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The Atlantic

It’s the GunsAmericans of high-school age are 82 times more likely to die from a gun homicide than 15- to 19-year-olds in the rest of the developed world. This stark discrepancy is often treated as a baffling fact, requiring some counterintuitive explanation. After today’s massacre in Texas, the state’s lieutenant governor, Dan Patrick, suggested that the problem may be that high schools have too many doors.
18h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Hitler definitely died in 1945 according to new study of his teethAdolf Hitler definitely died in 1945 in Berlin, from taking cyanide and a bullet, according to French researchers who were given rare access to fragments of the dictator's teeth held in Moscow.
8h
Ingeniøren

Fodboldspillere slæber tonsvis af gummigranulat hjem fra kunstgræsbanerneNorske forskere har fået hjælp fra over 12.000 skoleelever til at undersøge omfanget.
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LATEST

Science | The Guardian

Physicist Kate Shaw: ‘Even in conservative places, you do not have to be in conflict with scientific ideas’The Cern scientist on her dual role in studying quarks and helping to train a new generation of scientists from Palestine to Peru Kate Shaw is a physicist based at the University of Sussex, where she studies the data that pours out of the Atlas experiment, one of the huge detectors that forms part of the Large Hadron Collider at Cern, in Geneva. She is also the founder of Physics Without Frontier
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cognitive science

The Evolutionary Argument Against Realitysubmitted by /u/ephemeral-glitch [link] [comments]
25min
Big Think

How your mind, under stress, gets better at processing bad newsSome of the most important decisions you will make in your lifetime will occur while you feel stressed and anxious. Read More
34min
Scientific American Content: Global

Vermont Legislators Pass Law Allowing Drug ImportsThe state is the first to approve such legislation, but importation would still require federal sign-off -- Read more on ScientificAmerican.com
1h
Live Science

What Can the Death of a Neutron Tell Us About Dark Matter?Physicists speculate that decaying neutrons may be producing particles unknown to science that make up the elusive dark matter.
1h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Finasteride does not increase risk of prostate cancer death, SWOG results showTwenty five years after it opened for enrollment, the landmark Prostate Cancer Prevention Trial has delivered a final verdict. Finasteride, a common hormone-blocking drug, reduces mens' risk of getting prostate cancer without increasing their risk of dying from the disease.
2h
Live Science

Here's How Health Officials Plan to Use the Ebola Vaccine in New African OutbreakThe Ebola outbreak in the Democratic Republic of Congo (DRC) is spreading, but this time around, there's a vaccine.
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The Atlantic

How a Norwegian Retiree Got Caught Up in a Spy ScandalOSLO, Norway—Late last year, Russian authorities in Moscow arrested a 62-year-old retired Norwegian border guard and pensioner named Frode Berg and accused him of being a spy. According to Russian officials, since 2015 Berg had been mailing envelopes of cash to an unknown recipient; in exchange, they said, Norwegian intelligence acquired information on Russia’s nuclear submarines in the far north
2h
Scientific American Content: Global

Are We Even Playing the Same Game?Playing against a range of opponents opens doors for strategy and problem-solving, but also lessons that loss and failure are not the same thing -- Read more on ScientificAmerican.com
2h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News

UA surgeons developing new tool to detect urine blockageSurgeons at the University of Arizona College of Medicine - Tucson are developing a tool that may make detecting urine blockage simpler for patients.
2h
cognitive science

The act of reading a novel changes people's neural connectivity patterns, and these changes persist in the days after they have finished reading.submitted by /u/randomusefulbits [link] [comments]
3h
cognitive science

The Space of Possible Mindssubmitted by /u/NaiveSkeptic [link] [comments]
3h
Feed: All Latest

A Mugshots.com Indictment, Lost Grenades, and More Security News This WeekCritical Cisco bugs, lost grenades, and more of the week's top security news.
4h
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Is It Weird for Conservatives to Like 'Star Trek'?On the latest 'Geek's Guide to the Galaxy' podcast, writer Ana Marie Cox discusses Ted Cruz's love of one of the most openly liberal TV shows.
4h
Ingeniøren

DTU-rapport: Virksomheder baseret på DTU-patenter klarer sig godtEn rapport fra DTU, baseret på udtræk af CVR-registret, viser at selskaber med teknologi udviklet på DTU klarer sig godt.
4h
Scientific American Content: Global

Why SpaceX's "Block 5" Is a Big DealPsst! Want a used rocket? I've got a lovely one for you, ready to fly today -- Read more on ScientificAmerican.com
4h
Scientific American Content: Global

The Best Way to Use Compression GearTons of pro athletes are wearing compression gear and using compression machines to improve their performance. But do they really work? -- Read more on ScientificAmerican.com
4h
Big Think

Jonathan Lethem – Batman's Greatest Enemy – Think Again - a Big Think Podcast #148Hanging out with a bat vs. being a bat. Why 'titanic' artists are too big to float. Bob Dylan's very worst song, and more. Read More
5h
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Best Weekend Tech Deals: Apple Watch, Neck Massagers, MonitorsComputer monitors, TVs, laptops, desktops, and even the Apple Watch are all on sale this weekend.
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Feed: All Latest

Space Photos of the Week: Mars Gets Pac Man FeverNASA just released an image of a crater-dune combination it is calling Bachan Pac-Man.
5h
New on MIT Technology Review

The Best of the Physics arXiv (week ending May 19, 2018)This week’s most thought-provoking papers from the Physics arXiv.
5h
Science : NPR

USDA Unveils Prototypes For GMO Food Labels, And They're ... ConfusingThe labels use the letters BE, for bioengineered, not GMO, which critics say could baffle consumers. One design features a smiling sun that a skeptic calls "essentially propaganda for the industry." (Image credit: Department of Agriculture )
5h
Scientific American Content: Global

After Controversy Over Industry Funding, NIH Halts Enrollment in Moderate Drinking StudyThe agency is investigating how money for the study was raised and whether it is still worth pursuing -- Read more on ScientificAmerican.com
5h
The Atlantic

The Family Weekly: Something BorrowedThis Week in Family What does motherhood look like today? Around Mother’s Day, the Family section took a closer look at the lives of American mothers. The share of the American population who are mothers is lower than it’s been in a quarter century, and moms today are, on average, older than they’ve been in the past. But even though it can seem like older moms are everywhere, having kids after 40
5h
The Atlantic

The Real Risk of Trump’s Dehumanization of Immigrants“You wouldn’t believe how bad these people are. These aren’t people—these are animals.” That was President Trump earlier this week, when according to The New York Times he “lashed out at undocumented immigrants” during a meeting on so-called sanctuary cities. Democratic politicians seized the opportunity to criticize the president, accusing him of attacking many or most immigrants. Senate Minorit
6h
The Atlantic

The Coming Wave of Murders Solved by GenealogyJust three weeks ago, law enforcement in California announced the arrest of the Golden State Killer using DNA. The press conference was vague, but the details of the novel method soon trickled out : Joseph James DeAngelo was found by matching DNA from a crime scene with that of his distant relative on the genealogy site GEDmatch. On Friday, police in Washington State announced the arrest of Willi
6h
The Atlantic

Fahrenheit 451 Tackles the Evils of Social MediaHow do you make a television movie out of a book whose premise is that televised entertainment is destroying humanity? Fahrenheit 451 , Ray Bradbury wrote in 1951 , is a warning against an age of factoids, of rolling cable-news chyrons, of attention spans so fried that our “hopscotching existence” makes it impossible to sit still with a novel. The 1953 book features a woman whose entire life revo
6h
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Google, Alibaba Spar Over Timeline for 'Quantum Supremacy'Google says it expects to reach an important milestone for quantum computing this year. Not so fast, says Alibaba.
6h
Feed: All Latest

A Location-Sharing Disaster Shows How Exposed You Really AreThe failures of Securus and LocationSmart to secure location data are the failures of an entire industry.
6h
Ingeniøren

Digitale målere skal sikre Kamstrup ny vækstFor første gang lander målerproducenten Kamstrup i top-20 på Ingeniørens profilliste. Et heftigt udviklingsbudget og flere års solid fremgang lokker stadigt flere ingeniører til Østjylland, hvor sulten efter teknisk ekspertise er stor.
7h
The Atlantic

Trump’s Only Iran Strategy Is to Punish IranAfter Donald Trump’s announcement last week that the United States was walking away from the Iran nuclear deal, two State Department officials held a background briefing to explain the strategy. The transcript is a painful read . From start to finish, the unnamed officials struggled to answer the most basic questions about the purpose of reimposing sanctions on Iran, what they expected to achieve
8h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Phone data-leak company: No record of location-data abuseA California company confirmed that a flaw in its website allowed outsiders to pinpoint the location of mobile phones in the United States without authorization.
8h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Hawaii officials airlift 4 residents after lava crosses roadFast-moving lava crossed a road and isolated about 40 homes Friday in a rural subdivision below Hawaii's Kilauea volcano, forcing at least four people to be evacuated by county and National Guard helicopters.
8h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Gay-friendly Apple weighs North Carolina despite LGBT lawsGay-rights advocates are divided on whether to cheer or bemoan a potential marriage between the state of North Carolina and one of the global corporations most friendly to LGBT workers and causes.
8h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

High-tech, sphere-shaped arena coming to Las Vegas StripA massive high-tech, sphere-shaped venue that will host concerts and other events while engaging multiple senses will break ground this summer in Las Vegas, officials announced Friday.
8h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Yellow Prince guitar sells for $225,000 in New YorkA custom-made yellow guitar owned by Prince sold for $225,000 in New York on Friday, headlining a sale of jewelry, outfits and memorabilia from the late pop icon, Julien's Auctions said.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Slovenia, a land with beekeeping in its genesIt was a Slovene who wrote the world's first modern beekeeping manual.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Three-year study found no relationship between methane concentrations in groundwater and proximity to natural gas wellsA study of drinking water in Appalachian Ohio found no evidence of natural gas contamination from recent oil and gas drilling.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Annotation tool provides step toward understanding links between disease, mutant RNAResearchers at Oregon State University have developed a computer program that represents a key step toward better understanding the connections between mutant genetic material and disease.
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Viden

På vej til Danmark: Googles smart-højtalere æder sig ind på AmazonsAmazon har været totaldominerende på markedet for smart-højtalere, men konkurrencen tager til. Snart kommer de første lyttende højtalere til Danmark.
9h
Live Science

COPD: Causes, Symptoms & TreatmentChronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) is a chronic lung disease that makes breathing progressively more difficult. It affects about 11 million people in the United States.
15h
Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

How immune cells kill bacteria with acidThe first line of immune defense against invading pathogens like bacteria are macrophages, immune cells that engulf every foreign object that crosses their way and kill their prey with acid. However, it is not yet entirely understood how the acidification process is established. In their quest to systematically study proteins that transport chemicals across cellular membranes, researchers characte
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

Antibacterial in your toothpaste may combat severe lung diseaseResearchers have found that when triclosan, a substance that reduces or prevents bacteria from growing, is combined with an antibiotic called tobramycin, it kills the cells that protect cystic fibrosis bacteria, known as Pseudomonas aeruginosa, by up to 99.9 percent.
15h
cognitive science

We found Base Realitysubmitted by /u/jamonc37 [link] [comments]
16h
Big Think

How AI, VR and AR will change how you vacationArtificial Intelligence (AI), Virtual Reality (VR), and Artificial Reality (AR) are changing the way Americans are traveling. We only have room to fly up from here! Read More
17h
Latest Headlines | Science News

What we know about the Ebola outbreak, and the vaccine that might helpEven as an experimental vaccine arrives in Congo to contain the virus, there are worrisome signs Ebola has spread to a city.
18h
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Yes, 'Call of Duty''s Single-Player Campaign Will Be Missed'Black Ops 4' may not mark the permanent death of single-player options in the entire franchise, but it's sad news nonetheless
18h
The Atlantic

The Atlantic Daily: Revelations and RelationshipsWhat We’re Following Tragedy in Texas: On Friday morning, 10 students were killed and several more were wounded at a high school in Santa Fe, Texas, after a 17-year-old male student open fired on campus, according to Texas Governor Greg Abbott. In a video clip that went viral following the incident, a female student told a reporter that the shooting felt inevitable: “It’s been happening everywher
18h
Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

One third of people aged 40-59 have evidence of degenerative disc diseaseResearchers have reported that one-third of people 40-59 years have image-based evidence of moderate to severe degenerative disc disease and more than half had moderate to severe spinal osteoarthritis.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

A way to prevent pancreatic cancer from spreading post-surgery?New research suggests a strategy for lowering the odds of metastasis following successful pancreatic cancer surgery: The post-operative period, suggests a researcher, 'offers a window during which efforts might be made to keep cortisol levels down and T cells strong so the patient's own immune system can kill the cancer cells that have made their way to other parts of the body but until this point
18h
Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

Sugars in infant formulas pose risk to babies with inherited metabolic disorderBabies with inherited intolerance of fructose face a risk of acute liver failure if they are fed certain widely available formulas containing fructose, pediatricians and geneticists are warning. Baby formula manufacturers should remove fructose or sucrose, or explicitly label their products to allow parents to avoid those sweeteners if necessary, the doctors say.
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Popular Science

Octopuses are not aliens, but boy are they a bunch of beautiful weirdosAnimals A new paper raises an old, contentious idea. Octopuses seem to be particularly prone to alien theories. A new paper proposes—based on an old theory—that octopuses might have cosmic origins. The problem is that all…
19h
Live Science

Hatshepsut: Powerful Female PharaohQueen Hatshepsut was a woman who ruled Egypt, but she reigned as a man.
19h
The Atlantic

The Atlantic Politics & Policy Daily: ‘I’ve Always Kind of Felt Like Eventually It Was Going to Happen Here, Too’-Written by Elaine Godfrey ( @elainejgodfrey ) Today in 5 Lines Nine students and one teacher were killed after a gunman opened fire at Santa Fe High School in Santa Fe, Texas, according to Governor Greg Abbott. A student who survived the shooting told a reporter, “It’s been happening everywhere. I’ve always kind of felt like eventually it was going to happen here, too.” The House rejected an $86
19h
Live Science

Congressman Blames Sea Level Rise on Falling Rocks, Is Very WrongNo, "erosion" is not to blame for the alarming trends in global sea level rise.
19h
NYT > Science

Technique Used to Find Golden State Killer Leads to a Suspect in 1987 MurdersA break in the 31-year-long investigation of the killings in Washington State of a young Canadian couple came after DNA was uploaded to an ancestry website.
19h
Popular Science

Everything self-driving cars calculate before changing lanesTechnology Inside a self-driving car's lane-change calculus. To swerve or not to swerve: Inside a self-driving car's lane-change calculus.
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The Scientist RSS

How to Separate the Science From the (Jerk) ScientistA recent toast to James Watson highlights a tolerance for bigotry many want excised from the scientific community.
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The Scientist RSS

USDA to Warn Some Facilities Ahead of Animal Welfare InspectionsA pilot program announced last month will consider combining announced and surprise inspections.
19h
Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

Researchers mimic comet moth's silk fibers to make 'air-conditioned' fabricIn exploring the optical properties of the Madagascar comet moth's cocoon fibers, a team discovers the fibers' exceptional capabilities to reflect sunlight and to transmit optical signals and images, and develops methods to spin artificial fibers mimicking the natural fibers' nanostructures and optical properties.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

Insect gene allows reproductive organs to cope with harmful bacteriaA group of biologists has studied Nasonia parasitic wasps, which are about the size of a sesame seed, and they serve as one of the best models to dissect and characterize the evolution of insect genomes.
19h
Live Science

Auspicious? Meghan and Harry to Marry on Date of Royal BeheadingThe British monarchy has become a lot less bloody.
20h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Annotation tool provides step toward understanding links between disease, mutant RNAResearchers have developed a computer program that represents a key step toward better understanding the connections between mutant genetic material and disease.
20h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Dogs born in the summertime more likely to suffer heart diseaseDogs born June through August are at higher risk of heart disease than those born other months, rising in July to 74 percent higher risk, according to a study published this week in Scientific Reports from researchers at the Perelman School of Medicine at the University of Pennsylvania. A correlation to outdoor air pollution may be the culprit.
20h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Simpler scan still effective in deciding stroke treatmentA study led by a neurologist from McGovern Medical School at The University of Texas Health Science Center at Houston (UTHealth) showed that a computed tomography (CT scan) could be sufficient for determining thrombectomy treatment in stroke.
20h
Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

The dark side of our genes -- healthy aging in modern timesScientists collate the evidence for the mismatch between past evolutionary adaptation and our modern lives. They also ask whether natural selection linked to modernization might reduce globally the burden of some chronic diseases.
20h
Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

Ammunition with risks and side effectsHunting with lead shot is highly restricted or entirely banned in many countries due to the danger of poisoning birds and environment. However, alternative ammunition is not without its own risks, as was discovered in a recent study.
20h
Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

New era for blood transfusions through genome sequencingScientists have leveraged the MedSeq Project -- the first randomized trial of whole genome sequencing in healthy adults -- to develop and validate a computer program that can comprehensively and cost-effectively determine differences in individuals' blood types with more than 99 percent accuracy.
20h
Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

What bacteria can teach us about combating atrazine contaminationResearchers are interested in harnessing the bacterial ability to degrade atrazine in order to remediate atrazine-polluted environments. They now describe previously unknown proteins involved in atrazine degradation.
20h
Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

Probiotics to protect bees from an infection associated with colony collapse disorderAdding probiotics to bees' food helps make them more resistant to nosemosis, a fungal infection associated with colony collapse disorder that has been observed in Europe and North America over the past 20 years. Probiotics can decrease the mortality rate of this infection in bees by up to 40 percent, report researchers.
20h
Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

Buyer beware: Some water-filter pitchers much better at toxin removalScientists compared three popular pitcher brands' ability to clear dangerous microcystins from tap water. They found that while one did an excellent job, other pitchers allowed the toxins -- which appear during harmful algal blooms (HABs) -- to escape the filter and drop into the drinking water.
20h
New on MIT Technology Review

Another arrest shows why no one can hide from the genetic detectives
20h
cognitive science

Paths to Polarization: How Extreme Views, Miscommunication, and Random Chance Drive Opinion Dynamics (University of California, Merced, 2018, 24 page PDF)submitted by /u/CapnDinosaur [link] [comments]
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Science | The Guardian

Weatherwatch: should lightning conductors be pointed or blunt?When St Bride’s church was damaged by lightning in 1764 George III contacted Benjamin Franklin for advice. But the two fell out over the best design St Bride’s church in Fleet Street, London was a sorry sight on June 19, 1764 having been struck by lightning the day before. The top of Christopher Wren’s tallest spire came crashing down - losing the top 2.5 metres (8 ft) of its total 71-metre (234
20h
Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

Researchers operate lab-grown heart cells by remote controlResearchers have developed a technique that allows them to speed up or slow down human heart cells growing in a dish on command -- simply by shining a light on them and varying its intensity. The cells are grown on a material called graphene, which converts light into electricity, providing a more realistic environment than standard plastic or glass laboratory dishes.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

Researchers discover how body temperature wrecks potential dengue, Zika vaccineA major route toward creating effective vaccines against dengue virus and Zika involves the E protein that covers the surface of each viral particle. But creating such a vaccine has proven difficult for a number of reasons. Now researchers have delineated the details of one major barrier to a promising vaccine. It's something we all have -- a natural body temperature of about 98.6 degrees.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

Diamond 'spin-off' tech could lead to low-cost medical imaging and drug discovery toolsAn international team has discovered how to exploit defects in nanoscale and microscale diamonds and potentially enhance the sensitivity of magnetic resonance imaging and nuclear magnetic resonance systems while eliminating the need for their costly and bulky superconducting magnets.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

Variations in placental microbiota appear related to premature birthResearchers have found a surplus of pathogenic bacteria in placentas from premature births, supporting the hypothesis that maternal infection may cause preterm birth.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

New insights into malaria parasiteScientists have found that various stages of the development of human malaria parasites, including stages involved in malaria transmission, are linked to epigenetic features and how chromatin -- the complex of DNA and proteins within the nucleus -- is organized and structured in these parasites.
20h
Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

Immune cell provides cradle for mammary stem cellsResearchers have made new discoveries about how an immune cell known as the macrophage, which normally fights infection by swallowing foreign invaders, nurtures mammary gland stem cells through a chemical signaling molecule. The study may provide important clues about the roles of macrophages in breast cancer progression.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

Evaluating active pressure management of induced earthquakesCan altering the amount or rate of fluid injection and production in an oil and gas field or carbon storage site affect induced earthquakes in that field? A physics-based simulation suggests that this type of "active pressure management" can be useful in controlling induced seismicity at certain wells.
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Study finds no evidence of natural gas from fracking in Ohio drinking waterA study of drinking water in Appalachian Ohio found no evidence of natural gas contamination from recent oil and gas drilling. Geologists with the University of Cincinnati examined drinking water in northeast Ohio where many residents rely on water from private underground wells. The time-series study was the first of its kind in Ohio.
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Live Science

Some Women Regret Freezing Their Eggs, and Doctors Are WorriedMost women who elect to freeze their eggs are happy they did it, but about 1 in 6 say they regret the decision, according to a new study.
20h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

'It smelled like sulfur:' Ash falls near Hawaii volcanoHawaii residents covered their faces with masks after a volcano menacing the Big Island for weeks exploded, sending a mixture of pulverized rock, glass and crystal into the air in its strongest eruption of sandlike ash in days.
20h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Nuclear plant shuts down unexpectedly in Washington stateA nuclear power plant in southeastern Washington shut down unexpectedly Friday.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

BMW expands UK car recall againGerman car manufacturer BMW on Friday expanded a British safety recall for another 88,000 vehicles because of a fire risk.
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NYT > Science

Q&A: How Hot Can Lava Get?Hawaii Kilauea volcanoThe eruptions at Kilauea offer a glimpse into the range of temperatures for volcanic magma and lava.
20h
The Scientist RSS

Zoo Pregnancy Raises Hopes of Preserving White RhinosVictoria, a southern white rhino at the San Diego Zoo, was impregnated by artificial insemination on March 22 and, if all goes well, will birth the calf in summer 2019.
20h
The Scientist RSS

Immunotherapy More Effective in Men: StudyWomen with metastatic cancer who were treated with a checkpoint inhibitor had a smaller benefit than did men.
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The Atlantic

Trump’s New Strategy for Responding to Robert MuellerRudy Giuliani’s first weeks as President Trump’s lawyer have been hectic and full of contradictions —both Giuliani contradicting himself, and the president contradicting Giuliani. Underneath the chaos, however, it’s becoming possible to discern a fresh Trump legal strategy since the president shook up his team. On the one hand, Trump’s lawyers say they continue to work with Special Counsel Robert
20h
Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

Keep the light off: A material with improved mechanical performance in the darkResearchers found that zinc sulfide crystals were brittle under normal lighting conditions at room temperature, but highly plastic when deformed in complete darkness. Deformation of zinc sulfide crystals in the dark also narrowed their band gap, which controls electrical conductivity. The team's findings showed the mechanical and electronic properties of inorganic semiconductors are sensitive to l
20h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Researchers discover how body temperature wrecks potential dengue, Zika vaccineA major route toward creating effective vaccines against dengue virus and Zika involves the E protein that covers the surface of each viral particle. If we could develop strong antibodies against this E protein, then that would be the crux of a formidable vaccine—based on the important fact that the 180 E proteins come in pairs. But creating such a vaccine has proven difficult for a number of reas
20h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Diamond 'spin-off' tech could lead to low-cost medical imaging and drug discovery toolsIt may sound contradictory, but diamonds are the key to a new technique that could provide a very-low-cost alternative to multimillion-dollar medical imaging and drug-discovery devices.
20h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Where GM meets GEGenome edited (GE) crops will be sown in a field this month for the first time in the UK as part of an experimental trial at Rothamsted Research that aims to investigate genetic engineering's efficiency in developing plants to yield more nutritious diets more sustainably.Like traditional plant breeding, genome editing can create new varieties of plants with desired traits by altering their genetic
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News

MR spectroscopy imaging reveals effects of targeted treatment of mutant IDH1 gliomasUsing a novel imaging method, a Massachusetts General Hospital research team is investigating the mechanisms behind a potential targeted treatment for a subtype of the deadly brains tumors called gliomas.
20h
New Scientist - News

Grape skins and stems can be turned into a greener plasticSomeday you might buy wine in a plastic bottle made from the same grapes. Their skins, stems, and seeds can be used to make plastic that lasts longer
21h
Live Science

Something Is Sucking Iron Out of Earth's Crust, and Scientists Think They Know WhatEarth would look a lot more like Mars if a mysterious mineral wasn't sucking iron out of the planet's crust. Scientists think they now know the culprit — and it's a gemstone.
21h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News

ACR urges lawmakers to address rising costs and access barriers in arthritis careRheumatologists and rheumatology health professionals convened on Capitol Hill this week to urge legislative action on pressing policy issues affecting rheumatology care during the American College of Rheumatology's Advocacy Leadership Conference, held May 16-17, 2018 in Washington, D.C.
21h
Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

Battling bubbles: How plants protect themselves from killer fungusIn the battle between plants and pathogens, molecules called small RNAs are coveted weapons used by both invaders and defenders. Researchers report how plants package and deliver the sRNAs they use to fight back against plant pathogens. The study focused on Botrytis cinerea, a fungus that causes a grey mold disease in strawberries, tomatoes, and almost all fruits, vegetables, and many flowers.
21h
Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

Virtual-reality testing ground for dronesEngineers have developed a new virtual-reality training system for drones that enables a vehicle to 'see' a rich, virtual environment while flying in an empty physical space. The system, which the team has dubbed 'Flight Goggles,' could significantly reduce the number of crashes that drones experience in actual training sessions. It can also serve as a virtual testbed for any number of environment
21h
Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

Blood type affects severity of diarrhea caused by E. coliA new study shows that a kind of E. coli most associated with 'travelers' diarrhea' and children in underdeveloped areas of the world causes more severe disease in people with blood type A. The bacteria release a protein that latches onto intestinal cells in people with blood type A, but not blood type O or B, according to a new study.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

Repeating seismic events offer clues about Costa Rican volcanic eruptionsRepeating seismic events--events that have the same frequency content and waveform shapes--may offer a glimpse at the movement of magma and volcanic gases underneath Turrialba and Poas, two well-known active volcanoes in Costa Rica.
21h
Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

New Zealand's secret recipe for active school travel: The neighborhood built environmentIncreased rates of active travel (e.g., walking or cycling) to school in New Zealand children and youth were associated with shorter distances to school, and neighborhoods with more connected streets, less residential density, and lower socio-economic status, reveals a new systematic meta-analysis.
21h
Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

Vitamin B12 breakthrough for more complete Vegetarian and Vegan dietsScientists have made a significant discovery about how the vitamin content of some plants can be improved to make vegetarian and vegan diets more complete. Vitamin B12 (cobalamin) is an essential dietary component but vegetarians are more prone to B12 deficiency as plants neither make nor require this nutrient. But now a team, led by Professor Martin Warren, has proved that common garden cress can
21h
Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

New regimens improve survival for children and young adults with T-cell cancersIn a federally funded, randomized phase III clinical trial, 90 percent of children and young adults with T-cell acute lymphoblastic leukemia (T-ALL) or T-cell lymphoblastic lymphoma (T-LL) were alive four years after starting treatment regimens on this trial, and 84 percent were cancer free. These are the highest survival rates for these T-cell malignancies reported to date, according to the autho
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The Atlantic

A House Republican Rebellion on Two FrontsA deepening rupture within the House Republican ranks over immigration policy has claimed another casualty: the farm bill, a far-reaching priority of Speaker Paul Ryan that would impose work requirements on recipients of food stamps. Conservatives in the House Freedom Caucus joined in an unlikely alliance with Republican moderates and the entire Democratic caucus on Friday to sink the legislation
21h
The Atlantic

A World Where School Shootings Feel InevitableParkland Texas Santa FeThe school year at Santa Fe High School in Santa Fe, Texas—roughly 30 miles outside of Houston—was winding to a close. The seniors would be honored on Saturday during a baccalaureate ceremony, and they were just weeks away from graduation. Then, on Friday morning, a 17-year-old male student allegedly opened fire on campus, killing 10 people, according to Governor Greg Abbott, and wounding several
21h
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Gadget Lab Podcast: How to Make Bike Commuting Less Daunting“Bikes” Calore makes a case for why everyone should bike more–and tells you the gear you need to do it right.
21h
Popular Science

The FDA approved a drug that treats opioid addiction that isn’t addictive itselfHealth Unlike most opioid addiction treatments, Lucemyra is not derived from opioids themselves. This week, the Food and Drug Administration (FDA) gave final approval for a drug shown to mitigate the symptoms associated with opioid withdrawal.
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23andMe Goes Global In Its Data-Mining EffortsThe consumer genetics company is opening its data set to some researchers—and recruiting others to make that data set more robust in the first place.
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Big Think

Consciousness: How does the brain make the mind?In his new book, The Consciousness Instinct, Michael Gazzaniga does a deep dive into the process of consciousness. Read More
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

One medulloblastoma subset requires less aggressive therapyResearchers have identified a subtype of the brain tumor medulloblastoma that is associated with improved survival of infants treated with less aggressive, risk-adapted therapy.
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Ultrasound guidelines identify children who should be biopsied for thyroid cancerA Loyola Medicine study has found that new ultrasound guidelines can reliably identify pediatric patients who should be biopsied for thyroid cancer. Thyroid cancer is a common cause of cancer in teenagers, and the incidence is increasing. Adolescents have a 10-fold greater incidence than younger children, and the disease is five times more common in girls than boys.
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Big Think

New paper says Bitcoin network uses as much energy as Ireland, but not all agreeA new paper estimates the low and high end of total electricity consumption by the Bitcoin network, but not all agree with the methodology. Read More
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NYT > Science

New Youth Center at American Indian Museum Focuses on InventionAt the National Museum of the American Indian, imagiNATIONS emphasizes native innovations in math, science and engineering.
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Biotin supplements caused misleading test results, almost led to unnecessary procedureA new case report led by Maya Styner, M.D., of the University of North Carolina School of Medicine describes how a patient's use of a common over-the-counter biotin supplement caused clinically misleading test results and almost resulted in an unnecessary, invasive medical procedure.
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New Scientist - News

Stunning first image sent back by NASA’s planet-hunter satelliteThe beauty of the skies is on display in this incredible image, the first sent back by NASA’s Transiting Exoplanet Survey Satellite on its way past the moon
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Popular Science

How scientists can be sure that Kilauea won’t turn into the next Mount St. HelensScience It's all about their chemistry. Even the largest possible explosive event from Kilauea would still be tiny compared to other volcanoes around the world, from Krakatoa to Mount St. Helens to Vesuvius.
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Inside Science

What Can the Death of a Neutron Tell Us About Dark Matter?What Can the Death of a Neutron Tell Us About Dark Matter? Physicists speculate that decaying neutrons may be producing particles unknown to science that make up the elusive dark matter. Beta_radiation.jpg Tracks of particles produced by a type of decay process known as beta radiation. Image credits: Nuledo via Wikimedia Commons Rights information: CC BY-SA 4.0 Physics Friday, May 18, 2018 - 13:4
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Stroke researchers confirm role of frontal lesions in response to prism treatment'Our research shows that patients with frontal cortical lesions may benefit from prism adaptation treatment for spatial neglect,' said Dr. AM Barrett. 'Early identification of patients with hemiparesis and frontal lesions could reduce the substantial costs of stroke care and improve public health. Because spatial neglect often goes undetected, this is a major challenge. Meeting that challenge requ
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

Autonomous glider can fly like an albatross, cruise like a sailboatEngineers have designed a robotic glider that can skim along the water's surface, riding the wind like an albatross while also surfing the waves like a sailboat.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

Microglia are key defenders against prion diseasesPrion diseases are slow degenerative brain diseases that occur in people and various other mammals. No vaccines or treatments are available, and these diseases are almost always fatal. Scientists have found little evidence of a protective immune response to prion infections. Further, microglia -- brain cells usually involved in the first level of host defense against infections of the brain -- hav
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

Climate change broadens threat of emerald ash borerMore Canadian cities will experience damage from the emerald ash borer than previously thought. As a result of climate change and fewer days of extreme cold, the beetle may eat its way further north than originally estimated.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

Behavioral health workforce faces critical challenges in meeting population needsThe US mental health system faces considerable challenges in delivering behavioral healthcare to populations in need.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

Levers and zippers in the cell's 'customs'The passage of ions through the cell membrane is controlled by ion channels, which are protein complexes that regulate vital processes, such as the heartbeat, as well as being the target towards which many drugs are directed. Now a study presents a novel model to explain how the pores of these channels open and close.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

Use of mobile and sensor technology lowers symptom severity for people with head and neck cancerA randomized clinical trial of 357 people receiving radiation for head and neck cancer, using mobile and sensor technology to remotely monitor patient symptoms, resulted in less severe symptoms related to both the cancer and its treatment (both general and cancer-related).
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

Shorter trastuzumab treatment for HER2+ breast cancer can be as effective, with fewer cardiac side-effectsA phase III randomized clinical trial of 4,088 women with HER2-positive, early-stage breast cancer found that taking trastuzumab (Herceptin) for 6 months was non-inferior to the current standard of 12 months. The disease-free survival rate at four years was 89.4 percent with 6 months of therapy and 89.8 percent with 12 months of therapy. In addition, only 4 percent of women in the 6-month arm stop
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New on MIT Technology Review

How the nature of cause and effect will determine the future of quantum technologyAn unprecedented, global-scale test of one of quantum theory’s most counterintuitive predictions sheds new light on the nature of reality and how we can exploit it with quantum technologies.
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The Atlantic

Jerusalem’s Ramadan Is Different This YearJERUSALEM—It’s holiday season here in the Holy Land. Parts of the Old City are decked out for Ramadan in paper lanterns of yellow, red, and green. On the first Friday of the holiday, the often quiet streets of the Muslim Quarter were packed. Tiny boys screamed the price of sweets to hungry passersby, many of whom are fasting from sundown to sunset every day this month. Palestinians from all over
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

Young people are choosing marijuana before cigarettes and alcoholMore young people are turning to marijuana as their first substance of choice, rather than smoking cigarettes or drinking alcohol, an expert says. He says that young people who start off on marijuana before alcohol or tobacco are more likely to become heavy users and have cannabis-related problems later in life.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

Mechanism underlying malformation associated with severe epilepsy is revealedStudy suggests dysregulation of gene NEUROG2 could be linked to development of focal cortical dysplasia, one of the most common causes of drug-resistant epilepsy. NEUROG2 is involved in cell differentiation and, when overexpressed, it maintains the neurogenesis signal active into adulthood, what helps explaining the presence of abnormal neurons and glial cells in patients' brains.
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Diamond 'spin-off' tech could lead to low-cost medical imaging and drug discovery toolsAn international team has discovered how to exploit defects in nanoscale and microscale diamonds and potentially enhance the sensitivity of magnetic resonance imaging and nuclear magnetic resonance systems while eliminating the need for their costly and bulky superconducting magnets.
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News

UNC researchers discover how body temperature wrecks potential dengue, Zika vaccineA major route toward creating effective vaccines against dengue virus and Zika involves the E protein that covers the surface of each viral particle. But creating such a vaccine has proven difficult for a number of reasons. Now UNC School of Medicine researchers have delineated the details of one major barrier to a promising vaccine. It's something we all have -- a natural body temperature of abou
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Researchers operate lab-grown heart cells by remote controlResearchers at University of California San Diego School of Medicine and their collaborators have developed a technique that allows them to speed up or slow down human heart cells growing in a dish on command -- simply by shining a light on them and varying its intensity. The cells are grown on a material called graphene, which converts light into electricity, providing a more realistic environmen
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