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Smarter brains run on sparsely connected neuronsThe more intelligent a person, the fewer connections there are between the neurons in his cerebral cortex. This is the result of a study conducted by neuroscientists at Ruhr-Universität Bochum; the study was performed using a specific neuroimaging technique that provides insights into the wiring of the brain on a microstructural level. Together with colleagues from Albuquerque and Berlin, the team
7h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Researchers create a quantum entanglement between two physically separated ultra-cold atomic cloudsMembers of the Department of Theoretical Physics and History of Science of the UPV/EHU's Faculty of Science and Technology together with researchers from the University of Hannover have achieved quantum entanglement between two spatially separated Bose-Einstein condensates, ultra-cold atomic ensembles. Led by Géza Tóth, Ikerbasque Research Professor, the study is published in Science.
11h
Ingeniøren

Overraskelse: Uventet og vedvarende stigning i udledning af CFC-gasserMængden af CFC-gasser i atmosfæren er på retur, men slet ikke i samme omfang som tidligere. Det må skyldes nye udledninger, som forskerne formoder stammer fra det østlige Asien.
7h
Slack
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Researchers mimic comet moth's silk fibers to make 'air-conditioned' fabricIn exploring the optical properties of the Madagascar comet moth's cocoon fibers, Columbia Engineering team discovers the fibers' exceptional capabilities to reflect sunlight and to transmit optical signals and images, and develops methods to spin artificial fibers mimicking the natural fibers' nanostructures and optical properties.
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Hospitalized patients with acute kidney injury have increased risk of heart failureHospitalized patients who experience acute kidney injury face a 44 percent greater risk of heart failure during their first year after leaving the hospital, according to new Kaiser Permanente research published today in the Clinical Journal of the American Society of Nephrology.
6min
Science : NPR

California To Require All New Homes To Have Solar Panels Starting In 2020There will be intended and unintended consequences: lower emissions statewide, lower energy bills and more solar jobs. But the requirement means more expensive homes and may not have as big of an impact as desired.
7min
Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

Materials scientists develop new forming technology: Processing glass like a polymerPure quartz glass is highly transparent and resistant to thermal, physical, and chemical impacts. These are optimum prerequisites for use in optics, data technology or medical engineering. For efficient, high-quality machining, however, adequate processes are lacking. Scientists have developed a forming technology to structure quartz glass like a polymer.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

Photosynthesis involves a protein 'piston'The photosystem I (PSI)-ferrodoxin (Fd) complex is important in electron transfer during photosynthesis, through which plants convert sunlight, carbon dioxide, and water into complex chemicals and oxygen. Scientists have recently crystallized the PSI-Fd complex for the first time. They found that the PSI-Fd complex contained Fd with weak and strong binding states and that Fd binding caused the PSI
8min
Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

Breakthrough in understanding rare lightning-triggered gamma-raysThe Telescope Array detected 10 bursts of downward terrestrial gamma-ray flashes (TGFs) between 2014 and 2016, more events than have been observed in rest of the world combined. They are the first to detect downward TGFs at the beginning of cloud-to-ground lightning, and to show where they originated inside thunderstorms. The array is by far the only facility capable of documenting the full TGF 'f
8min
Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

Faster test for cannabis qualityResearchers have developed a new method of measuring phytocannabinoids -- the primary bioactive molecules in cannabis -- that will lead to faster, safer and more accurate information for producers, regulators and consumers alike.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

Ancient human remains and a mystery unearthedArchaeologists have unearthed an intact 4,000 year old human cremation in clay pottery urn on Cornish site she discovered by accident.
8min
Popular Science

A new Wi-Fi system could help your home network, if companies sign onTechnology The Wi-Fi Alliance wants to standardize home mesh networks. The way Wi-Fi is distributed throughout our abodes is changing.
10min
NYT > Science

Hail Caesar Salad! Romaine Is Safe to Eat AgainFederal health officials say the tainted lettuce is no longer on the shelves or on restaurant menus, because the harvesting season in the Yuma, Ariz., region ended more than a month ago.
22min
EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Morris Animal Foundation study identifies new virus in catMorris Animal Foundation-funded researchers from the University of Sydney have found a previously undiscovered hepadnavirus in an immunocompromised cat, and subsequently in banked samples. The research team published their results today in the prestigious journal Viruses.
27min
EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Single-tablet HIV treatment shows better outcomes over multi-tablet regimenHIV patients on a single-tablet daily regimen had better outcomes than patients taking multiple pills per day, in a study that included a researcher at the Michael E. DeBakey Veterans Affairs Medical Center in Houston.
27min
EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Want to help your child succeed in school? Add language to the math, reading mixA University of Washington study finds that a child's language skills in kindergarten can predict his or her future proficiency in other subjects.
27min
EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Injections for knee osteoarthritis -- 'subtle but significant' impact of revisions in clinical practice guidelinesRecent updates in evidence-based recommendations have led to changes in the use of steroid and hyaluronic acid injection for patients with osteoarthritis of the knee, reports a study in the May 16, 2018 issue of The Journal of Bone & Joint Surgery. The journal is published in partnership in the Lippincott portfolio by Wolters Kluwer.
27min
Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

La Trobe's infection-busting discoveryScientists have shown a protein found in a tobacco plant has the potential to fight life-threatening infectious diseases.
36min
Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

Detecting the shape of laser pulsesResearchers have developed a method to measure the shape of laser pulses in ambient air. Unlike conventional strategies, it is does not require a vacuum environment and can be applied to laser beams of different wavelengths (UV, visible or longer). This patented technique, currently available for technology transfer and commercialization and it is expected to accelerate studies on light-matter int
36min
Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

Smarter brains run on sparsely connected neuronsThe more intelligent a person, the fewer connections there are between the neurons in his cerebral cortex. This is the result of a study conducted by neuroscientists; the study was performed using a specific neuroimaging technique that provides insights into the wiring of the brain on a microstructural level.
36min
Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

The ultrafast dance of liquid waterTypically we consider that water molecules in the liquid state move randomly on ultrafast timescales due to thermal fluctuations. Now, scientists have discovered correlated motion in water dynamics on a sub-100 femtoseconds timescale. This appears as 'caging effects' due to buildup of tetrahedral structures upon supercooling. The results are based on a combination of experimental studies using x-r
36min
Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

The survival of sea birds affected by ocean cyclesIn a general context of climate change, researchers have revealed the impact of ocean cycles, such as the Pacific decadal oscillation and El Niño, on the survival of the Nazca booby. Their research shows for the first time that long cycles directly affect the survival of adult populations.
36min
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Canines born in summer prone to heart disease: studyDogs born during summer months run a higher risk of heart and artery problems, according to a study published Thursday in the journal Scientific Reports.
37min
Science | The Guardian

Spacewatch: China readies for part one of mission to far side of the moonMagpie Bridge relay satellite will communicate with lunar lander to be deployed later in the year China is aiming to launch its new mission to the moon on Monday 21 May. The Chang’e 4 relay satellite will be stationed about 60,000km behind the moon and provide a communications link for a rover that is designed to land and explore the lunar far side, which never faces Earth. The relay satellite ha
40min
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Privatize the International Space Station? Not so fast, Congress tells TrumpUS President Donald Trump's controversial plan to privatize the International Space Station beginning in 2025 has met with strong opposition from lawmakers, including from some in the Republican majority.
49min
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

'Undermatched' students less likely to graduate on time compared to peers"Undermatching" is a term to describe when high-performing students, typically from economically-disadvantaged households, attend less competitive colleges than their qualifications permit.
49min
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Insect gene allows reproductive organs to cope with harmful bacteriaA damaging bacteria with an uncanny ability to pass itself from insect mothers to eggs meets its genomic match in a tiny variety of parasitic wasp, a recent discovery by Associate Professor of Biological Sciences Seth Bordenstein and his team has shown.
55min
Popular Science

Your guide to YouTube Premium, Google One, and all the other stuff Google just renamedTechnology If you rely heavily on Google apps, things might look a little confusing lately. Here's how to navigate all the stuff Google recently renamed.
59min
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Reading histone modifications, an oncoprotein is modified in returnTurning genes on and off is an intricate process involving communication between many different types of proteins that interact with DNA.
1h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Tropical Cyclone 01A forms in northern Indian OceanTropical Cyclone 01A quickly formed in the northern Indian Ocean and strengthened into a tropical storm.
1h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

What bacteria can teach us about combating atrazine contaminationAtrazine, a controversial herbicide introduced to agriculture in the 1950s, has been banned in the European Union but is widely used in the United States and Australia. In the decades that atrazine has been accumulating in agricultural fields, some bacteria in those soils have evolved the ability to take advantage of this nitrogen-rich compound, metabolizing it and using it to grow.
1h
Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

Limiting warming to 1.5 degree C would save majority of global species from climate changeNew research finds that limiting global warming to 1.5 degrees C would save the majority of the world's plant and animal species from climate change. Species across the globe would benefit -- particularly those in Southern Africa, the Amazon, Europe and Australia. Examples of animals to benefit include the critically endangered black rhinoceros. Reducing the risk to insects is important because th
1h
Live Science

These Volunteers Drank E. Coli-Laced Water and Got Diarrhea, for ScienceVolunteers bravely downed a cup of E. coli.
1h
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The Physics of a Tesla Model X Towing a Boeing 787This Dreamliner weighs 130,000 kg—but actually, even a human could pull a full-sized aircraft.
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News

One third of people aged 40-59 have evidence of degenerative disc diseaseResearchers from Hebrew SeniorLife's Institute for Aging Research, and Boston Medical Center have reported that one-third of people 40-59 years have image-based evidence of moderate to severe degenerative disc disease and more than half had moderate to severe spinal osteoarthritis.
1h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Reading histone modifications, an oncoprotein is modified in returnTurning genes on and off is an intricate process involving communication between many different types of proteins that interact with DNA. These communications can go awry, resulting in conditions like cancer. Researchers at the University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center have uncovered an unusual form of cross-talk between proteins that affect gene expression, suggesting new ways of inhibiting m
1h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News

New guidelines to help clinicians manage GSM in women with breast cancerAlthough the genitourinary syndrome of menopause (GSM) is more prevalent in survivors of breast cancer than in other menopausal women, it is commonly undiagnosed and untreated. This led NAMS and ISSWSH to form a multidisciplinary Consensus Panel to develop recommendations for clinicians to manage GSM in women with or at high risk for breast cancer. The recommendations are published online in NAMS'
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News

What bacteria can teach us about combating atrazine contaminationResearchers at the Commonwealth Scientific and Industrial Research Organization of Australia, or CSIRO, are interested in harnessing the bacterial ability to degrade atrazine in order to remediate atrazine-polluted environments. In a new research paper published in the Journal of Biological Chemistry, a team from CSIRO and Australian National University describe previously unknown proteins involve
1h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Study co-authored by UCLA scientists shows evidence of water vapor plumes on Jupiter moonA combination of new modeling techniques and data from the Galileo spacecraft's flyby of Jupiter's icy moon Europa back in 1997 have revealed additional evidence of eruptions of water vapor, or plumes, venting from the moon.
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News

What's trending in fake news? IU tool shows what stories go viral, and if bots are to blameResearchers at the Indiana University Observatory on Social Media have launched upgrades to two tools playing a major role in the fight against the spread of misinformation online.
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Little difference between gun owners, non-gun owners on key gun policiesA new national public opinion survey from the Johns Hopkins Bloomberg School of Public Health finds widespread agreement among gun owners and non-gun owners in their support for policies that restrict or regulate firearms.
1h
Live Science

Wireless 'RoboFly' Looks Like an Insect, Gets Its Power from LasersA new type of flying robot is insect-sized, weighs about as much as a toothpick, and is powered by lasers.
1h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Insect gene allows reproductive organs to cope with harmful bacteriaBordenstein's team studied Nasonia parasitic wasps, which are about the size of a sesame seed, and they serve as one of the best models to dissect and characterize the evolution of insect genomes.
1h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News

'Undermatched' students less likely to graduate on time compared to peersA new University at Buffalo study finds that undermatching -- when high-performing students, often from economically-disadvantaged households, attend less competitive colleges than their qualifications permit -- correlates to another higher education dilemma: delayed graduation. The study shows that students who undermatch are less likely to graduate college within four or six years compared to pe
1h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Stem cell signaling drives mammary gland development and -- maybe -- breast cancerA unique tissue type in many ways, the mammary gland is cloaked in mysteries that scientists puzzle over. In a paper in Science, the University of Pennsylvania's Rumela Chakrabarti and colleagues describe a newly identified connection between mammary stem cells and macrophages, a type of immune cell. The crosstalk between these two cell types is crucial for mammary gland development, and may also
1h
NYT > Science

Trilobites: A Very Hungry Black Hole Is Found, Gorging on StarsAstronomers in Australia say they have discovered a fast-growing black hole swallowing stars in a baby galaxy 12 billion light years from here.
1h
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NASA’s Jim Bridenstine Agrees Humans Are Responsible for Climate Change“We are putting [carbon dioxide] into the atmosphere in volumes we haven’t seen before," said NASA's new administrator. "We are responsible for it.”
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The Atlantic

Trump’s NASA Chief: 'I Fully Believe and Know the Climate Is Changing'The new administrator of NASA held a town hall Thursday at the agency’s headquarters in Washington, D.C. Jim Bridenstine is about three weeks into the job , and his path here was mired in controversy. After a few opening remarks, he started taking some questions. The first was about what Bridenstine thinks makes him qualified to be the head of NASA . The second was, as the moderator put it, “one
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Tropical Cyclone 01A forms in northern Indian OceanTropical Cyclone 01A quickly formed in the northern Indian Ocean and strengthened into a tropical storm.
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News

AgriLife scientists uncover a new face of a famous protein, SWI2/SNF2 ATPaseA team of Texas A&M and Texas A&M AgriLife Research scientists now have a deeper understanding of a large switch/sucrose non-fermentable (SWI/SNF) protein complex that plays a pivotal role in plant and human gene expression that causes life-threatening diseases such as cancer.
1h
Big Think

Scientists shocked by massive emissions of a banned, ozone-destroying chemicalCFC-11 was banned worldwide in 1987 by the Montreal Protocol, but scientists have found increasing levels of the ozone-depleting chemical in the atmosphere since 2013. Read More
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TED Talks Daily (SD video)

How Pakistani women are taking the internet back | Nighat DadTED Fellow Nighat Dad studies online harassment, especially as it relates to patriarchal cultures like the one in her small village in Pakistan. She tells the story of how she set up Pakistan's first cyber harassment helpline, offering support to women who face serious threats online. "Safe access to the internet is access to knowledge, and knowledge is freedom," she says. "When I fight for a woma
1h
Inside Science

BRIEF: A Brittle Crystal Becomes Flexible in the DarkBRIEF: A Brittle Crystal Becomes Flexible in the Dark Scientists have just found out that zinc sulfide, a relatively common semiconductor material, becomes pliable when kept in the dark. top-image-crystal.jpg Zinc sulfide crystal that shatters when compressed under light (upper right) is flexible if kept in the dark (lower right). Rights information: Atsutomo Nakamura Physics Thursday, May 17, 20
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Scientific American Content: Global

Google's AI Assistant Does Your Talk TasksThe new Google AI voice assistant, called Duplex, highlights the intricacies of carrying out a mundane human-style conversation, as it keeps you off the phone. -- Read more on ScientificAmerican.com
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Science : NPR

Starbucks Training Focuses On The Evolving Study Of Unconscious BiasScientists and leadership trainers says it's nearly impossible to train people out of their biases, but organizations can develop ways of mitigating the effects of it. Often, it involves teamwork. (Image credit: Saul Loeb/AFP/Getty Images)
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Popular Science

Watch astronauts fix a leaky pump in spaceSpace Yesterday the astronauts on ISS had to deal with a faulty cooling system. The sun was setting 500 miles above the Indian Ocean as astronauts Drew Feustel and Ricky Arnold headed out of the airlock on the International Space Station to fix a…
1h
Scientific American Content: Global

Everything You Need to Know about the Ebola VaccinePublic health workers are preparing to roll out inoculations even as the disease has spread to an urban location -- Read more on ScientificAmerican.com
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Live Science

Kilauea Spews Boulders in 5-Mile-High EruptionAn explosion at Kilauea volcano's summit spawned chunky boulders and a tremendous volcanic cloud that reached as high as commercial airplanes fly — about 30,000 feet (5.6 miles, or 9.1 kilometers) above sea level — early this morning (May 17) local time.
2h
Live Science

Another Tropical Paradise Enacts a Sunscreen BanThe island of Bonaire follows Hawaii's lead.
2h
The Atlantic

Historic Photos of NASA's Cavernous Wind TunnelsThroughout the 20th century, NASA (and its predecessor, NACA) made extensive use of wind tunnels to test and refine designs for airplanes, spacecraft, and many other vehicles and structures. Dozens of specialized tunnels were constructed over the years at Langley Research Center in Virginia and Ames Research Center in California, to test the effects of high windspeed, turbulence, icing, ionizatio
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The Scientist RSS

FDA Approves Drug to Ease Symptoms of Opioid WithdrawalLucemyra is the first non-opioid drug to be approved in the U.S. specifically for this purpose.
2h
Scientific American Content: Global

The Truth About Hans Asperger's Nazi CollusionNeuroscientist Simon Baron-Cohen absorbs the grave revelations in a study on a pediatrician enmeshed in autism's history -- Read more on ScientificAmerican.com
2h
The Atlantic

A Top Adviser to the South Korean President Wants to 'Get Rid Of' the U.S. AllianceSEOUL, South Korea—A top adviser to South Korea’s president says he would eventually like to see the U.S.-South Korea alliance end. In language that sounded almost Trump-like, Chung In Moon, a special adviser to President Moon Jae In for foreign affairs and national security, said in an interview that alliances in general are a “very unnatural state of international relations” and said that, “for
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New on MIT Technology Review

Microsoft’s new video game controller is making gaming more accessible
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News

New algorithm more accurately predicts life expectancy after heart failureA new algorithm developed by UCLA researchers more accurately predicts which people will survive heart failure, and for how long, whether or not they receive a heart transplant.
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Science : NPR

Banned, Ozone-Depleting Chemical Is Still Being Produced Somewhere, Scientists SayTrichlorofluoromethane, or CFC-11, hurts the ozone layer and was phased out of production by 2010. Supposedly. But a NOAA study says CFC-11 emissions began to rise after 2012. (Image credit: NOAA via AP)
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Big Think

Shock treatment may be the best therapy for major depressionUnfortunately, the stigma is holding it back. Read More
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Scientific American Content: Global

How Much of the World's Protected Land Is Actually Protected?Intense human pressure on areas set aside for preservation could be threatening biodiversity -- Read more on ScientificAmerican.com
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'Deadpool 2' Is What All Sequels Should Be: Better Than Its PredecessorThe follow-up to the 2016 surprise hit packs even more punch (and punchlines) than the first.
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Big Think

The octopus is a fascinating creature. But is it from another world?A recent paper coauthored by 33 people speculated that octopi, and perhaps by extension other similar cephalopods, are from outside of our solar system, possibly coming to Earth as hitchhikers riding (or, rather, frozen in) comets and meteors and then disseminating in the oceans of our planet ... Read More
2h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Self-assembling 3-D battery would charge in secondsThe world is a big place, but it's gotten smaller with the advent of technologies that put people from across the globe in the palm of one's hand. And as the world has shrunk, it has also demanded that things happen ever faster—including the time it takes to charge an electronic device.
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Big Think

We hear there’s an old border wall they’re not using in ChinaWhat would it cost to move some of the world's most famous landmarks to new locations? Read More
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Popular Science

Mosquito spit primes your body for disease—so scientists want to make an anti-saliva vaccineHealth Skeeter spit is no friend to our immune system. Every time a mosquito bites you, she injects spit into your bloodstream. It helps her slurp up a meal by stopping your blood from clotting. But it can also make you…
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Researchers tailor E. coli to convert plants into renewable chemicalsWhat does jet fuel have in common with pantyhose and plastic soda bottles? They're all products currently derived from petroleum. Sandia National Laboratories scientists have demonstrated a new technology based on bioengineered bacteria that could make it economically feasible to produce all three from renewable plant sources.
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Latest Headlines | Science News

Keeping global warming to 1.5 degrees C helps most species hold their groundHolding global warming to 1.5 degrees Celsius by 2100 could help protect tens of thousands of insect, plant and vertebrate species.
3h
Big Think

How do self-driving cars know their way around without a map?Specific self-driving car systems are now being developed for urban and rural settings. Read More
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BBC News - Science & Environment

'Shocking' human impact reported on world's protected areasOne third of the world's protected lands are being degraded by human activities, says a new study.
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Sugars in infant formulas pose risk to babies with inherited metabolic disorderBabies with inherited intolerance of fructose face a risk of acute liver failure if they are fed certain widely available formulas containing fructose, pediatricians and geneticists are warning. Baby formula manufacturers should remove fructose or sucrose, or explicitly label their products to allow parents to avoid those sweeteners if necessary, the doctors say.
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Surviving sepsis campaign update focuses on critical first hourFor patients with sepsis, a serious infection causing widespread inflammation, immediate treatment is essential to improve the chances of survival. An updated 'Hour-1 Bundle' of the international, evidence-based guidelines for treatment of sepsis is introduced in the June issue of Critical Care Medicine. The official journal of the Society of Critical Care Medicine (SCCM), Critical Care Medicine i
3h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Self-assembling 3D battery would charge in secondsA cross-campus collaboration led by Ulrich Wiesner, professor of engineering in the at Cornell University, addresses this demand with a novel energy storage device architecture that has the potential for lightning-quick charges.The group's idea: Instead of having the batteries' anode and cathode on either side of a nonconducting separator, intertwine the components in a self-assembling, 3D gyroida
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Riding bacterium to the bankJet fuel, pantyhose and plastic soda bottles: all three could be made from bioengineered bacteria, as Sandia National Laboratories has now demonstrated.
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Immune cell provides cradle for mammary stem cellsResearchers have made new discoveries about how an immune cell known as the macrophage, which normally fights infection by swallowing foreign invaders, nurtures mammary gland stem cells through a chemical signaling molecule. The study may provide important clues about the roles of macrophages in breast cancer progression.
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News

What happens if we run out?What happens when pests resist all forms of herbicides and pesticides? To slow the evolutionary progression of weeds and insect pests gaining resistance to herbicides and pesticides, policymakers should provide resources for large-scale, landscape-level studies of a number of promising but untested approaches for slowing pest evolution.
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News

The superhero semiconductor: Inflexible during the day, but bendy at nightScientists have discovered that a type of inorganic semiconductor, which doesn't deform well under light, can bend a whopping 45 percent from its original form when in the dark.
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News

High stakes for biodiversity, depending on which climate change target we reachA new assessment finds that, by 2100, the number of plant and vertebrate species losing more than half of their natural ranges will double if global warming is limited to 2°Celsius (C), rather than 1.5°C; insects are projected to be impacted the most, with 18 percent losing over half of their natural ranges under the warmer scenario.
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News

One-third of world's 'protected' areas under intense human pressureGlobally, one-third of protected land is under intense human pressure from processes including road building, grazing, and urbanization, according to a new study.
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News

When farmers migrated to southeast Asia, according to the DNABy analyzing genome-wide DNA from the remains of ancient Southeast Asian individuals, scientists have shed new light on the past 4,000 years of genetic history from the region.
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Scientists analyze first ancient human DNA from Southeast AsiaThe first whole-genome analyses of ancient human DNA from Southeast Asia reveal that there were at least three major waves of human migration into the region over the last 50,000 years.
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Resistance to antifungal drugs could lead to disease and global food shortagesGrowing levels of resistance to antifungal treatments could lead to increased disease outbreaks and affect food security around the world.
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Pig immunology comes of age: Killer T cell responses to influenzaResearchers from The Pirbright Institute, University of Bristol, Cardiff University and University of Oxford have generated tools that allow scientists to understand a vital area of the pig immune system which was previously inaccessible.
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Biodiversity suffers as climate warmsHigh levels of warming will lead to systemic ecological simplification, a process where many 'climate losers' are replaced by far fewer 'climate winners.' Such a simplified ecological landscape could have impacts on ecosystem services such as water quality, soil conservation, flood prevention, all of which are important for human well-being. Fewer insects also mean fewer pollinators and hence conc
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News

How Nagana is carried by tsetse fliesResearchers at the University of Bristol have revealed new details on how the animal disease Nagana is spread by tsetse flies in Africa.
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News

New catalyst upgrades greenhouse gas into renewable hydrocarbonsResearch team out of U of T Engineering designs most efficient and stable process for converting climate-warming carbon dioxide into a key chemical building block for plastics -- all powered using renewable electricity.
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Battling bubbles: How plants protect themselves from killer fungusIn the battle between plants and pathogens, molecules called small RNAs are coveted weapons used by both invaders and defenders. In a paper publishing Thursday (May 17) in the journal Science, researchers at the University of California, Riverside report how plants package and deliver the sRNAs they use to fight back against plant pathogens. The study focused on Botrytis cinerea, a fungus that cau
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News

World's protected areas being rapidly destroyed by humanityOne-third of the world's protected land is under intense human pressure, according to an international study described as 'a stunning reality check' on efforts to avert a biodiversity crisis.The University of Queensland-led research has found six million square kilometers of protected land -- equivalent to two-thirds the size of China -- is in a state unlikely to conserve endangered biodiversity.
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News

More than a living syringe: Mosquito saliva alone triggers unexpected immune responseMosquito saliva alone can trigger an unexpected variety of immune responses in an animal model of the human immune system.
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News

A way to prevent pancreatic cancer from spreading post-surgery?New research suggests a strategy for lowering the odds of metastasis following successful pancreatic cancer surgery: The post-operative period, suggests CSHL Professor Douglas Fearon, 'offers a window during which efforts might be made to keep cortisol levels down and T cells strong so the patient's own immune system can kill the cancer cells that have made their way to other parts of the body but
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Keep the light off: A material with improved mechanical performance in the darkNagoya University researchers found that zinc sulfide crystals were brittle under normal lighting conditions at room temperature, but highly plastic when deformed in complete darkness. Deformation of zinc sulfide crystals in the dark also narrowed their band gap, which controls electrical conductivity. The team's findings showed the mechanical and electronic properties of inorganic semiconductors
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Limiting warming to 1.5 degree C would save majority of global species from climate changeNew research finds that limiting global warming to 1.5 degrees C would save the majority of the world's plant and animal species from climate change.Species across the globe would benefit -- particularly those in Southern Africa, the Amazon, Europe and Australia.Examples of animals to benefit include the critically endangered black rhinoceros.Reducing the risk to insects is important because they
3h
Latest Headlines | Science News

Ancient Chinese farmers sowed literal seeds of change in Southeast AsiaTwo waves of ancient migration from China to Southeast Asia spread farming and languages.
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New Scientist - News

Someone is wrecking the ozone layer again. They must be stoppedFor the health of our planet, and ourselves, we must find and foil those who breach crucial environmental treaties, says Lesley Evans Ogden
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NYT > Science

Trilobites: In Virtual Reality, How Much Body Do You Need?It might be as little as a pair of hands and feet, researchers in Japan found after recording subjects who wore an Oculus Rift headset.
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Drilling threatens ancient Chaco landscape
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Vaccine trial launched to stop Ebola
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U.S. lawmakers float plan to regulate cultured meat
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High altitude may have driven short stature in Peruvians
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Neutron stars' quark matter not so strange
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China's moon mission is set to probe cosmic dark ages
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Boycott highlights AI's publishing rebellion
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Hadza on the brink
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Little is lost
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Mapping kidney cellular complexity
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Ribosomes on the night shift
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Science current issue

How to achieve a successful biaxial marriage
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Science current issue

BRD4 and MYC--clarifying regulatory specificity
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Science current issue

Narrowing pathways to a sustainable future
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Science current issue

Improving support for young biomedical scientists
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Science current issue

The rise and fall of Theranos
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Science current issue

Einstein goes east
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Science current issue

Beware silent waning of shark protection
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Science current issue

Marine protected areas: Just for show?
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Science current issue

Sharing chemistry with Maori students
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Science current issue

Meeting resistance
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Science current issue

Wicked evolution: Can we address the sociobiological dilemma of pesticide resistance?Resistance to insecticides and herbicides has cost billions of U.S. dollars in the agricultural sector and could result in millions of lives lost to insect-vectored diseases. We mostly continue to use pesticides as if resistance is a temporary issue that will be addressed by commercialization of new pesticides with novel modes of action. However, current evidence suggests that insect and weed evo
3h
Science current issue

Genomic insights into the emergence and spread of antimicrobial-resistant bacterial pathogensWhole-genome sequencing (WGS) has been vital for revealing the rapid temporal and spatial evolution of antimicrobial resistance (AMR) in bacterial pathogens. Some antimicrobial-resistant pathogens have outpaced us, with untreatable infections appearing in hospitals and the community. However, WGS has additionally provided us with enough knowledge to initiate countermeasures. Although we cannot st
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Science current issue

Worldwide emergence of resistance to antifungal drugs challenges human health and food securityThe recent rate of emergence of pathogenic fungi that are resistant to the limited number of commonly used antifungal agents is unprecedented. The azoles, for example, are used not only for human and animal health care and crop protection but also in antifouling coatings and timber preservation. The ubiquity and multiple uses of azoles have hastened the independent evolution of resistance in many
3h
Science current issue

Prospects for harnessing biocide resistance for bioremediation and detoxificationProkaryotes in natural environments respond rapidly to high concentrations of chemicals and physical stresses. Exposure to anthropogenic toxic substances—such as oil, chlorinated solvents, or antibiotics—favors the evolution of resistant phenotypes, some of which can use contaminants as an exclusive carbon source or as electron donors and acceptors. Microorganisms similarly adapt to extreme pH, m
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Science current issue

Protected yet pressured
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Science current issue

Mycobacteria and metabolism
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Science current issue

SnSe doped a different way
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Science current issue

A very basic pathway from CO2 to ethylene
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Science current issue

One and a half degrees on biodiversity
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Science current issue

Benign colonization of the gut
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Science current issue

Profiling transcription--a SLAM dunk
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Science current issue

Incentives drive disclosure
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Science current issue

Better performance under stress
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Science current issue

Touring the kidney, cell by cell
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Science current issue

A selective autophagy receptor identified
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Science current issue

Finding order in twos
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Science current issue

Plastic in the dark
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Science current issue

Fat, microRNAs, and liver disease
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Science current issue

Stroke therapy goes local
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Science current issue

Taking the temperature of hot electrons
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Science current issue

Plants work out which way is up
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Science current issue

Timing metabolism in human muscle
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Science current issue

Access to oxygen minimum zones
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Science current issue

Tunable on-chip optical beam splitter
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Science current issue

Watching magnetic atoms thermalize
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Science current issue

A pause in progress on air pollution
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Science current issue

Heating up suppresses appetite
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Science current issue

NUFIP1 is a ribosome receptor for starvation-induced ribophagyThe lysosome degrades and recycles macromolecules, signals to the master growth regulator mTORC1 [mechanistic target of rapamycin (mTOR) complex 1], and is associated with human disease. We performed quantitative proteomic analyses of rapidly isolated lysosomes and found that nutrient levels and mTOR dynamically modulate the lysosomal proteome. Upon mTORC1 inhibition, NUFIP1 (nuclear fragile X me
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Science current issue

Single-cell transcriptomics of the mouse kidney reveals potential cellular targets of kidney diseaseOur understanding of kidney disease pathogenesis is limited by an incomplete molecular characterization of the cell types responsible for the organ’s multiple homeostatic functions. To help fill this knowledge gap, we characterized 57,979 cells from healthy mouse kidneys by using unbiased single-cell RNA sequencing. On the basis of gene expression patterns, we infer that inherited kidney diseases
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Science current issue

Elastic strain engineering for ultralow mechanical dissipationExtreme stresses can be produced in nanoscale structures; this feature has been used to realize enhanced materials properties, such as the high mobility of silicon in modern transistors. We show how nanoscale stress can be used to realize exceptionally low mechanical dissipation when combined with "soft-clamping"—a form of phononic engineering. Specifically, using a nonuniform phononic crystal pa
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Science current issue

Hybrid molecular-colloidal liquid crystalsOrder and fluidity often coexist, with examples ranging from biological membranes to liquid crystals, but the symmetry of these soft-matter systems is typically higher than that of the constituent building blocks. We dispersed micrometer-long inorganic colloidal rods in a nematic liquid crystalline fluid of molecular rods. Both types of uniaxial building blocks, while freely diffusing, interact t
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Science current issue

Extraordinary plasticity of an inorganic semiconductor in darknessInorganic semiconductors generally tend to fail in a brittle manner. Here, we report that extraordinary "plasticity" can take place in an inorganic semiconductor if the deformation is carried out "in complete darkness." Room-temperature deformation tests of zinc sulfide (ZnS) were performed under varying light conditions. ZnS crystals immediately fractured when they deformed under light irradiati
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Science current issue

Imaging of nonlocal hot-electron energy dissipation via shot noiseIn modern microelectronic devices, hot electrons accelerate, scatter, and dissipate energy in nanoscale dimensions. Despite recent progress in nanothermometry, direct real-space mapping of hot-electron energy dissipation is challenging because existing techniques are restricted to probing the lattice rather than the electrons. We realize electronic nanothermometry by measuring local current fluct
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Science current issue

3D charge and 2D phonon transports leading to high out-of-plane ZT in n-type SnSe crystalsThermoelectric technology enables the harvest of waste heat and its direct conversion into electricity. The conversion efficiency is determined by the materials figure of merit ZT . Here we show a maximum ZT of ~2.8 ± 0.5 at 773 kelvin in n-type tin selenide (SnSe) crystals out of plane. The thermal conductivity in layered SnSe crystals is the lowest in the out-of-plane direction [two-dimensional
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Science current issue

CO2 electroreduction to ethylene via hydroxide-mediated copper catalysis at an abrupt interfaceCarbon dioxide (CO 2 ) electroreduction could provide a useful source of ethylene, but low conversion efficiency, low production rates, and low catalyst stability limit current systems. Here we report that a copper electrocatalyst at an abrupt reaction interface in an alkaline electrolyte reduces CO 2 to ethylene with 70% faradaic efficiency at a potential of –0.55 volts versus a reversible hydro
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Science current issue

One-third of global protected land is under intense human pressureIn an era of massive biodiversity loss, the greatest conservation success story has been the growth of protected land globally. Protected areas are the primary defense against biodiversity loss, but extensive human activity within their boundaries can undermine this. Using the most comprehensive global map of human pressure, we show that 6 million square kilometers (32.8%) of protected land is un
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Science current issue

The projected effect on insects, vertebrates, and plants of limiting global warming to 1.5{degrees}C rather than 2{degrees}CIn the Paris Agreement on Climate Change, the United Nations is pursuing efforts to limit global warming to 1.5°C, whereas earlier aspirations focused on a 2°C limit. With current pledges, corresponding to ~3.2°C warming, climatically determined geographic range losses of >50% are projected in ~49% of insects, 44% of plants, and 26% of vertebrates. At 2°C, this falls to 18% of insects, 16% of pla
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Science current issue

Gut microbiota utilize immunoglobulin A for mucosal colonizationThe immune system responds vigorously to microbial infection while permitting lifelong colonization by the microbiome. Mechanisms that facilitate the establishment and stability of the gut microbiota remain poorly described. We found that a regulatory system in the prominent human commensal Bacteroides fragilis modulates its surface architecture to invite binding of immunoglobulin A (IgA) in mice
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Science current issue

SLAM-seq defines direct gene-regulatory functions of the BRD4-MYC axisDefining direct targets of transcription factors and regulatory pathways is key to understanding their roles in physiology and disease. We combined SLAM-seq [thiol(SH)–linked alkylation for the metabolic sequencing of RNA], a method for direct quantification of newly synthesized messenger RNAs (mRNAs), with pharmacological and chemical-genetic perturbation in order to define regulatory functions
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Science current issue

New Products
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Science current issue

There's no shame in leaving
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Science current issue

Comment on "Maxima in the thermodynamic response and correlation functions of deeply supercooled water"Kim et al . recently measured the structure factor of deeply supercooled water droplets (Reports, 22 December 2017, p. 1589). We raise several concerns about their data analysis and interpretation. In our opinion, the reported data do not lead to clear conclusions about the origins of water’s anomalies.
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Science current issue

Response to Comment on "Maxima in the thermodynamic response and correlation functions of deeply supercooled water"Caupin et al . have raised several issues regarding our recent paper on maxima in thermodynamic response and correlation functions in deeply supercooled water. We show that these issues can be addressed without affecting the conclusion of the paper.
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NYT > Science

‘Will You Be My Emergency Contact?’ Takes on a Whole New MeaningResearchers mined medical records to build family trees they hope could help advance medical research, but the privacy implications worry some bioethicists.
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The Atlantic

The Rise of Older MothersWomen in the United States are having children at record low rates, according to the latest statistical release from the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention. In 2017, births were down 2 percent from 2016 and were at their lowest in 30 years. In fact, the only American women who are consistently having more babies than before are those over 40. Births among Hispanic and white women declined
3h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Battling bubbles: How plants protect themselves from killer fungusIn the battle between plants and pathogens, molecules called small RNAs are coveted weapons used by both invaders and defenders.
3h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Supersonic waves may help electronics beat the heatResearchers at the Department of Energy's Oak Ridge National Laboratory made the first observations of waves of atomic rearrangements, known as phasons, propagating supersonically through a vibrating crystal lattice—a discovery that may dramatically improve heat transport in insulators and enable new strategies for heat management in future electronics devices.
3h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

New blood test rapidly detects signs of pancreatic cancerPancreatic cancer is expected to become the second deadliest cancer in the United States by 2030. It is tough to cure because it is usually not discovered until it has reached an advanced stage. But a new diagnostic test developed by researchers at UC San Diego shows promise for detecting the disease earlier.
3h
Live Science

Think Your Bed Is Clean? A Chimp's Is Cleaner.Human beds are teeming with more body microbes than the beds of chimpanzees.
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Science | The Guardian

Climate change on track to cause major insect wipeout, scientists warnInsects are vital to ecosystems but will lose almost half their habitat under current climate projections Global warming is on track to cause a major wipeout of insects, compounding already severe losses, according to a new analysis. Insects are vital to most ecosystems and a widespread collapse would cause extremely far-reaching disruption to life on Earth, the scientists warn. Their research sh
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Scientific American Content: Global

How Much of the World's Protected Land Is Actually Protected?Intense human pressure on areas set aside for preservation could be threatening biodiversity -- Read more on ScientificAmerican.com
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New on MIT Technology Review

Specialized chips are threatening to take over cryptocurrencies, and they look unstoppableThe Chinese firm Bitmain dominates the market for tailor-made mining hardware and shows no sign of slowing down.
3h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Supercomputing the emergence of material behaviorWhat makes kevlar stop a bullet, at the atomic level?
3h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Immune cell provides cradle for mammary stem cellsA new study finds that one of the toughest characters in the immune system, the macrophage, has a nurturing side, at least when it comes to guarding the developing breast.
3h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Pesticide resistance needs attention, large-scale studyTo slow the evolutionary progression of weeds and insect pests gaining resistance to herbicides and pesticides, policymakers should provide resources for large-scale, landscape-level studies of a number of promising but untested approaches for slowing pest evolution. Such landscape studies are now more feasible because of new genomic and technological innovations that could be used to compare the
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

New catalyst upgrades greenhouse gas into renewable hydrocarbonsA new technology from U of T Engineering is taking a substantial step towards enabling manufacturers to create plastics out of two key ingredients: sunshine and pollution.
3h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Study shows one third of world's protected areas degraded by human activitiesA study in the journal Science by the University of Queensland, Wildlife Conservation Society (WCS), and University of Northern British Columbia confirms that one third of the world's protected areas—an astonishing 2.3 million square miles or twice the size of the state of Alaska—are now under intense human pressure including road building, grazing, and urbanization.
3h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

How Nagana is carried by tsetse fliesResearchers at the University of Bristol have revealed new details on how the animal disease Nagana is spread by tsetse flies in Africa.
3h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Scientists analyze first ancient human DNA from Southeast AsiaThe first whole-genome analyses of ancient human DNA from Southeast Asia reveal that there were at least three major waves of human migration into the region over the last 50,000 years.
3h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Limiting warming to 1.5 degree C would save majority of global species from climate changeLimiting global warming to 1.5oC would save the vast majority of the world's plant and animal species from climate change—according to new research led by the University of East Anglia.
3h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Biodiversity suffers as climate warmsA simplified ecological landscape—with significant biodiversity loss—might be the outcome if a global temperature increase cannot be restricted to 1.5 degrees C above historical pre-industrial levels.
3h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Keep the light off: A material with improved mechanical performance in the darkInorganic semiconductors such as silicon are indispensable in modern electronics because they possess tunable electrical conductivity between that of a metal and that of an insulator. The electrical conductivity of a semiconductor is controlled by its band gap, which is the energy difference between its valence and conduction bands; a narrow band gap results in increased conductivity because it is
3h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Supersonic waves may help electronics beat the heatResearchers at the Department of Energy's Oak Ridge National Laboratory made the first observations of waves of atomic rearrangements, known as phasons, propagating supersonically through a vibrating crystal lattice--a discovery that may dramatically improve heat transport in insulators and enable new strategies for heat management in future electronics devices.
3h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News

New blood test rapidly detects signs of pancreatic cancerUC San Diego researchers have developed a test that can screen for pancreatic cancer in just a drop of blood. The test, which is at the proof-of-concept stage, provides results in under an hour. It's simple: apply a drop of blood on a small electronic chip, turn the current on, wait several minutes, add fluorescent labels and look at the results under a microscope. If a blood sample tests positive
3h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Supercomputing the emergence of material behaviorChemists at the University of California, San Diego designed the first artificial protein assembly (C98RhuA) whose conformational dynamics can be chemically and mechanically toggled. The Maverick GPU-based supercomputer at the Texas Advanced Computing Center simulated the system through an allocation on NSF-funded XSEDE, the Extreme Science and Engineering Discovery Environment. The research, publ
3h
Discovery (uploads) on YouTube

Experience the Elusive Tiger | Racing Extinction (360 Video)They are nature's largest and most mysterious feline predators -- and they need our help. As Discovery embarks on a landmark project to protect endangered tigers, take a step into the world of tigers and experience these legendary creatures up close. Join a conservation biologist on an interactive mission to learn how animals critical to the world’s ecosystem thrive and survive in the wild. For a
3h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Astronomers release most complete ultraviolet-light survey of nearby galaxiesCapitalizing on the unparalleled sharpness and spectral range of NASA's Hubble Space Telescope, an international team of astronomers is releasing the most comprehensive, high-resolution ultraviolet-light survey of nearby star-forming galaxies.
3h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Walmart profits take hit, but earnings rise as online growsUS retail giant Wal-Mart saw quarterly profits take a hit but earnings beat analysts' expectations and total sales rose amid the growth of online sales, according to results released Thursday.
3h
Big Think

Who invented the weekend and why?Why do we work for five days and then take two days off? The answer might surprise you. Read More
3h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Astronomers release most complete ultraviolet-light survey of nearby galaxiesCapitalizing on the unparalleled sharpness and spectral range of NASA's Hubble Space Telescope, an international team of astronomers is releasing the most comprehensive, high-resolution ultraviolet-light survey of nearby star-forming galaxies.
3h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Hubble shows the local universe in ultravioletUsing the unparalleled sharpness and ultraviolet observational capabilities of the NASA/ESA Hubble Space Telescope, an international team of astronomers has created the most comprehensive high-resolution ultraviolet-light survey of star-forming galaxies in the local universe. The catalogue contains about 8,000 clusters and 39 million hot blue stars.
3h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News

MIT researchers develop virtual-reality testing ground for dronesMIT engineers have developed a new virtual-reality training system for drones that enables a vehicle to 'see' a rich, virtual environment while flying in an empty physical space. The system, which the team has dubbed 'Flight Goggles,' could significantly reduce the number of crashes that drones experience in actual training sessions. It can also serve as a virtual testbed for any number of environ
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Giving employees 'decoy' sanitizer options could improve hand hygieneIntroducing a less convenient option for hand sanitizing may actually boost workers' use of hand sanitizer and increase sanitary conditions in the workplace, according to findings in Psychological Science, a journal of the Association for Psychological Science. The findings revealed that employees in a food factory used more of their regular sanitizer and had cleaner hands and workspaces after a '
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

'Party city' Amsterdam to crack down on touristsAmsterdam is seeking to contain the flood of tourists swamping the city, with the incoming council proposing a series of tough measures and plans to hike tourism taxes.
3h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

EU chokes on own air quality standardsIn the skies above Katowice in the heart of Poland's coal industry, Polish officials are deploying the latest weapon against air pollution: drones that inspect the city's chimneys.
3h
Big Think

The inside of a proton could be the most extreme environment in the cosmosIn a sense, a proton acts very much like a star. Read More
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Hawaii volcano sends ash plume 30,000 feet into sky (Update)Hawaii's Kilauea volcano erupted anew before dawn Thursday, spewing a steely gray plume of ash about 30,000 feet (9,100 meters) into the sky that began raining down on a nearby town.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

YouTube revamps streaming music serviceYouTube Google MusicYouTube is launching a revamped, standalone streaming music service as part of an effort to step up competition against fast-growing rivals like Spotify and Apple Music.
3h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Fox News names veteran executive Suzanne Scott as CEOFox News on Thursday named longtime executive Suzanne Scott as chief executive of the cable news channel which is a favorite of conservatives and President Donald Trump.
4h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Cambridge Analytica suspended head to appear at UK committeeBritish lawmakers investigating the use of Facebook users' data in political campaigns said Thursday that the suspended head of the now-defunct consultancy Cambridge Analytica has accepted a summons to appear before a committee.
4h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Total CEO says oil price could hit $100 'in coming months'The CEO of French oil giant Total said Thursday he would not be surprised to see the price of a barrel of crude reach $100 later this year.
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The Atlantic

The First Urban Case of Ebola in the Congo Is a ‘Game Changer’Ebola Congo WHO MbandakaUpdated on May 17 at 3:54 p.m. ET The current Ebola outbreak in the Democratic Republic of Congo has thus far been confined to remote rural areas, but one case has now been confirmed in Mbandaka, a city of almost 1.2 million people. “We are moving to a new phase of the epidemic, and we are putting all the means in place to respond to it in a quick and effective way,” said Oly Ilunga , the DRC’s m
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Ingeniøren

Videnskabelig rundtur: Fiskedynamik, den globale opvarmnings positive effekt og ekstrakoldt på rumstationenNy forskning forklarer fiskestimers pludselige drejning, global opvarming giver mere vindenergi, og rumstationen gør sig klar til at modtage nyt instrument, der bliver Universets koldeste sted.
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BBC News - Science & Environment

How physics gender gap starts in the classroomSome progress has been made in encouraging girls to study A-level physics, but not enough, says report.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Continental shelf shape leads to long-lasting tsunami edge waves during Mexican earthquakeThe shape of the continental shelf off the southern Mexican coast played a role in the formation of long-lasting tsunami edge waves that appeared after last September's magnitude 8.2 earthquake, according to researchers speaking at the SSA 2018 Annual Meeting.
4h
Popular Science

How South Africa's 'Cradle of Humankind' got the titleScience To find fossils from humanity’s origins, these scientists must first lower themselves down a 40-foot-long cave chute. To find fossils from humanity’s origins, these scientists must first lower themselves down a 40-foot-long chute. “It’s not a normal commute,” says paleoanthropologist…
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Rhino in San Diego pregnant, could help save subspeciesA southern white rhino has become pregnant through artificial insemination at the San Diego Zoo Safari Park—giving hope for efforts to save a subspecies of one of the world's most recognizable animals, researchers announced Thursday.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Climate change broadens threat of emerald ash borerMore Canadian cities will experience damage from the emerald ash borer than previously thought. As a result of climate change and fewer days of extreme cold, the beetle may eat its way further north than originally estimated.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Repeating seismic events offer clues about Costa Rican volcanic eruptionsRepeating seismic events—events that have the same frequency content and waveform shapes—may offer a glimpse at the movement of magma and volcanic gases underneath Turrialba and Poas, two well-known active volcanoes in Costa Rica.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Video: How milk becomes cheeseMaking cheese is an ancient exercise in preserving the nutritional value of milk. And it's also pretty tasty.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Evaluating active pressure management of induced earthquakesCan altering the amount or rate of fluid injection and production in an oil and gas field or carbon storage site affect induced earthquakes in that field? A physics-based simulation presented at the 2018 SSA Annual Meeting suggests that this type of "active pressure management" can be useful in controlling induced seismicity at certain wells.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Probiotics to protect bees from an infection associated with colony collapse disorderAdding probiotics to bees' food helps make them more resistant to nosemosis, a fungal infection associated with colony collapse disorder that has been observed in Europe and North America over the past 20 years. Probiotics can decrease the mortality rate of this infection in bees by up to 40%, report researchers at Université Laval in the most recent edition of Frontiers in Ecology and Evolution.
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Big Think

Is it ethical for A.I. to have a human voice?Google's recent AI technology that can mimic humans is raising ethical concerns. Read More
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Inside Science

The Connected Fates of Trees Thousands of Miles ApartThe Connected Fates of Trees Thousands of Miles Apart Interplay between forests and the atmosphere leads to surprising relationships between distant regions. Lonetree.jpg Image credits: Derek Σωκράτης Finch via flickr Rights information: CC BY 2.0 Earth Thursday, May 17, 2018 - 12:30 Gabriel Popkin, Contributor (Inside Science) -- It won't stop armchair philosophers from debating whether a tree f
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Buyer beware: Some water-filter pitchers much better at toxin removalWater pitchers designed to rid water of harmful contaminants are not created equal, new research has found.
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Science | The Guardian

Space tourism for the people: become a virtual reality astronautVR companies around the world are planning to offer live views of the Earth from space within the next few years It’s the dream of any would-be space tourist: seeing our home planet from above. First you see the Earth’s horizon curve away, and then the luminous thin envelope of atmosphere that keeps us all alive comes into focus. As you cross the daylight side of Earth, you look down to see gigan
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Scientists make vitamin B12 breakthroughScientists at the University of Kent have made a significant discovery about how the vitamin content of some plants can be improved to make vegetarian and vegan diets more complete.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

Robots grow mini-organs from human stem cellsA robotic system has been developed to automate the production of human mini-organs derived from stem cells. The ability to rapidly, mass produce organoids promises to expand the use of mini-organs in basic research and drug discovery. The system was tested in producing kidney organoids, including models of polycystic kidney disease. The robots were also programmed to analyze the organoids they pr
4h
Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

Learning music or speaking another language leads to more efficient brainsWhether you learn to play a musical instrument or speak another language, you're training your brain to be more efficient, suggests a new study. Researchers found that musicians and people who are bilingual utilized fewer brain resources when completing a working memory task, according to recently published findings.
4h
Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

What we've learned about the nucleolus since you left schoolThe size of a cell's nucleolus may reveal how long that cell, or even the organism it belongs to, will live. Over the past few years, researchers have been piecing together an unexpected link between aging and an organelle often called the cell's ribosome factory (or just a blob in the middle of the nucleus). A new report outlines the connections between the nucleolus and age-related pathways.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

Single surface protein boosts multiple oncogenic pathways in acute myeloid leukemiaResearchers have discovered that a signaling protein elevated in patients with acute myeloid leukemia (AML) plays a much wider role in the disease than previously thought. The study raises hopes that current efforts to target this signaling protein could be a successful strategy to treat AML and other blood cancers.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

Diabetes researchers find switch for fatty liver diseaseResearchers have identified a key fork in the road for the way the liver deals with carbohydrates, fats and protein. They say it could be a promising new target for combating the pandemics of fatty liver disease and prediabetes.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

Shedding light on brain's ability to orchestrate movementNew research in mice reveals how specialized neurons allow the brain to construct sequences of movements. Damage to these neurons disrupts the ability to correctly string together movements into desired actions. The findings may inform the study and eventual treatment of movement disorders such as Parkinson's and Huntington's.
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The Atlantic

Life Before CoffeeIn the United States Barista Championship, baristas have 15 minutes to make and serve espressos, cappuccinos, and a unique coffee drink for judges. Lemuel Butler, 48, has won more coffee championships than nearly any other barista. While he’s now a co-owner of Black and White Coffee Roasters, and has worked at Counter Culture Coffee for more than a decade, he entered the world of coffee relativel
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Science | The Guardian

Surge in young Americans using marijuana as first drugProportion of young people who tried cigarettes as their first drug fell over the same period, US study says The proportion of young people using marijuana as their first drug doubled in the 10 years from 2004, a US-based study has found. The government study reveals that among people aged between 12 and 21, the proportion of those who tried cigarettes as their first drug fell from about 21% to j
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BBC News - Science & Environment

Madagascar emerges as whale shark hotspotThe endangered whale shark has been hiding in plain sight off Madagascar, say scientists.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

Functional films made of environmentally friendly clay minerals and dyesResearchers have created a transparent hybrid film that combines natural clay minerals and dyes into a material that changes color in response to environmental humidity. The color change does not involve breaking chemical bonds; the team uncovered a novel mechanism that makes the process easily reversible, for long-lasting functionality using environmentally friendly materials. Applications includ
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The Atlantic

Letters: Why Don't Women Write to the Editor? Because They're Doing Absolutely Everything ElseWhy Do So Few Women Write Letters to the Editor? Earlier this month, Caroline Kitchener reported that issues of confidence and deep-seated social norms may help explain the gender imbalance in letters to the editor sections, at The Atlantic and elsewhere. My feedback is to suggest you reframe the question. Let go of the tired assumption that this stems from a “confidence gap,” which implies women
5h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Robots grow mini-organs from human stem cellsA robotic system has been developed to automate the production of human mini-organs derived from stem cells. The ability to rapidly, mass produce organoids promises to expand the use of mini-organs in basic research and drug discovery. The system was tested in producing kidney organoids, including models of polycystic kidney disease. The robots were also programmed to analyze the organoids they pr
5h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Blood type affects severity of diarrhea caused by E. coliA new study shows that a kind of E. coli most associated with 'travelers' diarrhea' and children in underdeveloped areas of the world causes more severe disease in people with blood type A. The bacteria release a protein that latches onto intestinal cells in people with blood type A, but not blood type O or B, according to a study led by researchers at Washington University School of Medicine in S
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Learning music or speaking another language leads to more efficient brainsWhether you learn to play a musical instrument or speak another language, you're training your brain to be more efficient, suggests a Baycrest study.Researchers found that musicians and people who are bilingual utilized fewer brain resources when completing a working memory task, according to recently published findings in the journal, Annals of the New York Academy of Sciences.
5h
Big Think

Map shows huge differences in educational attainment across U.S.West Virginia and Mississippi are at the bottom of the educational attainment table and Massachusetts is the state with the highest share of Bachelor's degree holders - beaten only by the District of Columbia Read More
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

Keep saying yes to fish twice a week for heart healthA new scientific advisory reaffirms the recommendation to eat two servings of fish per week.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

Marine animals have been following their preferred climate for millions of yearsCurrent global warming has far-reaching ecological consequences, also for the Earth's oceans. Many marine organisms are reacting by migrating towards the poles. Researchers have now discovered that marine animals have been migrating for millions of years when the temperature on Earth increases or decreases.
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Viden

Nyt patent tryller sukkerroer og CO2 om til kostbart kemikalieDe danske sukkerroefabrikker kan se frem til en økonomisk gevinst, fordi forskere fra DTU har opfundet en metode til at lave deres spildevand om til kostbare materialer.
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The Scientist RSS

Could a Dose of Sunshine Make You Smarter?Moderate ultraviolet light exposure boosts the brainpower of mice thanks to increased production of the neurotransmitter glutamate.
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Quanta Magazine

Mathematicians Disprove Conjecture Made to Save Black HolesNearly 60 years after it was proposed, mathematicians have settled one of the most profound questions in the study of general relativity. In a paper posted online last fall , mathematicians Mihalis Dafermos and Jonathan Luk have proven that the strong cosmic censorship conjecture, which concerns the strange inner workings of black holes, is false. “I personally view this work as a tremendous achi
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The Economist: The world this week

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The Economist: The world this week

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The Economist: The world this week

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Blog » Languages » English

An Eyewirer’s Guide to Naming Newly Discovered Cells29,276 Eyewirers contributed to reconstructing nearly 400 ganglion cells in a recent Seung Lab+Eyewirers publication that discovered 6 new cell types . Those who mapped over 50 cubes during the Countdown to Neuropia from October, 2014 to Aug 2015 are eligible to nickname the newly discovered neurons. Naming will work in rounds as detailed below. You can see the full list of Eyewire contributors h
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Feed: All Latest

Gruesome Jihadi Content Still Flourishes on Facebook and Google+Despite improvements to algorithmic filtering, Facebook and Google+ still host scores of ISIS and related content and accounts that sometimes stay up for months.
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Latest Headlines | Science News

Your blood type might make you more likely to get traveler’s diarrheaPeople with type A blood are more likely to develop severe diarrhea from E. coli infections.
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BBC News - Science & Environment

Fracking planning laws should be relaxed say ministersCritics say it will be as easy to get the go-ahead to do a test drill as it is for a home conservatory.
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Big Think

Why Star Wars may be the perfect vehicle to introduce VR and AR to the massesDisney has plans to make the Star Wars galaxy the setting for the widespread introduction of virtual reality and augmented reality to the public at large. Read More
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Big Think

Scientists are trying revive woolly mammoth DNA to fight climate changeScientists are investigating whether it’s possible to give modern elephants an ancient boost by reviving woolly mammoth DNA—all to curb climate change. Read More
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Big Think

10 philosophy courses you can take online, for freeWant to learn about philosophy but don't know where to begin? We can help. Read More
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Repeating seismic events offer clues about Costa Rican volcanic eruptionsRepeating seismic events--events that have the same frequency content and waveform shapes--may offer a glimpse at the movement of magma and volcanic gases underneath Turrialba and Poas, two well-known active volcanoes in Costa Rica.
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Blog » Languages » English

Structural and Functional Diversity of Eyewire Neurons RevealedBig news, Eyewirers! Your latest research has been published in the journal Cell and all 29,276 Eyewirers who helped are coauthors. Thanks to a monumental effort of community and lab, there’s a new classification of ganglion cell types, including 6 new ones that will be named by the players who first charted them ! The paper is open access and available freely on bioRxiv as: Digital museum of ret
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

Emergency contact info helps researchers branch out family treeA collaborative team of researchers from three major academic medical centers in New York City is showing that emergency contact information, which is included in individuals' electronic health records (EHRs), can be used to generate family trees. Those family trees in turn can be used to study heritability in hundreds of medical conditions.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

How social isolation transforms the brainResearchers gain new insights into the brain mechanisms underlying the negative effects caused by long-term social isolation.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

Surprise cell death discovery provides birth defect cluesResearchers have made a surprise discovery that could rewrite our understanding of the role programmed cell death plays in embryonic development and congenital birth defects. The team showed that, while programmed cell death -- or apoptosis -- is essential for healthy development overall, many organs and tissues do not require apoptosis to develop normally. The study also suggested that abnormalit
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

Male depression may lower pregnancy chances among infertile couplesAmong couples being treated for infertility, depression in the male partner was linked to lower pregnancy chances, while depression in the female partner was not found to influence the rate of live birth, according to a new study. The study also linked a class of antidepressants known as non-selective serotonin reuptake inhibitors (non-SSRIs) to a higher risk of early pregnancy loss among females
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Ingeniøren

Enigt folketing vedtager teleforlig: Mere bredbåndspulje og røffel til kommunerEt ualmindeligt bredt teleforlig sikrer ekstra penge til bredbåndspuljen og nedsætter et forum, der skal fremme 5G. Staten skal samtidig holde øje med kommunernes støtte til bredbånd og deres priser for masteleje.
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New Scientist - News

Frankenstein planets may form from the wreckage of dead worldsWhen stars die, they can explode and destroy any planets nearby. But new worlds could arise out of the debris and some could reach the mass of 10 Earths
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The Atlantic

Pork Legs Are Shaking Up British PoliticsIt’s the sort of thing you’re more likely to find at a country pub than at the center of a political debate. But in the U.K., the meat product known as gammon has recently become shorthand for a certain type of middle-aged white man. He’s a Conservative voter, he likely supports Brexit, and his habitual rantings about immigration and the scourge of political correctness have caused him to turn so
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The Atlantic

Is Salt Bad? A Prison Study May Hold the AnswerThere is a lot to fight over in the vagaries of dietary science , but possibly nothing has been as contentious or as longstanding as the salt wars . For decades, public-health officials have pushed people to eat less salt, which is linked to lower blood pressure , which in turn is linked to less heart disease. And for the same decades, a vocal opposition has challenged the guidelines as unscienti
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The Atlantic

The Radical Self-Reliance of Black HomeschoolingBALTIMORE—Racial inequality in Baltimore’s public schools is in part the byproduct of long-standing neglect . In a system in which eight out of 10 students are black, broken heaters forced students to learn in frigid temperatures this past winter. Black children in Baltimore’s education system face systemic disadvantages: They’re suspended at much higher rates than their white peers; they rarely
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Ovarian cancer drug shows promise in pancreatic cancer patients with BRCA mutationA targeted therapy that has shown its power in fighting ovarian cancer in women including those with BRCA1 and BRCA2 mutations may also help patients with aggressive pancreatic cancer who harbor these mutations and have few or no other treatment options.
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Climate change broadens threat of emerald ash borerMore Canadian cities will experience damage from the emerald ash borer than previously thought. As a result of climate change and fewer days of extreme cold, the beetle may eat its way further north than originally estimated.
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Old drug provides promising new avenue for treatment of MNDAn international study led by biochemists at the University of Liverpool has shown that the drug-molecule ebselen can correct many of the toxic characteristics of a protein that causes some cases of hereditary motor neurone disease (MND).
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Throwing out foodRational behavior is not the only thing that keeps Russians from throwing away food; many food-handling practices have been shaped by socio-cultural factors, including the gastronomic trauma suffered in times of famine and scarcity. Valeria Erguneva and Darya Asaturyan from HSE University have studied some of the cultural attitudes towards food loss and waste in Russia.
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NYT > Science

F.D.A. Names and Shames Drug Makers to Encourage Generic CompetitionIn its campaign to lower drug prices, the agency posted a list of brand-name manufacturers in an effort to force them to share drug samples with their generic rivals.
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Big Think

Should I kill spiders in my home? An entomologist explains why not toHumans are much more dangerous to spiders than vice versa. Read More
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Viden

Forskere spiller klassisk musik for krokodillerTyske forskere har puttet en krokodille i en hjerneskanner og udsat den for klassisk musik. Det kan give ny viden om krybdyrhjerner og hvordan de oplever smerte.
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News

University of Kent scientists make vitamin B12 breakthroughScientists at the University of Kent have made a significant discovery about how the vitamin content of some plants can be improved to make vegetarian and vegan diets more complete. Vitamin B12 (cobalamin) is an essential dietary component but vegetarians are more prone to B12 deficiency as plants neither make nor require this nutrient. But now a team, led by Professor Martin Warren, has proved th
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Above us only sky -- The open air as an underappreciated habitatScientists from the Leibniz Institute for Zoo and Wildlife Research (IZW) in Berlin have collated the current scientific knowledge on potential hazards to one group of animals flying at high altitudes, bats. In their recent article published in BioScience the authors synthesise threats facing bats in troposphere and provide recommendations for potential protective measures to ensure persistence of
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Continental shelf shape leads to long-lasting tsunami edge waves during Mexican earthquakeThe shape of the continental shelf off the southern Mexican coast played a role in the formation of long-lasting tsunami edge waves that appeared after last September's magnitude 8.2 earthquake, according to researchers speaking at the SSA 2018 Annual Meeting.
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News

International consortium wants to sequence the DNA of 1.5 million speciesThe purposes and the challenges of Earth Biogenome Project, which aims at sequencing the genome from all eukaryotic species, are described in article at PNAS. Objectives include not only biodiversity conservation but also exploring biotechnology's broad applications, capable of generating great economic input - especially for developing countries boasting rich ecological heritage.
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Microglia are key defenders against prion diseasesPrion diseases are slow degenerative brain diseases that occur in people and various other mammals. No vaccines or treatments are available, and these diseases are almost always fatal. Scientists have found little evidence of a protective immune response to prion infections. Further, microglia--brain cells usually involved in the first level of host defense against infections of the brain--have be
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News

International study suggests combination therapy may prevent stroke in certain peopleResults from an international clinical trial of more than 4880 participants, published in the New England Journal of Medicine, show that combining clopidogrel and aspirin following a small stroke or experiencing minor stroke symptoms decreases risk of a new stroke, heart attack or other ischemic event within 90 days. The combination therapy was also associated with an increase in major bleeding, a
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Albatross robot takes flightA new MIT autonomous glider can fly like an albatross, cruise like a sailboat.
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News

How immune cells kill bacteria with acidThe first line of immune defense against invading pathogens like bacteria are macrophages, immune cells that engulf every foreign object that crosses their way and kill their prey with acid. However, it is not yet entirely understood how the acidification process is established. In their quest to systematically study proteins that transport chemicals across cellular membranes, researchers at CeMM
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Princeton researchers crowdsource brain mapping with gamers, discover 6 new neuron typesBy turning a time-intensive research problem into an interactive game, Princeton neuroscientist Sebastian Seung has built an unprecedented data set of neurons, which he is now turning over to the public via the Eyewire Museum. Maps of retinal ganglion cells were developed machine learning paired with hundreds of thousands of person-hours volunteered by Eyewire gamers who have pieced together these
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Chance discovery links inflammatory bowel disease with common bacterial gut toxinNew research has uncovered a surprise link between a common bacterial toxin found in the gut and inflammatory bowel disease (IBD).
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Study shows New Zealand has its own population of blue whalesA group of blue whales that frequent the South Taranaki Bight (STB) between the North and South islands of New Zealand appears to be part of a local population that is genetically distinct from other blue whales in the Pacific Ocean and Southern Ocean, a new study has found.
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News

How accurate is breath test for diagnosis esophagogastric cancer?A breath analysis test to diagnose esophagogastric (esophagus or stomach) cancer showed good diagnostic accuracy in a study of 335 patients, including 172 patients already diagnosed with that cancer.
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Bone scan software accurately calculates prognosis of advanced prostate cancerA software tool to automatically calculate how extensively bones have been infiltrated by prostate cancer is both accurate and speedy, capturing key prognostic information related to survival and the development of symptoms over time.
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News

The right movesNew research in mice reveals how specialized neurons allow the brain to construct sequences of movements.Damage to these neurons disrupts the ability to correctly string together movements into desired actions.The findings may inform the study and eventual treatment of movement disorders such as Parkinson's and Huntington's.
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Diabetes researchers find switch for fatty liver diseaseDuke researchers have identified a key fork in the road for the way the liver deals with carbohydrates, fats and protein. They say it could be a promising new target for combating the pandemics of fatty liver disease and prediabetes.
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Surprise cell death discovery provides birth defect cluesResearchers have made a surprise discovery that could rewrite our understanding of the role programmed cell death plays in embryonic development and congenital birth defects.The team showed that, while programmed cell death -- or apoptosis -- is essential for healthy development overall, many organs and tissues do not require apoptosis to develop normally. The study also suggested that abnormaliti
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News

How social isolation transforms the brainCaltech researchers gain new insights into the brain mechanisms underlying the negative effects caused by long-term social isolation.
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News

What we've learned about the nucleolus since you left schoolThe size of a cell's nucleolus may reveal how long that cell, or even the organism it belongs to, will live. Over the past few years, researchers have been piecing together an unexpected link between aging and an organelle often called the cell's ribosome factory (or just a blob in the middle of the nucleus). A May 17 review in the journal Trends in Cell Biology outlines the connections between th
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News

One way social isolation changes the mouse brainSocial isolation is an intensely stressful environment for mice. When animals are stressed, they generally become much more reactive to a variety of negative stimulants, and these reactions or behaviors persist longer than in non-stressed animals. In a paper published May 17 in the journal Cell, scientists present what they believe is one of the mechanisms by which chronic social isolation in mice
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Emergency contact information helps researchers branch out family treeA collaborative team of researchers from three major academic medical centers in New York City is showing that emergency contact information, which is included in individuals' electronic health records (EHRs), can be used to generate family trees. Those family trees in turn can be used to study heritability in hundreds of medical conditions. The study appears May 17 in the journal Cell.
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Live Science

No, Octopuses Don't Come From Outer SpaceScientists are skeptical of a new paper that suggests frozen octopus eggs rode a meteor to Earth 540 million years ago.
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Popular Science

Forget allergy shots. Try allergy toothpaste.Health The future of allergy treatment could be as easy as brushing your teeth. Weekly immunotherapy shots are the gold standard for allergy desensitization. But one allergist wants to change that—with toothpaste.
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Scientific American Content: Global

Carbon Capture Test Facility Opens in WyomingIn a coal-dependent state, a Republican governor wants to focus on solutions to limit CO2 emissions -- Read more on ScientificAmerican.com
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Study shows New Zealand has its own population of blue whalesA group of blue whales that frequent the South Taranaki Bight (STB) between the North and South islands of New Zealand appears to be part of a local population that is genetically distinct from other blue whales in the Pacific Ocean and Southern Ocean, a new study has found.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

What we've learned about the nucleolus since you left schoolThe size of a cell's nucleolus may reveal how long that cell, or even the organism that cell belongs to, will live. Over the past few years, researchers have been piecing together an unexpected link between aging and an organelle typically known as the cell's ribosome factory (or perhaps just a blob in the middle of the nucleus). A May 17th review in the journal Trends in Cell Biology outlines the
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Surprise cell death discovery provides birth defect cluesAustralian researchers have made a surprise discovery that could rewrite our understanding of the role programmed cell death plays in embryonic development and congenital birth defects.
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Live Science

Ancient Horse and Stable Found Under Pompeii AshThe horse likely swiveled its ears when it heard the deafening roar from Mount Vesuvius in A.D. 79. That was one of the last things the animal ever did: After that, it died, buried in the massive amounts of ash that destroyed Pompeii.
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Science | The Guardian

Publishing Anne Frank’s ‘dirty’ jokes demeans the human who wrote them | Tanya GoldThere is no justification for publicising material she had hidden – it dehumanises her and diminishes the facts of the Holocaust There is a secret inside Anne Frank ’s diary: two pages of musing about “sexual matters” written in 1942 by a 13-year-old girl, and hidden with brown paper so they could not be found. But they were found with digital technology and are now published . The dead girl who w
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Feed: All Latest

Mesmerizing Photos of Finland's Icebound ArchipelagoThese drones-eye aerial shots capture a Scandinavian summer destination in off-season transition.
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News

New Zealand's secret recipe for active school travel: The neighborhood built environmentIncreased rates of active travel (e.g., walking or cycling) to school in New Zealand children and youth were associated with shorter distances to school, and neighborhoods with more connected streets, less residential density, and lower socio-economic status, reveals a new systematic meta-analysis published in Journal of Transport and Health.
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News

A classifier of frog calls for fighting against climate changeThe sounds of amphibians are altered by the increase in ambient temperature, a phenomenon that, in addition to interfering with reproductive behaviour, serves as an indicator of global warming. Researchers at the University of Seville have resorted to artificial intelligence to create an automatic classifier of the thousands of frog and toad sounds that can be recorded in a natural environment.
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News

How milk becomes cheese (video)Making cheese is an ancient exercise in preserving the nutritional value of milk. And it's also pretty tasty. With help from the St. James Cheese Company in New Orleans, Reactions explains how milk becomes cheese, why microbes make it taste better, and why cheese is yellow: https://youtu.be/uJEkb4Hq5jY.
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Can we get 100 percent of our energy from renewable sources?In a review paper last year in Renewable and Sustainable Energy Reviews, Benjamin Heard and colleagues presented their case against 100 percent renewable electricity systems. They doubted the feasibility of many of the recent scenarios for high shares of renewable energy. Now scientists have hit back with their response to the points raised by Heard and colleagues. They demonstrate that there are
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Futurity.org

Why we’re in such a frenzy about Prince Harry and Meghan MarkleThe wedding of Meghan Markle and Britain’s Prince Harry this weekend will mark a huge break from tradition for the royal family. Markle, best known for her role on the TV show Suits , is American-born, biracial, and divorced. Not that long ago, such a marriage would have been unthinkable for the tradition-steeped House of Windsor. Harry’s great-great uncle, King Edward VIII, on the throne less th
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Ingeniøren

Forskere: Landskabelige værdier bør medregnes, når vi bygger elnettetNår man placerer motorveje, vindmøller eller nationalparker medregner man tab af landskabelige værdier. Men ikke ved elmaster.
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Ingeniøren

EU indbringer seks lande for domstol på grund af luftforureningFrankrig, Tyskland og Storbritannien bliver som de første lande nogensinde indbragt for EU-domstolen på grund af for høj NO2-forurening.
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TED Talks Daily (SD video)

The age-old sharing economies of Africa -- and why we should scale them | Robert NeuwirthFrom rides to homes and beyond, we're sharing everything these days, with the help of digital tools. But as modern and high-tech as the sharing economy seems, it's been alive in Africa for centuries, according to author Robert Neuwirth. He shares fascinating examples -- like apprenticeships that work like locally generated venture capital and systems for allocating scarce water -- and says that if
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Evaluating active pressure management of induced earthquakesCan altering the amount or rate of fluid injection and production in an oil and gas field or carbon storage site affect induced earthquakes in that field? A physics-based simulation presented at the 2018 SSA Annual Meeting suggests that this type of 'active pressure management' can be useful in controlling induced seismicity at certain wells.
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Buyer beware: Some water-filter pitchers much better at toxin removalScientists from The Ohio State University compared three popular pitcher brands' ability to clear dangerous microcystins from tap water. They found that while one did an excellent job, other pitchers allowed the toxins -- which appear during harmful algal blooms (HABs) -- to escape the filter and drop into the drinking water.
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Antibacterial in your toothpaste may combat severe lung diseaseMichigan State University researchers have found that when triclosan, a substance that reduces or prevents bacteria from growing, is combined with an antibiotic called tobramycin, it kills the cells that protect cystic fibrosis bacteria, known as Pseudomonas aeruginosa, by up to 99.9 percent.
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Probiotics to protect bees from an infection associated with colony collapse disorderAdding probiotics to bees' food helps make them more resistant to nosemosis, a fungal infection associated with colony collapse disorder that has been observed in Europe and North America over the past 20 years. Probiotics can decrease the mortality rate of this infection in bees by up to 40 percent, report researchers at Université Laval in the most recent edition of Frontiers in Ecology and Evol
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Ohio capital launches unique "Smart City" operating systemOhio's capital city has unveiled the first version of its pioneering transportation operating system.
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The Atlantic

The Iridescent History of Light400,000 years ago, humans and Neanderthals created fire. This ignited a relationship between people and photons that changed the course of mankind—and continues to evolve to this day. Take a tour through the visual history of light in the video above, and read below for further information on the inventions. 400,000 BCE: Humans and Neanderthals deliberately begin making wood fire. 13,000 BCE: Hum
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News

New genes found that determine how the heart responds to exerciseA new study by researchers at Queen Mary University of London and University College London has discovered 30 new gene locations that determine how the heart responds to and recovers from exercise.
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Levers and zippers in the cell's 'customs'The passage of ions through the cell membrane is controlled by ion channels, which are protein complexes that regulate vital processes, such as the heartbeat, as well as being the target towards which many drugs are directed. Now a study by the University of Wisconsin, led by a Spanish researcher, presents a novel model to explain how the pores of these channels open and close.
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Feeding habits of ancient elephants uncovered from grass fragments stuck in their teethA new study, led by scientists at the Institute of Vertebrate Paleontology and Paleoanthropology in Beijing, China, including University of Bristol Ph.D. student Zhang Hanwen, examined the feeding habits of ancient elephant relatives that inhabited Central Asia some 17 million years ago.
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Advanced materials: processing glass like a polymerPure quartz glass is highly transparent and resistant to thermal, physical, and chemical impacts. These are optimum prerequisites for use in optics, data technology or medical engineering. For efficient, high-quality machining, however, adequate processes are lacking. Scientists of Karlsruhe Institute of Technology (KIT) have developed a forming technology to structure quartz glass like a polymer.
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News

The survival of sea birds affected by ocean cyclesIn a general context of climate change, researchers at the Centre d'écologie fonctionnelle et évolutive (CNRS/Université de Montpellier/Université Paul Valery/EPHE-PSL) and their international partners revealed the impact of ocean cycles, such as the Pacific decadal oscillation and El Niño, on the survival of the Nazca booby. Their research, which shows for the first time that long cycles directly
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News

New study could improve monitoring of tropical trees in face of climate changeExperts have challenged the principle that tropical ecosystems are aseasonal -- after discovering regular cycles in fruiting, flowering and leafing in such climates.
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Young people are choosing marijuana before cigarettes and alcoholMore young people are turning to marijuana as their first substance of choice, rather than smoking cigarettes or drinking alcohol, says Brian Fairman of the National Institute of Child Health and Human Development in the US, in Springer's journal Prevention Science. He says that young people who start off on marijuana before alcohol or tobacco are more likely to become heavy users and have cannabi
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Brain abnormality indicates general risk for mental illnessA new study by researchers at Duke University reports an abnormality in visual regions of the brain that is associated with a person's general risk for mental illness. The findings, published in Biological Psychiatry, indicate a signature abnormality shared between common forms of mental illness, which could help clinicians assess a patient's general risk for developing a mental illness.
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News

A bolt of insightThe Telescope Array detected 10 bursts of downward terrestrial gamma-ray flashes (TGFs) between 2014 and 2016, more events than have been observed in rest of the world combined. They are the first to detect downward TGFs at the beginning of cloud-to-ground lightning, and to show where they originated inside thunderstorms. The array is by far the only facility capable of documenting the full TGF 'f
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News

After 60 years, Isle Royale continues world's longest predator-prey studyThe 2018 report is out: two wolves, almost 1,500 moose and an ecosystem in transition. In its 60th year, the research conducted at Isle Royale National Park is the longest running predator-prey study of its kind.
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Innovative light-delivery technique improves biosensorsThere is a continuing need for practical chip-based sensors that can be used at the point of care to detect cancer and other diseases. An innovative way to inject light into tiny silicon microdisks could help meet this need by bringing down the cost and improving the performance of chip-based biosensors.
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Futurity.org

Could better learning from feedback ward off psychosis?Boosting how well people at risk for psychosis learn from positive and negative feedback could potentially keep psychosis at bay, report researchers. They also found that brain scans using functional magnetic resonance imaging, coupled with behavioral measures, could provide markers for the diagnosis of psychosis risk. Psychotic disorders often are severe and involve extreme symptoms such as delu
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Credit card payments evolve beyond the mobile walletMobile wallets can make paying by credit or debit card seamless: Tap your phone at checkout and you're on your way. But mobile wallets are just the beginning. Payment networks and manufacturers are building payment functions into more devices—expanding your options as well as freeing up your hands.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Team makes breakthrough in understanding rare lightning-triggered gamma-raysIn the western Utah desert, the Telescope Array sprawls across an area the size of New York City, waiting for cosmic rays. The facility detects the high-energy particles that collide with Earth's atmosphere constantly; the cosmic rays trigger the 500-plus sensors once every few minutes.
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Futurity.org

How the ’70s shaped myths about Mexican immigrantsSince 2008, more Mexicans have been leaving the Unites States than arriving. But the myth that undocumented Mexican migration is out of hand still lingers today, says Ana Raquel Minian, assistant professor of history in the Stanford University School of Humanities and Sciences. That narrative and other negative, untrue stereotypes about Mexican migrants spread in the 1970s when undocumented migra
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Futurity.org

Why veterans shy away from sharing combat experiencesA new study has found that veterans tend to disclose wartime information on a strict need-to-know basis and that therapists treating combat veterans when they return home can improve counseling strategies by seeking to understand privacy rules formed by military culture. “Like many other marginalized groups, veterans have certain rules that arise from military culture for how they share private i
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BBC News - Science & Environment

Ebola's returnIt is unrealistic to think Ebola will ever be eradicated, but it is now easier to prevent a crisis.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Discovery will impact design of drug delivery systems at the molecular levelResearchers at Houston Methodist and Rice University have made a discovery that will impact the design of not only drug delivery systems, but also the development of newer applications in water filtration and energy production.
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Feed: All Latest

More Artists Are Writing Songs in the Key of AICollaborating with the likes of Sony’s Flow Machine and IBM’s Watson, music producers, K-pop stars, and YouTubers are enlisting AI to crank out hits.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Petry finds missing ingredient to spark the fireworks of lifeMost people can name at least a few bones of the human body, but not many know about the cytoskeleton within our cells, let alone the "microtubules" that give it its shape. Now, a group of Princeton researchers has resolved a long-standing controversy by identifying exactly how the body creates these micron-sized filaments.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Researchers develop faster test for cannabis qualityWith the coming legalization of cannabis in Canada, producers are increasingly looking for quick and accurate means of determining the potency and quality of their products.
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Scientific American Content: Global

I Lost My Arm to Microbes, but They Can Save the WorldExploring their hidden realm could uncover solutions to our most pressing problems -- Read more on ScientificAmerican.com
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

After 60 years, Isle Royale continues world's longest predator-prey studyResearchers from Michigan Technological University have released the annual Winter Study report detailing updates on the ecology of Isle Royale National Park. For the third year in a row, the Isle Royale wolf population remains a mere two, while the moose population continues to stay above the historic average. Without the pressure of predation, the expanding moose population will have a greater i
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Innovative light-delivery technique improves biosensorsThere is a continuing need for practical chip-based sensors that can be used at the point of care to detect cancer and other diseases. An innovative way to inject light into tiny silicon microdisks could help meet this need by bringing down the cost and improving the performance of chip-based biosensors. The advance could eventually lead to a portable and low cost optical sensor for early-stage ca
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BBC News - Science & Environment

Hawaii's Volcano Kilauea spews out 'ballistic blocks'But projectile boulders are not the only hazard facing islanders near the erupting Mount Kilauea.
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Amateur astronomer's data helps scientists discover a new exoplanetScientists of the international project 'Kourovka Planet Search,' organized at Kourovka Astronomical Observatory of Ural Federal University, discovered a new planet outside the solar system (exoplanet).
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Explaining the history of Australia's vegetationUniversity of Adelaide-led research has uncovered the history of when and why the native vegetation that today dominates much of Australia first expanded across the continent.
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Porous materials make it possible to have nanotechnology under controlA University of Cordoba research team is able to stabilize different metallic nanostructures by encapsulating them in porous monocrystalline materials.
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News

PharmaMar announces data presentations: Yondelis® and lurbinectedin at ASCODuring the Congress of the American Society of Clinical Oncology (ASCO) that will be held form the June 1-5 in Chicago (USA), PharmaMar will present the data obtained from various clinical studies of the molecules Yondelis ®, lurbinectedin (PM1183) and plitidepsin.
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Detecting the shape of laser pulsesA team of researchers at the Center for Relativistic Laser Science, within the Institute for Basic Science (IBS) have developed a method to measure the shape of laser pulses in ambient air. Unlike conventional strategies, it is does not require a vacuum environment and can be applied to laser beams of different wavelengths (UV, visible or longer). This patented technique, currently available for t
7h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Ancient human remains and a mystery unearthed by ANU archaeologistANU archaeologist Dr. Catherine Frieman unearths an intact 4,000-year-old human cremation in clay pottery urn on a Cornish site she discovered by accident.
7h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News

A new system is designed that improves the quality of frozen horse spermThe method reduces ice crystals that form during cryopreservation and affect spermatozoon structure.
7h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News

La Trobe's infection-busting discoveryA team of scientists from Melbourne's La Trobe University has shown a protein found in a tobacco plant has the potential to fight life-threatening infectious diseases.
7h
Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

Vast ionized hydrogen cloud in the Whirlpool Galaxy revealed by ultra-sensitive telescopeNo one has ever seen what astronomers first observed using a refurbished 75-year-old telescope in the Arizona mountains. What it was turned out to be a massive cloud of ionized hydrogen gas spewed from a nearby galaxy and then essentially 'cooked' by radiation from the galaxy's central black hole.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

Most deprived are nearly twice as likely to develop dementiaOlder adults in England with fewer financial resources are more likely to develop dementia, according to new research.
7h
Live Science

Dogs Might Be More Rational Than HumansLaurie Santos, a cognitive psychologist at Yale, demonstrates how dogs can sometimes be more rational than humans.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Egypt, Sudan, Ethiopia agree study of contentious Nile damEgypt, Sudan and Ethiopia have agreed to set up a scientific committee to study a dam Ethiopia is building on a tributary of the Nile, an Ethiopian minister said Thursday.
7h
Popular Science

How to avoid ingrown hairsDIY Welcome to summer, the season of red, pus-filled bumps. In our quest to become smooth and hairless, many of us end up the opposite: Our recently shorn hairs grow into the skin, causing red bumps. Yes, we’re talking about…
7h
The Atlantic

Trump Can't Afford to Admit His Failures With North KoreaThink of the past few months of President Trump’s Korea policy as a drama, unfolding in multiple acts. Act I: Trump impulsively agrees to meet North Korean dictator Kim Jong Un. Perhaps unaware that the North Koreans have sought such a summit meeting for decades, Trump boasts that he has extracted a major concession. Act II: Trump gradually comes to appreciate that he has been duped. To prove tha
7h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Discovery will impact design of drug delivery systems at the molecular levelResearchers at Houston Methodist and Rice University have made a discovery that will impact the design of not only drug delivery systems, but also the development of newer applications in water filtration and energy production. They made this discovery while investigating how the drug molecules in solution travel through a nanochannel drug-delivery system. The findings are described in Nature Comm
7h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News

The ultrafast dance of liquid waterTypically we consider that water molecules in the liquid state move randomly on ultrafast timescales due to thermal fluctuations. Now, scientists at Stockholm University have discovered correlated motion in water dynamics on a sub-100 femtoseconds timescale. This appears as 'caging effects' due to buildup of tetrahedral structures upon supercooling. The results, reported in Nature Communications o
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Sex, viruses and cancerA new study suggests that a common treatment for erectile dysfunction combined with the flu vaccine may be able to help the immune system mop up cancer cells left behind after surgery. The study, published in OncoImmunology, shows that this unconventional strategy can reduce the spread of cancer by more than 90 percent in a mouse model. It is now being evaluated in a world-first clinical trial.
7h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Photosynthesis involves a protein 'piston'The photosystem I (PSI)-ferrodoxin (Fd) complex is important in electron transfer during photosynthesis, through which plants convert sunlight, carbon dioxide, and water into complex chemicals and oxygen. An Osaka University-led international collaboration recently crystallized the PSI-Fd complex for the first time. They found that the PSI-Fd complex contained Fd with weak and strong binding state
7h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Petry finds missing ingredient to spark the fireworks of lifeUsing a novel imaging technique, the Petry Lab demonstrates that XMAP215, a protein known to help microtubules grow faster and longer, is necessary to nucleating microtubules. For decades, researchers have been struggling to understand why the gamma-tubulin ring complex (g-TuRC) nucleates only a few microtubules in the test tube, looking for some other factor that could activate or enhance g-TuRC.
7h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Shorter trastuzumab treatment for HER2+ breast cancer can be as effective, with fewer cardiac side-effectsA phase III randomized clinical trial of 4,088 women with HER2-positive, early-stage breast cancer found that taking trastuzumab (Herceptin) for 6 months was non-inferior to the current standard of 12 months. The disease-free survival rate at four years was 89.4 percent with 6 months of therapy and 89.8 percent with 12 months of therapy. In addition, only 4 percent of women in the 6-month arm stop
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Vast majority of heavy smokers not screened for lung cancer despite USPSTF recommendationsAn analysis of 1,800 lung cancer screening sites nationwide found that only 1.9 percent of more than 7 million current and former heavy smokers were screened for lung cancer in 2016, despite United States Preventive Services Task Force (USPSTF) and ASCO screening recommendations.
7h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Upfront, comprehensive genetic testing in advanced lung cancer is cost-effectiveAn economic model comparing different types of genetic testing in metastatic non-small-cell lung cancer (NSCLC) found that using next-generation sequencing (NGS) to test for all known lung cancer-related gene changes at the time of diagnosis was more cost-effective and faster than testing one or a limited number of genes at a time.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

EU takes UK, Germany, four others to court over air pollutionThe European Commission said Thursday it is taking Germany, Britain, France and three other countries to the bloc's highest court for failing to comply with EU air quality standards.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

Why chikungunya, other arthritis-causing viruses target jointsScientists have understood little about how chikungunya and related viruses cause arthritis. Now, researchers at have identified the molecular handle that chikungunya grabs to get inside cells. The findings could lead to ways to prevent or treat disease caused by chikungunya and related viruses.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Toshiba says China approves sale of chip unit to Bain consortiumEmbattled Japanese conglomerate Toshiba on Thursday said Chinese regulators have given approval for its plan to sell its prized chip unit—the final hurdle to complete the deal.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Rovio's shares fly high on Angry Birds 2 successFinnish game maker Rovio's shares soared five percent Thursday after the company reported first-quarter results with net profit doubling and "record revenues" from its sequel game Angry Birds 2.
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Dagens Medicin

KL kommer med anbefalinger til løft af psykiatrienEn række anbefalinger fra KL skal hjælpe med at styrke indsatsen på psykiatriområdet. Danske Regioner hilser udspillet velkommen.
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The Atlantic

The Mystery of the ‘SpaceBees’ Just Got Even Weirder“Perfect timing!” Mike Coletta said when he answered the phone. I called him recently to ask about some satellites currently orbiting Earth. Just then, one of them was passing over his home in Colorado. Coletta has been tracking satellites with radio antennas mounted on his house for years. This spring, he’s on a special mission: He wants to catch the transmissions of “SpaceBees,” four satellites
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

New study could improve monitoring of tropical trees in face of climate changeExperts have challenged the principle that tropical ecosystems are aseasonal – after discovering regular cycles in fruiting, flowering and leafing in such climates.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Feeding habits of ancient elephant relatives uncovered from grass fragments stuck in their teethA new study, led by scientists at the Institute of Vertebrate Paleontology and Paleoanthropology (IVPP) in Beijing, China, including University of Bristol Ph.D. student Zhang Hanwen, examined the feeding habits of ancient elephant relatives that inhabited Central Asia some 17 million years ago.
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Scientific American Content: Global

The New Biography of the SunOur closest star has a much more exciting biography than scientists once assumed. New research illuminates the sun's past and potential future -- Read more on ScientificAmerican.com
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

Major shift in marine life occurred 33 million years later in the SouthA new study of marine fossils from Antarctica, Australia, New Zealand and South America reveals that one of the greatest changes to the evolution of life in our oceans occurred more recently in the Southern Hemisphere than previously thought.
8h
Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

Climate-threatened animals unable to relocateMany of the European mammals whose habitat is being destroyed by climate change are not able to find new places to live elsewhere.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

New method eliminates guesswork when lenses go freeformResearchers have combined theory and practice in a step-by-step method that eliminates much of the guesswork of using freeform lenses.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

Under certain conditions, bacterial signals set the stage for leukemiaA new study shows that bacterial signals are crucial to the development of a precursor condition to leukemia, which can be induced by disrupting the intestinal barrier or by introducing a bacterial infection.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

Cellular valve structure opens up potential novel therapiesBiochemists have determined the detailed structure of a volume-regulated chloride channel. This cellular valve is activated in response to swelling to prevent the cell from bursting. The protein also plays an important role in the uptake of chemotherapeutics and the release of neurotransmitters after a stroke. The controlled regulation of its activity thus opens up a promising strategy for novel t
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Metallic drivers of Alzheimer's diseaseX-ray spectromicroscopy at the Scanning X-ray Microscopy beamline (I08), here at Diamond, has been utilised to pinpoint chemically reduced iron and calcium compounds within protein plaques derived from brains of Alzheimer's disease patients. The study, published in Nanoscale, has shed light on the way in which metallic species contribute to the pathogenesis of Alzheimer's disease and could help di
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Playing games to address conservation conflictsA new study, led by Professor Steve Redpath at the University of Aberdeen, explores the role that playing games can have in helping us understand and deal with conflicts that impact on biodiversity and on people's lives.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

To save whale sharks, first we track their youngAn international team of researchers have for the first time uncovered the migration routes for whale sharks around Madagascar.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Securing the UK's natural carbon storageThe UK's spectacular scenery attracts millions of visitors from around the world. Iconic heath, peatland and sea lochs don't just look beautiful though. They are shaped by the changing climate.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Newly discovered protein operated in earliest organismsLife on Earth depends on photosynthetic carbon dioxide (CO2) fixation to form organic carbon. Plants take atmospheric CO2 and transform it into organic molecules such as glucose. This process evolved in cyanobacteria and was later conveyed to eukaryotes, giving rise to plastids in algae and plants. Researchers have now discovered a new protein which is involved in this complex process; it regulate
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Viden

Digital guldfeber tømmer butikkerne for grafikkortDer har været global krise i alverdens computerbutikker, men snart kan du igen købe muskler til spillecomputeren
8h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News

UBC Okanagan researchers develop faster test for cannabis qualityResearchers at UBC's Okanagan campus have developed a new method of measuring phytocannabinoids -- the primary bioactive molecules in cannabis -- that will lead to faster, safer and more accurate information for producers, regulators and consumers alike.
8h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Single surface protein boosts multiple oncogenic pathways in acute myeloid leukemiaResearchers from the Albert Einstein College of Medicine in New York have discovered that a signaling protein elevated in patients with acute myeloid leukemia (AML) plays a much wider role in the disease than previously thought. The study, which will be published May 17 in the Journal of Experimental Medicine, raises hopes that current efforts to target this signaling protein could be a successful
8h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News

New regimens improve survival for children and young adults with T-cell cancersIn a federally funded, randomized phase III clinical trial performed by the Children's Oncology Group (COG), 90 percent of children and young adults with T-cell acute lymphoblastic leukemia (T-ALL) or T-cell lymphoblastic lymphoma (T-LL) were alive four years after starting treatment regimens on this trial, and 84 percent were cancer free. These are the highest survival rates for these T-cell mali
8h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Use of mobile and sensor technology lowers symptom severity for people with head and neck cancerA federally funded, randomized clinical trial of 357 people receiving radiation for head and neck cancer, using mobile and sensor technology to remotely monitor patient symptoms, resulted in less severe symptoms related to both the cancer and its treatment (both general and cancer-related).
8h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News

More choices for treating insomnia in cancer survivors: Acupuncture and cognitive behavioral therapyALEXANDRIA, Va. - A Patient-Centered Outcomes Research Institute (PCORI)-supported randomized clinical trial of cancer survivors showed that eight weeks of either acupuncture or cognitive behavioral therapy for insomnia (CBT-I) decreased the severity of insomnia among cancer survivors, though improvements were greatest among patients receiving cognitive behavioral therapy.
8h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Letting the cat out of the bag: Why researchers disclose results ahead of publicationA new study from a research team from the Georgia Institute of Technology found that a majority of scientists disclose key details about their work informally to peers and potential collaborators ahead of publishing in a peer reviewed journal or presenting the findings publicly.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

The long life of pesticidesAlthough the use of organochlorine pesticides has been forbidden for decades, it is still affecting our soils. This is the conclusion of a research group from Universidad Politécnica de Madrid after an exhaustive study carried out in the Laguna del Hito, a Special Protection Area for Birds.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Cell motility mystery cracked—the protein that re-charges the cell's motility machinery revealedResearch conducted in the University of Helsinki may help in developing specific inhibitors that would slow down actin-dependent movement of cancer cells.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Processing glass like a polymerPure quartz glass is highly transparent and resistant to thermal, physical, and chemical impacts. These are optimum prerequisites for use in optics, data technology or medical engineering. For efficient, high-quality machining, however, adequate processes are lacking. Scientists of Karlsruhe Institute of Technology (KIT) have developed a forming technology to structure quartz glass like a polymer.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

How China will reduce its carbon impactRon Yuang, Ph.D. candidate from the Institute of Environmental Sciences investigated the impact of the renewable energy, expansion on China's carbon emission. On 17 May, she will defend her thesis. China is investing heavily in the development of low-carbon electricity sources, like nuclear, hydro-, wind and solar power.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

We aren't doing enough to protect prisoners during natural disastersThe intensity of recent hurricanes and the damage they have caused in America have garnered lots of national news coverage. After Hurricane Katrina, it became evident how a lack of planning for natural disasters can have dangerous and deadly consequences. However, often hidden from public view is the struggle that some of our most vulnerable citizens endure during times of hurricanes and other nat
8h
New on MIT Technology Review

The world’s first quantum software superstore—or so it hopes—is hereZapata Computing plans to build the algorithms for companies that want to experiment with quantum computers.
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Scientific American Content: Global

So, Umm, Google Duplex's Chatter Is Not Quite HumanA systems scientist breaks down the intricacies of making a machine that can fool humans into thinking it’s one of us -- Read more on ScientificAmerican.com
8h
The Atlantic

Is It Futile to 'Dissect' Frank Ocean's Work?Frank Ocean defies categorization. Whether in genre, medium, sexuality, or personal ethos, the reclusive artist has nimbly resisted both binaries and boundaries throughout his career. Ocean has been a singer, songwriter, producer, rapper, visual artist, photographer, model, and muse. For the four years between his debut studio album, C hannel Orange, and his almost impossibly delayed 2016 followu
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Futurity.org

Your teens may actually take healthy food rules to heartTeens with health-oriented food rules at home are more likely to make healthy eating decisions on their own, according to a new study. The finding is good news for parents who want their kids to eat their vegetables. “It is important for parents to understand whether having food rules—and more specifically, what kinds of food rules—may help encourage healthy eating,” write Jennifer Wang and Priya
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Protecting forests and people from tropical stormsNatural disasters are becoming more frequent and extreme. I witnessed this myself when I travelled to Nicaragua, on behalf of Fauna & Flora International (FFI), last year. A few weeks before my trip a huge tropical storm (Hurricane Nate) ripped through the country, endangering people's lives and livelihoods. Driving through the country, I saw the impact of the heavy rains, landslides and floods –
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Dagens Medicin

Trykbølger hjælper diabetespatienter med dårlige nyrerSkridende nyrefunktion hos diabetespatienter kan bremses – måske endog forbedres – hvis de behandles med trykbølger, viser et igangværende pilotstudie fra Odense Universitetshospital.
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Dagens Medicin

Sundhedspersonale anmelder færre sager til PatienterstatningenFærre og færre sager ender hos patienterstatningen, og det er særligt sundhedspersonalet, der anmelder mindre end tidligere. Ærgerligt, mener Patienterstatningens direktør.
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Latest Headlines | Science News

Nanoparticles could help rescue malnourished cropsNanoparticles normally used to fight cancer could also be used to treat malnourished crops.
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Feed: All Latest

Spermbots Offer a Promising New Way to Target CancerAfter discovering that sperm could be coaxed into carrying chemotherapy drugs, researchers shifted their focus from inducing life to slaying reproductive cancer.
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5 Comics to Read Before You See 'Deadpool 2'Want to know what's up with Josh Brolin's character Cable? Here's your primer.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Research reveals digital impact on journalistsOver 3000 Australian print and broadcast journalists have been made redundant in the past six years. A team of academics is investigating their fates and recording the effects of digital media on the profession.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

X-ray laser reveals ultrafast dance of liquid waterWater's lack of color, taste and smell make it seem simple – and on a molecular level, it is. However, when many water molecules come together they form a highly complex network of hydrogen bonds. This network is believed to be responsible for many of the peculiar properties of liquid water, but its behavior is not yet fully understood.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Veterinary professor says ticks, fleas and mosquitoes not just a seasonal problemWarmer weather is upon us and pet owners tend to think about tick and flea control for their dogs and cats. But according to a veterinary parasitology expert at Auburn University's College of Veterinary Medicine, this should not be just a seasonal concern.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

Critically endangered South American forests were planted by ancient peoplesCritically endangered South American forests thought to be the result of climate change were actually spread by ancient communities, archaeologists have found.
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New Scientist - News

Harsh: Europe’s cannabis died just as the first farmers arrivedCannabis – the source of the drug marijuana – virtually disappeared from Europe just as farmers arrived, so they didn’t get the chance to grow it for another 4500 years
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New Scientist - News

Drones plus AI help to spot sick trees and plants in timeDrones fitted with multispectral cameras are scanning forests for beetle attack, and orchards and vineyards for signs of disease before it’s too late
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Study of prepublication disclosure shows some do and some don'tA quartet of researchers affiliated with Harvard University, the University of Passau in Germany and the University of Missouri, has found that a majority of researchers disclose details about their research prior to publication. In their paper published on the open access site Science Advances, the researchers describe what their survey of a large number of scientists revealed.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Researchers are creating a spot colder than the vacuum of space inside the International Space StationIn 2018, a new atomic refrigerator will blast off for the space station. It's called the Cold Atom Lab (CAL), and it can refrigerate matter to one ten billionth of a degree above absolute zero, just above the point where all the thermal activity of atoms theoretically stops.
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Futurity.org

Lucky flyby suggests Europa ejects plumes of waterResearchers have found the strongest evidence yet to suggest that Europa, one of Jupiter’s moons, has plumes ejecting water from its subsurface into space. Scientists have long suspected that Europa is hiding a global ocean beneath its icy surface. The new research adds to evidence suggesting that’s the case. “I do feel we were lucky—maybe fortuitous is a better word…” The researchers conducted a
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

European wind energy generation potential in a 1.5 degree C warmer worldThe UK and large parts of northern Europe could become windier if global temperatures reach 1.5 degrees C above pre-industrial levels, according to a new study.
8h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Improving survival in pancreatic cancer with platinum-based chemotherapyA small study of adults with the most common form of pancreatic cancer adds to evidence that patients with BRCA1 or BRCA2 gene mutations long linked to a high risk of breast cancer have poorer overall survival rates than those without the mutations.
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Ingeniøren

Brinttog skal på skinnerne i ØstrigGodt en halv milliard kroner for fem brinttog, lyder en ordre til den østrigske Zillertalbahn, der pga. sine smalle spor ikke havde mange leverandører i udbuddet.
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Popular Science

These animals spend their whole lives waiting to have sex, and then they dieAnimals Existing just to have sex is a solid evolutionary strategy. The humble antechinus has been making headlines recently because, well, it has so much sex that it dies. This is not an evolutionary flaw. It is, in fact, a feature of…
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Science | The Guardian

Guardian science reporter wins prize for vaginal mesh investigationHannah Devlin’s reporting wins Association of British Science Writers award for best investigative journalism The Guardian’s science correspondent Hannah Devlin has scooped a coveted prize in the Association of British Science Writers awards for her investigation into the vaginal mesh scandal. Her report exposing NHS data on how thousands of women have undergone surgery to have vaginal mesh impla
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The Scientist RSS

Image of the Day: Coral FirebreakMarine scientists slowed the spread of a disease that attacks coral by removing areas around diseased tissue.
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The Atlantic

‘Without Personal Honor There Is No Leadership’Rex Tillerson spent 10 years as CEO of ExxonMobil before Donald Trump tapped him to be secretary of state, only to fire him from the position 14 months later. On Wednesday, he delivered a commencement address at the Virginia Military Institute, where he warned graduates that their democracy is in peril. “I observe a growing crisis of ethics and integrity,” he lamented, twice invoking the biblical
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The Atlantic

Los Angeles, America’s Future SpaceportL os Angeles is an open-air museum of aerospace history. It is a city of abandoned missile-defense facilities and stealth-jet assembly plants, of erased airfields and repurposed hangars, flagships of another era standing dormant but unnoticed in plain sight. First lost to the secrecy of war, then overlooked as mundane industry, this earlier version of the metropolis is stirring once again, as pri
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The Atlantic

Can the San Francisco Bay Be Saved From the Sea?“The scale of what we are proposing to do out here scares people,” says John Bourgeois, the executive project manager of the South Bay Salt Pond Restoration Project, the single largest wetlands rehabilitation effort this side of the Mississippi River. Bourgeois and I are standing in the Don Edwards San Francisco Bay National Wildlife Refuge Environmental Education Center in a glass-walled widow’s
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Logging burns conceal industrial pollution in the name of 'community safety'Earlier this year, Melbourne and large areas of Central Victoria, experienced days of smoke haze and poor air quality warnings as a result of planned burns. It's a regular event occurring every autumn.
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Live Science

Hippo Poop Is Literally Suffocating FishThousands of hippos in Kenya's Mara River poop out 9.3 tons of feces every day!
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Dagens Medicin

Overlægerne stemmer for overenskomstaftaleOverlægeforeningens repræsentantskab besluttede tirsdag aften enstemmigt at bakke op om resultatet for overenskomstforhandlingerne.
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The Physics—and Physicality—of Extreme JugglingThe world's best numbers juggler can throw and catch 14 balls. Once. Has he reached juggling's limit?
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Fun Ideas That Keep Kids Learning Even After School's OutBoredom is just the start of an adventure.
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NYT > Science

Review: ‘The Most Unknown’ Tackles Science’s Big QuestionsThe documentary interviews nine scientists in fields including astronomy and neuroscience, and asks them to reflect on their work.
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Science-Based Medicine

The Supreme Court of Canada orders a new trial for parents convicted in Ezekiel Stephan’s deathThe Supreme Court of Canada has ordered a new trial for David and Collet Stephan, who had been convicted in the meningitis death of their son. The Stephans say they're vindicated. The facts say otherwise.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Researchers develop new chemistry to make smart drugs smarterA method to activate targeted drugs, or smart drugs, only at the selected site of action, an approach that improves the drug's therapeutic effect and minimizes side effects, has been developed in a study led by Georgia State University.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Women are less likely to be replaced by robots and might even benefit from automationResearch shows women are better positioned than men to resist the automation of work and possibly even benefit from it.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

What happens to small towns whose water becomes big business for bottled brands?Groundwater being pumped from a highland aquifer, only to be whisked away in tankers and sold in little plastic bottles by a multinational corporation – it's a difficult concept for a small farming town to swallow.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

GP-write has big goals for synthetic genomesWe continue to improve our ability to read, write, and edit DNA on larger and larger scales. GP-write wants to gather and coordinate the global enthusiasm around large-scale genome engineering to bring about some major advancements in several areas. Overall, they have the goal to reduce of cost of building and testing large genomes by over 1,000-fold within ten years. This major reduction in cost
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The Atlantic

13 Reasons Why Tries AgainLate in the second season of 13 Reasons Why , Clay Jensen (Dylan Minnette) has an altercation with his school principal, Mr. Bolan (Steven Weber). Bolan has imposed a new rule at Liberty High that anyone talking about the suicide of Hannah Baker (Katherine Langford) will be suspended. “Suicide contagion is a real thing, and we’ve got to take measures to protect you kids,” he says. Clay argues tha
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Detecting the shape of laser pulsesA team of researchers at the Center for Relativistic Laser Science, within the Institute for Basic Science (IBS) have developed a method to measure the shape of laser pulses in ambient air. Unlike conventional strategies, it is does not require a vacuum environment and can be applied to laser beams of different wavelengths (UV, visible or longer). This patented technique, currently available for t
9h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Photosynthesis involves a protein "piston"Plants convert water and carbon dioxide into sugars and oxygen by photosynthesis. Photosynthesis is thus integral to life as we know it and has been investigated extensively by researchers around the globe.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

The survival of sea birds affected by ocean cyclesIn a general context of climate change, researchers at the Centre d'écologie fonctionnelle et évolutive (CNRS/Université de Montpellier/Université Paul Valery/EPHE-PSL) and their international partners revealed the impact of ocean cycles, such as the Pacific decadal oscillation and El Niño, on the survival of the Nazca booby, a species found on the Galapagos Islands. Their research, which shows fo
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Medium- and heavy-duty truck research propels efficiency to meet future needsFueled by the rise of e-commerce and fast shipping services like Amazon, consumers have come to expect their goods at their doorstep in a matter of days and even hours—not weeks. This on-demand culture coincides with the expansion of transportation technologies, connectivity, and automation, and together, these changes are shaking up an important cornerstone of American transportation—our vital de
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Zero-waste palm oil industry on the horizon with new technologyEngineers at the University of Nottingham Malaysia have developed new technology to help the global palm oil processing industry reduce CO2 emissions and create renewable energy from its waste.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

The secret to measuring an antineutrino's energyThe MINERvA collaboration analyzed data from the interactions of an antineutrino—the antimatter partner of a neutrino—with a nucleus. They were surprised to find evidence that antineutrinos interacted with pairs of particles inside the nucleus. They had expected antineutrinos to interact with just single protons or neutrons. To see this evidence, the team compared their antineutrino data to a mode
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cognitive science

The Mind: New group where we are discussing the mind, the self, and consciousness.submitted by /u/soyjorgesilva [link] [comments]
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Science | The Guardian

Wallace’s enigma: how the island of Sulawesi continues to captivate biologistsAfter 150 years, biologists are untangling the history of the Indonesian island’s unusual fauna “We now come to the Island of Celebes, in many respects the most remarkable and interesting in the whole region, or perhaps on the globe, since no other island seems to present so many curious problems for solution.” ( Wallace 1876 ) Wedged in between the continental landmasses of south-east Asia and A
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BBC News - Science & Environment

UK referred to Europe's top court over air pollutionBritain is being taken to the European Court of Justice over persistent breaches of pollution limits.
10h
Live Science

US Birth Rate Hits All-Time Low: What's Behind the Decline?2017 saw the lowest birth rate in more than 100 years.
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The Atlantic

The Curse of an Open Floor PlanF or some American families, one kitchen is apparently not enough. What is wrong with having just one kitchen? Well, people cook in kitchens, and when they cook in kitchens, they make messes, and then, to make matters worse, if their kitchen is in full view from the rest of the house—as many today are—their mess is out in the open visible as they eat their meals, hang out with their families, ent
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The Atlantic

The Republican Party's Generational BetRepresentative Martha McSally, the establishment favorite for the Republican Senate nomination in Arizona, took the unusual step this week of removing her name as a co-sponsor of legislation to provide a path to citizenship for the so-called “Dreamers,” young people brought to the U.S. illegally by their parents. Locked in a tough primary with two anti-immigration hardliners—former state Senator
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Live Science

Moon Dust Is Super Toxic to Human CellsTurns out moon dust is really bad for human cells.
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What Happened to Internet.org, Facebook's Grand Plan to Wire the World?Five years ago Mark Zuckerberg debuted a bold vision of global internet. It didn’t go as planned—forcing Facebook to reckon with the limits of its own ambition.
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Is Tesla's Autopilot Safe? Finding Out Demands Better DataElon Musk has made bold claims about his sort of self-driving feature’s saving lives, but the truth is far trickier, and harder to reach.
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Sam Harris and the Myth of Perfectly Rational ThoughtSam Harris, the famous proponent of New Atheism is on a crusade against tribalism but seems oblivious to his own version of it.
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4 Key Takeaways From Mueller’s First Year—and What’s NextOne year in, Robert Mueller’s investigation into Trump and Russia appears poised to connect all the pieces of the puzzle.
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Feed: All Latest

The Complete History And Future of RobotsHere's the WIRED guide to catch you up on everything you should know about robotics.
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Latest Headlines | Science News

50 years ago, scientists warned of a sparrow’s extinctionOnly 17 dusky seaside sparrows remained in 1968. Today, there are none.
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Scientific American Content: Global

Countries with Less Gender Equity Have More Women in STEM--Huh?It seems like a paradox, but it may have more to do with how we measure equity -- Read more on ScientificAmerican.com
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Scientific American Content: Global

The Most Important Inventor You've Never Heard OfStanford Ovshinsky changed your life, and the full impact of his brilliance may still be to come -- Read more on ScientificAmerican.com
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

A match made on a high-altitude balloonOn March 29, 2018, World View's Stratollite high-altitude balloon lifted off from the company's launch facility in Tucson, Arizona, reaching a float altitude of 115,000 feet. The balloon was aloft for approximately five hours before landing near the border of New Mexico and Texas.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Germany returns grave-plundered artefacts to AlaskaGermany has restituted nine artefacts belonging to indigenous people in Alaska after determining they were plundered from graves.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

In Denmark, Airbnb to report hosts' rent to tax authoritiesDenmark says online room-rental platform Airbnb will start to automatically report its users' deals to taxation authorities, the first country to do so.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Chinese private firm launches first space rocketA suborbital rocket was launched into space Thursday by a start-up in China's burgeoning commercial aeronautics industry, as private firms snap at the heels of their dominant American rivals.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Social network models provide new tool for ecology studiesSocial media networks such as Twitter and Facebook have inspired a new method of describing how other species interact with one another.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Ultralight science—boundary layer measurements from low-flying sourceOn a grassy runway just outside of Madison, Grant Petty makes the final checks on his skeleton-framed airplane. Once ready, he hits the throttle and lurches forward. After a few 100 feet, the ultralight aircraft is airborne and climbing steadily, the scenery miniaturizing beneath Petty's feet. He will ultimately reach a cruising speed of around 40 mph.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Research proves value of traceability in dairy industryAs part of her research, Melissa developed a model for estimating the value added by traceability systems. As well as helping companies gauge the overall benefit of improving their products' traceability, the model also helps them identify the stages in the production chain where these systems have the greatest impact.
11h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

New theory describes intricacies of a splashing dropletAs a single raindrop falls to the ground, it can splash back up in a crown-like sheet, spraying smaller droplets from its rim before sinking back to the surface—all in the blink of an eye.
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Doctors in US and Canada launch sweeping pharmaceutical reform proposalA group of 21 physician leaders published a comprehensive proposal to ensure universal access to safe, innovative, and affordable medications. Published today in the British Medical Journal (BMJ), 'Healing an ailing pharmaceutical system: prescription for reform for the US and Canada,' identifies seven critical areas for reform, along with both short- and long-term solutions to improve the develop
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Marine animals have been following their preferred climate for millions of yearsCurrent global warming has far-reaching ecological consequences for the Earth's oceans. Many marine organisms are reacting by migrating toward the poles. Researchers at Geozentrum Nordbayern at Friedrich-Alexander-Universität Erlangen-Nürnberg (FAU) have now discovered that marine animals have been migrating for millions of years when the temperature on Earth increases or decreases.
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Ingeniøren

Sundere brændeovne kræver et teknologisk tigerspringCirka hvert sjette danske hjem opvarmes med brænde. Udsigterne til for alvor at indfri det tekniske potentiale i forhold til at nedbringe de sundhedsskadelige udledninger er lange, lyder det fra danske forskere i en ny rapport.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Explaining the history of Australia's vegetationUniversity of Adelaide-led research has uncovered the history of when and why the native vegetation that today dominates much of Australia first expanded across the continent.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

New nuclear RNA retention activity discoveredGene expression involves mRNA transport from its place of synthesis to the cytoplasm where protein translation occurs. However, many non-coding RNA species do not follow this flow and new data now demonstrate how cells prevent the unwanted export of RNA and instead ensure nuclear degradation.
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BBC News - Science & Environment

Bee crisis: EU court backs near-total neonicotinoids banThree insecticides blamed for bee colony collapses will be restricted to greenhouses.
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The Atlantic

Should the U.S. Break Up Amazon?Some time later this year, Amazon could become the first trillion-dollar company in American history. Its valuation has already doubled in the last 14 months to about $800 billion, and Jeff Bezos, its founder and CEO, is officially the richest man on the planet. There are ways in which Amazon seems to be the greatest company in American history. It’s revolutionized the global shopping experience
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The Atlantic

Once I LivedAfter du Bellay Ulysses, Jason—they were the real travelers, but merely arriving home is not the whole story. Once I lived with a view all the way to LaGuardia, and at dusk the planes were beads on a single thread. Once I lived in a neighborhood where the light was unemotional, and an exiled Greek waited for his country to be freed. Once I lived in a city with a name that was beautiful, lit by a
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The Atlantic

The ConversationThe Last Temptation In April, Michael Gerson described how evangelicals, once culturally confident, became an anxious minority seeking political protection from the least religious president in living memory. I grew up in an evangelical-Christian household, and I am currently a student at Liberty University. As I am a recent ex-evangelical, Michael Gerson’s excellent article, “The Last Temptation
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Hydrogen peroxide assists sexual reproduction in sprucePlant physiologists from MSU have proved for the first time that dangerous reactive oxygen species that are often considered by-products of energy generation in cells are required by conifers to fertilize egg cells. Experiments with blue spruce (Picea pungens) pollen led to the discovery of a protein that makes the whole system work. The scientists believe that the obtained data will lead to the o
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Apatite-type materials without interstitial oxygens show high oxide-ion conductivity by overbondingScientists at Tokyo Institute of Technology and collaborators have shown the overbonding of channel oxygens in La-rich apatite-type lanthanum silicates, rather than the presence of the interstitial oxygens, to be responsible for the high oxide-ion conductivity. This concept of "high oxide-ion conductivity by overbonding" opens the door for designing better ion conductors, which could be useful in
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BBC News - Science & Environment

Scientists detect oxygen legacy of first starsThe very first stars to shine in the Universe left a tell-tale trace in a far-distant galaxy.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Main regularities of thermal expansion and thermal stability of layered ferroelectrics establishedThe scientists of the Lobachevsky University and the Institute of Low Temperatures and Structural Research in Wroclaw (Poland) have conducted unique studies of oscillation properties using optical spectroscopy.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

How humans repress prejudicesBochum-based philosopher Dr. Beate Krickel has used psychoanalysis to investigate why people are often not aware of their prejudices. In her accounts, she has been elaborating how prejudices can become unconscious. As researcher at the Institute of Philosophy II at Ruhr-Universität Bochum, she outlines her theory in the journal Philosophical Psychology from May 15, 2018.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Functional films made of environmentally friendly clay minerals and dyesResearchers from Tokyo Metropolitan University and Shimane University have created a transparent hybrid film that combines natural clay minerals and dyes into a material that changes color in response to environmental humidity. The color change does not involve breaking chemical bonds; the team uncovered a novel mechanism that makes the process easily reversible, for long-lasting functionality usi
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Ingeniøren

Misbrug af betalingskort udgør stærkt stigende andel af internetkriminalitetOmkring 105.000 danskere fik misbrugt deres betalingskort sidste år, viser en ny offerundersøgelse foretaget af Det Kriminalpræventive Råd.
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Ingeniøren

Protonens ukendte sider: Det høje indre tryk og den 'svage' ladningTrykket i protonens indre er større end selv i neutronstjerner. Den første måling af protonens såkaldte 'svage' ladning giver en grænse for, hvor 'ny fysik' udover Standardmodellen kan tænkes at indtræffe.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Study says China-backed dam would destroy MekongA Chinese-backed plan for Cambodia to build the Mekong River's biggest dam would destroy fisheries that feed millions and worsen tensions with Vietnam, the downstream country with most to lose from dams on the waterway, according to a three-year study commissioned by the Cambodian government.
12h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Sri Lanka elephants face plastic danger foraging dumps for foodAt a garbage dump in central Sri Lanka a herd of wild elephants forage among a mountain of rubbish, swallowing dangerous scraps of plastic mixed with rotting food in what experts warn is an increasing problem for the revered animals.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Europe car sales speed up in AprilCar sales in the top European markets rose sharply in April, statistics showed Thursday, confounding fears that a slowdown in the eurozone's recovery might put the brakes on the continent's vehicle industry.
12h
Ingeniøren

Omstridt databeskyttelseslov vedtaget uden modstand i FolketingetFolketinget har i dag vedtaget den nye databeskyttelseslov, der skal implementere GDPR i Danmark.
12h
Ingeniøren

Amerikansk senat vil genindføre netneutralitetEt flertal blandt de amerikanske senatorer stemte tirsdag for at genindføre netneutralitetsregler, der skal sikre et frit og åbent internet.
12h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Critically endangered South American forests were man madeCritically endangered South American forests thought to be the result of climate change were actually spread by ancient communities, archaeologists have found.
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Major shift in marine life occurred 33 million years later in the SouthA new study of marine fossils from Antarctica, Australia, New Zealand and South America reveals that one of the greatest changes to the evolution of life in our oceans occurred more recently in the Southern Hemisphere than previously thought. The results are published today in the journal Communications Biology.
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Keep saying yes to fish twice a week for heart healthA new scientific advisory from the American Heart Association reaffirms the Association's recommendation to eat two servings of fish per week.
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