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Big Think

Mathematics confirms rich people aren't smart—they're luckyIt all boils down to the power law, also known as the 80:20 rule. Read More
3h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Google pushes artificial intelligence for upgraded news appFor its updated news application, Google is doubling down on the use of artificial intelligence as part of an effort to weed our disinformation and help users get viewpoints beyond their own "filter bubble."
12h
Ingeniøren

Tusindvis af skorstene skal skabe regnvejr over TibetDe første 500 kinesiske brændkamre er sat op i bjergene i det tibetanske plateau som led i et projekt, der skal give regn til en tørkeramt region på størrelse med Spanien.
14h
GoDaddy

HTTPS is Google Chrome's new security must-haveAttention all website owners, designers and developers! Last call to secure your website before some major changes take place
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Big Think

Tell your boss that cyberloafing is good for productivityCyberloafing — or, absent-mindedly browsing the internet — actually has a place in the workday according to this recently published study. Read More
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

Biotin supplements caused misleading test results, almost led to unnecessary procedureA new case report describes how a patient's use of a common over-the-counter biotin supplement caused clinically misleading test results and almost resulted in an unnecessary, invasive medical procedure.
1h
Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

MR spectroscopy imaging reveals effects of targeted treatment of mutant IDH1 gliomasUsing a novel imaging method, a research team is investigating the mechanisms behind a potential targeted treatment for a subtype of the deadly brains tumors called gliomas.
1h
NYT > Science

Pakistan Has Just One New Polio Case, but Isn’t Declaring Victory YetThe country has come tantalizingly close to eradicating the virus in recent years, only to be foiled by instability, mistrust and attacks on vaccinators.
2h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Inpatient opioid use and insufficient weaning pre-discharge may increase outpatient opioid prescriptPatients who receive an opioid for most of their hospital stay and patients who are still taking an opioid within 12 hours of being discharged from the hospital appear more likely to fill a prescription for opioids within 90 days of leaving the hospital, according to new research presented at the ATS 2018 International Conference.
2h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News

In utero exposure to carbon monoxide increases infants' risk of poor lung functionExposure to elevated levels of carbon monoxide (CO) in utero increases infants' risk of poor lung function at one month after birth, according to new research conducted as part of the Ghana Randomized Air Pollution and Health Study (GRAPHS).
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News

CPAP may reduce resting heart rate in prediabetic patientsPatients with prediabetes who also have obstructive sleep apnea (OSA) may improve their resting heart rate, an important measure of cardiovascular health, by using continuous positive airway pressure (CPAP) to treat their OSA, according to a randomized, controlled trial presented at the ATS 2018 International Conference.
3h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Ozone exposure at birth increases risk of asthma developmentA long-term study of the health of Canadian children has found that exposure to ozone (O3), a common air pollutant, at birth was associated with an 82 percent increased risk of developing asthma by age three. The study, which was a 10-year follow-up to the 2006 Toronto Child Health Evaluation Questionnaire (T-CHEQ), was presented at the 2018 American Thoracic Society International Conference.
3h
NYT > Science

Trilobites: The Thing Inside Your Cells That Might Determine How Long You LiveYou may have forgotten about the nucleolus since you took biology class, but scientists think this structure inside every cell in your body may play an important role in aging.
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Big Think

Augmented reality could rule the classrooms of the futureToday’s children and youth are very tech savvy and easily use tablets, laptops, and smartphones to access the Internet, play games and consume media. AR can put that on fast-forward. Read More
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

Dogs born in the summertime more likely to suffer heart diseaseDogs born June through August are at higher risk of heart disease than those born other months, rising in July to 74 percent higher risk, according to a new study. A correlation to outdoor air pollution may be the culprit.
3h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Technique shows promise for reconstruction of airway following surgeryAn early study suggests it may be feasible to use human aortic grafts preserved by freezing to rebuild windpipe and airway sections removed because of disease.
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Scientific American Content: Global

Algae Living inside Salamanders Aren't Happy about the SituationThe world’s only known vertebrate–microbe symbiosis appears to be good for the salamander, but stressful for the alga. So why do they put up with it? -- Read more on ScientificAmerican.com
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

Annotation tool provides step toward understanding links between disease, mutant RNAResearchers have developed a computer program that represents a key step toward better understanding the connections between mutant genetic material and disease.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

No evidence of natural gas from fracking in found Ohio drinking waterA study of drinking water in Appalachian Ohio found no evidence of natural gas contamination from recent oil and gas drilling. Geologists examined drinking water in northeast Ohio where many residents rely on water from private underground wells.
4h
Big Think

Does my algorithm have a mental-health problem?By training algorithms on human data, they learn our biases. Read More
5h
Big Think

7 actual superpowers certain humans have, due to genetic mutationA lot of the powers found in the comics exist in real life. They’re just a bit different. Read More
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Viden

Planterig kost får dine tarmbakterier til at blomstreForskning viser, at mennesker, der spiser 30 plantetyper om ugen, har en talrig tarmflora, som måske kan beskytte dem mod bl.a. antibiotikaresistens.
5h
Ingeniøren

Kamp om softwarefolk: Terma har de unge talenter på radarenTerma er ny på årets top-20 med et stærkt regnskab og en projektportefølje, de færreste danske virksomheder kan matche. Men manglen på softwareingeniører kan få Termas vækst til at tabe flyvehøjde.
6h
Latest Headlines | Science News

China is set to launch a satellite to support a future lunar roverChina is set to launch a satellite to support a future lunar rover that will make the first-ever visit to the farside of the moon.
6h
Feed: All Latest

John Kelly's Comments on Immigration Top This Week's Internet NewsThe White House chief of staff's comments about immigration had a lot of people online talking last week.
7h
Scientific American Content: Global

Making Electricity Consumes a Lot of Water. What's the Best Way to Fix That?Reducing water consumption from power plants is a worthy strategy for conserving water, but the cost may outweigh the benefits compared with alternatives like desalinating saltwater -- Read more on ScientificAmerican.com
7h
The Atlantic

Electric Scooter Charger Culture Is Out of ControlEvery afternoon around 4:00 p.m., when school lets out, Brandon, an 18-year-old high-school senior in Los Angeles who asked to be referred to only by his first name, goes “Bird hunting.” He heads for his minivan and, on the drive home, he’ll swing through convenient neighborhoods, picking up about 13 Bird electric scooters along the way, tossing them into the back of his car. “I have a whole syst
8h
Feed: All Latest

The US Needs an Artificial Intelligence Strategy—Just Like France, China, and the EUOpinion: Rep. John K. Delaney argues that if the United States wants a prosperous economy, it needs a national plan for artificial intelligence.
8h
Ingeniøren

Spørg Scientariet: Hvordan troede man Solen virkede i gamle dage?Forskerne har længe haft en forestilling om, hvordan Solen ’virker’. Men før, man opdagede fusionsprocesserne; hvad tænkte man så, der foregik? Lektor på Aarhus Universitet kigger tilbage i tiden.
8h
Scientific American Content: Global

When Do Puppies Hit "Peak Cuteness" to Humans?Nature strategically times this stage of a pup’s development for a good reason -- Read more on ScientificAmerican.com
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Viden

Er atomkraft løsningen på klimaproblemet?Ne.. Måske.
9h
Science : NPR

Magdalena Skipper Is Named New Chief Of 'Nature'NPR's Lulu Garcia-Navarro talks to Magdalena Skipper, who the journal Nature has chosen as its new editor-in-chief. Skipper is the first woman to hold the post.
9h
The Atlantic

The Long Shadow of MLB's Next Free-Agent ClassWhen the Los Angeles Dodgers announced in late April that the all-star shortstop Corey Seager would undergo elbow surgery and miss the rest of the season, it seemed to be a critical blow to the team’s World Series hopes. Losing Seager meant losing a five-tool player who excelled consistently at the game’s most important position. He’d be difficult, if not impossible, to replace. But almost immedi
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The Atlantic

Who Does the Democratic Party Stand For?There are two Staceys angling to become Georgia’s first woman governor. One Stacey—Stacey Abrams—is black. She’s the former minority leader of the state House of Representatives. The other, Stacey Evans, is white. She founded her own law firm and has represented the state’s 42nd district since 2011. Both Democrats have years of experience in the state House, and each has pledged to advance an amb
9h
Feed: All Latest

You Can Send Invisible Messages With Subtle Font TweaksResearchers have developed a new technique called FontCode that hides secrets in plain sight.
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Feed: All Latest

A New World’s Extraordinary Orbit Points to Planet NineAstronomers argue that there’s an undiscovered giant planet far beyond the orbit of Neptune. A newly discovered rocky body has added evidence to the circumstantial case for it.
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The Atlantic

Where ‘America First’ Once LedAccording to the authoritative Freedom House rankings, we have seen over a decade of deterioration in free institutions. Outright massacre is the order of the day in countries from Burma to the Levant, and tyrants no less cunning than Mussolini or Franco subvert the rule of law, freedom of the press, and freedom of speech from Warsaw to Ankara, and from Beijing to Moscow. As was the case 80 years
10h
The Atlantic

What the North Koreans Told Me About Their PlansWhat exactly do the North Koreans mean when they say they’re willing to denuclearize? And how exactly would they do so? These are the key mysteries at the heart of the upcoming Trump-Kim summit—and indeed they threatened to derail the whole thing this week when Kim Jong Un objected to National-Security Adviser John Bolton’s vision for it. In a statement attributed to Vice Foreign Minister Kim Kye
11h
Ingeniøren

Grundfos holder fokus på pumperne: Ikke alt skal digitaliseresRo på!, lyder det fra Grundfos’ adm. direktør, Mads Nipper, når digitalisering og disruption udråbes til tidens løsen. For Grundfos er kerneforretningen stadig energieffektive pumper, og her giver digitalisering ikke altid mening.
11h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Rural Hawaii communities face various volcano threatsIn the weeks since Hawaii's Kilauea volcano began erupting, dozens of homes have burned from oozing lava, people have fled their homes and plumes of steam from the summit have shot skyward, prompting officials to distribute face masks to protect against ash particles.
12h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Brumby reprieve: Australia to ban wild horses cull at national parkAustralia said Sunday the culling of wild horses in a unique national park would be banned despite fears the animals were threatening native species.
12h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Apple-Samsung iPhone design copying case goes to juryJurors return to a Silicon Valley courtroom Monday to put a price on patented iPhone design features copied by Samsung in a legal case dating back seven years.
12h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Japan's new 'Airbnb law': a double-edged swordRental platforms like Airbnb are hoping for a boost from a new law coming into force next month in Japan ahead of an expected surge in demand for the 2020 Olympics, but experts warn it could actually hamper business in the short-term.
12h
Scientific American Content: Global

Is This Going to Be a Stand-Up Fight, Sir, or Another Sloth Hunt?Ice age tracks show how humans harassed giant ground sloths -- Read more on ScientificAmerican.com
13h
Science | The Guardian

Carved idol from the Urals shatters expert views on birth of ritual artStudies date Shigir Idol to 11,500 years ago – and cast new light on hunter-gatherers at the end of the ice age On 24 January 1894, gold prospectors were digging in the Shigir peat bog, north of the town of Yekaterinburg in the Ural mountains, when they uncovered a strange collection of carved pieces of wood. A total of 10 fragments were found beside each other. When put together, a wooden idol m
14h
Science | The Guardian

Fasting diets may raise risk of diabetes, researchers warnNew study also suggests regimes that include intermittent fasting may cause other long-term health problems Fasting every other day to lose weight could have damaging side effects. That is the conclusion of a group of scientists speaking this weekend at the European Society of Endocrinology’s annual meeting. Their findings suggest that fasting-based diets may impair the action of sugar-regulating
14h
Science | The Guardian

You’ve heard of mindfulness, now meet its young cousin sophrologyA modern blend of yoga, Zen Buddhism, hypnosis and psychology, it’s huge on the continent and it’s on its way here Mindfulness is the tried-and-tested tool of our times for anxiety, depression, chronic pain, addiction and more, but what if it’s not your thing? For those too twitchy to sit still and focus on breathing, the ubiquitous mindfulness apps, self-help sheets and courses in schools and wo
15h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Minimizing exposure to common hormone-disrupting chemicals may reduce obesity ratesEveryday products carry environmental chemicals that may be making us fat by interfering with our hormones, according to research presented in Barcelona at the European Society of Endocrinology annual meeting, ECE 2018. Following recommendations on how to avoid these chemicals could help minimize exposure and potentially reduce the risk of obesity and its complications.
22h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Could intermittent fasting diets increase diabetes risk?Fasting every other day to lose weight impairs the action of sugar-regulating hormone, insulin, which may increase diabetes risk, according to data presented in Barcelona at the European Society of Endocrinology annual meeting, ECE 2018. These findings suggest that fasting-based diets may be associated with long-term health risks and careful consideration should be made before starting such weight
22h
Big Think

Study: TV makes you unhappy, and unhappy people watch more TVA vicious cycle! Read More
22h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

UN, EU call for global action to protect beesThe United Nation's food agency and the European Union on Saturday called for global action to protect pollinators, and bees in particular, which are crucial for ensuring food security.
23h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Scholar: Dumping fossil fuels by 2050 needed to save climateGetting rid of fossil fuels by mid-century and making the switch to large-scale renewable energy sources and nuclear power offers the best chance of meeting the climate change targets set out by the Paris accord, a prominent American economist said Friday.
23h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Latest lava flow destroys 4 homes, sparks evacuation prepLava creeping across roadways destroyed four homes and left dozens of others in the shadow of Hawaii's Kilauea volcano isolated Saturday, forcing more residents to plan for a possible evacuation.
23h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

World's first floating nuclear barge to power Russia's Arctic oil driveTo meet its growing electricity needs in its drive to develop oil resources in remote Arctic regions, Russia has built a floating nuclear power station, a project that detractors deride as a "Chernobyl on ice".
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Scientific American Content: Global

Sexual Selection at Chicheley HallA meeting of horned beetles and dinosaurs, peacocks and cichlid fishes… -- Read more on ScientificAmerican.com
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Big Think

Could A.I. redistribute wealth for us?Artificial intelligence and automation stand poised to put millions out of work and make inequality even more pronounced. Is it possible to solve one problem with another? Read More
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Science | The Guardian

Physicist Kate Shaw: ‘Even in conservative places, you do not have to be in conflict with scientific ideas’The Cern scientist on her dual role in studying quarks and helping to train a new generation of scientists from Palestine to Peru Kate Shaw is a physicist based at the University of Sussex, where she studies the data that pours out of the Atlas experiment, one of the huge detectors that forms part of the Large Hadron Collider at Cern, in Geneva. She is also the founder of Physics Without Frontier
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