U.S. Department of Energy's (DOE) Brookhaven National Laboratory have identified a catalyst—a substance that speeds up a chemical reaction—that may be able to do just that. This "bimetallic" catalyst, made of iron and nickel, drives the reaction of the greenhouse g
7h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Lack of 'happiness' hormone makes rice plants less attractive to insectsInhibiting the production of the 'happiness' hormone – serotonin – in rice plants, increases their resistance to two of the world's most destructive and costly insect pests, new research has shown.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Antarctic seals can help predict ice sheet meltTwo species of seal found in Antarctic seas are helping scientists collect data about the temperature and salinity of waters around vulnerable ice sheets in West Antarctica.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Enzyme adopts dynamic structure to function in hot, salty seaFor the microbes that dwell in the hot, salty depths of the Red Sea, life is a delicate evolutionary balancing act. Just for these critters to replicate their DNA requires an enzyme that's adapted to both high temperatures and high salt concentrations, two environmental factors that impose countervailing selective pressures on the structure of a protein.
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BBC News - Science & Environment

Building back upAfter last years first test runs, the Bloodhound supersonic car is being rebuilt ready to go faster still.
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Dagens Medicin

Anne Tybjærg-Hansen modtager international pris
7h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Entangled atoms shine in unisonA team led by Austrian experimental physicist Rainer Blatt has succeeded in characterizing the quantum entanglement of two spatially separated atoms by observing their light emission. This fundamental demonstration could lead to the development of highly sensitive optical gradiometers for the precise measurement of the gravitational field or the earth's magnetic field.
7h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Treating muscle wasting improved cancer survivalResearchers from the University of Jyväskylä in Finland have found that continued treatment of muscle wasting with a soluble growth factor receptor protein, produced at the University of Helsinki, improved survival in a preclinical cancer model without affecting the tumor size. This effect was not found when the mice were treated with the recombinant protein only prophylactically before cancer.
7h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Enzyme's movement may be key to new cancer drugsMotion is crucial for proper functioning of a kinase enzyme, a University of Arizona-led research team found. Not only must the kinase have all needed parts in place, the enzyme must move in the correct manner and at the correct speed to function properly in a cell. Focusing on ways to impede the enzyme's motion may be an avenue for developing new drugs to combat cancer and other diseases.
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Big data from world's largest citizen science microbiome project serves food for thoughtResearchers at University of California San Diego School of Medicine and collaborators have published the first major results from the American Gut Project a crowdsourced, global citizen science effort. The project, described May 15 in mSystems, is the largest published study to date of the human microbiome -- the unique microbial communities that inhabit our bodies.
7h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News

OU physicist developing quantum-enhanced sensors for real-life applicationsA University of Oklahoma physicist, Alberto M. Marino, is developing quantum-enhanced sensors that could find their way into applications ranging from biomedical to chemical detection. In a new study, Marino's team demonstrates the ability of quantum states of light to enhance the sensitivities of state-of-the-art plasmonic sensors. The team presents the first implementation of a sensor with sensi
7h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Evidence shows ocean sound may help reduce stress and create a sense of calmThe power of the ocean to bring mental health benefits to humans is a growing field of research as scientists increasingly understand the value of the marine realm in human health and wellbeing.
7h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Astonishing effect enables better palladium catalystsIn chemistry, atoms can usually only affect their immediate neighborhood. At TU Vienna, a novel effect with astonishing long-range action has been discovered, which can make automotive catalytic converters more effective.
7h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

GRACE-FO will help monitor droughtsYou may not notice water in the ground under your feet, but it plays an important role in keeping you alive. Plants draw water from soil into their roots and use it to grow. If there's not enough, the resulting drought may have impacts that spread across local water supplies, regional agriculture and even international food prices. NASA's Gravity Recovery and Climate Experiment (GRACE) mission was
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New Scientist - News

The tides are getting stronger thanks to the shifting continentsThe ocean tides are the strongest they have been for millions of years, and they will get stronger for several million years to come – because of the position of the continents
7h
Viden

Tesla på autopilot bragede ind i brandbil med 100 km/tFøreren bekræfter, at hun havde overladt styringen til bilen, mens hun brugte tiden på sin telefon. Elon Musk roser bilen for, at kvinden slap med en brækket fod.
7h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Why Iceland is set to resume whaling despite international oppositionAfter a two-year pause in the fin whale (Balaenoptera physalus) hunt, Icelandic whaling company Hvalur hf. will resume whaling this summer, with a government-issued quota.
7h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Researchers determine chemical composition of two extremely metal-poor starsA group of scientists led by Avrajit Bandyopadhyay of the Indian Institute of Astrophysics, Bangalore, has conducted chemical analysis of two bright, extremely metal-poor stars. The results of the analysis, presented May 6 in a paper published on arXiv.org, provide important insights into the nature of these stars, and could help astronomers better understand their origin.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Bamboo-eating Bale monkeys could still be saved from extinctionThere are fewer than 10,000 surviving Bale monkeys in Ethiopia, and they prefer to eat only bamboo – but the bamboo forests are shrinking, and local farmers harass or kill monkeys when they try to eat cultivated foods. This part sounds like a recipe for a species at high risk, but new research shows that the Bale monkeys can still be saved from extinction.
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Feed: All Latest

Henry the Sexbot Wants to Know All Your Hopes and DreamsSex doll maker RealBotix is betting that that AI can help its latest creation offer an extra layer of companionship that goes beyond sex.
7h
Feed: All Latest

This Insect-Sized Flying Robot Is Powered by LasersIt’s the first robo-fly that doesn’t need to be tethered to a power supply.
7h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

New study finds variations in global warming trend are caused by oceansNew research has shown that natural variations in global mean temperature are always forced by changes in heat release and heat uptake by the oceans, in particular the heat release associated with evaporation.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

A history of the marsupial lion—with science, colonial politics and bunyips"Marsupial lions" lived on the Australian continent from about 24 million years ago up until the end of the Pleistocene era, about 30,000 years ago.
8h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Scientists' discovery in Yellowstone 'extremely relevant' to origin of lifeMontana State University scientists have found a new lineage of microbes living in Yellowstone National Park's thermal features that sheds light on the origin of life, the evolution of archaeal life and the importance of iron in early life.
8h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

High-definition archaeology reveals secrets of the earliest citiesYou may not have noticed, but a revolution is underway in archaeology.
8h
Scientific American Content: Global

Here's What's Needed for Self-Flying Taxis and Delivery Drones to Really Take OffWhether carting pizzas or passengers, small autonomous aircraft like the ones Amazon, Uber and others are testing need sophisticated traffic management to prevent collisions -- Read more on ScientificAmerican.com
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

Move it and use it: Exergaming may help those at risk of Alzheimer's or related dementiasOlder adults with mild cognitive impairment (MCI), often a precursor to Alzheimer's, showed significant improvement with certain complex thinking and memory skills after exergaming, according to a new study. The results could encourage seniors, caregivers and health care providers to pursue or prescribe exergames (video games that also require physical exercise) in hopes of slowing the debilitatin
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

Omega-3, omega-6 in diet alters gene expression in obesityA new study reveals that essential fats in the diet may play a role in regulating protein secretion in the muscles by changing the way genes associated with secretion act.
8h
Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

Six years of exercise -- or lack of it -- may be enough to change heart failure riskBy analyzing reported physical activity levels over time in more than 11,000 American adults, researchers conclude that increasing physical activity to recommended levels over as few as six years in middle age is associated with a significantly decreased risk of heart failure, a condition that affects an estimated 5 million to 6 million Americans.
8h
Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

Wildfires may cause long-term health problems for endangered orangutansOrangutans, already critically endangered due to habitat loss from logging and farming, may face another threat in the form of smoke from natural and human-caused fires, a new study finds.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

Gender discrimination results in the deaths of extra 239,000 girls per year in IndiaA new study has found that there is an average of 239,000 excess deaths per year of girls under the age of five in India, or 2.4 million in a decade, and excess female child mortality is found in 90 percent of districts in the country.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

Scientists find missing factor in gene activationScientists have unraveled a mystery on how genes are activated. Human genes are blocked by structures known as nucleosomes, components that package DNA inside cells. How do these roadblocks clear out to allow genes to be turned on? Scientists have identified a key factor that unravels nucleosomes and clears the way for gene activation. They say the finding is useful in understanding diseases such
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Metal-based probes for detection of dopamine receptors, a cancer biomarkerA team at Hong Kong Baptist University has developed the world's first iridium(III)-based probes for imaging dopamine receptors in living cells. The discovery has enhanced the understanding of dopamine receptors in carcinogenesis, and the findings can be potentially developed as a novel early cancer detection technology.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

To get conservative climate contrarians to really listen, try speaking their languageIt's a well-studied fact that facts don't speak for themselves. This is especially apparent with climate change. Some brilliant studies in the past ten years have shown that people respond to narratives about climate change, not raw facts.
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Dagens Medicin

Sundhedsplatformen får produktiviteten til at falde med ti pct. i Region SjællandSygehusene i Region Sjælland har behandlet ti pct. færre patienter siden implementeringen af Sundhedsplatformen i november 2017.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

How high can seas rise? On a tropical isle, the answers are not always obviousWith its white-sand beaches and nice weather, the far southern Caribbean island of Barbados is a magnet for vacationers. It is also a magnet for geologists and climate scientists. That is because it is made largely of fossil corals that reach from its shoreline high into the hilly interior. Within these deposits lie exquisitely preserved records of past sea levels—perhaps the most obvious baromete
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

What mobile phones mean for refugeesWhat do refugees use their mobile phones for? And what does it mean for aid workers in reception camps? The Leiden Centre for Innovation studied this issue together with researchers from Harvard Humanitarian Initiative and Data & Society.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Microlitter—a challenge for wastewater treatment plantsFinnish Environment Institute Researcher and M.Sc. Julia Talvitie's doctoral dissertation indicates that wastewater treatment plants function well overall for microlitter removal. The vast majority (approx. 99%) of microlitter of 20 micrometers is removed using the normal treatment methods currently in use.
8h
Ingeniøren

Rapport: Aircondition bliver en af de helt store energisyndereDet Internationale Energiagentur fastslår, at aircondition tredobles inden 2050.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

Why some people resist authorityControl aversion -- the urge to rebel against control over one's decisions -- can be explained by connectivity between two regions of the brain as well as behavioral measures of distrust and lack of understanding.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

New agility tests can discriminate between soccer players at different performance levelsA new study reports that two new agility tests can distinguish between youth soccer players in under-17 and under-19 divisions, with older players showing increased agility. In contrast, other characteristics thought to indicate agility -- such as sprinting and jumping abilities -- were not significantly different between players of different ages. The findings suggest that specific agility traini
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

Scientists use Dorset, UK, as model to help find traces of life on MarsBy studying a stream on the UK coast, experts have calculated how much organic matter we might find on Mars, and where to look.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

New hope for patients with depression and anxietyThere is a strong link between depression and anxiety disorders and autoimmune thyroiditis (AIT), a chronic thyroid condition affecting approximately 10 percent of the population. Scientists have now demonstrated that special treatment could help many sufferers, especially women.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Model T killed Kansas German dialectsIt was Henry Ford, not Kaiser Bill, who was responsible for the decline of the distinctive German dialects spoken by immigrants and their descendants in five Kansas and Missouri settlements during the 20th century.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Two-degree warming may cause droughts in the Mediterranean regionThe Mediterranean region is vulnerable to a global warming of two degrees, a new study shows. At 1.5 degrees or less, climate models do not respond in a similar fashion.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Small sats are vital to Australia's space industry – and they won't be space junkToday the federal government released its response to the review of Australia's Space Capability.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

A new gelling molecule for growing neurons in 3-DA multidisciplinary team of researchers from CNRS, INSERM and Université Toulouse III – Paul Sabatier has developed a hydrogel that can grow, develop and differentiate neural stem cells. This biomaterial could provide new paths for the development of in vitro cellular models of brain tissue or of in vivo tissue reconstruction. This work is published in ACS Applied Materials & Interfaces on May 14,
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

The disc of the Milky Way is bigger than we thoughtA team of researchers at the Instituto de Astrofísica de Canarias (IAC) and at the National Astronomical Observatories of Beijing (NAOC) have published a paper which suggests that if we could travel at the speed of light it would take us 200,000 years to cross the disc of our galaxy.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

American kestrels provide important 'ecosystem services'America's smallest raptor, the American kestrel, can boost economies in Michigan and other fruit-growing states, new research shows. It's the first study to measure regional job creation aided by the activity of native predators.
8h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Physicist investigates black holes like crime scenesNicholas Warner wants to figure out how matter behaves at the most extreme frontier of the universe. Warner, professor of physics and astronomy and mathematics at USC Dornsife, recently received a prestigious grant from the European Research Council to study a problem first revealed by Stephen Hawking—the black hole information paradox.
8h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Six years of exercise -- or lack of it -- may be enough to change heart failure riskBy analyzing reported physical activity levels over time in more than 11,000 American adults, Johns Hopkins Medicine researchers conclude that increasing physical activity to recommended levels over as few as six years in middle age is associated with a significantly decreased risk of heart failure, a condition that affects an estimated 5 million to 6 million Americans.
8h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Omega-3, omega-6 in diet alters gene expression in obesityA new study reveals that essential fats in the diet may play a role in regulating protein secretion in the muscles by changing the way genes associated with secretion act. The study is published ahead of print in Physiological Genomics.
8h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Europa by the numbersGalileo Galilei discovered Jupiter's moon Europa in 1610. More than four centuries later, astronomers are still making discoveries about its icy surface. With a diameter of almost 2,000 miles, an orbit equivalent to 3.5 Earth days and a mass about 65 percent of Earth's Moon, Europa is considered by some scientists a likely place to look for present-day environments suitable for life.
8h
Dagens Medicin

Kræftens Bekæmpelse mister også sin formandDorthe Crüger stopper som formand for Kræftens Bekæmpelse, der allerede er midt i et direktørskifte. »Jeg er blevet interesseret i andre ting,« siger den afgående formand.
8h
The Scientist RSS

Image of the Day: Cancer Spheroid3-D balls of cells can be used to screen for potential cancer drugs.
8h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Research collaboration uses cutting-edge technology to produce new veterinary drugResearchers from Victoria University of Wellington's Ferrier Research Institute, Callaghan Innovation, the University of Canterbury, and Massey University have developed cutting-edge gene engineering technology to help scientists more efficiently manipulate DNA in order to produce new products, including a new veterinary drug.
8h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Online atlas explores north-south divide in childbirth and child mortality during Victorian eraA new interactive online atlas, which illustrates when, where and possibly how fertility rates began to fall in England and Wales during the Victorian era has been made freely available from today.
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Popular Science

Astronomy's next big discovery is probably hiding in piles of old dataSpace The ability to gather more information means we'll spend more time sifting through it. Astronomers are gathering an exponentially greater amount of data every day—so much that it will take years to uncover all the hidden signals buried in the archives.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Orbital variations can trigger 'snowball' states in habitable zones around sunlike starsAspects of an otherwise Earthlike planet's tilt and orbital dynamics can severely affect its potential habitability—even triggering abrupt "snowball states" where oceans freeze and surface life is impossible, according to new research from astronomers at the University of Washington.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Review of common construction practice finds environmental contamination, need for improved oversight and monitoringAn in-depth review of environmental protections for a common storm water culvert repair practice—cured-in-place pipe repair, or CIPP—has revealed differing installation practices across states, water contamination incidents in 10 states and Canada, and lack of safety data for existing installation practices.
8h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Van der Waals (VDW) material shows the right stuff at 200 nanometresThe unusual electronic and magnetic properties of van der Waals (vdW) materials, made up of many 'stacked' 2-D layers, offer potential for future electronics, including spintronics.
8h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Heat shock system helps bug come back to life after drying upHeat shock factor, which exists in a single form in invertebrates but multiple forms in vertebrates, is an essential part of the ability of living cells to survive stressful conditions such as heat, cold, radiation, and, it turns out, desiccation.
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Feed: All Latest

Americans Can't Have Audi's Super Capable Self-Driving SystemAnd the automaker's reasons point to the American struggle to adapt to a new kind of driving.
8h
The Atlantic

Helicopters Are Coming to a Planet Near YouThe first space missions humans sent to Mars were flybys. Spacecraft had one chance to observe the planet before hurtling away, never to return. Then came the orbiters, designed to be captured by Mars’s gravity and stick around. Eventually, the orbiters started bringing landers with them, dropping them on the rust-colored surface. Then came the rovers, built to move along the rocky terrain. Over
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The Atlantic

Letters: Why Is State Funding for Public Universities Declining?American Higher Education Hits a Dangerous Milestone Ronald Brownstein reported recently that state funding for public colleges and universities has declined as student populations have become more racially diverse. Ronald Brownstein accurately documents the catastrophic loss of public confidence in American higher education, but the causes may be more wide-ranging than he suggests. The past seve
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The Atlantic

How the Enlightenment EndsT hree years ago , at a conference on transatlantic issues, the subject of artificial intelligence appeared on the agenda. I was on the verge of skipping that session—it lay outside my usual concerns—but the beginning of the presentation held me in my seat. The speaker described the workings of a computer program that would soon challenge international champions in the game Go. I was amazed that
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Platform for mobile networks would bring services up to speeds of 100 GbpsEven though mobile internet link speeds might soon achieve 100 Gbps, this doesn't necessarily mean network carriers will be free of data-handling challenges that effectively slow down mobile data services, for everything from individual device users to billions of Internet-of-Things connections.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Rhino horn used to comfort the terminally ill in VietnamThe horns of endangered wild rhinoceroses are widely used as a folk cure-all in parts of Asia. A new Danish-Vietnamese study from the University of Copenhagen uncovers new reasons that Vietnamese consumers buy illegal rhino horn. This knowledge can now be used in campaigns to save endangered rhinoceroses.
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Futurity.org

Why ‘2001: A Space Odyssey’ still matters in 20182001: A Space Odyssey (1968) is arguably the world’s most influential science fiction film. Stanley Kubrick’s space epic inspired a generation of filmmakers, including George Lucas, Steven Spielberg, and Christopher Nolan, who likened his film Interstellar (2015) to 2001 . Fifty years after its initial release, the film is getting renewed attention, including the debut of a new 70mm print at the
9h
Scientific American Content: Global

Who Are You Calling Normal?Neuroscientists are increasingly convinced that using the term restricts our understanding of the brain and behavior -- Read more on ScientificAmerican.com
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Measuring the hardness of living tissues without damageWhen a fertilized egg is developing into a fetus, cell populations forming tissues are in a fluid state, and thus, the tissue can be easily deformed. Cells also generate mechanical forces during development that contribute to the shaping of the tissues and organs. An important question is how organisms secure/proceed with proper tissue and organ formation in these conditions. In order to understan
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Scientists investigate inorganic biomaterials with antimicrobial propertiesA team of scientists from the Lobachevsky University Department of Solid State Chemistry under Dr. Evgeny Bulanov has developed a new method for obtaining bismuth-containing apatite and has studied its crystal structure and thermodynamic properties with the purpose of modeling its behavior under service conditions.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Ecological systems research: What do disturbances in the system result in?The effects of disturbances on an ecosystem such as flooding or increasing drought have been difficult to predict in the past. UFZ researchers have demonstrated the complexity with which even simple model ecosystems respond to disturbances and have uncovered underlying mechanisms that may play a role in natural ecosystems. The study was recently published in the journal Scientific Reports.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Connecting the dots to unlock brain structureMapping genetic influences on connections between neural networks could lead to a better understanding of brain organization and behavior.
9h
New Scientist - News

We may finally be able to beat the common cold with a new drugAn experimental drug stops common cold viruses from building their protective outer armour, preventing them from replicating and spreading
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Viden

Forskere overfører hukommelse mellem to snegleSnegl fik nye reflekser gennem en indsprøjtning med en anden snegls hukommelse.
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Scientific American Content: Global

The Science of Altering ConsciousnessIn a new book, bestselling author Michael Pollan explores psychedelics and the mind -- Read more on ScientificAmerican.com
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Dagens Medicin

Steno Diabetes Center Aarhus hyrer forskningschefProfessor og overlæge Niels Jessen bliver forskningschef ved Steno Diabetes Center Aarhus.
9h
Live Science

Is It Possible to Predict Earthquakes?How do scientists know when an earthquake is expected to hit an area?
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Latest Headlines | Science News

Kids are selective imitators, not extreme copycatsPreschool-age kids have a reputation as “overimitators” based on lab tests. But in realistic test situations, kids don’t blindly imitate adults.
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Feed: All Latest

When the Blockchain Skeptic Walked Into the Lions' DenJimmy Song, a venture partner at Blockchain Capital, tells the biggest cryptocurrency conference of the year that blockchain is a solution in search of a problem.
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Feed: All Latest

Want an Xbox One X? It's $100 Off Right NowFor a new console like the Xbox One X, this $100 discount is pretty amazing.
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Feed: All Latest

Elon Musk, Mark Zuckerberg, Jeff Bezos, and Ethically Iffy 'Philanthropy'Tech moguls like Jeff Bezos and Elon Musk aren't using their money to solve today's pressing problems. They're trying to change the world...again.
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Feed: All Latest

Darpa's Next Challenge? A Grueling Underground JourneyDarpa calls on researchers to autonomously explore the innards of Earth. Get ready for high drama and some fantastical-looking robots.
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The Atlantic

The Ivy League School That Won't Talk About Its Most Famous GraduateFor 176 years, William Henry Harrison was the only president the University of Pennsylvania had any kind of claim on, and even then it was kind of a stretch. As a student, Harrison did a brief stint at Penn , but he didn’t stay long enough to get a degree. And he only lasted a month in office, dying of pneumonia in April of 1841. Ever since then, Penn has waited, as Harvard, Yale, and its other I
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The Atlantic

The End of Trump Won't Be the End of TrumpismFor two years, the American media has been stuck in the movie Groundhog Day , replaying the 2016 election over and over in the hopes of extracting some new insight about an outcome it didn’t see coming. While some of this work comes from an earnest place—national reporters sense they got the story wrong, and now they’ve been to the heartland to see what they missed—in aggregate, they’re easily ca
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Live Science

For 'Flesh-Eating' Bacteria, Your Agonizing Pain Is Their PleasureBacteria that eat your flesh are also hijacking your pain receptors for their own benefit.
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Scientific American Content: Global

10 Things You Don't Know About YourselfYou probably do not understand yourself as well as you think you do -- Read more on ScientificAmerican.com
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Scientific American Content: Global

Will NASA Go Nuclear to Return to the Moon?A new reactor design could make nuclear-powered space exploration cheap, reliable and safe -- Read more on ScientificAmerican.com
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Mapping movements of ocean creatures great and smallA whale and a turtle differ in size, shape and lifestyle but their patterns of movement are surprisingly similar, reveals the largest collection of movement data for a diverse group of large marine vertebrates.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

A clearer future for underwater explorationA new system that simultaneously transmits ultrahigh-definition live video and receives feedback signals offers greatly improved underwater optical communications.
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News

In era of #MeToo, majority of employees say their employers fail to take new steps addressing sexual harassmentThe spotlight on workplace sexual harassment since fall 2017 has led to high-profile resignations, terminations and lawsuits. And while the revelations and consequences have prompted ongoing, national conversations about appropriate behavior, only 32 percent of working Americans said that their employer has taken new steps to prevent and address sexual harassment in the workplace, according to a s
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

A new material quickly identifies the presence of harmful ions in food productsA team of scientists from MSU has developed a new material based on silicon-titanium gel and a dye agent. The material is able to reveal the presence of harmful oxalate ions in food products even in field conditions. Analysis entails only bringing the sample into contact with the new material. The results of the study were published in Sensors.
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The Atlantic

A Reckoning for Obama's Foreign-Policy LegacyIran US Donald TrumpEmbedded in any policy is some theory of victory—some explanation, no matter how inchoate or ill-considered, that explains why this might work. So too with President Trump’s decision to walk away from the Joint Comprehensive Plan of Action, the agreement with Iran so ungainly that even the acronym JCPOA seems elegant by comparison. The nominal theory of victory here is preposterous: that Iran wil
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The Atlantic

How Income Affects the BrainWe often attribute financial problems to bad life decisions: Why didn’t that person stay in college? Why didn’t they pick a more lucrative career? Why did they have so many kids? But several recent studies suggest that having less money can actually affect thinking and memory for the worse. In the most recent of these papers, scientists found a link between being lower on the socioeconomic ladder
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Ingeniøren

Regeringen: Skolelærere skal vide mere om dataetik og it-sikkerhedFolkeskoler, gymnasier og universiteter skal fremover undervise elever og studerende i, hvordan man færdes sikkert på nettet, passer på sine data og bliver opmærksom på digitale farer på internettet.
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Ingeniøren

USA: Teleudbydere overvåger kunder i real time og sælger data videreAmerikanske tredjepartstjenester kan købe data om telekunders præcise placering - real time. Dette skyldes et smuthul i amerikansk lovgivning.
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Ingeniøren

Spørg Scientariet: Hvordan måler man pollen i luften?En læser vil gerne vide, hvordan man måler pollen, og hvorfor det kun foregår to steder i Danmark. Det svarer biolog i Astma-Allergi Danmark på.
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Ingeniøren

Ny svinevirus kan ramme menneskerForskere frygter, at dødelig husdyrsygdom kan brede sig til mennesker ligesom sars.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

EasyJet says losses narrow on sales boostBritish low-cost airline EasyJet slashed its first-half losses as a collapse of rivals boosted passenger numbers, but the performance was weighed down by integration costs from Air Berlin assets.
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Feed: All Latest

The Untold Story of Robert Mueller's Time in the Vietnam WarSpecial Counsel Robert Mueller’s job is to make sense of how Russia hacked the 2016 election. But to make sense of Mueller, you have to revisit some of the bloodiest battles of Vietnam.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Chemists find new way to create lithium metal electrodes for batteriesResearchers at Yale and Donghua University in China have developed a new process for creating lithium metal that may boost the energy and capacity of rechargeable batteries.
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Scientists use Dorset, UK, as model to help find traces of life on MarsBy studying a stream on the UK coast, experts have calculated how much organic matter we might find on Mars, and where to look.
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Your body is transparentized in a virtual environmentResearchers at Toyohashi University of Technology, University of Tokyo and Keio University have found that visual-motor synchronicity of only the hands and feet can induce a sense of illusory ownership over an invisible body interpolated between virtual hands and feet. This active method to induce a sense of illusory ownership over an invisible body at a distance has potential applications in skil
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Joint resolution: A link between Huntington's disease and rheumatoid arthritisUsing new analytic tools, researchers at University of California San Diego School of Medicine and the Icahn School of Medicine at Mount Sinai have decoded the epigenetic landscape for rheumatoid arthritis (RA), a common autoimmune disease that affects more than 1.3 million Americans.
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News

New agility tests can discriminate between soccer players at different performance levelsA new study reports that two new agility tests can distinguish between youth soccer players in under-17 and under-19 divisions, with older players showing increased agility. In contrast, other characteristics thought to indicate agility -- such as sprinting and jumping abilities --were not significantly different between players of different ages. The findings suggest that specific agility trainin
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New Scientist - News

Let’s hear it for psychology, a better than average scienceIt’s often derided as a pseudoscience, but every once in a while experimental psychology delivers a result that changes the way we think about ourselves
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Science : NPR

Louisiana Wants To Use The Muddy Mississippi To Build Up Its CoastLouisiana has big plans to redirect parts of the river to build up its shrinking coast. New research suggests it won't help nearly enough. (Image credit: Travis Lux/WWNO)
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Ingeniøren

Tysk persondrone skal flyve i DubaiSERIE: Volocopters drone 2X får nu drone-lufthavne.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Scientists use Dorset, UK, as model to help find traces of life on MarsImperial College London scientists have found traces of fatty acids—key building blocks of biological cells—in Dorset's acidic streams. They say that because of the similarity of acidic streams in Dorset and on Mars, their findings hint that life might once have existed on Mars.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Wildfires may cause long-term health problems for endangered orangutansOrangutans, already critically endangered due to habitat loss from logging and large-scale farming, may face another threat in the form of smoke from natural and human-caused fires, a Rutgers University-New Brunswick study finds.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

The Smithsonian is preserving this geologist's rock collectionThe Smithsonian Institution wanted Stephen Haggerty's rock collection.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

From Yahoo to Uber, major hacks of dataThe European Union's new data protection rules, which take effect on May 25, will give people more control over the way their personal information is used online.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Chinese volunteers emerge from virtual moon baseA group of Chinese volunteers has emerged from 110 days of isolation in a virtual "lunar lab", state media reported Tuesday, as the country pursues its ambition to put people on the moon.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Kaspersky to transfer infrastructure out of RussiaRussian anti-virus software firm Kaspersky Lab, which is suspected by US authorities of helping the Kremlin's espionage efforts, said Tuesday it was moving its core infrastructure and operations to Switzerland.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Too much sex puts Australia marsupials on endangered listTwo marsupial species whose males die after marathon sex sessions have been put on Australia's endangered list, with scientists warning Tuesday they are racing against the clock to save them.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

EU data protection may trigger global ripple effectThe EU's new data protection rules that enter into force later this month are having an impact around the world as firms, including in the United States and China, move to comply.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Vodafone returns to profit, announces CEO departureBritish telecoms giant Vodafone on Tuesday announced a return to annual profit, as it revealed that long-serving chief executive Vittorio Colao will step down later this year.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Under the hammer: record art auctionsAt $157.2 million, a painting by Italian artist Amedeo Modigliani has become the fourth most expensive work of art sold at auction.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

EU seeks to protect citizens in data 'jungle': ministerThe Facebook scandal has laid bare the urgency of protecting personal information in a digital "jungle," the EU's justice minister said before new European data rules become law.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Symantec downplays mysterious internal investigationSymantec shares regained some lost ground Monday as executives downplayed a mysterious internal investigation as an accounting matter not expected to have "material adverse" effect on finances.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

No time to waste: Moscow urged to recycle, not burnProtests have been growing in recent months over the stench from landfill sites around Moscow, overflowing with millions of tonnes of rubbish.
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Ingeniøren

PRO: Datacentre kan løbe tør for strømDatacentrenes hollandske lobbyorganisation frygter, at mangel på strøm bliver en trussel mod fortsat udvikling. I Danmark er der kun plads til datacentre vest for Storebælt.
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cognitive science

The evolution of language? There's an app for thatsubmitted by /u/wintz [link] [comments]
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Struggling Toshiba returns to black, avoids delistingStruggling Japanese conglomerate Toshiba said Tuesday it had bounced back into the black after a disastrous year and will avoid a humiliating delisting from the Tokyo stock exchange.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Seattle backs tax on companies like Amazon to help homelessSeattle Amazon HQ2Seattle leaders on Monday unanimously approved a tax on large businesses such as Amazon and Starbucks to fund the fight against homelessness after weeks of heated debate and raucous hearings.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Tesla's Autopilot engaged during Utah crashThe driver of a Tesla electric car had the vehicle's semi-autonomous Autopilot mode engaged when she slammed into the back of a Utah fire truck over the weekend, in the latest crash involving a car with self-driving features.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Study says insurance industry dangerously unprepared for extreme weatherAs historic flooding caused by climate change devastates communities in New Brunswick and British Columbia, new research from the University of Waterloo reveals the insurance industry hasn't considered a changing climate in their practices, putting homeowners at financial risk.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Algorithm is 'game-changer' for picking up on insurance fraudA Queen's University Belfast student has developed software which can detect insurance fraud quickly.
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NYT > Science

The World Wants Air-Conditioning. That Could Warm the World.The number of units worldwide is predicted to soar by midcentury, and the electricity to power them will increase planet-warming emissions.
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NYT > Science

ScienceTake: How Asteroids May Have Brought Water to EarthIt was thought that water bound up in asteroids would be lost in the intense heat of the impacts when they hit our planet. New experiments say no.
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NYT > Science

Did Asteroids Bring Water to Earth?Lab experiments to recreate what happens when asteroids hit the Earth show how these rocky objects could have transferred water to terrestrial rock in the intense heat of impact.
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Feed: All Latest

Wearables Company Whoop Moves to a $30 Monthly Subscription ModelCurious consumers can now get one of Whoop's sports-tracking wearables, beloved by elite athletes, for a $30 monthly fee.
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Science-Based Medicine

Reflex Integration TherapyVarious methods of reflex integration claim benefits for autism, ADHD, brain injuries, pain, and more. They are based on speculative ideas about retained primitive reflexes. They have not been scientifically tested.
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BBC News - Science & Environment

'Feel good' factor not CO2 boosts global forest expansionForests are increasing around the world because of rising incomes and national wellbeing say researchers.
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Ingeniøren

Region Hovedstaden sletter alle fingeraftryk fra bloddonererFremover bliver fingeraftryk krypteret med en hashværdi i Region Hovedstaden. Det sker efter flere bloddonorer har gjort opmærksom på potentielle sårbarheder i det fingeraftrykssystem, der har sikret en høj patientsikkerhed siden 2013.
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Science | The Guardian

Country diary: this cute creature is a cold killerAigas, Highlands: The pine marten brought a touch of night in its sharp black muzzle and in the big silent dark-stockinged feet For more than 90 minutes we’d sat until cold air quieted the wood and the day thinned into the long shadows of the trees. By 10.30pm we were centred in an arc of artificial lamp glow. There was just the sound of a last robin across the loch, its spindly song an analogue
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Protective protein activated by vitamin K found, inactive, abundant in blacks on dialysisHigh levels of a protein activated by vitamin K and associated with cardiovascular disease when it isn't, has been found in the blood of African-Americans on dialysis, investigators report.
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News

New hope for patients with depression and anxietyThere is a strong link between depression and anxiety disorders and autoimmune thyroiditis (AIT), a chronic thyroid condition affecting approximately 10 percent of the population. Scientists at Friedrich-Alexander-Universität Erlangen-Nürnberg (FAU) have now proven that special treatment could help many sufferers, especially women.
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Waterloo study says insurance industry dangerously unprepared for extreme weatherAs historic flooding caused by climate change devastates communities in New Brunswick and British Columbia, new research from the University of Waterloo reveals the insurance industry hasn't considered a changing climate in their practices, putting homeowners at financial risk.
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Move it and use it: Exergaming may help those at risk of Alzheimer's or related dementiasOlder adults with mild cognitive impairment (MCI), often a precursor to Alzheimer's, showed significant improvement with certain complex thinking and memory skills after exergaming, according to a new study.The results could encourage seniors, caregivers and health care providers to pursue or prescribe exergames (video games that also require physical exercise) in hopes of slowing the debilitating
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News

The big ethical questions for artificial intelligence in healthcareAI in healthcare is developing rapidly, with many applications currently in use or in development in the UK and worldwide. The Nuffield Council on Bioethics examines the current and potential applications of AI in healthcare, and the ethical issues arising from its use, in a new briefing note, artificial intelligence (AI) in healthcare and research, published today.
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Understanding vitamin D trends in children with non-alcoholic fatty liver diseaseNew research charts vitamin D levels and variations in genes that determine vitamin D status in UK children diagnosed with non-alcoholic fatty liver disease.
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Viden

TJEK DIG SELV: Har du et arveligt højt kolesterol-niveau?Find ud af, om du bør gå til lægen og få tjekket dit kolesterol-niveau.
16h
Live Science

If These Tiny Marsupials' Marathon Mating Sessions Don't Kill Them, Humans WillMarsupials with suicidal mating habits currently face a much greater threat to their survival: humans.
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The Atlantic

Deadpool 2 Is Even Better Than the OriginalAt the opening of Deadpool 2 , we see the titular super-antihero constructing a model of Wolverine—and not just any Wolverine, but dead Wolverine, impaled on a tree branch as he was at the end of Logan . It’s a remarkably apt curtain-raiser: hilarious, but with a vein of tragedy that will consistently characterize—and deepen—the film to a surprising degree. Wade Wilson (a.k.a. Deadpool) is not in
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The Scientist RSS

Deep Brain Stimulation Affects the Activity of Hundreds of GenesChanges in gene activity levels after DBS appear to underlie improvements seen in a mouse model of Rett syndrome, a genetic disease that causes intellectual disability.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

Altered body odor indicates malaria even if microscope doesn'tTyphoid Mary may have infected a hundred or more people, but asymptomatic carriers of malaria infect far more people every year. Researchers is working toward a way to identify malaria patients including infected individuals who show no malaria symptoms.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

Using MRSA's strength against itMRSA evolved to become a deadly killer because it's wily and resilient. A new study, however, is figuring out how to turn one of its strengths against it.
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Feed: All Latest

Why Trump Suddenly Wants to Save Jobs in ChinaIn a surprising reversal, the president says he wants to avert planned sanctions on telecommunications company ZTE.
20h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

The evolution of language? There's an app for thatResearchers at the Max Planck Institute for the Science of Human History in Jena, Germany have just launched the Color Game, an app designed to provide a new way to study language evolution. The game asks players to communicate specific colors to each other using only a series of black and white symbols. It allows large numbers of players to interact freely and build shared visual languages. The d
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

Flight: Research examines wing shapes to reduce vortex and wakeRecent research demonstrated that, although most wing shapes used today create turbulent wake vortices, wing geometrics can be designed to reduce or eliminate wingtip vortices almost entirely. In the study, the vortex and wake characteristics were computed for three classic wing designs: the elliptic wing, and wing designs developed in classic studies by the researchers.
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Futurity.org

Students may do worse when they know past grades in a classUndergraduates who know how previous students performed in their university courses end up receiving slightly lower grades on average than they would have if they didn’t check out that information, according to new research. In a new research paper, researchers examined the effects of a course-planning web application which visualizes data from registrar records and prior student evaluations for
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

Early BPA exposure may influence cardiac function, according to new study in neonatal ratsA new study paves the way for translational research examining cardiovascular disease risk factors associated with short-term BPA exposure in infancy. By examining neonatal rat heart cells, researchers find the immature heart may respond to BPA with a slowed heart rate, irregular heart rhythm and calcium instabilities. The significance of this research is that plastics revolutionized the way docto
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

Hippos: Global change may alter the way that hippos shape the environment around themCommunity ecologists have found that global change may alter the way that hippos shape the environment around them.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

Lead pollution in Greenland ice shows rise and fall of ancient European civilizationsScientists, historians and economists have used ice samples from the North Greenland Ice Core Project to measure, date and analyze European lead emissions that were captured in Greenland ice between 1100 BC and AD 800. Their results provide new insight for historians about how European civilizations and their economies fared over time.
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Futurity.org

A robot is teaching itself to dress hospital patientsA robot can successfully slide hospital gowns onto people’s arms, a potential first step towards dressing people. The machine doesn’t use its eyes as it pulls the cloth. Instead, it relies on the forces it feels as it guides the garment onto a person’s hand, around the elbow, and onto the shoulder. More than 1 million Americans require daily physical assistance to get dressed because of injury, d
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Big Think

Random fact roundup: Hotels, feet, and The SimpsonsWhat do hotels, The Simpsons, and feet have in common? They're all in this actual blog post. Wow. Read More
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

Consumer sleep technology is no substitute for medical evaluationConsumer sleep technology must be cleared by the Food and Drug Administration (FDA) and rigorously tested if it is intended to diagnose or treat sleep disorders, according to a position statement from the American Academy of Sleep Medicine.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

World's fastest water heater: 100,000 degrees Celsius in less than a tenth of a picosecondScientists have turned a powerful X-ray laser into the world's fastest water heater, reaching 100,000 degrees Celsius in less than a tenth of a picosecond (millionth of a millionth of a second). The experiment produced an exotic state of water, from which researchers hope to learn more about the peculiar characteristics of Earth's most important liquid.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

Deadly cancers show early, detectable differences from benign tumorsDo metastatic cancer tumors 'break bad' or are they 'born bad'? Researchers found that in the colorectal tumors they examined, invasive cancers are born to be bad, and this tendency can potentially be identified at early diagnosis.
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Futurity.org

Marine protected areas can’t keep animals out of hot waterMost marine life in marine protected areas will not be able to tolerate warming ocean temperatures caused by greenhouse gas emissions, according to a new study. Marine protected areas have been established as a haven to protect threatened marine life, like polar bears, penguins, and coral reefs, from the effects of fishing and other activities like mineral and oil extraction. The study found that
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Scientific American Content: Global

Radar Scans Detail North Korean NukesScientists have added radar info to seismic data, isotope measurements and optical imagery to study covert nuclear tests. Christopher Intagliata reports. -- Read more on ScientificAmerican.com
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Feed: All Latest

How NASA Will Look for Geysers (and Life) on EuropaFuture spacecraft will scan for biomarkers of life in the ocean of Jupiter's moon.
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Futurity.org

Should some violent movies get a PG-15 rating?Parents are more willing to let their children see intense gun violence in PG-13 movies when the violence appears to be “justified,” used in defense of a loved one or for self-protection, than when it has no socially redeeming purpose, according to a new study. Even when the gun violence in PG-13 movies appears justified, however, parents think that the movies are more suitable for teens age 15 a
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Futurity.org

These steps would spare kids a deadly parasite in porkNew research reveals high levels of a potentially fatal tapeworm infection among school-age children in China. The researchers suggest solutions that could reduce infections in this sensitive age range and possibly improve education outcomes and reduce poverty. Tapeworm infection tied to pork consumption in poor regions can cause cognitive damage and enforce cycles of poverty. A new study is the
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Live Science

Why This Man's Blood Helped Save Millions of BabiesA man in Australia helped save the lives of more than 2 million babies by donating his "special" blood.
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Science | The Guardian

Exercise is good for you – unless it's part of your jobScientists find physically demanding jobs are linked to greater risk of early death Men who work as labourers or in other physically demanding roles have a greater risk of dying early than those with more sedentary jobs, researchers say. The finding, from scientists in the Netherlands, reveals an apparent “physical activity paradox” where exercise can be harmful at work but beneficial to health w
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Science | The Guardian

Genomics and nanotechnology to benefit from $393m research funding boostGovernment allocates new funding after recommendations from chief scientist Alan Finkel Sign up to receive the top stories in Australia every day at noon Nanotechnology, genomics and remote ocean sensors to improve the health of the Great Barrier Reef are among the projects that will benefit from $393m over five years in new federal research funding. On Tuesday, the federal government released it
22h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Call for low-cost approach to tackle disease afflicting millions of the world's poorestResearchers at Brighton and Sussex Medical School are asking governments in the developing world to adopt a low-cost, community-based approach to prevent acute attacks that occur in patients with a devastating neglected tropical disease.
22h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Gender discrimination results in the deaths of extra 239,000 girls per year in IndiaA new study has found that there is an average of 239,000 excess deaths per year of girls under the age of five in India, or 2.4 million in a decade, and excess female child mortality is found in 90 percent of districts in the country.
22h
Popular Science

Mystery meat: scientists are investigating the roadkill we never get to seeAnimals Thank goodness for scavenger animals. That flattened raccoon or broken reptile might just be something to drive past for motorists, but for scavenging animals, it’s breakfast.
22h
The Atlantic

The Atlantic Daily: Until They LoseWhat We’re Following Jerusalem and Gaza: Israeli and American officials celebrated the opening of the new U.S. embassy in Jerusalem, even as Israeli forces opened fire on Palestinian demonstrators in Gaza, killing dozens. Here are photos of the scene in Gaza. While President Trump has expressed hope that his decision to move the embassy from Tel Aviv to Jerusalem will bring peace in the Middle Ea
22h
Feed: All Latest

The Ethereal Summit Shows Blockchain’s Transformative PotentialThe best and worst of the blockchain were on display at last weekend's Ethereal Summit.
22h
NYT > Science

Jerrold Meinwald, 91, Dies; Studied Creatures’ Chemical SignalsHe examined the chemistry behind secreted substances that can attract a mate or repel a predator, helping to establish a new field, chemical ecology.
22h
The Atlantic

The Atlantic Politics & Policy Daily: FYI on ZTE-Written by Elaine Godfrey ( @elainejgodfrey ) Today in 5 Lines The United States formally relocated its embassy to Jerusalem from Tel Aviv. The relocation sparked protests in Gaza, where at least 50 people have been killed by Israeli gunfire, according to Palestinian officials. First Lady Melania Trump underwent a procedure to treat a “benign kidney condition” and is expected to remain at Walter
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

New cracks spew lava as Hawaii volcano erupts for 2nd weekAnother fissure spewing lava and unhealthy gas opened up Monday on Hawaii's Big Island, and a crack in the Earth that emerged a day earlier was sending molten rock on a slow run for the ocean, officials said.
23h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Brexit in space: EU, Britain fight over Galileo navigationBrexit talks have reached into space, with the European Union and Britain fighting over the rights that London will have to the multi-billion Galileo satellite navigation system and its security-sensitive information.
23h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

US looking at alternative sanctions for China's ZTE: RossUS Commerce Secretary Wilbur Ross said Monday he was looking for "alternative remedies" to replace the sanctions that forced Chinese telecoms giant ZTE to essentially cease operations.
23h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Hackers divert funds from Mexico banks, amount unclear: officialHackers have stolen an unknown amount of money from banks in Mexico in a series of cyber attacks on the country's interbank payments system, an official said Monday.
23h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Tesla reorganizing to speed up productionTesla chief Elon Musk told employees Monday the electric carmaker is being reorganized to speed up production of Model 3 vehicles—a key to profitability at the fast-growing firm.
23h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Global change may alter the way that hippos shape the environment around them: studyThe average hippo weighs more than 3,000 pounds and consumes about 100 pounds of vegetation daily. This naturally results in large quantities of dung being deposited into the rivers and lakes where hippos spend their days.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Research examines wing shapes to reduce vortex and wakeIt's common to see line-shaped clouds in the sky, known as contrails, trailing behind the engines of a jet airplane.
23h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News

How to cure more hepatitis C patientsThe cost of cures for hepatitis C have been prohibitive, but experts who served on an NAS panel have a solution that will save more patients and incentivize drug innovation.
23h
Popular Science

Here's China's plan to compete with SpaceX and Blue OriginEastern Arsenal Private companies want to launch reusable space rockets in 2020. China's going to fly a reusable Long March 8 rocket in 2020.
23h
Live Science

The Science Behind Hawaii's Surprising 2018 Volcanic EruptionHere's the latest on a fiery, explosive eruption that surprised even Hawaii volcanologists.
23h
Live Science

Stephen Hawking's Memorial Might Have Time Travelers in AttendanceStephen Hawking once threw a party just for time-travelers (none showed up). Will his interment be a different story?
23h

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