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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

Daily egg consumption may reduce cardiovascular diseasePeople who consume an egg a day could significantly reduce their risk of cardiovascular diseases compared with eating no eggs, suggests a new study.
9h
Ingeniøren

Elcykler kan erstatte bilen på de længere tureKampen mod trængsel kan tages på en elcykel. For vi gider ikke cykle mere end fem kilometer.
5h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Bone trove in Denmark tells story of 'Barbarian' battleThousands of bones from boys and men likely killed in a ferocious battle 2,000 years ago have been unearthed from a bog in Denmark, researchers said Monday.
35min
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Experts disclose new details about 300-year-old shipwreckA Spanish galleon laden with gold that sank to the bottom of the Caribbean off the coast of Colombia more than 300 years ago was found three years ago with the help of an underwater autonomous vehicle operated by the Woods Hole Oceanographic Institution, the agency disclosed for the first time.
23min
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Uber hit with harassment suit following policy shiftUber was hit with a lawsuit Monday alleging sexual harassment and discrimination against female employees, apparently the first case in court since the ride-hailing giant scrapped a requirement for arbitration of such claims.
35min
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Hawaii volcano generates toxic gas plume called lazeThe eruption of Kilauea volcano in Hawaii sparked new safety warnings about toxic gas on the Big Island's southern coastline after lava began flowing into the ocean and setting off a chemical reaction.
35min
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

As EU privacy law looms, debate swirls on cybersecurity impactDays ahead of the implementation of a sweeping European privacy law, debate is swirling on whether the measure will have negative consequences for cybersecurity.
35min
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Friends influence middle schoolers' attitudes toward peers of different ethnicities, racesThe United States is increasingly diverse ethnically and racially. Studies have shown that for young people, simply being around peers from different ethnic and racial backgrounds may not be enough to improve attitudes toward and relationships with other groups. Instead, children and adolescents also need to value spending time and forming relationships with peers from diverse groups. A new study
35min
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Experts: China far side lunar mission potentially historicChina's ambition to soft-land a spacecraft on the far side of the moon later this year faces considerable challenges, but if successful would propel the country's space program to the forefront of one of the most important areas of lunar exploration, experts say.
35min
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

First violins imitated human voices: studyMusic historians have long suspected that the inventors of the violin wanted to imitate the human voice, and a study out Monday shows how 16th to 18th century luthiers in Italy did it.
41min
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Sony invests in image sensors, acquires more of EMI MusicElectronics and entertainment company Sony Corp. said Tuesday it plans to invest 1 trillion yen ($9 billion) mostly in image sensors over the next three years, under a revamped strategy to strengthen both hardware and creative content.
41min
Science-Based Medicine

A Feast of ScienceDr. Joe Schwarcz's new book is a banquet of easily digested, fascinating information about chemistry, history, science, alternative medicine, critical thinking, and current trends. It entertains as it informs.
1h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Kids show adult-like intuition about ownershipChildren as young as age three are able to make judgements about who owns an object based on its location, according to a study from the University of Waterloo.
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Blue dye tablet helps identify polyps during colonoscopyIngestion of a blue dye tablet during bowel prep for colonoscopy could be a significant advance in the early detection of colorectal cancer (CRC). When used in conjunction with colonoscopy, the blue dye increased adenoma detection rate (ADR) by nearly 9 percent, according to a study scheduled for presentation at Digestive Disease Week® (DDW) 2018.
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News

New study sheds light on the opioid epidemic and challenges prevailing views about this public health crisisA study published in the American Journal of Preventive Medicine sheds new light on the sharp rise in fatal drug overdoses in recent years, one of the most severe public health challenges of our time. The study found that the growth in fatal overdoses for non-Hispanic whites (NHWs) aged 22-56 years was sufficiently large to account for the entire growth in mortality rates (MR) and years of potenti
4h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Model estimates lifetime risk of Alzheimer's dementia using biomarkersLifetime risks of developing Alzheimer's disease dementia vary considerably by age, gender and whether any signs or symptoms of dementia are present, according to a new study published online by Alzheimer's & Dementia: The Journal of the Alzheimer's Association.
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News

More patients with severe alcoholic hepatitis receiving liver transplantsIncreasingly, liver transplant centers are changing a long-standing practice of delaying potentially life-saving liver transplantation for patients with severe alcoholic hepatitis until after they stopped drinking alcohol for six months, according to a new study scheduled for presentation at Digestive Disease Week® (DDW) 2018.
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News

DNA-based vaccine treatment for colorectal cancer to undergo first human studyCombining a DNA vaccine, which boosts the body's immune response against tumors, with an antibody that blocks the body's natural defense against the potency of the DNA vaccine, may lead to the development of an effective treatment for late stage colorectal cancer, when a cure is not often possible. Preliminary research leading up to this trial will be presented at Digestive Disease Week® 2018.
4h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Experimental drug eases effects of gluten for celiac patients on gluten-free dietAn investigational new drug offers hope of relief for celiac disease patients who are inadvertently exposed to gluten while on a gluten-free diet. Findings of the first phase 2 study of a biologic immune modulator in celiac disease will be presented at the upcoming Digestive Disease Week® (DDW) 2018. Inadvertent exposure to gluten can be a frequent occurrence for celiac patients that triggers symp
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Young toddlers may learn more from interactive than noninteractive mediaPreschoolers can learn from educational television, but younger toddlers may learn more from interactive digital media (such as video chats and touchscreen mobile apps) than from TV and videos alone, which don't require them to interact. That's the conclusion of a new article in the journal Child Development Perspectives that also notes that not all children learn to the same degree from these med
4h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Friends influence middle schoolers' attitudes toward peers of different ethnicities, racesStudies have shown that for young people, simply being around peers from different ethnic and racial backgrounds may not be enough to improve attitudes toward other groups. Instead, children and adolescents also need to value spending time and forming relationships with peers from diverse groups. A new study examined how friends in middle school affect each other's attitudes about interacting with
4h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Michael Jackson's antigravity tilt -- Talent, magic, or a bit of both?Three neurosurgeons from the Postgraduate Institute of Medical Education and Research in Chandigarh, India, set out to examine Michael Jackson's antigravity tilt, introduced in the movie video 'Smooth Criminal,' from a neurosurgeon's point of view.
4h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Including Indigenous elders in primary care positively affects Indigenous patients' mental healthIndigenous elders can have a broad range of positive effects on the mental and physical health of urban Indigenous people who often experience marginalization and barriers accessing health care, according to a study in CMAJ (Canadian Medical Association Journal) that partnered elders with mainstream health care providers in primary care.
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Improving health research among Indigenous peoples in CanadaResearchers must understand the historical and social context of Indigenous health research, while valuing the unique knowledge, skills and experiences of Indigenous people, in order to conduct meaningful health research, according to an analysis in CMAJ (Canadian Medical Association Journal).
4h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News

The CMAJ group: A home for patient-oriented researchResearchers who are conducting patient-oriented research, which engages patients in research to improve health and health care, may find a home for their research in CMAJ Open and CMAJ, announces an editorial in CMAJ (Canadian Medical Association Journal),
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Ingeniøren

Region Sjælland: Flere venter for længe på diagnose efter SundhedsplatformenDanske patienter har ret til udredning inden for 30 dage. Men efter indførelsen af Sundhedsplatformen overholdes den rettighed for langt færre patienter i Region Sjælland, viser nye tal.
4h
The Scientist RSS

Opinion: We Must Demand Evidence of Peer ReviewPeer review varies in quality and thoroughness. Making it publicly available could improve it.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

Pregnant smokers may reduce harm done to baby's lungs by taking vitamin CWomen who are unable to quit smoking during their pregnancy may reduce the harm smoking does to their baby's lungs by taking vitamin C, according to a new randomized, controlled trial.
5h
Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

Higher formaldehyde risk in e-cigarettes than previously thoughtThe researchers who published an article three years ago about the presence of previously undiscovered forms of formaldehyde in e-cigarette vapor revisited their research and found that formaldehyde risks were even higher than they originally thought.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

The vessel not taken: Understanding disproportionate blood flowEach time a blood vessel splits into smaller vessels, red blood cells (RBCs) are presented with the same decision: Take the left capillary or the right. While one might think RBCs would divide evenly at every fork in the road, it is known that at some junctures, RBCs seem to prefer one vessel over the other. One new computer model looks to determine why RBCs behave this way, untangling one of the
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

Sleep better, parent better: Study shows link between maternal sleep and permissive parentingA new study looks at the link between maternal sleep and permissive parenting during late adolescence. Findings show that mothers who don't get enough sleep or who take longer falling asleep have a greater tendency to engage in permissive parenting -- parenting marked by lax or inconsistent discipline.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

New data changes the way scientists explain how cancer tumors developA collaborative research team has uncovered new information that more accurately explains how cancerous tumors grow within the body. This study is currently available in Nature Genetics.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

Another potential mechanism links androgen deprivation therapy to cardiovascular mortalityThe mechanisms by which ADT may lead to an increased risk of sudden death were unclear.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

The chestnut gall wasp -- The threat of an invasive species with clonal reproductionA molecular study carried out on the chestnut gall wasp, Dryocosmus kuriphilus, has revealed the absence of genetic variability in this invasive species, a chestnut-tree parasite, in Europe. This is due to the fact that the wasp's reproduction is strictly parthenogenetic, the females produce more females without having to be fertilized by a male. The high capacity of reproduction of the females, p
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

Receptor proteins that respond to nicotine may help fat cells burn energyThe same proteins that moderate nicotine dependence in the brain may be involved in regulating metabolism by acting directly on certain types of fat cells, new research shows.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

Mice regrow brain tissue after stroke with bioengineered gelIn a first-of-its-kind finding, a new stroke-healing gel helped regrow neurons and blood vessels in mice with stroke-damaged brains, researchers report.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

Discovery for grouping atoms invokes PasteurScientists have found a new way of joining groups of atoms together into shape-changing molecules -- opening up the possibility of a new area of chemistry and the development of countless new drugs, microelectronics and materials. Discoveries of new ways to make isomers -- molecules made of the same atoms connected together differently -- were last reported in 1961 and before then in 1914. Proof-o
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

Deadly malaria's evolution revealedThe evolutionary path of the deadliest human malaria parasite, Plasmodium falciparum, has been revealed for the first time. This parasite is a member of the Laverania parasite family that only infect the great apes including humans, chimpanzees and gorillas. Scientists estimate that Plasmodium falciparum emerged as a human-specific parasite species earlier than previously thought.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

Don't wait for a unicorn: Investing in low-carbon tech now will save moneyWaiting for a 'unicorn technology' that provides green energy at low cost could be more expensive than adopting low-carbon energy technologies now.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

Reading the minds of pilots on the flyWearable brain monitoring sensors allowed researchers to measure cognitive workload while aircraft pilots completed memory tasks.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

Scientists find link between increases in local temperature and antibiotic resistanceBacteria have long been thought to develop antibiotic resistance largely due to repeated exposure through over-prescribing. But could much bigger environmental pressures be at play?
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

Profiling the genome hundreds of variations at a timeUsing baker's yeast, a team at Harvard's Wyss Institute developed a CRISPR-Cas9-based high-throughput approach that allows researchers to precisely alter hundreds of different genes or features of a single gene at once in individual yeast cells with 80 to 100% efficiency, select cells from the population that show specific behaviors, and identify the gene alterations that either trigger or prevent
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

Boron nitride nanotubes enhanced for next-gen compositesResearchers discover a way to 'decorate' electrically insulating boron nitride nanotubes with functional groups. That makes them complementary building blocks to conductive carbon nanotubes for future composite and polymer materials.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

Immune cells hold promise in slowing down ALSRecent research showed that a new immunotherapy was safe for patients with ALS and also revealed surprising results that could bring hope to patients who have this relentlessly progressive and fatal disease.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

Cell types underlying schizophrenia identifiedScientists have identified the cell types underlying schizophrenia. The findings offer a roadmap for the development of new therapies to target the condition.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

Graphene paves the way to faster high-speed optical communicationsResearchers created a technology that could lead to new devices for faster, more reliable ultra-broad bandwidth transfers. For the first time, researchers demonstrated how electrical fields boost the non-linear optical effects of graphene.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

Vascular risk interacts with amyloid levels to increase age-related cognitive declineRisk factors for heart disease and stroke appear to hasten the risk of cognitive decline in normal older individuals with evidence of very early Alzheimer's-disease-associated changes in the brain.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

One year's losses for child sexual abuse in US top $9 billion, new study suggestsA new study found that the annual economic impact of child sexual abuse in the US is far-reaching and costly: In 2015, the total economic burden was approximately $9.3 billion and includes costs associated with health care, child welfare, special education, violence and crime, suicide and survivor productivity losses.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

Fetal MRI can reliably spot holoprosencephaly as early as 18 gestational weeksFetal magnetic resonance imaging can reliably spot holoprosencephaly as early as 18 gestational weeks, providing an opportunity to counsel families earlier in their pregnancy, according to new research.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

Ice cream funds research showing new strategy against thyroid cancerA new study shows that stereotactic body radiation (SBRT) may be better against anaplastic thyroid cancer, and with fewer side effects.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

Advanced biofuels can be produced extremely efficiently, confirms industrial demonstrationResearchers have developed new technologies that can be used to convert industrial plants to produce fossil-free heat, electricity, fuel, chemicals and materials. The technical potential is enormous -- using only Sweden's currently existing power plants, renewable fuels equivalent to 10 percent of the world's aviation fuel could be produced.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

Inpatient opioid use and insufficient weaning pre-discharge may increase outpatient opioid prescriptionsPatients who receive an opioid for most of their hospital stay and patients who are still taking an opioid within 12 hours of being discharged from the hospital appear more likely to fill a prescription for opioids within 90 days of leaving the hospital, according to new research.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

Does pupil dilation occur before insight?Researchers have measured the human pupil upon gaining insight into an object. It is known that pupils dilate/narrow to adjust the amount of light entering the eye and that emotional state affects the extent of dilation/narrowing. This study indicates that dilation extent varies depending on if inspiration occurs and that dilation occurs before inspiration.
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The Scientist RSS

Newly Described Salamander Species Nearly ExtinctThe Chinese giant salamander is not one but five different species.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

Hotter bodies fight infections and tumors better -- researchers show howThe hotter our body temperature, the more our bodies speed up a key defense system that fights against tumors, wounds or infections, new research has found.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

Neuron guidance factor found to play a key role in immune cell functionMacrophages are white blood cells that perform different functions with different energy needs. M2-type macrophages have anti-inflammatory properties that may protect against inflammatory disorders such as inflammatory bowel disease (IBD). However, the molecular pathways driving M2 formation are not fully understood. Researchers identified a protein commonly involved in nervous system development
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

New 3D printer can create complex biological tissuesScientists have developed a specially adapted 3D printer to build therapeutic biomaterials from multiple materials. The advance could be a step toward on-demand printing of complex artificial tissues for use in transplants and other surgeries.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

Atomic-level study reveals why rare disorder causes sudden paralysisA rare genetic disorder in which people are suddenly overcome with profound weakness or temporary paralysis is caused by a hole in a membrane protein that allows sodium ions to leak across cell membranes. The results of a new study reveal the mechanisms of periodic paralysis at the atomic level and suggest designs for drugs that may prevent this ion leak and provide relief to these patients.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

CPAP may reduce resting heart rate in prediabetic patientsPatients with prediabetes who also have obstructive sleep apnea (OSA) may improve their resting heart rate, an important measure of cardiovascular health, by using continuous positive airway pressure (CPAP) to treat their OSA, according to a randomized, controlled trial.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

Research sheds light on a novel disease mechanism in chronic smokersResearch suggests that an immune signalling protein called interleukin (IL)-26 is increased among chronic smokers with lung disease and this involvement reveals disease mechanisms of interest for developing more effective therapy for these hard-to-treat patients.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

Larger waistlines are linked to higher risk of vitamin D deficiencyHigher levels of belly fat are associated with lower vitamin D levels in obese individuals. The study reports that vitamin D levels are lower in individuals with higher levels of belly fat, and suggests that individuals, particularly the overweight with larger waistlines should have their vitamin D levels checked, to avoid any potentially health damaging effects.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

Brain stimulation may reduce food cravings as obesity treatmentStimulating the brain to alter its intrinsic reward system shows promise in the treatment of obesity, according to new results. The technique has yielded positive results after just a single treatment session, revealing its potential to become a safer alternative to treat obesity, avoiding invasive surgery and drug side effects.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

Nanoparticles derived from tea leaves destroy lung cancer cells: Quantum dots have great potentialNanoparticles derived from tea leaves inhibit the growth of lung cancer cells, destroying up to 80 percent of them, new research has shown. The team made the discovery while they were testing out a new method of producing a type of nanoparticle called quantum dots. These are tiny particles which measure less than 10 nanometers. A human hair is 40,000 nanometers thick.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

One in 10 parents say their child has gotten sick from spoiled or contaminated foodFew parents are using some simple strategies to protect kids from food poisoning outside the home, such as at a potluck or restaurant, according to a new report.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

Fewer men are being screened, diagnosed, and treated for prostate cancerA new study reveals declines in prostate cancer screening and diagnoses in the United States in recent years, as well as decreases in the use of definitive treatments in men who have been diagnosed.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

Synchrotron radiations shed light on formation mechanism of aromatic polyimide precursorA mechanism for an industrially used catalysis of an aromatic polyimide precursor is now revealed by use of synchrotron radiations. This finding is of service to the more economical production of an aromatic polyimide by further development of catalysts.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

US poison control centers receive 29 calls per day about children exposed to ADHD medicationsThe study found that there were more than 156,000 calls to US Poison Control Centers regarding exposures to attention-deficit hyperactivity disorder (ADHD) medications among children and adolescents 19 years of age and younger from January 2000 through December 2014, averaging 200 calls each week or 29 calls per day.
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New Scientist - News

China launched a satellite to help explore the moon’s far sideA satellite launched on 21 May will allow China's upcoming moon lander – the first to visit the far side – to receive commands and send data back to Earth
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Science : NPR

Rewinding & Rewriting: The Alternate Universes in Our HeadsAll of us think back to turning points in our lives, and imagine how things could have unfolded differently. Why do we so often ask ourselves, "What if?" (Image credit: Courtesy of Laura Ogden)
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After Meltdown and Spectre, Another Scary Chip Flaw EmergesSpectre Intel MeltdownA new processor vulnerability known as Speculative Store Bypass could expose user data on a huge swath of devices.
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An Ebola Vaccine Gets Its First Real-World TestScientists have known about Ebola since 1976, and the Democratic Republic of Congo has had nine outbreaks since then. But now one shot might beat it.
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Tesla Expands Its Model 3 Offerings—At a Steep PriceElon Musk's automaker is now offering more variants of its most important car, and making steady progress toward profitability. But that $35,000 price point remains just a promise.
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BBC News - Science & Environment

Air pollution plans to tackle wood burnersCritics of the government proposals say they put too much responsibility on local councils.
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BBC News - Science & Environment

'Living fossil' giant salamander heading for extinctionThe world's largest amphibian is in "catastrophic" decline, with probably only a handful left in the wild.
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BBC News - Science & Environment

Malaria genetics: study shows how disease became deadlyA genetic study reveals the secrets of how malaria evolved to be deadly killer of humans.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

Preventing murder by addressing domestic violenceVictims of domestic violence are at a high risk to be murdered -- or a victim of attempted murder -- according to a task force of criminal-justice professionals, victim advocates and researchers working to prevent domestic violence and homicides.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

Could intermittent fasting diets increase diabetes risk?Fasting every other day to lose weight impairs the action of sugar-regulating hormone, insulin, which may increase diabetes risk. These findings suggest that fasting-based diets may be associated with long-term health risks and careful consideration should be made before starting such weight loss programs.
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Futurity.org

Gun owners, non-owners agree on these proposalsGun owners and people who don’t own firearms often agree on their support for new gun regulations, a survey shows. The survey, which measured support for 24 different proposed gun policies, found minimal gaps in support between gun owners and non-owners on 15 of those policies. “Policies with high overall support among both gun owners and non-gun owners may be the most feasible to enact,” says le
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Futurity.org

Sugary soda is extra bad for you, say expertsWhile calories from any food have the potential to increase the risk of obesity and other cardiometabolic diseases, 22 nutrition researchers agree that sugar-sweetened beverages play a unique role in chronic health problems. The disease risk increases even when the beverages are consumed within diets that do not result in weight gain, the researchers say. Are all calories equal with regards to ef
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Futurity.org

For nurses, working overtime may cut collaborationWorking overtime may negatively influence nurses’ collaboration with fellow nurses and physicians, according to a new study. The study, which appears in the Journal of Nursing Administration , shows that a third of nurses work beyond their scheduled shift, the average of which is nearly 12 hours. “One in three nurses reported working longer than scheduled. This appears to be a chronic problem for
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

Target for chikungunya treatmentScientists have identified a molecule found on human cells and some animal cells that could be a target for drugs against chikungunya virus infection and related diseases, according to new research.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

New technique reveals 3D shape of nanostructure's polariton interactionResearchers have found a way to reveal the 3D shape of the polariton interaction around a nanostructure. Their technique improves upon the common spectroscopic imaging technique known as scattering-type scanning near-field optical microscopy (s-SNOM).
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

Minimizing exposure to common hormone-disrupting chemicals may reduce obesity ratesEveryday products carry environmental chemicals that may be making us fat by interfering with our hormones, according to new research. Following recommendations on how to avoid these chemicals could help minimize exposure and potentially reduce the risk of obesity and its complications.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

Eczema drug effective against severe asthmaNew studies of patients with difficult-to-control asthma show that the eczema drug dupilumab alleviates asthma symptoms and improves patients' ability to breathe better than standard therapies. Dupilumab, an injectable anti-inflammatory drug, was approved in 2017 by the Food and Drug Administration as a treatment for eczema, a chronic skin disease.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

Quantum effects observed in photosynthesisMolecules that are involved in photosynthesis exhibit the same quantum effects as non-living matter, concludes an international team of scientists. This is the first time that quantum mechanical behavior was proven to exist in biological systems that are involved in photosynthesis. The interpretation of these quantum effects in photosynthesis may help in the development of nature-inspired light-ha
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

Observing cellular activity, one molecule at a timeUsing a new mode of atomic force microscopy, researchers have found a way to see and measure protein assembly in real time and with unprecedented detail.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

Scientist reveals likely cause of childhood leukemiaA major new analysis reveals for the first time the likely cause of most cases of childhood leukemia, following more than a century of controversy about its origins.
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Futurity.org

Our tiny, furry genetic ancestors were bug eatersScientists have concluded that our distant ancestors—the small, furry creatures that scurried around the feet of the dinosaurs 66 million years ago—were mostly insect eaters, based on an analysis of the genomes of 107 different species of mammals. The scientists inferred this because the genes for the enzymes that allowed these early ancestors of all mammals to digest insects are still hanging ar
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Live Science

Origami Robots Just Helped Build the World's Smallest HouseThis teensy little house is so small that even a malnourished amoeba couldn't fit inside.
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Futurity.org

Understanding bacteria ‘switch’ could lead to new antibioticsScientists have deciphered the workings of a common but little-understood bacterial switch that cuts off protein production before it begins. The discover points to potential new antibiotics. Many gram-positive bacteria use T-box riboswitches to regulate production of proteins that utilize amino acids, the basic building blocks of all proteins. A study in Nature Communications describes how one o
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Futurity.org

We’re messing up the way hippo poo keeps rivers healthyDrying rivers due to deforestation, human agriculture, and climate change are redefining the way hippos—and their dung—shape the ecology of freshwater ecosystems in sub-Saharan Africa, according to new research. The average hippo weighs more than 3,000 pounds and consumes about 100 pounds of vegetation daily. This naturally results in large quantities of dung being deposited into the rivers and l
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Daily egg consumption may reduce cardiovascular diseasePeople who consume an egg a day could significantly reduce their risk of cardiovascular diseases compared with eating no eggs, suggests a study carried out in China, published in the journal Heart.
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Link between IBD and Parkinson's might allow doctors to slow down conditionDoctors may be able to modify or slow down the progress of the neurological condition Parkinson's disease in the future by spotting signs of it in patients with inflammatory bowel disease (IBD), suggest a study published in the journal Gut.
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Avoiding the car for travel could significantly lower risk of illness and deathPeople who are more active when commuting to work by walking or cycling could be cutting their relative risk of developing ischaemic heart disease or stroke by 11 percent and their relative risk of dying from these diseases by 30 percent, suggests a study published in the journal Heart.
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The Atlantic

The Atlantic Daily: Put an End to ItWhat We’re Following Executive Anger: President Trump has threatened to order the Department of Justice to investigate the Obama White House, after reports that an informant fed intelligence to the FBI about possible Russian interference in the 2016 election led the president to claim his campaign had been the target of political spying. It’s not the first time Trump has made this type of claim,
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

Feel the burn: Biochemical pathway that spurs beige fat cells to burn energy is discoveredResearchers have identified a brain receptor and signaling pathway that spurs beige fat cells to burn energy, revealing a possible target for obesity therapies in humans.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

Turning entanglement upside downPhysicists have come up with a surprisingly simple idea to investigate quantum entanglement of many particles. Instead of digging deep into the properties of quantum wave functions - which are notoriously hard to experimentally access - they propose to realize physical systems governed by the corresponding entanglement Hamiltonians. By doing so, entanglement properties of the original problem of i
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The Atlantic

The Atlantic Politics & Policy Daily: Obama Pivots to Video-Written by Elaine Godfrey ( @elainejgodfrey ) Today in 5 Lines Following a meeting between President Trump and top law-enforcement and intelligence officials, the White House announced that Chief of Staff John Kelly will convene a meeting with the FBI, DOJ, and DNI along with GOP congressional leaders to “review highly classified and other information” related to the FBI’s use of a confidential
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Supreme Court Rules Against Workers In Arbitration CaseThe ruling legitimizes agreements, widely used by tech companies, that prevent workers from filing lawsuits and are blamed for perpetuating sexual harassment.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

A better way to control crystal vibrationsThe vibrational motion of an atom in a crystal propagates to neighboring atoms, which leads to wavelike propagation of the vibrations throughout the crystal. The way in which these natural vibrations travel through the crystalline structure determine fundamental properties of the material. Now, researchers have shown that by swapping out just a small fraction of a material's atoms with atoms of a
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

What can snakes teach us about engineering friction?If you want to know how to make a sneaker with better traction, just ask a snake. That's the theory driving new research by an expert who is studying snake skin to help engineers improve the design of textured surfaces, such as engine cylinder liners, prosthetic joints - and yes, maybe even footwear.
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Latest Headlines | Science News

Ebola vaccinations begin in CongoA vaccination campaign is up and running to fight the ongoing Ebola outbreak in Congo. It’s the first of its kind.
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We Need to Talk About That 'Deadpool 2' Credits SceneNow that Wade Wilson has cleaned up all those pesky loose ends, what's next for the X-Universe?
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Raging 'Fortnite' eSport game gets $100 mn prize poolFortnite Epic GamesEpic Games on Monday stoked the blazing popularity of its "Fortnite" death-match video game by putting up $100 million in prize money for eSports competitions.
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Popular Science

NASA is about to create the coldest spot in the known universeSpace The Cold Atom Laboratory launched this morning Beyond our planet, the record for coldest temperature is currently held by the Boomerang Nebula. Down here on the ground, physicists managed to surpass that last year,…
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Live Science

Why Would a Pig Follow a Man Home?What reason could a pig have for following around a human?
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Live Science

What Is Nipah Virus? Outbreak in India Kills at Least 3At least three people in India have died from a rare virus known as Nipah virus, according to news reports.
10h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Microsoft pledges to extend EU data rights worldwideMicrosoft says it's committing to giving users worldwide the same data and privacy rights being offered to Europeans under new regulations there.
10h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Activist groups launch campaign to break up FacebookA coalition of activist groups on Monday announced a campaign to break up Facebook, arguing that the huge social network "has too much power over our lives and democracy."
10h
Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

Compound in citrus oil could reduce dry mouth in head, neck cancer patientsA compound found in citrus oils could help alleviate dry mouth caused by radiation therapy in head and neck cancer patients, according to a new study.
11h
Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

A single-injection vaccine for the polio virusA nanoparticle vaccine could help eradicate polio worldwide. The vaccine, which delivers multiple doses in just one injection, could make it easier to immunize children in remote regions of Pakistan and other countries where the disease is still found.
11h
Feed: All Latest

A New Look Inside Theranos’ Dysfunctional Corporate CultureWhen a chemist raised concerns about the blood testing machines' high error rates, she was ignored. So she resigned.
11h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Mayo study identifies new potential treatment option for triple negative breast cancerIn a recent study published in the Journal of Clinical Investigation, Mayo Clinic researchers identified that an FDA drug approved for myelodysplastic syndrome may be useful to treat triple-negative breast cancer, which is one of the most aggressive and lethal types of breast cancer.
11h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News

New PSU study shows higher formaldehyde risk in e-cigarettes than previously thoughtPortland State University researchers who published an article three years ago in the New England Journal of Medicine about the presence of previously undiscovered forms of formaldehyde in e-cigarette vapor revisited their research and found that formaldehyde risks were even higher than they originally thought.
11h
Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

Major fossil study sheds new light on emergence of early animal life 540 million years agoAll the major groups of animals appear in the fossil record for the first time around 540-500 million years ago -- an event known as the Cambrian Explosion -- but new research suggests that for most animals this 'explosion' was in fact a more gradual process.
11h
Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

Insufficient sleep, even without extended wakefulness, leads to performance impairmentsResearchers have isolated the impacts of short sleep and extended wakefulness on vigilant performance decline.
11h
Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

Sweet potatoes didn't originate in the Americas as previously thoughtSweet potatoes may seem as American as Thanksgiving, but scientists have long debated whether their plant family originated in the Old or New World. New research by a paleobotanist suggests it originated in Asia, and much earlier than previously known.
11h
Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

Chemists synthesize millions of proteins not found in natureChemists have devised a way to rapidly synthesize and screen millions of novel proteins that could be used as drugs against Ebola and other viruses.
11h
Live Science

Russia's Floating Nuclear Power Plant Heads for the Bering StraitRussia's got a floating nuclear plant on a barge, and it's heading for the Bering Strait — just a short drift from Alaska.
11h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Humans account for little next to plants, worms, bugsWhen you weigh all life on Earth, billions of humans don't amount to much compared to trees, earthworms or even viruses. But we really know how to throw what little weight we have around, according to a first-of-its-kind global census of the footprint of life on the planet.
11h
Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

Widespread ocean anoxia was cause for past mass extinctionFor decades, scientists have conducted research centered around the five major mass extinctions that have shaped the world we live in. The extinctions date back more than 450 million years with the Late Ordovician Mass Extinction to the deadliest extinction, the Late Permian extinction 250 million years ago that wiped out over 90 percent of species.
12h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Clues found to early lung transplant failureResearchers at Washington University School of Medicine in St. Louis and Northwestern University have uncovered cells that flow into and harm the lung soon after transplant. The resulting dysfunction is the leading cause of early death after lung transplantation and contributes to organ rejection that can lead to death months or years later. The discovery, in mice, may lead to drug therapies that
12h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Probe into rare cougar attack in US that left one deadWildlife officials in the US state of Washington on Monday were probing what prompted a cougar to attack two cyclists over the weekend, leaving one dead and the other seriously injured.
12h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Consumer Reports raises concerns over Tesla Model 3 brakingLong emergency stopping distances, difficult-to-use controls and a harsh ride stopped Tesla's Model 3 electric car from getting a recommended buy rating from Consumer Reports.
12h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Twin sportscar-sized satellites to chase water changes on EarthA pair of identical, sportscar-sized satellites are poised to zoom around the Earth and track changes in water and ice, offering new insights into global warming and sea level rise, NASA said Monday.
12h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

The vessel not taken: Understanding disproportionate blood flowEach time a blood vessel splits into smaller vessels, red blood cells (RBCs) are presented with the same decision: Take the left capillary or the right. While one might think RBCs would divide evenly at every fork in the road, it is known that at some junctures, RBCs seem to prefer one vessel over the other. One new computer model looks to determine why RBCs behave this way, untangling one of the
12h
New Scientist - News

Half of life on Earth has vanished since we arrived on the sceneThe biomass of living organisms on the planet has halved since human civilisation began, and humans now outweigh all wild mammals tenfold
12h
New Scientist - News

Think you’re fully alert? You can’t always tell if you’re tiredHow safe is it to drive when you haven’t had much sleep? Just like drinking alcohol, it turns out we’re not always a good judge of how mentally impaired we are
12h
The Atlantic

The Pope's Turnaround on Sex Abuse May Have a ‘Tsunami Effect’The Vatican is working through an extraordinary series of events related to child sex abuse. Last month, Pope Francis apologized for “grave errors” in the way the Catholic Church handled sex-abuse cases in Chile, where a bishop, Juan Barros Madrid, was accused of covering up the crimes of another priest, Fernando Karadima. On Friday, following an emergency meeting in Rome with the pope, all 34 Ch
12h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

A better way to control crystal vibrationsThe vibrational motion of an atom in a crystal propagates to neighboring atoms, which leads to wavelike propagation of the vibrations throughout the crystal. The way in which these natural vibrations travel through the crystalline structure determine fundamental properties of the material. For example, these vibrations determine how well heat and electrons can traverse the material, and how the ma
12h
Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

Birds from different species recognize each other and cooperateScientists show how two different species of Australian fairy-wrens not only recognize individual birds from other species, but also form long-term partnerships that help them forage and defend their shared space as a group.
12h
Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

Mediterranean diet may blunt air pollution's ill health effectsEating a Mediterranean diet may protect people from some of the harm of long-term exposure to air pollution, and reduce their risk of dying from heart attacks, stroke and other causes of death, according to new research.
12h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

What can snakes teach us about engineering friction?If you want to know how to make a sneaker with better traction, just ask a snake. That's the theory driving the research of Hisham Abdel-Aal, Ph.D., an associate teaching professor from Drexel University's College of Engineering who is studying snake skin to help engineers improve the design of textured surfaces, such as engine cylinder liners, prosthetic joints—and yes, maybe even footwear.
12h
Big Think

Forensic analysis of Hitler’s teeth debunks long-held conspiracy theories about his deathNo more secret submarines and moon bases. A new study puts to rest decades-old conspiracy theories and confirms how Adolf Hitler died. Read More
12h
Big Think

NASA will create the coldest temperature in the universe to study 'weird' physicsThe entire device is about the size of an ice chest, and the temperature it achieves will be 10 billion times colder than the vacuum of space. Read More
12h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Sleep better, parent better: Study shows link between maternal sleep and permissive parentingA new study from Kelly Tu, a human development and family studies researcher at the University of Illinois, and colleagues, looks at the link between maternal sleep and permissive parenting during late adolescence. Findings show that mothers who don't get enough sleep or who take longer falling asleep have a greater tendency to engage in permissive parenting -- parenting marked by lax or inconsist
12h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News

UCI researchers discover novel mode of neurotransmitter-based communicationThis is the first example of a novel mode of neurotransmitter-based communication and challenges current dogma about mechanisms of signaling in the brain. The findings uncover new pathways for developing therapies for disorders like epilepsy, anxiety and chronic pain.
12h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News

The vessel not taken: Understanding disproportionate blood flowEach time a blood vessel splits into smaller vessels, red blood cells (RBCs) are presented with the same decision: Take the left capillary or the right. While one might think RBCs would divide evenly at every fork in the road, it is known that at some junctures, RBCs seem to prefer one vessel over the other. One new computer model looks to determine why RBCs behave this way, untangling one of the
12h
The Scientist RSS

Chris Fall Picked to Lead the Department of Energys Office of ScienceFall served in the White House Office of Science and Technology Policy under President Barack Obama.
12h
Popular Science

Last week in tech: The whole world is going premiumTechnology Microsoft's awesome new Xbox controller, OnePlus 6 smartphone, and download our new podcast. We're living in a life in a post-Yanny world.
12h
NYT > Science

Matter: Every Cell in Your Body Has the Same DNA. Except It Doesn’t.The genome obviously varies from person to person. But it can also vary from cell to cell, even within the same individual. The implications of “mosaicism” are enormous.
12h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News

New data changes the way scientists explain how cancer tumors developA collaborative research team has uncovered new information that more accurately explains how cancerous tumors grow within the body. This study is currently available in Nature Genetics.
12h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News

A better way to control crystal vibrationsThe vibrational motion of an atom in a crystal propagates to neighboring atoms, which leads to wavelike propagation of the vibrations throughout the crystal. The way in which these natural vibrations travel through the crystalline structure determine fundamental properties of the material. Now, researchers have shown that by swapping out just a small fraction of a material's atoms with atoms of a
12h
NYT > Science

Take a Number: Every 202,500 Years, Earth Wanders in a New DirectionThe planet’s orbit alternates from elliptical to almost perfectly circular — and has for hundreds of millions of years.
12h
The Atlantic

When You’re Not Just the Product on Facebook, but the ManagerIn the near future, if Facebook fulfills its stated goal, a billion people will be part of a “meaningful group” on the service, up from 200 million now . By the company’s definition, a meaningful group is a Facebook group that becomes part of a person’s real-life support network. People come to depend on these groups, and none more so than the addiction support groups. These groups have been high
12h
cognitive science

Does the Brain Store Information in Discrete or Analog Form?submitted by /u/NaiveSkeptic [link] [comments]
12h
Live Science

How a Prairie-Dog Plague Vaccine Could Protect Ferrets (and Maybe People, Too)Yes, there's a vaccine for the plague, one of the most notorious diseases known to humanity. But unfortunately, this vaccine isn't for humans — it's for prairie dogs.
12h
Live Science

Giant Waves Nearly Half a Million Miles Across Seen on the Sun for the First TimeHuge, slow-moving waves that drive Earth's weather and shape the swirls in Jupiter's atmosphere also exist on the sun, new research reveals.
12h
Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

Flexible, highly efficient multimodal energy harvestingA 10-fold increase in the ability to harvest mechanical and thermal energy over standard piezoelectric composites may be possible using a piezoelectric ceramic foam supported by a flexible polymer support, according to researchers.
12h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Eating at night, sleeping by day swiftly alters key blood proteinsThe first human study to look at how blood proteins vary over a 24-hour-period identified 30 with distinct time-of-day patterns and more than 100 that are disrupted by simulated night shift work
13h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Research suggests sweet potatoes didn't originate in the Americas as previously thoughtSweet potatoes may seem as American as Thanksgiving, but scientists have long debated whether their plant family originated in the Old or New World. New research by an Indiana University paleobotanist suggests it originated in Asia, and much earlier than previously known.
13h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News

UNM scientists find widespread ocean anoxia as cause for past mass extinctionFor decades, scientists have conducted research centered around the five major mass extinctions that have shaped the world we live in. The extinctions date back more than 450 million years with the Late Ordovician Mass Extinction to the deadliest extinction, the Late Permian extinction 250 million years ago that wiped out over 90 percent of species.
13h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Chemists synthesize millions of proteins not found in natureMIT chemists have devised a way to rapidly synthesize and screen millions of novel proteins that could be used as drugs against Ebola and other viruses.
13h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Major fossil study sheds new light on emergence of early animal life 540 million years agoAll the major groups of animals appear in the fossil record for the first time around 540-500 million years ago -- an event known as the Cambrian Explosion -- but new research from the University of Oxford in collaboration with the University of Lausanne suggests that for most animals this 'explosion' was in fact a more gradual process.
13h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Helping preterm infants grow bigger kidneys would prevent kidney disease later in lifeA study from Cincinnati Children's reveals a mechanism regulating nephron formation in kidneys during prenatal development. The discovery, based on mouse models, suggests a potential path for reducing demand for kidney transplantation.
13h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Insufficient sleep, even without extended wakefulness, leads to performance impairmentsA team of researchers from BWH have isolated the impacts of short sleep and extended wakefulness on vigilant performance decline and their results are published in PNAS.
13h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News

A single-injection vaccine for the polio virusA nanoparticle vaccine developed by MIT researchers could help eradicate polio worldwide. The vaccine, which delivers multiple doses in just one injection, could make it easier to immunize children in remote regions of Pakistan and other countries where the disease is still found.
13h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Compound in citrus oil could reduce dry mouth in head, neck cancer patientsA compound found in citrus oils could help alleviate dry mouth caused by radiation therapy in head and neck cancer patients, according to a new study by researchers at the Stanford University School of Medicine.
13h
Science | The Guardian

Scientists find secret behind sweet sound of Stradivarius violinsThe instruments achieve their sweetness and brilliance by mimicking aspects of the human voice, study says The violins made by the Italian masters Andrea Amati and Antonio Stradivari are celebrated as the finest ever made, but the secret behind their perfect sound has mystified experts for centuries. Now scientists in Taiwan believe they have hit on an answer. Using software normally reserved for
13h
Science | The Guardian

Human race just 0.01% of all life but has eradicated most other living thingsGroundbreaking assessment of all life on Earth reveals humanity’s surprisingly tiny part in it as well as our disproportionate impact Humankind is revealed as simultaneously insignificant and utterly dominant in the grand scheme of life on Earth by a groundbreaking new assessment of all life on the planet. The world’s 7.6 billion people represent just 0.01% of all living things, according to the
13h
Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

How animals hollerWhile humans can only broadcast about one percent of their vocal power through their speech, some animals and mammals are able to broadcast 100 percent. The secret to their long-range howls? A combination of high pitch, a wide-open mouth and a clever use of the body's shape to direct sound -- none of which are factors that humans can replicate.
13h
The Atlantic

Travel Monday: A Photo Trip to Southeast AlaskaSoutheast Alaska, or the Alaska Panhandle, is a narrow strip of coastal islands and mountains that stretches more than 500 miles along the Pacific Ocean. It is home to Alaska’s capital city of Juneau, and was once the seat of power for Russian America, in the town of Sitka. Famed for its wildlife, lush climate, spectacular views, and the protected seaway known as the inside passage, the region ha
13h
The Atlantic

How to Get Scotch Tape off of a Work of ArtSticky tape was first invented in the mid-19th century, and it’s been making conservators’ lives hell ever since. “Tape is the bane of the conservator’s existence,” says Margaret Holben Ellis, a professor of paper conservation at New York University. The problem is simply that tape works too well. Removing it can easily take off a layer of paper, and adhesives from old tape can sink into paper, s
13h
New Scientist - News

Chinese giant salamanders may already be virtually extinctResearchers spent four years looking for Chinese giant salamanders and only found 24 – and that’s not even the worst bit of news
13h
New Scientist - News

Babies should mix with other children to lower leukaemia riskCancer researcher Mel Greaves has suggested that a lack of exposure to microbes in a baby’s first year can make children more likely to get a form of leukaemia
13h
Live Science

Why Radioactive Waste Is Being Melted into GlassDangerous radioactive waste has been trapped inside solid glass in a first-of-its-kind demonstration, according to a statement from the Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL) in southeastern Washington.
13h
Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

Deep space radiation treatment reboots brain's immune systemNASA and private company SpaceX plan to send humans to Mars within the next 15 years -- but need to figure out how to protect astronauts from the dangerous cosmic radiation of deep space. Now neuroscientists have identified a potential treatment for the brain damage caused by cosmic rays -- a drug that prevents memory impairment in mice exposed to simulated space radiation.
13h
Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

Are humans causing cancer in wild animals?As humans, we know that some of our activities can cause cancer to develop in our bodies. Smoking, poor diets, pollution, chemicals used as additives in food and personal hygiene products, and even too much sun can contribute to an increased risk of cancer. But, are human activities also causing cancer in wild animals? Researchers think so and are urgently calling for research into this topic.
13h
Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

Vocal neurons encode evolution of frog callsA study of two closely related frog species reveals a population of neurons that give rise to the unique mating calls of each species. The findings suggest that changes in the properties of these cells over the course of evolution may have shaped vocal patterns in vertebrates including bats and primates.
13h
Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

Computer redesigns enzymeBiotechnologists used a computational method to redesign aspartase and convert it to a catalyst for asymmetric hydroamination reactions. Their colleagues in China scaled up the production of this enzyme and managed to produce kilograms of very pure building blocks for pharmaceuticals and other bioactive compounds.
13h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News

What can snakes teach us about engineering friction?If you want to know how to make a sneaker with better traction, just ask a snake. That's the theory driving the research of Hisham Abdel-Aal, PhD, an associate teaching professor from Drexel University's College of Engineering who is studying snake skin to help engineers improve the design of textured surfaces, such as engine cylinder liners, prosthetic joints - and yes, maybe even footwear.
13h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Nanoparticles could offer a new way to help eradicate polio worldwideA new nanoparticle vaccine developed by MIT researchers could assist efforts to eradicate polio worldwide. The vaccine, which delivers multiple doses in just one injection, could make it easier to immunize children in remote regions of Pakistan and other countries where the disease is still found.
13h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Major fossil study sheds new light on emergence of early animal life 540 million years agoAll the major groups of animals appear in the fossil record for the first time around 540-500 million years ago—an event known as the Cambrian Explosion—but new research from the University of Oxford in collaboration with the University of Lausanne suggests that for most animals this 'explosion' was in fact a more gradual process.
13h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Chemists synthesize millions of proteins not found in natureMIT chemists have devised a way to rapidly synthesize and screen millions of novel proteins that could be used as drugs against Ebola and other viruses.
13h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Research suggests sweet potatoes didn't originate in the Americas as previously thoughtSweet potatoes may seem as American as Thanksgiving, but scientists have long debated whether their plant family originated in the Old or New World. New research by an Indiana University paleobotanist suggests it originated in Asia, and much earlier than previously known.
13h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Scientists find widespread ocean anoxia as cause for past mass extinctionFor decades, scientists have conducted research centered around the five major mass extinctions that have shaped the world we live in. The extinctions date back more than 450 million years with the Late Ordovician Mass Extinction to the deadliest extinction, the Late Permian extinction 250 million years ago that wiped out over 90 percent of species.
13h
The Atlantic

This Is Real Jailhouse RockCall it whatever you want—jailhouse rock, incarcerated funk, prison soul. But any way you slice it, Edge of Daybreak’s Eyes of Love is a singular achievement in music history. Recorded live in prison by incarcerated musicians during a strict five-hour window, this 1979 record is an improbable soul music sensation—worlds apart from records such as Johnny Cash’s At Folsom Prison , which was not act
13h
Science : NPR

NASA Launching New Satellites To Measure Earth's Lumpy GravityThe two satellites, which are collectively called GRACE and will replace two retired probes, are one of the most important tools for understanding the effects of climate change. (Image credit: NASA/JPL)
13h
Big Think

How to be happy: Aristotle's 11 guidelines for a good lifePeople often ask "What should I do?" when faced with an ethical problem. Aristotle urges us to ask "What kind of person should I be?" Read More
13h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Deep space radiation treatment reboots brain's immune systemNASA and private company SpaceX plan to send humans to Mars within the next 15 years--but need to figure out how to protect astronauts from the dangerous cosmic radiation of deep space. Now the lab of UCSF neuroscientist Susanna Rosi, PhD, has identified a potential treatment for the brain damage caused by cosmic rays--a drug that prevents memory impairment in mice exposed to simulated space radia
13h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News

The chestnut gall wasp -- The threat of an invasive species with clonal reproductionA molecular study carried out on the chestnut gall wasp, Dryocosmus kuriphilus, has revealed the absence of genetic variability in this invasive species, a chestnut-tree parasite, in Europe. This is due to the fact that the wasp's reproduction is strictly parthenogenetic, the females produce more females without having to be fertilized by a male. The high capacity of reproduction of the females, p
13h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Birds from different species recognize each other and cooperateCooperation among different species of birds is common. Some birds build their nests near those of larger, more aggressive species to deter predators, and flocks of mixed species forage for food and defend territories together in alliances that can last for years. In most cases, though, these partnerships are not between specific individuals of the other species—any bird from the other species wil
13h
Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

Personalizing therapeutic brain stimulationA study of epilepsy patients with implanted electrodes provides an unprecedented view of the changes in brain activity created by electrical stimulation. These findings have the potential to improve noninvasive stimulation approaches toward the treatment of neuropsychiatric disorders.
13h
Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

Flavonoids may slow lung function decline due to agingA type of flavonoid found in dark-pigmented fruits like red grapes and blueberries may slow the lung function decline that occurs with aging.
13h
Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

Japanese student discovers new crustacean species in deep sea hydrothermal ventA new species of microcrustacean was collected from a submarine hot spring (hydrothermal vent) of a marine volcano (Myojin-sho caldera) in the Pacific Ocean off the coast of Japan. This crustacean group is found only in deep-sea hydrothermal vents and is the first of its kind found in Japanese waters.
13h
Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

In utero exposure to carbon monoxide increases infants' risk of poor lung functionExposure to elevated levels of carbon monoxide (CO) in utero increases infants' risk of poor lung function at one month after birth.
13h
Feed: All Latest

Hunting for Frankenstein Amid Switzerland's Melting Glaciers and Nuclear BunkersFor one photographer, Mary Shelley's sci-fi novel is more relevant than ever.
13h
Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

World's biggest fisheries supported by seagrass meadowsScientific research has provided the first quantitative global evidence of the significant role that seagrass meadows play in supporting world fisheries productivity.
14h
Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

Snap-lock mechanism in bacterial riboswitchIn a discovery that points to potential new antibiotic medicines, scientists have deciphered the workings of a common but little-understood bacterial switch that cuts off protein production.
14h
Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

Autism is not linked to eating fish in pregnacyA major study examining the fish-eating habits of pregnant women has found that they are not linked to autism or autistic traits in their children. Scientists looked at the assumption that mercury exposure during pregnancy is a major cause of autism using evidence from nearly 4,500 women who took part in the Children of the '90s study.
14h
Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

Lightning in the eyewall of a hurricane beamed antimatter toward the groundHurricane Patricia, which battered the west coast of Mexico in 2015, was the most intense tropical cyclone ever recorded in the Western Hemisphere. Amid the extreme violence of the storm, scientists observed something new: a downward beam of positrons, the antimatter counterpart of electrons, creating a burst of powerful gamma-rays and X-rays.
14h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Birds from different species recognize each other and cooperateScientists from the University of Chicago and University of Nebraska show how two different species of Australian fairy-wrens not only recognize individual birds from other species, but also form long-term partnerships that help them forage and defend their shared space as a group.
14h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Another potential mechanism links androgen deprivation therapy to cardiovascular mortalityThe mechanisms by which ADT may lead to an increased risk of sudden death were unclear. Now, a team of researchers from BWH has shed some light on this issue and their findings are published findings in the Journal of the Endocrine Society.
14h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Eczema drug effective against severe asthmaTwo new studies of patients with difficult-to-control asthma show that the eczema drug dupilumab alleviates asthma symptoms and improves patients' ability to breathe better than standard therapies. Dupilumab, an injectable anti-inflammatory drug, was approved in 2017 by the Food and Drug Administration as a treatment for eczema, a chronic skin disease.
14h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Humans may influence cancer in many other species on the planetAs humans, we know that some of our activities can cause cancer to develop in our bodies. Smoking, poor diets, pollution, chemicals used as additives in food and personal hygiene products, and even too much sun are some of the things that contribute to an increased risk of cancer.
14h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

How animals hollerWhile humans can only broadcast about one percent of their vocal power through their speech, some animals and mammals are able to broadcast 100 percent. The secret to their long-range howls? A combination of high pitch, a wide-open mouth and a clever use of the body's shape to direct sound—none of which are factors that humans can replicate.
14h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Flexible, highly efficient multimodal energy harvestingA 10-fold increase in the ability to harvest mechanical and thermal energy over standard piezoelectric composites may be possible using a piezoelectric ceramic foam supported by a flexible polymer support, according to Penn State researchers.
14h
NYT > Science

Global Health: For First Time, W.H.O. Names Some Lab Tests ‘Essential’Forty years after creating its “essential medicines” list, which revolutionized the struggle to get drugs to the poor, the agency tackles diagnostics.
14h
Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

Giant Chinese salamander is at least five distinct species, all heading toward extinctionWith individuals weighing in at more than 140 pounds, the critically endangered Chinese giant salamander is well known as the world's largest amphibian. But researchers now find that those giant salamanders aren't one species, but five, and possibly as many as eight. The bad news is that all of the salamanders now face the imminent threat of extinction in the wild, due to demand for the amphibians
14h
Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

Self-healing material a breakthrough for bio-inspired roboticsMany natural organisms have the ability to repair themselves. Now, manufactured machines will be able to mimic this property. Researchers have created a self-healing material that spontaneously repairs itself under extreme mechanical damage.
14h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

New NIST roadmap charts path to reduced fire hazards from materialsFire researchers will tell you that there's a simple solution for reducing fire hazards: eliminate flammable materials. If it doesn't burn, the experts say, then there won't be a fire. Of course, that option isn't very practical or realistic; after all, who wants to sit on a block of cement when you can have a cushiony recliner?
14h
The Atlantic

The Silence in Kelly Clarkson’s Call for ‘Action’ on Mass ShootingsThe script for what happens after a mass shooting—the thoughts, the prayers, the arguments, the forgetting—has come to, even, include mourning that such a script exists at all. At least as far back as 2012, after the killings in Aurora, Colorado, my colleagues were writing about “ The Template of Our Grief ” and “ The Certainty of More Shootings .” This year, after the Parkland shooting, The Bost
14h
The Atlantic

The Higher Education Nearly All Americans LoveTwo surveys last year painted an unambiguous picture: Republicans had soured on higher education. They thought colleges had a negative impact on the country and the “way things were going.” But a new survey shows that Americans’ attitudes towards higher education—regardless of political affiliation—are a little more complex. Not only do Americans value education after high school, many of them—of
14h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Soft machinesIn the world of robotics, soft robots are the new kids on the block. The unique capabilities of these automata are to bend, deform, stretch, twist or squeeze in all the ways that conventional rigid robots cannot.Today, it is easy to envision a world in which humans and robots collaborate -- in close proximity -- in many realms. Emerging soft robots may help to ensure that this can be done safely,
14h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Patients with high lipoprotein(a) levels may benefit from taking PCSK9 inhibitorsIn the latest analysis from the FOURIER (Further Cardiovascular Outcomes Research With PCSK9 Inhibition in Subjects With Elevated Risk) trial, researchers found that PCSK9 inhibitors reduced lipoprotein(a) levels and that patients starting with higher Lp(a) levels appeared to derive greater absolute benefit from taking PSCK9 inhibitors.
14h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News

New NIST roadmap charts path to reduced fire hazards from materialsDon't use flammable materials and you won't have fires. Good idea but not very practical or realistic. Better option: reduce the flammability of numerous materials and make more fire-safe products through scientific study directed by a new research roadmap published by the National Institute of Standards and Technology (NIST).
14h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Flexible, highly efficient multimodal energy harvestingA 10-fold increase in the ability to harvest mechanical and thermal energy over standard piezoelectric composites may be possible using a piezoelectric ceramic foam supported by a flexible polymer support, according to Penn State researchers.
14h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Montana State laser technology could help Yellowstone battle invasive troutA laser-based sensor developed by electrical engineering professor Joe Shaw has been shown to be effective at locating non-native lake trout, which Yellowstone National Park managers remove in an attempt to reverse the decline of native cutthroat trout.
14h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News

How animals hollerWhile humans can only broadcast about one percent of their vocal power through their speech, some animals and mammals are able to broadcast 100 percent. The secret to their long-range howls? A combination of high pitch, a wide-open mouth and a clever use of the body's shape to direct sound -- none of which are factors that humans can replicate.
14h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Are humans causing cancer in wild animals?As humans, we know that some of our activities can cause cancer to develop in our bodies. Smoking, poor diets, pollution, chemicals used as additives in food and personal hygiene products, and even too much sun can contribute to an increased risk of cancer. But, are human activities also causing cancer in wild animals? Researchers from ASU's School of Life Sciences think so and are urgently callin
14h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Perceived trustworthiness helps women entrepreneurs with crowdfunding backersFemale entrepreneurs have been at a disadvantage when seeking financial backing from traditional sources, but new research shows that crowdfunding investors view them as more trustworthy, making female-led projects more likely to secure support through crowdfunding platforms.
14h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

From airlines to pizza parlors, EU businesses adopt data lawLisa Meyer's hair salon is a cozy place where her mother serves homemade macaroons, children climb on chairs and customers chat above the whirr of hairdryers.
14h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

The challenges and potential rewards of transitioning to concentrated solar power to desalinate seawaterFreshwater shortages are projected to increase in our hotter and more crowded future. Already, 150 countries desalinate seawater, using fossil fuels.
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Science | The Guardian

GCSEs are failing stress test as students suffer | LettersA year 11 pupil describes the strain on her non-academic peers, while other readers decry the effects of relentless exams on young people I am a year 11 student who is currently sitting their GCSE examinations. Sally Weale’s article ( ‘My lunchtimes are filled with crying children’ , 17 May) sheds some light on what people my age go through. Many people I know suffer from depression and anxiety, w
14h
Science | The Guardian

The Guardian view on AI in the NHS: a good servant, when it’s not a bad master | EditorialThe NHS collects vast amounts of data. It must be used in imaginative ways that respect privacy and make life better for patients and health workers Technology helps us live better and for longer; in fact it has been doing so since the birth of modern medicine. And as each new technology comes into use, it turns out to have medical uses, even though these are not always the ones that are sold hard
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Science : NPR

Trump Hints At Plan To Create 'Space Force' As Sixth Military BranchWhile the Pentagon opposes the measure, the military has conducted operations in space for 50 years. (Image credit: NASA/Getty Images)
14h
Big Think

The one thing A.I. needs is the one thing we likely cannot programSilicon Valley might just be missing the most important aspect of being human: the ability to feel. Read More
14h
Big Think

Is virtual reality dangerous for children?Virtual reality tech is now approaching mainstream. But with so little research available, it is difficult to determine the dangers of virtual reality for children. Read More
14h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Lightning in the eyewall of a hurricane beamed antimatter toward the groundHurricane Patricia, which battered the west coast of Mexico in 2015, was the most intense tropical cyclone ever recorded in the Western Hemisphere. Amid the extreme violence of the storm, scientists observed something new: a downward beam of positrons, the antimatter counterpart of electrons, creating a burst of powerful gamma-rays and x-rays.
14h
Latest Headlines | Science News

Gun owner or not, Americans agree on many ways to limit gun violenceA new survey suggests that gun owners support many potential gun-control policies — now research on their efficacy needs to catch up.
14h
Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

Hurricanes: Stronger, slower, wetter in the future?Scientists have developed a detailed analysis of how 22 recent hurricanes would be different if they formed under the conditions predicted for the late 21st century.
14h
New on MIT Technology Review

The UK wants to build a cancer-diagnosing AI to save lives
14h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Profiling the genome hundreds of variations at a timeGeneticists have been using model organisms ranging from the house mouse to the single-cell bakers' yeast, Saccharomyces cerevisiae, to study basic biological processes that regulate human development and physiology, and that can be compromised in various diseases. This has been possible because many of the genes that control these processes in humans are also present with similar functions in tho
14h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Hurricanes: A bit stronger, a bit slower, and a lot wetter in a warmer climateScientists have published a detailed analysis of how 22 recent hurricanes would change if they instead formed near the end of this century. While each storm's transformation would be unique, on balance, the hurricanes would become a little stronger, a little slower moving, and a lot wetter.
14h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

NASA sees Tropical Cyclone Sagar's landfallThe final bulletin on Tropical Cyclone Sagar was issued at 11 a.m. EDT (1500 UTC) on May 19. By that time, Sagar had made landfall in Somalia. NASA's Terra satellite captured an infrared image of the storm as it was making landfall.
14h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Leading UK scientist reveals likely cause of childhood leukaemiaA major new analysis reveals the likely cause of most cases of childhood leukaemia, following more than a century of controversy about its origins.Professor Mel Greaves assessed the most comprehensive body of evidence ever collected on acute lymphoblastic leukaemia (ALL). He concludes the disease is caused through a two-step process of genetic mutation and exposure to infection that means it may b
15h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Personalizing therapeutic brain stimulationA study of epilepsy patients with implanted electrodes provides an unprecedented view of the changes in brain activity created by electrical stimulation. These findings, published in Journal of Neuroscience, have the potential to improve noninvasive stimulation approaches toward the treatment of neuropsychiatric disorders.
15h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Vocal neurons encode evolution of frog callsA study of two closely related frog species reveals a population of neurons that give rise to the unique mating calls of each species. Published in JNeurosci, the findings suggest that changes in the properties of these cells over the course of evolution may have shaped vocal patterns in vertebrates including bats and primates.
15h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Single 'clock' syncs action and perceptionA difficult task that requires participants to determine which of two stimuli appears first demonstrates how varying rhythms of brain activity may be synchronized to achieve a stable sense of time. The research is published in eNeuro.
15h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Researchers enhance boron nitride nanotubes for next-gen compositesBoron nitride nanotubes are primed to become effective building blocks for next-generation composite and polymer materials based on a new discovery at Rice University—and a previous one.
15h
Popular Science

Thunder fever sounds fake, but it's a real danger to asthma sufferersEnvironment When spring and summer storms strike, asthma attacks can get worse. Last week a bizarre and ominous term surfaced online: thunder fever. The term refers to the idea that certain thunderstorm conditions put people with asthma at an…
15h
The Atlantic

The President Who Cried WolfStop me if you’ve heard this one. The president of the United States is seizing on vague news reports to allege a vast political conspiracy against him, demanding an investigation, and searching for vindication. Of course you’ve heard this—it’s a trope nearly as old as the Trump administration. The latest recurrence concerns a reported informant who fed information to the FBI about possible Russi
15h
New on MIT Technology Review

The world can’t afford to wait for an energy miracle
15h
Science | The Guardian

Most common childhood cancer 'partly caused by lack of infection'Childhood acute leukaemia is caused by genetic mutations and a lack of childhood infection, scientists say Clean modern homes, antiseptic wipes and the understandable desire to protect small babies against any infection are all part of the cause of the most common form of childhood cancer, a leading expert has concluded after more than 30 years of research. Childhood acute leukaemia, says the hig
15h
Science | The Guardian

Toxic mushrooms in Iran kill 11 people and poison more than 800Up to 10 provinces, mostly in west of country, affected by mass fungi poisoning At least 11 people have reportedly died in Iran after eating toxic mushrooms. Emergency services in up to 10 provinces, mostly in the west of the country, reported that more than 800 people had become ill after mushroom poisoning and scores had been taken to hospital. It is unclear what kind of mushroom those affected
15h
Science | The Guardian

AI may well be the future but the Maybot gives it a bad name | John CraceEither the PM is playing a canny long game on Brexit or self-destruction is her default setting Maybe it was too much time in front of the TV watching the royal wedding. Or maybe it was just too long in the sun. Whatever it was, our politicians appeared to have returned from their weekends even less able to think straight than normal. Even the four pot plants, who can normally be relied upon to b
15h
Scientific American Content: Global

Free Lolita the Killer Whale!She’s the only free-born orca still in captivity, and her birth pod—and even her mother—are still living in the wild -- Read more on ScientificAmerican.com
15h
The Atlantic

Pompeo Declares Economic War on IranThe Trump administration’s new strategy on Iran essentially amounts to economic war. In a speech on Monday, Secretary of State Mike Pompeo vowed “unprecedented financial pressure in the form of the strongest sanctions in history” unless the Islamic Republic renounced all its nuclear activities, its ballistic-missile program, and its support of regional proxies. “The [Iranian] regime has been figh
15h
New Scientist - News

How Theresa May’s plan for an AI-powered NHS could go very wrongTrials of artificial intelligence show it can spot diseases that doctors miss – but rolling the tech out across the UK might prove more difficult
15h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Fetal MRI can reliably spot holoprosencephaly as early as 18 gestational weeksFetal magnetic resonance imaging can reliably spot holoprosencephaly as early as 18 gestational weeks, providing an opportunity to counsel families earlier in their pregnancy, according to Children's-led research featured on the cover of the American Journal of Medical Genetics.
15h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Women with pregnancy-related diabetes may be at risk for chronic kidney diseaseGestational diabetes may predispose women to early-stage kidney damage, a precursor to chronic kidney disease, according to a study by researchers at the National Institutes of Health and other institutions. The study appears in Diabetes Care.
15h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Lightning in the eyewall of a hurricane beamed antimatter toward the groundHurricane Patricia, which battered the west coast of Mexico in 2015, was the most intense tropical cyclone ever recorded in the Western Hemisphere. Amid the extreme violence of the storm, scientists observed something new: a downward beam of positrons, the antimatter counterpart of electrons, creating a burst of powerful gamma-rays and X-rays.
15h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Smog laid bare: Precise analysis of the composition of particulate matterSmog is a problem. But the knowledge about its constituents -- no longer. Researchers from several leading Warsaw scientific institutions have joined forces and developed a new, extremely precise method for the chemical analysis of suspended particulate matter. The method, easily adaptable in many modern laboratories, not only determines the chemical composition of compounds, but even recognizes c
15h
Big Think

This self-assembling 3D battery could charge your phone in secondsA team of researchers at Cornell University has developed a revolutionary battery architecture that could someday increase storage capacity while cutting charge times to mere seconds. Read More
15h
Science : NPR

Hawaii Volcano's Lava Spews 'Laze' Of Toxic Gas And Glass Into The AirLava from the Kileaua volcano is pouring into the Pacific Ocean, generating a plume of "laze" — hydrochloric acid and steam with fine glass particles — into the air. (Image credit: USGS/AP)
16h
Live Science

Found! New Evidence Suggests Planet Nine Is RealThe solar system just got a bit stranger.
16h
The Atlantic

What Didn’t Work in Season 43 of Saturday Night LiveThe opening sketch of Saturday Night Live ’s 43rd season finale epitomized the show’s direction this year. It was chock-full of celebrity guests, with Alec Baldwin in his usual role as Donald Trump, Ben Stiller as the president’s beleaguered attorney Michael Cohen, and Robert De Niro as a watchful, stone-faced Robert Mueller. It wasn’t laugh-out-loud funny, mostly just referencing the news of the
16h
The Atlantic

There Is Only One Trump ScandalThe sheer volume of Trump scandals can seem difficult to keep track of. There’s the ongoing special-counsel investigation into whether the Trump campaign aided a Russian campaign to aid Trump’s candidacy and defeat his Democratic rival, Hillary Clinton; there’s the associated inquiry into whether the president obstructed justice when he fired former FBI Director James Comey, whom he had asked not
16h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News

New form of local anesthetic does not reduce opioid use or complications after knee surgeryContrary to what some studies may suggest, the local anesthetic drug, liposomal bupivacaine, did not reduce in-hospital opioid prescriptions or opioid-related complications in patients who received the drug during total knee replacement surgery as part of a multimodal approach to manage postsurgical pain, finds a new study published in the Online First edition of Anesthesiology, the peer-reviewed
16h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Hurricanes: Stronger, slower, wetter in the future?Scientists have developed a detailed analysis of how 22 recent hurricanes would be different if they formed under the conditions predicted for the late 21st century.
16h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Ice cream funds research showing new strategy against thyroid cancerUniversity of Colorado Cancer Center study shows that stereotactic body radiation (SBRT) may be better against anaplastic thyroid cancer, and with fewer side effects.
16h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News

NASA sees Tropical Cyclone Sagar's landfallThe final bulletin on Tropical Cyclone Sagar was issued at 11 a.m. EDT (1500 UTC) on May 19. By that time, Sagar had made landfall in Somalia. NASA's Terra satellite captured an infrared image of the storm as it was making landfall.
16h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News

New study reveals prevalence of anti-gay verbal and physical bullying in Florida schoolsAnti-gay verbal and physical harassment are pervasive publichealth problems found in schools, which are correlated with negative mental health andeducational outcomes for students. A study published in the Florida Public Health Review,'Incidences of School-based Anti-gay and Gender-related Bullying: Differences across Levelsof Education,' compares anti-gay and gender-related bullying with student
16h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Innovative risk score tool effectively predicts future risk of hospitalization for COPD patientsResearchers have developed a new tool that utilizes basic laboratory tests to effectively identify patients with chronic obstructive pulmonary disease who are at high risk of being hospitalized due to a flare up of the condition.
16h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Mediterranean diet may blunt air pollution's ill health effectsEating a Mediterranean diet may protect people from some of the harm of long-term exposure to air pollution, and reduce their risk of dying from heart attacks, stroke and other causes of death, according to new research presented at the ATS 2018 International Conference.
16h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Flavonoids may slow lung function decline due to agingA type of flavonoid found in dark-pigmented fruits like red grapes and blueberries may slow the lung function decline that occurs with aging, according to new research presented at the ATS 2018 International Conference.
16h
New Scientist - News

Why Saturn’s inner moons look like ravioli, cigars and potatoesThe small moons that orbit in Saturn’s rings have a range of odd shapes, all of which may have come from smaller moonlets crashing into one another and merging
16h
Scientific American Content: Global

Government Sea Level Rise Report Released after Charges of CensorshipLong-delayed study examines potential for rising seas to damage national parks -- Read more on ScientificAmerican.com
16h
Live Science

The Next Cascadian Megaquake May Be Sooner Than You ThinkDevastating Cascadia megaquakes may rock the Pacific Northwest more frequently than previously suspected.
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Science | The Guardian

Did you solve it? The birthday birthday problemThe solution to today’s puzzle In my puzzle blog earlier today I set you the following problem: Ariel, Balthazar and Chastity are great mates, genius logicians and they always tell the truth. Neither Ariel nor Balthazar know the day or the month of Chastity’s birthday, so she decides to tell them in the following way: Continue reading...
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Feed: All Latest

Seakeeper’s Super Spinning System Keeps Ships Stable at SeaSeakeeper's gyroscopic system counteracts a boat's natural motion to keep you and your seasick friends from rocking with the waves.
16h
BBC News - Science & Environment

PM will pay to have 'full association' with EU researchThe Prime Minister makes the strongest commitment yet to "fully associate" the UK with the EU's £68bn research programme post-Brexit.
16h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Hurricanes: A bit stronger, a bit slower, and a lot wetter in a warmer climateScientists have published a detailed analysis of how 22 recent hurricanes would change if they instead formed near the end of this century. While each storm's transformation would be unique, on balance, the hurricanes would become a little stronger, a little slower moving, and a lot wetter.
16h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News

One year's losses for child sexual abuse in US top $9 billion, new study suggestsA new study at the Johns Hopkins Bloomberg School of Public Health found that the annual economic impact of child sexual abuse in the US is far-reaching and costly: In 2015, the total economic burden was approximately $9.3 billion and includes costs associated with health care, child welfare, special education, violence and crime, suicide and survivor productivity losses.
16h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Vascular risk interacts with amyloid levels to increase age-related cognitive declineRisk factors for heart disease and stroke appear to hasten the risk of cognitive decline in normal older individuals with evidence of very early Alzheimer's-disease-associated changes in the brain.
16h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Graphene paves the way to faster high-speed optical communicationsGraphene Flagship researchers created a technology that could lead to new devices for faster, more reliable ultra-broad bandwidth transfers. For the first time, researchers demonstrated how electrical fields boost the non-linear optical effects of graphene. The research, published in Nature Nanotechnology, was carried out by a team of Graphene Flagship partners led by the Cambridge Graphene Centre
16h
New Scientist - News

The volcanic eruption on Hawaii is now making an acidic fogAs lava from Kilauea plunges into the Pacific Ocean, clouds of hot acidic steam are being blasted off – and the eruption shows no signs of slowing down
16h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News

How to ethically conduct clinical research during public health emergenciesCarnegie Mellon University's Alex John London, a prominent bioethicist, has co-authored a viewpoint article in PLOS: Neglected Tropical Diseases on the ethics of clinical research during public health emergencies, like Ebola outbreaks.
16h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Cell types underlying schizophrenia identifiedScientists at Karolinska Institutet in Sweden and University of North Carolina, USA, have identified the cell types underlying schizophrenia in a new study published in Nature Genetics. The findings offer a roadmap for the development of new therapies to target the condition.
16h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Extrasolar asteroid has been orbiting the sun for 4.5 billion yearsThe object is revolving around the sun in the vicinity of Jupiter but in the opposite direction from most other celestial bodies, according to a study featuring a Brazilian scientist as co-author. Through a computer simulation, the study shows that the orbit has been stable since the giant planets were formed.
16h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Immune cells hold promise in slowing down ALSRecent research from Houston Methodist Hospital showed that a new immunotherapy was safe for patients with ALS and also revealed surprising results that could bring hope to patients who have this relentlessly progressive and fatal disease.
16h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News

NIH-funded researchers identify target for chikungunya treatmentScientists have identified a molecule found on human cells and some animal cells that could be a target for drugs against chikungunya virus infection and related diseases, according to new research published in the journal Nature. A team led by scientists at Washington University School of Medicine in St. Louis conducted the research, which was funded in part by the National Institute of Allergy a
16h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Rice U. researchers enhance boron nitride nanotubes for next-gen compositesRice University researchers discover a way to 'decorate' electrically insulating boron nitride nanotubes with functional groups. That makes them complementary building blocks to conductive carbon nanotubes for future composite and polymer materials.
16h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News

High-nicotine dependent smokers 'less likely' to quit after lung cancer screeningA new study in the May edition of the journal CHEST® investigated the relationship between the degree of nicotine dependence and the likelihood to quit smoking and clinical cancer and mortality outcomes in a cohort of screened patients. The study found that patients with a higher nicotine dependence are less likely to quit post-lung cancer screening.
17h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Autism is not linked to eating fish in pregnacyA major study examining the fish-eating habits of pregnant women has found that they are not linked to autism or autistic traits in their children.Scientists at the University of Bristol looked at the assumption that mercury exposure during pregnancy is a major cause of autism using evidence from nearly 4,500 women who took part in the Children of the '90s study.
17h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Profiling the genome hundreds of variations at a timeUsing baker's yeast, a team at Harvard's Wyss Institute developed a CRISPR-Cas9-based high-throughput approach that allows researchers to precisely alter hundreds of different genes or features of a single gene at once in individual yeast cells with 80 to 100% efficiency, select cells from the population that show specific behaviors, and identify the gene alterations that either trigger or prevent
17h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Scientists find link between increases in local temperature and antibiotic resistanceBacteria have long been thought to develop antibiotic resistance largely due to repeated exposure through over-prescribing. But could much bigger environmental pressures be at play?
17h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Self-healing material a breakthrough for bio-inspired roboticsMany natural organisms have the ability to repair themselves. Now, manufactured machines will be able to mimic this property. In findings published this week in Nature Materials, researchers at Carnegie Mellon University have created a self-healing material that spontaneously repairs itself under extreme mechanical damage.
17h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Observing cellular activity, one molecule at a timeUsing a new mode of atomic force microscopy, researchers at EPFL have found a way to see and measure protein assembly in real time and with unprecedented detail.
17h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Quantum effects observed in photosynthesisMolecules that are involved in photosynthesis exhibit the same quantum effects as non-living matter, concludes an international team of scientists including University of Groningen theoretical physicist Thomas la Cour Jansen. This is the first time that quantum mechanical behavior was proven to exist in biological systems that are involved in photosynthesis. The interpretation of these quantum eff
17h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Don't wait for a unicorn: Investing in low-carbon tech now will save moneyWaiting for a 'unicorn technology' that provides green energy at low cost could be more expensive than adopting low-carbon energy technologies now.
17h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Deadly malaria's evolution revealedThe evolutionary path of the deadliest human malaria parasite, Plasmodium falciparum, has been revealed for the first time. This parasite is a member of the Laverania parasite family that only infect the great apes including humans, chimpanzees and gorillas. Scientists from the Wellcome Sanger Institute and their collaborators estimate that Plasmodium falciparum emerged as a human-specific parasit
17h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Mice regrow brain tissue after stroke with bioengineered gelIn a first-of-its-kind finding, a new stroke-healing gel helped regrow neurons and blood vessels in mice with stroke-damaged brains, UCLA researchers report in the May 21 issue of Nature Materials.
17h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Turning entanglement upside downA team of physicists from ICTP-Trieste and IQOQI-Innsbruck has come up with a surprisingly simple idea to investigate quantum entanglement of many particles. Instead of digging deep into the properties of quantum wave functions -- which are notoriously hard to experimentally access -- they propose to realize physical systems governed by the corresponding entanglement Hamiltonians. By doing so, ent
17h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Discovery for grouping atoms invokes PasteurScientists have found a new way of joining groups of atoms together into shape-changing molecules -- opening up the possibility of a new area of chemistry and the development of countless new drugs, microelectronics and materials. Discoveries of new ways to make isomers -- molecules made of the same atoms connected together differently -- were last reported in 1961 and before then in 1914. Proof-o
17h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Age-related racial disparity in childhood suicideAge-related racial disparity exists in suicide rates among US youths.
17h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Age-related racial disparity in suicide rates among US youthResearchers investigated race-related differences in suicide rates in US youth. The researchers analyzed data separately for children ages 5-12 and adolescents ages 13-17. The suicide rate was roughly two times higher for black children compared with white children of the same age group. In contrast, the suicide rate for black adolescents was half that of white adolescents. The findings suggest th
17h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Age-related racial disparities in suicide rates among youth ages 5 to 17 yearsThe study shows racial disparities in suicide rates are age-related. Specifically, suicide rates for black children aged 5-12 were roughly two times higher than those of similarly-aged white children. For older children, the trend reverses back to the national average. For youth aged 13-17 years, suicide was roughly 50 percent lower in black children than in white children.
17h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Pregnancy drug DES might have triggered ADHD in the grandchildren of women who used itA new study reported elevated odds for attention deficit hyperactivity disorder (ADHD) in the grandchildren of users of diethylstilbestrol, a synthetic estrogen commonly known as DES prescribed between 1938 and 1971 to prevent pregnancy complications. This is the first study to provide evidence of the potential neurodevelopmental consequences of DES use across generations.
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Feel the burn: Biochemical pathway that spurs beige fat cells to burn energy is discoveredResearchers have identified a brain receptor and signaling pathway that spurs beige fat cells to burn energy, revealing a possible target for obesity therapies in humans.
17h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Computer redesigns enzymeUniversity of Groningen biotechnologists used a computational method to redesign aspartase and convert it to a catalyst for asymmetric hydroamination reactions. Their colleagues in China scaled up the production of this enzyme and managed to produce kilograms of very pure building blocks for pharmaceuticals and other bioactive compounds. This successful proof of principle study was published in Na
17h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Researchers identify genetic variants that may predict glaucoma riskA study led by scientists from King's College London, University College London, Massachusetts Eye and Ear and Harvard Medical School has identified 133 genetic variants that could help predict the risk of developing glaucoma, the world's leading cause of incurable blindness.
17h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Receptor proteins that respond to nicotine may help fat cells burn energyThe same proteins that moderate nicotine dependence in the brain may be involved in regulating metabolism by acting directly on certain types of fat cells, new research from the University of Michigan Life Sciences Institute shows.
17h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Giant Chinese salamander is at least five distinct species, all heading toward extinctionWith individuals weighing in at more than 140 pounds, the critically endangered Chinese giant salamander is well known as the world's largest amphibian. But researchers reporting in Current Biology now find that those giant salamanders aren't one species, but five, and possibly as many as eight. The bad news is that all of the salamanders now face the imminent threat of extinction in the wild, due
17h
Science : NPR

Levees Make Mississippi River Floods Worse, But We Keep Building ThemFor more than 150 years, scientists have known that levees increase flood risk on the Mississippi River. That hasn't stopped local officials from building up levees in response to more severe floods. (Image credit: Cliff Schiappa/AP)
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Futurity.org

Gay teen guys use hookup apps like Grindr to find friendsAlthough hookup apps require users to be 18 or older, a new study finds that more than 50 percent of sexually active gay and bisexual boys ages 14 to 17 met male sexual partners on apps such as Grindr and Scruff. It also was common for these teens to use the apps to connect with friends and find new gay, bisexual, and queer friends and boyfriends, which sheds new light on who uses adult male hook
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Scientists find link between increases in local temperature and antibiotic resistanceBacteria have long been thought to develop antibiotic resistance largely due to repeated exposure through over-prescribing. But could much bigger environmental pressures be at play?
17h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Study finds snap-lock mechanism in bacterial riboswitchIn a discovery that points to potential new antibiotic medicines, scientists from Rice University and the University of Michigan have deciphered the workings of a common but little-understood bacterial switch that cuts off protein production before it begins.
17h
Live Science

Why Is Ice Slippery?No, it's not because there's a thin layer of melted water on the top.
17h
Popular Science

Caught in a race against climate change, lizards hit an evolutionary dead endNexus Media News The brown anole has little room left to evolve. Cold-blooded critters are struggling to adapt to a rapidly warming world. And they can only evolve so much.
17h
The Atlantic

How a Pyramid Scheme Doomed the World’s Largest AmphibiansThe world’s largest amphibian should have been easy to find. While most salamanders are the size of your finger, Chinese giant salamanders can be as big as your entire body. Even average individuals can grow to Labrador size. Their heads are broad and flattened, their eyes are small and lidless, and their bodies look like something you might find left behind in a toilet. Their skin has the color
17h
NYT > Science

New Cancer Treatments Lie Hidden Under Mountains of PaperworkGuideposts to powerful treatments may be buried in the nation’s medical records. But there is no easy way to gather those records or to get them into a usable format.
17h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Self-healing material a breakthrough for bio-inspired roboticsMany natural organisms have the ability to repair themselves. Now, manufactured machines will be able to mimic this property. In findings published this week in Nature Materials, researchers at Carnegie Mellon University have created a self-healing material that spontaneously repairs itself under extreme mechanical damage.
17h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Study shows Plasmodium falciparum emerged earlier than thought and gives clues to how deadly parasites ariseThe evolutionary path of the deadliest human malaria parasite, Plasmodium falciparum, has been revealed for the first time. This parasite is a member of a parasite family called the Laverania that only infect the great apes including humans, chimpanzees and gorillas. Scientists from the Wellcome Sanger Institute and their collaborators from the French National Centre for Scientific Research, Frenc
17h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Discovery for grouping atoms invokes PasteurScientists have found a new way of joining groups of atoms together into shape-changing molecules—opening up the possibility of a new area of chemistry and the development of countless new drugs, microelectronics and materials with novel characteristics.
17h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Quantum effects observed in photosynthesisMolecules that are involved in photosynthesis exhibit the same quantum effects as non-living matter, concludes an international team of scientists including University of Groningen theoretical physicist Thomas la Cour Jansen. This is the first time that quantum mechanical behavior was proven to exist in biological systems that are involved in photosynthesis. The interpretation of these quantum eff
17h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Observing cellular activity, one molecule at a timeProteins and molecules assemble and disassemble naturally as part of many essential biological processes. It is very difficult to observe these mechanisms, which are often complex and take place at the nanometer scale, far smaller than the normal visible range. At EPFL, however, an interdisciplinary team of researchers has invented and applied a technique that allows these mechanisms to be examine
17h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Computer redesigns enzymeUniversity of Groningen biotechnologists used a computational method to redesign aspartase and convert it to a catalyst for asymmetric hydroamination reactions. Their colleagues in China scaled up the production of this enzyme and managed to produce kilograms of very pure building blocks for pharmaceuticals and other bioactive compounds. This successful proof of principle study was published in Na
17h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Giant Chinese salamander is at least five distinct species, all heading toward extinctionWith individuals weighing in at more than 140 pounds, the critically endangered Chinese giant salamander is well known as the world's largest amphibian. But researchers reporting in the journal Current Biology on May 21 now find that those giant salamanders aren't one species, but five, and possibly as many as eight. The bad news as highlighted by another report appearing in the same issue is that
17h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Turning entanglement upside downA team of physicists from ICTP-Trieste and IQOQI-Innsbruck has come up with a surprisingly simple idea to investigate quantum entanglement of many particles. Instead of digging deep into the properties of quantum wave functions, which are notoriously hard to experimentally access, they propose to realize physical systems governed by the corresponding entanglement Hamiltonians. By doing so, entangl
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Latest Headlines | Science News

Satellite smashups could have given birth to Saturn’s odd moonsNearly head-on collisions between icy moonlets might be responsible for the peculiar shapes of some of Saturn’s moons, computer simulations suggest.
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The 6-Foot Chinese Giant Salamander Is in Serious TroubleScientists figured out one species is actually at least five. Which means conservationists have been going about trying to save the creature all wrong.
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Interview with CAR T cell expert Dr. Michel Sadelain in Human Gene TherapyMichel Sadelain, M.D., Ph.D., Director, Center for Cell Engineering, Memorial Sloan-Kettering Cancer Center in New York City, offers a fascinating perspective on the re-markable progress being made in the field of chimeric antigen receptor (CAR) engineered T-cell therapies to treat cancer.
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Why are the elderly increasingly more inclined to live alone?For decades, the elderly in Spain have shown a preference for living at home, either alone or with their partners, instead of sharing a home with relatives of other generations. A study by the University of Granada delves into the reasons for this trend.
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Study finds snap-lock mechanism in bacterial riboswitchIn a discovery that points to potential new antibiotic medicines, scientists from Rice University and the University of Michigan have deciphered the workings of a common but little-understood bacterial switch that cuts off protein production.
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Reading the minds of pilots on the flyWearable brain monitoring sensors allowed researchers to measure cognitive workload while aircraft pilots completed memory tasks.
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Scientific American Content: Global

A Warming Climate May Produce More Drug-Resistant InfectionsHotter temperatures can lead to increased growth and genetic mutations -- Read more on ScientificAmerican.com
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The Atlantic

Thoroughly Modern MeghanHilary Mantel has compared them to pandas in a zoo, “expensive to conserve and ill-adapted to any modern environment.” Martin Amis once described them as “philistines.” When it comes to the Windsors, Christopher Hitchens wrote in 2000 , the stubborn appeal of the British Royal Family comes down to a national “conditioning of mild hysteria and personality cult.” Why are we so fascinated by them? “
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News

New hope for women with fistula injuriesThe health care systems in the United States and other industrialized countries have outgrown many of the childbirth-related injuries that are still very problematic in poor countries.
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News

To establish a timescale for more than 10 million years agoThe timescale is the base to reconstruct the history of the Earth and the biological evolution. Research on a chronostratigraphic sequence of the Chinese Neogene with accurate geological dating was published online in Science China: Earth Sciences.
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TED Talks Daily (SD video)

Where joy hides and how to find it | Ingrid Fetell LeeCherry blossoms and rainbows, bubbles and googly eyes: Why do some things seem to create such universal joy? In this captivating talk, Ingrid Fetell Lee reveals the surprisingly tangible roots of joy and shows how we all can find -- and create -- more of it in the world around us.
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New on MIT Technology Review

Does the brain store information in discrete or analog form?New evidence in favor of a discrete form of data storage could change the way we understand the brain and the devices we build to interface with it.
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Futurity.org

Bird and turtle genomes offer clues to ancient lizardy creatureScientists have reconstructed the likely genome structure of a common ancestor of birds, turtles, and dinosaurs. The research, published in Nature Communications , suggests the chromosomal structure, known as a karyotype, in early dinosaurs is similar to that of most present-day birds. Working backward from the living relatives of dinosaurs can shed light on traits the fossil record can’t illumin
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Futurity.org

In an office of machines, where will you fit in?In tomorrow’s workplace, machines will increasingly assume many routine jobs workers perform now, leaving more complicated tasks to humans who see the big picture and possess interpersonal skills, says James Timbie, a distinguished visiting fellow at the Hoover Institution at Stanford University. Artificial intelligence and other advancing technologies promise advances in health, safety, and prod
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The Atlantic

Diplomats Are Getting Away With Abusing Their Children's NanniesEdith Mendoza was working at Damayan , a migrant workers’ organization, when she met a young woman, Sherile Pahagas, whose story was eerily like her own. Both Mendoza and Pahagas were from the Philippines. Both had searched for work on a website called greataupair.com. Both had found work at the home of a German diplomat and his wife, Pit and Mareike Koehler. And both ended up working day and nig
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Futurity.org

Daily aspirin linked to higher melanoma risk for menMen who take once-daily aspirin have nearly double the risk of melanoma compared to men who don’t, according to a new study. Women, however, do not have an increased risk in this large patient population, the study found. “Given the widespread use of aspirin and the potential clinical impact of the link to melanoma, patients and health care providers need to be aware of the possibility of increas
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Big Think

5 ways to secure American schools from shootersWith school shootings happening constantly around the country, here are real measures we can take to protect our kids. Read More
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Advanced biofuels can be produced extremely efficiently, confirms industrial demonstrationResearchers from Chalmers University of Technology, Sweden, have developed new technologies that can be used to convert industrial plants to produce fossil-free heat, electricity, fuel, chemicals and materials. The technical potential is enormous -- using only Sweden's currently existing power plants, renewable fuels equivalent to 10 percent of the world's aviation fuel could be produced.
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Novel bioactive steroid biosynthetic pathway in symbiotic fungiFuranosteroids, represented by wortmannin and viridin, are a special group of highly-oxygenated steroids featured by a furan ring. They are well-known nanomolar-potency inhibitors of phosphatidylinositol 3-kinase (PI3K) and widely used in biological studies. Here, we report the first identification of the biosynthetic gene cluster for demethoxyviridin in symbiotic fungi. Structure-activity analyse
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News

World's biggest fisheries supported by seagrass meadowsScientific research, led by Dr Richard Unsworth at Swansea University, has provided the first quantitative global evidence of the significant role that seagrass meadows play in supporting world fisheries productivity.
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News

International anesthesia standards updated with WHO in global effort to improve surgical careThis month the World Federation of Societies of Anaesthesiologists (WFSA) launched an update of the International Standards For A Safe Practice of Anaesthesia, co-published with World Health Organization (WHO) for the first time as an official WHO guideline. The standards are recommended for anesthesia professionals throughout the world and are intended to provide guidance to anesthesia profession
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Many Americans say infectious and emerging diseases in other countries will threaten the USAn overwhelming majority of Americans (95 percent) think infectious and emerging diseases facing other countries will pose a 'major' or 'minor' threat to the US in the next few years, but more than half (61 percent) say they are confident the federal government can prevent a major infectious disease outbreak in the US, according to a new national public opinion survey commissioned by Research!Amer
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Science | The Guardian

'The right thing to do': Jeremy Corbyn reacts to Livingstone's resignation – politics liveRolling coverage of the day’s political developments as they happen Yuval Noah Harari: Brexit will not halt drive to ‘human unification’ Support for Brexit falls sharply in Northern Ireland No 10 lobby briefing – Summary May’s science and industrial strategy speech – Summary and analysis Evening summary 10.10pm BST That’s all for this evening. Here’s a summary of the day’s events: The European Co
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Live Science

New Controversial Idea About Stonehenge Has Archaeologists Shaking Their HeadsIn a new book, this scientist says glaciers, not Neolithic people, carried the huge rocks to Stonehenge.
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The Atlantic

Most Maps of the New Ebola Outbreak Are WrongOn Thursday, the World Health Organization released a map showing parts of the Democratic Republic of the Congo that are currently being affected by Ebola. The map showed four cases in Wangata, one of three “health zones” in the large city of Mbandaka. Wangata, according to the map, lies north of the main city, in a forested area on the other side of a river. That is not where Wangata is. #DRC #E
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Toxic cloud caused by Hawaii volcano lava emerges over oceanWhite plumes of acid and extremely fine shards of glass billowed into the sky over Hawaii as molten rock from Kilauea volcano poured into the ocean, creating yet another hazard from an eruption that began more than two weeks ago: A toxic steam cloud.
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Viden

Forskere gemmer hemmelige budskaber i tekstfilerEn ny teknik kan skjule information i hvad, der ligner helt almindelige tekstdokumenter
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Scientist set to tackle the mystery of Loch NessThe story of the Loch Ness monster is one of the world's greatest mysteries. We have waited more than a thousand years for an answer on its existence. Now, it is only months away.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Far from special: Humanity's tiny DNA differences are 'average' in animal kingdomResearchers report important new insights into evolution following a study of mitochondrial DNA from about 5 million specimens covering about 100,000 animal species.
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New on MIT Technology Review

Activists are lobbying the FTC to break up Facebook
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

New technique reveals 3-D shape of nanostructure's polariton interactionNanostructures are the holy grail of new materials. The wonder material graphene, for example, is a single layer of carbon atoms arranged in a hexagonal pattern that, because of its conductivity, flexibility, transparency and strength, has the potential to create more efficient solar cells, smaller and faster electric circuits and microchips, transparent displays, and high density capacitors and b
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

Genome structure of dinosaurs discovered by bird-turtle comparisonsA discovery has provided significant insight into the overall genome structure of dinosaurs. By comparing the genomes of different species, chiefly birds and turtles, the Kent team were able to determine how the overall genome structure (i.e. the chromosomes) of many people's favourite dinosaur species - like Velociraptor or Tyrannosaurus - might have looked through a microscope.
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Live Science

This Box Could Become the Coldest Spot in the UniverseLasers and microgravity will chill this ice chest-size box to 10 billion times colder than the vacuum of space.
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Studying insightThe research team at Toyohashi University of Technology has measured the human pupil upon gaining insight into an object. It is known that pupils dilate/narrow to adjust the amount of light entering the eye and that emotional state affects the extent of dilation/narrowing. This study indicates that dilation extent varies depending on if inspiration occurs and that dilation occurs before inspiratio
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Children understand plant-animal interdependence by the age of eightWhen do children start to become aware of the relationship between animal and plant life? According to a study by the UPV/EHU, they begin to associate animals and plants with each other spontaneously in their drawings by the age of eight. The UPV/EHU researchers José Domingo Villarroel, Álvaro Antón, Teresa Nuño and Daniel Zuazagoitia are the authors of this work, published in the scientific journ
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The Atlantic

A Black Bishop Brings a Political Message to the Royal WeddingMaybe it was the gospel choir singing “Stand by Me.” Perhaps it was the fiery sermon on the power of love. Price Harry and Meghan Markle’s wedding on Saturday had a distinctively black-church flavor to it. And the joyful avatar of this quality was Bishop Michael Curry, the presiding head of the Episcopal Church, which is part of the Anglican communion along with the Church of England. His address
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Effective methods for automated design of complex technical objects and systemsIn almost any field of human activity, people choose optimal options from a great variety of possible alternatives. When designing new devices, products and systems, researchers and engineers always strive to ensure that their systems have the best characteristics and are economically viable. Thus, for example, a new car being developed must be fast, consume a minimum amount of fuel, be reliable a
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

First interstellar immigrant discovered in the solar systemA new study has discovered the first known permanent immigrant to our solar system. The asteroid, currently nestling in Jupiter's orbit, is the first known asteroid to have been captured from another star system.
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Big Think

Teens are increasingly choosing marijuana as their first substance, over alcohol and tobaccoA new study shows that teenagers are increasingly experimenting with marijuana before beer or cigarettes. Is that a good thing? Read More
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Popular Science

Should I work out when I’m sick?Health Depends on the intensity. You know it the moment you wake up: Last night’s throat tickle has turned into a full-blown cold. You had plans to work out today, but would keeping them make your…
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News

An unexpected chemosensor pathway for innate fear behavior against predator odorInnate behaviors are genetically encoded, but their underlying molecular mechanisms remain largely unknown. University of Tsukuba researchers conducted a large-scale forward genetics screening and detected an unexpected chemosensor pathway. The work establishes the first forward genetics screen to uncover the molecular mechanism of innate fear, a basic emotion and evolutionarily conserved survival
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Hotter bodies fight infections and tumors better -- researchers show howThe hotter our body temperature, the more our bodies speed up a key defence system that fights against tumours, wounds or infections, new research by a multidisciplinary team of mathematicians and biologists from the Universities of Warwick and Manchester has found.
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Far from special: Humanity's tiny DNA differences are 'average' in animal kingdomResearchers report important new insights into evolution following a study of mitochondrial DNA from about five million specimens covering about 100,000 animal species.Mining 'big data' insights from the world's fast-growing genetic databases and reviewing a large literature in evolutionary theory, researchers at The Rockefeller University in New York City and the Biozentrum at the University of B
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Neuron guidance factor found to play a key role in immune cell functionMacrophages are white blood cells that perform different functions with different energy needs. M2-type macrophages have anti-inflammatory properties that may protect against inflammatory disorders such as inflammatory bowel disease (IBD). However, the molecular pathways driving M2 formation are not fully understood. Researchers identified a protein commonly involved in nervous system development
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Japanese student discovers new crustacean species in deep sea hydrothermal ventA new species of microcrustacean was collected from a submarine hot spring (hydrothermal vent) of a marine volcano (Myojin-sho caldera) in the Pacific Ocean off the coast of Japan. This crustacean group is found only in deep-sea hydrothermal vents and is the first of its kind found in Japanese waters.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Flat Earthers vs climate change sceptics: why conspiracy theorists keep contradicting each otherFlat Earthism and the idea that human activity is not responsible for climate change are two of the most prevalent conspiracy theories today. Both have been increasing in popularity since the late 20th century. Currently, 16% of the US population say they doubt the scientifically established shape of the Earth, while 40% think that human-induced climate change is a hoax. But proponents of one of t
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The Atlantic

The Futility of Trying to Prevent More School Shootings in AmericaThe 17-year-old who killed 10 people at Santa Fe High School, in Texas, allegedly used his father’s shotgun and .38 revolver. After a firefight with police, he surrendered , saying he did not have the courage to kill himself, as he had planned, Governor Greg Abbott told reporters. In the hours after the May 18 attack, some students were shocked that Dimitrios Pagourtzis felled his classmates and
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Stronger-than-binary correlations experimentally demonstrated for the first timeFor the first time, physicists have experimentally demonstrated ternary—rather than binary—quantum correlations between entangled objects. The results show that the quantum measurement process cannot be described as a binary process (having two possible outcomes), but rather stronger-than-binary ternary measurements (which have three possible outcomes) should be considered in order to fully unders
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Loss of marine habitats is threatening the global fishing industry – new researchSeafood consumption is both a love and a necessity for hundreds of millions of people worldwide. And its supply is a key part of maintaining food security for the whole planet. But during a time of rapid population growth and increasing demand, stocks of wild fish and invertebrates (such as mussels and prawns) are declining.
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New on MIT Technology Review

Boeing’s folding wings are cleared for takeoff
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Advanced biofuels can be produced extremely efficientlyA chance to switch to renewable sources for heating, electricity and fuel, while also providing new opportunities for several industries to produce large numbers of renewable products. This is the verdict of researchers from Chalmers University of Technology, Sweden, who now, after 10 years of energy research into gasification of biomass, see an array of new technological achievements.
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Framework diversity of carbon nitrides offers rich platform for single atom catalysisIn a recent study, an international research team led by the group of Advanced Catalysis Engineering at ETH Zurich demonstrated that carbon nitrides of distinct framework types can serve as efficient hosts for metal atoms. The specific interaction with the host influenced the oxidation state, stability, and associated performance providing new opportunities to control and understand the properties
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Genome structure of dinosaurs discovered by bird-turtle comparisonsGenome structure of dinosaurs discovered by bird-turtle comparisons A discovery by scientists at the University of Kent has provided significant insight into the overall genome structure of dinosaurs. By comparing the genomes of different species, chiefly birds and turtles, the Kent team were able to determine how the overall genome structure (i.e. the chromosomes) of many people's favourite dinos
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Atomic-level study reveals why rare disorder causes sudden paralysisA rare genetic disorder in which people are suddenly overcome with profound weakness or temporary paralysis is caused by a hole in a membrane protein that allows sodium ions to leak across cell membranes. The results of a new study reveal the mechanisms of periodic paralysis at the atomic level and suggest designs for drugs that may prevent this ion leak and provide relief to these patients
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New Scientist - News

Weird backwards asteroid may be an interstellar interloperAn asteroid that has been orbiting backwards near Jupiter for billions of years may actually be an interstellar rock captured by our solar system
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Futurity.org

More Americans have tried e-cigarettes, but fewer use themMore American adults have tried e-cigarettes, but the rate of current use appears to be declining, a new study shows. Researchers analyzed national data from more than 101,000 Americans who participated in the annual National Health Interview Survey (NHIS) by the US Centers for Disease Control and Prevention. Since 2014, the NHIS has asked adult participants whether they currently use e-cigarette
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BBC News - Science & Environment

China launch will prep for Moon landingChina has launched a relay satellite to prepare for a Moon rover mission planned for later in the year.
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Ingeniøren

Testtone fra DTU kan skabe forstærkere der spiller højereLyt med på nyt testsignal, som kan give bedre forstærkere og højttalere.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Newly discovered copper and graphite combo could lead to more efficient lithium-ion batteriesA first-of-its-kind copper and graphite combination discovered in basic energy research at the U.S. Department of Energy's Ames Laboratory could have implications for improving the energy efficiency of lithium-ion batteries, which include these components.
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Futurity.org

We recognize ‘green’ design quickly but don’t really know whyWhen it comes to judging environmental friendliness, people learn to make quick decisions based on looks without even realizing it. “The idea of products cueing things is not new,” says Erin MacDonald, a mechanical engineer at Stanford University. For example, sports cars look streamlined and sleek, which cues that they go fast, she says. Alternatively, people identify teardrop-shaped cars, such
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Quanta Magazine

Stellar Disks Reveal How Planets Get MadeOver the past two and half centuries, scientists envisioning the origin of planetary systems (including our own) have focused on a specific scene: a spinning disk around a newborn star, sculpting planets out of gas and dust like clay on a potter’s wheel. But as for testing the idea, by actually spotting an exoplanet coalesce from swirling matter? No luck yet. “Nowadays, everybody says planets for
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Two bright high-redshift quasars discoveredAstronomers have detected two new bright quasars at a redshift of about 5.0. The newly found quasi-stellar objects (QSOs) are among the brightest high-redshift quasars known to date. The finding was presented May 9 in a paper published on the arXiv pre-print repository.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

An eco-friendly cure for a global fish-killing diseaseParasites are as a rule very picky about who they infect. But there are always exceptions.
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BBC News - Science & Environment

A baby elephant surprised zoo keepersA baby elephant surprised zoo keepers after being born to a mum whose pregnancy they thought had failed.
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Feed: All Latest

Star Wars News: Life After 'Solo' May or May Not Include a Lando MovieWill Donald Glover be getting his own 'Star Wars Story'? It's not impossible!
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Lu resignation a blow for Baidu's push into AI, analysts sayThe resignation of a senior Baidu executive is a major setback to the Chinese internet giant's push into artificial intelligence, an analyst said Monday, as the company tries to diversify away from its search engine business.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Facebook's Zuckerberg agrees to live-stream EU parliament hearingFacebook chief Mark Zuckerberg has agreed to live-stream his meeting with European Parliament members as he answers questions in the wake of the Cambridge Analytica scandal, a top official said Monday.
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News

New technique reveals 3D shape of nanostructure's polariton interactionResearchers from Lehigh University have found a way to reveal the 3D shape of the polariton interaction around a nanostructure. Their technique improves upon the common spectroscopic imaging technique known as scattering-type scanning near-field optical microscopy (s-SNOM). The research will be online published today in Nature Communications.
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News

New 3D printer can create complex biological tissuesA UCLA Samueli-led team has developed a specially adapted 3D printer to build therapeutic biomaterials from multiple materials. The advance could be a step toward on-demand printing of complex artificial tissues for use in transplants and other surgeries.
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News

MontanaPBS releases trailer explaining search for new weight standardA MontanaPBS trailer for 'The Last Artifact' probes the international race to redefine the standard for the kilogram and reboot the international measurement system.
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Scientific American Content: Global

Leading Science Museum Turns the Page on a Prominent #MeToo CaseMore than three years after a high-profile male anthropologist at the American Museum of Natural History was accused of sexual misconduct, a respected female anthropologist will replace him -- Read more on ScientificAmerican.com
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Image: Hidden secrets of a massive star-formation regionStellar nurseries are cloudy and dusty places that shine brightly in infrared light. The G305 star-forming complex is no exception. It features a number of bright, intricate gas clouds heated by infant stars in their midst. In this spectacular image by ESA's Herschel space observatory, these star-forming hotspots stand out in a blue tone that contrasts with the red-brownish colour of cooler region
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Genome structure of dinosaurs discovered by bird-turtle comparisonsBy comparing the genomes of different species, chiefly birds and turtles, the Kent team were able to determine how the overall genome structure (i.e. the chromosomes) of many people's favourite dinosaur species – like Velociraptor or Tyrannosaurus – might have looked through a microscope.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

New evidence for existence of Planet NineA large international team of researchers has found what they are describing as more evidence of the existence of Planet Nine. In their paper posted on the arXiv preprint server, the group describes the behavior of a newly discovered distant object as suggestive of an influence of a large planet.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Chimpanzees eat plants that point to new ways of treating diseasesAs cancer and other non-infectious diseases continue to rise all over the world it's become harder for scientists to find safe, effective treatments. In addition, bacteria are becoming more and more resistant to drugs and synthetic medicines have become harsher.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

We have no idea how much microplastic is in Australia's soil (but it could be a lot)Microplastics in the ocean, pieces of plastic less than 5mm in size, have shot to infamy in the last few years. Governments and businesses targeted microbeads in cosmetics, some were banned, and the world felt a little better.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Led a privileged working life? Then you're likely to have a pretty good third ageA new language is emerging to describe those who would have traditionally been called retired but are increasingly engaging in other forms of activity in later life. New terms for this phase of life include the third age, the encore stage and unretirement. But while some commentators predict a rosy picture of new found freedoms, others focus on problems caused by financial difficulties.
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The Scientist RSS

Image of the Day: HammerheadThis hammer-headed fruit bat is wearing a GPS tracker deployed by researchers with the Wildlife Conservation Society.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

What are climate models, and how accurate are they?There's a famous saying that "The climate is what you expect; the weather is what you get." As a native Texan moving to New York, I had an idea of what to expect, but was not fully prepared for what I would get. Because New York's climate is drastically different from what I'm used to, every morning before I leave my apartment I religiously check the weather forecast. Very quickly I know if it's g
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Symbiotic plankton: providers or parasites?Out at sea, a scientist holds a plankton sample up to the light and observes the shimmering contents. This sparkling spectacle is caused by thousands of microscopic organisms living at the sea surface, their intricate, crystalline skeletons refracting and reflecting the sunlight.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

People voyaged to Australia by boat more than 50,000 years agoResearchers working to solve the mystery of how people first reached Australia have combined sophisticated deep sea mapping, voyage simulation techniques and genetic information to show that arrival was made by sizeable groups of people deliberately voyaging between islands.
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Science | The Guardian

Asteroid from another star system found orbiting wrong way near JupiterFor the first time, a permanent member of our solar system has been found to have originated elsewhere A permanent visitor from interstellar space has been found in our solar system, astronomers studying an asteroid orbiting our sun have revealed. While collisions with Earth by comets and asteroids from within our solar system are thought to have brought organic material and water necessary for l
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Monitoring alterations in the aquatic system by listening to microalgae communicatingLed by the University of Bath, the research which has been published in Scientific Reports demonstrates that contrary to popular belief, microalgae do communicate with each other when under stress.
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NYT > Science

Alien Asteroids Are Here, Scientists Say. Get Used to Them.An asteroid that cohabits an orbit with Jupiter came from outside the solar system.
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Popular Science

While you sleep, scientists will use a space telescope to spy on migrating birdsAnimals Scientists are on the brink of learning the details of where they go and why. At the end of April, or when spring starts to thaw, a great migration north begins. Thousands upon thousands of songbirds make the trek, but you won’t see most of them.
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Preventing murder by addressing domestic violenceVictims of domestic violence are at a high risk to be murdered -- or a victim of attempted murder -- according to a Cuyahoga County task force of criminal-justice professionals, victim advocates and researchers working to prevent domestic violence and homicides.
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Bladder cancer model could pave the way for better drug efficacy studiesIn the journal Cancer Research, UNC Lineberger Comprehensive Cancer Center researchers report they have developed a model of luminal bladder cancer, one of the two subtypes of advanced bladder cancer. The researchers said this model may help them to determine which patients may respond to checkpoint inhibitors.
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News

First interstellar immigrant discovered in the solar systemA new study has discovered the first known permanent immigrant to our solar system. The asteroid, currently nestling in Jupiter's orbit, is the first known asteroid to have been captured from another star system. The work is published in Monthly Notices of the Royal Astronomical Society: Letters.
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New Scientist - News

Blood from umbilical cord may help fix your brain after a strokeTen people have received infusions of umbilical cord blood days after having a stroke, and they seem to have recovered better than would normally be expected
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Futurity.org

Did 250 Siberians become the first Native Americans?A new analysis of DNA sequences suggests the Native American founding population that migrated from Siberia consisted of approximately 250 people. Despite numerous genetic studies that have helped contribute to knowledge about how ancient groups populated the Americas, scientists have not reached a consensus about how many Native Americans made up the original population. The new study appears in
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Disenfranchisement study impacts new voting rights lawsIn March of this year, Washington State Governor Jay Inslee signed the Washington Voting Rights Act into law. The state's Voting Rights Act says that a jurisdiction is in violation of the law "…where there is a significant risk members of a protected class do not have an equal opportunity to elect candidates of choice as a result of dilution or abridgement of their rights."
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

PROSPECTing for antineutrinosThe Precision Reactor Oscillation and Spectrum Experiment (PROSPECT) has completed the installation of a novel antineutrino detector that will probe the possible existence of a new form of matter.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Image: Orbital ATK rocket rolls out for may 21 launchAn Orbital ATK rocket rolls out to launch Pad-0A at NASA's Wallops Flight Facility on May 17, 2018, in advance of a May 21 launch from Wallops Island, VA. The Antares will launch a Cygnus spacecraft on a cargo resupply mission to the International Space Station.
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BBC News - Science & Environment

'Permanent' interstellar visitor foundAn asteroid from beyond our Solar System has been orbiting near Jupiter for billions of years, scientists say.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Managed hunting can help maintain animal populationsResearchers studying the hunting of ibex in Switzerland over the past 40 years have shown how hunts, when tightly monitored, can help maintain animal populations at optimal levels.
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Latest Headlines | Science News

Maverick asteroid might be an immigrant from outside the solar systemA space rock’s backward orbit could be a hint of unusual origins.
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Feed: All Latest

How Self-Driving Cars Will Reshape CitiesUrban planners can ditch those outdated layouts and transform the city into a joyful mess of throughways and byways optimized not for cars but for people.
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Scientific American Content: Global

Astronomers Spot Potential "Interstellar" Asteroid Orbiting Backward around the SunThe three-kilometer-wide object is near Jupiter; future spacecraft could visit if its status is confirmed -- Read more on ScientificAmerican.com
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

First interstellar immigrant discovered in the solar systemA new study has discovered the first known permanent immigrant to our Solar System. The asteroid, currently nestling in Jupiter's orbit, is the first known asteroid to have been captured from another star system. The work is published in Monthly Notices of the Royal Astronomical Society: Letters.
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The Atlantic

Donald Trump Has All the PowerSunday afternoon, President Trump tweeted an extraordinary threat —extraordinary even by the standards of Donald Trump’s norm-busting use of Twitter and abusive conduct toward the Justice Department and federal investigations: “I hereby demand, and will do so officially tomorrow, that the Department of Justice look into whether or not the FBI/DOJ infiltrated or surveilled the Trump Campaign for P
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Live Science

Celebrities Are Obsessed with the Keto Diet. Why You Shouldn't Be.The fad diet, which promises weight loss without sacrificing bacon, is not all it's cracked up to be.
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The Atlantic

Is the 'Cynthia Effect' Real?NEW PALTZ, N.Y.—“I’m Cynthia Nixon, standing in the mud!” the candidate declared by way of introduction to a rally of students, professors, and activists near a State University of New York campus about 80 miles north of Manhattan. The crowd laughed as Nixon acknowledged her obvious predicament: She wasn’t standing in the mud so much as she was sinking into it, a soggy hillside field threatening
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Scientific American Content: Global

Wealthy Families Invest More in SonsHigh-income parents spend more on blue backpacks than pink ones, research suggests -- Read more on ScientificAmerican.com
21h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Wasp warriors—entomologists on samurai mission to slay stink bugsHillary Peterson is every brown marmorated stink bug's worst nightmare.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Just five things about GRACE follow-onScheduled to launch no earlier than May 22, the twin satellites of the Gravity Recovery and Climate Experiment Follow-On (GRACE-FO) mission, a collaboration between NASA and the German Research Centre for Geosciences (GFZ), will continue the work of monitoring changes in the world's water cycle and surface mass, which was so well performed by the original GRACE mission. There are far more than fiv
21h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Small packages to test big space technology advancesThis weekend, when the next cargo resupply mission to the International Space Station lifts off from NASA Wallops Flight Facility in Virginia, it will be carrying among its supplies and experiments three cereal box-sized satellites that will be used to test and demonstrate the next generation of Earth-observing technology.
21h
Feed: All Latest

The Line Between Big Tech and Defense WorkEmployees at Google are protesting a Pentagon contract. But there are few signs of unrest over CIA deals at Amazon and Microsoft.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Artificial cells-in-cells triggered by light act as mini chemical reactorsArtificial cells that release materials when exposed to light have been embedded in a durable membrane, allowing chemical reactions to be controlled.
21h
Live Science

How Can a Smartphone Survive a 100-Foot Drop But Crack on Your Floor?It's all about the angle of contact.
21h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Synchrotron radiations shed light on formation mechanism of aromatic polyimide precursorAromatic polyimide is a thermal- and chemical-resistant polymer with high mechanical strength, which is widely used for electrical insulation materials and aerospace materials. One of the major polyimides is made from tetramethyl biphenyltetracarboxylate, which is prepared by dehydrogenative coupling of dimethyl phthalate catalyzed by conventional [Pd(OAc)2]/[Cu(OAc)2]/1,10-phenanthroline (phen) s
21h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Upscaling of tannin hot water extractionRehap recently mapped the abundant supply of agroforestry waste in Europe and where it can be most sustainably sourced from. With this knowledge, project studies have been researching the most suitable technique for developing the best protocol for extracting tannins from softwood bark for the development of petrochemical alternatives. Now, it looks like Rehap may have found it.
21h
Scientific American Content: Global

8 Years until Red Wolf Extinction?As the wild population falls to just 40 animals, captive breeding may be their last chance for survival -- Read more on ScientificAmerican.com
21h
Scientific American Content: Global

Quantum Physics May Be Even Spookier Than You ThinkA new experiment hints at surprising hidden mechanics of quantum superpositions -- Read more on ScientificAmerican.com
21h
Science | The Guardian

Using lots of mirrors, can you see infinity?The long-running series in which readers answer other readers’ questions on subjects ranging from trivial flights of fancy to profound scientific concepts Given a theoretically perfect set of mirrors reflecting into each other and a perfect set of eyes, can you see infinity? Francois Pittion Continue reading...
21h
The Neurocritic

What counts as "memory" and who gets to define it?Do Plants Have “Memory”? A new paper by Bédécarrats et al. (2018) is the latest entry into the iconoclastic hullabaloo claiming a non-synaptic basis for learning and memory. In short, “RNA extracted from the central nervous system of Aplysia given long-term sensitization training induced sensitization when injected into untrained animals...” The results support the minority view that long-term me
21h
New Scientist - News

Plastic waste is a problem – but some solutions are even worsePlastics have done wonders for hygiene and human health. We need to fix the waste problem – but don’t throw out the baby with the bath tub
22h
The Atlantic

Email Is DangerousOne week ago, a group of European security researchers warned that two obscure encryption schemes for email were deeply broken. Those schemes, called OpenPGP and S/ MIME , are not the kinds of technologies you’re using but don’t know it. They are not part of the invisible and vital internet infrastructure we all rely on. This isn’t that kind of story. The exploit, called Efail by the researchers
22h
Ingeniøren

Nu skal routere tale sammen på tværs af leverandørerNy international standard fra Wifi Alliance gør det muligt at forbinde routere fra forskellige producenter i et samlet mesh-netværk i dit hjem eller arbejdsplads.
22h
NYT > Science

Lanternflies Eat Everything in Sight. The U.S. Is Looking Delicious.The invasive insects turned up in Pennsylvania in 2014. Now the state has placed 3,000 square miles under quarantine, and scientists worry the pest will spread.
22h
NYT > Science

Nonfiction: How One Company Scammed Silicon Valley. And How It Got Caught.In “Bad Blood,” John Carreyrou tells of the rise and incredible fall of Theranos, the biotech company that was going to revolutionize blood testing.
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Science | The Guardian

London hospitals to replace doctors and nurses with AI for some tasksUCLH aims to bring ‘game-changing’ benefits of artificial intelligence to NHS patients, from cancer diagnosis to reducing wait times One of the country’s biggest hospitals has unveiled sweeping plans to use artificial intelligence to carry out tasks traditionally performed by doctors and nurses, from diagnosing cancer on CT scans to deciding which A&E patients are seen first. Continue reading...
22h
Science : NPR

French Researchers: Hitler Really Did Die In The Bunker In 1945Conspiracy theories have abounded for years about the fate of the Fuhrer , ranging from his escape to Argentina aboard a German U-boat to living out his days at a secret Nazi moon base. (Image credit: Anonymous/AP)
23h
BBC News - Science & Environment

Kilauea: What happens when lava meets the seaBBC correspondent Chris Buckler explains what happens when lava flow meets the sea.
23h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

NASA shipper Orbital ATK launches space station suppliesOne of NASA's prime shippers, Orbital ATK, has launched a fresh load of supplies to the International Space Station.
23h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Britain to intensify defence against space 'threats'Britain will boost the number of defence personnel working in the space sector by a fifth over five years to counter "intensifying threats", Defence Minister Gavin Williamson said on Monday.
23h
BBC News - Science & Environment

Could illegal mines in Ghana lead to an increase in chocolate prices?There's a warning that cocoa plantations in Ghana are being turned into illegal gold mines.
23h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Nanoparticles derived from tea leaves destroy lung cancer cellsNanoparticles derived from tea leaves inhibit the growth of lung cancer cells, destroying up to 80% of them, new research by a joint Swansea University and Indian team has shown.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Indonesia's most volatile volcano erupts againIndonesia's most volatile volcano spewed smoke and ash early Monday in the latest of several eruptions in less than two weeks.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Lava from Kilauea volcano enters ocean, creates toxic cloudWhite plumes of acid and extremely fine shards of glass billowed into the sky over Hawaii as molten rock from Kilauea volcano poured into the ocean, creating yet another hazard from an eruption that began more than two weeks ago.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

US firm Harbour Energy ups bid for Australia's SantosUS private investment firm Harbour Energy on Monday boosted its bid for Australian energy giant Santos as oil prices soar, in a deal valuing the company at US$10.9 billion.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Six pygmy elephants found dead on Malaysian BorneoSix Borneo pygmy elephants have been found dead in Malaysian palm oil plantations in recent weeks, officials said Monday, the latest of the endangered creatures to perish as their rainforest habitat is devastated.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

China satellite heralds first mission to dark side of MoonChina launched on Monday a relay satellite that will allow a rover to communicate with the Earth from the far side of the Moon during an unprecedented mission later this year.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Ryanair profits up 10% despite cancellations crisisIrish budget carrier Ryanair said Monday its net profit had risen 10 percent in 2017-2018 despite the cancellation of thousands of flights, but forecast a fall this year due to higher oil prices.
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cognitive science

Date Extended June 05, 2018: 10th International Conference on Intelligent Human Computer Interaction (IHCI 2018)submitted by /u/ihciconf [link] [comments]
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Science-Based Medicine

The very worst version of the sham known as “right-to-try” is poised to become law"Right-to-try" laws are a cruel sham that purport to allow terminally ill patients access to promising experimental drugs. In reality, they strip away many protections and leave vulnerable patients on their own. After four years and a number of toothless state laws, a federal version of "right-to-try" is poised to become law. A version passed by the Senate could be voted on in the House as early a
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Science | The Guardian

Can you solve it? The birthday birthday problemJoin in the celebrations UPDATE: Read the solution here Hi guzzlers, My Monday Puzzle column celebrates its third birthday this week. What better way to mark the occasion than a puzzle about a birthday! Continue reading...
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Science | The Guardian

China aims to land on dark side of moon via launch of 'Magpie Bridge' satelliteRelay station will eventually let teams on the ground talk to a lunar probe that China plans to launch this year in world-first mission China is one step closer to being the first country to land on the dark side of the moon. At 5.28am on Monday, the Queqiao relay satellite was launched from Sichuan province, according to Chinese state media. With Queqiao in place, China will be able to send a lu
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Science | The Guardian

UK engineering's gender imbalance is embarrassing, leading figure saysBritain’s record on employing female engineers is worst in Europe, says Hayaatun Sillem, CEO of the Royal Academy of Engineering The failure of British engineering companies to increase the proportion of women they employ above 10% is a source of embarrassment, one of the profession’s leading figures has said. Hayaatun Sillem, chief executive of the Royal Academy of Engineering , said the gender
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Ingeniøren

Navneskifte gør ondt – selv på en velsmurt virksomhed som ØrstedDong Energy/Ørsted stod i efteråret for et af de mest velforberedte og velekspone- rede navneskifter i mange år. Alligevel har det påvirket ingeniørernes vurdering af selskabet negativt – for det gør et navneskifte.
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Viden

Ny medicin har fået bugt med Marias migræneMaria Heimann har testet en ny medicin, der netop er blevet godkendt mod migræne.
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Feed: All Latest

'Westworld' Recap, Season 2 Episode 5: More Dead Than Alive'Westworld' is artful, intelligent, and sleek. Warm and relatable? Not so much.
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BBC News - Science & Environment

UK's clean car goal 'not ambitious enough'An industry expert says petrol and diesel cars should be banned by 2030 or 2035, not 2040.
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Scientists have deciphered the chemical reaction mechanism critical for cleaner combustionScientists have deciphered the mechanism of a chemical reaction critical for the development of environmentally friendly combustion technologies.
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Synchrotron radiations shed light on formation mechanism of aromatic polyimide precursorA mechanism for an industrially used catalysis of an aromatic polyimide precursor is now revealed by use of synchrotron radiations. This finding is of service to the more economical production of an aromatic polyimide by further development of catalysts.
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News

US poison control centers receive 29 calls per day about children exposed to ADHD medicationsThe study found that there were more than 156,000 calls to US Poison Control Centers regarding exposures to attention-deficit hyperactivity disorder (ADHD) medications among children and adolescents 19 years of age and younger from January 2000 through December 2014, averaging 200 calls each week or 29 calls per day.
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Fewer men are being screened, diagnosed, and treated for prostate cancerA new study reveals declines in prostate cancer screening and diagnoses in the United States in recent years, as well as decreases in the use of definitive treatments in men who have been diagnosed.
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News

One in 10 parents say their child has gotten sick from spoiled or contaminated foodFew parents are using some simple strategies to protect kids from food poisoning outside the home, such as at a potluck or restaurant, according to a new report from C.S. Mott Children's Hospital National Poll on Children's Health at the University of Michigan.
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Science | The Guardian

Aboriginal astronomy can teach us about the link between sky and land | Kirsten BanksMy favourite Aboriginal constellation is the Great Celestial Emu, the dark clouds of our Milky Way manifesting as a huge emu in the sky Recently, astronomers have been calling for a “dark sky reserve” in Central Australia – minimising artificial light to make it a reclaimed area for astronomical observing. There are already 12 international dark sky reserve sites around the world, but it would be
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cognitive science

Using thought to control machinessubmitted by /u/JBsoftcones [link] [comments]
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The Atlantic

Westworld: A Cut AboveEvery week for the second season of Westworld , three Atlantic staffers will discuss new episodes of HBO’s cerebral sci-fi drama. Spencer Kornhaber: For all the queasy bloodshed and queasier cross-cultural politics of this episode, part of me wishes we’d been in Shogun World all along. Maybe that’s because it’s recently felt as though Westworld had run out of ways to stage high-brow homages to co
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Exercise to stay young: 4-5 days a week to slow down your heart's agingParticipating in exercise 4-5 days per week is necessary to keep your heart young, according to new research published in The Journal of Physiology. These findings could be an important step to develop exercise strategies to slow down such aging.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

Giving employees 'decoy' sanitizer options could improve hand hygieneIntroducing a less convenient option for hand sanitizing may actually boost workers' use of hand sanitizer and increase sanitary conditions in the workplace, according to a new study. The findings revealed that employees in a food factory used more of their regular sanitizer and had cleaner hands and workspaces after a
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

Supercomputing the emergence of material behaviorChemists have designed the first artificial protein assembly (C98RhuA) whose conformational dynamics can be chemically and mechanically toggled. The Maverick GPU-based supercomputer at the Texas Advanced Computing Center simulated the system through an allocation on NSF-funded XSEDE, the Extreme Science and Engineering Discovery Environment. The research could help create new materials for renewab
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

Surviving sepsis campaign update focuses on critical first hourFor patients with sepsis, a serious infection causing widespread inflammation, immediate treatment is essential to improve the chances of survival. An updated 'Hour-1 Bundle' of the international, evidence-based guidelines for treatment of sepsis is introduced in the June issue of Critical Care Medicine.
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Improving heart health could prevent frailty in old ageThe largest study of its kind, led by the University of Exeter, found that even small reductions in risk factors helped to reduce frailty, as well as dementia, chronic pain, and other disabling conditions of old age.
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Futurity.org

Octopus-like ‘smart gel’ walks and moves objects underwaterEngineers have created a 3D-printed smart gel that can walk underwater, grab objects, and move them. The watery creation could lead to soft robots that mimic sea animals like the octopus, which can walk underwater and bump into things without damaging them. It may also lead to artificial heart, stomach, and other muscles, along with devices for diagnosing diseases, detecting and delivering drugs,
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BBC News - Science & Environment

Seeds of hope: The gardens springing up in refugee campsThe gardens giving hope and a sense of belonging to Syrian refugees in Iraq.
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Nanoparticles derived from tea leaves destroy lung cancer cells: Quantum dots have great potentialNanoparticles derived from tea leaves inhibit the growth of lung cancer cells, destroying up to 80 percent of them, new research by a joint Swansea University and Indian team has shown. The team made the discovery while they were testing out a new method of producing a type of nanoparticle called quantum dots. These are tiny particles which measure less than 10 nanometers. A human hair is 40,000 n
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Research sheds light on a novel disease mechanism in chronic smokersResearch published in the journal Clinical Science suggests that an immune signalling protein called interleukin (IL)-26 is increased among chronic smokers with lung disease and this involvement reveals disease mechanisms of interest for developing more effective therapy for these hard-to-treat patients.
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BBC News - Science & Environment

The 'day spa' for pregnant sharksVisit the 'day spa' where pregnant dusky sharks treat themselves to a warm bath
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Science | The Guardian

Defence secretary unveils strategy to protect UK satellitesThreat of space-based attack by hostile states is intensifying, says Gavin Williamson Britain must be ready to counter the “intensifying threats” to everyday life emerging in space, Gavin Williamson has said, as he announced the launch of the UK’s first defence space strategy. The defence secretary confirmed he would boost the number of personnel working in the defence space sector by a fifth ove
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Futurity.org

Discovery upends assumptions about birth defectsResearchers have discovered that, contrary to expectation, apoptosis plays a less extensive role in birth defects than previously thought. “This challenges many of our basic assumptions about embryo development…” Since the 1940s, scientists have thought that programmed cell death, in which the body rids itself of unneeded cells, plays the main role in how babies develop in utero. Known as “apopto
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Futurity.org

Ready to enter kindergarten? Language skills are keyIt’s time to add language to the list of skills that constitute “kindergarten readiness,” a new study suggests. Research shows that the more skills children bring with them to kindergarten—in basic math, reading, even friendship and cooperation—the more likely they will succeed in those same areas in school. But not only does a child’s use of vocabulary and grammar predict future proficiency with
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Futurity.org

Cocoa crops could get shady but still supply lots of chocolateNew research clarifies how shade trees can contribute to the sustainability and productivity of cocoa crops. Chocolate consumption is increasing around the world. Yet cocoa farmers, most of them smallholders, have to cope with aging plantations, decreasing soil fertility, increasing rates of pests and disease, and the consequences of climate change. As a result, cocoa could become scarce in the f
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Futurity.org

Better online tools give you more ways to check ‘fake news’Researchers have launched upgrades to two tools that counter the spread of misinformation online. The researchers have made improvements to Hoaxy and Botometer and a third tool—an educational game that aims to make people smarter news consumers—also launches alongside the upgrades. “You can now easily detect when information is spreading virally, and who is responsible for its spread.” “The major
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Brain stimulation may reduce food cravings as obesity treatmentStimulating the brain to alter its intrinsic reward system shows promise in the treatment of obesity, according to results presented in Barcelona at the European Society of Endocrinology annual meeting, ECE 2018. The technique has yielded positive results after just a single treatment session, revealing its potential to become a safer alternative to treat obesity, avoiding invasive surgery and dru
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Larger waistlines are linked to higher risk of vitamin D deficiencyHigher levels of belly fat are associated with lower vitamin D levels in obese individuals, according to data presented in Barcelona at the European Society of Endocrinology annual meeting, ECE 2018. The study reports that vitamin D levels are lower in individuals with higher levels of belly fat, and suggests that individuals, particularly the overweight with larger waistlines should have their vi
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Cement, extreme cold experiments to launch on Orbital cargo shipFood for astronauts, new space gardening gear and an experiment to test how cement forms in weightlessness are poised to launch Monday to the International Space Station aboard Orbital ATK's unmanned Cygnus spacecraft.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

'Jurassic Park' dinosaur expert's next big thing: hologramsForget the gray, green and brown dinosaurs in the "Jurassic Park" movies. Paleontologist Jack Horner wants to transport people back in time to see a feathered Tyrannosaurus rex colored bright red and a blue triceratops with red fringe similar to a rooster's comb.
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Infection blood test of limited value in reducing antibiotic useOverall antibiotic use was not curbed by giving physicians the results of biomarker tests in patients with suspected lower respiratory tract infections, according to findings from the Procalcitonin Antibiotic Consensus Trial.
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Multidisciplinary lung health clinic helps low-income patientsA new study demonstrates that a comprehensive and multidisciplinary clinic for low-income and homeless individuals with respiratory disease can decrease no-show rates and provide quality care that is highly satisfying to the individuals treated. The study was presented at the 2018 American Thoracic Society International Conference.
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Science : NPR

The Case Of The Stolen SucculentsCalifornia Fish and Wildlife agents are combating a rash of succulent poaching incidents on the state's coastline, apparently to satisfy a booming demand for the plants in Korean and Chinese markets. (Image credit: Courtesy of Pat Freeling)
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Science | The Guardian

Starwatch: an exercise in opposites – the Moon and JupiterOur largest planet, bright in the evening sky, can be seen close by the waxing gibbous Moon The Moon joins Jupiter in the constellation of Libra for a close approach on 27 May. The Moon will be in its waxing gibbous phase, heading towards full on 29 May. Jupiter is now a few weeks past its closest approach to Earth and will remain a fabulously bright evening object visible for most of the night.
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