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NYT > Science

F.D.A. Approves First Drug Designed to Prevent MigrainesThe decision ushers in what many experts believe will be a new era in treatment for people who suffer the most severe form of the headaches.
18h
Viden

Sådan kan du se, hvad Facebook tror om digSe, hvilke interesser Facebook mener, du har.
13h
Ingeniøren

Forslag: For første gang skal der stilles krav til lastbilers CO2-udledningI 2025 skal CO2-udledningen fra nye lastbiler være 15 procent lavere end i 2019. Og i 2030 skal udledningen være 30 procent lavere. Sådan lyder et nyt forslag fra EU-kommissionen.
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LATEST

The Atlantic

Photos of the Week: Kyrgyz Horsemen, Shanghai Steeplechase, Giant BobbleheadsParticipants at the Wave and Goth festival in Germany, a baby bear in Turkey, attendees at a “Kiss-a-thon” in Mexico City, the 71st Cannes Film Festival in France, a Rocket festival in Thailand, observations of Ramadan in Indonesia, celebrations of the Circus in Budapest, and so much more.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Researchers operate lab-grown heart cells by remote controlResearchers at University of California San Diego School of Medicine and their collaborators have developed a technique that allows them to speed up or slow down human heart cells growing in a dish on command—simply by shining a light on them and varying its intensity. The cells are grown on a material called graphene, which converts light into electricity, providing a more realistic environment t
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New on MIT Technology Review

Surprise! Hundreds of ICOs are probably scams
3min
Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

New genes found that determine how the heart responds to exerciseA new study has discovered 30 new gene locations that determine how the heart responds to and recovers from exercise.
16min
Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

Most scientists disclose key details of their work prior to journal publicationA new study found that a majority of scientists disclose key details about their work informally to peers and potential collaborators ahead of publishing in a peer reviewed journal or presenting the findings publicly.
16min
Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

Upfront, comprehensive genetic testing in advanced lung cancer is cost-effectiveAn economic model comparing different types of genetic testing in metastatic non-small-cell lung cancer (NSCLC) found that using next-generation sequencing (NGS) to test for all known lung cancer-related gene changes at the time of diagnosis was more cost-effective and faster than testing one or a limited number of genes at a time.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

Missing ingredient to spark the fireworks of lifeUsing a novel imaging technique, researchers demonstrate that XMAP215, a protein known to help microtubules grow faster and longer, is necessary to nucleating microtubules. For decades, researchers have been struggling to understand why the gamma-tubulin ring complex (g-TuRC) nucleates only a few microtubules in the test tube, looking for some other factor that could activate or enhance g-TuRC. Th
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The Atlantic

A Devastating Story of Hate and MurderOn February 22, 2017, Adam Purinton, a United States Navy veteran, walked into Austin’s Bar in Olathe, Kansas and singled out two South Indian men, Srinivas Kuchibhotla and Alok Madasani, who were there enjoying happy hour. “He approached them, asking, ‘Are you here illegally?’” recounts Sunayana Dumala, Kuchibhotla’s wife, in the short film Do We Belong? . “Srinivas being Srinivas, he was polite
18min
NYT > Science

The Baby’s Hand Was Mummified. Why Wasn’t the Rest of Its Body?Hungarian archaeologists think they have an explanation for an unusual form of mummification, but their solution poses a new mystery.
18min
Popular Science

Robotic noses could be the future of disaster rescue—if they can outsniff search dogsTechnology If researchers can crack the chemistry, the applications are numerous. Analytical chemists have been working to develop high-functioning robotic smelling devices to detect victims of everything from human trafficking to natural disasters.
21min
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Man sentenced to 15 years in prison for hacker sabotageA New Mexico man accused of paying hackers to sabotage websites affiliated with his former employers and state agencies has been sentenced in Minnesota to 15 years in prison.
21min
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Rare bottles of whisky fetch record $1m each at Hong Kong auctionTwo bottles of rare 60-year-old Macallan whisky fetched a total of more than $2 million under the hammer on Friday in Hong Kong, Bonhams said, with both sales shattering the previous world auction record for the spirit.
21min
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Growing wealth gap between families with children and seniorsThe wealth gap between households of seniors and those with children has ballooned since 1989, a new study finds.
21min
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

NASA satellite reveals a more prganized Tropical Cyclone Sagar?Tropical Cyclone Sagar, formerly known as 01A, appeared more organized on satellite imagery and has strengthened since May 17. NASA-NOAA's Suomi NPP satellite captured a visible light image of the storm.
21min
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

NASA's new planet hunter snaps initial test image, swings by Moon toward final orbitNASA's next planet hunter, the Transiting Exoplanet Survey Satellite (TESS), is one step closer to searching for new worlds after successfully completing a lunar flyby on May 17. The spacecraft passed about 5,000 miles from the Moon, which provided a gravity assist that helped TESS sail toward its final working orbit.
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News

NASA satellite reveals a more prganized Tropical Cyclone Sagar?Tropical Cyclone Sagar, formerly known as 01A, appeared more organized on satellite imagery and has strengthened since May 17.
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Big Think

43% of U.S. households can’t afford the basicsDespite a low unemployment rate, all is not well in the United States. Not by a long shot. Read More
28min
Big Think

Elon Musk’s Boring Company to charge $1 for 150-mph ‘Loop’ ridesElon Musk LA BC BoringElon Musk revealed some new details about the early stages of the Boring Company’s plans to transform the mass-transit system in Los Angeles. Read More
28min
Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

Astronomers release most complete ultraviolet-light survey of nearby galaxiesCapitalizing on the unparalleled sharpness and spectral range of NASA's Hubble Space Telescope, an international team of astronomers is releasing the most comprehensive, high-resolution ultraviolet-light survey of nearby star-forming galaxies.
31min
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Research offers new insights into malaria parasiteA team of researchers led by a University of California, Riverside, scientist has found that various stages of the development of human malaria parasites, including stages involved in malaria transmission, are linked to epigenetic features and how chromatin—the complex of DNA and proteins within the nucleus—is organized and structured in these parasites.
39min
Science | The Guardian

Sir Roger Elliott obituarySpecialist in theoretical physics who investigated the structure of matter On Roger Elliott’s 60th birthday, a conference in his honour displayed beneath his photograph the title: “Disorder in Condensed Matter Physics”. This reference to his speciality in theoretical physics, where he made important contributions to theories of optical, magnetic and semiconductor properties of the solid state, was
42min
EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Study finds growing wealth gap between seniors and families with childrenThe wealth gap between households of seniors and those with children has ballooned since 1989, a new study finds. Also, wealth is now spread very differently within each group: The gap between the richest and poorest seniors has remained stable, but a vast economic divide now exists among families with children.
44min
EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Variations in placental microbiota appear related to premature birthA team of researchers from the United Kingdom has found a surplus of pathogenic bacteria in placentas from premature births, supporting the hypothesis that maternal infection may cause preterm birth. The research is published in Applied and Environmental Microbiology, a journal of the American Society for Microbiology.
44min
Blog » Languages » English

Stalactites vs Stalagmites: Stalagmites win!It was a very drippy battle, but in the end there could only be one. Coming in from the ground up, the Stalagmites ultimately proved that they could drip their way towards victory! Thanks to all who participated! Leaderboard:
55min
Big Think

Our brains rapidly and automatically process opinions we agree with as if they are factsIn a post-truth world of alternative facts, there is understandable interest in the psychology behind why people are so attached to their opinions and why it is so difficult to change minds. Read More
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Live Science

Trump Asked About 'Difference Between HIV and HPV,' Bill Gates SaysBill Gates says President Trump repeatedly asked him about the difference between two notorious viruses: HIV and HPV.
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News

New mechanism essential for eye lens development identifiedA team led by a University of Delaware researcher has identified the protein essential for eye lens development and clear vision. Without the protein, eyes will form cataracts; with it, lens cells are cleared and ready to see. The work is providing fundamental new knowledge on the basic underlying mechanisms involved in eye development.
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Scientific American Content: Global

Amgen's New Migraine Drug Will Cost 30 Percent Less Than Wall Street ExpectedClinical trial patients had two fewer headaches a month compared with those who received a placebo -- Read more on ScientificAmerican.com
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NYT > Science

A Guide to Gynecological Exams: What Should — and Shouldn’t — HappenThe cases of Dr. Larry Nassar and Dr. George Tyndall involve touching and comments that gynecologists say are highly inappropriate.
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Feed: All Latest

How to Not Watch the Royal WeddingYou have been invited to virtually attend Meghan Markle and Prince Harry's marriage this weekend. But frankly, you don't give a damn.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

Asian tiger mosquito on the moveScientists have compared the ecological niches of the Asian tiger mosquito and the yellow fever mosquito, both of which transmit infectious diseases, on various continents. The invasion time span plays an important role in their expansion and the Asian tiger mosquito has not yet arrived in all regions where it would find a suitable environment.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

Giraffes surprise biologists yet againNew research has highlighted how little we know about giraffe behavior and ecology.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

Robotic assembly of the world's smallest house -- Even a mite doesn't fit through the door!A nanorobotics team has assembled a new microrobotics system that pushes forward the frontiers of optical nanotechnologies. Combining several existing technologies, the newly developed nanofactory builds microstructures in a large vacuum chamber and fixes components onto optical fiber tips with nanometer accuracy. The microhouse construction demonstrates how researchers can advance optical sensing
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

Women sometimes feel regret after electing to freeze their eggsMost women feel empowered by elective procedures that enable them to bank eggs in case they can't conceive naturally later in life, researchers have found. But one in six become regretful, for reasons that researchers do not yet fully understand.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

3D-printed smart gel that walks underwater, moves objectsEngineers have created a 3D-printed smart gel that walks underwater and grabs objects and moves them. The watery creation could lead to soft robots that mimic sea animals like the octopus, which can walk underwater and bump into things without damaging them. It may also lead to artificial heart, stomach and other muscles, along with devices for diagnosing diseases, detecting and delivering drugs a
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Gay male teens use adult hookup apps to find friends, partnersAlthough hookup apps require users to be 18 or older, a new Northwestern Medicine study found that more than 50 percent of sexually active gay and bisexual boys ages 14 to 17 met male sexual partners on apps such as Grindr and Scruff. It also was common for these teens to use the apps to connect with friends and find new gay, bisexual and queer friends and boyfriends, which sheds new light on who
1h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Research offers new insights into malaria parasiteA team of researchers led by a University of California, Riverside, scientist has found that various stages of the development of human malaria parasites, including stages involved in malaria transmission, are linked to epigenetic features and how chromatin -- the complex of DNA and proteins within the nucleus -- is organized and structured in these parasites.
1h
New Scientist - News

An AI can now tell how malnourished a child is just from a photoA company in Kenya has devised a system that uses artificial intelligence to detect a child’s level of malnutrition from a photo, without bulky equipment or examinations
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New Scientist - News

Can a repeat of disastrous Ebola epidemic be averted this time?The latest outbreak of the deadly virus has spread to a city of a million people in the Democratic Republic of Congo. But hopes are high disaster can be avoided
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Scientific American Content: Global

New NASA Chief Says He Will Protect Climate ResearchAfter his previous rejection of climate science, Jim Bridenstine tells employees he will keep politics out of the agency’s work -- Read more on ScientificAmerican.com
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The Atlantic

Mount St. Helens and the Fear of Not KnowingYesterday, a Hawaiian volcano thousands of miles away from me erupted violently. Moments later, the phone in my pocket buzzed with an alert, Twitter notified me, friends on Slack pinged me, and within minutes I joined thousands of other curious people across the planet, watching someone livestream the eruption of Kilauea. The giant stack of technology that our apps and browsers feed on has made t
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News

NASA's new planet hunter snaps initial test image, swings by Moon toward final orbitAfter launching April 18, TESS has completed its lunar flyby to put it on track for its final science orbit, and has released a first test image.
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Feed: All Latest

Fed Up With Apple's Policies, App Developers Form a 'Union' Ahead of WWDCA group identifying itself as The Developers Union worries its members cannot earn a living by writing software built on Apple’s existing values.
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BBC News - Science & Environment

Hedgehogs: Thousands sign petition over rat trap threatHedgehog lovers are worried that a rat trap, licensed by the government in England, could harm their spiky friends.
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Study finds more than 40 percent of prostate biopsies could be avoided with new blood testA multi-center study that validates the clinical performance of IsoPSA -- a new blood test that has proven to be more accurate in predicting overall risk of prostate cancer than standard prostate-specific antigen (PSA) -- will be presented during the AUA Annual Meeting this weekend in San Francisco. Results suggest that use of IsoPSA may substantially reduce the need for biopsy, and may thus lower
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

French farmers furious over plans to release bearsA furious debate is disturbing the peace in the French mountains: do plans to release two bears into the countryside represent a victory for biodiversity, or an intolerable threat to farmers?
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

NYC bill would let workers take a break from calls, emailsThe city that never sleeps could become the first to tell employees "take a break."
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

E. coli tailored to convert plants into renewable chemicalsJet fuel, pantyhose and plastic soda bottles: all three could be made from bioengineered bacteria.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Rivals gain on Amazon in hot market for digital assistants: surveyAmazon has kept its lead in the fast-growing global market for smart speakers powered by artificial intelligence, but Google and others are gaining, a market tracker said.
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Popular Science

Green bones, green hearts, can’t lose: these lizards survive with toxic green bloodAnimals It's so easy being green that these lizards kept evolving the same weird quirk. In New Guinea, lizards scurry around with green bones, green hearts, green tongues, and green blood. At least six species share this enigmatic trait.
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The Atlantic

In Europe, Standing Up to America Is Now PatrioticThe United States and Europe have had serious foreign-policy disputes before—notably during the Iraq war, when France and Germany split with the U.S. over the invasion. But since he took office in January 2017, President Trump’s decisions, including his withdrawal from the Paris climate accord and his imposition of steel and aluminum tariffs on European countries, have initiated a series of sever
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The Atlantic

What's Up With All These Viral Illusions?The dress is blue; tennis balls are yellow; and much like a glass can be both half-empty and half-full (because there are TWO HALVES), the audio clip is saying both “laurel” and “yanny” at the same time. These are the molehills I have chosen to die on, because when it comes to viral illusions, it seems, you must choose a side. Enough of these divisive illusions have piled up now to make one wonde
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

NBA stars on losing teams follow fewer teammates on social mediaNBA stars on winning teams are more likely to follow teammates on Twitter than their high-status counterparts on bad teams are, according to a new study by the University of Cincinnati.
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Safety program for surgical patients sharply drops surgical site infectionsSurgical site infections (SSIs) in patients undergoing colorectal operations were reduced by 61 percent in less than two years in Hawaiian hospitals participating in the Agency for Healthcare Research and Quality (AHRQ) Safety Program for Surgery, according to new study findings published as an 'article in press' on the website of the Journal of the American College of Surgeons ahead of print.
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Antithrombotic therapy in patients with atrial fibrillaton before, after strokeOral anticoagulation therapy after stroke in patients with atrial fibrillation was associated with lower risk for recurrent blood vessel-blocking blood clots.
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Clinical trial supports chiropractic care as component of care for low back painUS military personnel with low back pain who received usual medical care plus chiropractic care reported moderate improvement in their pain intensity and disability compared with patients who received usual medical care alone.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

A new map for a birthplace of starsA research group has created the most detailed maps yet of a vast seedbed of stars similar to Earth's sun.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

Can a quantum drum vibrate and stand still at the same time?Researchers have studied how a 'drumstick' made of light could make a microscopic 'drum' vibrate and stand still at the same time.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

Cannabis: It matters how young you startResearchers find that boys who start smoking pot before 15 are much more likely to have a drug problem at 28 than those who start at 15 or after.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

Matabele ants: Travelling faster with detoursAnts do not always take the shortest route when they are in a hurry. Their navigational system occasionally makes them take detours to speed up their journey.
2h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Magnonic interferometer paves way toward energy-efficient information processing devicesResearchers have designed an interferometer that works with magnetic quasiparticles called magnons, rather than photons as in conventional interferometers. Although magnon signals have discrete phases that normally cannot be changed continuously, the magnonic interferometer can generate a continuous change of the magnon signal. In the future, this ability could be used to design magnonic integrate
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Science | The Guardian

Neuroscientist Hannah Critchlow: ‘Consciousness is a really funny word’The Cambridge fellow on what it means to be human, the neurological benefits of running, artificial intelligence and why a simulated version of her might miss gnocchi On any given day in Cambridge, you may see numerous people jogging along the towpaths, and it’s not unreasonable to assume neuroscientists may be over-represented. “You see so many,” says Hannah Critchlow, a neuroscientist who likes
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Blog » Languages » English

Science Hangout with Alex Bae, lead author on Eyewire’s “Cell” PublicationCongratulations Eyewirers! As you may have heard, Eyewire’s latest research has been published in the journal Cell and all 29,276 Eyewirers who helped are coauthors. Thanks to a monumental effort of the community and the lab, there are new ganglion cell type classifications, including 6 new ones. If you want to learn more about this publication, join us for a Science Hangout with lead author Alex
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TED Talks Daily (SD video)

Why fascism is so tempting -- and how your data could power it | Yuval Noah HarariIn a profound talk about technology and power, author and historian Yuval Noah Harari explains the important difference between fascism and nationalism -- and what the consolidation of our data means for the future of democracy. Appearing as a hologram live from Tel Aviv, Harari warns that the greatest danger that now faces liberal democracy is that the revolution in information technology will ma
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News

NBA stars on losing teams follow fewer teammates on social mediaNBA stars on winning teams are more likely to follow teammates on Twitter than high status players on bad teams are, according to a new study by the University of Cincinnati.UC anthropology professor Jeremy Koster examined the relationships of 330 players on 30 NBA teams who used the social network Twitter during the 2014-15 season. The study was published in the journal PLOS One.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

Innovative light-delivery technique improves biosensorsThere is a continuing need for practical chip-based sensors that can be used at the point of care to detect cancer and other diseases. An innovative way to inject light into tiny silicon microdisks could help meet this need by bringing down the cost and improving the performance of chip-based biosensors.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

Porous materials make it possible to have nanotechnology under controlA research team is able to stabilize different metallic nanostructures by encapsulating them in porous monocrystalline materials.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

Improving survival in pancreatic cancer with platinum-based chemotherapyA small study of adults with the most common form of pancreatic cancer adds to evidence that patients with BRCA1 or BRCA2 gene mutations long linked to a high risk of breast cancer have poorer overall survival rates than those without the mutations.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

Erectile dysfunction drugs and flu vaccine may work together to help immune system fight cancer after surgeryA new study suggests that a common treatment for erectile dysfunction combined with the flu vaccine may be able to help the immune system mop up cancer cells left behind after surgery. The study shows that this unconventional strategy can reduce the spread of cancer by more than 90 percent in a mouse model. It is now being evaluated in a world-first clinical trial.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

Discovery will impact design of drug delivery systems at the molecular levelResearchers have made a discovery that will impact the design of not only drug delivery systems, but also the development of newer applications in water filtration and energy production. They made this discovery while investigating how the drug molecules in solution travel through a nanochannel drug-delivery system.
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Live Science

Ghostly 'Lightning' Waves Discovered Inside a Nuclear ReactorWhistler waves are normally produced in the atmosphere by lightning. They could help protect nuclear fusion reactors from runaway electrons.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Giraffes surprise biologists yet againNew research from the University of Bristol has highlighted how little we know about giraffe behaviour and ecology.
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The Atlantic

Should Businesses Help Employees Pay Off Their Student Loans?Every month, Fidelity Investments contributes exactly $167 apiece toward the student-loan payments of almost 9,000 of its employees. In most cases, Fidelity can make a simple electronic transfer to student-loan servicers, the patchwork of companies that handle billing and other administrative functions for student loans in the United States, of which there are over $1.5 trillion outstanding . A f
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Ingeniøren

Novo Nordisk ligger øverst i imageanalyse for 18. gang i trækNovo Nordisk fik igen førstepladsen i Ingeniørens imageanalyse over 111 af landets største ingeniørvirksomheder, tæt efterfulgt af Lego, Novozymes, DTU og Rambøll.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Robotic assembly of the world's smallest house—even a mite doesn't fit through the doorA French nanorobotics team from the Femto-ST Institute in Besançon, France, assembled a new microrobotics system that pushes forward the frontiers of optical nanotechnologies. Combining several existing technologies, the μRobotex nanofactory builds microstructures in a large vacuum chamber and fixes components onto optical fiber tips with nanometer accuracy. The microhouse construction, reported i
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

How Google, Facebook will adapt to Europe's new privacy lawCompanies large and small are updating their privacy policies and service terms to comply with upcoming European Union rules governing data and privacy. Only EU users are technically covered by the rules, formally known as the General Data Protection Regulation.
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News

The dark side of our genes -- healthy ageing in modern timesIn a paper published in the journal Nature Review Genetics an international team of five scientists collate the evidence for the mismatch between past evolutionary adaptation and our modern lives. They also ask whether natural selection linked to modernization might reduce globally the burden of some chronic diseases.
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Using Tinder doesn't result in more casual sexTinder users don't have more sexual partners than other similarly minded people. Women tend to use the app to feel better about themselves, whereas men are more focused on sex.
3h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Giraffes surprise biologists yet againNew research from the University of Bristol has highlighted how little we know about giraffe behaviour and ecology.
3h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Robotic assembly of the world's smallest house -- Even a mite doesn't fit through the door!A French nanorobotics team has assembled a new microrobotics system that pushes forward the frontiers of optical nanotechnologies. Combining several existing technologies, the μRobotex nanofactory builds microstructures in a large vacuum chamber and fixes components onto optical fiber tips with nanometer accuracy. The microhouse construction, reported in the Journal of Vacuum Science and Technolog
3h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Cannabis: It matters how young you startCanadian researchers find that boys who start smoking pot before 15 are much more likely to have a drug problem at 28 than those who start at 15 or after.
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Science | The Guardian

Life is too messy for absolute certainty. And that’s a fact | Oliver BurkemanMaking inflexible demands of the world, then flying off the handle when they’re unmet, is no path to happiness One thing most people these days seem absolutely certain about – and yes, this is a bit ironic – is that absolutist thinking is bad. Making inflexible demands of the world, then flying off the handle when they’re unmet, is no path to happiness. Nor is seeing every issue in black and whit
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Natural antioxidant bilirubin may improve cardiovascular healthA recent analysis of health data from almost 100,000 veterans, both with and without HIV infection, found that within normal ranges, higher levels of bilirubin in the blood were associated with lower rates of heart failure, heart attack and stroke.
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News

'Love displaces violence'Art historian Eva-Bettina Krems on persistent motifs of peace in art from antiquity to the present day -- dove, rainbow or victory of love: artists draw on recurring motifs. Internationally renowned researchers will attend the Cluster of Excellence's Peace Conference next week.
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Asian tiger mosquito on the moveScientists at the Goethe University and the Senckenberg Gesellschaft für Naturforschung have compared the ecological niches of the Asian tiger mosquito and the yellow fever mosquito, both of which transmit infectious diseases, on various continents. The invasion time span plays an important role in their expansion and the Asian tiger mosquito has not yet arrived in all regions where it would find
4h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Fingerprints in birefringenceStimuli-sensitive materials can respond to physical forces with structural phase transitions. This also applies to biopolymer-surfactant mixtures, a study by German and Chinese scientists now reports. Surprisingly, the newly adopted phases persist after removal of the stress and can be detected by a simple optical read-out technology. Biometric fingerprint detection is an attractive application fo
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News

A new map for a birthplace of starsA Yale-led research group has created the most detailed maps yet of a vast seedbed of stars similar to Earth's sun.
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Label-free method for rapid cancer diagnosisResearchers in Bochum have deployed a novel infrared (IR) microscope with quantum cascade lasers in order to analyze tissue samples taken during routine clinical procedures for colorectal cancer diagnosis. The IR microscope used to date had not yet established itself as a diagnostic tool in hospitals, as the analyses used to take too long. By utilizing the new laser technology, the researchers red
4h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Matabele ants: Travelling faster with detoursAnts do not always take the shortest route when they are in a hurry. Their navigational system occasionally makes them take detours to speed up their journey.
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BBC News - Science & Environment

Pump it downA high-tech solution being tested in Iceland gets rid of waste carbon dioxide by pumping it 1,000m underground.
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Latest Headlines | Science News

To regulate fecal transplants, FDA has to first answer a serious question: What is poop?Fecal transplants are the treatment of the future for some conditions. But right now, they are entirely unregulated. Here’s why putting regulations in place is so complex.
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The Atlantic

Fight Songs: Can Political Debate Make Good Music?ABC executives now say that the next season of Roseanne will focus more on “family” and less on “politics,” though one of the big lessons of the show is that the first can hardly be separated from the second. It was politics that gave the rebooted sitcom its initial gust of publicity, and the show probably stands as the most discussed pop-culture riff on the Trump era. While the president himself
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Popular Science

I developed a sturdier, crisper, and yummier appleScience Bruce Barritt wanted to create a new apple variety. This is how he tasted his way to the Cosmic Crisp. Bruce Barritt wanted to create a new apple variety. This is how he tasted his way to the Cosmic Crisp.
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Futurity.org

‘Traveler’s diarrhea’ can be even worse with this blood typePeople with blood type A get more severely ill from a kind of E. coli most associated with “traveler’s diarrhea,” research shows. This type of E. coli also causes illness among children in underdeveloped areas of the world. The bacteria release a protein that latches onto intestinal cells in people with blood type A, but not blood type O or B, according to the study. A vaccine targeting that prot
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Brain simulation reveals benefits of emergency cooling treatmentFresh insight into how the brain responds to medically induced cooling -- routinely used to limit head injury -- could inform treatments for related conditions and help babies at risk of birthing complications.
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Flow of cerebrospinal fluid regulates neural stem cell divisionStem cells in the brain can divide and mature into neurons participating in various brain functions, including memory. In a paper published in the journal 'Cell Stem Cell', scientists at Helmholtz Zentrum München and Ludwig-Maximilians-Universität München (LMU) have shown how this works. They found that ion channels play a key role in mediating force signals to the neural stem cells to activate th
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Developmental psychotherapy for antisocial adolescentsWorking with young offenders is considered difficult activity and often ineffective. Most popular programs focus on behavior control, in the assumption that behavioral problems are a 'lack of something.' Whereas, a developmental approach understands antisocial behavior results from intentions, values and goals that need thorough consideration. A developmental understanding of delinquent youth comb
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News

A new Achilles' heel of blood cancerAcute Myeloid Leukemia is an aggressive form of blood cancer. The diseased cells often carry mutated forms of a specific gene, which is known to function within large protein networks. Applying a combination of proteomic and genomic screens, researchers at CeMM and LBI-CR identified a protein crucial for the survival of the cancer cells. When this protein is lost, AML cells stop growing and accumu
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News

World first use of cognitive training reduces gait freezing in Parkinson's patientsIn a world first, clinicians have reduced 'freezing of gait' in Parkinson's Disease patients by teaching brain training exercises in a randomized control trial led by Brain and Mind Centre scholars at the University of Sydney and published today in npj Parkinson's Disease.
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Particle shows promise for treating the deadliest type of breast cancerUSC researchers have pinpointed a remedy to thwart a protein that helps the metastatic spread of breast cancer, a leading cause of death for women. The findings appear today in Nature Communications.
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Genome editing method targets AIDS virusBy destroying the regulatory genes of the AIDS virus HIV-1 using the genome editing system CRISPR/Cas9, a Japanese research group has succeeded in blocking the production of HIV-1 by infected cells.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Scott Pruitt's approach to pollution control will make the air dirtier and Americans less healthyEnvironmental Protection Agency Administrator Scott Pruitt's ethical lapses and extravagant spending habits have distracted the public from what he is doing to roll back important environmental protections.
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Futurity.org

How a virus can cause joint-crippling arthritisResearchers have identified the molecular “handle” that the chikungunya virus grabs to get inside cells, potentially leading to a form of arthritis that persists for months or even years. Chikungunya is a growing threat to the United States and other regions of the world as the mosquito that carries the virus expands its reach. Telltale symptoms of chikungunya infection are fever and joint pain t
4h
Science : NPR

Report: Most Former Research Chimps Should Move To Retirement SanctuariesA working group convened by the National Institutes of Health looked at where chimps that had been used in research should live now. Unless relocating chimps would endanger them, a sanctuary is best. (Image credit: Brandon Wade/AP Images for The Humane Society)
4h
Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

Explaining the history of Australia's vegetationNew research has uncovered the history of when and why the native vegetation that today dominates much of Australia first expanded across the continent.
4h
Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

A new system is designed that improves the quality of frozen horse spermThe method reduces ice crystals that form during cryopreservation and affect spermatozoon structure.
4h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

From slow sand filters and to towers that measure energy and gasesThe slow sand filter method has been used for centuries to treat water. It's so effective that the World Health Organization has given it its stamp of approval: "Under suitable circumstances, slow sand filtration may be not only the cheapest and simplest but also the most efficient method of water treatment."
4h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Wisdom of the protists; electron flow tricks for controlling cancerAll schoolchildren learn that the difference between eukaryotes and prokaryotes has something to do with a nucleus. This is usually around the same time they learn that the mitochondria is the powerhouse of the cell. The real difference between these two life forms, however, has more to do with how they control the flow of electrons to make their living, i.e., their electron transport chains going
4h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Germany orders Porsche recall over diesel emissions cheatingGerman authorities said Friday they had ordered 19,000 Porsche SUVs recalled over emissions cheating, saying a total of 60,000 manipulated vehicles had been identified across Europe.
4h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Could recent supernovae be responsible for mass extinctions?Two nearby supernovae that exploded about 2.5 and eight million years ago could have resulted in a staggered depletion of Earth's ozone layer, leading to a variety of repercussions for life on Earth.
4h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Researchers discover new male variant of bulb miteThe bulb mite (Rhizoglyphus robini) is a common pest of numerous crops. Male bulb mites display one of two reproductive tactics and are classified as "fighters" and "scramblers." Biologists from the University of Amsterdam (UvA) have now discovered a third variant, the "mega-scrambler," in which males are morphologically similar to females. Their results were published on 17 May in the scientific
4h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Matabele ants travel faster with detoursAnts do not always take the shortest route when they are in a hurry. Their navigational system occasionally makes them take detours to speed up their journey.
4h
Ingeniøren

Asim har fanget sit første lyn fra rumstationenLæs om de første lyn, klimaobservatoriet på ISS har fotograferet og målt.
4h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Live, precise recording of grid voltage and load currentsResearchers of Karlsruhe Institute of Technology (KIT) have developed a novel monitoring and analysis tool for electrical power grids: The EDR – Electrical Data Recorder continuously scans grid voltage and load currents with high precision and high resolution. While power generation from renewable sources by decentralized producers is increasing, the EDR will provide deeper insight into real syste
4h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

The live export trade is unethical, puts money ahead of animals' painLast month millions of Australians saw footage of sheep dying slowly from heat and thirst while being shipped on the Awassi Express from Fremantle in Western Australia to Doha, Qatar. The voyage was last August, and what viewers saw was a very small portion of the suffering undergone by the 2,400 sheep who reportedly died on that one voyage. The suffering came to light only because a whistleblower
4h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Optimum shade for cocoaAs chocolate becomes ever more popular, demand for cocoa keeps rising. For production to keep up, agricultural practices have to become more sustainable. ETH researchers tested what shade trees can contribute to solving this problem.
4h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Women sometimes feel regret after electing to freeze their eggsMost women feel empowered by elective procedures that enable them to bank eggs in case they can't conceive naturally later in life, researchers at UC San Francisco have found. But one in six become regretful, for reasons that researchers do not yet fully understand.
4h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Cardiomyopathy mutation reduces heart's ability to vary pumping force, study revealsResearchers from Washington State University have discovered how a genetic mutation linked to hypertrophic cardiomyopathy disrupts the heart's normal function. The study, which will be published May 18 in the Journal of General Physiology, reveals that the mutation prevents the heart from increasing the amount of force it produces when it needs to pump additional blood around the body.
4h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Food security and health: Revenge of the nasty fungiFungi can evolve so swiftly to counter the chemical treatments designed to protect health and food, in much the same way as bacteria change in the face of increasingly powerful antibiotics, that urgent action is necessary to control this rapid emergence of resistant strains.
4h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Why the EPA's 'secret science' proposal alarms public health expertsLater this month, the EPA could finalize a controversial rule to limit what scientific research the agency can use in writing environmental regulations.
4h
Big Think

Study: Mental conditioning with cute animal pictures can rekindle your relationshipA study finds that re-conditioning married individuals by linking spouse photos to pictures of puppies and bunnies makes us like our mates more. Read More
4h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

It pays to invest in biodiversityIn 2010, 193 countries stepped up to halt the global decline of biodiversity by 2020 as part of their commitment to the Convention on Biological Diversity.
4h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Wildfire risks are high again this year – here's what travelers need to knowMemorial Day marks the traditional opening of the summer travel season. This year the American Automobile Association projects that more than 41.5 million Americans will hit the road over Memorial Day weekend, nearly 5 percent more than last year and the most in a dozen years.
5h
Feed: All Latest

Uber's Flying Cars, Tesla's Autopilot Fight, and More Cars News This WeekPlus: the sticky icky problem of trucking marijuana around California, Acura's new infotainment system, and how just one autonomous car can help kill traffic.
5h
Feed: All Latest

New Kitchen Knives from Shun and Kikuichi CutleryOur kitchen gear expert gives you some points to consider when adding a new blade to your quiver.
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Feed: All Latest

The Swedish Designer Creating Edible RobotsErika Marthins fuses food with tech to create a futuristic noshing experience.
5h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Greener fuels may not make shipping safer – here's whyGlobal shipping emits 2% of the world's carbon dioxide emissions and this is projected to increase. No wonder there have been widespread calls for the shipping industry to reduce its hazardous emissions by replacing traditional fuels with "greener" alternatives.
5h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Flow of cerebrospinal fluid regulates divisionStem cells in the brain can divide and mature into neurons participating in various brain functions, including memory. In a paper scientists have discovered that the flow of cerebrospinal fluid is a key signal for neural stem cell renewal.
5h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Did Cambridge Analytica sway the election?In the controversy surrounding Cambridge Analytica—the political consulting firm that worked for Donald Trump's campaign—and Facebook, concerns about foreign governments interfering in U.S. elections and privacy violations of Facebook users have been paramount.
5h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

One-third of the world's nature reserves are under threat from humansIn the 146 years since Yellowstone National Park in the northwestern United States became the world's first protected area, nations around the world have created more than 200,000 terrestrial nature reserves. Together they cover more than 20 million km², or almost 15% of the planet's land surface – an area bigger than South America.
5h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Sharing the workplace with robots? New tool helps designers create safer machinesA research team is helping robot developers design machines less likely to injure the humans they work with. How? With their novel 'safety map."
5h
New Scientist - News

New algorithm can help spot faked photos before they go viralFaked pictures can make very powerful propaganda if they get widely shared. A new algorithm aims to weed out doctored images before they spread
5h
TED Talks Daily (SD video)

"You Found Me" | Helen GilletCellist and singer Helen Gillet mixes her classical training, New Orleans-based jazz roots and free improvisational skills to perform her own eclectic music. In a powerful, melodious performance, she plays her song "You Found Me."
5h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Before you invest in cryptocurrency, read thisWe've all heard the headline stories about cryptocurrencies – they're millionaire-makers and dream-destroyers. They're part of a decentralised market that supports criminal activity, yada yada yada. But how do you separate facts from fiction? Here are six cryptocurrency myths you need to get on top of.
5h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Parkinson-related protein is 'tunable'Fibrils of the protein alpha-synuclein, that plays a role in Parkinson's disease, form a stiffer and stronger network in water, when temperature is increased. Researchers of the University of Twente show that this has to do with the water-repellent part of the fibres coming to the surface and interacting. The mechanism could also play a role in the interaction with healthy cells. Researchers of th
5h
Futurity.org

Smaller optical ‘tuning knob’ could make lasers cheaperNew research could enable cheaper, smaller, and more efficient optical frequency synthesizers, which have traditionally been large, power-hungry devices. Only a few decades ago, finding a particular channel on the radio or television meant dialing a knob by hand and then making small adjustments to home in on the right signal. That’s no longer the case, thanks to something called a radio-frequenc
5h
Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

Want to help your child succeed in school? Add language to the math, reading mixA new study finds that a child's language skills in kindergarten can predict his or her future proficiency in other subjects.
5h
Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

Single-tablet HIV treatment shows better outcomes over multi-tablet regimenHIV patients on a single-tablet daily regimen had better outcomes than patients taking multiple pills per day, a new study shows.
5h
Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

Hookah responsible for over half of tobacco smoke inhaled by young smokersSmoking tobacco from a waterpipe, also known as a hookah, accounted for over half of the tobacco smoke volume consumed by young adult hookah and cigarette smokers in the US, a new analysis discovered. In the US, hookah smoking rates are increasing and cigarette smoking rates are decreasing, especially among young adults.
5h
Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

Arthritis drugs potentially safe for expectant mothersA new study has revealed that pregnant women with rheumatoid arthritis (RA) may be able to use certain RA drugs without possible increased health risks to their unborn babies.
5h
The Scientist RSS

Image of the Day: Xenopus PigmentResearchers recently used CRISPR single-guide RNAs to alter genes involved in pigmentation in frog embryos.
5h
The Scientist RSS

Slowing Global Warming Could Save a Majority of Earths SpeciesFollowing the ultimate goal of the Paris Agreement would benefit plants and animals around the world, according to a new study.
5h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

A new way to make biaxial nematic phase liquid crystalsA team of researchers from the University of Colorado in the U.S. and Université Paris-Saclay, in France has developed a new way to make biaxial nematic phase liquid crystals. In their paper published in the journal Science, the group describes the technique they developed and possible uses for the results. Philippe Poulin, with CNRS, University of Bordeaux offers a Perspective piece on the work d
5h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Why teams perform better with divergent perspectivesTeam members aren't always going to agree with leaders' goals and strategies—but that's not necessarily a bad thing. In certain circumstances, having disagreement among teams, and the discourse that this disagreement elicits, can translate into success for certain types of teams who are tackling complex problems, according to researchers from the University of Maryland's Robert H. Smith School of
5h
The Atlantic

Germany's Attempt to Fix Facebook Is BackfiringThe new year was just a day old when Alice Weidel, the 38-year-old co-leader of the far-right Alternative for Germany (AfD) party, and Beatrix von Storch, her deputy, came under investigation for inciting hatred on Twitter. Both women had attacked the police in Cologne for tweeting a New Year’s greeting in Arabic: “What the hell is wrong with this country?” von Storch asked in a racially incendia
5h
Ingeniøren

Produktionsingeniør i Novo Nordisk: Med hovedet i maskiner og Excel-arkBlisterpakninger til tabletter er et helt nyt område for Novo Nordisk, og der bliver optimeret på livet løs ved maskinerne.
5h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

A soft solution to the hard problem of energy storageIt's great in the lab, but will it actually work? That's the million-dollar question perpetually leveled at engineering researchers. For a family of layered nanomaterials, developed and studied at Drexel University—and heralded as the future of energy storage—that answer is now, yes.
5h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Consumers quickly learn what environmentally friendly looks likeYou can't judge a book by its cover, goes the saying. Yet, that's exactly what people do, according to new research from Stanford mechanical engineer Erin MacDonald and visiting researcher Ping Du. They found that when it comes to judging environmental friendliness, people learn to make quick decisions based on looks without even realizing it. Their study was published recently in the Journal of M
5h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Simplifying skin disease diagnosis with topical nanotechnologyThis vision of simplifying disease diagnosis using topically applied nanotechnology could change the way skin diseases such as abnormal scars are diagnosed and managed.
5h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

How cognitive psychology and cultural sociology can benefit each otherFor decades, cognitive psychologists have sought to understand how the brain works and in recent years have outlined a number of theories—from implicit biases to the psychology of scarcity and tribalism—to explain how that influences our behavior.
5h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Dutch radio antenna to depart for the moon on Chinese missionOn 21 May 2018, the Chinese space agency will launch the relay satellite Chang'e 4 to an orbit behind the Moon. On board will be a Dutch radio antenna, the Netherlands Chinese Low-Frequency Explorer (NCLE). The radio antenna is the first Dutch-made scientific instrument to be sent on a Chinese space mission, and it will open up a new chapter in radio astronomy. The is instrument developed and buil
5h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

World-class battery storage system helps to power country townA new energy storage system developed by University of Adelaide researchers and industry partners is now successfully supporting the electricity network for the country town of Cape Jervis, South Australia.
5h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

A lipid 'trap' inside cells reduces drug effectivenessCellular lipids are more efficient than proteins in trapping most drugs and hence reducing the free intracellular drug concentration. This is shown by researchers at Uppsala University in an article published in Molecular Pharmaceutic.
5h
Popular Science

Your dog gets allergies for the same reasons you doAllergic Reaction Pollen season can be ruff for everyone. Spring can be just as itchy, sneezy, and wholly uncomfortable for some dogs as their allergy-prone owners. Our pups can also be allergic to particles of dust and pollen…
5h
cognitive science

Is Addictive Behavior Compulsive? According to the disease view, it is because addictive behavior is compulsive rather than freely chosen that addicts should not be blamed and punished for their troublesome behavior.submitted by /u/thedabarry [link] [comments]
5h
The Atlantic

The Instagram Stars of High-School BasketballZion Williamson has 1.5 million followers on Instagram and more than 100,000 on Twitter, and tens of thousands more keep up with his every move via a network of dedicated fan accounts. On his most recent Instagram post, which garnered more than 200,000 likes, fans praised him as “the next king of the NBA,” writing things like, “I follow you, my dream is playing like you” and “ GOAT .” Williamson,
5h
The Atlantic

Finding the Lost Generation of Sperm DonorsThis past January, at an office park in Phoenix, Arizona, two women with similar chins and similar smiles met for the first time. They recognized each other and hugged immediately. “As soon as we talked, it was like talking to someone that I had known for a really long time,” remembers Courtney McKinney, a 28-year-old who was raised by a single mother in Sacramento, California. The series of even
5h
Dagens Medicin

Rudkjøbing om selvmordsmanual: Den helt forkerte vej at gåAktivist-lægen Svend Lings, der har lagt en udførlig selvmordsmanual på nettet i et forsøg på at presse politikerne til at lovliggøre aktiv dødshjælp, går den helt forkerte vej, mener Lægeforeningen. »Folk, der ønsker at dø, skal have hjælp til at få det bedre,« siger formand Andreas Rudkjøbing.
6h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Simplifying skin disease diagnosis with topical nanotechnologyIn a new SLAS Technology auto-commentary, two authors of an article recently published in Nature Biomedical Engineering share more insight into their unique method for skin disease diagnosis using NanoFlare nanotechnology. In particular, the authors address point-of-care diagnosis and image acquisition, which are the primary bottlenecks in efficient disease diagnosis.
6h
Feed: All Latest

Congress' Latest Move to Extend Copyright Protection Is MisguidedOpinion: Law professor and copyright expert Lawrence Lessig argues that Congress is once again selling the public domain to the special interests.
6h
Ingeniøren

Nu skal virksomheder selv lave egne simkort til maskinerneNyt teleforlig: Fremover er det ikke kun teleselskaber, der skal give telefonnumre til maskiner
6h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

NASA's Curiosity rover aims to get its rhythm backNASA's Curiosity rover could soon be drilling rocks on Mars again.
6h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Alternatives to lead hunting shot pose their own hazardsHunting with lead shot is highly restricted or entirely banned in many countries due to the danger of poisoning birds and environment. However, alternative ammunition is not without its own risks, as was discovered in a study conducted by a team of researchers from the Technical University of Munich.
6h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Above us only sky—The open air as an underappreciated habitatMany bat species hunt and migrate at great altitudes. The range of the open sky is a new interest area as a habitat relevant to a large variety of species. Christian Voigt and colleagues from the Leibniz Institute for Zoo and Wildlife Research (IZW) in Berlin have collated the current scientific knowledge on potential hazards to bats flying at high altitudes. In their recent article published in B
6h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Can we get 100 percent of our energy from renewable sources?Is there enough space for all the wind turbines and solar panels to provide all our energy needs? What happens when the sun doesn't shine and the wind doesn't blow? Won't renewables destabilise the grid and cause blackouts?
6h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Classifying frog calls for fighting climate changeThe sounds of amphibians are altered by the increase in ambient temperature, which, in addition to interfering with reproductive behaviour, serves as an indicator of global warming. Researchers at the University of Seville have used artificial intelligence to create an automatic classifier of the thousands of frog and toad sounds that can be recorded in a natural environment.
6h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Researchers discover non-canonical ion channel activation pathwayThe passage of ions through the cell membrane is controlled by ion channels, which are protein complexes that regulate vital processes, such as the heartbeat, and are a target of drug development. Now, a study at the University of Wisconsin, led by a Spanish researcher, presents a novel model to explain how the pores of these channels open and close.
6h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Amateur astronomer's data helps scientists discover a new exoplanetScientists at Kourovka Astronomical Observatory of Ural Federal University have discovered a new exoplanet.
6h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Optimum shade for cocoaAs chocolate becomes ever more popular, demand for cocoa keeps rising. For production to keep up, agricultural practices have to become more sustainable. ETH researchers tested what shade trees can contribute to solving this problem.
6h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Toyota chief hopes to help Japan auto makers keep tech edgeToyota Motor Corp. chief Akio Toyoda, tapped to head the Japanese auto industry association, is promising to lead a push among manufacturers to keep a competitive edge in emerging technologies like zero-emission and autonomous driving.
6h
The Scientist RSS

Chief Academic Officer Accused in Ongoing Research Scandal at UCLNew allegations of fraud committed under the watch of geneticist David Latchman were made last year.
6h
Dagens Medicin

Ny ledende overlæge skal styrke akutafdelingen på Nordsjællands HospitalKitten Engell Weber skal som ledende overlæge i akutafdelingen på Nordsjællands Hospital, være med til at positionere hospitalet som en attraktiv karrieremulighed inden for akutmedicin.
7h
The Atlantic

The Bracing, Grim Power of First ReformedThe First Reformed of Paul Schrader’s new film is a church, a small edifice in Upstate New York with a rich history in the abolitionist movement, a landmark of a bygone age of activism and justice. Now, it’s little more than a museum piece that exists in the shadow of the more popular mega-church that owns it, and its depleted parish is presided over by the taciturn Reverend Toller (Ethan Hawke).
7h
The Atlantic

The North Korea Summit Isn't a Real-Estate DealIt’s often hard for outside analysts to determine what’s driving North Korea’s tactical decisions, but it’s fun to imagine that someone in Pyongyang has been reading The Art of the Deal ahead of a planned summit with the U.S. in Singapore. (Iranian Supreme Leader Ali Khamenei has been digging into Michael Wolff’s Fire and Fury , if his Instagram feed is to be believed. ) That would explain North
7h
Live Science

Why Are Sweaty-Armpit Stains So Dark?When we spill water down our front, or sweat profusely, our clothes get darker. Why? The fabric isn't actually changing colors in real time. Rather, our perception of the fabric's color is changing.
7h
Feed: All Latest

The Shape-Shifting Robot That Evolves by Falling DownEvolutionary robotics is a potentially powerful way to get machines to master novel terrain on their own, no hand-holding required.
7h
Feed: All Latest

Kik Founder Plots a Rebel Alliance Against Facebook's 'Death Star'Ted Livingston is tired of Facebook copying Kik's features. To protect his cryptocurrency, he wants other apps to adopt it.
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Feed: All Latest

Net Neutrality Is Just a Gateway to the Real Issue: Internet FreedomThe Senate vote wasn't about net neutrality. It was about making world class internet, in all its forms, a powerful political issue—with rippling effects come 2020.
7h
Latest Headlines | Science News

The CDC advises: Don’t swallow the water in a hotel swimming poolIn a 15-year period, hotel swimming pools and water parks had the highest number of swimming-related disease outbreaks in the United States.
7h
New on MIT Technology Review

Job of the future: Embalming your online personaThe woman organizing our messy digital lives to survive us.
7h
Science-Based Medicine

A Canadian Journalist Calls Out Pediatric Chiropractic, and a Chiropractor RespondsA recent National Post article calls chiropractic care of the infant and young child into question for some very good reasons, none of which were effectively rebutted by the Canadian Chiropractic Association President.
7h
Viden

Praktiserende læger skal nu hjælpe kræftoverlevereHalvdelen af kræftoverlevere har psykiske og fysiske problemer, efter de er blevet erklæret raske. Derfor skal de praktiserende læger nu behandle de oversete sygdomme efter kræft.
7h
Viden

Hver anden kræftoverlever oplever voldsomme generPsykiske og fysiske efterslæb fra et ellers veloverstået kræftforløb er et overset problem.
7h
Live Science

Here's Why Mosquito Bites Itch for Such a Long TimeMosquito spit makes you itch, and it probably also helps viruses invade
7h
Scientific American Content: Global

Gunshot Sensors Pinpoint Destructive "Fish Bombs"Technology developed for urban crimes can help localize blasts that destroy coral reefs -- Read more on ScientificAmerican.com
7h
Ingeniøren

VIDEO: Dampen lukkes ud af Københavns fjernvarmeHofor lukkede i går den sidste damp ud af fjernvarmerørene i bydele uden for søerne i København, der blandt andet har forsynet Rigshospitalet og Bispebjerg Hospital.
7h
Ingeniøren

Aarhus Letbane håber på at køre til Odder i løbet af sommerenLetbaneselskabet har hidtil afvist at melde en forventet åbning af Odderbanen ud, efter at indvielsen af første strækning gennem Aarhus måtte aflyses under stor offentlig bevågenhed.
7h
Ingeniøren

Hør ugens podcast om den nye cybersikkerhedsstrategiRegeringen er klar med en ny cybersikkerhedsstrategi. De grønne poser i de københavnske biospande er først og fremmest grønne af udseende, viser nye undersøgelser. Og så er Ingeniørens årlige imageanalyse af landets 111 største ingeniør-virksomheder – Profil-magasinet – på gaden. Alt det kan du h...
7h
Science : NPR

Hawaii Officials Hand Out Thousands Of Masks As Kilauea Spews More AshCounty officials have distributed about 2,000 N95 masks as they warn that ash fallout is the biggest health concern for residents. (Image credit: Caleb Jones/AP)
7h
The Atlantic

The Enduring Appeal of the Fairy-Tale WeddingOn Saturday, millions of people around the world will tune in to watch a fairy tale. A prince will marry his beloved and, together, they’ll parade through the streets in a horse-drawn carriage, waving— royally —to thousands of adoring subjects as they pass. The royal wedding is a global phenomenon. An estimated 2 billion people watched Prince William marry Kate Middleton; in 1981, 750 million wat
7h
The Atlantic

The House Republican Blockade on Immigration Finally RupturesFor the better part of five years, a small but vocal group of congressional Republicans has been pushing the party’s leadership in the House to act on immigration—either to address the issue comprehensively or, more recently, to protect some 700,000 undocumented immigrants who find themselves in legal limbo. Time and again, from two different Republican speakers across two presidential administra
7h
New Scientist - News

Ape ‘midwives’ spotted helping female bonobos give birthWhen female bonobos went into labour, other females gathered around to keep them safe, swatting away flies and even seemingly trying to catch the baby as it emerged
8h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

New system improves the quality of frozen horse spermCryopreservation is a freezing method of storing spermatozoa to be used for reproduction. Although it is widespread, there is an issue with the ice formation that occurs during the process, which ends up affecting sperm structure and quality. In order to diminish this problem, permeable cryoprotectants are used. These are substances that penetrate tissues and act inside cells in order to stop ice
8h
Nyheder - Forskning - Videnskab

Dekan Ulla Wewer hædres for uselvisk indsats for forskning i sundhedsvidenskabEn eminent forsker, en kvalitetsbevidst og uselvisk leder og en fremtidsorienteret katalysator af dansk...
8h
Nyheder - Forskning - Videnskab

Royal anerkendelse til australske udvekslingsstuderendeFor 14. gang uddelte HKH Kronprinsessen legater til to australske udvekslingsstuderende på Københavns...
8h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Porous materials make it possible to have nanotechnology under controlA University of Cordoba research team has stabilized metallic nanostructures by encapsulating them in porous monocrystalline materials.
8h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Elon Musk presents underground LA tunnel projectEntrepreneur Elon Musk has given updated details of a project to build high-speed transport tunnels underneath Los Angeles in a bid to combat traffic and said he wanted to work with the city's subway operator.
8h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Cambridge Analytica files for voluntary bankruptcy in US: court filingBritish political consulting group Cambridge Analytica filed for voluntary Chapter 7 bankruptcy in the Southern District of New York, court documents showed.
8h
Ingeniøren

USA’s nye hangarskib tvunget i havn af nye problemerDet amerikanske søværns dyreste krigsskib er på anden gang indenfor et år ramt af problemer med fremdriftsystemet.
8h
Ingeniøren

Nordkoreanske hackere brugte Google Play i målrettet aktion mod afhoppereEn gruppe hackere fra Nordkorea har designet malware og lagt det på Google Play i et forsøg på at narre informationer ud af afhoppere og journalister. Det viser forskning foretaget af McAfee.
8h
Ingeniøren

USA opgiver at bruge machine learning til at spotte terroristerDonald Trump og de amerikanske immigrationsmyndigheder kaster håndklæde i ringen og dropper deres stort anlagt machine learning-software, der skulle udpege potentielle terrorister via sociale medier
8h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Rutgers researchers create a 3D-printed smart gel that walks underwater, moves objectsRutgers University-New Brunswick engineers have created a 3D-printed smart gel that walks underwater and grabs objects and moves them. The watery creation could lead to soft robots that mimic sea animals like the octopus, which can walk underwater and bump into things without damaging them. It may also lead to artificial heart, stomach and other muscles, along with devices for diagnosing diseases,
8h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Humira does not improve aortic vascular inflammation in psoriasis patientsAn antibody used to treat the skin disease psoriasis and other chronic autoimmune diseases such as rheumatoid arthritis and inflammatory bowel disease has no effect on aortic inflammation -- a key marker of future risk of major cardiovascular events -- unlike other antibodies that target different aspects of the immune system.
8h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Researchers create a 3D-printed smart gel that walks underwater, moves objectsRutgers University-New Brunswick engineers have created a 3-D-printed smart gel that walks underwater and grabs objects and moves them.
9h
New Scientist - News

The way toddlers waddle can teach robot footballers how to playA robot football team trained to mimic how infants walk comprehensively beat others trained on geometric walking patterns
9h
Dagens Medicin

Regionspolitikere kræver svar om Sundheds­platformenPolitikerne i Region Hovedstaden kræver en redegørelse for væsentlige spørgsmål omkring Sundhedsplatformen, hvor de bl.a. vil vide, hvad det koster at komme ud af kontrakten.
10h
Viden

Bilen er klogere end du tror: Kom med på testkørselModerne biler er rullende data-indsamlere. Se DR's økonomikorrespondent blive klogere på en spritny BMW.
10h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Can a quantum drum vibrate and stand still at the same time?Researchers have studied how a 'drumstick' made of light could make a microscopic 'drum' vibrate and stand still at the same time.
10h
Viden

Tusindvis af biler i Danmark er online: Registrerer dine kørevaner, taler med fabrikken og slår selv alarmIfølge motorejernes interesseorganisation FDM er omkring 100.000 danske biler nu koblet på internettet.
10h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Can a quantum drum vibrate and stand still at the same time?Researchers have studied how a 'drumstick' made of light could make a microscopic 'drum' vibrate and stand still at the same time.
10h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Only 1 pct of Japan's biggest coral reef healthy: surveyJapan's biggest coral reef has not recovered from bleaching due to rising sea temperatures, with only one percent of the reef in a healthy condition, according to a government study.
10h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Sherpa shortage takes a toll on EverestThe Everest industry is suffering from a dangerous shortage of its most important resource: experienced Sherpa guides.
10h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Solo Russian climber dies on fourth highest mountainA Russian climber died just below the summit of Lhotse, the world's fourth highest peak, in at least the third fatality of the spring climbing season in the Nepali Himalaya, officials said Friday.
10h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Singapore Airlines to absorb regional wing after upgradeSingapore Airlines said Friday it will absorb its struggling premium wing SilkAir following a multimillion-dollar upgrade as part of a reform drive to stay competitive.
11h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

What's changing and what's not under new data privacy rulesEurope's new data and privacy rules take effect a week from Friday, clarifying individual rights to the personal data collected by companies around the world for targeted advertising and other purposes.
11h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

FACT CHECK: Tesla safety claims aren't quite rightFor years, Tesla has boasted that its cars and SUVs are safer than other vehicles on the roads, and CEO Elon Musk doubled down on the claims in a series of tweets this week.
11h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

PayPal buys payments startup iZettle for $2.2 bnPayPal on Thursday announced a deal to buy Swedish online commerce startup iZettle for $2.2 billion, a deal that came as the young company was poised for a stock market debut.
11h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Light coats of gritty ash fall near erupting Hawaii volcanoAuthorities handed out around 2,000 masks for protection as people living near Hawaii's Kilauea volcano braced for pulverized rock, glass and crystal to rain down after an explosive eruption at the peak's summit.
11h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

China first home-built aircraft carrier completes sea trialsChina said Friday its first home-built aircraft carrier has completed five days of sea trials, putting it closer to joining its sister flattop in the country's increasingly powerful fleet.
11h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Study identifies new virus in catMorris Animal Foundation-funded researchers from the University of Sydney have found a previously undiscovered hepadnavirus in an immunocompromised cat, and subsequently in banked feline blood samples. The research team published their results today in the prestigious journal Viruses.
11h
Ingeniøren

Tabletter mod diabetes åbner helt ny æra for Novo NordiskNovo Nordisk står igen øverst på skamlen i Ingeniørens imageanalyse. Og med satsninger i milliardklassen på vej bliver arbejdspladsen fremover ekstra spændende, fortæller produktionsdirektøren.
11h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Want to help your child succeed in school? Add language to the math, reading mixResearch shows that the more skills children bring with them to kindergarten—in basic math, reading, even friendship and cooperation—the more likely they will succeed in those same areas in school. Hence, "kindergarten readiness" is the goal of many preschool programs, and a motivator for many parents.
11h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Researchers mimic comet moth's silk fibers to make 'air-conditioned' fabricFabrics made from silkworm fibers have long been treasured for their beautiful luster and refreshing coolness. Columbia Engineering researchers have discovered that fibers produced by the caterpillars of a wild silk moth, the Madagascar comet moth (Argema mittrei), are far superior in terms of brilliance and cooling ability. Not only do the comet moth's cocoon fibers have outstanding cooling prope
11h
Science | The Guardian

How smaller drinks could reduce the UK’s alcohol consumptionCutting down drinking is difficult, but could smaller servings of alcohol help? Our study suggests it might Many of us worry about our drinking and want to cut down, but finding the motivation and willpower to stick to it is hard. But what if we could change our environment so drinking less became the default? Making small changes to the environment to nudge people to behave a certain way (someti
12h
Science | The Guardian

Why is asbestos still killing people? – Science Weekly podcastEvery year, more people die from asbestos exposure than road traffic accidents in Great Britain. Many countries still continue to build with this lethal substance – but why? Hannah Devlin investigates Subscribe and review on Acast , Apple Podcasts , Soundcloud , Audioboom and Mixcloud . Join the discussion on Facebook and Twitter The health effects of asbestos have been well documented for decade
12h
The Guardian's Science Weekly

Why is asbestos still killing people? – Science Weekly podcastEvery year, more people die from asbestos exposure than road traffic accidents in Great Britain. Many countries still continue to build with this lethal substance – but why? Hannah Devlin investigates
12h
Ingeniøren

Leder: Dyrk også de forskningsdrevne helte, Tommy Ahlers
12h
Viden

Følsom data kan ikke slettes fra FacebookJurister vurderer, at man skal kunne slette følsomme og forkerte oplysninger
13h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Ammunition with risks and side effectsHunting with lead shot is highly restricted or entirely banned in many countries due to the danger of poisoning birds and environment. However, alternative ammunition is not without its own risks, as was discovered in a study conducted by a team of researchers from the Technical University of Munich.
13h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Drug used to treat daytime sleepiness does not appear to improve driving in those with sleep apneaA drug used to treat excessive daytime sleepiness may not improve driving ability in adults with obstructive sleep apnea (OSA) who cannot tolerate standard therapies, according to new research published online in the American Journal of Respiratory and Critical Care Medicine.
13h
Feed: All Latest

Elon Musk Presents His Tunnel Vision to the People of LAThe Boring Company CEO presented his idea for slaying traffic to a packed and adoring audience in Los Angeles, sharing specs and engineering details.
14h
Dagens Medicin

PLO-formand: Fint med penge, men nu melder udfordringerne sigUdmøntningen af de første 200 mio. kr. til læge- og sundhedshuse glæder PLO-formand Christian Freitag. Investeringens succes afhænger dog af, om det lykkes at tiltrække praktiserende læger nok.
14h
Dagens Medicin

Lose: Det er svært at se et mønsterRegionernes formand ærgrer sig over at have fået afslag på ansøgninger uden begrundelse og forstår ikke linjen i uddelingen af 200 mio. kr. til læge- og sundhedshuse. Sundhedsministeren siger, at man har prioriteret at »styrke flest mulige opgaver så tæt på borgeren som muligt«.
14h
Dagens Medicin

Marshall-hjælp eller silkeforet fængselMinisteren sender et gigantisk signal om, at hun ikke understøtter de praktiserende læger som selvstændige næringsdrivende
14h
Dagens Medicin

Nyt dansk studie bekræfter, at type 2-diabetes er fem forskellige sygdommeEt nyt dansk studie bekræfter resultaterne fra et meget omtalt svensk studie, som tidligere i år viste, at type 2-diabetes ikke blot er to, men hele fem forskellige sygdomme. Den nye klassificering kan få betydning for, hvordan type 2-patienter skal behandles.
14h
Dagens Medicin

Hvidovre-læger på vej mod medicinsk behandling af fedmeVægttab og helbredelse for type 2-diabetes efter gastric bypass-kirurgi skal især tilskrives kulhydrater, som aktiverer de hormonproducerende celler i tyndtarmen. Det har forskere fra Hvidovre Hospital fundet ud af, og de har store forhåbninger til, at den nye viden vil bringe dem tættere på at efterligne den kirurgiske effekt medicinsk.
14h
Dagens Medicin

Yemen tur/retur med tillidDet var ikke bomberne og de kliniske opgaver, som gjorde størst indtryk på speciallæge Josephine Obel, da hun tilbragte tre måneder i Yemen. Det var derimod den tillid, som hun oplevede på hospitalet i Yemen, trods landets mange udfordringer
14h
Ingeniøren

Lektor om disruption: Danskerne dataficeres og demokratiet taberDet kniber gevaldigt med at diskutere dataetik i al hastværket om at indføre danskernes digitale borgerskab. Diskussionen af dataetik og hvordan hensynet til privatliv ignoreres, anfører lektor Peter Aagaard, RUC, i et blogindlæg.
14h
Ingeniøren

Region H: Syddanmark får EPJ for 252 mio. - hvorfor har vi betalt knap to milliarder?Sundhedsplatformen har skabt store problemer i både Region Hovedstaden og Region Sjælland. Nu vil hovedstaden have undersøgt, hvorfor Epics system er så meget dyrere end det, man har købt i Region Syd.
14h
NeuWrite San Diego

Stop, You’re Making Me BlushI want to take you back to the most embarrassing moment of your life. Come on, you know what that was. For some people it was giving a presentation in front of a large audience. For some it involved saying or doing something really stupid, perhaps in front of someone you were attracted to; it […]
16h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Big data reveals new Alzheimer's risk genesAn international research team has identified three new genes linked to the risk of Alzheimer's disease.
17h
New Scientist - News

A third of ‘protected’ nature zones are quietly being ruinedThe world’s nations have set up 200,000 protected areas in which nature is supposed to flourish, but in many cases the protection is pretty much theoretical
17h
Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

Scientists uncover a new face of a famous protein, SWI2/SNF2 ATPaseA team of scientists now have a deeper understanding of a large switch/sucrose non-fermentable (SWI/SNF) protein complex that plays a pivotal role in plant and human gene expression that causes life-threatening diseases such as cancer.
18h
Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

'Undermatched' students less likely to graduate on time compared to peersA new study finds that undermatching -- when high-performing students, often from economically-disadvantaged households, attend less competitive colleges than their qualifications permit -- correlates to another higher education dilemma: delayed graduation. The study shows that students who undermatch are less likely to graduate college within four or six years compared to peers who do not underma
18h
Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

More than a living syringe: Mosquito saliva alone triggers unexpected immune responseMosquito saliva alone can trigger an unexpected variety of immune responses in an animal model of the human immune system.
18h
Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

New catalyst upgrades greenhouse gas into renewable hydrocarbonsEngineers have designed a most efficient and stable process for converting climate-warming carbon dioxide into a key chemical building block for plastics -- all powered using renewable electricity.
18h
Futurity.org

Will climate change turn Quebec’s parks into biodiversity havens?Climate change may transform Quebec’s protected areas and national parks into refuges for biodiversity, a new study suggests. “…the gain in the number of species of birds, amphibians, trees, and vascular flowering plants could range from 12 to 530 percent.” Researchers used ecological niche modeling to calculate potential changes in the presence of 529 species in about one third of the protected
18h
Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

Shocking study shows one third of world's protected areas degraded by human activitiesA shocking study confirms that one third of the world's protected areas -- an astonishing 2.3 million square miles or twice the size of the state of Alaska - are now under intense human pressure including road building, grazing, and urbanization.
18h
Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

Pesticides: What happens if we run out of options?What happens when pests resist all forms of herbicides and pesticides? To slow the evolutionary progression of weeds and insect pests gaining resistance to herbicides and pesticides, policymakers should provide resources for large-scale, landscape-level studies of a number of promising but untested approaches for slowing pest evolution.
18h
Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

Scientists analyze first ancient human DNA from Southeast AsiaResearchers have completed the first whole-genome analysis of ancient human DNA from Southeast Asia Study identifies at least three major waves of human migration into the region over the last 50,000 years, each shaping the genetics of Southeast Asia.
18h
cognitive science

Get Help! Pony is in Trouble!submitted by /u/burtzev [link] [comments]
18h
Futurity.org

Young adults inhale half of tobacco smoke from hookahsIn a new analysis, hookahs accounted for over half of the tobacco smoke volume that American young adult hookah and cigarette smokers consumed. Toxicant exposures—such as tar, carbon monoxide, and nicotine—were lower, yet substantial, for those young adults who smoked tobacco just using a hookah, compared to those who smoked both hookahs and cigarettes. The research appears in the journal Tobacco
18h
Futurity.org

Decisions can be tough when you have chronic painChronic pain, which affects an estimated 100 million Americans, goes beyond physical discomfort. A new study shows it can even affect our decision-making abilities. Researchers investigated how pain impacts cognitive flexibility, or the ability of the brain to learn new information—and discovered that the ability to adapt to changing situations may be hindered in those with chronic pain. “Cogniti
18h
Futurity.org

Maps chart space cloud where stars are bornResearchers have created the most detailed maps yet of a vast seedbed of stars similar to Earth’s sun. The maps provide unprecedented detail of the structure of the Orion A molecular cloud, the closest star-forming region of high-mass stars. Orion A hosts a variety of star-forming environments, including dense star clusters similar to the one where Earth’s sun is believed to have formed. “Our map
18h
Feed: All Latest

How Volcanologists Predicted Kilauea’s Explosive EruptionScientists are now warning that the next phase of eruptions could send very large boulders as far as a mile from the crater.
18h
Futurity.org

Toothpaste ingredient may bust up cystic fibrosis biofilmsA common antibacterial substance in toothpaste may combat life-threatening diseases such as cystic fibrosis when combined with an with an FDA-approved drug, researchers report. “We think this can save lives…” Researchers have found that when triclosan, a substance that reduces or prevents bacteria from growing, combines with an antibiotic called tobramycin, it kills the cells that protect the CF
18h
Futurity.org

Hat for tuning brain zaps could improve Parkinson’s treatmentBrain signals that electrodes inside a fashionable hat record could one day guide treatment to control the involuntary body movements characteristic of Parkinson’s disease. That’s a piece of a larger goal in the research of Nicole Swann of the University of Oregon’s human physiology department, lead author of a new study in the Journal of Neural Engineering that, she says, offers encouragement to
18h
Futurity.org

Theory accounts for weird ‘heavy fermion’ superconductorA 2017 theory to explain the contradictory behavior of an iron-based high-temperature superconductor is helping solve a puzzle in a different type of unconventional superconductor, the “heavy fermion” compound known as CeCu2Si2. The study, published in the Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences , focuses on a cerium, copper, and silicon composite whose strange behavior in 1979 helped ush
19h
Live Science

Tardigrades Apparently Do Huge PoopsLike, really big poops.
19h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News

New era for blood transfusions through genome sequencingIn a new study, investigators from Brigham and Women's Hospital and Harvard Medical School, as well as from the New York Blood Center have leveraged the MedSeq Project -- the first randomized trial of whole genome sequencing in healthy adults -- to develop and validate a computer program that can comprehensively and cost-effectively determine differences in individuals' blood types with more than
19h
Dagens Medicin

Kunstig intelligens – kollega eller fjende?Der er masser af nye etiske problemstillinger ved brug af AI og big data. Men teknologierne giver fortsat masser af muligheder for at forbedre diagnostik og behandling af patienter, som det er uetisk ikke at forfølge og anvende.
19h
Big Think

How organizations can embrace diversity to boost creativityCreativity is of vital importance in the modern world. Does diversity help promote it? Read More
19h
Science : NPR

A Pregnant Rhino In California Could Save A Related SubspeciesResearchers announced Thursday that they impregnated "Victoria" through artificial insemination. It is a step toward saving the critically endangered northern white rhino. (Image credit: Julie Watson/AP)
19h
Live Science

There's No Good Explanation for Why Ozone-Ripping CFCs Are BackScientists can't explain why in the world someone would decide to pump out the dangerous gases again.
19h
The Atlantic

The Atlantic Daily: Unearthed and ExposedWhat We’re Following Peace May End an Alliance: Chung In Moon, a special advisor to the South Korean president, said that South Korea may eventually like to see its alliance with the U.S. dissolve in an exclusive interview with Uri Friedman. Moon said that if North Korea agrees to dismantle their nuclear weapons to secure a peace treaty with South Korea and the U.S., the alliance between the latt
20h
The Atlantic

The Atlantic Politics & Policy Daily: Madame Director-Written by Elaine Godfrey ( @elainejgodfrey ) Today in 5 Lines On the first anniversary of the special counsel’s Russia probe , President Trump reiterated his claim that there was no collusion between his campaign and the Russians. Trump told reporters that he was referring to MS-13 gang members when he called some undocumented immigrants “animals” on Wednesday. The Senate confirmed Gina Haspel
20h
Popular Science

The world agreed to ban this ozone killer years ago—but it looks like someone is making moreEnvironment CFC-11 isn't leaving the atmosphere as quickly as it should. A new study shows a shocking spike in emissions for an ozone-depleting chemical banned more than 20 years ago. The culprit who is generating this pollutant is still…
20h
Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

Supersonic waves may help electronics beat the heatResearchers made the first observations of waves of atomic rearrangements, known as phasons, propagating supersonically through a vibrating crystal lattice -- a discovery that may dramatically improve heat transport in insulators and enable new strategies for heat management in future electronics devices.
20h
Science : NPR

Army 'Leans In' To Protect A Shooter's Brain From Blast InjuryThe Army tells NPR of plans to monitor blast exposure across a military career, to enforce limits on firing certain weapons, and to even look into whether special helmets could help stop blast waves. (Image credit: Lance Cpl. Matthew Bragg/U.S. Marines/DVIDS)
20h
Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

Self-assembling 3D battery would charge in secondsThe world is a big place, but it's gotten smaller with the advent of technologies that put people from across the globe in the palm of one's hand. And as the world has shrunk, it has also demanded that things happen ever faster -- including the time it takes to charge an electronic device.
20h
Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

New Zealand has its own population of blue whalesA group of blue whales that frequent the South Taranaki Bight (STB) between the North and South islands of New Zealand appears to be part of a local population that is genetically distinct from other blue whales in the Pacific Ocean and Southern Ocean, a new study has found.
20h
Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

Can we get 100 percent of our energy from renewable sources?Some researchers doubted the feasibility of many of the recent scenarios for high shares of renewable energy. Now scientists have hit back with their response to the points raised. They demonstrate that there are no roadblocks on the way to a 100 percent renewable future.
20h
Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

Above us only sky: The open air as an underappreciated habitatScientists have collated the current scientific knowledge on potential hazards to one group of animals flying at high altitudes, bats. Researchers synthesize threats facing bats in troposphere and provide recommendations for potential protective measures to ensure persistence of bats and other high-flying animals.
20h
Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

Continental shelf shape leads to long-lasting tsunami edge waves during Mexican earthquakeThe shape of the continental shelf off the southern Mexican coast played a role in the formation of long-lasting tsunami edge waves that appeared after last September's magnitude 8.2 earthquake.
20h
Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

Brain abnormality indicates general risk for mental illnessA new study reports an abnormality in visual regions of the brain that is associated with a person's general risk for mental illness. The findings indicate a signature abnormality shared between common forms of mental illness, which could help clinicians assess a patient's general risk for developing a mental illness.
20h
Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

Feeding habits of ancient elephants uncovered from grass fragments stuck in their teethA new study examined the feeding habits of ancient elephant relatives that inhabited Central Asia some 17 million years ago.
20h

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