MOST POPULAR

Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Silicon breakthrough could make key microwave technology much cheaper and betterResearchers using powerful supercomputers have found a way to generate microwaves with inexpensive silicon, a breakthrough that could dramatically cut costs and improve devices such as sensors in self-driving vehicles.
49min
Feed: All Latest

Trump Can't Block Critics on Twitter. What Does This Mean For Free Speech?Here's how the decision impacts the future of the First Amendment online.
8h
Ingeniøren

Forskere: Enorm økonomisk gevinst ved at holde global opvarmning på 1,5 graderVerden vil være meget bedre økonomisk tjent med at holde den globale opvarmning på halvanden grader end to grader, viser ny beregning. Men hvor stærk denne konklusion står, er økonomer dog ikke helt enige om.
3h

LATEST

Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

California high court to rule on social media accessThe California Supreme Court will decide whether Facebook and other social media companies must turn over user content to criminal defendants.
32min
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Indonesia ride-hailing app GoJek says expanding abroadIndonesian ride-hailing app Go-Jek said Thursday it would expand into Vietnam, Thailand, Singapore and the Philippines as it takes on regional rival Grab in the fast-growing Southeast Asian market.
31min
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

US disrupts Russian botnet of 500,000 hacked routersThe US Justice Department said Wednesday that it had seized an internet domain that directed a dangerous botnet of a half-million infected home and office network routers, controlled by hackers believed tied to Russian intelligence.
31min
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Hawaii volcano produces methane and 'eerie' blue flamesScientists in Hawaii have captured rare images of blue flames burning from cracks in the pavement as Kilauea volcano gushes fountains of lava in the background, offering a look at a new dimension in the volcano's weeks-long eruption.
37min
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Cyclone Mekenu pummels Yemeni island, seven missingSeven people were missing and hundreds of others evacuated from their homes after Cyclone Mekunu hit the Yemeni island of Socotra Wednesday night, causing severe flooding and damage to houses, officials said.
37min
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Improved financial regulation deters misconduct, study findsImproved regulation has deterred a greater amount of financial misconduct in the UK since the global financial crisis, according to new research published today by the University of East Anglia (UEA).
37min
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

NASA's new chief changes mind, now believes in climate changeNASA's new administrator, a former lawmaker nominated by President Donald Trump to lead the US space agency, admitted Wednesday he has changed his mind about climate change and now believes that humans are the main driver of greenhouse gas emissions.
55min
Ingeniøren

Interview: Io-Interactive kæmpede sig tilbage fra konkursens rand og står nu stærkereDanmarks mest sejlivede spiludvikler, Io-Interactive, var i reel fare for at gå konkurs i 2017. Direktør Hakan Abrak fortæller nu om kampen for at vende tilbage til en position, han selv mener er stærkere, end før de købte deres frihed tilbage fra deres japanske ejere.
1h
Science-Based Medicine

Legislative Alchemy: Michigan naturopathic licensing bill passes SenateA bill granting naturopathic doctors one of the broadest scopes of practice in the country passed in the Michigan Senate. If enacted, the egregious quackery already being practiced by Michigan naturopaths will bear the imprimatur of state approval and rectifying harm to consumers will become much harder.
2h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Silicon breakthrough could make key microwave technology much cheaper and betterResearchers using powerful supercomputers have found a way to generate microwaves with inexpensive silicon, a breakthrough that could dramatically cut costs and improve devices such as sensors in self-driving vehicles.
3h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Tau mutations may increase cancer riskMutations to the protein tau, commonly associated with neurodegenerative disorders, may serve as a novel risk factor for cancer, according to results published in Cancer Research, a journal of the American Association for Cancer Research.
3h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Kaiser Permanente researchers develop new models for predicting suicide riskCombining data from electronic health records with results from standardized depression questionnaires better predicts suicide risk in the 90 days following either mental health specialty or primary care outpatient visits, reports a team from the Mental Health Research Network, led by Kaiser Permanente research scientists.
3h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Hot cars can hit deadly temperatures in as little as one hourIn the journal Temperature, researchers outline how quickly hot cars become deadly for children.
3h
Science | The Guardian

'The Mediterranean diet is gone': region's children are fattest in EuropeThe diet Greece, Spain and Italy are famous for - rich in fruit, vegetables, fish and olive oil – is supposedly the healthiest in the world, but obesity is rocketing For kids in Greece, Spain and Italy, the Mediterranean diet is dead, according to the World Health Organisation, which says that children in Sweden are more likely to eat fish, olive oil and tomatoes than those in southern Europe. In
3h
Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

Excess nutrients, coupled with climate change, damage the most highly resilient coralsExperimentalists conducted a simulation of future conditions in the Red Sea caused by global warming and acidification, while simultaneously increasing levels of nutrients such as nitrate and phosphate. They found that when nitrate and phosphate were added, the coral thermal resilience was compromised while algal growth benefited from excess CO2 and nutrients. Algal dominance over corals in the re
4h
Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

Nuclear physicists leap into quantum computing with first simulations of atomic nucleusScientists have now simulated an atomic nucleus using a quantum computer. The results demonstrate the ability of quantum systems to compute nuclear physics problems and serve as a benchmark for future calculations.
4h
Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

Perceived socioeconomic status can affect how old we feelA recent study finds that how older adults perceive their socioeconomic status influences how old they feel and their attitudes toward aging. Specifically, the lower people deem their relative socioeconomic status, the worse they feel about growing older.
4h
Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

Self-consistency influences how we make decisionsWhen making decisions, our perception is influenced by judgments we have made in the past as a way of remaining consistent with ourselves, suggests new research.
4h
Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

How many taxis does a city need?A taxi dispatching approach could cut the number of cars on the road while meeting rider demand.
4h
Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

Cause of pesticide exposure, Parkinson's linkPrevious studies have found an association between two commonly used agrochemicals (paraquat and maneb) and Parkinson's disease. Now a professor has determined that low-level exposure to the pesticides disrupts cells in a way that mimics the effects of mutations known to cause Parkinson's disease. Adding the effects of the chemicals to a predisposition for Parkinson's disease drastically increases
4h
Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

Memory molecule limits plasticity by calibrating calciumResearchers have for the first time identified a novel role for the CA2-enriched protein RGS14 and provided insights into the mechanism by which it limits plasticity. RGS14 seems to be special, acting as a molecular factor that puts the brakes on plasticity when it's present, enabling specialized types of memory encoding.
4h
Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

Source of molecule linked to nasal polyps, asthma attacksA new discovery about how the immune system responds to common sinus infections and asthma could explain why patients develop these issues in the first place and ultimately may lead to improved targeted therapies.
4h
Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

Orphaned elephants change where they live, in response to poaching and the need for foodYoung elephants who have lost either their mothers or the matriarchs of the herd are affected dramatically, and change where they live, according to new research.
4h
Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

Why an upcoming appointment makes us less productiveYou've got a full hour until your next meeting. But you probably won't make the most of that time, new research suggests. In a series of eight studies, both in the lab and real life, researchers found that free time seems shorter to people when it comes before a task or appointment on their calendar.
4h
Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

How local communities can transition to sustainable energy systemsWhat makes for a successful transition to a low-carbon energy system? Local involvement, perceived fairness and information sharing, according to new research.
4h
Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

Most comprehensive tree of life for malaria parasitesA new study puts forth the most comprehensive tree of life for malaria parasites to date. Among the researchers' findings is that the diverse malaria parasite genus Plasmodium (which includes those species that infect humans) is composed of several distantly related evolutionary lineages, and, from a taxonomic standpoint, many species should be renamed.
5h
Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

Changes to specific MicroRNA involved in development of Lou Gehrig's diseaseA new study identifies a previously unknown mechanism involved in the development of Lou Gehrig's disease, or amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS). The findings could serve as the foundation for the treatment of ALS in the future.
5h
Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

Surgery involving ultrasound energy found to treat high blood pressureAn operation that targets the nerves connected to the kidney has been found to significantly reduce blood pressure in patients with hypertension, according to a clinical trial.
5h
Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

Valves for tiny particlesNewly-developed nanovalves allow the flow of individual nanoparticles in liquids to be controlled in tiny channels. This is of interest for lab-on-a-chip applications such as in materials science and biomedicine.
5h
Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

Research reveals concerning childbirth trendsNew research has raised concern about the number of Australian women suffering potentially dangerous levels of blood loss after childbirth.
5h
Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

New advances in understanding and treating intellectual disorderResearchers have investigated an intellectual disorder (ATR-X) syndrome to reveal its cause, mechanism and a potential therapeutic strategy to decrease associated cognitive impairment.
5h
Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

Strain directs spin wavesScientists have revealed the relationship between the strain in a magnetic insulator thin film and spin waves. The relationship between magnetoelastic anisotropy and propagation properties of forward volume spin waves in single-crystalline yttrium iron garnet films grown on three garnet substrates was experimentally demonstrated. This facilitates the design of spin wave integrated circuits.
5h
Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

Men take shortcuts, while women follow well-known routesWhen navigating in a known environment, men prefer to take shortcuts to reach their destination more quickly, while women tend to use routes they know. This is according to a new study that investigated the different ways in which men and women navigate.
5h
Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

Tuberculosis: Pharmacists develop new substance to counteract antimicrobial resistanceAntimicrobial resistance is on the rise worldwide. This is becoming a problem for infectious diseases like tuberculosis as there are only a few active substances available to combat such diseases. Pharmacists have now found a way to increase the efficacy of a common tuberculosis agent while, at the same time, reducing resistance to it.
5h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Cigarette smoke directly damages muscles in the bodyNot only is smoking bad for your lungs, but new research shows that components in cigarette smoke directly damages your muscles. The research, published in The Journal of Physiology, indicates that smoking decreases the number of small blood vessels that bring oxygen and nutrients to muscles in the legs.
6h
Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

Why we fail to understand our smartphone useChecking your phone dozens of times a day indicates unconscious behavior, which is 'extremely repetitive' say psychologists. Existing research is yet to conclude whether people really are 'addicted' to their smartphones due to over reliance on people's own estimates or beliefs. But new research into smartphone behavior has revealed that while people underestimate time spent on their smartphones, t
6h
Futurity.org

Tiny valve can sort a lone nanoparticle from liquidResearchers have developed tiny valves that enable the separation and sorting of individual nanoparticles in liquids. The valves work with a broad range of tiny particles, including individual metal and semiconductor nanoparticles, virus particles, liposomes, and larger biomolecules such as antibodies. The nanovalves work differently than classic valves, which are used to mechanically close and o
7h
Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

How a cell knows when to divideWe know that hundreds of genes contribute to a wave of activity linked to cell division, but to generate that wave new research shows that cells must first grow large enough to produce four key proteins in adequate amounts, according to new research.
7h
Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

Are pain tolerance levels similar among groups of friends?Are your friends very pain tolerant? Then it is likely that you are as well, provided you are a male. A recent study shows that there is a positive correlation between the pain tolerance of individuals and that of their friends.
7h
Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

Long-term study reveals one invasive insect can change a forest bird communityEastern hemlock forests have been declining due to a non-native insect pest. A new study presents some of the best data showing how the decline of a single tree species leads to the disappearance of birds specialized to them. The data also indicate birds associated with non-hemlock habitat features are spreading into former hemlock forests. A single insect species has led to a less diverse bird co
7h
Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

Birds play the waiting game in tough environmental conditionsIf resources are limited and tough to find, reproductive efforts may fail. In these situations, it may be in an animal's best interests to not defend a territory or to breed at all, but rather focus its efforts on surviving to the next breeding season. A new study presents some of the best evidence on how changes in environmental conditions, specifically droughts, impact the social and reproductiv
7h
Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

Global healthcare access and quality improved from 2000-2016Healthcare access and quality improved globally from 2000-2016 due in part to large gains seen in many low and middle-income countries in sub-Saharan Africa and Southeast Asia, according to the latest data.
7h
Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

Early physical therapy benefits low-back pain patientsPatients with low-back pain are better off seeing a physical therapist first, according to a study of 150,000 insurance claims.
7h
Futurity.org

Working out may keep young women from shrinking laterA new study has identified several key factors in postmenopausal women that are associated with height loss, a common occurrence in this age group that can increase the risk for death and disease. One factor goes back to what study participants may—or may not—have done when they were just teenagers. “Exercise also increases strength and balance, both of which might help to prevent spine fracture
7h
Futurity.org

Coin-toss cheaters also break these school rulesA new study connects cheating for financial gain in the lab with misbehavior in school. “Several studies have documented relationships between behavior in the lab and behavior in the real world,” says Alain Cohn, assistant professor of information at the School of Information at the University of Michigan. “We extend this literature by showing that there is also such a relationship in the domain
7h
Science | The Guardian

EU split over exclusion of UK from Galileo after BrexitFrance, Spain, Sweden and Netherlands among countries wishing to retain close ties on GPS system Divisions are emerging within the EU over the European commission’s decision to exclude the UK from the bloc’s new satellite navigation system , Galileo. A number of member states are said by sources in Brussels to have become sympathetic to the British cause regarding the handling of the issue by EU
7h
Futurity.org

Early obesity may lead to school-age cognitive troubleChildren on the threshold of obesity or overweight in the first two years of life had lower perceptual reasoning and working memory scores than lean children did when tested at ages five and eight, according to a new study. The study also indicates that IQ scores may be lower for higher-weight children. Obesity, which can dysregulate hormones that act in multiple brain regions, is associated with
7h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Hot cars can hit deadly temperatures in as little as one hourThe dashboard of a car parked in the sun on a hot summer day can reach 70°C in about an hour. One hour is also about how long it can take for a young child to suffer heat injury or even die from hyperthermia -- when the body warms to above 40°C and cannot cool down.
8h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Depression speeds up brain aging, find psychologistsPsychologists at the University of Sussex have found a link between depression and an acceleration of the rate at which the brain ages.
8h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Improved financial regulation deters misconduct, study findsImproved regulation has deterred a greater amount of financial misconduct in the UK since the global financial crisis, according to new research published today by the University of East Anglia (UEA).
8h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Disadvantaged students with lower grades do just as well on medical degreesStudents from some of England's worst performing secondary schools who enroll on medical degrees with lower A Level grades, on average, do at least as well as their peers from top performing schools, a new study has revealed.
8h
Futurity.org

Embryonic stem cells form useful proto-nervous systemIt’s possible to guide human embryonic stem cells to become the precursor tissue of the central nervous system, research demonstrates. The new study also reveals the important role of mechanical signals in the development of the human nervous system. While studying embryonic development using animal embryos can provide useful insights about what happens during human development, human embryos gro
8h
Feed: All Latest

‘Significant’ FBI Error Reignites Data Encryption DebateFBI stats about inaccessible cellphones were inflated, undermining already controversial bureau claims about the threat of encryption.
8h
Science | The Guardian

Link found between severe eczema and heart problemsIndividuals with severe eczema face a higher risk of cardiovascular problems such as heart attacks, heart failure and strokes People with severe eczema have an increased risk of cardiovascular problems, new research suggests. About 10% of the population are thought to have atopic eczema, but evidence for a connection to cardiovascular problems had been mixed, said Dr Sinéad Langan, lead author of
8h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Severe eczema in adults may increase risk of cardiovascular diseaseAdults with severe eczema could face an increased risk of experiencing non-fatal cardiovascular disease, according to the largest ever study to examine the link, published in the BMJ.
8h
The Atlantic

The Atlantic Daily: Important for All of UsWhat We’re Following Breitbart Without Bannon: Raheem Kassam, the London editor brought on by Steve Bannon in 2014, has left Breitbart. His departure marks a turning point for Bannon and the news network; Kassam, who is heavily involved in far-right organizations such as the anti-European Union and anti-immigration United Kingdom Independence Party, was one of the few allies Bannon had left at th
8h
Popular Science

Sleeping in on the weekend might be good for you, but it's not going to fix all your problemsHealth Scientists still aren't sure exactly how to deal with our chronic sleep deficit. A new study found that time spent sleeping on the weekends could impact the likelihood of dying young. But don’t start partying ‘til 2 a.m. on weeknights just yet.
9h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Blueprint to beat cancer launched today by World Cancer Research Fund (WCRF)Overweight and obesity increase cancer risk. A new report published today by World Cancer Research Fund (WCRF), and presented at the European Congress on Obesity in Vienna, shows that overweight or obesity is a cause of at least 12 cancers, five more than WCRF findings a decade ago.
9h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Boys who become overweight during puberty at greater risk of heart failure as adultsBoys who become overweight during puberty are more likely to be diagnosed with heart failure when they grow up than their slimmer counterparts, according to new research being presented at this year's European Congress on Obesity (ECO) in Vienna, Austria (May 23-26).
9h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Overweight boys who have excessive weight gain during puberty at greater risk of colon cancer as adultsNew research being presented at this year's European Congress on Obesity (ECO) in Vienna, Austria (May 23-26) suggests that being overweight in childhood coupled with excessive weight gain during puberty may contribute to the development of adult colon cancer in men.
9h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Avoiding obesity and maintaining stable weight both important in preventing several obesity-related cancers in womenAvoiding obesity as well as maintaining a stable weight in middle adulthood could help prevent certain cancers in women, according to new research presented at this year's European Conference on Obesity (ECO) in Vienna, Austria (May 23-26).
9h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Latest WHO data on child obesity shows that Southern European countries have the highest rate of child obesityThe latest data (2015-17) from the WHO Childhood Obesity Surveillance initiative show that southern European countries have the highest rate of child obesity. In Italy, Cyprus, Spain, Greece, Malta and San Marino approximately one in five boys (ranging from 18 to 21 percent) are obese.
9h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Study finds that obesity surgery is associated with a massive fall in risk of melanoma skin cancerNew research presented at the European Congress on Obesity in Vienna, Austria (May 23-26), shows that obesity (bariatric) surgery is associated with a 61 percent fall in the risk of developing malignant melanoma skin cancer, and a 42 percent drop in the risk of skin cancer in general. The study is by Magdalena Taube and colleagues from University of Gothenburg, Sweden.
9h
Science | The Guardian

Obesity now linked to 12 different cancersEarlier studies found links between excess body mass and seven different cancers, but new evidence has found five more Obesity is linked to as many as 12 different forms of cancer, according to a major new report which advises giving up bacon and swapping sugary drinks for water as part of a 10-point plan for avoiding the disease. Up to 40% of cancers are preventable, says the World Cancer Resear
9h
Futurity.org

Pterodactyls didn’t actually fly splay-legged like batsScientists have thought that pterodactyls and other extinct flying reptiles flew like bats, with their hind limbs splayed wide apart. A new study shows they probably couldn’t strike that pose. “Most of the work that’s being done right now to understand pterosaur flight relies on the assumption that their hips could get into a bat-like pose,” says Armita Manafzadeh, a PhD student at Brown Universi
9h
Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

Making massive leaps in electronics at nano-scaleBy chemically attaching nano-particles of the rare earth element, gadolinium, to carbon nanotubes, the researchers have found that the electrical conductivity in the nanotubes can be increased by incorporating the spin properties of the gadolinium which arises from its magnetic nature.
9h
Scientific American Content: Global

Doc's YA Novel Treats Life and Death IssuesPediatric cardiologist Ismée Williams discusses her young-adult novel Water In May, about a teenage girl whose newborn has a life-threatening heart condition. -- Read more on ScientificAmerican.com
9h
Live Science

How Did a 'Lava Bomb' Split a Man's Leg Open?Lava bombs are red-hot cannonballs of gooey lava, and they are incredibly dangerous for people near an eruption.
9h
The Atlantic

The Atlantic Politics & Policy Daily: Thou Shalt Not Block-Written by Lena Felton ( @lenakfelton ) and Taylor Hosking ( @Taylor__Hosking ) Today in 5 Lines A federal judge ruled that it’s unconstitutional for President Trump to block people from his Twitter account. After more than a year-long delay, Trump’s son-in-law and adviser Jared Kushner received a permanent White House security clearance. NFL owners unanimously approved new rules that will requi
9h
Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

Controlled nano-assemblyDNA, the carrier of genetic information, has become established as a highly useful building material in nanotechnology. One requirement in many applications is the controlled, switchable assembly of nanostructures. Scientists have now introduced a new strategy for control through altering pH value. It is based on ethylenediamine, which only supports the assembly of DNA components in a neutral to a
9h
Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

Chimpanzee calls differ according to contextAn important question in the evolution of language is what caused animal calls to diversify and to encode different information. A team of scientists has found that chimpanzees use the quiet 'hoo' call in three different behavioral contexts -- alert, travel and rest. The need to stay together in low visibility habitat may have facilitated the evolution of call subtypes.
9h
New on MIT Technology Review

Another “missing” component could revolutionize electronicsA new theory predicts the existence of an electronic device that works like an inverse transistor. It could make circuits, smaller, faster, and less power hungry.
9h
Feed: All Latest

Tinder Wants to Match You With People Who Go to the Same PlacesThe dating app is testing a new feature aimed at connecting users who hang out at the same spots.
10h
The Scientist RSS

Opinion: Should Human-Animal Chimeras Be Granted Personhood?Determining which products of advanced biotechnology are deserving of legal protections is essential to our own social architecture.
10h
The Scientist RSS

Congress Passes Right to Try BillMedical groups have criticized the legislation, which will give terminal patients access to experimental treatments, as dangerous and unnecessary.
10h
Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

In the beginning was the phase separationThe question of the origin of life remains one of the oldest unanswered scientific questions. A team has now shown for the first time that phase separation is an extremely efficient way of controlling the selection of chemical building blocks and providing advantages to certain molecules.
10h
New on MIT Technology Review

The machine vision challenge to better analyse satellite images of EarthMachine vision has revolutionised many areas of technology but satellite image analysis isn’t one of them. That looks set to change
10h
Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

'Virtual safe space' to help bumblebeesThe many threats facing bumblebees can be tested using a 'virtual safe space.'
10h
Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

Cheap, small carbon nanotubesCarbon nanotubes are supermaterials that can be stronger than steel and more conductive than copper, but they're rare because, until now, they've been incredibly expensive.
10h
Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

A promising target in the quest for a 1-million-year-old Antarctic ice coreThe oldest ice core so far provides 800,000 years of our planet's climate history. A field survey in Antarctica has pinpointed a location where an entire million years of undisturbed ice might be preserved intact.
10h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Trump can't block his critics on Twitter, judge rulesDonald Trump TwitterPresident Donald Trump cannot legally block Twitter users who disagree with him, a federal judge ruled Wednesday in a case with potentially far-reaching implications for social media use by public officials.
10h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

First chip-scale broadband optical system that can sense molecules in the mid-IRResearchers at Columbia Engineering have demonstrated, for the first time, a chip-based dual-comb spectrometer in the mid-infrared range, that requires no moving parts and can acquire spectra in less than 2 microseconds. The system, which consists of two mutually coherent, low-noise, microresonator-based frequency combs spanning 2600 nm to 4100 nm, could lead to the development of a spectroscopy l
10h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Team cracks code to cheap, small carbon nanotubesImagine a box you plug into the wall that cleans your toxic air and pays you cash.
10h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Electron tomography technique leads to 3-D reconstructions at the nanoscaleUnderstanding the microscopic structure of a material is key to understanding how it functions and its functional properties. Advances in fields like materials science have increasingly pushed abilities to determine these features to even higher resolutions. One technique for imaging at nanoscale resolution, transmission electron microscopy (TEM), is one example of promising technology in this are
10h
Viden

Dansker vinder sølv ved VM i science: Nu skal han navngive astroideBenjamin Muntz fra Brønshøj strøg næsten helt til tops foran 1.750 projekter fra 80 lande.
11h
Latest Headlines | Science News

As CO2 increases, rice loses B vitamins and other nutrientsField experiments add vitamins to list of nutrients at risk from a changing atmosphere.
11h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News

First chip-scale broadband optical system that can sense molecules in the mid-IRResearchers at Columbia Engineering have demonstrated, for the first time, a chip-based dual-comb spectrometer in the mid-infrared range, that requires no moving parts and can acquire spectra in less than 2 microseconds. The system, which consists of two mutually coherent, low-noise, microresonator-based frequency combs spanning 2600 nm to 4100 nm, could lead to the development of a spectroscopy l
11h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Social media usage linked to underage drinkingPenn Medicine researchers found a statistically significant relationship between teen and young adult alcohol related social media engagement and both alcohol consumption and alcohol-related problems.
11h
Big Think

An 'interstellar immigrant' asteroid is going 30,000mph in the wrong directionThis asteroid is feeling itself, clearly. Read More
11h
Latest Headlines | Science News

As CO2 increases, rice loses B vitamins and other nutrientsField experiments add vitamins to list of nutrients at risk from a changing atmosphere.
11h
Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

Fleet of autonomous boats could service cities to reduce road trafficResearchers have designed a fleet of autonomous boats that offer high maneuverability and precise control. The boats can also be rapidly 3-D printed using a low-cost printer, making mass manufacturing more feasible.
11h
Live Science

How Bats Could Help Scientists Stop Ebola Outbreaks Before They StartWhat if scientists were able to predict Ebola outbreaks and stop them before they even started?
11h
The Atlantic

The Day the Genius DiedIf you Google the phrase literary lion , here is one of the first definitions that will be returned to you for the effort: “Noun: a noted author who has reached celebrity status.” And, then: “Examples: Philip Roth is a literary lion.” With that, once again, Dictionary.com cuts to the chase. Literary lion is, fittingly, being used a lot today, along with “ towering ” and “ preeminent ” and “ incom
11h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News

'These could revolutionize the world'Carbon nanotubes are supermaterials that can be stronger than steel and more conductive than copper, but they're rare because, until now, they've been incredibly expensive.
11h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Asthma management: Allocating dutiesSome examples of the persistence of incompletely resolved issues in asthma management are: 1) misdiagnosis -- with the related complex consequences --, especially in children population and, 2) poor control of the disease. Also related factors as suboptimal medical management , poor education and health literacy of patients, poor adherence and elevated costs for patients and healthcare systems are
11h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News

CU researchers offer insights into liver disease caused by intravenous nutritionUniversity of Colorado School of Medicine's Karim C. El Kasmi, MD, PhD, assistant professor of pediatrics, and Ronald Sokol, MD, professor of pediatrics, are authors of an article in the April 2018 Nature Communications that sheds light on the underlying cause of intestinal failure-associated liver disease and suggests new therapeutic approaches.
11h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Cultivating cannabisNot long ago, cannabis growers learned their trade mainly by trial and error, passing along tips to others behind a veil of secrecy. But with expanding legalization of cannabis in the US, this situation is changing. According to an article in Chemical & Engineering News (C&EN), the weekly news magazine of the American Chemical Society, cannabis growers are starting to benefit from increased commun
11h
NeuWrite West

Sleeping with the CavefishesAs a graduate student, I would give my right arm to be a fully functioning human being with little to no sleep. Alas, even Aristotle in 350 BCE observed a seemingly simple truth -- all animals sleep. Much to the frustration of sleep scientists, we still do not fully understand why we need sleep or why there is so much variation between species in sleep behavior. We are, however, beginning to gain
11h
Popular Science

The weirdest things we learned this week: the best dog of all time, kindles of kittens, and mushrooms eating human corpsesScience Our editors scrounged up some truly bizarre facts. What’s the weirdest thing you learned this week? Well, whatever it is, we promise you’ll have an even weirder answer if you listen to PopSci’s newest podcast.
11h
Big Think

Could brain stimulation be the answer to ending drug addiction?TMS might also help those with anxiety, PTSD, and traumatic brain injury. Read More
11h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Cheeseburger or salad? How music volume impacts your decisionAmbient music played in restaurants plays a major role in whether you order a healthy or unhealthy meal.
11h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Electron tomography technique leads to 3-D reconstructions at the nanoscaleScientists recently found a way to harness the power of TEM to measure the structure of a material at the highest possible resolution -- determining the 3-D position of every individual atom.
11h
Big Think

10 amazing new species that have been discovered in the last yearEven though 18,000 species are discovered and named each year we are still losing ground, writes the College of Environmental Science and Forestry. Read More
11h
The Atlantic

Photo Updates From Kilauea: The Lava Meets the SeaSince the Kilauea volcano began its most recent eruptive activity on Hawaii's Big Island three weeks ago, the situation has evolved and worsened. More than 40 structures have been destroyed and one resident was badly injured when he was struck in the leg by a molten hunk of rock thrown from one of the erupting fissures. The Associated Press reported that some fissures were merging and producing f
11h
cognitive science

Split brain: divided perception but undivided consciousnesssubmitted by /u/Kant2050 [link] [comments]
11h
Big Think

Women are less likely to be replaced by robots and might even benefit from automationResearch shows women are better positioned than men to resist the automation of work and possibly even benefit from it. Read More
11h
Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

'Uniquely human' muscles have been discovered in apesMuscles believed to be unique to humans have been discovered in several ape species, challenging long-held anthropocentric theories on the origin and evolution of human soft tissues. This questions the view that certain muscles evolved to provide special adaptations for human traits, such as walking on two legs, tool use, and sophisticated vocal communication and facial expressions. The findings h
11h
Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

Streams may emit more carbon dioxide in a warmer climateStreams and rivers could pump carbon dioxide into the air at increasing rates if they continue to warm, potentially compounding the effects of global warming, a new worldwide analysis has shown.
11h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News

To manage weight, it may matter when protein supplements are consumedPeople looking to manage their weight with strength-training and protein supplements should consume their supplements during a meal, according to a research review by nutrition experts at Purdue University.
12h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Study finds antioxidant-enriched vitamin reduces respiratory illnesses in patients with CFResearchers at Children's Hospital Colorado and the University of Colorado School of Medicine have found that taking a specially formulated antioxidant-enriched multivitamin may decrease respiratory illnesses in people with cystic fibrosis.
12h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News

A promising target in the quest for a 1-million-year-old Antarctic ice coreThe oldest ice core so far provides 800,000 years of our planet's climate history. A field survey in Antarctica has pinpointed a location where an entire million years of undisturbed ice might be preserved intact.
12h
Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

Microplastics may be abundant in the surface sediments of Baynes Sound and Lambert ChannelMicroplastics were found at all 16 sites studied in Baynes Sound and Lambert Channel, British Columbia, and were most abundant in the sediments of Henry Bay and Metcalfe Bay, according to a new study.
12h
Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

Early-life obesity impacts children's learning and memory, study suggestsA new study found that children on the threshold of obesity or overweight in the first two years of life had lower perceptual reasoning and working memory scores than lean children when tested at ages five and eight. The study also indicated that IQ scores may be lower for higher-weight children.
12h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

A promising target in the quest for a 1-million-year-old Antarctic ice coreIce cores offer a window into the history of Earth's climate. Layers of ice reveal past temperatures, and gases trapped in bubbles reveal past atmospheric composition. The oldest continuous ice core so far comes from Dome C in East Antarctica and extends back 800,000 years.
12h
New Scientist - News

Brain implant for OCD surprisingly helps alleviate diabetes tooA person who has a brain implant for OCD has had an unexpected side-effect: better blood sugar control. The finding reveals the brain has a role in diabetes
12h
Feed: All Latest

How Facebook Wants to Improve the Quality of Your News FeedIn a rare interview, nine Facebook executives discuss the company's tools for reducing the quantity and reach of misinformation.
12h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Estimated 7,000 bodies may be buried at former asylumSome of the boxes stacked inside anthropologist Molly Zuckerman's laboratory contain full bones—a skull, a jaw, or a leg. Others contain only plastic bags of bone fragments that Zuckerman describes as "grit."
12h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Shining a light on toxic chemicals curbs industrial useThe annual federal report on toxic material emissions from industrial sites across the country gains widespread media attention and serves as a reminder of the potential environmental impacts of industrial activities.
12h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Rosetta unravels formation of sunrise jetsThe atmosphere of Rosetta's comet 67P/Churyumov-Gerasimenko is far from homogeneous. In addition to sudden outbursts of gas and dust, daily recurring phenomena at sunrise can be observed. In these, evaporating gas and entrained dust are concentrated to form jet-like structures. A new study, led by the Max Planck Institute for Solar System Research (MPS) in Germany and published in the journal Natu
12h
Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

Unprecedented detail in pulsar 6,500 light-years from EarthA team of astronomers has performed one of the highest resolution observations in astronomical history by observing two intense regions of radiation, 20 kilometers apart, around a star 6,500 light-years away. The observation is equivalent to using a telescope on Earth to see a flea on the surface of Pluto.
12h
Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

Researchers squeeze light into nanoscale devices and circuitsInvestigators have made a major breakthrough in nanophotonics research, with their invention of a novel 'home-built' cryogenic near-field optical microscope that has enabled them to directly image, for the first time, the propagation and dynamics of graphene plasmons at variable temperatures down to negative 250 degrees Celsius. If researchers can harness this nanolight, they will be able to impro
12h
Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

Utah fossil reveals global exodus of mammals' near relatives to major continentsA nearly 130-million-year-old fossilized skull found in Utah is an Earth-shattering discovery in one respect. The small fossil is evidence that the super-continental split likely occurred more recently than scientists previously thought and that a group of reptile-like mammals that bridge the reptile and mammal transition experienced an unsuspected burst of evolution across several continents.
12h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Shining a light on toxic chemicals curbs industrial useA team of researchers at the Georgia Institute of Technology wondered whether federal regulators can persuade companies to abandon toxic chemicals by simply highlighting that information.
12h
The Atlantic

The New York Stock Exchange Has Its First Woman President. Is She on a Glass Cliff?In April, officials in New York City decided to move the “Fearless Girl,” the statue commissioned by a financial firm to stare down the Charging Bull of Wall Street, in what became a symbol of female grit, to a spot outside the New York Stock Exchange. Just over a month later, the NYSE announced that Stacey Cunningham, the exchange’s chief operating officer, will soon become its president—the fir
12h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Researchers bring the scientific community closer to understanding binary star mergersImagine only knowing 15 people in the world, and as you discover more people, your knowledge expands. Scientists studying our galaxy face something similar as they make discoveries that build our understanding of the universe.
12h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Scientists introduce cosmochemical model for Pluto formationSouthwest Research Institute scientists integrated NASA's New Horizons discoveries with data from ESA's Rosetta mission to develop a new theory about how Pluto may have formed at the edge of our solar system.
12h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Shedding light on the faintest galaxies with the world's biggest steerable dishAstronomers are one step closer to understanding a mysterious class of optically faint galaxies thanks to deep radio observations with the Green Bank Telescope, reveals a poster presented today at the Canadian Astronomical Society Annual Meeting in Victoria, British Columbia.
12h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Astronomers spot a distant and lonely neutron starAstronomers have discovered a special kind of neutron star for the first time outside of the Milky Way galaxy, using data from NASA's Chandra X-ray Observatory and the European Southern Observatory's Very Large Telescope (VLT) in Chile.
12h
Popular Science

Cosmic collisions with their neighbors may have weighed these white dwarfs downSpace Two stars enter, one star leaves Now, a study recently submitted to the Monthly Notices of the Royal Astronomical Society: Letters finds that roughly one in 10 white dwarf stars may actually be the…
12h
Big Think

N.F.L. officially bans kneeling during national anthemN.F.L. team owners signed an agreement on Wednesday that prohibits players from kneeling during the national anthem, but does allow them to stay inside locker rooms during ceremonies. Read More
12h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Drilling success: Curiosity is collecting Mars rocksEngineers working with NASA's Curiosity Mars rover have been hard at work testing a new way for the rover to drill rocks and extract powder from them. This past weekend, that effort produced the first drilled sample on Mars in more than a year.
12h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

1.5C cap on warming saves global economy trillions: studyFailing to cap global warming at two degrees Celsius or less could cost the world economy tens of trillions of dollars over the next 80 years, researchers warned Wednesday.
12h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Foxconn says no changes planned for Wisconsin projectTaiwan-based Foxconn Technology Group said Wednesday that it remains committed to its $10 billion Wisconsin manufacturing facility, rejecting a report that it's considering reducing its initial investment by making display screens for smaller electronics, like phones, rather than large screens for televisions.
12h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Problem with new US weather satellite could affect pictures (Update)The nation's newest weather satellite, launched less than three months ago, has a serious cooling problem that could affect the quality of its pictures.
12h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Uber ends self-driving program in Arizona after fatal crashUber Arizona PittsburghUber is pulling its self-driving cars out of Arizona, a reversal triggered by the recent death of woman who was run over by one of the ride-hailing service's robotic vehicles while crossing a darkened street in a Phoenix suburb.
12h
The Atlantic

Italy’s Populist Victory Is Both Tragedy and FarcePARIS—Will a certain dream of Europe end with a bang or a whimper, with a calamity or a thousand paper cuts, with a grand dramatic moment or a tawdry local melodrama? That’s the question that has been swirling around in Europe ever since two populist, Euroskeptic parties triumphed in Italy’s national elections in March. The vote failed to produce a solid majority, plunging the country into weeks
12h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Overweight and obesity make up for more than 15,000 cancer cases per year in BrazilA collaboration between Brazilian university and Harvard assessed the impact of the rise in body mass index over health indicators and can serve as a basis for public policy. The study can serve as basis for public policies, such as a higher degree of regulation on ultraprocessed foods market, whose sales in Latin America increased over 100 percent since year 2000.
12h
NYT > Science

How More Carbon Dioxide Can Make Food Less NutritiousCarbon dioxide helps plants grow. But a new study shows that rice grown in higher levels of carbon dioxide has lower amounts of several important nutrients.
12h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Streams may emit more carbon dioxide in a warmer climateStreams and rivers could pump carbon dioxide into the air at increasing rates if they continue to warm, potentially compounding the effects of global warming, a new worldwide analysis has shown.
12h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Rehabilitating lactate: From poison to cureGeorge Brooks has been trying to reshape thinking about lactate—in the lab, the clinic and on the training field—for more than 40 years, and finally, it seems, people are listening. Lactate, it's becoming clear, is not a poison, it's the antidote.
12h
Live Science

Scientists to Hunt for Loch Ness Monster DNACould DNA sequencing finally reveal whether the Loch Ness monster exists?
13h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

'Uniquely human' muscles have been discovered in apesMuscles once thought 'uniquely human' have been discovered in several ape species, challenging long-held theories on the origin and evolution of human soft tissues. The findings question the anthropocentric view that certain muscles evolved for the sole purpose of providing special adaptations for human traits, such as walking on two legs, tool use, vocal communication and facial expressions. Publ
13h
Viden

Nu får du helt nye digitale rettigheder på internettetEU-loven GDPR giver for første gang alle 250 millioner europæere nøglerne til deres digitale liv. Her er tre ting, du skal vide som borger, forening og virksomhed.
13h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Change the face of nanoparticles and you'll rule chemistry!Depending on the lighting, the surface of appropriately crafted nanoparticles can change its topography. Researchers from the Institute of Physical Chemistry of the Polish Academy of Sciences have shown that the molecular mechanism they have designed makes it possible, by the use of light, to effectively uncover or hide catalyst molecules. The technique they present leads to qualitatively new poss
13h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News

In a break with dogma, myelin boosts neuron growth in spinal cord injuriesIn a new paper, published in the May 23 online issue of Science Translational Medicine , researchers at University of California San Diego School of Medicine report that adult rat myelin actually stimulated axonal outgrowth in rat neural precursor cells (NPCs) and human induced pluripotent (iPSC)-derived neural stem cells (NSCs).
13h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News

'Uniquely human' muscles have been discovered in apesMuscles believed to be unique to humans have been discovered in several ape species, challenging long-held anthropocentric theories on the origin and evolution of human soft tissues. This questions the view that certain muscles evolved to provide special adaptations for human traits, such as walking on two legs, tool use, and sophisticated vocal communication and facial expressions. The findings h
13h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Researchers challenge genetic tests for guiding psychiatric treatmentThe paper reviewed the scientific basis and effectiveness of pharmacogenetic (Pgen) tests in guiding the choices and doses of psychiatric medications for treating major depressive disorder (MDD) and related psychiatric conditions.
13h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Fleet of autonomous boats could service cities to reduce road trafficResearchers from MIT's Computer Science and Artificial Intelligence Laboratory (CSAIL) and the Senseable City Lab in the Department of Urban Studies and Planning (DUSP), have designed a fleet of autonomous boats that offer high maneuverability and precise control. The boats can also be rapidly 3D printed using a low-cost printer, making mass manufacturing more feasible.
13h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Are you at risk for lung cancer?This question isn't only for people who've smoked a lot. Seven factors, including two new ones, can predict whether you have a high risk of developing lung cancer.
13h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News

UQ Zika detection breakthough a potential lifesaverA cheap and effective tool that could save lives by helping health authorities target mosquitos infected with Zika virus has been developed by researchers from the University of Queensland and colleagues in Brazil.
13h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Machine listening for earthquakesIn a new study in Science Advances, researchers at Columbia University show that machine learning algorithms could pick out different types of earthquakes from three years of earthquake recordings at The Geysers in California, a major geothermal energy field. The repeating patterns of earthquakes appear to match the seasonal rise and fall of water-injection flows into the hot rocks below, suggesti
13h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News

A stimulating approach to the treatment of diabetesScientists have discovered that electric stimulation of the brain regulated the metabolism of blood sugar (or glucose) and increased insulin sensitivity in a small patient group.
13h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Rice's nutritional value decreases in higher CO2 concentrationsRice grown at higher carbon dioxide (CO2) concentrations, like those possible later this century, has lower nutritional value, according to a study that evaluated rice grown in Japan and China under simulated carbon dioxide increases.
13h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

New portable malaria screening instrument developedAccording to the World Health Organization, over 216 million people were infected with malaria in 2016, and 445,000 individuals died from the disease. The key to solving this health crisis is early-stage diagnosis when malaria therapeutics are most effective. A new prototype for a portable instrument capable early-stage malaria detection has been developed by a team of researchers at the USC Viter
13h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

How human brains became so bigThe human brain is disproportionately large. And while abundant grey matter confers certain intellectual advantages, sustaining a big brain is costly—consuming a fifth of energy in the human body.
13h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

NASA's Aqua satellite sees Tropical Cyclone Mekunu strengthenVisible satellite imagery from NASA's Aqua satellite revealed that Tropical Cyclone 02A, now renamed Mekunu has continued to consolidate and organize off the coast of Oman in the Arabian Sea.
13h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Long-term study shows crop rotation decreases greenhouse gas emissionsMany farmers grow corn and soybean in rotation to avoid the continuous corn yield penalty, but now there's another reason to rotate. Scientists at the University of Illinois have provided further evidence that rotating crops increases yield and lowers greenhouse gas emissions compared to continuous corn or soybean.
13h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Cause of E. coli beach closings? GullsThis summer, during the middle of a heat wave, you might want to enjoy a swim at your local beach. But summer is also the time of algal blooms and E.coli alerts—and that can put a damper on your plans to cool off.
13h
New Scientist - News

We may have got the evolution of our big brains entirely wrongMany scientists think that our big brains evolved to help us cope with the complexities of social living, but a model suggests it was more to do with finding food and lighting fires
13h
New Scientist - News

Seafood-lovers have more sex and take less time to get pregnantCouples who eat seafood more than twice a week have more sex and get pregnant quicker, a study of 1000 people has found, although the reason why remains unclear
13h
New Scientist - News

Clouds of plasma let us zoom in on weird flashes from spaceSpace plasma magnifies the light from a distant pulsar, letting us zoom in on features so small it’s like measuring the width of a hair on the surface of Mars
13h
New on MIT Technology Review

Facebook says it can protect you—but first it wants your most intimate photos
13h
Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

A first look at the earliest decisions that shape a human embryoFor the first time, scientists have shown that a small cluster of cells in the human embryo dictates the fate of other embryonic cells. The discovery of this developmental 'organizer' could advance research into any human diseases, and it suggests we have more in common with birds than meets the eye.
13h
The Scientist RSS

Animals Embryonic Organizer Now Discovered in Human CellsThe finding confirms that a cluster of cells that directs the fate of other cells in the developing embryo is evolutionarily conserved across the animal kingdom.
13h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Fossilized feces reveal Early Cretaceous aquatic vertebrate diversityAncient fossils faeces found in central Spain belonged to fish-eating carnivores from the Early Cretaceous, according to a study published on May 23, 2018 in the open-access journal PLOS ONE by Sandra Barrios de Pedro from the Universidad Autónoma de Madrid, Spain, and colleagues.
13h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Food fraud in China leads to opportunities for EU productsThe perceived safety and quality of food imported from Europe into China provides commercial opportunities for European food producers, research has found.
13h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Microplastics may be abundant in the surface sediments of Baynes Sound and Lambert ChannelMicroplastics were found at all 16 sites studied in Baynes Sound and Lambert Channel, British Columbia, and were most abundant in the sediments of Henry Bay and Metcalfe Bay, according to a study published May 23, 2018 in the open-access journal PLOS ONE by T. N. Kazmiruk from Simon Fraser University, Canada, and colleagues.
13h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Machine listening for earthquakes: Algorithms pick out hidden signals that could boost geothermal energy productionFor all that seismologists have learned about earthquakes, new technologies show how much remains to be discovered.
13h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Increasing CO2 levels reduce rice's nutritional valueHigher concentrations of carbon dioxide are associated with reductions in protein and multiple key nutrients in rice, according to a new field study by an international team of scientists.
13h
Inside Science

Cities Drive Creatures to Body Size ExtremesCities Drive Creatures to Body Size Extremes How the heat of cities drives animal size may offer clues about how ecosystems will respond to global warming. urban butterfly.jpg Image credits: Lewis Tse Pui Lung via Shutterstock Creature Wednesday, May 23, 2018 - 13:30 Nala Rogers, Staff Writer (Inside Science) -- Cities may be shaping the body sizes of urban insects and other animals, shrinking so
13h
The Atlantic

Collusion HappenedTrump aides colluded with foreign governments. This is a simple, straightforward statement, and by this point, it ought to be an uncontroversial one. There’s ample evidence on many fronts, from legal documents to reliable reporting. This doesn’t mean that a crime was committed, because, as Trump lawyer Rudy Giuliani and others have pointed out, collusion is not a crime per se. But it does mean th
13h
Scientific American Content: Global

Bendy Laser Beams Can Examine Human Tissue Like Never BeforeLight-sheet fluorescence microscopy could lead to less intrusive and more effective diagnosis for patients -- Read more on ScientificAmerican.com
13h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Rehabilitating lactate: From poison to cureWhen George Brooks at UC Berkeley first began investigating lactate, or lactic acid, sports physiologists saw it as a muscle poison that lowered performance. His research over decades has reversed that picture, showing that it is the body's way of revving up for exercise or to fight disease. Clinicians are now planning clinical trials to use lactate to treat traumatic brain injury and a host of il
13h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Boys continue to lag behind in readingWhen boys start school, they recognize fewer letters and their corresponding sounds than girls do. The difference is just as great at the end of the school year.
13h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News

NASA's Aqua satellite sees Tropical Cyclone Mekunu strengthenVisible satellite imagery from NASA's Aqua satellite revealed that Tropical Cyclone 02A, now renamed Mekunu has continued to consolidate and organize off the coast of Oman in the Arabian Sea.
13h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Streams may emit more carbon dioxide in a warmer climateStreams and rivers could pump carbon dioxide into the air at increasing rates if they continue to warm, potentially compounding the effects of global warming, a new worldwide analysis has shown.
13h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Early-life obesity impacts children's learning and memory, study suggestsA new study by Brown University epidemiologists found that children on the threshold of obesity or overweight in the first two years of life had lower perceptual reasoning and working memory scores than lean children when tested at ages five and eight. The study also indicated that IQ scores may be lower for higher-weight children.
13h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Robotically controlled digital microscope provides new visualization system in operating roomThe Department of Neurosurgery at the Mount Sinai Health System is one of the first hospitals in the country to use Modus V™, a hands-free, robotically controlled digital microscope that provides advanced visualization in the operating room.
13h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News

New portable malaria screening instrument developedAccording to the World Health Organization, over 216 million people were infected with malaria in 2016, and 445,000 individuals died from the disease. The key to solving this health crisis is early-stage diagnosis when malaria therapeutics are most effective. A new prototype for a portable instrument capable early-stage malaria detection has been developed by a team of researchers at the USC Viter
13h
Viden

Therese hjælper med opklaring af drabssager: Hendes dna-metode kan fælde gerningsmandenDansk statistik-forsker har hjulpet det engelske politi i de seneste par år.
13h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Study highlights environmental cost of tearing down Vancouver's single-family homesRising property values in Vancouver have resulted in the demolition of an unprecedented number of single-family homes in recent years, many of which were replaced with the same type of structure. Despite the better energy performance of the new homes, this cycle is likely to increase overall greenhouse gas emissions, according to new analysis from researchers at the University of British Columbia
13h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Determining effective methods of irrigation as water becomes increasingly scarceA recent study out of Texas A&M University focused on the practical applications of the global concern that potable water will become less and less accessible in the future. Melinda Knuth and her team engaged an examination of how to most efficiently divide this diminishing resource into uses (and sometimes re-uses) for what is needed to sustain human life and plant life in landscaping and horticu
13h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News

In the beginning was the phase separationThe question of the origin of life remains one of the oldest unanswered scientific questions. A team at the Technical University of Munich (TUM) has now shown for the first time that phase separation is an extremely efficient way of controlling the selection of chemical building blocks and providing advantages to certain molecules.
13h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Long-term study shows crop rotation decreases greenhouse gas emissionsMany farmers grow corn and soybean in rotation to avoid the continuous corn yield penalty, but now there's another reason to rotate. Scientists at the University of Illinois have provided further evidence that rotating crops increases yield and lowers greenhouse gas emissions compared to continuous corn or soybean.
13h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Study: Strenuous exercise in adolescence may ward off height loss later in lifeA new study has identified several key factors in postmenopausal women that are associated with height loss, a common occurrence in this age group that is known to increase the risk for death and disease.
13h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Painless real-time proteomics may one day speed up cancer surgeryResearchers at the University of Lille developed a matrix-assisted ion source for mass spectrometry that can liberate lipids and metabolites from the skin without causing pain. Now, they have optimized protein measurement using this device. The device can be used to differentiated normal from cancerous tissues.
13h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Whey protein supplements and exercise help women improve body compositionIt's known that men benefit from whey protein supplements and exercise, and for what is believed to be the first time, the same can be said for women, according to a large study review by Purdue University nutrition experts.
13h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Cause of E. coli beach closings? GullsResearchers have recently published results identifying the major sources of E. coli breakouts on several beaches on Lake Michigan. They have also researched an effective method of reducing the breakouts and the resulting beach closings.
13h
Live Science

Can You Make Up for Lost Sleep on the Weekend?Good news for weekend snoozers.
13h
Live Science

Mysterious Ailment Strikes US Employee in China, Drawing Comparisons to Cuba 'Sonic Attacks'A U.S. government employee experienced mysterious symptoms after working at a U.S. consulate in China, in a case that's being likened to the so-called "sonic attacks" in Cuba last year.
14h
Ingeniøren

Landmænd skal droppe bejdsning med bidræber-pesticidFor første gang har Miljøstyrelsen afslået en ansøgning om dispensation til at bejdse danske vinterrapsfrø med pesticidgruppen neonikotinoider, som EU har forbudt af hensyn til bierne.
14h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Microsoft's new Xbox controller courts gamers with disabilitiesMike Luckett had been having trouble controlling his Xbox controller. His diminished finger dexterity after a spinal cord injury meant it was tough to be as quick as he wanted on the toggles and buttons on the game console's controller.
14h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Determining effective methods of irrigation as water becomes increasingly scarceUS consumers prefer the idea of using fresh water for any watering needs. In most cases, plants irrigated with recycled water saw no negative impact when compared to the same types of plants irrigated with pure, non-recycled water.
14h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Study highlights environmental cost of tearing down Vancouver's single-family homesRising property values in Vancouver have resulted in the demolition of an unprecedented number of single-family homes in recent years, many of which were replaced with the same type of structure. Despite the better energy performance of the new homes, this cycle is likely to increase overall greenhouse gas emissions, according to new analysis from researchers at the University of British Columbia
14h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News

University of Guelph study uncovers cause of pesticide exposure, Parkinson's linkPrevious studies have found an association between two commonly used agrochemicals (paraquat and maneb) and Parkinson's disease.Now U of G professor Scott Ryan has determined that low-level exposure to the pesticides disrupts cells in a way that mimics the effects of mutations known to cause Parkinson's disease.Adding the effects of the chemicals to a predisposition for Parkinson's disease drastic
14h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Complementing conventional antibioticsAntimicrobial resistance (AMR) is a major medical problem worldwide, impacting both human health and economic well-being. A new strategy for fighting bacteria has now been reported in the latest online issue of Nature by a research group headed by Professor Ivan Dikic at the Goethe University Frankfurt. The scientists revealed the molecular action mechanism of a Legionella toxin and developed a fi
14h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News

A first look at the earliest decisions that shape a human embryoFor the first time, scientists have shown that a small cluster of cells in the human embryo dictates the fate of other embryonic cells. The discovery of this developmental 'organizer' could advance research into 'any human diseases, and it suggests we have more in common with birds than meets the eye.
14h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Dengue: Investigating antibodies to identify at-risk individualsUsing an original mathematical and statistical analysis method, a team of scientists from the Institut Pasteur partnered with researchers from the United States and Thailand to analyze a Thai cohort in order to help identify individuals at risk of infection. By modeling changes in antibody levels after successive infections with the different dengue serotypes, the scientists were able to establish
14h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Land rising above the sea 2.4 billion years ago changed planet EarthChemical signatures in shale, the Earth's most common sedimentary rock, point to a rapid rise of land above the ocean 2.4 billion years ago that possibly triggered dramatic changes in climate and life.
14h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Astronomers observe unprecedented detail in pulsar 6,500 light-years from EarthA team of astronomers has performed one of the highest resolution observations in astronomical history by observing two intense regions of radiation, 20 kilometers apart, around a star 6,500 light-years away. The observation is equivalent to using a telescope on Earth to see a flea on the surface of Pluto.
14h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Columbia researchers squeeze light into nanoscale devices and circuitsColumbia investigators have made a major breakthrough in nanophotonics research, with their invention of a novel 'home-built' cryogenic near-field optical microscope that has enabled them to directly image, for the first time, the propagation and dynamics of graphene plasmons at variable temperatures down to negative 250 degrees Celsius. If researchers can harness this nanolight, they will be able
14h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Utah fossil reveals global exodus of mammals' near relatives to major continentsA nearly 130-million-year-old fossilized skull found in Utah is an Earth-shattering discovery in one respect. The small fossil is evidence that the super-continental split likely occurred more recently than scientists previously thought and that a group of reptile-like mammals that bridge the reptile and mammal transition experienced an unsuspected burst of evolution across several continents.
14h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News

How many taxis does a city need?A taxi dispatching approach developed at MIT's Senseable City Lab could cut the number of cars on the road while meeting rider demand.
14h
Popular Science

Bonnie and Clyde's getaway car has hidden lessons for cops in the self-driving vehicle eraCars The outlaw duo died May 23, 1934. Their stolen Ford V8 could be relevant once more. Bonnie and Clyde’s “death car”—a 1934 Ford Fordor Deluxe with a V8 engine stolen from a Topeka, Kansas driveway—symbolizes the golden age of cars, and of crime.
14h
NYT > Science

Trilobites: Big Discovery in a Tiny Mammal-Like Skull Found Under a Dinosaur’s FootPaleontologists found a 130 million-year-old haramiyid fossil in Utah, suggesting that the ancient relatives of modern mammals spread farther across the globe than thought.
14h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

A first look at the earliest decisions that shape a human embryoThe factors that shape the destiny of a cell, like that of a fully formed person, remain something of a mystery. Why, for example, does one stem cell in a human embryo become a neuron rather than a muscle cell? And why does another decide to build cartilage rather than cardiac tissue?
14h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Land rising above the sea 2.4 billion years ago changed planet EarthChemical signatures in shale, the Earth's most common sedimentary rock, point to a rapid rise of land above the ocean 2.4 billion years ago that possibly triggered dramatic changes in climate and life.
14h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Utah fossil reveals global exodus of mammals' near relatives to major continentsA nearly 130-million-year-old fossilized skull found in Utah is an Earth-shattering discovery in one respect.
14h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Researchers squeeze light into nanoscale devices and circuitsAs electronic devices and circuits shrink into the nanoscale, the ability to transfer data on a chip, at low power with little energy loss, is becoming a critical challenge. Over the past decade, squeezing light into tiny devices and circuits has been a major goal of nanophotonics researchers. Electronic oscillations at the surface of metals, known as surface plasmon polaritons or plasmons for sho
14h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Astronomers observe unprecedented detail in pulsar 6,500 light-years from EarthA team of astronomers has performed one of the highest resolution observations in astronomical history by observing two intense regions of radiation, 20 kilometres apart, around a star 6500 light-years away.
14h
New on MIT Technology Review

Missing climate goals could cost the world $20 trillion
14h
Latest Headlines | Science News

Fleets of self-driving taxis could be choreographed to cut trafficHive-minded self-driving cars could curb traffic congestion and vehicle pollution.
14h
Feed: All Latest

Exclusive: Facebook Opens Up About False NewsFacebook US RevengeIn a rare interview, nine Facebook executives talk about the challenge, and their progress, in battling clickbait and falsehoods.
14h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News

BU: Religious refusal laws harm sexual minority mental healthA new study led by a Boston University School of Public Health (BUSPH) researcher has found that state laws permitting the denial of services to same-sex couples because of religious or moral beliefs harm the mental health of sexual minority adults in those states.
14h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Study examining a novel index of coronary artery stenosis presented at EuroPCRA novel non-hyperemic index of coronary stenosis severity called resting full-cycle ratio (RFR) was found to be diagnostically equivalent to instantaneous wave-free ratio (iFR) in the VALIDATE RFR study. The results were presented today at EuroPCR, the annual meeting of the European Association of Percutaneous Cardiovascular Interventions, by Ziad A. Ali, M.D., D.Phil., and simultaneously publishe
14h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Nuclear physicists leap into quantum computing with first simulations of atomic nucleusScientists at the Department of Energy's Oak Ridge National Laboratory are the first to successfully simulate an atomic nucleus using a quantum computer. The results, published in Physical Review Letters, demonstrate the ability of quantum systems to compute nuclear physics problems and serve as a benchmark for future calculations.
14h
The Atlantic

Breitbart's Raheem Kassam Is OutUpdated on May 23 at 2:23 p.m. ET Breitbart London editor Raheem Kassam has left the company, a source with direct knowledge of his departure told The Atlantic , marking the exit of one of the most visible legacies of the company’s former chairman Steve Bannon within the organization. Kassam was one of the last staunch allies of Bannon still working there. The former White House chief strategist
14h
Scientific American Content: Global

FDA Plans to Speed Path to Approval for Some Gene TherapiesThe agency’s first target will be hemophilia -- Read more on ScientificAmerican.com
14h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Nuclear physicists leap into quantum computing with first simulations of atomic nucleusScientists at the Department of Energy's Oak Ridge National Laboratory are the first to successfully simulate an atomic nucleus using a quantum computer. The results, published in Physical Review Letters, demonstrate the ability of quantum systems to compute nuclear physics problems and serve as a benchmark for future calculations.
14h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

FBI overstated encryption problem with cell phonesA programming error led the FBI to vastly overstate the number of cell phones that investigators could not access because of encryption, officials said Wednesday.
14h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Thailand stops short of banning hazardous weedkillersA toxic weedkiller linked to Parkinson's disease and banned in more than 30 countries will not be outlawed in Thailand, after authorities announced Wednesday they would instead restrict its use.
14h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Macron presses tech giants on taxes, working conditionsFrench President Emmanuel Macron on Wednesday urged Facebook CEO Mark Zuckerberg and the bosses of other tech companies accused of hoovering up personal data while avoiding taxes to use their clout for global good.
14h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

United Technologies plans to hire 35,000 peopleUnited Technologies plans to hire 35,000 people and invest more than $15 billion in the U.S. over the next five years.
14h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Twitter to add special labels to political candidates in USTwitter says it's adding special labels to tweets from some U.S. political candidates ahead of this year's midterm elections.
14h
Feed: All Latest

Stealthy, Destructive Malware Infects Half a Million RoutersCisco researchers discover a new router malware outbreak that might also be the next cyberwar attack in Ukraine.
14h
Science : NPR

Echoes Of Cuba? U.S. Employee In China Hit With 'Sensations Of Sound And Pressure'Secretary of State Mike Pompeo said "the medical indications are very similar and entirely consistent" with symptoms reported by American diplomats in Cuba, where there were reports of sonic attacks. (Image credit: U.S. Department of State)
14h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Excess nutrients, coupled with climate change, damage the most highly resilient coralsOver the last 30 years, 50% of the world's coral reefs have suffered significant damage due to climate change and acidification with the last three being the worst in reefs recent history. Major coral bleaching events, which transpire when water temperatures are too high, have occurred in the Pacific Ocean, the Caribbean and parts of the Red Sea.
14h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Cultivating cannabisNot long ago, cannabis growers learned their trade mainly by trial and error, passing along tips to others behind a veil of secrecy. But with expanding legalization of cannabis in the U.S., this situation is changing. According to an article in Chemical & Engineering News (C&EN), the weekly news magazine of the American Chemical Society, cannabis growers are starting to benefit from increased comm
14h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Preserving a painter's legacy with nanomaterialsPaintings by Vincent van Gogh, Pablo Picasso and Johannes Vermeer have been delighting art lovers for years. But it turns out that these works of art might be their own worst enemy—the canvases they were painted on can deteriorate over time. In an effort to combat this aging process, one group is reporting in ACS Applied Nano Materials that nanomaterials can provide multiple layers of reinforcemen
14h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Helping dental retainers and aligners fight off bacteriaClear, plastic aligners have been growing in popularity as alternatives to bulky, metal braces. And once the teeth are straightened, patients graduate to plastic retainers to maintain the perfect smile. But these appliances can become contaminated, so one group is now reporting in ACS Applied Materials & Interfaces that they have developed a film to prevent bacteria from growing on them.
14h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Social media posts may signal whether a protest will become violentA USC-led study of violent protest has found that moral rhetoric on Twitter may signal whether a protest will turn violent.
14h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Memory molecule limits plasticity by calibrating calciumResearchers at the Max Planck Florida Institute for Neuroscience in collaboration with researchers at Emory University and the National Institute of Environmental Health Sciences, have for the first time identified a novel role for the CA2-enriched protein RGS14 and provided insights into the mechanism by which it limits plasticity. RGS14 seems to be special, acting as a molecular factor that puts
14h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Self-consistency influences how we make decisionsWhen making decisions, our perception is influenced by judgments we have made in the past as a way of remaining consistent with ourselves, suggests new research published in eLife.
14h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Perceived socioeconomic status can affect how old we feelA recent study finds that how older adults perceive their socioeconomic status influences how old they feel and their attitudes toward aging. Specifically, the lower people deem their relative socioeconomic status, the worse they feel about growing older.
14h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Team approach to support families improves ICU patient-centered careFamilies of critically ill hospital patients report higher satisfaction with clinician communication and a better perception of patient-centered care when the care team uses a low-cost strategy involving intensive emotional support and frequent meetings.
14h
Big Think

Study: Human activity is causing cancer in animalsThe changes humans bring to the environment, like pollution or pesticides, is spiking cancer rates in animals, according to a new study. Read More
14h
Scientific American Content: Global

Dinosaurs: From Humble Beginnings to Global DominanceEdinburgh University paleontologist Steve Brusatte talks about his May 2018 Scientific American article, "The Unlikely Triumph of the Dinosaurs," and his new book, The Rise and Fall of the... -- Read more on ScientificAmerican.com
14h
Science : NPR

Trying Physical Therapy First For Low Back Pain May Curb Use Of OpioidsA study of patients with low back pain finds that those who got physical therapy first needed fewer pricey scans and surgeries and had "significantly lower out-of-pocket costs" for treatment overall. (Image credit: PeopleImages/Getty Images)
14h
Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

Training compassion 'muscle' may boost brain's resilience to others' sufferingA new study suggests that as little as two weeks of compassion meditation training -- intentionally cultivating positive wishes to understand and relieve the suffering of others -- may reduce the distress a person feels when witnessing another's suffering. The findings may have implications for professions in which people routinely work with others who are suffering, like doctors, law enforcement
15h
Feed: All Latest

Facebook Is Beefing Up Its Two-Factor AuthenticationThe update, now available to most users, comes several months after Facebook was criticized for spamming users' two-factor authentication phone numbers.
15h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Virtual visits for follow-up hypertension care have outcomes similar to office visitsA study conducted among patients at Massachusetts General Hospital and Brigham and Women's Hospital found that virtual follow-up visits for patients with hypertension appeared just as effective as in-person office visits in helping maintain blood pressure control.
15h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News

ECDC and EMCDDA make the case for active case finding of communicable diseases in prisonWhat are the most (cost-) effective ways to prevent and control communicable diseases in prison settings? In their Guidance ECDC and the European Monitoring Centre for Drugs and Drug Addiction, present the evidence on active case finding as key measure to diagnose communicable diseases early. The two agencies advise to actively offer testing for hepatitis B and C and HIV to all people in prison an
15h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Excess nutrients, coupled with climate change, damage the most highly resilient coralsExperimentalists conducted a simulation of future conditions in the Red Sea caused by global warming and acidification, while simultaneously increasing levels of nutrients such as nitrate and phosphate. They found that when nitrate and phosphate were added, the coral thermal resilience was compromised while algal growth benefited from excess CO2 and nutrients. Algal dominance over corals in the re
15h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News

People with family history of alcoholism release more dopamine in expectation of alcoholPeople with a family history of alcohol use disorder (AUD) release more dopamine in the brain's main reward center in response to the expectation of alcohol than people diagnosed with the disorder, or healthy people without any family history of AUD, reports a new study in Biological Psychiatry: Cognitive Neuroscience and Neuroimaging.
15h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Helping dental retainers and aligners fight off bacteriaClear, plastic aligners have been growing in popularity as alternatives to bulky, metal braces. And once the teeth are straightened, patients graduate to plastic retainers to maintain the perfect smile. But these appliances can become contaminated, so one group is now reporting in ACS Applied Materials & Interfaces that they have developed a film to prevent bacteria from growing on them.
15h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Abdominal fat secretes novel adipokine promoting insulin resistance and inflammationA novel adipokine that favors the development of insulin resistance and systemic inflammation has been identified by an international research team with participation of the DZD. In cases of severe obesity, this adipokine is secreted by the adipocytes of the abdominal fat tissue and released into the bloodstream. The new findings could contribute to the development of alternative approaches for th
15h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Social media posts may signal whether a protest will become violentThe study also finds that people are more likely to condone using violence to defend their beliefs when they think others share their moral values.
15h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Air pollution associated with acute respiratory distress hospitalization of elderlyIn a new study, researchers found significant associations between seniors' long-term exposure to two types of air pollution and hospitalization for acute respiratory distress syndrome (ARDS). The study was presented at the 2018 American Thoracic Society International Conference.
15h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News

AVATS surgery shown to be option for patients deemed 'inoperable'A new study demonstrates that awake video-assisted thoracoscopic surgery (AVATS) -- a minimally invasive procedure that is done under local anesthesia and sedation -- is a safe and effective alternative for patients with poor lung function and lung cancer who would normally be precluded from having surgery due to its risks. The study was presented at the 2018 American Thoracic Society Internationa
15h
Feed: All Latest

Emilia Clarke Wants a Chewbacca Tattoo—and a DragonThe 'Solo: A Star Wars Story' actress loves her co-star.
15h
Big Think

How to see slick social graphs of your favorite characters from 700 top filmsCould social graphing be a way to find the 'Holy Grail' of successful movie writing? Read More
15h
Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

Evening use of light-emitting tablets may disrupt healthy sleepA new study reveals that evening use of light-emitting tablets can induce delays in desired bedtimes, suppress secretion of melatonin (the hormone that regulates sleep and wakefulness), and impair next-morning alertness.
15h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Berlin agrees to compensate power firms for nuclear exitThe German government approved a draft law Wednesday that paves the way for energy giants RWE and Vattenfall to receive hundreds of millions of euros in compensation for the country's decision to phase out nuclear power.
15h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Tata Motors profit halves over $4.5bn investmentIndian carmaker Tata Motors on Wednesday reported a staggering 50 percent fall in quarterly net profit, blaming a huge one-off investment and a slowdown in sales.
15h
The Atlantic

An Unusual Idea for Fixing School SegregationMany proposals for addressing school segregation seem pretty small, especially when compared to the scale and severity of the problem. Without the power of a court-ordered desegregation mandate, progress can feel extremely far off, if not altogether impossible. Some even believe—understandably though mistakenly —that no meaningful steps can be taken to integrate schools unless housing segregation
15h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Researchers build most comprehensive tree of life for malaria parasitesA new study led by the American Museum of Natural History puts forth the most comprehensive tree of life for malaria parasites to date. Known for being a devastating scourge of human health, with five species known to infect humans, there are more than 500 described species of malaria that infect mammals, birds, and reptiles. Among the researchers' findings, which were published today in the journ
15h
Scientific American Content: Global

The Price of Open ScienceWhen it’s also big science, the careers of those involved can suffer -- Read more on ScientificAmerican.com
15h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Preserving a painter's legacy with nanomaterialsPaintings by Vincent van Gogh, Pablo Picasso and Johannes Vermeer have been delighting art lovers for years. But it turns out that these works of art might be their own worst enemy -- the canvases they were painted on can deteriorate over time. In an effort to combat this aging process, one group is reporting in ACS Applied Nano Materials that nanomaterials can provide multiple layers of reinforce
15h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Rapamycin lotion reduces facial tumors caused by tuberous sclerosis, UTHealth reportsAddressing a critical issue for people with a genetic disorder called tuberous sclerosis complex (TSC), doctors at The University of Texas Health Science Center at Houston (UTHealth) reported that a skin cream containing rapamycin significantly reduced the disfiguring facial tumors affecting more than 90 percent of people with the condition.
15h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Researchers build most comprehensive tree of life for malaria parasitesA new study led by the American Museum of Natural History puts forth the most comprehensive tree of life for malaria parasites to date. Among the researchers' findings is that the diverse malaria parasite genus Plasmodium (which includes those species that infect humans) is composed of several distantly related evolutionary lineages, and, from a taxonomic standpoint, many species should be renamed
15h
Quanta Magazine

A Classical Math Problem Gets Pulled Into the Modern WorldLong before robots could run or cars could drive themselves, mathematicians contemplated a simple mathematical question. They figured it out, then laid it to rest — with no way of knowing that the object of their mathematical curiosity would feature in machines of the far-off future. The future is now here. As a result of new work by Amir Ali Ahmadi and Anirudha Majumdar of Princeton University,
15h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Hamburg is first German city to order diesel bansAuthorities in Hamburg said Wednesday they would ban some diesel vehicles from two major arteries to improve air quality, making the German port city the first to take the long-feared step.
15h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Comcast challenges Disney for control of 21st Century Fox assetsA full-fledged bidding war for key assets of Rupert Murdoch's 21st Century Fox erupted Wednesday as media and cable giant Comcast announced it plans an all-cash bid that would top an offer already on the table from Walt Disney Co.
15h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

The scandals bedevilling FacebookFacebook US RevengeAs Facebook chief Mark Zuckerberg pursues a tour of Europe to explain his company's shortcomings involving the use of data and fake news, here is a roundup of the scandals.
15h
Viden

NASAs nye planetjæger afslører utroligt stjernebilledePlanetjæger på jagt efter exoplaneter afslører sit første billede af spektakulær stjernehimmel.
15h
New Scientist - News

Men more likely to get diabetes if they have overweight wivesIn heterosexual relationships, only men are more likely to get diabetes when their partner has a high BMI – perhaps because of gender roles in the home
15h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Digital Life: Cutting back on a constant smartphone habitWhy are we checking Facebook, Instagram, Twitter, then Facebook again when we just wanted to check the weather?
15h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Why an upcoming appointment makes us less productiveYou've got a full hour until your next meeting. But you probably won't make the most of that time, new research suggests.
15h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News

How local communities can transition to sustainable energy systemsWhat makes for a successful transition to a low-carbon energy system? Local involvement, perceived fairness and information sharing, according to new research from Lund University in Sweden.
15h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Changes to specific MicroRNA involved in development of Lou Gehrig's diseaseA new Tel Aviv University study identifies a previously unknown mechanism involved in the development of Lou Gehrig's disease, or amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS). The findings could serve as the foundation for the treatment of ALS in the future.
15h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Why an upcoming appointment makes us less productiveYou've got a full hour until your next meeting. But you probably won't make the most of that time, new research suggests. In a series of eight studies, both in the lab and real life, researchers found that free time seems shorter to people when it comes before a task or appointment on their calendar.
15h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Military-civilian partnerships aim to help meet military medical readiness needsA growing partnership between the Military Health System and civilian trauma institutions will create, for the first time, a fully integrated military-civilian trauma system.
15h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Orphaned elephants change where they live, in response to poaching and the need for foodYoung elephants who have lost either their mothers or the matriarchs of their herd are affected dramatically, and change where they live, according to new research from Save the Elephants and Colorado State University.
15h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

American 'prepping' culture influenced by media and government fearsNew research from SSPSSR finds most people hoarding items such as food and water do so 'just in case', rather than because of deeply-held, irrational beliefs that society is on the verge of an imminent collapse.
15h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Chimpanzee calls differ according to contextAn important question in the evolution of language is what caused animal calls to diversify and to encode different information. A team of scientists led by Catherine Crockford of the Max Planck Institute for Evolutionary Anthropology found that chimpanzees use the quiet 'hoo' call in three different behavioural contexts—alert, travel and rest. The need to stay together in low visibility habitat m
15h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

How a cell knows when to divideHow does a cell know when to divide? We know that hundreds of genes contribute to a wave of activity linked to cell division, but to generate that wave new research shows that cells must first grow large enough to produce four key proteins in adequate amounts. The study, published today in Cell Systems, offers a path for controlling the balance between cell growth and division, which is implicated
15h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

ESF lists top 10 new species for 2018The large and small, beautiful and bizarre are among the newly discovered animals, plants and microbes announced by the College of Environmental Science and Forestry (ESF) as the Top 10 New Species for 2018.
15h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Floridians could far far more frequent, intense heatwavesBy the late 21st century, if atmospheric greenhouse gas concentrations reach worst-case projections, Floridians could experience summer heatwaves three times more frequently, and each heatwave could last six times longer than at present, according to Meteorology Professor Shawn M. Milrad of Embry-Riddle Aeronautical University.
15h
Scientific American Content: Global

World Needs to Set Rules for Geoengineering Experiments, Experts SayWith interest in such research rising, and the risks uncertain, that conservation needs to start now -- Read more on ScientificAmerican.com
15h
Big Think

Scientists explain Michael Jackson's 'impossible' antigravity tiltHow did Michael Jackson accomplish the famous antigravity tilt? Three neurosurgeons (and MJ fans) dissect the dynamics. Read More
15h
Live Science

This Mysterious, Deep-Sea Jellyfish Looks Like the Ghost of an AlienA remotely operated vehicle named Hercules filmed a rarely seen jellyfish that looks like a cross between an alien and a pinkish makeup bag.
16h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Orphaned elephants change where they live, in response to poaching and the need for foodYoung elephants who have lost either their mothers or the matriarchs of the herd are affected dramatically, and change where they live, according to new research.
16h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Research highlights the influence social media marketing has on children's food intakeNew research from the University of Liverpool, presented at the European Congress on Obesity today (Wednesday, May 23), highlights the negative influence that social media has on children's food intake.
16h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Understanding light-induced electrical current in atomically thin nanomaterialsScientists demonstrated that scanning photocurrent microscopy--an imaging capability just added to Brookhaven Lab's Center for Functional Nanomaterials--could provide the optoelectronic information needed to improve the performance of devices for power generation, communications, data storage, and lighting
16h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News

International Tree Nut Council study links tree nuts and improved type 2 diabetes healthOne of the largest studies to date on nuts and diabetes was published today in Diabetologia, the journal of the European Association for the Study of Diabetes (EASD). The study shows that approximately two ounces of nuts a day, as a replacement for carbohydrate foods, can improve glycemic control and blood lipids in those with type 2 diabetes.
16h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Genetic diversity helps protect against diseaseSo much for survival of the fittest -- diversity is the key: a team of researchers from the Leibniz-Institute of Freshwater Ecology and Inland Fisheries (IGB) has succeeded in demonstrating experimentally that genetic diversity makes populations more resistant to disease.
16h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Fatty liver disease research set to benefit from stem cell advanceScientists have developed a lab-based system for studying the most common type of liver disease, paving the way for research into new therapies. The team at the University of Edinburgh has devised a way to probe Non-Alcoholic Fatty Liver Disease, which affects up to one in three people, using cells in a dish.
16h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Chimpanzee calls differ according to contextAn important question in the evolution of language is what caused animal calls to diversify and to encode different information. A team of scientists led by Catherine Crockford of the Max Planck Institute for Evolutionary Anthropology found that chimpanzees use the quiet 'hoo' call in three different behavioural contexts -- alert, travel and rest. The need to stay together in low visibility habita
16h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Making massive leaps in electronics at nano-scaleBy chemically attaching nano-particles of the rare earth element, gadolinium, to carbon nanotubes, the researchers have found that the electrical conductivity in the nanotubes can be increased by incorporating the spin properties of the gadolinium which arises from its magnetic nature.
16h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Penn researchers identify source of molecule linked to nasal polyps, asthma attacksA new discovery about how the immune system responds to common sinus infections and asthma could explain why patients develop these issues in the first place and ultimately may lead to improved targeted therapies.
16h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News

How a cell knows when to divideWe know that hundreds of genes contribute to a wave of activity linked to cell division, but to generate that wave new research shows that cells must first grow large enough to produce four key proteins in adequate amounts, according to research published in Cell Systems.
16h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Is topical rapamycin effective, safe to treat facial lesions?Facial angiofibromas are disfiguring growths and these lesions occur in most people with tuberous sclerosis complex, a genetic disorder where growths can appear throughout the body. Current treatments for these facial growths include laser surgery, cryotherapy, dermabrasion and other similar procedures that can be painful and cause scarring but can't prevent recurrence of the lesions.The results o
16h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Is there association between groundwater lithium, diagnoses of bipolar disorder, dementia?High groundwater concentration of lithium, a naturally occurring trace element, wasn't associated with any benefit in diagnoses of bipolar disorder or dementia when accounting for local health care resources and demographics, two factors that can cause mental health diagnosis rates to vary.
16h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Opioid-related adverse drug events common after surgery, associated with worse outcomesOpioid-related adverse drug events were common among patients undergoing surgery and endoscopy procedures in the hospital and they were associated with worse patient outcomes.
16h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Laws allowing denial of services to same-sex couples associated with increase in sexual minority adults reporting mental distressLaws that allow same-sex couples to be denied services are associated with an increase in sexual minority adults reporting mental distress.
16h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Effect of new guideline on US adults recommended for high blood pressure treatmentThe number of US adults with high blood pressure is estimated to grow by 31 million and the number of adults recommended for antihypertensive treatment would increase by 11 million under the 2017 American College of Cardiology/American Heart Association hypertension guideline.
16h
The Atlantic

The Undemocratic Spread of Big BrotherEarlier this week, the ACLU led a coalition of two dozen civil-rights organizations in a new protest mounted in defense of an old proposition: that “people should be free to walk down the street without being watched by the government.” Facial-recognition technology threatens that proposition. Amazon is marketing a facial recognition product to local police agencies. And while it is hardly alone
16h
The Atlantic

Visiting the Mysterious Fairy Circles of the Namib DesertO ne evening earlier this spring, German naturalist Norbert Jürgens strayed from his expedition in the Namib Desert. He walked away from his campsite beside Leopard Rock, a huge pile of schist slabs stacked like left-over roofing tiles, and into a vast plain ringed with red-burnished hills. He had 20 minutes of light left before sunset, and he intended to use them. This next part may sound like a
16h
The Atlantic

The Dour Resurgence of Cable, Deadpool 2’s Anti-HeroThis article contains spoilers for the film Deadpool 2 . “There are five kinds of mutants,” the comic-book character Cable says in New Mutants #99 (1991), one of his earliest appearances. “The mollifiers. The abusers. The used. The hunted. The hidden. I am trying to create a sixth kind. The survivors. I am trying to prepare you all for a very bleak future.” In the world of early-’90s superhero co
16h
Popular Science

It's a bird! It's a plane! It's a drone that loves trash!Nexus Media News A New Jersey man is using drones and machine learning to measure plastic pollution on beaches. 72 year-old New Jersey resident Morris Enyeart is a drone pilot on a mission to track plastic pollution on beaches.
16h
Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

Recombinant E. Coli As a biofactory for the biosynthesis of diverse nanomaterialsA metabolic research group has developed a recombinant E. coli strain that biosynthesizes 60 different nanomaterials covering 35 elements on the periodic table. Among the elements, the team could biosynthesize 33 novel nanomaterials for the first time, advancing the forward design of nanomaterials through the biosynthesis of various single and multi-elements.
16h
Futurity.org

This may be why you gain weight when you quit smokingThe same proteins that moderate nicotine dependence in the brain may be involved in regulating metabolism by acting directly on certain types of fat cells, new research shows. Researchers had previously identified a new type of fat cell in mice and humans, in addition to the white fat cells that store energy as lipids. These thermogenic, or “beige” fat cells can be activated to burn energy throug
16h
TED Talks Daily (SD video)

How I made friends with reality | Emily LevineWith her signature wit and wisdom, Emily Levine meets her ultimate challenge as a comedian/philosopher: she makes dying funny. In this personal talk, she takes us on her journey to make friends with reality -- and peace with death. Life is an enormous gift, Levine says: "You enrich it as best you can, and then you give it back."
16h
Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

Atomic-scale manufacturing now a realityScientists have applied a machine learning technique using artificial intelligence to perfect and automate atomic-scale manufacturing, something which has never been done before. The vastly greener, faster, smaller technology enabled by this development greatly reduces impact on the climate while still satisfying the insatiable demands of the information age.
16h
Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

Beyond the limits of conventional electronics: Stable organic molecular nanowiresScientists have created the first thermally stable organic molecular nanowire devices using a single 4.5-nm-long molecule placed inside electroless gold-plated nanogap electrodes.
16h
Feed: All Latest

Thanks to Binges and Benders, Postmates Knows the True YouA team of data scientists at the anything-goes delivery company revealed our collective whims, whether it’s scarfing brisket, stockpiling sex toys, or splurging on caviar.
16h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Controlled nano-assemblyDNA, the carrier of genetic information, has become established as a highly useful building material in nanotechnology. One requirement in many applications is the controlled, switchable assembly of nanostructures. In the journal Angewandte Chemie, scientists have now introduced a new strategy for control through altering pH value. It is based on ethylenediamine, which only supports the assembly o
16h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Appending triphenyltriazine to 1,10-phenanthrolineThe electron-transport material is a dispensable element of organic light-emitting diodes (OLEDs). Recently, Xu-Hui Zhu and co-workers at State Key Laboratory of Luminescent Materials and Devices, South China University of Technology developed a series of high Tg phenanthroline derivatives, which may provide a promising approach to high-performant and cost-effective organic electron-transport mate
16h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News

American 'prepping' culture influenced by media and government fearsThe act of 'prepping' is not driven by delusional fears of society's imminent collapse, but more a response to fears raised by the media and government over short-term, but possible, shocks to society.
16h
Ingeniøren

Dansk-designede ’mælkebøtte-shelters’ til Mars vinder prisTo arkitektstuderendes forslag til primitive overnatningssteder på Mars er så smart og anderledes tænkt, at det har vundet en konkurrence. Nu forfølger vinderne drømmen om rumarkitektur.
16h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

A necessary evil? What you need to know about animal researchEvery year, millions of animals are used in scientific research across the UK. Statistics suggest that almost four million scientific procedures were carried out on animals in 2016 alone. The majority of these were reported to be on mice (73%), followed by fish (14%), rats (6%) and birds (4%). The remaining proportion was made up of other species including horses and other equines (0.23%), dogs (0
16h
New Scientist - News

World’s most-spoken languages may have arisen in ancient IranAbout 3 billion people speak Indo-European languages like English and Hindustani, and it seems the first such tongue was spoken south of the Caucasus mountains
16h
New Scientist - News

Watch a badminton robot practice its game-winning trick shotsA badminton robot could be the perfect sparring partner for pros. It has superhuman wrist speeds and has even mastered the tricky spin net shot
16h
cognitive science

How Brain Waves Surf Sound Waves to Process Speechsubmitted by /u/OneMansModusPonens [link] [comments]
16h
Latest Headlines | Science News

Genetic sleuthing again IDs a murder suspect in a cold caseThe arrest of a second murder suspect with the help of genetic genealogy raises worries that suspicionless searches may be next.
16h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Skin responsible for greater exposure to carcinogens in barbecue smoke than lungsWith summer coming, it's only a matter of time before the smells and tastes of barbecued foods dominate the neighborhood. But there's a downside to grilling that can literally get under your skin. In a study appearing in Environmental Science & Technology, scientists report that skin is a more important pathway for uptake of cancer-causing compounds produced during barbecuing than inhalation. They
16h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Genetic diversity helps protect against diseaseSo much for survival of the fittest – diversity is the key: a team of researchers from the Leibniz-Institute of Freshwater Ecology and Inland Fisheries (IGB) has succeeded in demonstrating experimentally that genetic diversity makes populations more resistant to disease.
16h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Atomic-scale manufacturing now a realityScientists at the University of Alberta have applied a machine learning technique using artificial intelligence to perfect and automate atomic-scale manufacturing, something which has never been done before. The vastly greener, faster, smaller technology enabled by this development greatly reduces impact on the climate while still satisfying the insatiable demands of the information age.
16h
Latest Headlines | Science News

Genetic sleuthing again IDs a murder suspect in a cold caseThe arrest of a second murder suspect with the help of genetic genealogy raises worries that suspicionless searches may be next.
16h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Valves for tiny particlesNewly-developed nanovalves allow the flow of individual nanoparticles in liquids to be controlled in tiny channels. This is of interest for lab-on-a-chip applications such as in materials science and biomedicine.
16h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Surgery involving ultrasound energy found to treat high blood pressureAn operation that targets the nerves connected to the kidney has been found to significantly reduce blood pressure in patients with hypertension, according to a clinical trial led in the UK by Queen Mary University of London and Barts Health NHS Trust.
16h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News

New papers highlight economic benefits of European-Eurasian economic tiesA IIASA-led project looking at economic ties between the European Union (EU) and the Eurasian Economic Union (EAEU) has published three new reports offering recommendations to improve economic cooperation despite ongoing political cool-down.
16h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Are pain tolerance levels similar among groups of friends?Are your friends very pain tolerant? Then it is likely that you are as well, provided you are a male. A recent study, published in the Scandinavian Journal of Pain, along with an Editorial Comment by Dr. Jeffrey Mogil, published by De Gruyter, shows that there is a positive correlation between the pain tolerance of individuals and that of their friends.
16h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Strain directs spin wavesA collaboration research team at the Toyohashi University of Technology and Massachusetts Institute of Technology has revealed the relationship between the strain in a magnetic insulator thin film and spin waves. The relationship between magnetoelastic anisotropy and propagation properties of forward volume spin waves in single-crystalline yttrium iron garnet films grown on three garnet substrates
16h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Why we fail to understand our smartphone useChecking your phone dozens of times a day indicates unconscious behavior, which is 'extremely repetitive' say psychologists. Existing research is yet to conclude whether people really are 'addicted' to their smartphones due to over reliance on people's own estimates or beliefs. But new research into smartphone behavior has revealed that while people underestimate time spent on their smartphones, t
16h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Leopoldina-Experts call for stricter approval procedures for plant protection productsA number of chemical plant protection products, also known as pesticides, show harmful effects on ecosystems and biodiversity in their current use. Besides climate change, changes in global nutrient cycles and habitat destruction through altered land-use, the utilization of pesticides has also led to a dramatic loss of biodiversity. This is explained by a group of experts in the discussion paper p
16h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Tuberculosis: Pharmacists develop new substance to counteract antimicrobial resistanceAntimicrobial resistance is on the rise worldwide. This is becoming a problem for infectious diseases like tuberculosis as there are only a few active substances available to combat such diseases. Pharmacists at Martin Luther University Halle-Wittenberg (MLU) have now found a way to increase the efficacy of a common tuberculosis agent while, at the same time, reducing resistance to it. The researc
16h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Men take shortcuts, while women follow well-known routesWhen navigating in a known environment, men prefer to take shortcuts to reach their destination more quickly, while women tend to use routes they know. This is according to Alexander Boone of UC Santa Barbara in the US who is lead author of a study that investigated the different ways in which men and women navigate. The research is published in Springer's journal Memory & Cognition.
16h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

First light for the storm hunterAs the International Space Station flew over the Indonesian coast of Sumatra on an April night, lightning from a thunderstorm reached the upper layers of the atmosphere and its light show was captured by ESA's latest observatory in space.
16h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Spinning rugby balls—the rotation of the most massive galaxiesBy targeting the most massive galaxies in our universe, astronomers have studied how their stars move. The results are surprising: while half of them spin around their short axis as expected, the other half turn around their long axis. Such kinematics are most likely the result of a special type of galaxy merger, involving already massive, similar-mass galaxies. This would imply that the growth of
16h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Mining for answers in the ocean's archivesWith a death toll of more than 250,000 people, the Boxing Day tsunami of 2004 was one of the most devastating disasters of recent history.
16h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Bendy laser beams can examine human tissue like never beforeLight-sheet fluorescence microscopy is an exciting new imaging method that harnesses thin sheets of light to make images of large biological samples such as fly and fish embryos, mice and even pieces of human tissue. And its use could lead to less intrusive and more effective diagnosis for patients.
16h
Futurity.org

3 steps to fight mass incarceration in the United StatesHow do we take the “mass” out of mass incarceration? Here, Mark Kleiman, professor of public policy at the NYU Marron Institute of Urban Management, tackles that question. “To get back to our 1962 incarceration rate, now that we’re back to our 1962 crime rate,” he says, “we have let to let out 80 percent of the prisoners.” In this video, Kleiman offers three steps for making that happen. 3 reason
16h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

The Standard Model of particle physics—the absolutely amazing theory of almost everythingThe Standard Model. What dull name for the most accurate scientific theory known to human beings.
17h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

How chemical weapons became taboo – and why they still areThe world has witnessed two very different chemical weapons attacks in the last two months: in March, the assassination attempt against Sergei Skripal in the British town of Salisbury, and then the Assad regime's latest chemical strike in Syria. The weapons used in both cases are prohibited under international law, and their use indicates the breaking of a "taboo" which has provoked a swift and fo
17h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Farmers and cropdusting pilots on the Great Plains worried about pesticide risks before 'Silent Spring'It is easy to frame conservation as a clash between environmentalists and polluters. But this view can greatly oversimplify many complex choices. What does conservation look like when ideas about nature cut across political lines?
17h
The Atlantic

Former South Korean National-Security Adviser: The U.S. May Have to Withdraw Some TroopsSEOUL, South Korea—In a striking challenge to his fellow conservatives ahead of nuclear talks between Donald Trump and Kim Jong Un, a top aide to former South Korean President Lee Myung Bak told me that South Koreans will “have to live with” a reduction in American forces in Korea “if that’s necessary and there’s no other way to denuclearize North Korea.” “If we can make a deal with the U.S. on t
17h
The Atlantic

Democrats Split Over Trump's Prison PitchMany Democrats believed that a years-long bipartisan push to overhaul the federal criminal-justice system died with the election of Donald Trump. The president had proudly anointed himself the “law-and-order candidate” in 2016 and appointed as his attorney general Jeff Sessions, the Senate’s leading conservative critic of reducing mandatory-minimum sentences, improving federal prison conditions,
17h
Futurity.org

How to detect a ‘mystery’ state in liquid crystalsChemists have demonstrated a theoretical framework for detecting a mysterious intermediate state in liquid crystals and for better understanding how it works. Liquid crystals undergo a peculiar type of phase change. At a certain temperature, their cigar-shaped molecules go from a disordered jumble to a more orderly arrangement in which they all point more or less in the same direction. LCD televi
17h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News

New advances in understanding and treating intellectual disorderResearchers at Tohoku University in Japan have investigated an intellectual disorder (ATR-X) syndrome to reveal its cause, mechanism and a potential therapeutic strategy to decrease associated cognitive impairment.
17h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Beyond the limits of conventional electronics: stable organic molecular nanowiresScientists at Tokyo Institute of Technology created the first thermally stable organic molecular nanowire devices using a single 4.5-nm-long molecule placed inside electroless gold-plated nanogap electrodes.
17h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Study examines bone health in children with leukemiaIn a Journal of Bone and Mineral Research study that followed 186 children with Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia (ALL) for 6 years after initiation of chemotherapy, approximately 1 in 5 children experienced a non-vertebral fracture and 1 in 3 had a new vertebral fracture.
17h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Atomic-scale manufacturing now a realityScientists at the University of Alberta have applied a machine learning technique using artificial intelligence to perfect and automate atomic-scale manufacturing, something which has never been done before. The vastly greener, faster, smaller technology enabled by this development greatly reduces impact on the climate while still satisfying the insatiable demands of the information age.
17h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Research reveals concerning childbirth trendsNew research from La Trobe University has raised concern about the number of Victorian women suffering potentially dangerous levels of blood loss after childbirth.
17h
Science | The Guardian

Jordan Peterson may be a ‘public intellectual’, but his latest theory isn’t very cleverThe academic believes violent men can be cured by the love of a good woman through enforced monogamy. And he can’t understand why people are laughing at him? I read an interview recently in which a gentleman by the name of Jordan Peterson claimed that chaos is represented by ‘the feminine’ and order is masculine. What? Tamsin, by email Continue reading...
17h
Feed: All Latest

Porsche's Cayenne E-Hybrid Checks Your Route to Pick Your PowerThe luxury SUV looks down the road to see where you need battery power, and where you need old-fashioned internal combustion.
17h
Futurity.org

Closing power plants cuts rate of preterm baby birthsClosing coal- and oil-fired power plants lowers the rate of preterm births in neighboring communities and improves fertility, two new studies show. Researchers compared preterm births and fertility before and after eight power plants in California closed between 2001 and 2011. “We were excited to do a good news story in environmental health…” Overall, the percentage of preterm births—babies born
17h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

As more solar and wind come onto the grid, prices go down but new questions come upWind and solar energy are growing rapidly in the U.S. As these energy sources become a bigger part of the electricity mix, their growth raises new questions: How do solar and wind influence energy prices? And since power plants last for decades, what should policymakers and investors think about to ensure that investments in power infrastructure pay off in the future?
17h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

How shoplifters justify theft at supermarket self-service checkoutsThe number of self-check out terminals around the world is predicted to reach 325,000 by 2019 and some stores have even become fully self service. But for some supermarket customers, the removal of store clerks has been a green light for dishonest behaviour.
17h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Pairing AI with optical scanning for real-world product authenticationToday IBM Research is introducing IBM Crypto Anchor Verifier, a new technology that brings innovations in AI and optical imaging together to help prove the identity and authenticity of objects. We're rolling this technology out with one of our first clients, GIA (Gemological Institute of America), to help them evaluate and grade diamonds.
17h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Understanding the generation of light-induced electrical current in atomically thin nanomaterialsScientists at the Center for Functional Nanomaterials (CFN)—a U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office of Science User Facility at Brookhaven National Laboratory—have used an optoelectronic imaging technique to study the electronic behavior of atomically thin nanomaterials exposed to light. Combined with nanoscale optical imaging, this scanning photocurrent microscopy technique provides a powerful t
17h
Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

Floridians could far far more frequent, intense HeatwavesBy the late 21st century, if atmospheric greenhouse gas concentrations reach worst-case projections, Floridians could experience summer heatwaves three times more frequently, and each heatwave could last six times longer and be much hotter than at present, according to new research.
17h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Student finds a way to control the spin transport in networks of the smallest conductor knownResearchers at the University of the Witwatersrand have found ways to control the spin transport in networks of the smallest electrical conductor known to man.
17h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

New research helps to de-gender the teaching professionA new qualitative study, published in the journal Gender and Education and carried out by researchers at the Universities of Hertfordshire and Hildesheim, found that teacher gender has no effect on how male and female teachers employ discipline strategies used in primary school classrooms.
17h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Designer human tissue—coming to a lab near youThe latest issue of Philosophical Transactions B looks at the opportunities for the use of human pluripotent stem cells (PSCs), both from embryos and from the reprogramming of adult cells, as a scalable alternative to using human tissue for bio- and regenerative medicine applications. These special cell types have the ability to change into different types of cells, which promises an unlimited sup
17h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Novel strategies to combat production diseases in pigs and poultryThe intensification of farming increases the risk and susceptibility of pigs and chickens getting production diseases. This makes animal husbandry practices less efficient, resulting in huge financial losses.
17h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

New mobile app for healthier food choices when dining outOver the last few years, the frequency of dining at restaurants or other out-of-home dining establishments in Europe has radically increased. Yet, compared to meals prepared at home, restaurant fare tends to contain more calories, total fat, saturated fat and sodium. Eating out is often cited as the primary reason for an unhealthy lifestyle and increased obesity levels as consumers have very littl
17h
Feed: All Latest

So Long, Glassholes: Wearables Aren't Science Projects AnymoreThe end of Google Glass wasn’t even the end of Google Glass. More than that, the idea of augmented reality has been normalized.
17h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

New robots set to transform farmingEuropean consumers expect a clean supply chain and biodiversity to be conserved. Therefore, reducing the inputs of pesticides and chemical fertilisers to a minimum and/or replacing them by agro-ecological or robot solutions is required. Furthermore, the average age of European farmers is among the highest of all sectors, thus farming needs to attract young people with attractive working opportunit
17h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Urban food from vertical farmingYour local supermarket and favourite restaurant could soon be growing their own food, thanks to an EU-funded project that has completely redesigned the food supply chain to develop the concept of in-store farming.
17h
Scientific American Content: Global

Oxygen Depletion Smothered Marine Life in Earth's Largest Mass ExtinctionNew findings suggest oxygen diminished globally -- Read more on ScientificAmerican.com
17h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

DNA replication in HPVA pair of researchers from the University of Delaware Department of Medical and Molecular Sciences are investigating genetic variations in DNA replication of human papillomaviruses (HPV) and its correlation with HPV-related cancers. UD's Esther Biswas-Fiss and Subhasis Biswas—and their former doctoral student, Dr. Gulden Yilmaz (currently at Arcus Medica, PA) recently published their findings in B
17h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Land-cover changes likely intensified Dust Bowl droughtDramatic human-caused changes in land cover between 1850 and the 1930s had a substantive effect on the 1930s Dust Bowl drought in the Great Plains, a new study by University of Nebraska–Lincoln researchers finds.
17h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Novel organ-on-chip platform for drug screeningImec, the world-leading research and innovation hub in nano-electronics and digital technologies, presents this week at its technology forum ITF 2018 (Antwerp, May 23-24), a novel organ-on-chip platform for pharmacological studies with unprecedented signal quality. It fuses imec's high-density multi-electrode array (MEA)-chip with a microfluidic well plate, developed in collaboration with Micronit
17h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Single-system solar tech cuts clean energy costs in halfGenerating power from the sun isn't the problem. The technology has been there for decades. Storing that power efficiently, however, has been a challenge.
17h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

State crash data shows seat belt use critical in saving livesThose involved in auto crashes while not wearing seat belts are 40 times more likely to die than those who buckle up, according to an analysis of state crash records from the past five years.
17h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

New study details geological process behind Titan's dunesTitan's windswept dunes may sprawl millions of more kilometers than previously thought and were likely formed by geological processes similar to those on Earth, according to a new study. The new findings could help scientists look for life or its molecular precursors on Saturn's largest moon.
17h
Viden

Vulkanolog: Vulkanudbrud på Hawaii bliver overvåget 24 timer i døgnetGiftgasser udgør den største fare på Hawaii, da de er mindre synlige og spredes af uforudsigelig vind.
17h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

The farmer wants a hive—inside the world of renting beesAlmonds, blueberries, apples, melons – all of these fruits, and many more, rely on insect pollination. Some crops rely more on pollinators than others. Insect pollination isn't just about the number of fruits produced – it can also improve the quality of the yield. For example, self-pollinated flowers may produce a fruit, but it might be very small or misshapen.
17h
Popular Science

How to keep your dank memes and other creations safe from internet thievesDIY Protect your images, videos, and writing. You're proud to post your own digital artwork, songs, and jokes online—until you spot someone else claiming credit for your work. Here's how to protect your digital…
17h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Recombinant E. Coli As a biofactory for the biosynthesis of diverse nanomaterialsA metabolic research group at KAIST and Chung-Ang University in Korea has developed a recombinant E. coli strain that biosynthesizes 60 different nanomaterials covering 35 elements on the periodic table. Among the elements, the team could biosynthesize 33 novel nanomaterials for the first time, advancing the forward design of nanomaterials through the biosynthesis of various single and multi-eleme
17h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Team tests feasibility of EmDrive and Mach Effect ThrustersA team of German physicists with TU Dresden has independently tested the feasibility of the EmDrive and Mach Effect Thrusters. They have presented their findings at this year's Aeronautics and Astronautics Association of France's Space Propulsion conference.
17h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Combing light for tell-tale chemical fingerprintsA laser-based technique that can scan and lock on to molecular vibrational signals that are normally too complex to resolve clearly could enable production of sensors for multi-species identification in harsh environments, including industrial emissions.
17h
The Atlantic

The GOP’s 'Unbelievably Absurd' Response to Santa FeIn the wake of mass shootings in America, Republicans and Democrats migrate to their respective marks as though urged on by a stage director. They read from their respective scripts, Democrats amping up their calls for gun control and Republicans stressing the need for more effective mental health care. Friday’s mass shooting in Santa Fe, Texas, in which a teenager murdered 10 people at Santa Fe
17h
Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

Lightening up dark galaxiesAstronomers have identified at least six candidates for dark galaxies -- galaxies that have a few (if any) stars in them and are, for that reason, notoriously difficult to detect with current instruments.
17h
Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

Skin responsible for greater exposure to carcinogens in barbecue smoke than lungsWith summer coming, it's only a matter of time before the smells and tastes of barbecued foods dominate the neighborhood. But there's a downside to grilling that can literally get under your skin. Scientists report that skin is a more important pathway for uptake of cancer-causing compounds produced during barbecuing than inhalation. They also found that clothing cannot fully protect individuals f
17h
Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

Spike in severe black lung disease among former US coal minersThe number of cases of progressive massive fibrosis, the most severe form of black lung disease, has been increasing dramatically among coal workers and especially younger workers in central Appalachia.
17h
Futurity.org

Can you spot the liar in this group?Researchers are using data science and an online crowdsourcing platform called FlimFlam to create a screening system that can more accurately detect deception based on facial and verbal cues. “Basically, our system is like Skype on steroids…” They also hope to minimize instances of racial and ethnic profiling that TSA critics contend occur when passengers are pulled aside under the agency’s Scree
17h
Scientific American Content: Global

What Is Dark Matter?An elusive substance that permeates the universe exerts many detectable gravitational influences yet eludes direct detection -- Read more on ScientificAmerican.com
17h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Finding Nemo's genes—reef fish genome mapped and sharedNemo's genome has been deciphered and made publicly available, helping researchers further investigate fish ecology and evolution.
17h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

How situation awareness could save your lifeIn December 1972, three days before New Year, Eastern Airlines flight 401 from New York crashed on approach to Miami when the pilot and crew, all focusing on a malfunctioning landing light, failed to register the plane was losing altitude. In 2007 a truck and train collided on a rail crossing in Kerang, Australia, when the truck driver failed to notice the approaching train. In 2010 the crew of BP
17h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Revealing the mysteries of early developmentZebrafish embryos are transparent and develop outside the mother's body, enabling scientists to get a detailed view of early development. A research team led by Lila Solnica-Krezel, the Alan A. and Edith L. Wolff Distinguished Professor and head of the Department of Developmental Biology at Washington University School of Medicine in St. Louis, is revealing new clues to how birth defects develop i
17h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Many migrants can take nothing for grantedBandana Purkayastha is a professor of sociology and Asian & Asian American Studies, and former head of the Department of Sociology. She is the American Sociological Association's national representative to the International Sociological Association. Her current research interests focus on human rights/human security, migration, intersectionality, and transnationalism. She recently published an art
17h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

How can you tell if a quantum memory is really quantum?Quantum memories are devices that can store quantum information for a later time, which are usually implemented by storing and re-emitting photons with certain quantum states. But often it's difficult to tell whether a memory is storing quantum or merely classical information. In a new paper, physicists have developed a new test to verify the quantum nature of quantum memories.
17h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Earth's climate to increase by 4 degrees by 2084A new study shows the Earth's climate would increase by 4 degrees Celsius, compared to pre-industrial levels, before the end of 21st century. The study also projects precipitation changes in association with a 4 degrees Celsius global warming above the pre-industrial period using the available RCP8.5 experiments of CMIP5 models.
18h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Birds play the waiting game in tough environmental conditionsIf resources are limited and tough to find, reproductive efforts may fail. In these situations, it may be in an animal's best interests to not defend a territory or to breed at all, but rather focus its efforts on surviving to the next breeding season. A new study from The Auk: Ornithological Advances presents some of the best evidence on how changes in environmental conditions, specifically droug
18h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Long-term study reveals one invasive insect can change a forest bird communityEastern hemlock forests have been declining due to a non-native insect pest. A new study from The Condor: Ornithological Applications presents some of the best data showing how the decline of a single tree species leads to the disappearance of birds specialized to them. The data also indicate birds associated with non-hemlock habitat features are spreading into former hemlock forests. A single ins
18h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Tianjin University makes breakthrough in synthetic genome rearrangementA synthetic biology team at Tianjin University (TJU) has reported new methods and strategies for genome rearrangement and accelerated the evolution of yeast strains with their three latest studies published in Nature Communications on May 22, 2018.
18h
Popular Science

You have questions about sunscreen. We have answers.Health Choosing the right brand can be intimidating if you aren’t quite sure what you’re looking for. Choosing a sunscreen used to be simple. You picked the cheapest or the nicest looking or just whatever happened to be at eye level (probably the most expensive one).
18h
Popular Science

Mouser ElectronicsTechnology Generation Robot: Co-existing with Robots We often talk about robots working for us—even replacing our jobs, but what about robots as co-workers?
18h
New Scientist - News

Those GDPR emails should stop soon, but our data nightmare won’tYour inbox is full of pleading emails because the EU’s new data rules come into force this week – but they might not actually do anything to improve your life
18h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Multiple gamma-ray emission regions detected in the blazar 3C 279Using very long baseline interferometry (VLBI), astronomers have investigated the magnetic field topology of the blazar 3C 279, uncovering the presence of multiple gamma-ray emission regions in this source. The discovery was presented May 11 in a paper published on arXiv.org.
18h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Birds play the waiting game in tough environmental conditionsEvery animal's ultimate goal in life is to generate offspring to pass on its genetic material to the next generation. But sometimes, resources are scarce and the task of reproduction is too difficult or risky. If resources are limited and tough to find, reproductive efforts may fail anyway. In these situations, it may be in an animal's best interests to not defend a territory or to breed at all, b
18h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Long-term study reveals one invasive insect can change a forest bird communityEastern hemlock forests have been declining due to a non-native insect pest, the hemlock woolly adelgid. A new study from The Condor: Ornithological Applications presents some of the best long-term data showing how the decline of a single tree species (eastern hemlock) leads to the disappearance of birds specialized to those trees. The data also indicate birds associated with non-hemlock habitat f
18h
Live Science

Sunscreen Pills Are Fake, FDA WarnsAs summer approaches, the FDA warns that there is no such thing as a sunscreen pill.
18h
Dagens Medicin

Danske Patienter vil have kortlægning af milliarder til overbelægningBelægningsprocenterne på de medicinske afdelinger er fortsat høje, selvom en handleplan og 2,4 mia. kr. skulle løse det. Danske Patienter vil have kortlægning af midlerne.
18h
Dagens Medicin

Regionsrådsformand vil give økonomisk hjælp til Aarhus UniversitetshospitalAnders Kühnau (S) foreslår at regionen giver Aarhus Universitetshospital 60 mio. kr. som tilskud til flytteudgifter. Andre midtjyske hospitaler skal spæde til.
18h
Feed: All Latest

This Robotic Pollinator Is Like a Huge Bee With Wheels and an ArmIn a world with too many humans and not enough pollinators, robots like the BrambleBee could help.
18h
Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

Top 10 new species for 2018The large and small, beautiful and bizarre are among the newly discovered animals, plants and microbes announced as the Top 10 New Species for 2018.
18h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Floridians could face far more frequent, intense heatwavesBy the late 21st century, if atmospheric greenhouse gas concentrations reach worst-case projections, Floridians could experience summer heatwaves three times more frequently, and each heatwave could last six times longer and be much hotter than at present, according to Meteorology Professor Shawn M. Milrad of Embry-Riddle Aeronautical University.
18h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News

The Lancet: Global healthcare access and quality improved from 2000-2016Healthcare access and quality improved globally from 2000-2016 due in part to large gains seen in many low and middle-income countries in sub-Saharan Africa and Southeast Asia, according to the latest data from the Global Burden of Disease study published in The Lancet.
18h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News

SWOG sails into ASCO 2018 on a raft of research resultsResearchers from SWOG, a cancer clinical trials group funded by the National Cancer Institute, will participate in 29 presentations to be made at the 54th Annual Meeting of the American Society of Clinical Oncology (ASCO), the world's largest clinical cancer research meeting, which runs June 1-5 in Chicago.
18h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Researchers identify spike in severe black lung disease among former US coal minersThe number of cases of progressive massive fibrosis, the most severe form of black lung disease, has been increasing dramatically among coal workers and especially younger workers in central Appalachia.
18h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Hepatitis C infections resulting from medical treatment occur despite clear guidelinesIn a 10 year span, more than 130,000 patients were notified of medical errors that may have exposed them to blood-borne illness, including Hepatitis C. However, the majority of these notification events were discovered only after patients became acutely ill rather than through proactive reporting of violations of health safety protocols.
18h
The Atlantic

Reverse Migration Might Turn Georgia BlueATLANTA—Adrienne White remembers the first time she visited Atlanta as a junior in college. White, who is black, walked into a grocery store in an affluent neighborhood while she was staying with her uncle, and by the time she walked out, she hadn’t seen one white person. “I was shocked,” White told me. “That left a really good taste in my mouth.” So when White, an accountant who is now 37, was l
18h
The Scientist RSS

Ebola Update: Funding, Vaccines, and More Deaths in DRCA total of 27 people have died since April, but new funds and the deployment of an experimental vaccine are expected to help contain the virus.
18h
The Scientist RSS

Image of the Day: CocoonResearchers have taken inspiration from wild silk moths to craft fibers that can transport images.
18h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Review of biodegradable bags shows not enough is known to judge if they are safe for environmentA team of researchers from the U.K. Austria and France has found that not enough work has been done to determine if biodegradable shopping bags are actually environmentally friendly. In their paper published in the journal Royal Society Open Science, the group describes their survey regarding biodegradable bag research efforts and what they found.
18h
Ingeniøren

VIDEO: Speed pedelec-forhandler: »Hver gang vi sætter en cykel på gaden, fjerner vi en bil«Ingeniøren har besøgt Ebikecenter, der sælger elcykler og speed pedelecs for at diskutere teknik, trængsel, cykler, rækkevidde og fremtiden.
18h
New Scientist - News

Minimally conscious people woken with brain zap by their familySome people, who have been minimally conscious for years, could respond to questions from their loved ones for the first time after treatment with electricity
18h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Tracking the Kilauea eruptionSitting on the porch of our B&B at Hawaiian Paradise Park, watching the pouring rain, I am still overwhelmed by last night's events. Glowing lava. Blocked roads. Flashing drone lights. An ocean entry being born. It was all very intense. OK, let me start from the beginning.
18h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Carnivore snacks debunk theory of turtles' strict herbivore dietA study has revealed the diet of green turtles is more complex than previously thought, providing insights which could influence conservation and management strategies.
18h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Study bolsters bats' reputation as mosquito devourersIt's a common assumption: Bats are important because they feast upon those pervasive warm-weather pests known as mosquitoes. You want to see bats flying above, cleaning up the night sky and ridding you of itchy bites and pesky ear-buzzing.
18h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Ergonomic eye-tracking technology for high-quality AR/VR experiencesImec, the world-leading research and innovation hub in nano-electronics and digital technology, will demonstrate today at its Imec Technology Forum in Antwerp (ITF Belgium 2018), a new wireless eye-tracking technology based on electro-oculography (EOG), an ophthalmology technique used to examine eyes and record eye movement. The technology, which is integrated into a standard pair of eyeglasses, c
18h
Live Science

Summer Grilling Could Expose Your Skin to Cancer-Causing ChemicalsSummer barbecues may expose you to potentially cancer-causing chemicals in a surprising way: The chemicals may literally get under your skin.
18h
Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

Space-like gravity weakens biochemical signals in muscle formationMicrogravity conditions affect DNA methylation of muscle cells, slowing their differentiation.
18h
Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

Can weekend sleep make up for the detriments of sleep deprivation during the week?In a recent study, short, but not long, weekend sleep was associated with an increased risk of early death in individuals under 65 years of age.
18h
Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

Centenarians' end-of-life thoughts: is their social network informed?People in centenarians' close social networks are often not aware of their thoughts on end-of-life issues, a new study reveals.
18h
Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

Prescription costs increase for low-value treatments despite reduction in numbersDespite a fall in prescription numbers for low-value treatments, the overall cost of prescribing these items in English primary care has risen, according to new research.
18h
Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

Study casts doubt on traditional view of pterosaur flightA new study of how ligaments restrict joint movement suggests that pterosaurs and 'four-winged' dinosaurs couldn't have flown in the same way that bats do.
18h
Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

How high-latitude corals cope with the coldCorals growing in high-latitude reefs in Western Australia can regulate their internal chemistry to promote growth under cooler temperatures, according to new research.
18h
Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

Gauging language proficiency through eye movementA new study indicates eye movement can reveal the proficiency of people reading English as a second language.
18h
Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

Driverless cars change lanes more like humans doResearchers will present a new lane-change algorithm that splits the difference. It allows for more aggressive lane changes than the simple models do but relies only on immediate information about other vehicles' directions and velocities to make decisions.
18h
Scientific American Content: Global

Asteroid, Meteor, Meteorite and Comet: What's the Difference?The terms asteroid, meteor, meteorite and even comet are often used interchangeably...but what is the difference? -- Read more on ScientificAmerican.com
18h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Study shows people rarely express gratitude to those closest to themAn international team of researchers has found that people around the world rarely say "thank you" to those closest to them. In their paper published in the journal Royal Society Open Science, the group describes their study of expressing gratitude and what they found.
18h
Ingeniøren

Kinesiske hackere finder lang række sikkerhedshuller i BMW'erEt stort antal BMW-modeller har i hvert fald siden 2012 været påvirket af 14 sikkerhedshuller, der potentielt kan gøre hackere i stand til at overtage dele af bilernes funktioner på afstand.
19h
Ingeniøren

Kronik: Sådan får vi Danmark op i superligaen inden for AI
19h
Science-Based Medicine

Death from Cancer Quackery – Black Salve EditionAn Australian nurse dies of cancer while being treated by a cancer quack with a caustic substance known as black salve. How and why is this allowed to happen?
19h
Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

Leg exercise is critical to brain and nervous system healthNew research shows that using the legs, particularly in weight-bearing exercise, sends signals to the brain that are vital for the production of healthy neural cells. The groundbreaking study fundamentally alters brain and nervous system medicine -- giving doctors new clues as to why patients with motor neuron disease, multiple sclerosis, spinal muscular atrophy and other neurological diseases oft
19h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Lightening up dark galaxiesBased on new observational data, an international team led by astronomers at ETH Zurich identified at least six candidates for dark galaxies -- galaxies that have a few (if any) stars in them and are, for that reason, notoriously difficult to detect with current instruments.
19h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Skin responsible for greater exposure to carcinogens in barbecue smoke than lungsWith summer coming, it's only a matter of time before the smells and tastes of barbecued foods dominate the neighborhood. But there's a downside to grilling that can literally get under your skin. In a study appearing in Environmental Science & Technology, scientists report that skin is a more important pathway for uptake of cancer-causing compounds produced during barbecuing than inhalation. They
19h
Scientific American Content: Global

How Does Google Know Everything about Me?You may wonder how Google knows what you’re typing, where you are or even what you’re thinking—they use your data to do it all. -- Read more on ScientificAmerican.com
19h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Lightening up dark galaxiesDespite substantial progress over the past half-century in understanding how galaxies form, important open questions remain regarding how precisely the diffuse gas of the intergalactic medium is converted into stars. One possibility, suggested in recent theoretical models, is that the early phase of galaxy formation involves an epoch when galaxies contain a great amount of gas but are still ineffi
19h
Feed: All Latest

Scientists Are Using AI to Painstakingly Assemble Single AtomsA machine’s atom-wide tip could help usher in an era of microscopic circuits.
19h
Feed: All Latest

The Truth-Affirming Powers of a Good, Old-Fashioned Netflix BingeOnline, the barriers between fiction and nonfiction blur. But there's a throwback way to right this disorientation.
19h
cognitive science

New study shows chronic pain affects our decision-making abilities. Researchers investigated how pain impacts cognitive flexibility and discovered that the ability to adapt to changing situations may be hindered in those with chronic pain.submitted by /u/parrishthethought [link] [comments]
19h
The Atlantic

Dear Therapist: I Still Obsess About My Ex From a Decade AgoEditor’s Note: Every Wednesday, Lori Gottlieb answers questions from readers about their problems, big and small. Have a question? Email her at dear.therapist@theatlantic.com . Dear Therapist, I’m a 40-year-old single woman. Never married, no children, and I’ve been struggling for years to get over my ex. He was my first love and we met when I was in my early 20s. It was a very immature relations
19h
The Atlantic

The Future of AI Depends on High-School GirlsDuring her freshman year, Stephanie Tena, a 16-year-old programmer, was searching the internet for coding programs and came across a website for an organization called AI4All, which runs an artificial-intelligence summer camp for high-schoolers. On the site, a group of girls her age were gathered around an autonomous car in front of the iconic arches of Stanford’s campus. “AI will change the worl
19h
Scientific American Content: Global

Marine Protected Areas Are Important, but......they can't do their job of protecting aquatic ecosystems if people fail to respect their boundaries -- Read more on ScientificAmerican.com
19h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Sterol-producing bacteria may change interpretation of geological historyMolecules called sterols linger in soils and rocks for billions of years and have served as a tell-tale sign to geologists that the plants, animals and fungi that produce them must once have lived nearby. But a new discovery could have geologists rethinking what they've learned from that rock record.
19h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Universal pH regulated assembly of DNA nanostructuresDNA, the carrier of genetic information, has become established as a highly useful building material in nanotechnology. One requirement in many applications is the controlled, switchable assembly of nanostructures. In the journal Angewandte Chemie, scientists have now introduced a new strategy for control through altering pH value. It is based on ethylenediamine, which only supports the assembly o
19h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Gemini Observatory cloud camera captures volcano's dramatic glowGemini Observatory cloud camera captures volcano's dramatic glow
19h
Scientific American Content: Global

What Made Saturn's Ravioli-Shaped Moons?New research suggests collisions between moonlets created the oddly-formed objects -- Read more on ScientificAmerican.com
19h
The Atlantic

Remembering Philip Roth, a Giant of American LiteraturePhilip Roth, who died Tuesday night at the age of 85, was at the center of American literature for almost 60 years—a quarter of his country’s history. It has been six years since Roth announced his retirement from writing, and there were surely no more books to come; so why does his death feel so much like a loss, as if readers had been deprived of something? Perhaps it is because Roth was the la
19h
Dagens Medicin

Fælles indsats fik lægerne tilbage til TingbjergEfter at have stået uden læge i tre år, har borgerne i Tingbjerg atter deres egen praktiserende læge. Et samarbejde mellem Region Hovedstaden, Københavns Kommune og PLO har trukket hele to læger til området.
19h
Scientific American Content: Global

Superslow Brain Waves May Play a Critical Role in ConsciousnessSignals long thought to be “noise” appear to represent a distinct form of brain activity -- Read more on ScientificAmerican.com
19h
Science | The Guardian

Scientists to lead DNA hunt for Loch Ness monsterSamples of Scottish lake will be tested to reveal truth behind centuries-old legend An examination of Loch Ness using DNA sampling techniques will try to establish exactly what lives in the UK’s largest freshwater body – it may also discover whether there is any scientific basis to the monster legend. The mission will involve genetic code being extracted from the lake over a two-week period to de
19h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Bunya pines are ancient, delicious and possibly deadlyThe Bunya pine is a unique and majestic Australian tree – my favourite tree, in fact. Sometimes simply called Bunya or the Bunya Bunya, I love its pleasingly symmetrical dome shape.
20h
Ingeniøren

Kommunale skraldebiler skal redde Amager Bakkes økonomiEfter flere års tovtrækkeri er borgmestrene i Amager Bakkes fem ejerkommuner blevet enige om en ny, økonomisk redningsmodel for det alt for store forbrændingsanlæg. Nu skal kommunalbestyrelserne godkende løsningen.
20h
Live Science

Does Humanity Need a Backup Earth?SpaceX CEO Elon Musk has a vision: He wants to get humans to Mars as soon as possible. Is that humanity's best option?
20h
New Scientist - News

Changes in your sperm reveal if you’ve had a difficult lifeMen carry chemical clues to childhood traumas in their sperm, and these might be passed down to their sons – but we don’t know what effects these have yet
20h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Natural predators protect oilseed rape crops from pollen beetlesOilseed rape fields are home to a variety of insects that bother farmers. The pollen beetle is one of them. The beetle's larvae feed on the flower buds of oilseed rape causing damage and crop failure. The larvae of weevil species also have a preference for rape: They tunnel into the plants' stems, making them wither and die.
20h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

New network is installed to investigate space weather over South AmericaA group of Brazilian researchers affiliated with the National Space Research Institute (INPE) is working to install a network comprised of magnetometers (instruments used to measure the intensity of a magnetic field) across South America.
20h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Previously unreported Arctic phytoplankton transport could jeopardize fish populationsTiny gypsum crystals can make phytoplankton so heavy that they rapidly sink, transporting large quantities of carbon to the ocean's depths. Experts from the Alfred Wegener Institute recently observed this phenomenon for the first time in the Arctic. As a result of this massive algal transport, in the future, large amounts of nutrients could be lost from the surface waters.
20h
Dagens Medicin

Lægeforeningen vil rykke flere patienter ud til praktiserende psykiaterePatienter med psykiske lidelser af moderat grad skal rykkes fra den pressede sygehuspsykiatri ud til praktiserende psykiatere, mener Lægeforeningen.
20h
New on MIT Technology Review

The US military is funding an effort to catch deepfakes and other AI trickeryBut DARPA’s technologists admit that it might be a losing battle.
20h
Feed: All Latest

'Solo: A Star Wars Story’ Review: It May Be Inessential, But It’s Also Utterly DelightfulThere are few, if any, revelations here, and some of the fleshed-out backstory is woefully dumb, but Han finally gets the solo adventure he deserves.
20h
Feed: All Latest

Congress Is About to Learn Just How Little Science Knows About Tech AddictionBut political interest—and political capital—could drive the research needed for evidence-based policies.
20h
Feed: All Latest

The Laser Battle Against Blood-Sucking Parasites of the DeepWhat can salmon farmers do against the scourge of tiny fish-killing sea lice? Fry them.
20h
Scientific American Content: Global

New Thalidomide-Like Therapy Hijacks Cells' Trash-Disposal SystemCancer treatment using the notorious drug may hold promise for other diseases like Alzheimer’s -- Read more on ScientificAmerican.com
20h
Ingeniøren

Krypterings-skandale viser vigtigheden af kvante-teleportationMed kvantecomputere bliver nutidens krypteringsmetoder nemme at knække. Kvanteforskere fremhæver, at kvante-teleportation er fremtiden inden for sikker udveksling af data.
21h
Ingeniøren

Fyn er fed - cannabis, nyt sygehus og mega-projekter kræver en masse strømEnergi Fyn har travlt som aldrig før
21h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News

ESF lists top 10 new species for 2018The large and small, beautiful and bizarre are among the newly discovered animals, plants and microbes announced by the College of Environmental Science and Forestry (ESF) as the Top 10 New Species for 2018.
21h
cognitive science

The (holy) ghost in the machine: Catholic thinkers tackle the ethics of artificial intelligencesubmitted by /u/trot-trot [link] [comments]
21h
The Atlantic

The Only Way to Find Out If the President Can Be IndictedCan the president be indicted while in office? Rudolph Giuliani, at this writing one of President Trump’s lawyers, apparently wants the public to believe that there is a clear answer to that question—the one that by coincidence favors his client. The one thing I am sure of is that there’s no clear answer. To begin with, no one suggests that a president can never be indicted for crimes committed i
21h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Scientists find inconsistencies and biases in weather forecasting systemThe tiniest of natural phenomena can have a big impact on weather, but an international team of researchers has found that the most widely used system to model meteorological conditions doesn't account for environmental microphysics well at all scales. The researchers published their evaluation in the latest issue of Advances in Atmospheric Sciences .
21h
Ingeniøren

DI om cybersikkerhedsstrategi: Småpenge - og vigtige enheder holdes udenforDer lægges ikke op til et tilstrækkeligt bredt samarbejde i den nye nationale strategi for it-sikkerhed, mener DI Digital. Derfor vil DI selv tage initiativ til at involvere flere erhvervsvirksomheder.
21h
Ingeniøren

Ny asfalt skal spare danske bilejere fem pct. brændstofEn ny klimavenlig asfalt kan gøre det lettere for bilens dæk at rulle hen ad vejen, hvilket kan spare bilejere for fem pct. af deres benzinregning. Det skal testes på 50 km vej nu.
21h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

The prevalence of twin births in pure Spanish horses (PREs)It is known that chromosomal anomalies are one of the principle genetic causes of infertility in horses. However, a great proportion of these cases still go undiagnosed, probably due to the fact that their symptomatology is non-specific and diagnosis is complex. This is the case with chimerism, which is greatly associated with twin births in domestic animals, and whose prevalence and reproductive
21h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Embryonic mammary gland stem cells identifiedResearch team led by Prof. Cédric Blanpain has identified the mechanisms that regulate mammary gland development. Using a combination of lineage tracing, molecular profiling, single cell sequencing and functional experiments, A. Wuidart and colleagues demonstrated that mammary gland development is initiated by multipotent progenitors during the early steps of embryonic mammary gland morphogenesis,
21h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

New material detects levels of UV radiation and monitors radiation doseResearchers at the University of Turku, Finland, have developed a synthetic material, SensoGlow, that detects the quantity and quality of ultraviolet radiation from the sun or other sources. This material makes it possible to produce an affordable, versatile, and long-lasting UV radiation detector which can be used to monitor the UV radiation dose with a mobile app, for example.
21h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Researchers build artificial cellular compartments as molecular workshopsHow to install new capabilities in cells without interfering with their metabolic processes? A team from the Technical University of Munich (TUM) and the Helmholtz Zentrum München have altered mammalian cells in such a way that they formed artificial compartments in which sequestered reactions could take place, allowing the detection of cells deep in the tissue and also their manipulation with mag
21h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Researchers make a two-neuron networkThe human brain is an exquisitely complex, organic CPU, made of trillions of connections between many billions of neurons. Understanding such a complicated organ is a massive scientific undertaking, and researchers often use simplified models to uncover small pieces of the neurological puzzle.
21h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Researchers develop reprocessable thermosets for sustainable 3-D printing3-D printing of complex structures that contain submillimeter-sized features has eluded researchers for decades. Recent advancements in 3-D printing have brought about viable 3-D printing techniques such as digital light processing (DLP)-based systems that use ultra-violet (UV) light to transform initially-liquid polymer resins into free-standing solid structures in a precise, controlled manner.
22h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

One-way roads for spin currentsSpin is a type of angular momentum intrinsic to particles, roughly speaking as if they were spinning on themselves. Particles can exchange their spin, and in this way spin currents can be formed in a material. Through years of research, scientists have learned how to control such spin currents in an analogous way such that they can control the flow of electrons, the basis of a field of physics kno
22h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

MH370 search under review, may be scrapped: MahathirThe hunt for missing flight MH370 is being reviewed and may be scrapped, Malaysia's prime minister said Wednesday, as the country's new government seeks cuts in public spending.
22h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

France's Macron takes on Facebook's Zuckerberg in tech pushFacebook CEO Mark Zuckerberg may finally find a friendly face when he meets French President Emmanuel Macron. Or not.
22h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Everest's Hillary Step now a 'slope': climbersMount Everest's Hillary Step—a rocky outcrop just below the summit—is now a slope, say climbers who recently returned from the mountain.
22h
Ingeniøren

Tre største rådgivere: Den grønne, den tunge og den lønsommeVirksomhedens ry har stor betydning, når den skal kapre ingeniører fra konkurrenterne. Og de opfatter landets tre største rådgivervirksomheder vidt forskelligt. To brancheeksperter tolker.
22h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Space-like gravity weakens biochemical signals in muscle formationMicrogravity conditions affect DNA methylation of muscle cells, slowing their differentiation.
22h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Social isolation plus heart failure could increase hospitalizations, deathsHeart failure patients who felt socially isolated were much more likely to die or be hospitalized than more socially connected patients. Screening heart failure patients for social isolation could help identify those at risk of poor outcomes.
22h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Leg exercise is critical to brain and nervous system healthNew research shows that using the legs, particularly in weight-bearing exercise, sends signals to the brain that are vital for the production of healthy neural cells. The groundbreaking study fundamentally alters brain and nervous system medicine -- giving doctors new clues as to why patients with motor neuron disease, multiple sclerosis, spinal muscular atrophy and other neurological diseases oft
22h
Science | The Guardian

The NHS is suffering from repetitive change injury | André SpicerIt affects Swedish trains and US business. Now the poor British health system is catching another dose of reform mania During the past few decades, people working in the NHS have noticed the rise of a puzzling yet dangerous new syndrome. It cannot be found in any medical textbook, but the symptoms are more obvious each year. They include delusional behaviour, stress, memory loss, anxiety. Unlike m
22h
NYT > Science

They’ve Been to All 417 National Park Sites. How About You?A hardy few have visited every park, monument, preserve, battlefield and historic site overseen by the U.S. National Park Service. It can take decades.
22h
NYT > Science

F.Y.I.: The Elusive City SquabBaby pigeons take only a month to become fully developed and leave the nest, which is usually hidden and high up on a window ledge or rooftop.
22h
The Atlantic

Trump Almost Always FoldsPresident Trump’s May 8 announcement that he was withdrawing from the Iran nuclear deal should not have come as a surprise. He’d spent years railing against the plan—“the worst deal ever,” he dubbed it—and had promised to rip it up. And yet up to the moment when the president made the final call, there was still some suspense about what he would say. This was not merely wishful thinking by the de
22h
Science : NPR

California's Message To Hospitals: Shape Up Or Lose 'In-Network' StatusCovered California, the state's health insurance exchange, will exclude hospitals from insurance networks if they don't reduce their numbers of C-sections, back scans and opioid prescriptions. (Image credit: Thanasis Zovoilis/Getty Images)
22h
Ingeniøren

Zuckerberg bombarderet med kritiske spørgsmål fra EUFlere EU-repræsentanter er utilfredse med, at Facebook-chefen ikke besvarede en del af ders spørgsmål. Zuckerberg lover, at alle bekymringer vil blive besvaret skriftlig senere.
23h
Ingeniøren

Ingeniøren tester speed pedelec: Både muligheder og problemerne virker meget ægteSpeed pedelecs kan være en løsning på fremtidens trængsel eller en risiko for andre trafikanter, afhængig af øjnene, der ser. Efter en prøvetur virker begge muligheder realistiske.
23h
Nyheder - Forskning - Videnskab

Virksomheder, forskere og politikere skal i fællesskab redde verdenHverken virksomheder, politikere eller forskere kan alene løse de store problemer, verden står...
23h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Why birds don't have teethWhy did birds lose their teeth? Was it so they would be lighter in the air? Or are pointy beaks better for worm-eating than the jagged jaws of dinosaur ancestors?
1d
Science | The Guardian

How do you break up with someone? You asked Google – here’s the answer | Anouchka GroseEvery day millions of internet users ask Google life’s most difficult questions, big and small. Our writers answer some of the commonest queries First of all, consult someone who’s messed it up horribly at least a couple of times. They will offer some mature and very wise counsel, not at all tinged with bitterness and regret. They won’t simply spout generic “good advice” about kindness, understand
1d
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

'Overwatch League' eSports dreams of rivaling mainstreamThe Los Angeles Gladiators becoming as well known as the Los Angeles Lakers?
1d
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Wyoming makes rush for hyped new tech, results still virtualBlock Chain Gang LLC, Crypto Cowboy, Something Something Blockchain LLC: Based on the names of dozens of new companies registering to set up shop in Wyoming, the state's effort to lure the latest tech craze appears to be paying off.
1d
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Wyoming to vote on biggest grizzly hunt in lower 48 statesWyoming could allow grizzly bear hunting for the first time in decades when state officials vote Wednesday whether to allow as many as 22 grizzlies to be killed this fall outside Yellowstone and Grand Teton national parks.
1d
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Drought on tap to intensify over US SouthwestRivers are drying up, popular mountain recreation spots are closing and water restrictions are in full swing as a persistent drought intensifies its grip on pockets of the American Southwest.
1d
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Legend of Loch Ness Monster will be tested with DNA samplesThe stories seem as tall as the lake is deep. For hundreds of years, visitors to Scotland's Loch Ness have described seeing a monster that some believe lurks in the depths.
1d
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Foxconn unit to raise $4.2bn in China IPOA unit of electronics manufacturing giant Foxconn said it will launch an initial public offering in China on Thursday aimed at raising $4.2 billion, in the biggest mainland debut for three years.
1d
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Team puts the optical microscope under the microscope to achieve atomic accuracyOver the last two decades, scientists have discovered that the optical microscope can be used to detect, track and image objects much smaller than their traditional limit—about half the wavelength of visible light, or a few hundred nanometers.
1d
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

The Trump Presidency's impact on public perception of the Republican PartyA new Presidential Studies Quarterly article analyzes the effects of the early Trump Presidency on public attitudes toward the Republican Party.
1d
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

The role of race in police contact among homeless youthMore than 1.7 million U.S. youth experience homelessness each year, according to the U.S. Department of Justice. Homeless youth are at an increased risk of being stopped by police and arrested, yet it is unclear if this interaction is related to race. A new longitudinal study examined the likelihood of homeless youth of different races being harassed and arrested by police. The study found that no
1d
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

World Cup fever causes sleepless nights for Bangladesh flagmakersFlagmakers in Bangladesh are doing a roaring trade weeks ahead of the World Cup, but no-one is interested in the home nation's colours—the money is all on pennants for Lionel Messi's Argentina and Neymar's Brazil.
1d
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Two sportscar-sized satellites in orbit to measure Earth's waterA SpaceX rocket Tuesday blasted off a duo of sports car-sized satellites built by the US and Germany to reveal changes in sea level rise, ice melt and drought on Earth.
1d
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Tiny African start-ups draw interest after slow startAfrican high-tech startups are minuscule compared with their US and European peers but they are finally gaining momentum and attention in some of the world's most promising economies.
1d
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

From ships to satellites: Scotland aims for the skyA shipbuilding hub since the days of the British empire, the Scottish city of Glasgow is now reaching for the stars with a growing space satellite industry.
1d
Ingeniøren

Energinet ramt af fejl i nyt ERP-system: Gasforbrug og regninger må tjekkes manueltEfter frasalget fra DONG skulle Dansk Gas Distribution skifte ERP-system. Det viste sig at være noget sværere end forventet.
1d
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Drivers brace for Egyptian ride-hailing lawsUber Arizona Self DrivingNew legislation regulating ride-hailing services in Egypt may have been welcomed by Uber and competitor Careem, but some behind the wheel fear they could be driven out of business.
1d
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Energy wells plugged as Hawaii's volcano sends lava nearby (Update)Production wells at a geothermal plant under threat by lava flowing from Hawaii's Kilauea volcano have been plugged to prevent toxic gases from seeping out.
1d
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

The internet: a dangerous place for wild animalsFrom ivory baubles and leopard coats to rare turtles and live bears, the online market for protected wildlife is booming, according to an International Fund for Animal Welfare (IFAW) investigation released Wednesday.
1d
Science | The Guardian

Planet Nine from outer space: is there another world beyond Neptune?A newly discovered asteroid’s unusual orbit supports the idea that a massive planet lurks in the far reaches of the solar system An enormous planet containing 10 times the mass of the Earth could explain the unusual orbit of a newly discovered asteroid. If found, the giant world would represent the first discovery of a planet in our solar system since Pluto in 1930, and before that Neptune in 184
1d
EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Centenarians' end-of-life thoughts: is their social network informed?People in centenarians' close social networks are often not aware of their thoughts on end-of-life issues, a new Journal of the American Geriatrics Society study reveals.
1d
EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Evening use of light-emitting tablets may disrupt healthy sleepA new Physiological Reports study reveals that evening use of light-emitting tablets can induce delays in desired bedtimes, suppress secretion of melatonin (the hormone that regulates sleep and wakefulness), and impair next-morning alertness.
1d
EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Do childhood development programs help children living in conflict and crisis settings?Millions of young children living in conditions of war, disaster, and displacement are at increased risk for developmental difficulties that can follow them throughout their lives.
1d
EurekAlert! - Breaking News

The Trump presidency's impact on public perception of the Republican PartyA new Presidential Studies Quarterly article analyzes the effects of the early Trump presidency on public attitudes toward the Republican Party.
1d
EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Study examines treatment options for women with recurrent ovarian cancerNew research indicates that for women with advanced epithelial ovarian cancer whose cancer has relapsed after surgery, a second surgery is worth considering.
1d
EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Lifestyle counseling program may reduce risk of certain cancersA five-year healthy lifestyle counseling program for adult men was linked with a reduced risk of developing cancers related to overweight, diet, and smoking over 25 years.
1d
EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Chemsex linked with increased diagnoses of HIV and other sexually transmitted infectionsChemsex -- the use of crystallized methamphetamine, mephedrone, γ-hydroxybutyrate or γ-butyrolactone and to a lesser extent cocaine and ketamine to facilitate sex -- has emerged as a new phenomenon in the UK and across Europe among gay, bisexual and other men who have sex with men (GBMSM).
1d
EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Medication-related harm in older adults is common, costly, and preventableNew research indicates that harm from medicines is common in older adults following hospital discharge, and it results in substantial use of healthcare resources.
1d
EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Predicting relapses in patients with autoimmune vascular diseasePatients with an autoimmune disorder called antineutrophil cytoplasmic antibody-associated vasculitis produce antibodies that damage blood vessels in the body.
1d
EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Can weekend sleep make up for the detriments of sleep deprivation during the week?In a recent Journal of Sleep Research study, short, but not long, weekend sleep was associated with an increased risk of early death in individuals under 65 years of age.
1d
EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Poor sleep may keep arthritis patients from getting enough exercisePoor sleep quality was linked with less physical activity in an Arthritis Care & Research analysis of individuals with or at risk for knee osteoarthritis.
1d
EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Early physical therapy linked to reduced healthcare costs and opioid use in low back pain patientsIn a Health Services Research analysis of patients with low back pain, when patients saw a physical therapist first, there was lower utilization of high cost medical services as well as lower opioid use.
1d
EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Surgery benefits older women with breast cancerIn a BJS (British Journal of Surgery) analysis of 18,730 older patients with estrogen receptor-positive breast cancer in the UK, the risk of dying from breast cancer was greater in patients treated with primary endocrine therapy than in those who received surgery.
1d
EurekAlert! - Breaking News

The role of race in police contact among homeless youthA new longitudinal study examined the likelihood of homeless youth of different races being harassed and arrested by police. The study found that nonwhite homeless youth are more likely than white homeless youth to report police harassment and arrest, but that elements of living on the street -- including increased visibility and prior experiences with harassment -- offset racial disparities.
1d
Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

Putting the optical microscope under the microscope to achieve atomic accuracyNew work enables optical microscopes to measure these nanometer-scale details with a new level of accuracy.
1d
Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

Fluid dynamics may play key role in evolution of cooperationIn a new study, physicists examined how the mechanical properties of an environment may shape the social evolution of microbial populations.
1d
Science | The Guardian

Plans for £100m Nobel Centre blocked by Swedish courtDavid Chipperfield-designed centre would harm Stockholm waterfront, court rules A Swedish court has blocked the construction of a major new Nobel Centre in Stockholm intended as the future venue for the world’s most prestigious arts and science awards. The 1.2bn krona (£100m) brass-clad structure, designed by the British architect David Chipperfield , would harm the capital’s picturesque waterfro
1d
Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

Amazonian 'lookout' birds help other species live in dangerous neighborhoodsUsually, birds of a feather flock together -- but in the Amazon, some flocks feature dozens of species of all shapes and colors. A new study singles out one reason why these unusually diverse flocks exist: lookout species that call in alarm when they spot dangerous predators.
1d
Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

Science in the palm of your hand: How citizen science transforms passive learnersCitizen science projects can engage even children who previously were not interested in science. This article provides guidance on building these lessons.
1d
Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

The prevalence of twin births in pure Spanish horsesA group of researchers has published the first study to determine the prevalence of twin births and chimerism in a large population of PRE horses, and the results suggest that chimerism is not especially connected to infertility.
1d
Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

Tunable diamond string may hold key to quantum memoryResearchers have engineered diamond strings that can be tuned to quiet a qubit's environment and improve memory from tens to several hundred nanoseconds, enough time to do many operations on a quantum chip.
1d
Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

Invasive seaweed makes fish change their behaviorResearchers have found that changes in the seascape may impact the behavior of fish and could be leaving them less options for refuge and more vulnerable to predators.
1d
Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

More patients with severe alcoholic hepatitis receiving liver transplantsIncreasingly, liver transplant centers are changing a long-standing practice of delaying potentially life-saving liver transplantation for patients with severe alcoholic hepatitis until after they stopped drinking alcohol for six months, according to a new study.
1d
Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

Missing link between blow flies and possible pathogen transmissionDetermining whether blow flies have consumed animal fecal material versus animal tissue has important implications for both human public health and animal conservation. A recent study shows how that determination can be made.
1d
Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

Non-plasma high-speed anisotropic diamond etching with nickel in 1000°C water vaporDevelopment of next-generation power devices is needed for energy saving in a low carbon society. Diamond is a potentially important power device material due to its excellent physical and electronic properties. Here we have developed a non-plasma high-speed anisotropic etching process using a thermochemical reaction between nickel and diamond in high-temperature water vapor. This technology is ex
1d
Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

Building a brain, cell by cell: Researchers make a mini neuron network (of two)Neurological research uses simplified models consisting of artificial collections of neurons. These models are often imprecise, because it is difficult to control how neurons connect to one another. Researchers have developed a technique that uses microscopic plates to guide how individual neurons grow, and showed that they can make functional connections between specific neurons. The findings may
1d
Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

Designer cells: Artificial enzyme can activate a gene switchComplex reaction cascades can be triggered in artificial molecular systems: Scientists have constructed an enzyme than can penetrate a mammalian cell and accelerate the release of a hormone. This then activates a gene switch that triggers the creation of a fluorescent protein.
1d
Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

Embryonic gene regulation through mechanical forcesDuring embryonic development genetic cascades control gene activity and cell differentiation. Researchers reported that besides the genetic program, also mechanical cues can contribute to the regulation of gene expression during development. Comparisons with other animals suggests that this regulatory principle is ancient.
1d
Ingeniøren

Silo-udslip kan have gjort muslinger i Lillebælt giftigeDanske forskere er på vej med undersøgelser, der skal afgøre, om udslippet af kvælstoffet urea i 2016 var årsag til giftige muslinger. Fiskerne overvejer erstatningssag.
1d
Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

Early life trauma in men associated with reduced levels of sperm microRNAsExposure to early life trauma can elevate risk for poor physical and mental health in individuals and their children. A new epigenetics study in both men and mice posits that some of the vulnerability in children may derive from stress-associated reductions in microRNAs in their father's sperm.
1d
Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

New treatment for severe asthmaResearchers have developed a new method to treat severe asthma. In a study of over 200 participants with severe asthma, the new treatment was shown to have improved asthma symptoms and lung function, while reducing the need for corticosteroids by up to 70%.
1d
Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

Malaria-causing parasite manipulates liver cells to surviveBefore invading the bloodstream, the malaria-causing Plasmodium parasite rapidly reproduces inside its host's liver cells. Researchers show that liver-stage Plasmodium relies on a host protein called aquaporin-3 to survive and copy itself. Inhibiting the function of aquaporin-3 may provide a new way to keep Plasmodium from proliferating and prevent malaria before symptoms start.
1d
Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

Using 3-D X-rays to measure particle movement inside lithium ion batteriesLithium ion battery performance can decay over time, may not fully charge after many charge/discharge cycles, and may discharge quickly even when idle. Researchers have applied a technique using 3D X-ray tomography of an electrode to better understand what is happening on the inside of a lithium ion battery and ultimately build batteries with more storage capacity and longer life.
1d
Science | The Guardian

Weekend lie-ins could help you avoid an early death, study saysSurvey of 38,000 adults shows 65% higher mortality rate for adults getting five hours’ sleep a night unless balanced with longer snooze on ‘days off’ Many people complain they do not get enough sleep, and it seems they are right to be concerned. Researchers have found that adults under the age of 65 who get five or fewer hours of sleep for seven days a week have a higher risk of death than those
1d
The Scientist RSS

Nipah Virus Kills 10 in IndiaFruit bats are a reservoir for the disease, which can cause brain damage.
1d
NYT > Science

There’s a Sinkhole at the White House. Blame the Swamp. (Really.)“Drain the swamp” jabs were abundant on Twitter, but joking aside, the phrase has some geological merit. There is a “legitimate swamp” around the White House, an expert said.
1d
Feed: All Latest

Few Rules Govern Police Use of Facial-Recognition TechnologyAmazon RekognitionGroups call for Amazon to stop selling facial-recognition tech to police departments after documents reveal the practice.
1d
EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Early physical therapy benefits low-back pain patientsPatients with low-back pain are better off seeing a physical therapist first, according to a study of 150,000 insurance claims. The study was published in Health Services Research.
1d
EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Prescription costs increase for low-value treatments despite reduction in numbersDespite a fall in prescription numbers for low-value treatments, the overall cost of prescribing these items in English primary care has risen, according to new research published by the Journal of the Royal Society of Medicine.
1d
New Scientist - News

Quantum stopwatch could be the best in the universeStoring time from a quantum stopwatch with qubits – instead of losing accuracy by stopping and starting it – could give us the ultimate precision in timekeeping
1d
Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

Avoiding the car for travel could significantly lower risk of illness and deathPeople who are more active when commuting to work by walking or cycling could be cutting their relative risk of developing ischaemic heart disease or stroke by 11 percent and their relative risk of dying from these diseases by 30 percent, suggests a new study.
1d
Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

Guns in Chicago just '2.5 handshakes' away, study findsIn one of the first studies to try to map a gun market using network science, researchers used the novel scientific approach to understand how close offenders are to guns in the city of Chicago. Recreating Chicago's co-offending network of approximately 188,000 people, the researchers used data on firearms recovered by the Chicago Police Department to locate who in the network possessed those guns
1d
Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

Link between IBD and Parkinson's might allow doctors to slow down conditionDoctors may be able to modify or slow down the progress of the neurological condition Parkinson's disease in the future by spotting signs of it in patients with inflammatory bowel disease (IBD), suggest a new study.
1d
BBC News - Science & Environment

Risk of water shortages for England warns Environment AgencyEnough water to meet the needs of 20 million people is lost through leakage every day, the report says.
1d
BBC News - Science & Environment

Hawaiian volcano: What are vog and laze?Making sense of the Hawaiian volcano with the help of volcanologist Evgenia Ilyinskaya.
1d
Futurity.org

How to protect yourself from ticks this summerCases of disease from ticks, fleas, and mosquitoes have more than tripled nationwide, growing from 27,388 cases in 2004 to 96,075 cases in 2016, according to a new report from the Centers for Disease Control. Tamar Barlam, interim chief of the Section of Infectious Disease at Boston Medical Center and associate professor at the School of Medicine at Boston University, talked about the spike in di
1d
EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Study reveals how high-latitude corals cope with the coldCorals growing in high-latitude reefs in Western Australia can regulate their internal chemistry to promote growth under cooler temperatures, according to new research at the ARC Centre of Excellence for Coral Reef Studies at The University of Western Australia.The study, published today in Proceedings of the Royal Society B, suggests that ocean warming may not necessarily promote faster rates of
1d
EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Study casts doubt on traditional view of pterosaur flightA new study of how ligaments restrict joint movement suggests that pterosaurs and 'four-winged' dinosaurs couldn't have flown in the same way that bats do.
1d
EurekAlert! - Breaking News

'Virtual safe space' to help bumblebeesThe many threats facing bumblebees can be tested using a 'virtual safe space' created by scientists at the University of Exeter.
1d
Futurity.org

Pups born in summer have greater heart disease riskDogs born in June through August are at higher risk of heart disease than those born other months, report researchers. This risk peaks in July at 74 percent higher risk. A correlation with outdoor air pollution may be the culprit, the findings in Scientific Reports suggest. “It’s important to study dogs because the canine heart is a remarkably similar model to the human cardiovascular system.” Th
1d
BBC News - Science & Environment

This is why those lynx are shriekingA pair of Canada lynx have been caught on camera "screaming" at each other.
1d
Futurity.org

Black male teachers face unrealistic expectationsA new book centers on interviews with black male teachers, which the author, Ed Brockenbrough, says often felt like therapy sessions for his subjects. During the long and often emotional interviews, teacher after teacher would tell Brockenbrough that it was the first time anyone had asked them what it felt like to be a black male teacher working in a predominantly black urban school district in t
1d
New Scientist - News

‘Impossible’ EM drive doesn’t seem to work after allA rocket engine propelled by electromagnetic waves grabbed headlines, but new tests find the EM drive may actually be driven by Earth’s magnetic field
1d
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Study reveals how high-latitude corals cope with the coldCorals growing in high-latitude reefs in Western Australia can regulate their internal chemistry to promote growth under cooler temperatures, according to new research at the ARC Centre of Excellence for Coral Reef Studies at The University of Western Australia.
1d
Futurity.org

Drug combo may ease near-term risk of second strokeFor people who have had a minor stroke or a transient ischemic stroke (TIA), combining the clot-preventing drug clopidogrel with aspirin may lower risk of having a major event within the next 90 days, new research shows. A study of 4,881 adults in 10 countries who either had a minor stroke or a TIA showed that people who took clopidogrel plus aspirin had a 25 percent lower risk of a major stroke,
1d
Science | The Guardian

People rarely say thank you when others help them out, scientists sayIt’s not to do with rudeness, but with tradition: we take it for granted that people will cooperate with each other At first glance it seems a slight on the polite: recordings of more than a thousand casual conversations from around the world reveal that people hardly ever say “thank you” when others help them out. The everyday social exchanges, which played out in eight different languages on fi
1d
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

'Virtual safe space' to help bumblebeesThe many threats facing bumblebees can be tested using a "virtual safe space" created by scientists at the University of Exeter. Bumble-BEEHAVE provides a computer simulation of how colonies will develop and react to multiple factors including pesticides, parasites and habitat loss.
1d
Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

Advance genetics study identifies virulent strain of TBA virulent strain of tuberculosis (TB) has adapted to transmit among young adults in Ho Chi Minh City, Vietnam.
1d
Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

Study finds popular 'growth mindset' educational interventions aren't very effectiveA new study found that 'growth mindset interventions,' or programs that teach students they can improve their intelligence with effort -- and therefore improve grades and test scores -- don't work for students in most circumstances.
1d
Futurity.org

Fructose in formula threatens babies with this disorderBabies with inherited intolerance of fructose face a risk of acute liver failure if they drink certain widely available formulas containing fructose, pediatricians and geneticists warn. Baby formula manufacturers should remove fructose or sucrose, or explicitly label their products to allow parents to avoid those sweeteners if necessary, the doctors say. In a recent paper in Molecular Genetics an
1d
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Study casts doubt on traditional view of pterosaur flightMost renderings and reconstructions of pterodactyls and other extinct flying reptiles show a flight pose much like that of bats, which fly with their hind limbs splayed wide apart. But a new method for inferring how ancient animals might have moved their joints suggests that pterosaurs probably couldn't strike that pose.
1d
Futurity.org

Gel regrows mouse neurons after brain-damaging strokesA new gel helped regrow neurons and blood vessels in mice with stroke-damaged brains, researchers report. “…new brain tissue can be regenerated in what was previously just an inactive brain scar after stroke.” The results suggest that such an approach may someday be a new therapy for stroke in people, says Tatiana Segura, professor of biomedical engineering at Duke University. “We tested this in
1d
Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

How order first appears in liquid crystalsChemists have shown a technique that can identify regions in a liquid crystal system where molecular order begins to emerge just before the system fully transitions from disordered to ordered states.
1d
Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

Posttraumatic stress affects academicsPosttraumatic stress disorder (PTSD) caused by traumatic military experiences is associated with feelings of anxiety, anger, sadness and/or guilt. New research is evaluating how PTSD symptoms increase risks for academic difficulties as well.
1d
Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

Faster genome evolution methods to transform yeastScientists have created a new way of speeding up the genome evolution of baker's yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae, the same yeast we use for bread and beer production.
1d
The Atlantic

The Atlantic Daily: Illuminate AnxietiesWhat We’re Following High-Stakes Summit: South Korean President Moon Jae In came to Washington to meet with President Trump in preparation for the summit between Trump and North Korean leader Kim Jong Un. That summit is planned for June 12, but both Kim and Trump have now suggested it may not happen. With his own negotiations with Kim hanging in the balance, Moon has an urgent stake in ensuring i
1d
Popular Science

There’s finally a drug that prevents migraines instead of just treating themHealth The FDA's approval shows we're getting closer to understanding these headaches The migraine therapy’s mechanism of action has been in the works for decades, but took researchers a long time to crack.
1d
EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Study finds boys' fitness has declined over past 20 yearsEven healthy weight boys have become less fit over the past 20 years, according to new research being presented at this year's European Congress on Obesity (ECO) in Vienna, Austria (May 23-26).
1d
EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Successful weight loss maintainers have different behavioral and physiological responses to foodSuccessful weight loss maintainers have different behavioral and physiological responses to food than people with obesity and their lean counterparts, according to new research by the University of Birmingham and the University of Amsterdam being presented at this year's European Congress on Obesity (ECO) in Vienna, Austria (May 23-26).
1d
EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Familiarity with junk-food ads linked with obesity in young peopleYoung people who watch one extra junk-food advert a week (over the average of six) consume an additional 350 calories in foods high in salt, sugar, and fat (HFSS) every week (18,000 each year), according to the largest study of its kind in the UK involving over 3,300 teens aged 11 to 19 years.
1d
EurekAlert! - Breaking News

On current trends, almost a quarter of people in the world will be obese by 2045, and 1 in 8 will have type 2 diabetesNew research from various cities in the world presented at this year's European Congress on Obesity in Vienna, Austria (May 23-26), demonstrate that if current trends continue, almost a quarter of the people in the world will be obese by 2045 (up from 14 percent in 2017), and one in eight will have type 2 diabetes (up from 9 percent in 2017).
1d
EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Adoption of 'healthier' Mediterranean-style diet varies considerably across US statesNew research being presented at this year's European Congress on Obesity (ECO) in Vienna, Austria (May 23-26) uses geospatial techniques to identify which US states have the greatest adherence to this Mediterranean-style of eating. Western and northeastern coastal areas of the USA including California, New Jersey, New York City, and Massachusetts lead the nation following this healthier eating pat
1d
EurekAlert! - Breaking News

A vegetarian diet is not only good for you -- it's the most affordable tooEating a vegetarian diet rich in fruits, vegetables, and grains is not only good for you, it's also more affordable then other healthy dietary patterns if you're buying online, according to new research being presented at this year's European Congress on Obesity (ECO) in Vienna, Austria (May 23-26). On average, following a vegetarian diet costs around $2 less per day than the Mediterranean- and th
1d
EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Even moderate adherence to vegetarian diet could prevent overweight/obesity in middle ageEating a diet high in plant-based foods and low in animal-based foods may protect against obesity in middle aged and elderly populations, even if a vegetarian or vegan diet is not strictly followed. The new research is being presented at this year's European Congress on Obesity (ECO) in Vienna, Austria (May 23-26).
1d
EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Simple food-based score predicts long-term overweight/obesity risk in healthy adultsSpanish researchers have developed a new food-based score that is strongly associated with long-term risk of overweight or obesity across adulthood, according to new research being presented at this year's European Congress on Obesity (ECO) in Vienna, Austria (May 23-26).
1d
EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Universal thyroid testing could reduce pregnancy problems in some casesUniversal testing for thyroid function in pregnant women could reduce miscarriages and negative neurodevelopmental effects for the baby, but may also put healthy pregnancies at risk by prescribing unnecessary drugs to mothers. The debate 'Pregnant women should be screened for thyroid hormones and antibodies' will be held in Barcelona at the European Society of Endocrinology annual meeting, ECE 201
1d
EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Transgender brains are more like their desired gender from an early ageBrain activity and structure in transgender adolescents more closely resembles the typical activation patterns of their desired gender, according to findings to be presented in Barcelona, at the European Society of Endocrinology annual meeting, ECE 2018. These findings suggest that differences in brain function may occur early in development and that brain imaging may be a useful tool for earlier
1d
The Atlantic

The Atlantic Politics & Policy Daily: A Tale of Two Staceys-Written by Elaine Godfrey ( @elainejgodfrey ) Today in 5 Lines In a meeting with South Korean President Moon Jae In, President Trump suggested that his historic summit with North Korean leader Kim Jong Un could be delayed : “There’s a very substantial chance that it won’t work out,” he told reporters. The Treasury Department sanctioned five Iranians who allegedly provided military expertise to r
1d
Big Think

Daily dose of baking soda may help against autoimmune diseasesIt might not be a great idea to chug a whole box of Arm and Hammer, but a small daily dose could do wonders for keeping your autoimmune system in check. Read More
1d
The Atlantic

A Belgian Legislator Berates and Scoffs at Mark ZuckerbergOn Tuesday, as the deadline to implement the sweeping European internet rule known as the General Data Protection Regulation approached, Mark Zuckerberg appeared before the European Parliament in Brussels to answer a few questions. The representatives of the many different parties present in the European legislative body asked some tough questions, but the format did not allow them to pin Zuckerb
1d
Popular Science

Boeing's new 777x planes have wings so wide they need to fold just to fit at the gateTechnology Aviation can be such a drag. When airborne, the forthcoming Boeing 777x aircraft will have a majestic wingspan of 235 feet. So they'll need to fold to fit at the gate.
1d
The Scientist RSS

Prevalent Form of Childhood Leukemia May Be PreventableEarly exposure to common microbes could stop leukemia from manifesting in children.
1d
EurekAlert! - Breaking News

NIST puts the optical microscope under the microscope to achieve atomic accuracyNew work at the National Institute of Standards and Technology (NIST) enables optical microscopes to measure these nanometer-scale details with a new level of accuracy.
1d
Feed: All Latest

How the LAPD Uses Data to Predict CrimeThe Los Angeles Police Department is using "predictive policing" to prevent crime, but this innovative approach has its problems.
1d


Vil du være med til at finde de mest interessante nyheder? Send email herom til BioNyt

Se nyheder fra en tidligere dato

Tegn abonnement på

BioNyt Videnskabens Verden (www.bionyt.dk) er Danmarks ældste populærvidenskabelige tidsskrift for naturvidenskab. Det er det eneste blad af sin art i Danmark, som er helliget international forskning inden for livsvidenskaberne.

Bladet bringer aktuelle, spændende forskningsnyheder inden for biologi, medicin og andre naturvidenskabelige områder som f.eks. klimaændringer, nanoteknologi, partikelfysik, astronomi, seksualitet, biologiske våben, ecstasy, evolutionsbiologi, kloning, fedme, søvnforskning, muligheden for liv på mars, influenzaepidemier, livets opståen osv.

Artiklerne roses for at gøre vanskeligt stof forståeligt, uden at den videnskabelige holdbarhed tabes.