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Yanny vs. Laurel Means We'll All Die AloneWhen everyone’s brain makes a little world out of sensory input, and everyone’s world is just a little bit different, can you really *know* anyone?
9h
Viden

Fremtidens kunst er digital street art, som opleves gennem computerbrillerMuseer og kunstnere er i fuld gang med projekter, der bringer kunst ind i den digitale verden
1h
Ingeniøren

Hospitalers spildevandsrensning møder kritikSpildevand fra danske hospitaler skal i dag renses i selvstændige rensningsanlæg på hospitalerne, men den løsning møder kritik fra Danske Vandværker og en række fagfolk.
52min

LATEST

Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Major shift in marine life occurred 33 million years later in the SouthA new study of marine fossils from Antarctica, Australia, New Zealand and South America reveals that one of the greatest changes to the evolution of life in our oceans occurred more recently in the Southern Hemisphere than previously thought. The results are published today (17 May 2018) in the journal Communications Biology.
9min
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Critically endangered South American forests were man madeCritically endangered South American forests thought to be the result of climate change were actually spread by ancient communities, archaeologists have found.
9min
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Returning otters to undersea world failing in their absenceWhile threatened southern sea otters bob and sun in the gentle waves of this central California estuary, wildlife experts up and down the West Coast are struggling to figure out how to restore the crucial coastal predator to an undersea world that's falling apart in their absence.
21min
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Critics attack Brazil's 'poison law' on pesticidesCritics including supermodel Gisele Bundchen are attacking a push to loosen Brazil's regulations on pesticides, calling the proposed legislation a "poison law."
21min
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Sherpa guide missing on Everest, presumed deadA sherpa guide who went missing four days ago on Everest is presumed dead, Nepali officials said Thursday, the first feared fatality of the climbing season on the world's highest mountain.
27min
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

EU court upholds curbs on bee-killing pesticideA top European Union court on Thursday upheld the ban on three insecticides blamed for killing off bee populations, dismissing cases brought by chemicals giants Bayer and Syngenta.
27min
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

In Lagos, the 'Venice of Africa' fights for survivalIts nickname is the "Venice of Africa" but, other than its maze of narrow waterways where wooden boats glide, Makoko offers little similarity with the fabled canal city of Europe.
27min
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Ford to restart production of best-selling US truckFord will restart production of the F-150, the best-selling truck in the United States, after a weeklong shutdown due to a fire at a key parts supplier, the automaker announced Wednesday.
27min
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

New Zealand's 'first bloke' fends off angry sharkNew Zealand's "first bloke" Clarke Gayford revealed Thursday how he fought off an angry shark with a pole while diving off Auckland.
27min
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Antarctica tourism regulation urgent for environment: summitTourism regulation in Antarctica has become an urgent matter due to environmental threats, officials from the 53 member countries of the Antarctic Treaty warned at their annual meeting, held this week in Buenos Aires.
27min
Science : NPR

Warming Waters Push Fish To Cooler Climes, Out Of Some Fishermen's ReachFrom bass to lobster, hundreds of species that live along U.S. coastlines are projected to migrate north over the next 80 years, making them harder to catch and manage. It's already happening. (Image credit: Portland Press Herald/Press Herald via Getty Images)
38min
Science : NPR

'Ballistic Blocks' Shooting From Kilauea's Crater, USGS SaysVolcanic rocks 2-feet in diameter have been found in a parking lot a few hundred yards from the volcano's Halemaumau crater, the U.S. Geological Survey reports. (Image credit: AP)
52min
cognitive science

Attend 10th International Conference on Intelligent Human Computer Interaction (IHCI 2018)submitted by /u/ihciconf [link] [comments]
1h
Dagens Medicin

#41 En tur i staldenStetoskopet besøger i denne podcast grise, frøer og mus i dyrestalden under panuminstituttet.
1h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Alaska dive fishermen plead for relief from sea ottersNorthern sea otters, once hunted to the brink of extinction along Alaska's Panhandle, have made a spectacular comeback by gobbling some of the state's finest seafood—and fishermen are not happy about the competition.
1h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Quakes damage roads as ash spews from Hawaii volcanoEarthquakes were damaging roads and buildings on Hawaii's Big Island on Wednesday as ash emissions streamed from Kilauea volcano.
1h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Democrats hope net neutrality issue will win votes this fallSenate Net NeutralitySenate Democrats, joined by three Republicans, pushed through a measure intended to revive Obama-era internet rules that ensured equal treatment for all web traffic, though opposition in the House and the White House seems insurmountable.
1h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Climate-threatened animals unable to relocateMany of the European mammals whose habitat is being destroyed by climate change are not able to find new places to live elsewhere.
1h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

New method eliminates guesswork when lenses go freeformLenses and mirrors with freeform surfaces enable designers to focus light within optical devices that are lighter, more compact, and more effective than ever before.
1h
New Scientist - News

Aha! What happens in your brain when you have a lightbulb momentWe now know what happens in your brain when inspiration strikes. The insight may lead to new brain stimulation techniques that put you in problem-solving mode
2h
New Scientist - News

The US isn’t fertile enough to sustain itself without immigrantsFor every 1000 women in the US, only around 1760 children are born, meaning the US population cannot replace itself without immigration
4h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News

New method eliminates guesswork when lenses go freeformResearchers at the University of Rochester's Center for Freeform Optics have combined theory and practice in a step-by-step method that eliminates much of the guesswork of using freeform lenses.
4h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Climate-threatened animals unable to relocateMany of the European mammals whose habitat is being destroyed by climate change are not able to find new places to live elsewhere.
4h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Marine animals have been following their preferred climate for millions of yearsCurrent global warming has far-reaching ecological consequences, also for the Earth's oceans. Many marine organisms are reacting by migrating towards the poles. Researchers at Geozentrum Nordbayern at Friedrich-Alexander-Universität Erlangen-Nürnberg (FAU) have now discovered that marine animals have been migrating for millions of years when the temperature on Earth increases or decreases.
4h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Functional films made of environmentally friendly clay minerals and dyesResearchers from Tokyo Metropolitan University and Shimane University have created a transparent hybrid film that combines natural clay minerals and dyes into a material that changes color in response to environmental humidity. The color change does not involve breaking chemical bonds; the team uncovered a novel mechanism that makes the process easily reversible, for long-lasting functionality usi
4h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Rheumatoid arthritis drugs taken during pregnancy may not be linked to large infection risk in childNew research indicates that when pregnant women take certain rheumatoid arthritis (RA) drugs that may cause immunosuppression, their children do not have a marked excess risk of developing serious infections.
4h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Arthritis drugs potentially safe for expectant mothersA new study led by a team at the Research Institute of the MUHC (RI-MUHC) in Montreal has revealed that pregnant women with rheumatoid arthritis (RA) may be able to use certain RA drugs without possible increased health risks to their unborn babies.
4h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Automated system better identifies patients at risk for ventilator-associated pneumoniaAn automated system developed at Massachusetts General Hospital for identifying patients at risk for complications associated with the use of mechanical ventilators provided significantly more accurate results than did traditional surveillance methods, which rely on manual recording and interpretation of individual patient data.
4h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Behavioral health workforce faces critical challenges in meeting population needsThe US mental health system faces considerable challenges in delivering behavioral healthcare to populations in need. In a special supplement to the American Journal of Preventive Medicine, experts focus on the key issue of behavioral health human resources for which substantial investment is needed to effect change. Articles in this issue cover research on workforce planning, service delivery and
4h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Male depression may lower pregnancy chances among infertile couples, NIH study suggestsAmong couples being treated for infertility, depression in the male partner was linked to lower pregnancy chances, while depression in the female partner was not found to influence the rate of live birth, according to a study funded by the National Institutes of Health.The study, which appears in Fertility and Sterility, also linked a class of antidepressants known as non-selective serotonin reupt
4h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Hookah responsible for over half of tobacco smoke inhaled by young smokersSmoking tobacco from a waterpipe, also known as a hookah, accounted for over half of the tobacco smoke volume consumed by young adult hookah and cigarette smokers in the US, a new University of Pittsburgh School of Medicine analysis discovered. In the US, hookah smoking rates are increasing and cigarette smoking rates are decreasing, especially among young adults.
4h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Viewing more medical marijuana ads linked to higher pot use among adolescentsAs prohibitions on the sale and use of marijuana ease, one result is more advertising about cannabis. A new study suggests that may have consequences on adolescents, with those who view more advertising for medical marijuana being more likely to use marijuana, express intentions to use the drug and have more-positive expectations about the substance.
4h
Ingeniøren

Hackere krydser etisk grænse med angreb på nødberedskab i MellemøstenNår statslige aktører sender malware mod kritisk infrastruktur, har der indtil nu været en uudtalt moralsk kodeks der forbyder personskade. Den grænse er for nyligt blevet krydset gange og eksperter frygter fremtidige cyberangreb får større konsekvenser.
5h
Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

How the gut influences neurologic diseaseA study sheds new light on the connection between the gut and the brain, untangling the complex interplay that allows the byproducts of microorganisms living in the gut to influence the progression of neurodegenerative diseases.
5h
Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

Exploration of diverse bacteria signals big advance for gene function predictionScientists have developed a workflow that enables large-scale, genome-wide assays of gene importance across many conditions. The study, 'Mutant Phenotypes for Thousands of Bacterial Genes of Unknown Function,' has been published in the journal Nature and is by far the largest functional genomics study of bacteria ever published.
5h
Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

Quarks feel the pressure in the protonInside every proton in every atom in the universe is a pressure cooker environment that surpasses the atom-crushing heart of a neutron star. That's according to the first measurement of a mechanical property of subatomic particles, the pressure distribution inside the proton.
5h
Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

New nuclear RNA retention activity discoveredGene expression involves mRNA transport from its place of synthesis to the cytoplasm where protein translation occurs. However, many non-coding RNA species do not follow this flow and new data now demonstrate how cells prevent the unwanted export of RNA and instead ensure nuclear degradation.
5h
Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

Researchers control the properties of graphene transistors using pressureResearchers have developed a technique to manipulate the electrical conductivity of graphene with compression, bringing the material one step closer to being a viable semiconductor for use in today's electronic devices.
5h
Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

Think chimpanzee beds are dirtier than human ones? Think againChimpanzees (Pan troglodytes) appear to keep tidier sleeping arrangements than humans do. That's one finding of a recent study that evaluated the microbes and arthropods found in the treetop beds that chimpanzees make each night.
5h
Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

The mystery of lime-green lizard bloodGreen blood is one of the most unusual characteristics in the animal kingdom, but it's the hallmark of a group of lizards in New Guinea. The muscles, bones and tongues of these lizards appear bright, lime-green due to high levels of biliverdin, or a green bile pigment, which is toxic and causes jaundice. Surprisingly, these lizards remain healthy with levels of green bile that are 40 times higher
5h
Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

Three gallons of radioactive tank waste vitrified last monthApproximately three gallons of low-activity Hanford tank waste were vitrified at PNNL's Radiochemical Processing Laboratory in April. The laboratory-scale demonstration is an important step toward the eventual treatment of millions of gallons of hazardous waste generated during past plutonium production at Hanford.
5h
Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

Alternative treatment for mild asthmaPeople with mild asthma are often prescribed a daily treatment regimen, but up to 80 per cent do not follow the routine, using inhalers only when they have an asthma attack. Now the researchers have found an as-needed combined-drug inhaler is a viable treatment option.
5h
Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

The opioid epidemic has boosted the number of organs available for transplantThe researchers examined 17 years of transplantation records and found no significant change in the recipients' chance of survival when the organ donation came from victims of drug intoxication.
5h
Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

Cannabidiol significantly reduces seizures in patients with severe form of epilepsyCannabidiol (CBD), a compound derived from the cannabis plant that does not produce a 'high,' was shown in a new large-scale, randomized, controlled trial to significantly reduce the number of dangerous seizures in patients with a severe form of epilepsy called Lennox-Gastaut syndrome. This study also is the first to offer information on cannabidiol dosing for patients with treatment-resistant epi
6h
Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

Climate change impacts fragile river ecosystemsResearch undertaken in South Africa's Kruger National Park (KNP) has shown that some of the world's most sensitive and valuable riverine habitats are being destroyed due to an increasing frequency of cyclone-driven extreme floods.
6h
Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

Diverse and abundant megafauna documented at new Atlantic US Marine National MonumentAirborne marine biologists were dazzled by the diversity and abundance of large, unusual and sometimes endangered marine wildlife on a recent trip to the Northeast Canyons and Seamounts National Marine Monument, about 150 miles southeast of Cape Cod.
6h
Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

Climate change in Quebec equals a much greater diversity of species???A team of researchers believe that, paradoxically, climate change may result in Quebec's national and provincial parks becoming biodiversity refuges of continental importance as the variety of species present there increases. They calculated potential changes in the presence of 529 species in about one third of the protected areas in southern Quebec. Their results suggest that fifty -- eighty year
6h
Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

How 'navigational hazards' in metro maps confuse travelersSome features in metro maps cause passengers to make substantial mistakes in journey planning, but it may be possible to detect and rectify these with automated software, new research has indicated.
6h
Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

C'mon get happy: Upbeat songs by female singers dominate the charts, UCI study findsRoll over, Beethoven. Elvis Presley too. Female singers with upbeat dance songs are far more likely to make the bestseller music charts, according to new findings. Yet the number of happy songs has declined in recent years, while more negative tunes are increasing.
6h
Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

Artificial Intelligence improves stroke and dementia diagnosis in most common brain scanArtificial Intelligence improves stroke and dementia diagnosis in commonest form of brain scan.
6h
Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

Scientists' new way to identify microscopic worm attacking coffee cropsThe plants which produce one of the most popular drinks in the world, coffee, are targeted by a microscopic worm, but scientists are fighting back. An underestimated problem in coffee farming, the parasite has been found in soil samples across the coffee growing world thanks to a new and quick detection method.
6h
Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

Processes in the atomic microcosmos are revealedPhysicists have successfully generated controlled electron pulses in the attosecond range. They used optical travelling waves that are formed by laser pulses of varying wavelengths. The movements of electrons in atoms were revealed using attosecond free-electron pulses.
6h
Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

Stroke prevention drug combo shows promise, study saysIf you've had a minor stroke or a transient ischemic stroke (TIA), taking the clot-preventing drug clopidogrel along with aspirin may lower your risk of having a major stroke within the next 90 days, according to new research.
6h
Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

Drug to treat bleeding may benefit some stroke patientsPatients with stroke caused by bleeding on the brain (intracerebral hemorrhage) may benefit from receiving a drug currently used to treat blood loss from major trauma and bleeding after childbirth, an international trial has revealed.
6h
Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

Method to overcome false positives in CT imaging for lung cancerA team of researchers has identified a technology to address the problem of false positives in CT-based lung cancer screening.
6h
Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

Not quite a 'double bind' for minority women in scienceMany studies have shown that both minority and women scientists face disadvantages in reaching the highest levels of their careers. So it would make sense that minority women would face a 'double bind' that would particularly disadvantage them. But a new study using a massive database of scientific articles suggests that minority women actually face what might be called a 'one-and-a-half bind.'
6h
Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

Keeping kids with asthma out of the hospitalOnly multimodal interventions that combined multiple categories were effective at reducing the risk of readmission for pediatric asthma between 30 days and one year after initial discharge, Children's research finds.
6h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Jennifer Van Grove: Lyft tests new subscription option in several citiesRide-hail service Lyft is offering select customers a way to save money on their daily trips with a new pre-paid option meant to test the viability of a monthly subscription service.
7h
Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

Novel therapy inhibits complement to preserve neurons and reduce inflammation after strokeResearchers report that, after ischemic stroke, the complement system identifies stressed but salvageable neurons for removal by microglial phagocytosis. To preserve these neurons, the investigators designed a novel therapeutic that targets a complement inhibitor to a damage signal expressed after stroke. A single post-stroke injection protected neurons from microglial attack in a preclinical mode
7h
Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

Whole-tree logging may not hinder plant biodiversityWhen it comes to timber harvesting, removing the whole tree -- from stump to twigs -- doesn't reduce plant diversity any more than old-fashioned logging, which leaves tree branches behind in the woods, new research finds.
7h
Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

Rising emissions of ozone-destroying chemical banned by Montreal ProtocolEmissions of one of the chemicals most responsible for the Antarctic ozone hole are on the rise, despite an international treaty that required an end to its production in 2010, a new study shows.
8h
Live Science

What Is Trepanation?Trepanation is the ancient practice of drilling a hole in the skull. It is one of the oldest medical procedures known to the human race.
8h
Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

China's program 'riskiest environmental project in history,' researcher warnsA global expert on infrastructure says that China's plan to crisscross half of the Earth with massive transportation and energy projects is environmentally the riskiest venture ever undertaken.
8h
Futurity.org

With the wrong tilt, Earthlike planets turn into ‘snowballs’Aspects of an otherwise Earthlike planet’s tilt and orbital dynamics can severely affect its potential habitability—even triggering abrupt “snowball states” in which oceans freeze and surface life is impossible—according to new research. The research indicates that locating a planet in its host star’s “habitable zone”—that swath of space just right to allow liquid water on an orbiting rocky plane
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Futurity.org

‘Honeycomb’ material could extend battery life by 100XScientists have created a material that could extend the life of the batteries in our electronics by more than 100 times. Among the chief complaints for smartphone, laptop and other battery-operated electronics users is that the battery life is too short and—in some cases—that the devices generate heat. “…the device could mean that a normal 5-hour charge could increase to more than a 500-hour cha
9h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

How the death of voicemail is changing the way we connectDon't wait for the beep: Voicemail is going the way of the dinosaurs.
9h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News

European wind energy generation potential in a 1.5 degree C warmer worldThe UK and large parts of northern Europe could become windier if global temperatures reach 1.5 degrees C above pre-industrial levels, according to a new study.
9h
Futurity.org

Controlling cell ‘recycling’ may help ease agingResearchers studying the biology of aging have demonstrated a new strategy for stimulating autophagy, the process by which cells rebuild themselves by recycling their own worn-out parts. “We and others think that by learning how to influence this process pharmacologically, we might be able to affect the progression of these diseases.” In a study in the journal Cell Reports , the researchers show
9h
Feed: All Latest

Inside the Takedown of Scan4You, a Notorious Malware ClearinghouseHow security researchers caught the creators of counter antivirus services Scan4You.
10h
Futurity.org

Gas sensors are like tiny electronic rescue dogsA new device is the smallest and cheapest yet for detecting people by smell, which could be useful in the aftermath of an earthquake or avalanche, for example. And although rescue dogs need to take breaks, an electronic alternative would always be ready. The team at ETH Zurich had previously developed small and extremely sensitive gas sensors for acetone, ammonia, and isoprene—all metabolic produ
10h
Futurity.org

‘Bottle’ traps neutrons to investigate early universeNew research could provide insight into the composition of the universe immediately after the Big Bang—as well as improve calculations used to predict the life span of stars and describe the rules that govern the subatomic world. The study, which appears in the journal Science , reports a highly accurate way to measure the decay rate of neutrons. “This is a significant improvement compared to pre
10h
Futurity.org

Math method aims to customize cancer treatmentA new way to simplify complex biomolecular data about tumors could in principle make it easier to prescribe the appropriate treatment for a specific patient. The new computational strategy translates highly complex information into a simplified format that emphasizes patient-to-patient variation in the molecular signatures of cancer cells, the researchers say. “The main point of this paper was to
10h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

European wind energy generation potential in a 1.5 degree C warmer worldThe UK and large parts of northern Europe could become windier if global temperatures reach 1.5 degrees C above pre-industrial levels, according to a new study.
10h
Science | The Guardian

Rigorous exercise does not halt dementia decline, study concludesKeeping active helps prevent the onset of dementia, but once the disease has taken hold, working out more does nothing to slow its progress Moderate to more intense exercise does not help people with dementia and may even make it worse, according to a major study which had hoped to find it slowed down the progress of the disease so that gym sessions could be offered as treatment by the NHS. Regul
10h
The Atlantic

The Atlantic Daily: What's the Right Course of Action?What We’re Following Diplomatic Setbacks: North Korea suspended talks with South Korea and threatened to cancel Kim Jong Un’s upcoming meeting with President Trump over an annual air-force drill by the U.S. and South Korean militaries. These developments call the recent progress toward denuclearizing North Korea into question—and illustrate the danger of what Uri Friedman calls “the international
10h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News

St. Jude trial identifies a medulloblastoma subset that requires less aggressive therapySt. Jude Children's Research Hospital researchers have identified a subtype of the brain tumor medulloblastoma that is associated with improved survival of infants treated with less aggressive, risk-adapted therapy.
10h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News

The Lancet Oncology: Patients' sex may impact efficacy of immunotherapy in cancer treatmentA patient's sex might impact on the efficacy of immunotherapy in cancer treatment, according to a new meta-analysis of 20 randomised trials in over 11000 patients with advanced cancer published in The Lancet Oncology.
10h
Ingeniøren

Trods nye teknologier bruger vi samme tid på transport70 minutter om dagen bruger vi i gennemsnit på transport, og det er det samme som for 80 år siden. Til gengæld rejser vi længere og på andre måder.
10h
Popular Science

The EPA is keeping a troubling new study on drinking water under wraps. Here’s what you need to know.Environment Will Scott Pruitt release it ahead of next week’s summit on harmful chemicals in water? The Environmental Protection Agency has been in the news a lot lately, thanks in large part to its administrator, Scott Pruitt. The latest issue hits close to home.
10h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Lyft to launch Camp Pendleton ride-hail programA new Lyft feature is making it easier for people to travel from and around Marine Corps Base Camp Pendleton.
10h
Feed: All Latest

Nissan's Following Tesla Into Solar Panels and Home BatteriesThe maker of the Leaf is now offering UK homeowners rooftop solar panels and big batteries for a clean ride from generation to acceleration.
11h
Scientific American Content: Global

The Future of Medicine 2018How emerging diseases in a changing world jeopardize public health, and what can be done -- Read more on ScientificAmerican.com
11h
The Atlantic

The Atlantic Politics & Policy Daily: Full-ish Disclosure-Written by Lena Felton ( @lenakfelton ) and Taylor Hosking ( @TaylorHosking ) Today in 5 Lines The Office of Government Ethics released President Trump’s financial disclosure, which included a reimbursement of more than $100,000 to his lawyer Michael Cohen for a payment to an unidentified third party. The Senate Judiciary Committee released nearly 2,000 pages of testimony and exhibits related
11h
NYT > Science

For Women With Early Breast Cancer, Herceptin Treatment Can Be Much ShorterA large, new study shows that the treatment regimen, typically recommended for a year, can be just as effective at 6 months, reducing serious side effects and costs.
11h
Science : NPR

'Yanny' Or 'Laurel'? Why People Hear Different Things In That Viral ClipWe consulted experts on how human brains perceive sound. The poor quality of the audio file can be blamed for the different ways our brains perceive it. What we expect to hear also matters.
11h
Popular Science

Five kitchen tools that can remove the seeds from just about anythingGadgets Any implement that shortens the time it takes to eat pie or guacamole is OK with us. Before you can enjoy culinary delights like guacamole and cherry pie, you first have to endure the tedious and finger-numbing process of pit removal. These things make…
11h
Scientific American Content: Global

New Data: Hurricanes Will Get WorseAnalysis of Hurricane Harvey, which drowned Houston, confirms predictions that the storms are likely to get bigger, be more intense and last longer -- Read more on ScientificAmerican.com
11h
Live Science

Is the Romaine Lettuce E. Coli Outbreak Finally Over?Romaine lettuce tied to a recent outbreak of E. coli is likely no longer on store shelves or in restaurants, the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention said today (May 16).
11h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Cannabidiol significantly reduces seizures in patients with severe form of epilepsyCannabidiol (CBD), a compound derived from the cannabis plant that does not produce a 'high,' was shown in a new large-scale, randomized, controlled trial to significantly reduce the number of dangerous seizures in patients with a severe form of epilepsy called Lennox-Gastaut syndrome. This study also is the first to offer information on cannabidiol dosing for patients with treatment-resistant epi
11h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Blocking two enzymes could make cancer cells mortalEPFL scientists have identified two enzymes that protect chromosomes from oxidative damage and shortening. Blocking them might be a new anticancer strategy for stopping telomerase, the enzyme that immortalizes tumors.
11h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Re-assessing organ availabilityBy expanding the donation pool to include currently deemed 'unfit' organs, researchers say the gap could be closed or narrowed, resulting in more lives saved.
11h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Opioid crisis leads to rise in viable hearts and lungs for those awaiting transplantsA new study published in The New England Journal of Medicine by investigators from Brigham and Women's Hospital and University of Utah, examines survival outcomes for patients who have received organs from donors who died of drug intoxication.
11h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Training for 21st century doctors: medicine, business, and leadership developmentGiven the complex and rapidly evolving health care system in the United States, medical schools must focus their efforts on training more physician leaders to master the diverse skills needed to navigate emerging challenges in the field, urge leaders from the Perelman School of Medicine at the University of Pennsylvania in a new Perspective piece published today in the New England Journal of Medic
11h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News

International study suggests alternative treatment for mild asthmaPeople with mild asthma are often prescribed a daily treatment regimen, but up to 80 per cent do not follow the routine, using inhalers only when they have an asthma attack. Now the researchers have found an as-needed combined-drug inhaler is a viable treatment option.
11h
Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

Scientists predict how 686 marine species' habitats may shift in response to warming seasNew predictions reveal how global warming may shift the geographic distribution of 686 marine species that inhabit North America's Atlantic and Pacific continental shelves, according to a new study.
11h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Spacewalking astronauts perform pump swap at space stationSpacewalking astronauts carried out a high-flying, high-tech version of musical chairs Wednesday, rearranging pumps outside the International Space Station.
11h
New on MIT Technology Review

Net neutrality gets a thumbs-up from US senators, but it still looks doomedSenate Net Neutrality
11h
Science : NPR

Test of Herceptin Finds Briefer Treatment Can Work, With Fewer Side EffectsAn aggressive type of breast cancer — a HER2-positive tumor — often shrinks with Herceptin treatment, but side effects can be tough. Researchers say a shorter course of the drug may be a good option. (Image credit: Jeff J Mitchell/Getty Images)
12h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Amount of ash in plume above Hawaii volcano decreasesWarnings to pilots remained in effect Wednesday after more unrest at Kilauea volcano on Hawaii's Big Island.
12h
The Atlantic

Trump Finally Fesses Up to Reimbursing Michael CohenUpdated at 8:31 p.m. ET In a new financial disclosure released on Wednesday, the Trump administration delivered an authoritative answer to one question about the president’s payment to Stormy Daniels—and raised a whole set of new ones. The form, released by the Office of Government Ethics, mentions in a footnote that President Trump had made a six-figure payment to his former fixer and lawyer Mic
12h
Latest Headlines | Science News

No, Kilauea won’t cause mass destructionA steam explosion at Kilauea isn’t anything like the explosive eruptions of certain other volcanoes.
12h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

US Senate votes to restore 'net neutrality' rulesSenate Net NeutralityThe US Senate voted Wednesday to restore so-called "net neutrality" rules aimed at requiring all online data to be treated equally, the latest step in a years-long battle on internet regulation.
12h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Diverse and abundant megafauna documented at new Atlantic US Marine National MonumentAirborne marine biologists were dazzled by the diversity and abundance of large, unusual and sometimes endangered marine wildlife on a recent trip to the Northeast Canyons and Seamounts National Marine Monument, about 150 miles southeast of Cape Cod. Scientists with the Anderson Cabot Center for Ocean Life at the New England Aquarium observed dozens of dolphins mixing with schools of pilot whales
12h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Climate change = a much greater diversity of species + a need to rethink conservation paradigmsA team of researchers believe that, paradoxically, climate change may result in Quebec's national and provincial parks becoming biodiversity refuges of continental importance as the variety of species present there increases. They used ecological niche modeling to calculate potential changes in the presence of 529 species in about 1/3 of the protected areas in southern Quebec almost all of which w
12h
Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

Europium points to new suspect in continental mysteryClues from some unusual Arizona rocks pointed scientists toward a discovery -- a subtle chemical signature in rocks the world over -- that could answer a long-standing mystery: What stole the iron from Earth's continents?
12h
Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

New technique reveals details of forest fire recoveryDo you know someone who's so caught up in the details of a problem that they 'can't see the forest for the trees?' Scientists seeking to understand how forests recover from wildfires sometimes have the opposite problem.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

Per-capita end-of-life spending is decreasing rapidly, according to new studyHealth economists have long considered end-of-life spending to be one of the major contributors to the overall increase in health spending in the United States. That narrative has been supported by recent research findings that increased use of hospice care costs more than it saves, that end-of-life care intensity has been increasing, and end-of-life intensive care unit has accelerated.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

Cell type switch helps colon cancer evade treatment, study suggestsResearchers have discovered that colon cancers are often resistant to existing drug treatments because they are composed of two different cell types that can replace each other when one cell type is killed. The study suggests that combination therapies targeting both cell types at once may be more effective at treating colorectal cancer, the third highest cause of cancer-related death in the Unite
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

Self-driving car has taken a leap towards automatic 24/7 drivingVTT's robot car, Marilyn, sees better than humans in foggy, and even snowy, conditions, and can now navigate without stopping -- including in bad weather. It can also see a human through fog and avoid accident automatically.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

Biologists find mechanisms that control where transcription factors bindA team of biologists has determined how transcription factors, which guide gene regulation, function differently in embryonic development. The results help illuminate how cells acquire distinct functions as the embryo matures.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

A green approach to making ammonia could help feed the worldResearchers have developed a new 'green' approach to making ammonia that may help make feeding the rising world population more sustainable.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

Superbug MRSA infections less costly, but still deadlyDrug-resistant staph infections continue to be deadlier than those that are not resistant and treatable with traditional antibiotics, but treatment costs surprisingly are the same or slightly less, a new national analysis shows.
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Diverse and abundant megafauna documented at new Atlantic US Marine National MonumentAirborne marine biologists were dazzled by the diversity and abundance of large, unusual and sometimes endangered marine wildlife on a recent trip to the Northeast Canyons and Seamounts National Marine Monument, about 150 miles southeast of Cape Cod.
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Climate change in Quebec equals a much greater diversity of species???A team of researchers believe that, paradoxically, climate change may result in Quebec's national and provincial parks becoming biodiversity refuges of continental importance as the variety of species present there increases. They calculated potential changes in the presence of 529 species in about one third of the protected areas in southern Quebec. Their results suggest that fifty -- eighty year
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Scientific American Content: Global

Great Ape Makes Good DocOrangutans were observed to use plant extracts to treat their own pain. -- Read more on ScientificAmerican.com
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Redstone family blocks move to dilute its CBS vote powerThe struggle over the future of CBS Corp. took a new twist Wednesday as the holding company for controlling shareholder Shari Redstone said it revised the bylaws of the media group, a move aimed at heading off an effort to dilute her voting power.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Target cuts delivery fee by almost half, putting pressure on Walmart, AmazonTarget will cut its next day delivery fee nearly in half for household staples ranging from paper towels to peanut butter as it rolls the service out to shoppers nationwide.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

US SEC launches phony cryptocurrency 'sale' to educate about scamsBoy, do US financial regulators have a deal for you: buy digital coins, travel to luxurious resorts...and learn how not to get scammed out of your life savings.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Climate change impacts fragile river ecosystemsBoulder, Colo., USA: Research undertaken in South Africa's Kruger National Park (KNP) has shown that some of the world's most sensitive and valuable riverine habitats are being destroyed due to an increasing frequency of cyclone-driven extreme floods.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Scientists study lava for clues to how volcano will behaveWhether spewing from the ground in red plumes or crawling in a fiery blob across neighborhoods, lava from the Kilauea volcano has produced the most arresting images of the recent eruption. But not all lava is created equal, and the differences could offer hints about the volcano's behavior.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Satellite study finds major shifts in global freshwaterA new global, satellite-based study of Earth's freshwater distribution found that Earth's wet areas are getting wetter, while dry areas are getting drier. The data suggest that this pattern is due to a variety of factors, including human water management practices, human-caused climate change and natural climate cycles.
12h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Remote camera network tracks Antarctic species at low costAn international research team has developed a simple method for using a network of autonomous time-lapse cameras to track the breeding and population dynamics of Antarctic penguins, providing a new, low-cost window into the health and productivity of the Antarctic ecosystem.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Astronomers find vast ionized hydrogen cloud in 'Whirlpool Galaxy' using ultra-sensitive Arizona telescopeAstronomers have been keenly peering into M51, or the Whirlpool Galaxy, since the 1800s, its signature spiral structure informing the earliest debates over the nature of galaxies and the Cosmos at large.
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The Scientist RSS

Lizards Green Blood Evolved Four TimesThe uncommon hue is present in skinks that aren't closely related, but the advantage of the odd trait remains anyone's guess.
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New on MIT Technology Review

Ride-sharing apps Uber and Didi equate surveillance with safety
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The Atlantic

The Senate Votes Against the Net-Neutrality RollbackSenate FCC DemocratsIn a shocking reversal, the Senate voted 52–47 to disapprove of the rollback of network neutrality—the policy that treats broadband and wireless data as common carriers. That protection required internet service providers to treat all internet traffic the same, rather than blocking, throttling, or otherwise interfering with access to particular services. All 49 Democratic senators were joined, so
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Science | The Guardian

Weatherwatch: Nimbus-B satellite was almost a disasterWeather satellites transformed forecasting, saving lives, but now rely on solar - not nuclear - power Weather satellites transformed forecasting in the 1960s. By watching weather systems evolve in real time, meteorologists could predict storms and save lives. But 50 years ago, a nuclear-powered weather satellite threatened disaster. The Nimbus-B , launched on 18 May 1968, was to be the third in i
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Whole-tree logging may not hinder plant biodiversityAs much as we love our two-by-fours and toilet paper, many of us have mixed feelings about logging. Those feelings can morph into straight-out hostility when it comes to removing the branches and treetops, which are increasingly chipped and burned for electrical power generation.
12h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Climate change impacts fragile river ecosystemsResearch undertaken in South Africa's Kruger National Park (KNP) has shown that some of the world's most sensitive and valuable riverine habitats are being destroyed due to an increasing frequency of cyclone-driven extreme floods.
12h
Feed: All Latest

Tech Firms Move to Put Ethical Guard Rails Around AIMicrosoft, Facebook, Google, and others are creating internal groups and reviewing uses of artificial intelligence.
12h
Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

Major shifts in global freshwaterA new global, satellite-based study of Earth's freshwater found that Earth's wet areas are getting wetter, while dry areas are getting drier. The data suggest this pattern is due to many factors, including human water management practices, human-caused climate change and natural climate cycles.
12h
Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

Individualized ovarian, brain cancer therapiesResearchers have discovered that a molecular communication pathway -- thought to be defective in cancer -- is a key player in determining the effectiveness of measles virus oncolytic cancer treatment in ovarian and aggressive brain cancers. This discovery enabled researchers to develop an algorithm to predict treatment effectiveness in individual patients.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

Wearable technology and AI to predict the onset of health problemsResearchers found that applying artificial intelligence to the right combination of data retrieved from wearable technology may detect whether your health is failing. The study found that the data from wearable sensors and artificial intelligence that assesses changes in aerobic responses could one day predict whether a person is experiencing the onset of a respiratory or cardiovascular disease.
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News

For older adults, a better diet may prevent brain shrinkagePeople who eat a diet rich in vegetables, fruit, nuts and fish may have bigger brains, according to a study published in the May 16, 2018, online issue of Neurology®, the medical journal of the American Academy of Neurology.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

Natural regeneration or tree-planting? Study points to bias in forest restoration studiesAt a time when countries are pledging to restore millions of hectares of forest, new research argues that recent studies on forest regeneration techniques are flawed. Sites used to evaluate natural regeneration were secondary growth forests, whereas sites chosen to evaluate artificial regeneration ranged from abandoned coal mines to cattle-trampled fields. Authors of the new study suggest elements
12h
Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

Less water, same Texas cottonIn Texas, the Southern High Plains uses water from an aquifer to water cotton fields. However, the aquifer is running low. Scientists from the area are working to find the best irrigation method for cotton that uses the least water.
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NYT > Science

Senator Grills Nominee on Deadly Carbon Monoxide Risk in Keyless CarsA top safety official said she would raise awareness about the hazard, but would not commit to mandating a software fix to increase alerts to drivers.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

Early evidence of use of a bit on domestic donkeys found in the Near EastDonkeys may have worn bits as early as the third millennium BCE, long before the introduction of horses in the ancient Near East, according to a study published May 16, 2018 in the open-access journal PLOS ONE by Haskel Greenfield from University of Manitoba, Canada, Aren Maeir from Bar-Ilan University, and colleagues.
13h
New Scientist - News

Lizards keep evolving toxic green blood and we don’t know whyAll the green-blooded lizards in the world live in New Guinea, but it turns out the trait has evolved there independently at least four times
13h
Feed: All Latest

Senate Votes to Save Net Neutrality, but Hurdles RemainSenate Net NeutralityThree Republicans joined Democrats to pass a resolution that would restore rules against blocking or throttling content. But the measure faces a tougher challenge in the House.
13h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Quartet of NFCR scientists publishes papers in immediate successionQuartet of NFCR scientists publishes papers in immediate succession; the three articles offer possible bases for brain cancer treatments, insight into somatic mutations.
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News

SF State study examines how stereotypes affect memory in older Chinese immigrantsAlthough studies have been done on how stereotypes about aging and memory affect older people in Western culture, no such studies had been done on older Asian people until recently. SF State researchers are the first to publish such a study, finding that older Chinese Americans underperform on memory tests when a negative stereotype is included.
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Big Think

Can anyone learn to sing? For most of us, the answer is yesSinging increases breathing control and lung capacity, can improve your health, and releases the happy hormone. Read More
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Senators Grill Cambridge Analytica Whistleblower Christopher WylieChristopher Wylie testified before the Senate Judiciary Committee Wednesday that Cambridge Analytica specialized in "disinformation, spreading rumors, *kompromat*, and propaganda."
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Popular Science

Ancient 'made in China’ label pushes back the date of shipwreck by 100 yearsScience Updated carbon dating techniques helped, too. An inscription on ancient shipwrecked artifacts pushes back the date of the shipwreck by 100 years.
13h
The Scientist RSS

Climate Change Will Force Hundreds of Marine Species to MoveA study of 686 fish and invertebrates predicts that some animals will have to shift more than 1,000 kilometers to stay within tolerable temperatures.
13h
The Scientist RSS

Sweden Cancels Agreement With Elsevier Over Open AccessA consortium of institutions will not renew its contract with the publisher that ends in June, following the lead of organizations in other countries.
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Big Think

A new technique could eliminate heart disease with a single injectionNorthwestern scientists believe they may have a way of wiping out heart disease for good. Read More
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Elevated homocysteine identified as metabolic risk factor for neurodegenerative diseasesHomocysteine occurs naturally in the human body, generated as a byproduct of methionine metabolism. Genetic diseases or an imbalanced diet, with too much red meat or B vitamins and folic acid deficiencies, can lead to high homocysteine levels, a condition known as hyperhomocysteinemia. This causes considerable harm to the heart but can also affect the brain.Now, Temple researchers further reveal t
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Researchers identify gene that helps prevent brain diseaseA UC San Diego-led team has identified a gene that helps prevent the harmful buildup of proteins that can lead to neurological disorders such as Alzheimer's and Parkinson's disease. As published in Nature, the researchers found that the 'Ankrd16' gene acts like a failsafe in proofreading and correcting errors to avoid the abnormal production of improper proteins.
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News

NOAA finds rising emissions of ozone-destroying chemical banned by Montreal ProtocolEmissions of one of the chemicals most responsible for the Antarctic ozone hole are on the rise, despite an international treaty that required an end to its production in 2010, a new NOAA study shows.
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News

NASA satellites reveal major shifts in global freshwaterNASA Satellites Reveal Major Shifts in Global Freshwater (NASA Headquarters).In a first-of-its-kind study, scientists have combined an array of NASA satellite observations of Earth with data on human activities to map locations where freshwater is changing around the globe and to determine why.
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Live Science

We Still Don't Know Why These Lizards Have Lime-Green BloodA new evolutionary investigation finds that skinks likely evolved to have green blood a total of four different times throughout history.
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Dana Foundation

Dana Alliance Members in Conversation: A Q&A with Eric NestlerWe spoke to neuroscientist and former Society for Neuroscience president Eric J. Nestler, M.D., Ph.D., about the bipartisan nature of biomedical research, his hopes for the future of addiction and depression, new findings on stress and depression, and more in the latest Dana Alliance member Q&A . These Q&As are part of a regular series of in-depth interviews that give readers a look into the outr
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

Intimacy in later life does not slow memory lossOlder people who enjoy a sexually active and emotionally close relationship with their partner tend to perform better at memory tests than sexually inactive older adults on a short-term basis, but this is not the case over a longer period of time. This is according to a study using data from more than 6000 adults aged 50 and over.
13h
New on MIT Technology Review

The SEC has created a fake cryptocurrency website to teach people about ICO scams
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Mechanical force controls the speed of protein synthesisAs cells create proteins, the proteins modulate synthesis speed by exerting a mechanical force on the molecular machine that makes them, according to a team of scientists who used a combination of computational and experimental techniques to understand this force.
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Viden

Værste klimascenarie er desværre for optimistiskNye undersøgelser af den globale økonomiske vækst anslår, at klimaforskernes værste mareridt faktisk er endnu værre end hidtil troet.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

An electronic rescue dogScientists have developed the smallest and cheapest ever equipment for detecting people by smell. It could be used in the search for people buried by an earthquake or avalanche.
13h
Big Think

Do aliens exist in the multiverse? New studies show it’s way more likely than scientists thoughtA set of new studies that used large-scale computer simulations found that life might be more common throughout other universes than previously thought. Read More
14h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Amazon Go targets Chicago, San Francisco for new storesAmazon Go is headed for Chicago and San Francisco.
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New on MIT Technology Review

Free software from Google aims to protect political candidates from cyberattacks
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Our brains are obsessed with being socialOur brains are obsessed with being social even when we are not in social situations. A Dartmouth-led study finds that the brain may tune towards social learning even when it is at rest. The findings published in an advance article of Cerebral Cortex, demonstrate empirically for the first time how two regions of the brain experience increased connectivity during rest after encoding new social infor
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Brazilians with less education more likely to report being in poor health, study findsBrazilians with less education are more likely to self-report as being in poor health, according to a study using data from nationwide surveys distributed every five years from 1998 to 2013. The study also found that general subjective health did not improve over the study period, even though more people gained education throughout the study, indicating that other factors associated with poor educ
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Comprehensive care physician model improves care, lowers hospitalizationPatients who need frequent hospitalization account for a disproportionate amount of health care spending. In 2012, the University of Chicago Medicine began enrolling patients in a clinical trial designed to reduce frequent stays. Hospitalization rates for these patients were 15 to 22 percent lower. They also reported a better experience.
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Satellite study finds major shifts in global freshwaterA new global, satellite-based study of Earth's freshwater found that Earth's wet areas are getting wetter, while dry areas are getting drier. The data suggest this pattern is due to many factors, including human water management practices, human-caused climate change and natural climate cycles. The NASA-led research team used 14 years of observations from the Gravity Recovery and Climate Experimen
14h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Reducing cholesterol could enhance T-cell cancer immunotherapyCleveland Clinic researchers have demonstrated for the first time that lowering blood cholesterol levels could enhance the success of a specific type of T-cell immunotherapy in fighting cancer. The team, led by Qing Yi, M.D., Ph.D., of Cleveland Clinic Lerner Research Institute studied T-cell transfer, which has shown great success in recent years.
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Remote camera network tracks Antarctic species at low costAn international research team has developed a simple method for using a network of autonomous time-lapse cameras to track the breeding and population dynamics of Antarctic penguins, providing a new, low-cost window into the health and productivity of the Antarctic ecosystem.
14h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Space cloud discoveryNo one has ever seen what Case Western Reserve University astronomers first observed using a refurbished 75-year-old telescope in the Arizona mountains. 'I literally looked at the image and said, 'What in the world is that?'' said Case Western Reserve astronomy professor Chris Mihos. What it was turned out to be a massive cloud of ionized hydrogen gas spewed from a nearby galaxy and then essential
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Scientists develop a 3-D view of an interstellar cloud, where stars are bornTwo astronomers from Greece have managed to model the three-dimensional structure of an interstellar gas cloud, and found that it's on the order of 10 times more spacious than it originally appeared.
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Popular Science

The weirdest things we learned this week: smoke enemas, sneaky sound design, and stranded lighthousesScience Our editors scrounged up some truly bizarre facts. On this week's episode of The Weirdest Thing I Learned This Week, three PopSci editors go on a curiosity voyage that starts with tobacco enemas and ends with an…
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

Bitcoin estimated to use half a percent of the world's electric energy by end of 2018Bitcoin's burgeoning electricity demands have attracted almost as much attention as the cryptocurrency's fluctuating value. But estimating exactly how much electricity the Bitcoin network uses remains a challenge. A new methodology helps pinpoint where Bitcoin's electric energy consumption is headed and how soon it might get there.
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BBC News - Science & Environment

Mysterious rise in emissions of ozone-damaging chemicalResearchers discover an unexplained rise in a compound that is highly destructive to the ozone layer.
14h
Live Science

Images: Amazing Artifacts from a Java Sea ShipwreckHere’s a look at artifacts discovered on a merchant ship that wrecked in the Java Sea in the late 1100s.
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Live Science

12th-Century Shipwreck Came with Handy 'Made in China' TagA bureaucratic label alters the timeline for a sunken ship.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

People are more honest on Tinder than you may think, study saysWith a quarter of young Americans now finding romance through online dating and mobile apps, you have to wonder—can you really trust someone you've met through a screen? Researchers at Stanford's Social Media Lab embarked on a quest to find out.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Mechanical force controls the speed of protein synthesisAs cells create proteins, the proteins modulate synthesis speed by exerting a mechanical force on the molecular machine that makes them, according to a team of scientists who used a combination of computational and experimental techniques to understand this force.
14h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Whole-tree logging may not hinder plant biodiversityWhen it comes to timber harvesting, removing the whole tree -- from stump to twigs -- doesn't reduce plant diversity any more than old-fashioned logging, which leaves tree branches behind in the woods.
14h
NYT > Science

Banned Ozone-Harming Gas Creeps Back, Suggesting a Mystery SourceCFC-11, once commonly used as a refrigerant, has been outlawed for nearly a decade. Scientists suspect it is being produced again, likely in East Asia.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Yanny or Laurel? Soundbite sparks internet dinLaurel YannyAn audio snippet with just two syllables has ignited an internet meltdown, dividing social media users into staunchly opposed camps: do you hear "Yanny" or "Laurel?"
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Google's location tracking: FTC probe urged, Australia inquiry beginsLocation, location, location. Is Google tracking Android users' whereabouts without their permission?
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News

UMBC ecologist and colleagues expose bias in forest restoration studiesAt a time when countries are pledging to restore millions of hectares of forest, new research argues that recent studies on forest regeneration techniques are flawed. Sites used to evaluate natural regeneration were secondary growth forests, whereas sites chosen to evaluate artificial regeneration ranged from abandoned coal mines to cattle-trampled fields. Authors of the new study suggest elements
14h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News

NIH, Northwestern scientists develop potential new approach to stop cancer metastasisResearchers have identified a compound that blocks the spread of pancreatic and other cancers in various animal models. When cancer spreads from one part of the body to another in a process called metastasis, it can eventually grow beyond the reach of effective therapies. Now, there is a new plan of attack against this deadly process, thanks to scientists at the National Institutes of Health, Nort
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News

A 'dirty bomb' battles cancer metastasisScientists have developed a new compound that inhibits the spread of cancer cells, which is what makes the disease so lethal. The compound, metarrestin, significantly reduced metastasis by human prostate, pancreatic and breast cancer transplanted into mice. Mice treated with it had fewer metastatic tumors and lived longer than mice that did not receive treatment. Metarrestin is being submitted to
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Europium points to new suspect in continental mysteryClues from some unusual Arizona rocks pointed Rice University scientists toward a discovery -- a subtle chemical signature in rocks the world over -- that could answer a long-standing mystery: What stole the iron from Earth's continents?
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Archaeologists uncover earliest evidence for equid bit wear in the ancient Near EastAchaeologists have uncovered the earliest example of the use of a bridle bit with an equid (horse family) in the Near East. The discovery provides first evidence of the use of the bit (mouth piece) to control an animal long before the appearance of the horse in the Near East. The evidence was derived from the skeleton of a donkey dating to the Early Bronze Age III (approximately 2700 BCE) .
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News

What we inherited from our bug-eating ancestorsHumans are known to have one functioning and three non-functioning genes that make an enzyme that digests the hard exoskeletons of insects, which are made of chitin. A new UC Berkeley study shows that nearly all placental mammals have one of five different chitinase genes, though not all are functioning and some fragmentary. This suggests that the common ancestor of all placental mammals, living w
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News

A stress response protein may prevent kidney damage after heart surgeryResearchers have discovered that elevated levels of a stress response protein are associated with a reduced risk of kidney damage after heart surgery in patients.
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Would you share your scientific results before publication?Scientists who surveyed more than 7,000 active faculty researchers in the US and abroad report that more than half of them had disclosed their results before publication, largely to receive feedback.
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Previous findings on tropical forest restoration were biasedWhat we think we know about how to restore tropical forests is based on shaky science. Missouri Botanical Garden Scientist Leighton Reid and other researchers reviewed major studies that had found natural regeneration was as good as or better than tree planting, and found those studies to be biased. Natural regeneration was studied in more resilient sites than tree planting, making it an apples to
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News

The mystery of lime-green lizard bloodGreen blood is one of the most unusual characteristics in the animal kingdom, but it's the hallmark of a group of lizards in New Guinea. The muscles, bones and tongues of these lizards appear bright, lime-green due to high levels of biliverdin, or a green bile pigment, which is toxic and causes jaundice. Surprisingly, these lizards remain healthy with levels of green bile that are 40 times higher
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Novel therapy inhibits complement to preserve neurons and reduce inflammation after strokeIn an article published online on May 16, 2018, by Science Translational Medicine, Medical University of South Carolina investigators report that, after ischemic stroke, the complement system identifies stressed but salvageable neurons for removal by microglial phagocytosis. To preserve these neurons, the investigators designed a novel therapeutic that targets a complement inhibitor to a damage si
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Climate change to shift many fish species north, disrupting fisheriesClimate change will force hundreds of ocean fish and invertebrate species, including some of the most economically important to the United States, to move northward, disrupting fisheries in the United States and Canada, a Rutgers University-led study reports.The study, published today in the journal PLOS ONE, covers the North American continental shelfs on the Pacific and Atlantic coasts.
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Scientists predict how 686 marine species' habitats may shift in response to warming seasNew predictions reveal how global warming may shift the geographic distribution of 686 marine species that inhabit North America's Atlantic and Pacific continental shelves, according to a study published May 16, 2018 in the open-access journal PLOS ONE by James Morley of Rutgers University, United States, and colleagues.
14h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Early evidence of use of a bit on domestic donkeys found in the Near EastDonkeys may have worn bits as early as the third millennium BCE, long before the introduction of horses in the ancient Near East, according to a study published May 16, 2018 in the open-access journal PLOS ONE by Haskel Greenfield from University of Manitoba, Canada, Aren Maeir from Bar-Ilan University, and colleagues.
14h
The Atlantic

What Democracies Can Learn From MalaysiaWhat is democracy for? This might seem like an obvious question. Yet disagreements over democracy’s ends are multiplying in the West, including in the oldest, most advanced democracies. Those disagreements include the question of whether democracy is an end unto itself or a means to something greater. Is it possible that the United States and Europe might learn something from Malaysia, a country
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Samsung and Apple are back in court over iPhone design. Here's why.Samsung and Apple return to a San Jose, Calif. district courtroom Monday to resume a patent infringement dispute that dates to 2011. The latest chapter in the longstanding saga is about determining the financial damages Samsung owes Apple for infringing on design patents covering the original iPhone, an outcome that could have a broad impact on intellectual property law.
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Feed: All Latest

Scientists Are Subverting Formal Publishing. Well, Some of ThemA survey shows which scientists are more likely to share their results before "official" publication.
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Big Think

The scientific reasons you hear ‘Laurel’ or ‘Yanny’ in that viral sound clipLaurel YannyYanny/Laurel is the blue dress vs. gold dress of 2018. Kinda. Read More
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Latest Headlines | Science News

Green blood in lizards probably evolved four timesPigment buildups that would cause jaundice in people are normal for some New Guinea skinks.
14h
New Scientist - News

Trump’s Iran U-turn could restart the global nuclear arms raceThe US has demonstrated that it cannot be trusted to stick to its word on arms control deals. The result may be a return to the dark days of growing nuclear arsenals
15h
New Scientist - News

Keep the facts front and centre in Ireland’s abortion debateResearch can offer plenty of evidence to back the case for relaxing Ireland’s near total abortion ban in the country’s upcoming referendum, says Lara Williams
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New Scientist - News

Some of the universe’s first stars have actually been seenUsing four of the world’s most powerful telescopes, we’ve spotted stars from just 250 million years after the big bang in a galaxy billions of light years away
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New Scientist - News

We’ve measured the pressure inside a proton and it’s extremeThe pressure inside a proton is a billion billion billion times the pressure in the Mariana Trench, and 10 times higher than in the core of a neutron star
15h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Can't type? Apple faces class-action lawsuit over defective MacBook keyboardsApple faces a proposed class action lawsuit over allegedly defective "butterfly" type keyboards in the company's MacBook and MacBook Pro laptops.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Google cuts prices for storage under a new name. Here's how Google One compares to its rivalsGoogle rebranded its online storage subscription program to Google One Monday and lowered prices, but Amazon still has the best deal for 1 terabyte of storage.
15h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Apple now has more self-driving car permits in California than Waymo and TeslaJust last year, Apple was in the backseat of an increasingly crowded competition for self-driving cars with Google-owned Waymo, Tesla and Uber vying for an edge.
15h
The Scientist RSS

Researchers Develop a Drug Against the Common ColdIn an in vitro study, the compound completely blocked the replication of rhinoviruses.
15h
The Atlantic

These Lizards Are Full of Green Blood That Should Kill ThemIn 1969, two biologists wrote about three lizards from New Guinea whose insides were green. The color ranged from a deep blue-green to a vivid lime hue, and it was everywhere. The lizards’ bodies, when dissected, revealed green bones, muscles, and blood. Their mouths, when opened, were green. Their eggs, when held up to a light, looked green inside their shells. Christopher Austin was just 3 year
15h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

A new map for a birthplace of starsA Yale-led research group has created the most detailed maps yet of a vast seedbed of stars similar to Earth's Sun.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Ecologists expose bias in forest restoration studiesWhen embarking on a reforestation project, is it better to let an area regenerate on its own, or take active steps like planting trees? Recent high-profile research has suggested that natural regeneration is more effective. However, UMBC's Matthew Fagan and colleagues have just published their own research in Science Advances suggesting those studies were biased, and advocating for a more nuanced
15h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Europium points to new suspect in continental mysteryClues from some unusual Arizona rocks pointed Rice University scientists toward a discovery—a subtle chemical signature in rocks the world over—that could answer a long-standing mystery: What stole the iron from Earth's continents?
15h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Climate change to shift many fish species north, disrupting fisheriesClimate change will force hundreds of ocean fish and invertebrate species, including some of the most economically important to the United States, to move northward, disrupting fisheries in the United States and Canada, a Rutgers University-led study reports.
15h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

The mystery of lime-green lizard bloodGreen blood is one of the most unusual characteristics in the animal kingdom, but it's the hallmark of a group of lizards in New Guinea. Prasinohaema are green-blooded skinks, or a type of lizard. The muscles, bones and tongues of these lizards appear bright, lime-green due to high levels of biliverdin, or a green bile pigment, which is toxic and causes jaundice. Surprisingly, these lizards remain
15h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Archaeologists uncover earliest evidence for equid bit wear in the ancient Near EastAn international team of archaeologists has uncovered the earliest example of the use of a bridle bit with an equid (horse family) in the Near East. The discovery provides first evidence of the use of the bit (mouth piece) to control an animal long before the appearance of the horse in the Near East.
15h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

What we inherited from our bug-eating ancestorsPeople who advocate adding insects to the human diet may be channeling their distant ancestors.
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Congo aims to stop its Ebola outbreak with an experimental vaccine
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Science : NPR

Why Do Some Lizards Have Green Blood?Scientists are trying to figure out how green-blooded lizards might benefit from the unusual pigment. The answer could provide new insights into human illnesses like jaundice and malaria. (Image credit: Courtesy of Christopher C. Austin/LSU)
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

Clues to treating psychoses in mental health patientsResearchers recently found evidence that boosting how well people at risk for psychosis learn from positive and negative feedback could potentially keep psychosis at bay. The team also found that brain scans using functional magnetic resonance imaging, coupled with behavioral measures, could provide markers for the diagnosis of psychosis risk. Researchers hope findings will help mental health prof
15h
Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

Tailor-made synthesis of cyclic chemicals by means of enzymesPenicillin-based antibiotics contain a five-membered hydrocarbon cycle, additionally incorporating a sulfur and a nitrogen atom. Researchers have now succeeded in selectively synthesizing this important substructure with different residues on this cycle using a biotechnological method.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

How electronic health records can benefit clinical trialsA new study has indicated that the Secure Anonymized Information Linkage (SAIL) Databank can provide a simple, cost-effective way to follow-up after the completion of randomized controlled trials.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

World's Strongest bio-material outperforms steel and spider silkAt DESY's X-ray light source PETRA III, researchers have produced the strongest bio-material that has ever been made. The artificial, but biodegradable cellulose fibers are stronger than steel and even than dragline spider silk, which is usually considered the strongest bio-based material.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

Small birds almost overheat while feeding their youngFor decades, researchers have thought that access to food determined the brood size of birds. Now, biologists have discovered a completely new explanation: the body temperature of small birds can increase by more than 4°C to exceed 45°C when they are feeding their young. Larger broods would require more work, resulting in even higher body temperatures -- something the birds would probably not surv
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Microbes Affect Brain Cells Activities in Mice with Multiple SclerosisResearchers find a link between molecules released by commensal bacteria and the degree of inflammation in a mouse model of MS.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Senate Democrats push to reinstate 'net neutrality' rulesDon't expect the House to go along with the Senate's expected passage of legislation that would revive an Obama-era rule requiring equal treatment for all web traffic by internet providers.
15h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Emergency 911 technology struggles to keep up with the timesHigh school students hiding from the gunman in Parkland, Florida, were forced to whisper in calls to 911 for fear of tipping off their location. Others texted friends and family who then relayed information to emergency dispatchers over the phone.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Emissions of banned ozone-eating chemical somehow are risingSomething strange is happening with a now-banned chemical that eats away at Earth's protective ozone layer: Scientists say there's more of it—not less—going into the atmosphere and they don't know where it is coming from.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

Evidence for stars forming just 250 million years after Big BangAstronomers have used observations from the Atacama Large Millimeter/submillimeter Array (ALMA) and ESO's Very Large Telescope (VLT) to determine that star formation in the very distant galaxy MACS1149-JD1 started at an unexpectedly early stage, only 250 million years after the Big Bang. This discovery also represents the most distant oxygen ever detected in the universe and the most distant galax
15h
Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

A simple software error corrected: Bittersweet chloroplast genome becomes the modelInformation about the organization and evolution of plastomes is crucial to improve crop plants and to resolve the phylogeny of photosynthetic organisms. In a recent study researchers have sequenced the plastid genome of a weed called bittersweet (Solanum dulcamara).
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

Diagnosing breast cancer with an imaging pillFor women, mammograms are a sometimes uncomfortable, but necessary, annual ritual. But this procedure doesn't always provide accurate results, and it exposes women to X-rays. In a new study, scientists report that they have developed a non-invasive 'disease screening pill' that can make cancerous tumors light up when exposed to near-infrared light in mice without using radiation.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

Beef peptides block bitter tastesFrom burgers to steaks, beef has a long history of being a delicious part of dinner. But what if that pleasant experience of eating beef could extend beyond the dinner plate? Now, one group reports that beef protein, when broken down into peptides, can block bitter taste receptors on the tongue. Such peptides could someday be used to make other foods and even medicines taste better.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

People make different moral choices in imagined versus real-life situationsResearchers often use hypothetical scenarios to understand how people grapple with moral quandaries, but experimental results suggest that these scenarios may not always reflect real-life behavior. The findings showed that people tend to focus more on the outcome of their decision and less on absolute moral principles when faced with a real-life scenario as opposed to a hypothetical scenario.
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Where the Yanny and Laurel Meme Comes FromLaurel YannyHere's where the meme came from, what the recording is actually saying, and who recorded it in the first place.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Researchers control the properties of graphene transistors using pressureA Columbia University-led international team of researchers has developed a technique to manipulate the electrical conductivity of graphene with compression, bringing the material one step closer to being a viable semiconductor for use in today's electronic devices.
15h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

New device could increase battery life of electronic devices by more than a hundred-foldAmong the chief complaints for smartphone, laptop and other battery-operated electronics users is that the battery life is too short and—in some cases—that the devices generate heat. Now, a group of physicists led by Deepak K. Singh, associate professor of physics and astronomy at the University of Missouri, has developed a device material that can address both issues. The team has applied for a p
15h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

New research could improve efficiency and luminance of TV and smartphone displaysYour TV and smartphone could be more efficient and luminescent thanks to new research conducted with assistance from Binghamton University, State University at New York.
15h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

New views of Sun: Two missions will go closer to our star than ever beforeAs we develop more and more powerful tools to peer beyond our solar system, we learn more about the seemingly endless sea of faraway stars and their curious casts of orbiting planets. But there's only one star we can travel to directly and observe up close—and that's our own: the Sun.
15h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

System outage causes flight cancelations in FrankfurtA technology failure at Frankfurt airport has caused the cancellation of dozens of flights at Germany's busiest hub.
15h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Resistant varieties, beneficial predators can help producers win sugarcane aphid battleWhile sugarcane aphids have been difficult to suppress in past years due to their natural traits and limited insecticide options, a Texas A&M AgriLife Research study shows resistant sorghum varieties and beneficial predators could provide a solution.
15h
Big Think

The future of VR will be shaped by the pornography of todayWhy the porn industry leads the way in developing virtual reality. Read More
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Cambridge Analytica shared data with Russia: whistleblowerPolitical consulting group Cambridge Analytica used Russian researchers and shared data with companies linked to Russian intelligence, a whistleblower told a congressional hearing on interference in the 2016 US election Wednesday.
15h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Less water, same Texas cotton: Study isolates best irrigation patterns to conserve waterPlants need water—but what about when it's running low? Is it possible to use less water and still have healthy crops?
15h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Researchers control the properties of graphene transistors using pressureA Columbia University-led international team of researchers has developed a technique to manipulate the electrical conductivity of graphene with compression, bringing the material one step closer to being a viable semiconductor for use in today's electronic devices.
15h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News

ALMA finds oxygen 13.28 billion light-years awayAstronomers detected a faint but definite signal of oxygen in a galaxy located 13.28 billion light-years away from us, through observations using the Atacama Large Millimeter/submillimeter Array (ALMA). Breaking their own records, this marks the most distant oxygen ever detected in the Universe. Referencing infrared observations, the team determined that star formation in the galaxy started at an
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Quarks feel the pressure in the protonInside every proton in every atom in the universe is a pressure cooker environment that surpasses the atom-crushing heart of a neutron star. That's according to the first measurement of a mechanical property of subatomic particles, the pressure distribution inside the proton, which was carried out by scientists at the Department of Energy's Thomas Jefferson National Accelerator Facility.
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Exploration of diverse bacteria signals big advance for gene function predictionScientists at Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory, including researchers at the US Department of Energy Joint Genome Institute, have developed a workflow that enables large-scale, genome-wide assays of gene importance across many conditions. The study, 'Mutant Phenotypes for Thousands of Bacterial Genes of Unknown Function,' has been published in the journal Nature and is by far the largest func
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News

ALMA finds most-distant oxygen in the universeALMA observations reveal the faint, telltale signature of oxygen coming from a galaxy at a record-setting distance of 13.28 billion light-years from Earth.
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News

How the gut influences neurologic diseaseA study published this week in Nature sheds new light on the connection between the gut and the brain, untangling the complex interplay that allows the byproducts of microorganisms living in the gut to influence the progression of neurodegenerative diseases.
15h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Cellular valve structure opens up potential novel therapiesBiochemists at the University of Zurich have determined the detailed structure of a volume-regulated chloride channel. This cellular valve is activated in response to swelling to prevent the cell from bursting. The protein also plays an important role in the uptake of chemotherapeutics and the release of neurotransmitters after a stroke. The controlled regulation of its activity thus opens up a pr
15h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News

ALMA and VLT find evidence for stars forming just 250 million years after Big BangAstronomers have used observations from the Atacama Large Millimeter/submillimeter Array (ALMA) and ESO's Very Large Telescope (VLT) to determine that star formation in the very distant galaxy MACS1149-JD1 started at an unexpectedly early stage, only 250 million years after the Big Bang. This discovery also represents the most distant oxygen ever detected in the universe and the most distant galax
15h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Under certain conditions, bacterial signals set the stage for leukemiaA new study by researchers from the University of Chicago Medicine shows that bacterial signals are crucial to the development of a precursor condition to leukemia, which can be induced by disrupting the intestinal barrier or by introducing a bacterial infection.
15h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Why chikungunya, other arthritis-causing viruses target jointsScientists have understood little about how chikungunya and related viruses cause arthritis. Now, researchers at Washington University School of Medicine in St. Louis have identified the molecular handle that chikungunya grabs to get inside cells. The findings, published May 16 in the journal Nature, could lead to ways to prevent or treat disease caused by chikungunya and related viruses.
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Stars formed only 250 million years after the Big BangStars in a galaxy 13.28 billion light years away formed only 250 million years after the Big Bang, finds a team of international astronomers led by groups at UCL and Osaka Sangyo University in Japan.
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Stroke: Researchers shed light on the brain recovery process and new treatment strategiesDr. Brian MacVicar at the University of British Columbia has recently discovered how two types of cells, called astrocytes and pericytes, work together to regenerate blood flow in the brain areas affected by stroke. His studies show that both types of cells proliferate and get recruited to the edge of the damaged area. These findings have the potential to lead to the identification of new targets
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The Atlantic

North Korea's Dangerous Game of Telephone With the United StatesNK US Donald TrumpSEOUL, South Korea—The incredible spectacle in recent days of Kim Jong Un becoming the first North Korean leader to step into South Korea, and Donald Trump welcoming home American hostages from North Korea, and Kim and Trump announcing an unprecedented meeting next month in Singapore, inflated expectations for a breakthrough. After 25 years of failing to denuclearize North Korea, and 65 years of
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The Atlantic

Women Are the Key to Winning Back the House for DemocratsThere are currently no women representing the state of Pennsylvania. But come November, there could be as many as seven. Eight women won their primaries on Tuesday—seven Democrats and one Republican. It was a promising sign for Democrats, who see Pennsylvania as ground zero in their effort to regain control of the House: The party needs to pick up 23 seats in November to win the House majority, a
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Ingeniøren

Stjerner blev født allerede 250 millioner år efter big bangMed nyt mikrobølgeobservatorium har forskergruppe fundet tegn på uventet meget tidlig stjernedannelse i universet. Der er usikkerhed om dette er et generelt fænomen.
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Latest Headlines | Science News

The inside of a proton endures more pressure than anything else we’ve seenFor the first time, scientists used experimental data to estimate the pressure inside a proton.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

UN: 68 percent of world population will live in urban areas by 2050Sixty-eight percent of the world's population will live in urban areas by the year 2050, the United Nation said Wednesday, up from 55 percent at present.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Facebook's Zuckerberg agrees closed-door talks with MEPsFacebook chief Mark Zuckerberg has agreed to meet European Parliament members behind closed-doors to answer questions in the wake of the Cambridge Analytica scandal, a top official said on Wednesday.
15h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Amazon to give Prime members extra discounts at Whole FoodsWhole Foods AmazonIt's Prime time at Whole Foods: Amazon said it will give its Prime members extra discounts at the grocery chain.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

Glass-forming ability: Fundamental understanding leading to smart designResearchers studied the glass-forming ability of two simple systems, establishing the 'thermodynamic interface penalty,' which is an indicator of the extent of the structural difference between a crystal and its melt. The fundamental understanding acquired is expected to lead to physics-driven design of glassy materials, allowing for better control and tailoring, and aiding advances in the manufac
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

Traditional knowledge sheds light on changing East Greenland climate and polar bear huntInuit polar bear hunters in East Greenland report changes to their subsistence hunting patterns as well as polar bear distribution and behavior due to decreasing sea ice and the introduction of hunting quotas in 2006. The study is the first in nearly 20 years to document traditional knowledge in East Greenland -- providing a valuable baseline for monitoring future changes and the polar bear popula
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Investigation seeks to create self-assembling materialsAs we travel farther into space, clever solutions to problems like engine part malfunctions and other possible mishaps will be a vital part of the planning process. 3-D printing, or additive manufacturing, is an emerging technology that may be used to custom-create mission-critical parts. An integral piece of this process is understanding how particle shape, size distribution and packing behavior
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Climate change should help Midwest corn production through 2050Climate change and global warming put some forms of life at risk, but researchers found one instance that might not feel the heat—corn.
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iBiology (uploads) on YouTube

David Baltimore (CalTech): microRNAs Create Regulatory Tension in Mammalian Blood CellsWhat is the involvement of microRNAs in the inflammatory response? In this seminar, David Baltimore shows how miRNAs are involved in the precise tuning of the inflammatory response. https://www.ibiology.org/immunology/micrornas-and-inflammatory-response Talk Overview: What is the involvement of microRNAs in the inflammatory response? In this seminar, Dr. David Baltimore shows that the expression
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Latest Headlines | Science News

These stars may have been born only 250 million years after the Big BangScientists find evidence that stars were forming just 250 million years after the universe was born.
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The Atlantic

MIT Now Has a Humanist Chaplain to Help Students With the Ethics of TechEven some of the most powerful tech companies start out tiny, with a young innovator daydreaming about creating the next big thing. As today’s tech firms receive increased moral scrutiny, it raises a question about tomorrow’s: Is that young person thinking about the tremendous ethical responsibility they’d be taking on if their dream comes true? Greg Epstein, the recently appointed humanist chapl
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Big Think

Will Prince Harry and Meghan Markle have a happy marriage? Here’s what psychology says.From what we know about the young prince and actress, how does the future look for their relationship based on psychological studies of successful marriages? Read More
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

New research could improve efficiency and luminance of TV and smartphone displaysYour TV and smartphone could be more efficient and luminescent thanks to new research.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

Climate change should help Midwest corn production through 2050Contrary to previous analyses, research shows that projected changes in temperature and humidity will not lead to greater water use in corn. This means that while changes in temperatures and humidity trend as they have in the past 50 years, crop yields can not only survive -- but thrive.
16h
Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

New device could increase battery life of electronics by a hundred-foldAmong the chief complaints for smartphone, laptop and other battery-operated electronics users is that the battery life is too short and -- in some cases -- that the devices generate heat. Now, a group of physicists has developed a device material that can address both issues. The team has applied for a patent for a magnetic material that employs a unique structure -- a 'honeycomb' lattice that ex
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

Researchers take key step toward growing human organs in laboratoryResearchers have learned that precursor cells for skeletal muscles actually also give rise to neurons, blood vessels, blood cells and immune cells, pushing science one step closer to generating body parts in a laboratory.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

How humans repress prejudicesA philosopher has used psychoanalysis to investigate why people are often not aware of their prejudices. In her accounts, she has been elaborating how prejudices can become unconscious.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

Optimizing steroid use in pregnancyResearch which aims to optimize steroid use in pregnancy is set to benefit millions of families worldwide who will have babies born prematurely.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Exploration of diverse bacteria signals big advance for gene function predictionIn the air, beneath the ocean's surface, and on land, microbes are the minute but mighty forces regulating much of the planet's biogeochemical cycles. To better understand their roles, scientists work to identify these microbes and to determine their individual contributions. While advances in sequencing technologies have enabled researchers to access the genomes of thousands of microbes and make
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Astronomers find evidence for stars forming just 250 million years after Big BangNot long after the Big Bang, the first generations of stars began altering the chemical make-up of primitive galaxies, slowly enriching the interstellar medium with basic elements such as oxygen, carbon, and nitrogen. Finding the earliest traces of these common elements would shed important light on the chemical evolution of galaxies, including our own.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

First measurement of subatomic particle's mechanical property reveals distribution of pressure inside protonInside every proton in every atom in the universe is a pressure cooker environment that surpasses the atom-crushing heart of a neutron star. That's according to the first measurement of a mechanical property of subatomic particles, the pressure distribution inside the proton, which was carried out by scientists at the Department of Energy's Thomas Jefferson National Accelerator Facility.
16h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Cellular valve structure opens up potential novel therapiesBiochemists at the University of Zurich have determined the detailed structure of a volume-regulated chloride channel. This cellular valve is activated in response to swelling to prevent the cell from bursting. The protein also plays an important role in the uptake of chemotherapeutics and the release of neurotransmitters after a stroke. The controlled regulation of its activity thus opens up a pr
16h
Science | The Guardian

Charles Dickens' contribution to medicine highlighted in London exhibitionAuthor’s startlingly accurate descriptions of illnesses may have assisted advances in medicine, curators say Fat boy Joe, the messenger in The Pickwick Papers , is “always asleep... he goes on errands fast asleep, and snores as he waits at table”. The chubby servant’s constant snoozing becomes a running joke in Dickens’ first novel, but the character also served as an unlikely inspiration for a b
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The Atlantic

The Man Who Could Shape Iraq's FutureMoqtada al-Sadr won’t be Iraq’s next prime minister, but he may very well decide who is. It’s a striking outcome for the Shia cleric who forged a reputation as a radical in the insurgency he led against the U.S. after the invasion of 2003, and who then defined himself as an Iraqi nationalist through his defiance of Iran. Over this period, Sadr has become an insider in Iraqi politics, but ahead of
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Big Think

Report: The number of billionaires on the planet just hit a record highA new report from data company Wealth-X shows that the world’s billionaires enjoyed a sharp increase both in number and wealth over the past year. Read More
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News

New device could increase battery life of electronics by a hundred-foldAmong the chief complaints for smartphone, laptop and other battery-operated electronics users is that the battery life is too short and -- in some cases -- that the devices generate heat. Now, a group of physicists led by Deepak K. Singh, associate professor of physics and astronomy at the University of Missouri, has developed a device material that can address both issues. The team has applied f
16h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Colon cancer cells use mysterious RNA strands to avoid cell deathResearchers from Case Western Reserve University School of Medicine have discovered how unusually long strands of RNA help colon cancer cells avoid death, allowing unregulated growth. Unlike other RNAs, the intriguing strands do not appear to encode proteins and are termed 'long non-coding RNAs' or 'lincRNAs.'A new study showed some lincRNAs could be targeted by drug developers to halt colon cance
16h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Researchers find clues to treating psychoses in mental health patientsResearchers at the University of Missouri recently found evidence that boosting how well people at risk for psychosis learn from positive and negative feedback could potentially keep psychosis at bay. The team also found that brain scans using functional magnetic resonance imaging, coupled with behavioral measures, could provide markers for the diagnosis of psychosis risk. Researchers hope finding
16h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Research shows how 'navigational hazards' in metro maps confuse travelersSome features in metro maps cause passengers to make substantial mistakes in journey planning, but it may be possible to detect and rectify these with automated software, research being conducted at the University of Kent has indicated.
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News

THE IADR/AADR publish JDR special issue on head and neck cancerThe International and American Associations for Dental Research (IADR/AADR) have published a special issue in the Journal of Dental Research (JDR) on head and neck cancer. Dr. Jacques E. Nör, University of Michigan, Ann Arbor, USA, and Dr. J. Silvio Gutkind, University of California, San Diego, USA, served as the guest editors of this special issue.
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News

UTHealth researcher reveals results of study on emergency breathing tubesIn a landmark study, researchers found that patients treated with paramedic oxygen delivery using a newer, more flexible laryngeal breathing tube may have a greater survival rate after sudden cardiac arrest than the traditional intubation breathing tube.
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Mayo discovery means individualized ovarian, brain cancer therapiesMayo Clinic researchers have discovered that a molecular communication pathway -- thought to be defective in cancer -- is a key player in determining the effectiveness of measles virus oncolytic cancer treatment in ovarian and aggressive brain cancers. This discovery enabled researchers to develop an algorithm to predict treatment effectiveness in individual patients. The findings appear in the Jo
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Latest Headlines | Science News

Meet the speedsters of the plant worldResearchers have recently uncovered a diverse array of mechanisms that allow plants to move — often faster than the blink of an eye.
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Live Science

New Smallpox-Related Virus Found Lurking in Texas RodentsA never-before-seen virus that's a relative of the smallpox virus has been found lurking in rodents in Texas.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

Plug-and-play diagnostic devicesResearchers have developed modular blocks that can be put together in different ways to produce diagnostic devices. These 'plug-and-play' devices can test blood glucose levels in diabetic patients or detect viral infection, among other functions.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

A shipwreck and an 800-year-old 'made in China' label reveal lost historyNearly a thousand years ago, a ship sank in the Java Sea near Indonesia. Cargo recovered from the ocean floor -- including the equivalent to a 'Made in China' label on a piece of pottery -- is helping archaeologists reevaluate when the ship went down and how it fits in with China's history.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

Global 2 degrees C rise doubles population exposed to multiple climate risks compared to 1.5 degrees CNew research identifying climate vulnerability hotspots has found that the number of people affected by multiple climate change risks could double if the global temperature rises by 2 degrees C, compared to a rise of 1.5 degrees C.
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Climate change should help Midwest corn production through 2050Contrary to previous analyses, research published by Michigan State University shows that projected changes in temperature and humidity will not lead to greater water use in corn. This means that while changes in temperatures and humidity trend as they have in the past 50 years, crop yields can not only survive -- but thrive.
17h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Mechanism underlying malformation associated with severe epilepsy is revealedStudy suggests dysregulation of gene NEUROG2 could be linked to development of focal cortical dysplasia, one of the most common causes of drug-resistant epilepsy. NEUROG2 is involved in cell differentiation and, when overexpressed, it maintains the neurogenesis signal active into adulthood, what helps explaining the presence of abnormal neurons and glial cells in patients' brains.
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Less water, same Texas cottonIn Texas, the Southern High Plains uses water from an aquifer to water cotton fields. However, the aquifer is running low. Scientists from the area are working to find the best irrigation method for cotton that uses the least water.
17h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Intimacy in later life does not slow memory lossOlder people who enjoy a sexually active and emotionally close relationship with their partner tend to perform better at memory tests than sexually inactive older adults on a short-term basis, but this is not the case over a longer period of time. This is according to a study using data from more than 6000 adults aged 50 and over. The research by Mark Allen of the University of Wollongong in Austr
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Big Think

How will virtual reality change your mind's consciousness?You are who you are because of your environment. What happens in a virtual world in an environment created by another mind? Read More
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Science | The Guardian

Sinclair Lough obituaryMy friend and former colleague Sinclair Lough, who has died aged 62 following a stroke, was a clinical psychologist who specialised in the care of older people. I first met Sinclair at the Faculty of the Psychology of Older People conference in Birmingham in 2000, where he was giving a talk on frontotemporal dementia . This was in the days before PowerPoint and Sinclair was struggling with a proj
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

Mutation protects against Alzheimer's-like disease in miceResearchers have discovered a mutation that can protect against Alzheimer's disease in mice. The study found that a specific mutation can reduce the characteristic accumulation of the amyloid-beta peptide that occurs.
17h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Resistant varieties, beneficial predators can help producers win sugarcane aphid battleWhile sugarcane aphids have been difficult to suppress in past years due to their natural traits and limited insecticide options, a Texas A&M AgriLife Research study shows resistant sorghum varieties and beneficial predators could provide a solution.
17h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News

MN childcare programs focused on nutrition and physical activities, study findsExisting state and local programs focused on good nutrition and physical activities for children have led to measurable improvement in practices by the state's child care programs between 2010 and 2016, says a new University of Minnesota Medical School study.
17h
Live Science

'Yanny' or 'Laurel'? Why Your Brain Hears One or the Other in This Maddening IllusionThe auditory version of the blue/gold dress is dividing Yanny and Laurel camps across the internet.
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Futurity.org

How plants build the tiny pores that release oxygenNew research describes how tiny pores called stomata form in plants. Through photosynthesis, plants use sunlight and carbon dioxide to make food, belching out the oxygen that we breathe as a byproduct. Nearly all land plants use stomata to take in carbon dioxide and release oxygen. Thousands of stomata dot on the surface of the plants. Understanding how stomata form is critical basic information
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Live Science

The Universe's Fastest-Growing Black Hole Eats Suns Like Ours for BreakfastThe fastest growing black hole in the known universe eats a mass the size of the sun every two days.
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News

New technique reveals details of forest fire recoveryDo you know someone who's so caught up in the details of a problem that they 'can't see the forest for the trees'? Scientists seeking to understand how forests recover from wildfires sometimes have the opposite problem.
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News

New research could improve efficiency and luminance of TV and smartphone displaysYour TV and smartphone could be more efficient and luminescent thanks to new research conducted with assistance from Binghamton University, State University at New York.
17h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Researchers combine wearable technology and AI to predict the onset of health problemsA team of Waterloo researchers found that applying artificial intelligence to the right combination of data retrieved from wearable technology may detect whether your health is failing.The study, which involved researchers from Waterloo's Faculties of Applied Health Sciences and Engineering, found that the data from wearable sensors and artificial intelligence that assesses changes in aerobic resp
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Is wealth late in life associated with increased dementia risk?Wealth in late life, independent of education, appeared to be associated with increased risk for dementia, suggesting that people with fewer financial resources were at higher risk, according to a study of a nationally representative sample of older English adults.
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Wide variation in rate of death between VA hospitals for patients with heart disease, heart failureDeath rates for veterans with ischemic heart disease and chronic heart failure varied widely across the Veterans Affairs (VA) health care system from 2010 to 2014, which could suggest differences in the quality of cardiovascular health care provided by VA medical centers.
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Greater burden of atrial fibrillation linked to higher stroke riskAmong people with intermittently recurring atrial fibrillation who are not taking anti-blood-clotting medications, those whose hearts were in abnormal rhythms longer were three times more likely to have strokes or other types of blood clots than those who had abnormal heart rhythms for less time, according to a new Kaiser Permanente study.Continuous heart monitoring may help physicians identify pa
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Most deprived are nearly twice as likely to develop dementiaOlder adults in England with fewer financial resources are more likely to develop dementia, according to new UCL research.
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Bitcoin estimated to use half a percent of the world's electric energy by end of 2018Bitcoin's burgeoning electricity demands have attracted almost as much attention as the cryptocurrency's fluctuating value. But estimating exactly how much electricity the Bitcoin network uses remains a challenge. In the first rigorously peer-reviewed article quantifying Bitcoin's energy requirements, a Commentary appearing May 16 in the journal Joule, financial economist and blockchain specialist
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Viden

Nordkoreansk atombombe flytter bjergNordkoreas hidtil kraftigste prøvesprængning var så voldsom, at bjerget Mantap rykkede sig tre meter.
17h
Ingeniøren

Internt rekrutterede chefer er en gevinstInternt rekrutterede er en konkurrencemæssig gevinst, fordi de fastholder vigtig viden, mener formanden for Dansk HR. To ud af tre IDA-medlemmer rekrutteres internt, viser ny undersøgelse.
17h
Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

Astronomers find fastest-growing black hole known in spaceAstronomers have found the fastest-growing black hole known in the universe, describing it as a monster that devours a mass equivalent to our sun every two days.
17h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Supercomputers and space-based laser to help predict extreme weather eventsFrom droughts and forest fires to floods and big freezes, extreme weather events are on the rise. But to what extent are these linked to climate change? Just months before the world's first wind monitoring satellite enters orbit, scientists have finalised a climate model with exceptional resolution, and the new tools will help identify how climate change impacts weather-related natural disasters l
18h
Live Science

Bitcoin Is Sucking Up So Much Energy, It Could Stop Being ProfitableIf bitcoin energy trends continue, mining bitcoin could soon stop being profitable, an economist found.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

British cybersecurity expert heads to court in malware caseA British cybersecurity expert accused of creating and distributing malware designed to steal banking passwords is headed to court for a hearing on what evidence may be used in the case.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

Unusual laser emission from the Ant NebulaAstronomers have discovered an unusual laser emission that suggests the presence of a double star system hidden at the heart of the 'spectacular' Ant Nebula. The extremely rare phenomenon is connected to the death of a star and was discovered in observations made by European Space Agency's Herschel space observatory.
18h
Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

A quantum entanglement between two physically separated ultra-cold atomic cloudsScientists have achieved, in an experiment, quantum entanglement between two ultra-cold atomic ensembles, called Bose-Einstein condensates, spatially separated from each other.
18h
Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

How large can a tsunami be in the Caribbean?The 2004 Indian Ocean tsunami has researchers reevaluating whether a magnitude 9.0 megathrust earthquake and resulting tsunami might also be a likely risk for the Caribbean region, seismologists report.
18h
Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

Exercise beats genetics in determining amount of body fatWith obesity now a global epidemic, there is increased focus on risk factors that contribute to weight gain, especially in postmenopausal women. Although many women may blame genetics for their expanding waistlines, a new study shows that as women age they are more likely to overcome genetic predisposition to obesity through exercise.
18h
Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

Hippo waste causes fish kills in Africa's Mara RiverEcologists have long known that agricultural and sewage pollution can cause low oxygen conditions and fish kills in rivers. A new study reports that hippo waste can have a similar effect in Africa's Mara River, which passes through the world renowned Maasai Mara National Reserve of Kenya, home to more than 4,000 hippos.
18h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Understanding veteran privacy rules could help improve counseling strategiesNow, a researcher at the University of Missouri has found that veterans tend to disclose wartime information on a strict need-to-know basis, and that therapists treating veterans can improve their counseling strategies if they seek to understand veteran privacy rules that are formed by military culture.
18h
TED Talks Daily (SD video)

Scientists must be free to learn, to speak and to challenge | Kirsty Duncan"You do not mess with something so fundamental, so precious, as science," says Kirsty Duncan, Canada's first Minister of Science. In a heartfelt, inspiring talk about pushing boundaries, she makes the case that researchers must be free to present uncomfortable truths and challenge the thinking of the day -- and that we all have a duty to speak up when we see science being stifled or suppressed.
18h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Moving away from plastics: The case of solid body washFor consumers trying to avoid plastics and go "green," solid body wash sold without packaging seems to be a good alternative to wrapped and bottled soaps. But as an article in Chemical & Engineering News (C&EN), the weekly newsmagazine of the American Chemical Society, points out, it's complicated.
18h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

How large can a tsunami be in the Caribbean?The 2004 Indian Ocean tsunami has researchers reevaluating whether a magnitude 9.0 megathrust earthquake and resulting tsunami might also be a likely risk for the Caribbean region, seismologists reported at the SSA 2018 Annual Meeting.
18h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Beef peptides block bitter tastesFrom burgers to steaks, beef has a long history of being a delicious part of dinner. But what if that pleasant experience of eating beef could extend beyond the dinner plate? Now, one group reports in ACS' Journal of Agricultural and Food Chemistry that beef protein, when broken down into peptides, can block bitter taste receptors on the tongue. Such peptides could someday be used to make other fo
18h
Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

Forest loss in one part of US can harm trees on the opposite coastIf a whole forest disappears, new research shows, this has ricocheting effects in the atmosphere that affect vegetation on the other side of the country.
18h
Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

Worm-eating mice reveal how evolution works on islandsWhen animals are isolated on islands, they can evolve into strange new species found nowhere else on Earth. But what's the cut-off -- how small can an island be and still support the evolution of multiple new species from a single common ancestor? A family of worm-eating mice from a tiny island in the Philippines have set a new lower limit for island size and evolution.
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New on MIT Technology Review

The White House’s cybersecurity tsar has been dethroned
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Scientific American Content: Global

EPA's Own Advisory Board Questions "Secret Science" PlanResearchers were not consulted on a proposed rule to restrict the studies used in creating regulations, board members say -- Read more on ScientificAmerican.com
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Science | The Guardian

Jen Sincero says she can make you a badass – has it worked for her millions of readers?The self-help guru’s book You Are a Badass is a bestseller in the US and making waves in the UK. But can her brand of straight-talking positive thinking really help you escape your ‘sucky life’? Fifteen minutes before my interview with inspirational guru Jen Sincero, I nip into a chic boutique in downtown Manhattan, where I am drawn to a pair of conch shell-pink sandals. Exquisite as they are, I
18h
The Atlantic

Book Club Is a Delightful, White Wine–Drenched RompThe appreciably bawdy new comedy Book Club —about a group of well-off, white wine–drinking, 60-something ladies—has a visual moment that’s so jarring, and yet so apt for the experience at hand, that it caused me to gasp aloud in the theater. It has to be seen to be believed, but let me try to describe it: One of our four heroines, the recently widowed Diane (Diane Keaton), is on a date with the d
18h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Understanding drug-resistant gonorrheaCan whole genome sequencing illustrate changes in drug susceptibility of gonorrhea to antimicrobials used for treatment and so help to define more effective treatment regimens? The first study of this kind within an international surveillance program for sexually transmitted infections shows distribution of drug-resistant gonorrhea strains across Europe. The study results are published in an ECDC
18h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News

A simple software error corrected: bittersweet chloroplast genome becomes the modelInformation about the organization and evolution of plastomes is crucial to improve crop plants and to resolve the phylogeny of photosynthetic organisms. In a recent study researchers of the Finnish Museum of Natural History, University of Helsinki, sequenced the plastid genome of a weed called bittersweet (Solanum dulcamara).
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News

An electronic rescue dogETH Zurich scientists have developed the smallest and cheapest ever equipment for detecting people by smell. It could be used in the search for people buried by an earthquake or avalanche.
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Colon cancer -- Targeting tumor cell plasticityCell type switch helps colon cancer evade treatment, a study suggests.
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Glass-forming ability: fundamental understanding leading to smart designResearchers studied the glass-forming ability of two simple systems, establishing the 'thermodynamic interface penalty,' which is an indicator of the extent of the structural difference between a crystal and its melt. The fundamental understanding acquired is expected to lead to physics-driven design of glassy materials, allowing for better control and tailoring, and aiding advances in the manufac
18h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Traditional Chinese medicine is widely used for cardiovascular diseaseIn this Letter to the Editor, the authors comment on a review article which assesses the efficacy and safety of TCM for cardiovascular disease, as well as the pharmacological effects of active TCM ingredients on the cardiovascular system and potential mechanisms.
18h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News

People make different moral choices in imagined versus real-life situationsResearchers often use hypothetical scenarios to understand how people grapple with moral quandaries, but experimental results suggest that these scenarios may not always reflect real-life behavior. The findings, published in Psychological Science, a journal of the Association for Psychological Science, showed that people tend to focus more on the outcome of their decision and less on absolute mora
18h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Beef peptides block bitter tastesFrom burgers to steaks, beef has a long history of being a delicious part of dinner. But what if that pleasant experience of eating beef could extend beyond the dinner plate? Now, one group reports in ACS' Journal of Agricultural and Food Chemistry that beef protein, when broken down into peptides, can block bitter taste receptors on the tongue. Such peptides could someday be used to make other fo
18h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Diagnosing breast cancer with an imaging pillFor women, mammograms are a sometimes uncomfortable, but necessary, annual ritual. But this procedure doesn't always provide accurate results, and it exposes women to X-rays. In a study appearing in ACS' journal Molecular Pharmaceutics, scientists report that they have developed a non-invasive 'disease screening pill' that can make cancerous tumors light up when exposed to near-infrared light in m
18h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News

New nuclear RNA retention activity discoveredGene expression involves mRNA transport from its place of synthesis to the cytoplasm where protein translation occurs. However, many non-coding RNA species do not follow this flow and new data now demonstrate how cells prevent the unwanted export of RNA and instead ensure nuclear degradation.
18h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News

How large can a tsunami be in the Caribbean?The 2004 Indian Ocean tsunami has researchers reevaluating whether a magnitude 9.0 megathrust earthquake and resulting tsunami might also be a likely risk for the Caribbean region, seismologists reported at the SSA 2018 Annual Meeting.
18h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Plug-and-play diagnostic devicesResearchers at MIT's Little Devices Lab have developed modular blocks that can be put together in different ways to produce diagnostic devices. These 'plug-and-play' devices can test blood glucose levels in diabetic patients or detect viral infection, among other functions.
18h
The Atlantic

Trump's Path to Immigration Restriction Runs Through AmnestyPresident Trump is furious over the failure of his administration to bring unauthorized migration to an end. At a recent cabinet meeting, he reportedly shouted at Kirstjen Nielsen, the homeland security secretary, blaming her for the fact that after a lull in unlawful border-crossings during the first year of his presidency, when many potential migrants were deterred by his fierce rhetoric, the n
18h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News

A quantum entanglement between two physically separated ultra-cold atomic cloudsMembers of the Department of Theoretical Physics and History of Science of the UPV/EHU's Faculty of Science and Technology together with researchers from the University of Hannover have achieved, in an experiment, quantum entanglement between two ultra-cold atomic ensembles, called Bose-Einstein condensates, spatially separated from each other.
18h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Moving away from plastics: The case of solid body washFor consumers trying to avoid plastics and go 'green,' solid body wash sold without packaging seems to be a good alternative to wrapped and bottled soaps. But as an article in Chemical & Engineering News (C&EN), the weekly newsmagazine of the American Chemical Society, points out, it's complicated.
18h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News

A laser from a space antAn international team of astronomers have discovered an unusual laser emission that suggests the presence of a double star system hidden at the heart of the 'spectacular' Ant Nebula.The extremely rare phenomenon is connected to the death of a star and was discovered in observations made by European Space Agency's Herschel space observatory.
18h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Working or protestingThe higher the unemployment rates in Western European countries, the more likely it is that socio-political destabilization will occur. At the same time, the highest levels of unemployment in Eastern European countries are accompanied by anti-government protests of very low intensity. These conclusions have been made by experts at the Higher School of Economics in the paper 'Unemployment as a pred
18h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News

New study reveals how electronic health records can benefit clinical trialsA new study by Swansea University academics has indicated that the Secure Anonymised Information Linkage (SAIL) Databank can provide a simple, cost-effective way to follow-up after the completion of randomized controlled trials (RCTs).
18h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Exercise beats genetics in determining amount of body fatWith obesity now a global epidemic, there is increased focus on risk factors that contribute to weight gain, especially in postmenopausal women. Although many women may blame genetics for their expanding waistlines, a new study shows that as women age they are more likely to overcome genetic predisposition to obesity through exercise. Study results are published online today in Menopause, the jour
18h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Hydrogen peroxide assists sexual reproduction in sprucePlant physiologists from MSU proved for the first time that dangerous reactive oxygen species that are often considered as by-products of energy generation in cells, are required by the conifers to fertilize the egg cell. Experiments with pollen of blue spruce (Picea pungens) helped to find a protein that makes the whole system work. The scientists believe that the obtained data will lead to the o
18h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News

A shipwreck and an 800-year-old 'made in China' label reveal lost historyNearly a thousand years ago, a ship sank in the Java Sea near Indonesia. Cargo recovered from the ocean floor -- including the equivalent to a 'Made in China' label on a piece of pottery -- is helping archaeologists reevaluate when the ship went down and how it fits in with China's history.
18h
Futurity.org

What 6 years of exercise (or sitting) mean for heart failure riskMiddle-aged people who bump their weekly exercise up to recommended levels over as little as six years may significantly decrease their risk of heart failure, a study finds. Conversely, as little as six years without physical activity in middle age is linked to an increased risk of the cardiac disorder, which affects an estimated 5 million to 6 million Americans. Researchers analyzed self-reporte
18h
Scientific American Content: Global

It's That Dress Again, but Now for Your EarsIn February 2015 a viral internet image of a dress took the world by storm. Now there’s new illusion—for the ears—that speaks to each of us each in different ways: The... -- Read more on ScientificAmerican.com
18h
Ingeniøren

Verdens hurtigste vandvarmer bringer vand i eksotisk tilstandPå mindre end 75 femtosekunder bringes vand fra flydende tilstand til plasma med en temperatur på 100.000 grader.
18h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Soho's 'unique' sexual character should be preserved, say researchersThe unique, cosmopolitan sexual character of London's Soho should be preserved in the face of gentrification, a new study argues.
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Futurity.org

‘Odors’ from skin indicate malaria, even without symptomsNew research identifies odor profiles typical of people with acute or asymptomatic malaria infections. The work is a first promising step towards a low-cost diagnostic test for use in developing countries. Every year, malaria infects more than 200 million people worldwide, claiming several hundred thousand victims. Children are particularly vulnerable, with 90 percent of the victims under the age
19h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

A shipwreck and an 800-year-old 'made in China' label reveal lost historyCenturies ago, a ship sank in the Java Sea off the coast of Indonesia. The wooden hull disintegrated over time, leaving only a treasure trove of cargo. The ship had been carrying thousands of ceramics and luxury goods for trade, and they remained on the ocean floor until the 1980s when the wreck was discovered by fishermen. In the years since, archaeologists have been studying artifacts retrieved
19h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

A warm spring and early summer improve the nesting success of northern songbirdsA recent study based on long-term Finnish monitoring data indicates that small birds produce more offspring after warm springs and summers. Cold weather means there are fewer insects to eat while reducing the chances of nesting twice in one summer and increasing the risk of exposure for the young.
19h
The Atlantic

How Rhetoric on the Left Fuels Bigotry on the RightFew questions divide opponents of President Donald Trump more than this one: Should those who hope to defeat the president exercise more care in how they talk about the American right to avoid fueling the most bigoted strains of populism? Lots of liberals think so. Dozens of variations on that advice appear in books, newspaper op-eds, magazine articles, lectures, and conversation threads on socia
19h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Mutation discovered to protect against Alzheimer's disease in miceResearchers at the RIKEN Center for Brain Science have discovered a mutation that can protect against Alzheimer's disease in mice. Published in the scientific journal Nature Communications, the study found that a specific mutation can reduce the characteristic accumulation of the amyloid-beta peptide that occurs.
19h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Artificial intelligence improves stroke and dementia diagnosis in most common brain scanMachine learning has detected one of the commonest causes of dementia and stroke, in the most widely used form of brain scan (CT), more accurately than current methods.
19h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Tailor-made synthesis of cyclic chemicals by means of enzymesPenicillin-based antibiotics contain a five-membered hydrocarbon cycle, additionally incorporating a sulfur and a nitrogen atom. Nadine Zumbrägel, doctoral student at the Chair of Organic Chemistry I at Bielefeld University, has succeeded in selectively synthesizing this important substructure with different residues on this cycle using a biotechnological method.
19h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Apatite-type materials without interstitial oxygens show high oxide-ion conductivity by overbondingScientists in Japan have shown the overbonding of channel oxygens in La-rich apatite-type lanthanum silicates, rather than the presence of the interstitial oxygens, to be responsible for the high oxide-ion conductivity.
19h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Pay-backs to Africa from the Paris Agreement's temperature targetsScientsits investigate potential benefits to Africa of limiting global warming to 1.5°C instead of 2°C. The study suggests that continued efforts to limit warming to 0.5 °C lower than 2°C offer substantial paybacks in terms of reducing heat extremes and their associated socio-economic impacts across Africa
19h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Scientists' new way to identify microscopic worm attacking coffee cropsThe plants which produce one of the most popular drinks in the world, coffee, are targeted by a microscopic worm, but scientists are fighting back. An underestimated problem in coffee farming, the parasite has been found in soil samples across the coffee growing world thanks to a new and quick detection method.
19h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Soho's 'unique' sexual character should be preserved, say researchersThe unique, cosmopolitan sexual character of London's Soho should be preserved in the face of gentrification, a new study argues.
19h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Researchers take key step toward growing human organs in laboratoryResearchers have learned that precursor cells for skeletal muscles actually also give rise to neurons, blood vessels, blood cells and immune cells, pushing science one step closer to generating body parts in a laboratory.
19h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Per-capita end-of-life spending is decreasing rapidly, according to new studyContrary to other recent studies, researchers from The Dartmouth Institute and Dartmouth-Hitchcock Medical Center find that end-of-life spending has been decreasing and contributing to the overall moderation of Medicare spending growth
19h
Feed: All Latest

The Physics of NASA's New Mars HelicopterNeedless to say, this coaxial, self-powered chopper is *not* your traditional helicopter.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Bill Gates gives $44M to influence state education plansBillionaire philanthropist Bill Gates saw an opportunity with a new federal education law that has widespread repercussions for American classrooms.
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Dagens Medicin

Hun afdramatiserede AIDSMINDEORD. Lone de Neergaard var en af de mest indflydelsesrige embedsmænd og en god kommunikator, der bl.a. bidrog væsentligt til at håndtere indsatsen over for AIDS, fortæller en daværende kollega, Else Smith.
19h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

US spacewalkers swap, check coolers 'Leaky' and 'Frosty' (Update)A pair of American astronauts began a spacewalk outside the International Space Station Wednesday to swap and check on two external cooling boxes, nicknamed "Leaky" and "Frosty," NASA said.
19h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

PNNL successfully vitrifies three gallons of radioactive tank wasteIn a first-of-its-kind demonstration, researchers at the Department of Energy's Pacific Northwest National Laboratory have vitrified low-activity waste from underground storage tanks at Hanford, immobilizing the radioactive and chemical materials within a durable glass waste form.
19h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Scientists' new way to identify microscopic worm attacking coffee cropsThe plants which produce one of the most popular drinks in the world, coffee, are targeted by a microscopic worm, but scientists are fighting back.
19h
BBC News - Science & Environment

Stephen Hawking thanksgiving service public ballot closesMore than 27,000 people applied for 1,000 public places at the scientist's Westminster Abbey service.
19h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Global 2 degrees C rise doubles population exposed to multiple climate risks compared to 1.5 degrees CNew research identifying climate vulnerability hotspots has found that the number of people affected by multiple climate change risks could double if the global temperature rises by 2°C, compared to a rise of 1.5°C.
19h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Ancient human remains unearthed by archaeologistAn ANU archaeologist has hailed her excavation of a Bronze Age burial mound in south west England a huge success with the discovery of an intact 4,000 year old human cremation as well as evidence of unaccountable activity from the medieval period on the same site.
19h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Unusual laser emission in the Ant Nebula suggests hidden double star systemAn international team of astronomers have discovered an unusual laser emission that suggests the presence of a double star system hidden at the heart of the "spectacular" Ant Nebula.
19h
Popular Science

You might not actually need a new computer. Try these upgrades first.DIY Give new life to an old machine. When your old computer starts slowing down, you don't have to spend big on a new one. First, try to boost its performance with one of these affordable upgrades.
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The Scientist RSS

Huge Gender Disparity in Cancer Research Funding in U.K.Men received both more and larger grants than women did, ending up with three times as much funding on average.
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The Atlantic

The 99% Is a Myth—Here's How It Breaks DownWhen it comes to the division of wealth, many Americans believe that the country is split between the 1%, which possesses a significant share of the country’s money, and the 99%, or “the people.” In reality, The Atlantic writer Matthew Stewart argues, 9.9% of the population comprises America’s new aristocracy, which often “takes wealth out of productive activities and invests it in walls.” But th
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

New way to stimulate cellular recycling processIn research that could lead to future therapies for age-related diseases, researchers have found a new way to stimulate the process by which cells recycle their spare parts.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

National trial: EEG brain tests help patients overcome depressionA new study found that measuring electrical activity in the brain can help predict a patient's response to an antidepressant.
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News

What is the economic impact of malaria for a pregnant woman living in an endemic area of Colombia?Although malaria treatment is free of charge in Colombia, the economic costs incurred by pregnant women seeking care are considerable (mainly due to transportation and time lost), according to a new study led by ISGlobal.
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Small birds almost overheat while feeding their youngFor decades, researchers have thought that access to food determined the brood size of birds. Now, biologists at Lund University in Sweden have discovered a completely new explanation: the body temperature of small birds can increase by more than 4°C to exceed 45°C when they are feeding their young. Larger broods would require more work, resulting in even higher body temperatures -- something the
19h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News

World's strongest bio-material outperforms steel and spider silkAt DESY's X-ray light source PETRA III, a team led by Swedish researchers has produced the strongest bio-material that has ever been made. The artificial, but biodegradable cellulose fibers are stronger than steel and even than dragline spider silk, which is usually considered the strongest bio-based material. The team headed by Daniel Söderberg from the KTH Royal Institute of Technology in Stockh
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Alcohol use before lung transplant increases time in hospital and on ventilatorLung transplant patients who showed evidence of alcohol use before their transplants spent more time in the hospital and on the ventilator, according to a Loyola University Chicago study. Researchers said abstaining from alcohol before transplant could improve outcomes.
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News

C'mon get happy: Upbeat songs by female singers dominate the charts, UCI study findsRoll over, Beethoven. Elvis Presley too. Female singers with upbeat dance songs are far more likely to make the bestseller music charts, according to new findings by University of California, Irvine researchers. Yet the number of happy songs has declined in recent years, while more negative tunes are increasing.
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BBC News - Science & Environment

Copy of BepiColombo Mercury mission goes on displayLondon's Science Museum unveils a replica of the probe Europe will send to the inner-most planet.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Entomologist explains why you shouldn't kill spiders in your homeI know it may be hard to convince you, but let me try: Don't kill the next spider you see in your home.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Small birds almost overheat while feeding their youngFor decades, researchers have thought that access to food determined the brood size of birds. Now, biologists at Lund University in Sweden have discovered a completely new explanation: the body temperature of small birds can increase by more than 4°C to exceed 45°C when they are feeding their young. Larger broods would require more work, resulting in even higher body temperatures—something the bir
19h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Tailor-made synthesis of cyclic chemicals by means of enzymesPenicillin-based antibiotics contain a five-membered hydrocarbon cycle, additionally incorporating a sulfur and a nitrogen atom. Nadine Zumbrägel, doctoral student at the Chair of Organic Chemistry I at Bielefeld University, has succeeded in selectively synthesizing this important substructure with different residues on this cycle using a biotechnological method. The targeted design of such struct
19h
Live Science

What's Next for Exoplanet Searches? Live Science Talks with Astrophysicist Sara SeagerHow will we know when we've found another Earth?
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BBC News - Science & Environment

Switzerland to vote on pesticide ban 'in 3 years'Campaigners force a referendum on the future use of synthetic pesticides in Switzerland.
19h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Self-propelled mindless tiny robots work together to move a corralA team of researchers at the University of Bordeaux in France has found that tiny, mindless robots are able to work together to move a corral. In their paper published in the journal Physical Review Letters, the group describes their experiments and what they found.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Salmon delivered by hyperloop and mail by drone?Developments in technology will leave their mark on Norwegian roads. More advanced IT systems make self-driving cars possible, as well as drones that can deliver parcel post – with built-in intelligence. Hyperloop technology is not just fantasy: this means of transport, based on very low air pressure and induction technology, can become a reality. Test circuits are being planned at several locatio
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Some tropical frogs may be developing resistance to a deadly fungal disease – but now salamanders are at riskMy office is filled with colorful images of frogs, toads and salamanders from around the world, some of which I have collected over 40 years as an immunologist and microbiologist, studying amphibian immunity and diseases. These jewels of nature are mostly silent working members of many aquatic ecosystems.
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Dagens Medicin

Ny professor forsker i biologisk støvSpeciallæge Vivi Schlünssen skal i sit nye professorat undersøge, hvordan miljø påvirker menneskers sundhed og sygdom.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Sending out an SOS for the solitary spider monkeyA female northern muriqui – one of the world's most critically endangered primates – has been discovered living in complete isolation in a forest fragment no bigger than a football field.
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Recent trends of marriage in IranData about marriages in Iran points to the declining number of formal (arranged) marriages in recent decades despite strong cultural and religious traditions favoring such marriages.
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Main regularities of thermal expansion and thermal stability of layered ferroelectrics establishedThe scientists of the Lobachevsky University and the Institute of Low Temperatures and Structural Research in Wroclaw, Poland, conducted unique studies of oscillation properties using modern methods of optical spectroscopy.Bismuth-containing layered perovskites, first described by Aurivillius, have recently received researchers' increasing attention. Lobachevsky University scientists have obtained
19h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Global 2 degrees C rise doubles population exposed to multiple climate risks compared to 1.5 degrees CNew research identifying climate vulnerability hotspots has found that the number of people affected by multiple climate change risks could double if the global temperature rises by 2 degrees C, compared to a rise of 1.5 degrees C.
19h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News

How humans repress prejudicesBochum-based philosopher Dr. Beate Krickel has used psychoanalysis to investigate why people are often not aware of their prejudices. In her accounts, she has been elaborating how prejudices can become unconscious. As researcher at the Institute of Philosophy II at Ruhr-Universität Bochum, she outlines her theory in the journal Philosophical Psychology from May 15, 2018.
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Predicting what drives people to seek, stay in substance-use treatmentAbout 22 million Americans are substance dependent, yet only 2.5 million seek treatment. Reviewing 5,443 records of adult substance use treatment clients, a new study examined treatment readiness, or the characteristics that are likely to promote treatment engagement, to predict who seeks and stays in treatment. Results show that white and black race, being male, lower levels of education, and bei
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Cell type switch helps colon cancer evade treatment, study suggestsResearchers in Germany have discovered that colon cancers are often resistant to existing drug treatments because they are composed of two different cell types that can replace each other when one cell type is killed. The study, which will be published May 16 in the Journal of Experimental Medicine, suggests that combination therapies targeting both cell types at once may be more effective at trea
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Almost everything you know about e-waste is wrongMany of us think we know what electronic waste is because we wonder what to do with devices we no longer want or need.
20h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

A brief history of immersion, centuries before VRImmersive experiences are fashionable at the moment, as virtual reality finally emerges into the mainstream with headsets now commercially available. But immersion is a technique much older than technology. It is the key to storytelling, in literature, film, videogames, even in the spoken stories told by our ancestors around the campfire. We are taken in by the experience: we become so involved wi
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Research shows how 'navigational hazards' in metro maps confuse travellersSome features in metro maps cause passengers to make substantial mistakes in journey planning, but it may be possible to detect and rectify these with automated software, research being conducted at the University has indicated.
20h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Dramatic decline of insects affects Netherlands, tooScientific research commissioned by Natuurmonumenten shows that the number of insects is declining dramatically in the Netherlands. Measurements and analyses in recent decades show a decline of 54 percent (ground beetles) and 72 percent (ground beetles) in nature reserves. This represents a dramatic fall in these groups of insects, which is in line with the results of recent German, French, Englis
20h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

New technique reveals details of forest fire recoveryDo you know someone who's so caught up in the details of a problem that they "can't see the forest for the trees?" Scientists seeking to understand how forests recover from wildfires sometimes have the opposite problem. Conventional satellite systems that survey vast tracts of land burned by forest fires provide useful, general information, but can gloss over important details and lead scientists
20h
New Scientist - News

Your social media data is out there, just waiting to be leakedSo much social media data has been siphoned off and stored in the name of research that questions over its security were only a matter of time, says Paul Marks
20h
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How 'Fortnite,' a 'Gamer's Game,' Took Over the WorldEpic's free-to-play battle royale title defies all conventional wisdom about crossover gaming success.
20h
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Jigsaw's Project Shield Will Protect Campaigns From Online AttacksProject Shield already defends journalists and human rights groups from DDoS attacks. Now, Jigsaw will help political campaigns out as well.
20h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

There are no age restrictions for gambling in video games, despite potential risks to childrenAccording to a 2018 report by Digital Australia, 97% of Australian households with children have at least one device for playing video games. More than 60% of households have five or more devices.
20h
New Scientist - News

Push to rid poorer nations of harmful trans fat is long overdueThe World Health Organization has rightly agreed to demand all countries remove artery-clogging trans fat from food, says Geoffrey Webb
20h
The Atlantic

The Lingering Mysteries of a Trump-Russia ConspiracyUpdated on May 16 9:00 a.m. ET. The day after Robert Mueller was appointed special counsel to lead the investigation into Russia’s election interference, it seemed to some that President Trump’s “worst nightmare” had come true. A year and nearly 20 indictments later, there’s no sign it’s winding down. Dozens of dizzying developments and near-daily news alerts have bolstered both Mueller’s critics
20h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Adapted polymer offers plant-based protection from the sun's harmful raysLignin, the natural polymer that gives tree trunks their strength, could be the source of a new range of skincare products, new research suggests.
20h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

An argument for calm about robots, artificial intelligence, and jobs"Superminds" aren't new. But with the support of computers they can do a lot more. An MIT Sloan expert on collective intelligence says that's a good thing.
20h
The Scientist RSS

Image of the Day: Lego MicroscopyWith open-source software and Lego hardware, researchers have created a low-cost, automated method for cellular fluorescence microscopy.
20h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

A Quiet Place: the science behind how filmmakers made aliens hear using distractions and deviant soundsBy now, you may have heard about highly rated film A Quiet Place. This excellent thriller is set in the near future, a time when almost all humans are dead, and those left alive are hiding from alien reptilian creatures who have poor eyesight but incredibly sensitive hearing. "If they hear you, they hunt you," we are told.
20h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Call for the public to help wildlife conservation by monitoring mammals with new appThe country's national voice for mammals has launched its new Mammal Mapper app today.
20h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

The charts may be getting sadder but popular music has never been more variedIn 1985, the best selling song in the UK was Jennifer Rush's The Power of Love. Thirty years later, it was Uptown Funk, by Mark Ronson, featuring Bruno Mars. From soft-rock power ballad to dance track, these were two very different chart toppers.
20h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Coffee adulteration uncovered using new methodResearchers from the Quadram Institute have developed a new technique to distinguish between superior Arabica coffee and cheaper, lower quality Robusta.
20h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

The chloroplast genome sequence of bittersweetInformation about the organization and evolution of plastomes is crucial to improve crop plants and to resolve the phylogeny of photosynthetic organisms. In a recent study researchers of the Finnish Museum of Natural History, University of Helsinki, sequenced the plastid genome of a weed called bittersweet (Solanum dulcamara).
20h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Rapid diagnostic test for bovine mastitis on the horizonAbingdon Health, a tenant at the University of Birmingham's bio-incubator, is developing a rapid diagnostic test for bovine mastitis, a common and serious health problem in dairy cows, which has an estimated £14-23 billion impact on the global dairy industry.
20h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Green crab predation identified as cause of Maine clam declineJuvenile soft-shell "steamer" clams are not surviving to adulthood due to high levels of predation, according to Brian Beal, a professor of marine ecology at the University of Maine at Machias and director of research at the nonprofit Downeast Institute (DEI), who partnered with the Maine Clammers Association to conduct the research.
20h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Are Rossby waves to blame for Earth's magnetic field drifting westward?A doctoral student at the University of Cambridge has come up with a possible explanation for the westward drift of the Earth's magnetic field. In his paper published in Proceedings of the Royal Society A, O.P. Bardsley suggests it may be due to Rossby waves generated in the Earth's core.
20h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Activism changing museums for better, researcher saysFor years, Canadian Indigenous communities were allowed little say in how their cultural representations – artifacts and paintings, for example – were displayed in the country's museums. With few Indigenous curators on staff, museums often kept items taken from communities and displayed them with no regard to permission, context or, in many cases, accuracy.
20h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Does evolution make us or are we just drifting that way?Evolution may be responsible for a range of complex traits, including height and waist-to-hip ratio, and diseases such as schizophrenia, research from The University of Queensland shows.
20h
Scientific American Content: Global

5 Ways Technology Is Making Us AnxiousSavvy Psychologist, Dr. Ellen Hendriksen, weighs in on five ways technology feeds anxiety -- Read more on ScientificAmerican.com
20h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Scientists predict number of undiscovered mammal speciesThere are probably 303 species of mammals left to be discovered by science, most of which are likely to live in tropical regions, according to a predictive model developed by a team of University of Georgia ecologists. Their research, recently published in Ecology and Evolution, could guide efforts to find and conserve these as-yet unknown species.
20h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Size-based standards incentivize automakers to increase size of cars, study findsAs the Trump administration weighs how to revise fuel economy standards, a new study finds footprint-based rules are less effective and more costly than a flat standard with credit trading.
20h
Big Think

The biggest European festival on the future will tackle tough questions once againScientists, artists, writers, and entrepreneurs will tackle the most exciting and controversial topics shaping our future at Brain Bar Budapest, Hungary’s most inspiring event. Read More
20h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Willow flycatchers, already an endangered species, also imperiled by climate changeThe southwestern willow flycatcher is facing serious environmental challenges.
20h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Fossil record reveals changes in Earth's movement and rotationProfessor James Crampton from Victoria University's School of Geography, Environment, and Earth Sciences worked with a research team from GNS Science and the Universities of Wisconsin, California Riverside, and Chicago to examine the fossils of graptoloids, an extinct type of plankton that floated in ancient oceans. They found evidence that regular changes in the Earth's orbit and axis of rotation
20h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Opinion: Lift-off finally imminent for Australia's new space agencyDetails of Australia's new space agency were released on Monday with the federal government's response to the Report on the Review of Australia's Space Industry Capability.
20h
Popular Science

What’s the difference between indoor and outdoor allergies?Allergic Reaction The allergy aisle can be confusing. The allergy aisle is filled with products purporting to be your springtime savior. “All day relief!” “Non-drowsy!” “Indoor and outdoor!” But wait, hang on—are indoor and…
20h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

New tool can help researchers identify enzymes in microbiomesFor researchers studying the possible connections between human health and the trillions of microbes that inhabit our digestive tract, what makes the work so exciting is also what makes it challenging.
21h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Technology turns smartphones into on-the-spot detectors for foodborne illnesses, other dangerous contaminantsPurdue University researchers have developed detection technology that allows a typical smartphone to analyze produce for foodborne pathogens such as E. coli O157:H7, which has been linked to a deadly outbreak in romaine lettuce.
21h
The Atlantic

The One Emoji That Means True LoveThere’s no more universal sign of love than a heart. The traditional red heart has become the default signal of approval on Instagram, Twitter, Tumblr, and countless other apps. According to Apple , the red heart emoji was the second-most popular emoji in 2017, bested only by the crying-laugh face. When Facebook released its emoji data last year, hearts were included in three of the top six emoji
21h
The Atlantic

The 9.9 Percent Is the New American Aristocracy1. The Aristocracy Is Dead … For about a week every year in my childhood, I was a member of one of America’s fading aristocracies. Sometimes around Christmas, more often on the Fourth of July, my family would take up residence at one of my grandparents’ country clubs in Chicago, Palm Beach, or Asheville, North Carolina. The breakfast buffets were magnificent, and Grandfather was a jovial host, al
21h
Feed: All Latest

It Takes a Single Autonomous Car to Prevent Phantom Traffic JamsNew research shows that the presence of just one connected, automated car can smooth traffic for everyone.
21h
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Marfa, Texas Is Getting Its Own Solar-Powered StonehengeEnglish artist Haroon Mizra is recreating an ancient archeological "stone circle" in Marfa—and adding a modern twist.
21h
Scientific American Content: Global

Maria Agnesi, the Greatest Female Mathematician You've Never Heard ofBorn 300 years ago this month, Agnesi was the first woman to write a mathematics textbook and to be appointed to a university chair in math -- Read more on ScientificAmerican.com
21h
Futurity.org

Tiny robotic fly gets power from laser beamA new kind of robotic fly, called RoboFly, receives power from a laser beam. This cuts the cord between the robot and the ground and lets it take off on its own. “Before now, the concept of wireless insect-sized flying robots was science fiction.” Insect-sized flying robots could help with time-consuming tasks like surveying crop growth on large farms or sniffing out gas leaks. These robots soar
21h
Live Science

Earliest Version of Our Alphabet Possibly DiscoveredA 3,400-year-old piece of limestone may hold the earliest example of our alphabet sequence.
21h
Science | The Guardian

Like Tessa Jowell, I have a brain tumour. I hope her death inspires new research | Jessica MorrisIt’s hard to attract research funding for this complex disease, with a mountain of patient experience going undocumented Many people are grieving the untimely death of Tessa Jowell . She was an exceptional person. Tony Blair confirmed the impression she gave to those of us who only knew her from afar: “Tessa had passion, determination and simple human decency in greater measure than any person I
21h
New Scientist - News

Laser can detect your heartbeat and breathing from a metre awayA laser device can monitor vital signs such as your heartbeat, breathing rate, and muscle activity - all without wires
21h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

A pale blue dot, as seen by a CubeSatNASA's Voyager 1 took a classic portrait of Earth from several billion miles away in 1990. Now a class of tiny, boxy spacecraft, known as CubeSats, have just taken their own version of a "pale blue dot" image, capturing Earth and its moon in one shot.
21h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Edmunds examines 3 semi-autonomous driving systemsYou've heard of Tesla Autopilot, but perhaps not always in a good way: The semi-autonomous driving system is now under investigation by the National Transportation Safety Board for the role it may have played in a March fatal accident near Mountain View, California.
22h
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Is This Stem-Cell Clinic Really Making Cancer Vaccines?In a Facebook Live video, the CSO of one of the largest networks of stem-cell clinics in the country touted a new, unregulated treatment.
22h
Feed: All Latest

RAVPower Wireless Charger Deal: Save 30 PercentGrab a discount on RAVPower's fast, beautiful wireless chargers until the end of May.
22h
The Atlantic

Dear Therapist: My Adult Daughter Thinks I Was an Awful ParentEditor’s Note: Every Wednesday, Lori Gottlieb answers questions from readers about their problems, big and small. Have a question? Email her at dear.therapist@theatlantic.com . Dear Therapist, My 32-year-old daughter has developed the idea that I am responsible for all her failures—not having the job she wanted, not being a sociable person, not being capable to love and to be loved. She also feel
22h
The Atlantic

A Mother Wants the Internet to Forget Italy's Most Viral Sex TapeM aria Teresa Giglio has a daily routine of hunting down men who are trying to watch her daughter’s sex tape. She starts by searching the internet for her daughter’s name: Tiziana Cantone. Then she scours websites for photos of Tiziana, and tries to track down back channels or personal pages that still host her videos. One comment she found recently was posted under an article about Tiziana on Fa
22h
Scientific American Content: Global

Extinct in Algeria: Rare Plant Declared LostExhaustive searchers have failed to turn up the lost Algerian species Adenocarpus faurei. Could other plants in the region also be extinct? -- Read more on ScientificAmerican.com
22h
Dagens Medicin

Antibiotika kan øge risikoen for nyrestenIsær blandt børn og unge kan behandling med antibiotika øge risikoen for at udvikle nyresten, viser et studie baseret på journaldata fra lægeklinikker i primærsektoren i Storbritannien.
22h
Live Science

Here's When Puppies Are Most Adorable, According to ScienceThere's no debating it: Puppies are adorable. But is there an age when they reach "peak" cuteness?
22h
Live Science

Why Do Some Fruits and Vegetables Conduct Electricity?Many people may think it's amazing that a simple piece of produce can conduct electricity. As it turns out, that's not the whole story.
22h
Scientific American Content: Global

Cosmic Conflict: Diverging Data on Universe's Expansion Polarizes ScientistsA disagreement between two canonical measures of intergalactic distances could signal a renaissance in physics—or deep flaws in our studies of cosmic evolution -- Read more on ScientificAmerican.com
22h
Dagens Medicin

To nye ydernumre i Odense forsinkes af uenighed om VollsmoseFor første gang i ti år er der nye ydernumre på vej i Odense. Men trods politisk enighed om behovet for flere praksislæger i byen, strides regionspolitikerne om, hvorvidt nye ydernumre skal bindes til Vollsmose.
22h
Dagens Medicin

Læger klar til at overtage nordjysk regionsklinik, men intet svar fra regionenTo læger har søgt om at overtage patienterne i en regionsklinik i Nordjylland, men lægerne har ikke fået svar fra Region Nordjylland.
22h
Dagens Medicin

Helen Bernt Andersen kørt i stilling som formand for Kræftens BekæmpelseFhv. vicedirektør på Rigshospitalet Helen Bernt Andersen er hovedbestyrelsens kandidat til at blive ny formand for Kræftens Bekæmpelse. Hun vil efter alt at dømme blive valgt i forbindelse med repræsentantskabsmødet senere på måneden.
22h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Drug to treat bleeding may benefit some stroke patients, study findsPatients with stroke caused by bleeding on the brain (intracerebral hemorrhage) may benefit from receiving a drug currently used to treat blood loss from major trauma and bleeding after childbirth, an international trial has revealed.
22h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Stroke prevention drug combo shows promise, study saysIf you've had a minor stroke or a transient ischemic stroke (TIA), taking the clot-preventing drug clopidogrel along with aspirin may lower your risk of having a major stroke within the next 90 days, according to new research published in The New England Journal of Medicine.
22h
Ingeniøren

Twitter vil bortcensurere 'forstyrrende' tweetsTwitter offentliggjorde i tirsdags, at de vil begynde at skjule alle tweets fra udvalgte, 'forstyrrende' profiler. Det er en del i nyt initiativ for at gøre Twitter 'sundere'
22h
Ingeniøren

Aarhus Letbane: Vi har en intern plan. Men om den holder, ved vi faktisk ikkeEfterårets forfejlede åbning af Danmarks første letbane står i smerteligt frisk erindring. Derfor afviser selskabet bag banen at sætte dato på åbningen af næste strækning.
22h
Science : NPR

As '13 Reasons Why' Returns, Schools Try To Help Students Who Are Thinking Of SuicideAbout 1 in 5 teens may have contemplated suicide. But new research suggests that schools as a whole can make a difference. (Image credit: Fahmida Azim for NPR)
23h
NYT > Science

Democrats Sharpen Focus as Scott Pruitt Testifies Again on Capitol HillThe E.P.A. administrator made his third congressional appearance in less than a month and appeared unable to deflect some tough questions.
23h
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This Is Ajit Pai, Nemesis of Net NeutralityStar Wars references. Dorky tweets. Goofy videos. FCC chair Ajit Pai just wants to be one of the tech nerds, but he seems to be trying to destroy everything they believe in.
23h
The Atlantic

Can a Lawyer Declare His Client Guilty?On a television lawyer show—take The Good Fight , the best of the genre currently available—a legal case is all about the lawyers. In a typical episode, for example, lawyer Lucca Quinn must prove her client’s innocence, safeguard her job at her law firm, keep up with her pregnancy-related back exercises, win the respect of a tough federal judge, and protect as best she can her relationship with t
23h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Radical closed-wing aircraft design could see greener skies take flightAviation is one of the most environmentally harmful forms of transportation, accounting for 3% of all EU greenhouse gas emissions. But new aircraft designs inspired by the work of an early 20th-century aviation engineer and natural substances such as honeycomb and grass could help to cut the environmental footprint of flying.
23h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

New device for quick and accurate detection of leadA research team from the Department of Chemistry of Hong Kong Baptist University (HKBU) has invented a portable device for one-stop detection of lead concentration in drinking water. The DNA-based device, which works together with a smartphone, can accurately detect lead concentration in less than 10 minutes. Compared with traditional detection methods, it is much quicker, lower in cost, and highl
23h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

3-D images of cancer cells in the body: Physicists present new methodMedical physicists at Martin Luther University Halle-Wittenberg (MLU) have developed a new method that can generate detailed three-dimensional images of the body's interior. These can be used to more closely investigate the development of cancer cells. The research group published its findings in Communication Physics.
23h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Flowing cells in a wavy microchannel for effective size-based cell sortingNearly a half-century ago, scientists noticed that small particles flowing through a long tube can stay at a specific position along the cross-section of a tube. This is known as inertial focusing. Later, along with the development of microfluidic technology in recent decades, inertial focusing, a type of passive microfluidic manipulation technology, has emerged as one of the most powerful and pre
23h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

How far to go for satellite cloud image forecasting into operationCloud is a tracer for a variety of significant weather changes. Cloud images obtained from satellite remote sensing are of great help to weather forecasters in understanding the past and present weather processes in a macroscopic way. Forecasts made directly via satellite cloud images are a major goal of meteorologists and forecasters. Recent studies have shown that it is possible to produce satel
23h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

A new method for studying semiconductor nanoparticles has been testedA team from Siberian Federal University and Kirensky Institute of Physics (Siberian Department of the Russian Academy of Sciences) has developed a new method to study nanoparticles made of cadmium telluride (CdTe). The compound's peculiar interaction with light differs depending on the magnetic field. The results of the study were published in the Physics Letters A journal.
23h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Entangled atoms shine in unisonA team led by Austrian experimental physicist Rainer Blatt has succeeded in characterizing the quantum entanglement of two spatially separated atoms by observing their light emission. This fundamental demonstration could lead to the development of highly sensitive optical gradiometers for the precise measurement of the gravitational field or the Earth's magnetic field.
23h
New Scientist - News

The woman who laughs uncontrollably when others get tickledA woman has a type of synaesthesia that makes her experience huge seizures of uncontrollable laughter whenever she sees someone else getting tickled
23h
Viden

Facebook kan se, om du er til højreekstremisme eller homoseksualitetMens du hygger dig på nettet, skaber Facebook en detaljeret profil om dig - inklusiv private detaljer.
23h
Ingeniøren

Paller, papir og stopur: Sådan kan man også teste produktionscellerDet lyder som Olsen Banden. Men det er hovedingredienserne i et simpelt kravlegårdskoncept, der hjælper Linak med at teste montageflow og ergonomi.
23h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Processes in the atomic microcosmos revealedPhysicists at Friedrich-Alexander-Universität Erlangen-Nürnberg (FAU) have successfully generated controlled electron pulses in the attosecond range. They used optical traveling waves formed by laser pulses of varying wavelengths. The movements of electrons in atoms were revealed using attosecond free-electron pulses. The findings of the researchers from Erlangen have been published in the acclaim
23h
Dagens Medicin

Kræftpatienter bliver behandlet hurtigereDen samlede behandlingstid for kræftpatienter er generelt faldende, viser ny analyse fra Sundhedsdatastyrelsen.
23h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Hippo waste causes fish kills in Africa's Mara RiverEcologists have long known that agricultural and sewage pollution can cause low oxygen conditions and fish kills in rivers. A study published today in Nature Communications reports that hippo waste can have a similar effect in Africa's Mara River, which passes through the world renowned Maasai Mara National Reserve of Kenya, home to more than 4,000 hippos.
23h
Ingeniøren

Australske myndigheder undersøger Googles datahøst fra Android-telefonerOracle beskylder i præsentation for australske myndigheder Google for at høste omkring én gigabyte data om måneden fra Android-brugere, og at sende data om brugeres lokation, selv når placeringstjeneste er slået fra.
23h
Ingeniøren

Regeringens 800 MW-havmøllepark bliver en dværg i europæisk sammenhængDanmark var engang førende på havvind. Nu er Storbritannien og Tyskland langt foran.
23h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Hippo waste causes fish kills in Africa's Mara RiverEcologists have long known that agricultural and sewage pollution can cause low oxygen conditions and fish kills in rivers. A study published today in Nature Communications reports that hippo waste can have a similar effect in Africa's Mara River, which passes through the world renowned Maasai Mara National Reserve of Kenya, home to more than 4,000 hippos.
1d
The Atlantic

Hippos Poop So Much That Sometimes All the Fish DieAt first, Chris Dutton and Amanda Subalusky had no idea why the fish were dying. At a bridge on the border between Kenya and Tanzania, they noticed that whenever the Mara River rose by a few feet, dead fish would wash up on its banks, sometimes in the thousands. Storks, vultures, crocodiles, and hyenas made short work of the carcasses, so “if you weren’t there to see it, you’d never know it was h
1d
The Atlantic

Macron's Upstarts Have Become the EstablishmentPARIS—On a recent evening in Paris’s 10th arrondissement, Cyrille Boulanger, a volunteer for French President Emmanuel Macron’s En Marche (On the Move) movement, was out ringing doorbells. An En Marche pin fastened to the front of his jacket, stacks of questionnaires loaded in his arms, and a broad grin stretched across his face, he went door-to-door, greeting residents with an upbeat “Good eveni
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Dagens Medicin

Sjællands lægevagt skranter stadigTi private udbudsklinikker har takket nej til at indgå i Region Sjællands lægevagtsordning. Dermed er der stadig store problemer med at dække ubesatte vagter i lægevagten.
1d
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Twitter tweak steps up fight against trollsTwitter APITwitter said Tuesday it was stepping up its long-running battle against online trolls, trying to find offenders by looking at "behavioral signals."
1d
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Happiness makes hit songs: studyHit songs today are "happier", more danceable and more likely to be sung by women than songs that fail to make it to the charts, a study into 30 years of musical evolution revealed Wednesday.
1d
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Germany's Flixbus takes on Greyhound with US launchGerman startup Flixbus on Wednesday brought its low-cost, long-distance bus service to the west coast of the United States, launching a direct challenge to America's iconic Greyhound Lines.
1d
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

In Guadeloupe, going green means going bananasYellow is the new green in the French Caribbean archipelago of Guadeloupe.
1d
Ingeniøren

Amerikanske techgiganter i kapløb om fremtidens persondronerBåde Google, Uber og Boeing har meldt sig i kapløbet om persontransport med droner.
1d
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Homeowners scramble as Hawaii volcano spews ash, lavaPatricia Deter moved from Oregon to Hawaii to be closer to her two daughters, but the Kilauea volcano burned down her home only a month after she bought it.
1d
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Call transcript reveals new details in cyber expert's caseBritish cybersecurity expert Marcus Hutchins, once credited with stopping the worldwide WannaCry computer virus, said in a jailhouse phone call that he wrote code for someone who used it for the malware Hutchins is now charged with, according to federal court documents released Tuesday.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Google worker rebellion against military project growsAn internal petition calling for Google to stay out of "the business of war" was gaining support Tuesday, with some workers reportedly quitting to protest a collaboration with the US military.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

How does a one-tonne dino hatch its eggs? CarefullyMost dinosaurs buried their eggs and hoped for the best, but some species—including a few hefty ones—built nests and pampered unhatched offspring much as birds do today, researchers reported Wednesday.
1d
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Football field-sized asteroid to shave by EarthAn asteroid around the size of a football field is expected to zoom by Earth on Tuesday, but at a safe distance, the US space agency said.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Walmart unveils Lord & Taylor site as it tries to go upscaleWalmart, long known for its "everyday low prices" mantra and as a place for basics, wants shoppers to think of it as a source for style and upscale fashion as it tries to reach more affluent customers.
1d
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Greenpeace: Paper giant cut forests during conservation pactGreenpeace has ended a five-year truce with one of the world's largest paper companies, accusing it of cutting down tropical forests in Indonesia during the entire time the two were cooperating on conservation.
1d
BBC News - Science & Environment

Delay for Bloodhound supersonic car's high-speed trialsTesting of the 1,000mph car is pushed back ahead of next year's attempt on the land speed record.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Soon screening near you? Blockchain tech premieres at CannesBlockchain may not be the most glamorous new star at the Cannes festival but experts touting the technology say it will rock the world of film even if the red carpet crowd doesn't know it yet.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

With more refined palates, China's thirst for wine growsChina's growing thirst for wine has spawned a new crop of connoisseurs, inspired prize-winning domestic producers and even attracted a top international tasting competition.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Worm-eating mice reveal how evolution works on islandsAustralia has a bunch of kangaroo species, Madagascar has multiple species of lemurs, the Galapagos Islands have boulder-sized tortoises—islands get lots of cool animals. That's because when animals are isolated on islands, they can evolve into strange new species found nowhere else on Earth. But what's the cut-off—how small can an island be and still support the evolution of multiple new species
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Science | The Guardian

Cringeworthy by Melissa Dahl review – why feeling awkward is good for usThis lively study explains how embracing embarrassing conversations or exposing situations can improve your life I read part of this book in somebody else’s reserved seat on an overbooked train; do train companies have any idea of the anxiety they cause when they suddenly announce that all seat reservations are suspended? As each stop triggered another mortifying conversation about seats, the book
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Ingeniøren

Sundhedsplatformen sænker tempoet markant på sygehusene i Region SjællandSygehusene i Region Sjælland behandler 10 procent færre patienter, efter indførelsen af Sundhedsplatformen oplyser regionsrådsmedlem til Version2.
1d
Ingeniøren

Kryptoforsker efter EFAIL: Stol ikke på PGP-værktøjer til ekstremt følsom kommunikationDet største problem er S/MIME, men PGP-økosystemet er heller ikke til at stole på, mener krypteringsekspert Matt Green i lyset af EFAIL-sårbarhederne.
1d
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Researcher warns China's program 'riskiest environmental project in history'A global expert on infrastructure says that China's plan to crisscross half of the Earth with massive transportation and energy projects is environmentally the riskiest venture ever undertaken.
1d
BBC News - Science & Environment

1,600 IT workers and engineers denied UK visasMore than 1,600 IT specialists and engineers offered jobs in the UK were denied visas between last December and March, BBC News has learned.
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Science | The Guardian

Why are we living in an age of anger – is it because of the 50-year rage cycle?From passive-aggressive notes on ambulance windscreens to bilious political discourse, it feels as though society is suddenly consumed by fury. What is to blame for this outpouring of aggression? A neighbour objected to a young couple from Newcastle being naked in their own home . “We are sick of seeing big bums, big boobs and little willy,” was the core message of the note, crescendoing to: “We
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BBC News - Science & Environment

MPs criticise government clean energy policiesTwo parliamentary committees say ill-thought out policies have driven down clean energy investment.
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Processes in the atomic microcosmos are revealedPhysicists at Friedrich-Alexander-Universität Erlangen-Nürnberg (FAU) have successfully generated controlled electron pulses in the attosecond range. They used optical travelling waves that are formed by laser pulses of varying wavelengths. The movements of electrons in atoms were revealed using attosecond free-electron pulses.
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Nearly a quarter of Ontarians newly prescribed opioids received dose exceeding guidelinesNearly a quarter (23.9 percent) of initial opioid prescriptions in Ontario had a daily dose of more than 50 milligram morphine equivalents (MME), exceeding the suggested dose threshold for opioid prescriptions outlined in North American clinical guidelines, according to a new study from the Institute for Clinical Evaluative Sciences and St. Michael's Hospital.
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Study shows increase in youth suicide attemptsThe number of school-age children and adolescents hospitalized for suicidal thoughts or attempts has more than doubled since 2008, according to a new Vanderbilt-led study published today in Pediatrics.
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Science : NPR

Hospitals See Growing Numbers Of Kids And Teens At Risk For SuicideThe number of children and teens who visited the hospital for suicidal thoughts or attempts doubled from 2008 to 2015. Rates were highest during the school year. (Image credit: arabianEye/Getty Images)
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Ingeniøren

Rapport: Ingeniørfejl bag brokollaps, der kostede ti livTi arbejdere døde, da en pylon på en skråstagsbro under opførelse i Colombia kollapsede. Ny rapport fritager entreprenøren for skyld og konkluderer, at de projekterende ingeniører begik alvorlige fejl.
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Canadian researchers find key players for building and repairing the brainDuring brain development, neural stem cells generate the neurons and glial cells that form the complex network of connections required for proper brain functioning and cognition. Dr. Freda Miller's team in Toronto investigates how brain stem cells accomplish this task during development and seeks to understand why this goes wrong in neurodevelopmental disorders such as autism spectrum disorder. Th
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

Joint resolution: A link between Huntington's disease and rheumatoid arthritisUsing new analytic tools, researchers have decoded the epigenetic landscape for rheumatoid arthritis (RA), a common autoimmune disease that affects more than 1.3 million Americans.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

Making carbon nanotubes as usable as common plasticsBy using an inexpensive, already mass produced, simple solvent called cresol, scientists have discovered a way to make disperse carbon nanotubes at unprecedentedly high concentrations without the need for additives or harsh chemical reactions to modify the nanotubes. In a surprising twist, researchers also found that as the nanotubes' concentrations increase, the material transitions from a dilute
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

Randomized trial finds ibuprofen not a safe alternative to antibiotics for UTIsIbuprofen, given instead of antibiotics to women with uncomplicated urinary tract infection (cystitis), leads to longer duration of symptoms and more serious adverse events related to the spread of the primary infection, according to a new study.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

Some calories more harmful than othersWhile calories from any food have the potential to increase the risk of obesity and other cardiometabolic diseases, nutrition researchers agree that sugar-sweetened beverages play a unique role in chronic health problems.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

Love hurts: Spats with spouse may worsen chronic pain, other symptomsFor patients with chronic conditions like arthritis or diabetes, arguments with a spouse may have physical repercussions, according to researchers. They found that in two groups of older individuals -- one group with arthritis and one with diabetes -- the patients who felt more tension with their spouse also reported worse symptoms on those days.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

Scientists crack how primordial life on Earth might have replicated itselfScientists have created a new type of genetic replication system which demonstrates how the first life on Earth -- in the form of RNA -- could have replicated itself. The scientists say the new RNA utilizes a system of genetic replication unlike any known to naturally occur on Earth today.
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Scientific American Content: Global

Stool-Pigeon Poop Reveals Bird-Racing FoulsRacing pigeons is big business—and doping is common. Now scientists have devised a way to detect doping in the avian athletes. Christopher Intagliata reports. -- Read more on ScientificAmerican.com
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BBC News - Science & Environment

Dinosaur parenting: How the 'chickens from hell' nestedDinosaurs may have used a unique nesting strategy to prevent their eggs from being crushed.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

Taming random gene changes as our bodies start to formScientists exploring how to tame random gene fluctuations as the embryos that become our bodies start to form have identified a control switch in the vertebrate segmentation clock of developing zebrafish. The researchers report their findings could uncover methods for modulating genetic signals to prevent birth defects or cancers rooted at the earliest stages of development.
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Quanta Magazine

A New World’s Extraordinary Orbit Points to Planet NineIn early 2016, two planetary scientists declared that a ghost planet is hiding in the depths of the solar system, well beyond the orbit of Pluto. Their claim, which they made based on the curious orbits of distant icy worlds, quickly sparked a race to find this so-called Planet Nine — a planet that is estimated to be about 10 times the mass of Earth. “It has a real magnetism to it,” said Gregory
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News

CrossFit improves how people with type 2 diabetes can control blood sugar levelsNew research published in Experimental Physiology has suggested a six-week CrossFit™ exercise program can lead to improved control of blood sugar levels and decreased risk of heart disease in people with Type 2 diabetes.
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Researchers uncover genomic info linking extinct giant ground sloth to modern speciesResearchers have uncovered important genomic data from the remains of an ancient giant ground sloth, or Mylodon darwinii, the emblematic creature named after Charles Darwin, whose discovery of fossilized remains in South America is considered to be one of his significant scientific achievements.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Researchers uncover genomic info linking extinct giant ground sloth to modern speciesResearchers have uncovered important genomic data from the remains of an ancient giant ground sloth, or Mylodon darwinii, the emblematic creature named after Charles Darwin, whose discovery of fossilized remains in South America is considered to be one of his significant scientific achievements.
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Futurity.org

This strategy makes financial decisions less painfulNew research offers a few tips for preventing procrastination when it comes to choices about your financial future. We make tough decisions all the time, but choices relating to money send many of us running in the other direction. The science of decision-making offers some explanations for why we do this: We’re befuddled by too many choices, content to defer to our partner, or think we don’t hav
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

Monitoring lava lake levels in Congo volcanoNyiragongo in the Democratic Republic of the Congo is among the world's most active volcanoes, with a persistent lava lake as one of its defining features.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

Different diseases elicit distinct sets of exhausted T cellsThe battle between the human immune system and long-term, persisting infections and other chronic diseases such as cancer results in a prolonged stalemate. Over time battle-weary T cells become exhausted, giving germs or tumors an edge. Using data from multiple molecular databases, researchers have found nine distinct types of exhausted T cells, which could have implications for fighting chronic i
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

First clues to the causes of multiple sclerosisThere is still no cure for multiple sclerosis, with current treatments largely based on managing symptoms, especially accelerating recovery phases following a relapse and reducing the number and severity of relapses. Researchers have now identified a DNA-binding factor called TOX that might play a role in triggering multiple sclerosis. They found that TOX license immune cells to cause autoimmune t
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

Tiny satellite's first global map of ice cloudsLooking at Earth from the International Space Station, astronauts see big, white clouds spreading across the planet. They cannot distinguish a gray rain cloud from a puffy white cloud. While satellites can see through many clouds and estimate the liquid precipitation they hold, they can't see the smaller ice particles that create enormous rain clouds.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

New approach to global-warming projections could make regional estimates more preciseA new method for projecting how the temperature will respond to human impacts supports the outlook for substantial global warming throughout this century - but also indicates that, in many regions, warming patterns are likely to vary significantly from those estimated by widely used computer models.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

Lifting the economy on hawks' wingsWhat can help boost Michigan's economy? American kestrels.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

Impact of weather and well-timed cultural management techniques on organic weed controlWeed management can be a tough challenge in organic cropping systems since growers don't have herbicides in their weed control arsenal. New research, though, shows that weather conditions and well-timed cultural management techniques can help fill the void by making crops more competitive.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

Researchers use LiDAR to locate invasive fish and preserve a national treasureAccording to new research, an aircraft-mounted instrument could offer a faster way to locate and capture the non-native fish at Yellowstone National Park during the brief weeks each year when they come into shallow water to spawn.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

Monitoring the tremble -- and potential fall -- of natural rock archesScientists monitoring the vibrations of natural rock arches have found that the resonant frequencies of arches undergo dynamic changes from day to day, according to new research.
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Live Science

Diwali: Hindu Festival of LightsDiwali is the biggest Hindu festival and most important Hindu holiday of the year.
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NYT > Science

Laurel or Yanny? What We Heard From the ExpertsLaurel Yanny TwitterIt began as a vocabulary word recording. The rest is viral internet history.
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Futurity.org

Gun safety skills disappear when kids find the real thingChildren who participate in gun safety programs often ignore what they learned when they encounter a real firearm, research shows. The report, which appears in Health Promotion Practice , reviewed 10 studies on the effectiveness of strategies for teaching gun safety to children ages 4 to 9. The researchers found that: such programs do not reduce the likelihood that children will handle guns when
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Futurity.org

How melatonin puts you to sleepResearchers have discovered how melatonin suppresses neurons in the brain that keep you awake and alert. Their findings could lead to new therapies for those who suffer from insomnia. “…there is nothing more important than sleep.” An estimated 50 to 70 million Americans have some type of sleep disorder, according to the National Sleep Foundation. Some turn to melatonin supplements to help them fa
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Forest loss in one part of US can harm trees on the opposite coastIf a whole forest disappears, new research shows, this has ricocheting effects in the atmosphere that affect vegetation on the other side of the country.
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Think chimpanzee beds are dirtier than human ones? Think againChimpanzees (Pan troglodytes) appear to keep tidier sleeping arrangements than humans do. That's one finding of a recent study that evaluated the microbes and arthropods found in the treetop beds that chimpanzees make each night.
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Live Science

Earth's Magnetic Field Is Drifting Westward, and Nobody Knows WhyWeird, slow-moving waves in the planet's core could explain the mysterious drifting.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

IgG antibodies activate blood platelets and contribute to the severity of anaphylaxisWhile it was already known that IgE antibodies can trigger allergic reactions, scientists recently demonstrated that IgG antibodies play an active role in the severity of anaphylactic shock by unexpectedly activating blood platelets.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

Drug companies selling more 'lifestyle,' less 'symptom'More prescription drug commercials are promoting how certain medications can improve a user's lifestyle rather than curing symptoms and the negative emotions connected to their health condition.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

3D images of cancer cells in the bodyMaking tumor cells glow: medical physicists have developed a new method that can generate detailed three-dimensional images of the body's interior. This can be used to more closely investigate the development of cancer cells in the body.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

Prenatal testing of the fetal rhesus factor: Test is reliable, but benefit is unclearThe new noninvasive test, using a blood sample of the pregnant woman, is as reliable as the conventional test using a blood sample of the newborn. Studies on benefit and harm are still lacking.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

Prized data, free and open to allThe first official account of the electronic Rothamsted Archive and what it offers, highlights how this unique historical repository of agricultural and meteorological data, which date back to 1843, is the result of some remarkable forward thinking.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

Expert consensus finds that higher protein intake benefits adult bone healthA new expert consensus has reviewed the benefits and safety of dietary protein for bone health, based on analyses of major research studies.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

Magnetic stimulation dampens brain response to drug cues in addictionIn a study investigating the use of transcranial magnetic stimulation (TMS) for drug addiction, researchers are the first to demonstrate that the noninvasive brain stimulation technique can dampen brain activity in response to drug cues in chronic alcohol users and chronic cocaine users.
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Latest Headlines | Science News

Here’s how hefty dinosaurs sat on their eggs without crushing themSome heavier dinos had a strategy to keep eggs warm without crushing them: sit in an opening in the middle of the clutch instead of on top of them.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Think chimpanzee beds are dirtier than human ones? Think againChimpanzees (Pan troglodytes) appear to keep tidier sleeping arrangements than humans do. That's one finding of a recent study that evaluated the microbes and arthropods found in the treetop beds that chimpanzees make each night.
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Feed: All Latest

White House Cuts Top Cybersecurity Role as Threats LoomFormer national security officials say the Trump administration's decision to eliminate top cybersecurity policy roles sends the wrong message.
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Live Science

How 3,000-Pound Dinosaurs Sat on Eggs But Didn't Crush ThemImagine a giant, bird-like dinosaur that was so heavy, it weighed as much as a modern-day rhinoceros. Given its heft, how did this bulky, feathered beast sit on its eggs without crushing them to smithereens?
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Futurity.org

Attracting kestrels to orchards could create jobsFierce little raptors called American kestrels can boost the bottom lines of fruit-growing states in their range, research shows. It’s the first study ever to measure regional job creation due to native predators’ regulating services. American kestrels range from Alaska to southernmost South America. They dine on bugs, mammals, and fruit-eating birds. Growers can attract more of these beneficial
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Forest loss in one part of US can harm trees on the opposite coastLarge swaths of U.S. forests are vulnerable to drought, forest fires and disease. Many local impacts of forest loss are well known: drier soils, stronger winds, increased erosion, loss of shade and habitat. But if a whole forest disappears, new research shows, this has ricocheting effects in the atmosphere that can affect vegetation on the other side of the country.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

Astonishing effect enables better palladium catalystsThe taste of the chocolate cake's icing should not depend on whether it is served on a porcelain or a silver plate. Similarly, for chemical reactions on the surface of large precious metal grains, the substrate (the so-called support) should not play a crucial role. Experimental studies led to surprising findings. Chemical processes on palladium grains, which are also used for exhaust gas catalyst
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

Flowing cells in a wavy microchannel for effective size-based cell sortingResearchers have developed a precise microscale manipulation method by rapidly flowing cell suspensions through a specially designed microchannel. This novel microfluidic device enables high-throughput sized-based cell sorting of a large amount of biological samples, which has broad applications in practical biomedical research and pharmaceutical fields.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

Understanding Andean concepts of death and renewalResearch in the Andes has yielded evidence for a complex association between settlement sites and mortuary monuments, tied to concepts of death, ancestor veneration and water.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

Scientists develop method to tweak tiny 'antennae' on cellsScientists say they have found a fast way to manipulate a cell's cilia, the tiny, fingerlike protrusions that 'feel' and sense their microscopic environment. The experiments, performed in mouse cells, may advance scientists' efforts to not only understand how the nano-sized antennae work, but also how to repair them.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

Insurance industry dangerously unprepared for extreme weather, study findsAs historic flooding caused by climate change devastates communities in New Brunswick and British Columbia, new research reveals the insurance industry hasn't considered a changing climate in their practices, putting homeowners at financial risk.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

How the brain decides to make an effortFrom deciding to quit hitting the snooze button and get out of bed in the morning to opting to switch off the TV and prepare for sleep at night, the mind weighs the costs versus benefits of each choice we make. A new study reveals the mechanics of how the brain makes such effortful decisions, calculating whether it is worth expending effort in exchange for potential rewards.
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Popular Science

Yanny vs. Laurel is ‘The Dress of 2018'—but these sound experts think they can end the debate right nowScience We asked some scientists to weigh in on this viral ear-worm. Some hear a deep rich voice saying "Laurel." Others hear a tinny voice delivering "Yanny." Which do you hear? Which is correct? We talked to some scientists who…
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Live Science

Out-of-Sync Biological Clock Could Be Linked to DepressionCould disrupting your body's clock lead to mood disorders?
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Gonorrhea surveillance study maps antibiotic resistance across EuropeThe first European-wide genomic survey of gonorrhea has mapped antibiotic resistance in this sexually transmitted disease throughout the continent. Researchers at the Wellcome Sanger Institute and their collaborators showed that using DNA sequencing data they could accurately determine antibiotic resistance and identify incorrect laboratory test results. Reported in The Lancet Infectious Diseases,
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News

The Lancet Psychiatry: Disruption of the body's internal clock linked with mood disorders and adverse wellbeingDisruption to normal daily circadian rhythms is associated with a greater susceptibility to mood disorders such as severe depression and bipolar disorder over the life course, according to the largest observational study of its kind involving over 91,000 people, published in The Lancet Psychiatry.
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Science | The Guardian

Disruption of daily rhythms linked to mental health problemsPeople with disrupted 24-hour cycles of rest and activity more likely to have mood disorders, research suggests People who experience disrupted 24-hour cycles of rest and activity are more likely to have mood disorders, lower levels of happiness and greater feelings of loneliness, research suggests. While the study does not reveal whether disruptions to circadian rhythms are a cause of mental hea
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The Atlantic

The Atlantic Politics & Policy Daily: Gina Hasvotes-Written by Taylor Hosking ( @Taylor
Hosking ), Lena Felton ( @lenakfelton ), and Elaine Godfrey ( @elainejgodfrey ) Today in 5 Lines Virginia Senator Mark Warner announced his support for President Trump’s pick for CIA director, Gina Haspel, after she sent him a letter clarifying that, in hindsight, the agency’s “enhanced interrogation program is not one the CIA should have undertaken.” Haspel
1d The Atlantic

The Atlantic Daily: The Contemporary World OrderWhat We’re Following Lessons in Governance: President Trump’s withdrawal from the Iran nuclear deal is a major blow to President Obama’s legacy, and it illustrates how easily policies that are driven by executive order can be undone, Eliot A. Cohen writes. Meanwhile, as Trump pledges to find and stop the leaks in his administration, he could look to Bill Clinton’s White House for a model—though T
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The Atlantic

A Linguist Explains Why 'Laurel' Sounds Like 'Yanny'Listen to this recording. Before you go any further, just listen to it. What do you hear?! Yanny or Laurel pic.twitter.com/jvHhCbMc8I — Cloe Feldman (@CloeCouture) May 15, 2018 Late Monday night, this tweet was posted by a 20-year-old Instagram “influencer” named Cloe Feldman. It appears to be a screengrab of a poll that also appears on Feldman’s Instagram account (although the Instagram version
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Futurity.org

Is tolerating TB a better way to go than resisting it?Researchers have discovered that rather than fighting to resist tuberculosis, the body’s tolerance to the bacteria causing TB, Mycobacterium tuberculosis (or Mtb ), is the key mechanism for preventing the spread of the infection. More surprisingly, they found that having excessive levels of T cells, which are known as soldiers of our immune system, could cause more harm than good. Historically, o
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Feed: All Latest

Twitter Will Begin Hiding All Tweets From Suspect AccountsThe social network is taking steps to limit the reach of users that exhibit "troll-like behaviors that distort and detract from the public conversation."
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Popular Science

Probiotics might help your allergies, but we’re still not sure howAllergic Reaction We're still figuring out how the bugs in your gut make you sniffle. While there’s evidence to suggest that the bacteria that live inside our guts play a key role in our immune systems, there’s no evidence that any individual probiotic…
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

Savanna chimpanzees suffer from heat stressAn international team of scientists has studied the physiological parameters of savanna and rainforest chimpanzees and compared their water and energy budgets as well as their stress levels. They found that the stress of maintaining their body temperature is a tremendous burden on chimpanzees living in the savanna.
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iBiology (uploads) on YouTube

David Baltimore (Caltech): Introduction to VirusesDavid Baltimore outlines the sequence of events that led to the Nobel Prize-winning discovery of reverse transcriptase, an enzyme that converts a sequence in an RNA molecule into a sequence in a DNA molecule. https://www.ibiology.org/human-disease/reverse-transcriptase/ Talk Overview: The first video is a shortened version in which Dr. David Baltimore introduces the different types of viruses, an
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iBiology (uploads) on YouTube

David Baltimore (Caltech): Introduction to Viruses and Discovering Reverse TranscriptaseDavid Baltimore outlines the sequence of events that led to the Nobel Prize-winning discovery of reverse transcriptase, an enzyme that converts a sequence in an RNA molecule into a sequence in a DNA molecule. https://www.ibiology.org/human-disease/reverse-transcriptase/ Talk Overview: The first video is a shortened version in which Dr. David Baltimore introduces the different types of viruses, an
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The Scientist RSS

Patient Registries to Bolster Cell- and Gene-Therapy Clinical Trial DataAs the first personalized cell and gene therapies are approved from small clinical trials, researchers propose the creation of publicly accessible databases to pull together real-world results.
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Researcher warns China's program 'riskiest environmental project in history'A global expert on infrastructure says that China's plan to crisscross half of the Earth with massive transportation and energy projects is environmentally the riskiest venture ever undertaken.
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Popular Science

This self-driving car relies on spinning lasers to navigate down rural roadsTechnology MIT is working on autonomous cars that don't need good maps. If you hope to ride in a driverless car someday, chances are that the trip will take place in an urban area. But MIT is focusing on the country.
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Big Think

This AR app from the Red Cross shows you the horrors of war firsthand'Enter the room' is a rare case of an augmented reality app that could genuinely make the world a better place. Read our review here. Read More
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