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Scientific American Content: Global

Challenges for Science in Post-Hurricane Puerto RicoEight months after Irma and Maria struck, electricity is still unreliable -- Read more on ScientificAmerican.com
6h
Science current issue

An ingestible bacterial-electronic system to monitor gastrointestinal healthBiomolecular monitoring in the gastrointestinal tract could offer rapid, precise disease detection and management but is impeded by access to the remote and complex environment. Here, we present an ingestible micro-bio-electronic device (IMBED) for in situ biomolecular detection based on environmentally resilient biosensor bacteria and miniaturized luminescence readout electronics that wirelessly
2h
Ingeniøren

Vildsvinehegnet kan erstattes af en flydespærringUndersøgelse af de lokale forhold i Sønderjylland viser, at et hegn nogle steder vil være upraktisk og samtidig ’afskære’ Danmark fra mange hundrede hektar jord.
11h
Slack
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Science : NPR

As The Planet Warms, We'll Be Having Rice With A Side Of CO2Scientists found some rice varieties are better than others at resisting the increased levels of carbon dioxide expected to come with global warming. The trick might be getting people to switch. (Image credit: Maximilian Stock, Ltd./Getty Images/Passage)
4min
TED Talks Daily (SD video)

How to start a conversation about suicide | Jeremy ForbesIs there someone in your life dealing with anxiety, depression or thoughts of suicide -- but is too ashamed to talk about it? Jeremy Forbes saw this happening around him, and now he's on a mission to teach people how to start a conversation about it. In this deeply personal talk, Forbes shares his approach to helping a group of traditionally silent men in his community open up about their struggle
9min
EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Prehistoric people also likely disrupted by environmental changeVanderbilt and University of Illinois researchers used archaeological excavations, geologic mapping and coring, and radiocarbon dating to identify how Native Americans built and inhabited the Grand Caillou mound near Dulac, Louisiana.
12min
Scientific American Content: Global

Gut Sensor Could Monitor Health--and Beam Results to a SmartphoneThe swallowable device looks promising in pigs -- Read more on ScientificAmerican.com
13min
Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

Tick bite protection: New CDC study adds to the promise of permethrin-treated clothingThe case for permethrin-treated clothing to prevent tick bites keeps getting stronger. In new experiments, clothing treated with an insecticide known as permethrin had strong toxic effects on three primary species of ticks known to spread disease-causing pathogens in the United States. Exposure to permethrin interfered with the ticks' ability to move properly, making them sluggish and likely inter
13min
Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

Molecular network boosts drug resistance and virulence in hospital-acquired bacteriumIn response to antibiotics, a gene regulation network found in the bacterium Acinetobacter baumannii acts to boost both virulence and antibiotic resistance.
13min
Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

Gut microbiome can control antitumor immune function in liverScientists have found a connection between bacteria in the gut and antitumor immune responses in the liver. Bacteria found in the gut of mice affect the liver's antitumor immune function. The findings have implications for understanding the mechanisms that lead to liver cancer and for therapeutic approaches to treat them.
13min
Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

Past use of disinfectants and PPE for Ebola could inform future outbreaksData from the 2014 Ebola virus outbreak at two Sierra Leone facilities reveal daily usage rates for disinfectant and personal protective equipment, informing future outbreaks, according to a new study.
13min
Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

Bold lizards of all sizes have higher mating successBoldness correlates with the mating success, but not body size or sex, of yellow-spotted monitor lizards roaming the remote Oombulgurri floodplains of tropical Western Australia, ecologists report. Bold individuals expose themselves to much higher risk of being eaten by predators during the dangerous wet season. The researchers demonstrated quantifiable behavioral syndromes in the large lizards, w
13min
Popular Science

Lava is creating more Hawai'i. It's also forming corrosive acid mistEnvironment What happens when lava from the Kilauea eruption enters the ocean. There is something special and awe-inspiring about watching new land form. This is what is now happening in Hawai’i as its Kīlauea volcano erupts.
17min
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Scientists shrink chemistry lab to seek evidence of life on MarsAn international team of scientists has created a tiny chemistry lab for a rover that will drill beneath the Martian surface looking for signs of past or present life. The toaster oven-sized lab, called the Mars Organic Molecule Analyzer or MOMA, is a key instrument on the ExoMars Rover, a joint mission between the European Space Agency and the Russian space agency Roscosmos, with a significant co
24min
EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Scientists shrink chemistry lab to seek evidence of life on MarsAn international team of scientists has created a tiny chemistry lab for a rover that will drill beneath the Martian surface looking for signs of past or present life.
26min
EurekAlert! - Breaking News

African Americans and Latinos are more likely to be at risk for depression than whitesA new study published in the May 2018 issue of Preventive Medicine shows that African Americans and Latinos are significantly more likely to experience serious depression than Whites, but chronic stress does not seem to explain these differences.
26min
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Uber's Self-Driving Car Saw the Woman It Killed, Report SaysThe National Transportation Safety Board says the car had trouble identifying Elaine Herzberg as a human, and then wasn't made to hit the brakes to avoid hitting her.
27min
The Scientist RSS

Present-Day Arboreal Birds Have Ground-Dwelling PastA mass extinction event from an asteroid hitting Earth wiped out forests and, concurrently, tree-dwelling birds.
39min
Big Think

Life in orbit is better than you think. Ask Peggy Whitson.Big Think speaks with the American who’s spent the most time in space, astronaut Peggy Whitson, looking back on what she learned during life in orbit. Read More
40min
Big Think

Study shows key reason why men outperform women in navigationA new study echoes a body of prior research showing that men tend to outperform women in a variety of navigational and spatial tasks. Read More
40min
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Global Facebook users to get 'good' EU-style safeguards: ZuckerbergFacebook CEO Mark Zuckerberg said Thursday that he was rolling out the privacy controls demanded by European regulators to Facebook users worldwide because "everyone cares about privacy".
43min
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Nanoparticles carrying two drugs can cross the blood-brain barrier and shrink glioblastoma tumorsGlioblastoma multiforme, a type of brain tumor, is one of the most difficult-to-treat cancers. Only a handful of drugs are approved to treat glioblastoma, and the median life expectancy for patients diagnosed with the disease is less than 15 months.
43min
EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Tiny particles could help fight brain cancerMIT researchers have now devised a new drug-delivering nanoparticle that could offer a better way to treat glioblastoma.
48min
EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Portland State study measures free-base form of nicotine in electronic cigarettesResearchers at Portland State University have developed methods for measuring levels of free-base nicotine in electronic cigarette (e-cigarette) liquids and vapor, the levels of which are associated with harshness upon inhalation of e-cigarette vapors and tobacco smoke.
48min
EurekAlert! - Breaking News

New blood test to detect liver damage in under an hourA quick and robust blood test that can detect liver damage before symptoms appear has been designed and verified using clinical samples by a team from UCL and University of Massachusetts.
48min
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Officials: Efforts failing to save US West sagebrush landPublic lands managers are losing a battle against a devastating combination of invasive plant species and wildfires in the vast sagebrush habitats in the U.S. West that support cattle ranching and recreation and are home to an imperiled bird, officials said.
48min
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Facebook to label election-related 'issue ads' in USFacebook is expanding its advertising disclosure requirements to cover all U.S. ads on polarized issues such as gun control and abortion rights, even if they don't endorse a particular candidate.
48min
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Dusty rainfall records reveal new understanding of Earth's long-term climateAncient rainfall records stretching 550,000 years into the past may upend scientists' understanding of what controls the Asian summer monsoon and other aspects of the Earth's long-term climate, reports a University of Arizona-led international team of researchers in the May 25 issue of the journal Science.
48min
The Atlantic

Trump’s Reckoning Arrives“Gradually and then suddenly.” That was how one of Ernest Hemingway’s characters described the process of going bankrupt. The phrase applies vividly to the accumulating failures of President Trump’s foreign-policy initiatives. Donald Trump entered office with more scope for initiative in foreign policy than any of his recent predecessors. In his campaign for president, Trump had disparaged almost
49min
The Atlantic

That Dinosaur-Killing Asteroid? It Triggered Global Warming, TooIt took, at most, several seconds. An enormous hunk of rock, roughly the size of Manhattan, came whirling out of the vastness of space. It pierced Earth’s thin atmosphere, ignited as it fell, and slammed into the crust, opening a crater 20 miles deep in modern-day Mexico’s Yucatan Peninsula. Of course, it killed the non-avian dinosaurs: How could it not? By its end, the cataclysm wiped out 75 per
49min
Big Think

Fleet of autonomous boats could service some cities, reducing road trafficMIT researchers have designed a fleet of autonomous boats that offer high manoeuvrability and precise control. Read More
51min
Latest Headlines | Science News

The Chicxulub asteroid impact might have set off 100,000 years of global warmingAbout 66 million years ago, the Chicxulub asteroid impact set off 100,000 years of global warming, an analysis of oxygen in fish fossils suggests.
54min
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Researchers shed light on immune response in diseased coralsResearchers at The University of Texas at Arlington have found a correlation between a strong immune response in diseased corals and a lower expression of genes associated with growth and reproduction.
1h
Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

Reconstructing Zika's spreadThe urgent threat from Zika virus, which dominated headlines in early 2016, has passed. But research into how Zika and other mosquito-borne infections spread and cause epidemics is still very active. Researchers now report new details of how Zika emerged from Brazil and spread throughout Mexico and Central America, with evidence that some locations had more than one outbreak.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

Mongooses inherit behavior from role models rather than parentsYoung mongooses learn lifelong habits from role models rather than inheriting them from genetic parents, new research shows.
1h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Crafting a human nicheIn "How Humans and Apes Are Different and Why It Matters," published in the Journal of Anthropological Research, Agustin Fuentes explores the common ancestry between humans and apes by examining characteristics that the two share. Conversely, Fuentes draws upon anthropological evidence to examine the ways in which the hominin lineage underwent changes during the Pleistocene that led to the emergen
1h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Origami inspires new tech for tissue regenerationOrigami—the Japanese art of folding paper into shapes and figures—dates back to the sixth century. At UMass Lowell, it is inspiring researchers as they develop a 21st century solution to the shortage of tissue and organ donors.
1h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Rare element to provide better material for high-speed electronicsPurdue researchers have discovered a new two-dimensional material, derived from the rare element tellurium, to make transistors that carry a current better throughout a computer chip.
1h
Science : NPR

From Kilauea To The Ring Of Fire: What You Need To Know About VolcanoesThe threat from the volcano goes beyond lava. (Image credit: Mario Tama/Getty Images)
1h
The Atlantic

Personal Space Is an Elaborate, Unconscious DancePresident Trump has a signature handshake. It hit the world stage at the United Nations meeting last year when he grabbed Emmanuel Macron’s hand and appeared to aggressively pull the French president closer. Ever since, he’s shown a consistent tendency to loom into other people’s personal space, or pull them toward him. This article is adapted from Graziano’s new book . Everyone has a personal sp
1h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Telemedicine helps improve participation in clinical trialsVideos and creative uses of other visuals provide a novel way to obtain informed consent during clinical trials to improve participants' understanding and retention of trial information, according to a study by Nemours Children's Health System presented at the American Thoracic Society (ATS) Annual Conference.
1h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Dusty rainfall records reveal new understanding of Earth's long-term climateAncient rainfall records stretching 550,000 years into the past may upend scientists' understanding of what controls the Asian summer monsoon and other aspects of the Earth's long-term climate. Milankovitch theory says solar heating of the northernmost part of the globe drives the world's climate swings between ice ages and warmer periods. The new work turns Milankovitch in its head by suggesting
1h
Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

When the dinosaurs died, so did forests -- and tree-dwelling birdsSixty-six million years ago, the world burned. An asteroid crashed to Earth with a force one million times larger than the largest atomic bomb, causing the extinction of the dinosaurs. But dinosaurs weren't the only ones that got hit hard -- in a new study, scientists learned that the planet's forests were decimated, leading to the extinction of tree-dwelling birds.
1h
Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

Imminent extinction of northern white rhinoceros motivates genetic recovery effortsEarlier this year, the last remaining male northern white rhinoceros (NWR) died in captivity, nearly cementing the fate of this subspecies for extinction. In the wild, continuing threats of poaching, habitat destruction, and small population size have contributed to the rhinos' status as critically endangered. Yet, novel conservation efforts that make use of cryopreserved genetic material could sa
1h
Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

New theory finds 'traffic jams' in jet stream cause abnormal weather patternsA study offers an explanation for a mysterious and sometimes deadly weather pattern in which the jet stream, the global air currents that circle the Earth, stalls out over a region. Much like highways, the jet stream has a capacity, researchers said, and when it's exceeded, blockages form that are remarkably similar to traffic jams -- and climate forecasters can use the same math to model them bot
1h
Popular Science

Does a black hole ever die?Space What we know about the mysterious life cycle of a black hole. From their inception to their potential demise far in the future, black holes are a fascinating part of our universe—here’s their story as we understand it now, from…
1h
Big Think

Five ways to deal with burnout using lessons from elite sportBurnout has three major characteristics: emotional and physical exhaustion, a cynical attitude towards people at work, and a feeling that you're no longer accomplishing anything worthwhile. Read More
1h
The Atlantic

Uber’s Self-Driving Car Didn’t Malfunction, It Was Just BadOn March 18, at 9:58 p.m., a self-driving Uber car killed Elaine Herzberg. The vehicle was driving itself down an uncomplicated road in suburban Tempe, Arizona, when it hit her. Herzberg, who was walking across the mostly empty street, was the first pedestrian killed by an autonomous vehicle. The preliminary National Transportation Safety Board report on the incident, released on Thursday, shows
1h
The Atlantic

The NFL Tries to Push Protest Out of SightThe world of sports has two essential settings: the playing field and the locker room. The former, with its high-wattage triumph and failure, draws its narrative power from the existence of the latter, where athletic archetypes are sometimes revealed to be imperfect humans after all. Almost every sports story is concerned with this distinction. “On the field they won and lost before a nation;” Ro
1h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News

UTA researchers shed light on immune response in diseased coralsResearchers at The University of Texas at Arlington have found a correlation between a strong immune response in diseased corals and a lower expression of genes associated with growth and reproduction.
1h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Origami inspires new tech for tissue regenerationOrigami -- the Japanese art of folding paper into shapes and figures -- dates back to the sixth century. At UMass Lowell, it is inspiring researchers as they develop a 21st century solution to the shortage of tissue and organ donors.
1h
NYT > Science

Trilobites: Coyotes Conquered North America. Now They’re Heading South.New maps seek to update the historical range of our continent’s toughest canids, which have thrived as other predators experienced decline.
1h
Science : NPR

Asteroid Impact That Wiped Out The Dinosaurs Also Caused Abrupt Global WarmingThe crash of the space rock that slammed into the Yucatan Peninsula also warmed up the Earth's atmosphere for 100,000 years. And scientists say it's a cautionary tale for people living today. (Image credit: SPL/Science Source)
1h
The Scientist RSS

Scientist Who Received Millions From NIH Leaves Alabama PostsAn investigation finds 20 papers by Santosh Katiyar, who studied alternative treatments for cancer, include image manipulation.
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Viden

Meterlange rovorme invaderer FrankrigEfter i flere årtier at have levet ubemærket hærger rovorme nu flere steder i Frankrig.
1h
Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

The secret to honing kids' language and literacyResearchers found that a child's ability to self-regulate is a critical element in childhood language and literacy development, and that the earlier they can hone these skills, the faster language and literacy skills develop leading to better skills in the long run.
1h
Big Think

How AI will fight cancer thanks to UK investmentThe United Kingdom has announced their intention to spend millions on a new AI system that promises to save thousands of lives a year, but at what opportunity cost? Read More
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Kessler Foundation study compares neuropsychological tests for assessing deficits in MSKessler Foundation researchers compared two neuropsychological tests for assessing learning in individuals with multiple sclerosis. 'Comparing the Open Trial - Selective Reminding Test results with the California Learning Verbal Test II in Multiple Sclerosis' was published online on April 4, 2018, in Applied Neuropsychology: Adult. This is the first study to compare the two tests in the same indiv
1h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News

The secret to honing kids' language and literacyResearch from Michigan State University found that a child's ability to self-regulate is a critical element in childhood language and literacy development, and that the earlier they can hone these skills, the faster language and literacy skills develop leading to better skills in the long run.
1h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News

New parts of the brain become active after students learn physics -- Drexel University studyA new study out of Drexel University showed that, when confronted with physics problems, new parts of a student's brain are utilized after receiving instruction in the topic.
1h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Plant symbioses -- fragile partnershipsSymbioses between plants and nitrogen-fixing bacteria can be ecologically advantageous for both parties. Surprisingly, many partnerships, including some involving the ancestors of several modern fruits such as strawberries, blackberries and apples, have been dissolved during evolution.
1h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Polymer crystals hold key to record-breaking energy transportScientists from the universities of Bristol and Cambridge have found a way to create polymeric semiconductor nanostructures that absorb light and transport its energy further than previously observed.
1h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Past use of disinfectants and PPE for Ebola could inform future outbreaksData from the 2014 Ebola virus outbreak at two Sierra Leone facilities reveal daily usage rates for disinfectant and personal protective equipment, informing future outbreaks, according to a study published May 24, 2018 in the open-access journal PLOS ONE by Michaela Mallow of International Medical Corps in Los Angeles, Calif., and colleagues.
1h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News

New theory finds 'traffic jams' in jet stream cause abnormal weather patternsA study published in Science offers an explanation for a mysterious and sometimes deadly weather pattern in which the jet stream, the global air currents that circle the Earth, stalls out over a region. Much like highways, the jet stream has a capacity, researchers said, and when it's exceeded, blockages form that are remarkably similar to traffic jams -- and climate forecasters can use the same m
1h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Storks on the wingScientists can predict which storks will migrate to Africa in autumn and which will remain in Europe.
1h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Birds at the head of a flock are the more efficient, tactical fliersDetailed tracking of a flock of juvenile storks -- birds known for lengthy migrations sustained by thermal winds -- reveals very different flight tactics among those leading the group and those following; notably, leaders were more efficient at harnessing thermal winds, and they also flapped less.
1h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Jet streams experience traffic jams, too, driving extreme weather eventsHigh above our heads, an unseen traffic jam is occurring as meandering jet streams cause eastward atmospheric circulations to become blocked, a process that can in turn create extreme events such as heat waves.
1h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Did the Chicxulub asteroid knock Earth's thermometer out of the ballpark?When the Chicxulub asteroid smashed into Earth 65 million years ago, the event drove an abrupt and long-lasting era of global warming, with a rapid temperature increase of 5°Celsius (C) that endured for roughly 100,000 years, a new study reports.
1h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Towards a sensor you could swallow to detect gut-related woes, in real timeA newly developed device could one day detect the presence of disease-driving molecules in the gut -- an otherwise difficult-to-access environment -- reading out these results to a cell phone in real time.
1h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Ingestible 'bacteria on a chip' could help diagnose diseaseMIT researchers have built an ingestible sensor equipped with genetically engineered bacteria that can diagnose bleeding in the stomach or other gastrointestinal problems.
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News

NCI study finds gut microbiome can control antitumor immune function in liverScientists have found a connection between bacteria in the gut and antitumor immune responses in the liver. Bacteria found in the gut of mice affect the liver's antitumor immune function. The findings have implications for understanding the mechanisms that lead to liver cancer and for therapeutic approaches to treat them.
1h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Genome study presents new way to track historical demographics of US populationsSharon Browning of the University of Washington and colleagues developed a method to estimate historical effective population size, which is the number of individuals who pass on their genes to the next generation, to reveal the shifting demographic history of US populations during the last several thousand years. They report their findings in a new study published May 24, 2018, in PLOS Genetics.
1h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Molecular network boosts drug resistance and virulence in hospital-acquired bacteriumIn response to antibiotics, a gene regulation network found in the bacterium Acinetobacter baumannii acts to boost both virulence and antibiotic resistance. Edward Geisinger of Tufts University School of Medicine and colleagues present new insights into this system in a study published in PLOS Pathogens.
1h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Some veterans at higher risk of Zika complicationsZika virus (ZIKV) has affected roughly half a million people in the Western hemisphere in recent years, including US veterans. Older veterans and those with comorbidities are at an increased risk of hospitalizations and neurological complications after a ZIKV infection, researchers now report in PLOS Neglected Tropical Diseases.
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News

New computational tool could help optimize treatment of Alzheimer's diseaseScientists have developed a novel computational approach that incorporates individual patients' brain activity to calculate optimal, personalized brain stimulation treatment for Alzheimer's disease. Lazaro Sanchez-Rodriguez of the University of Calgary, Canada, and colleagues present their new framework in PLOS Computational Biology.
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New Scientist - News

Uber self-driving car ‘saw woman but didn’t brake before crash’Uber Arizona NTSB SelfAn autonomous Uber car spotted Elaine Herzberg about six seconds before fatally hitting her but did not stop because the emergency brakes were disabled, US federal investigators said today
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Science current issue

Canada's call
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Science current issue

News at a glance
2h
Science current issue

Rival giant telescopes join to seek U.S. funding
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Science current issue

China's ambitious brain science project inches forward
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Science current issue

German law allows use of DNA to predict suspects' looks
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Science current issue

B612 plans asteroid hunt with fleet of small satellites
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Science current issue

A call to arms against the other retrovirus
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Science current issue

Basic instincts
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Science current issue

The war on gluten
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Science current issue

Following the leader, for better or worse
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Science current issue

Enhancing energy transport in conjugated polymers
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Science current issue

Cold chemistry with two atoms
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Science current issue

Illuminating dark depths
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Science current issue

Cancer immunity thwarted by the microbiome
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Science current issue

The RNA face of phase separation
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Science current issue

Disparities in science literacy
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Science current issue

Our inheritance
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Science current issue

Truth with a vengeance
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Science current issue

Inventing Ourselves: The Secret Life of the Teenage Brain
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Science current issue

Brazil's government attacks biodiversity
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Science current issue

Broad interests: Benefits for science
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Science current issue

The road to wild yak protection in China
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Science current issue

Trout in hot water: A call for global action
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Science current issue

Global health shifts to local experts with global partners
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Science current issue

AAAS extends science in theological education program
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Science current issue

Screeners needed for journalism awards
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Science current issue

Evolution of the brain
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Science current issue

Forcing the East Asian summer monsoon
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Science current issue

Tracking the spin-valley current
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Science current issue

Lighting the way to molecules, one by one
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Science current issue

Using bugs in the gut to detect blood
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Science current issue

A stimulating therapy for diabetes
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Science current issue

A faster way to detect Zika in mosquitoes
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Science current issue

Bile acids and liver cancer
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Science current issue

Follow the leader
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Science current issue

Transforming nitrogen without carbon
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Science current issue

Mapping the planarian transcriptome
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Science current issue

Reduction can make cobalt act precious
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Science current issue

Poking a semiconductor
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Science current issue

A longer exciton pathway
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Science current issue

RNA and membraneless organelles
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Science current issue

Killing without poking holes
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Science current issue

Multiple parasites speed host evolution
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Science current issue

More ITAMs for more potent receptors
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Science current issue

The roots of gray hair
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Science current issue

Aluminum's breakup with fluoroalkenes
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Science current issue

Better to transfer than transfuse?
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Science current issue

How hosts can defeat selfish elements
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Science current issue

How drinking (alcohol) affects drinking (water)
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Science current issue

Something from nothing
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Science current issue

Simulating the future of our Universe
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Science current issue

A 550,000-year record of East Asian monsoon rainfall from 10Be in loessCosmogenic 10 Be flux from the atmosphere is a proxy for rainfall. Using this proxy, we derived a 550,000-year-long record of East Asian summer monsoon (EASM) rainfall from Chinese loess. This record is forced at orbital precession frequencies, with higher rainfall observed during Northern Hemisphere summer insolation maxima, although this response is damped during cold interstadials. The 10 Be m
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Science current issue

Evolution of pallium, hippocampus, and cortical cell types revealed by single-cell transcriptomics in reptilesComputations in the mammalian cortex are carried out by glutamatergic and -aminobutyric acid–releasing (GABAergic) neurons forming specialized circuits and areas. Here we asked how these neurons and areas evolved in amniotes. We built a gene expression atlas of the pallium of two reptilian species using large-scale single-cell messenger RNA sequencing. The transcriptomic signature of glutamatergi
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Science current issue

Cobalt-catalyzed asymmetric hydrogenation of enamides enabled by single-electron reductionIdentifying catalyst activation modes that exploit one-electron chemistry and overcome associated deactivation pathways will be transformative for developing first-row transition metal catalysts with performance equal or, ideally, superior to precious metals. Here we describe a zinc-activation method compatible with high-throughput reaction discovery that identified scores of cobalt-phosphine com
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Science current issue

Imaging of pure spin-valley diffusion current in WS2-WSe2 heterostructuresTransition metal dichalcogenide (TMDC) materials are promising for spintronic and valleytronic applications because valley-polarized excitations can be generated and manipulated with circularly polarized photons and the valley and spin degrees of freedom are locked by strong spin-orbital interactions. In this study we demonstrate efficient generation of a pure and locked spin-valley diffusion cur
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Science current issue

Long-range exciton transport in conjugated polymer nanofibers prepared by seeded growthEasily processed materials with the ability to transport excitons over length scales of more than 100 nanometers are highly desirable for a range of light-harvesting and optoelectronic devices. We describe the preparation of organic semiconducting nanofibers comprising a crystalline poly(di- n -hexylfluorene) core and a solvated, segmented corona consisting of polyethylene glycol in the center an
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Science current issue

Building one molecule from a reservoir of two atomsChemical reactions typically proceed via stochastic encounters between reactants. Going beyond this paradigm, we combined exactly two atoms in a single, controlled reaction. The experimental apparatus traps two individual laser-cooled atoms [one sodium (Na) and one cesium (Cs)] in separate optical tweezers and then merges them into one optical dipole trap. Subsequently, photoassociation forms an
2h
Science current issue

Flexo-photovoltaic effectIt is highly desirable to discover photovoltaic mechanisms that enable enhanced efficiency of solar cells. Here we report that the bulk photovoltaic effect, which is free from the thermodynamic Shockley-Queisser limit but usually manifested only in noncentrosymmetric (piezoelectric or ferroelectric) materials, can be realized in any semiconductor, including silicon, by mediation of flexoelectric
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Science current issue

High parasite diversity accelerates host adaptation and diversificationHost-parasite species pairs are known to coevolve, but how multiple parasites coevolve with their host is unclear. By using experimental coevolution of a host bacterium and its viral parasites, we revealed that diverse parasite communities accelerated host evolution and altered coevolutionary dynamics to enhance host resistance and decrease parasite infectivity. Increases in parasite diversity dr
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Science current issue

From local collective behavior to global migratory patterns in white storksSoaring migrant birds exploit columns of rising air (thermals) to cover large distances with minimal energy. Using social information while locating thermals may benefit such birds, but examining collective movements in wild migrants has been a major challenge for researchers. We investigated the group movements of a flock of 27 naturally migrating juvenile white storks by using high-resolution G
2h
Science current issue

RNA buffers the phase separation behavior of prion-like RNA binding proteinsPrion-like RNA binding proteins (RBPs) such as TDP43 and FUS are largely soluble in the nucleus but form solid pathological aggregates when mislocalized to the cytoplasm. What keeps these proteins soluble in the nucleus and promotes aggregation in the cytoplasm is still unknown. We report here that RNA critically regulates the phase behavior of prion-like RBPs. Low RNA/protein ratios promote phas
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Science current issue

mRNA structure determines specificity of a polyQ-driven phase separationRNA promotes liquid-liquid phase separation (LLPS) to build membraneless compartments in cells. How distinct molecular compositions are established and maintained in these liquid compartments is unknown. Here, we report that secondary structure allows messenger RNAs (mRNAs) to self-associate and determines whether an mRNA is recruited to or excluded from liquid compartments. The polyQ-protein Whi
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Science current issue

New Products
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Science current issue

What I learned from teaching
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Science current issue

Cell type atlas and lineage tree of a whole complex animal by single-cell transcriptomicsFlatworms of the species Schmidtea mediterranea are immortal—adult animals contain a large pool of pluripotent stem cells that continuously differentiate into all adult cell types. Therefore, single-cell transcriptome profiling of adult animals should reveal mature and progenitor cells. By combining perturbation experiments, gene expression analysis, a computational method that predicts future ce
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Science current issue

Cell type transcriptome atlas for the planarian Schmidtea mediterraneaThe transcriptome of a cell dictates its unique cell type biology. We used single-cell RNA sequencing to determine the transcriptomes for essentially every cell type of a complete animal: the regenerative planarian Schmidtea mediterranea. Planarians contain a diverse array of cell types, possess lineage progenitors for differentiated cells (including pluripotent stem cells), and constitutively ex
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Science current issue

Comment on "Plant diversity increases with the strength of negative density dependence at the global scale"LaManna et al . (Reports, 30 June 2017, p. 1389) claim that subadult trees are proportionally less common at high conspecific adult density (CNDD) and that this effect increases toward the tropics and for rare species. We show that the CNDD-abundance correlation may have arisen from a methodological artifact and that a range of processes can explain the reported latitudinal pattern.
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Science current issue

Response to Comment on "Plant diversity increases with the strength of negative density dependence at the global scale"Hülsmann and Hartig suggest that ecological mechanisms other than specialized natural enemies or intraspecific competition contribute to our estimates of conspecific negative density dependence (CNDD). To address their concern, we show that our results are not the result of a methodological artifact and present a null-model analysis that demonstrates that our original findings—(i) stronger CNDD
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Science current issue

Comment on "Plant diversity increases with the strength of negative density dependence at the global scale"LaManna et al . (Reports, 30 June 2017, p. 1389) found higher conspecific negative density dependence in tree communities at lower latitudes, yielding a possible mechanistic explanation for the latitudinal diversity gradient. We show that their results are artifacts of a selective data transformation and a forced zero intercept in their fitted model. A corrected analysis shows no latitudinal tren
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Science current issue

Response to Comment on "Plant diversity increases with the strength of negative density dependence at the global scale"Chisholm and Fung claim that our method of estimating conspecific negative density dependence (CNDD) in recruitment is systematically biased, and present an alternative method that shows no latitudinal pattern in CNDD. We demonstrate that their approach produces strongly biased estimates of CNDD, explaining why they do not detect a latitudinal pattern. We also address their methodological concern
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Science current issue

Gut microbiome-mediated bile acid metabolism regulates liver cancer via NKT cellsPrimary liver tumors and liver metastasis currently represent the leading cause of cancer-related death. Commensal bacteria are important regulators of antitumor immunity, and although the liver is exposed to gut bacteria, their role in antitumor surveillance of liver tumors is poorly understood. We found that altering commensal gut bacteria in mice induced a liver-selective antitumor effect, wit
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Science current issue

Beyond fossil fuel-driven nitrogen transformationsNitrogen is fundamental to all of life and many industrial processes. The interchange of nitrogen oxidation states in the industrial production of ammonia, nitric acid, and other commodity chemicals is largely powered by fossil fuels. A key goal of contemporary research in the field of nitrogen chemistry is to minimize the use of fossil fuels by developing more efficient heterogeneous, homogeneou
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Quanta Magazine

Questioning Truth, Reality and the Role of ScienceIt’s an interesting time to be making a case for philosophy in science. On the one hand, some scientists working on ideas such as string theory or the multiverse — ideas that reach far beyond our current means to test them — are forced to make a philosophical defense of research that can’t rely on traditional hypothesis testing. On the other hand, some physicists, such as Richard Feynman and Step
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BBC News - Science & Environment

Giant canyons discovered in AntarcticaVast troughs are identified in one of the last places to be explored on Earth - under the ice at the South Pole.
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BBC News - Science & Environment

Why is there a row about Galileo?Britain may be denied full access to the EU's Galileo satellite navigation system on security grounds after Brexit.
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Big Think

Elon Musk creates another company: 'Pravda' would rate journalists' credibilityElon Musk had a bit of a meltdown on Twitter this week as the media reported troubles at Tesla, including missing production goals and clashing with the government about the infamous autopilot crash that happened with a Tesla car a few months ago. Going to create a site where the public can ... Read More
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Feed: All Latest

This Digital Pill Prototype Uses Bacteria to Sense Stomach BleedingResearchers are cooking up pill-sized sensors to detect medical molecules and possibly diagnose other gastrointestinal ailments.
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NYT > Science

Trilobites: Only Two of These Rhinos Survive. Scientists See Promise in Resurrecting Them.Even if the technology can bring back the northern white rhinoceros, should we do it?
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NYT > Science

M.L.B. Hired Scientists to Explain Why Home Runs Have Surged. They Couldn’t.The ball is not juiced, it’s just more aerodynamic. But not even scientists hired by M.L.B. can explain precisely why.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Polymer crystals hold key to record-breaking energy transportScientists from the universities of Bristol and Cambridge have found a way to create polymeric semiconductor nanostructures that absorb light and transport its energy further than previously observed.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Scientists can predict which storks will migrate to Africa in autumn and which will remain in EuropeLouis the young stork came into the world on a birch tree in Radolfzell on Lake Constance six or seven weeks ago. Until this day in June 2014, he has only known his parents and three siblings. But suddenly, strange beings have appeared at the nest and take the four small white storks captive. They are Andrea Flack and Wolfgang Fiedler of the Max Planck Institute for Ornithology and the University
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

New theory finds 'traffic jams' in jet stream cause abnormal weather patternsThe sky sometimes has its limits, according to new research from two University of Chicago atmospheric scientists.
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Rare element to provide better material for high-speed electronicsPurdue researchers have discovered a new two-dimensional material, derived from the rare element tellurium, to make transistors that carry a current better throughout a computer chip.
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News

How greener grids can stay litWithout careful management, distributed energy resources have the potential to cause unreliable power delivery, or even outages, and lead utility companies to overcharge customers. A new index will help ISOs and utilities account for uncertainties introduced by both the electricity market and DERs so utility companies can balance the distribution grid and find the fairest customer rates.
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Hot cars can hit life-threatening levels in approximately one hourResearchers from University of California San Diego School of Medicine and Arizona State University found that if a car is parked in the sun on a summer day, the interior temperature can reach 116 degrees F. and the dashboard may exceed 165 degrees F. in approximately one hour -- the time it can take for a young child trapped in a car to suffer fatal injuries.
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News

New study highlights opportunity to restore abundance to Hawaiian reef fisheriesA recently published study, led by researchers at the University of Hawai'i at Manoa, identified areas in the Hawaiian Islands that would provide the greatest increase in coastal fishery stocks, if effectively managed.
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Crafting a human nicheWhy it's important to study the deep similarities, and the critical differences, between humans and the apes to seek an anthropological and evolutionary explanation.
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Revealed mechanism behind citrus canker bacteria's defense system for predatorsA study published by Brazilian researchers describes one of Xanthomonas citri's secretion systems and a signaling pathway that enhances its resistance against amoebae. Investigations might contribute for future forms of intervening and putting a stop on the development of X. citri, known for its persistency.
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Nyheder - Forskning - Videnskab

Persondata har været opbevaret forkertEn gennemgang af interne drev på Københavns Universitet har vist, at tusindvis af studerende...
2h
Nyheder - Forskning - Videnskab

Virksomheder, forskere og politikere skal i fællesskab redde verdenHverken virksomheder, politikere eller forskere kan alene løse de store problemer, verden står...
2h
Nyheder - Forskning - Videnskab

Dekan Ulla Wewer hædres for uselvisk indsats for forskning i sundhedsvidenskabEn eminent forsker, en kvalitetsbevidst og uselvisk leder og en fremtidsorienteret katalysator af dansk...
2h
Nyheder - Forskning - Videnskab

Royal anerkendelse til australske udvekslingsstuderendeFor 14. gang uddelte HKH Kronprinsessen legater til to australske udvekslingsstuderende på Københavns...
2h
Nyheder - Forskning - Videnskab

Ny forskning: Derfor har folkekirken et godt tag i danskerneDanskerne støtter langt mere op om folkekirken end de nationer, vi normalt sammenligner os med....
2h
Nyheder - Forskning - Videnskab

Forskere trodser biologien: Mus forbliver slanke på burger-diætKroppen er rigtig god til at lagre fedt fra mad i fedtvæv. Men i et nyt studie er det lykkedes...
2h
Nyheder - Forskning - Videnskab

Forskere finder forbindelse mellem døgnrytme og aggressionEt forskerhold med Det Sundhedsvidenskabelige Fakultet repræsenteret har i mus fundet et kredsløb...
2h
Nyheder - Forskning - Videnskab

Forskere "snigmyrder" sygdomsfremkaldende bakterier i tyndtarmen med cocktail af viraDet er lykkedes forskere fra Københavns Universitet at dræbe sygdomsfremkalende E. coli-bakterier...
2h
Nyheder - Forskning - Videnskab

2 år efter Taksøe: Danmark glider ned af den diplomatiske ranglisteDanmark er et lille land, men har tidligere kunnet bryste sig af en diplomatisk indflydelse, der var...
2h
Nyheder - Forskning - Videnskab

Sukkerstoffer styrer cellers optag af dårligt kolesterolSukkerstoffer har en afgørende betydning for, hvordan celler kan optage og fjerne det dårlige...
2h
Nyheder - Forskning - Videnskab

Sædcelleforsker vinder Ph.d.-cupAnders Rehfeld fra Det Sundhedsvidenskabelige Fakultet og Rigshospitalet har vundet formidlingskonkurrencen...
2h
Live Science

Active Hurricane Season Ahead, NOAA SaysWill hurricane season in 2018 be as intense as last year's?
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Big Think

Alex Jones sued over Sandy Hook conspiracies, calls it attack on 1st AmendmentIt marks the third such defamation against Jones, but it's not clear the plaintiffs will have an easy case ahead of them. Read More
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The Scientist RSS

Ultrasound Fires Up the Auditory CortexEven Though Animals Cant Hear ItResearchers have been using ultrasound to control brain activity, but studies in mice and guinea pigs show it also stimulates the auditory system, presenting a confounder for direct neural stimulation.
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Latest Headlines | Science News

Pregnant bonobos get a little delivery help from their friendsAs in humans, female bonobos become helpers for mothers giving birth, data from captive apes suggest.
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Big Think

10 intellectuals who were expelled on the 'Philosopher's Ships'Authoritarian regimes have had a long history of targeting intellectuals that don’t agree with them. What kind of people get deported? We have a list of ten people whose work got them shipped out of Russia. Read More
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Macron wants to make France gateway to Europe for tech firmsFrench President Emmanuel Macron called on tech leaders Thursday to invest in France, saying his innovation policies aim to make the country the gateway to Europe.
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Ingeniøren

Mennesket har forandret Jordens biomasse ud over alle grænserIkke alene er menneskers samlede masse næsten 10 gange større end massen af de vilde pattedyr – også for mange former for levende materiale har menneskers virkelyst haft vidtgående konsekvenser.
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Science | The Guardian

Doctors in Commons rally to overturn ban on medicinal cannabisGroup of MPs to campaign on issue following recent case of six-year-old Alfie Dingley Doctors in the House of Commons are to lead a campaign to change the law banning the medicinal use of cannabis, as a new all-party parliamentary group (APPG) forms to campaign for the issue. Dan Poulter, a former health minister who still works part-time as a GP, said he had already signed up fellow Conservative
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New on MIT Technology Review

Uber’s self-driving car spotted a pedestrian six seconds before it killed herUber Arizona NTSB Self
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News

NASA satellites provide a 3-way analysis of Tropical Cyclone MekunTropical Cyclone Mekunu, the second tropical cyclone in less than a week, formed in the western Arabian Sea early on May 22, 2018 and is moving toward a landfall in Oman. NASA satellites provided an infrared, night-time and precipitation analysis of the storm.
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News

UMass Amherst chemists, team develop new blood test to quickly detect liver damageChemist Vincent Rotello at UMass Amherst, with others at University College London, have developed a 'quick and robust' blood test that can detect liver damage before symptoms appear, offering what they hope is a significant advance in early detection of liver disease. Details appear in Advanced Materials. Their new method can detect liver fibrosis, the first stage of liver scarring that can lead
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Programming synthetic molecular codes to turn genes 'on'A team of researchers in Japan developed a synthetic molecular code to script gene activation. The process, described in the Journal of the American Chemical Society, could help lead to future gene-based therapies for a wide array of diseases.
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Imminent extinction of northern white rhinoceros motivates new genetic recovery effortsIn a study published today in the journal Genome Research, researchers investigated the genetic history of nine northern white rhino (NWR) cryopreserved cell lines compared to that of a closely related subspecies, the southern white rhino (SWR). Importantly, genetic analyses of variation and inbreeding facilitated identification of cell lines, which may serve as valuable pools of genetic material
2h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Imminent extinction of northern white rhinoceros motivates genetic recovery effortsEarlier this year, the last remaining male northern white rhinoceros (NWR) died in captivity, nearly cementing the fate of this subspecies for extinction. In the wild, continuing threats of poaching, habitat destruction, and small population size have contributed to the rhinos' status as critically endangered. Yet, novel conservation efforts that make use of cryopreserved genetic material could sa
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

NASA satellites provide a 3-way analysis of Tropical Cyclone MekunTropical Cyclone Mekunu, the second tropical cyclone in less than a week, formed in the western Arabian Sea early on May 22, 2018 and is moving toward a landfall in Oman. NASA satellites provided an infrared, night-time and precipitation analysis of the storm.
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The Atlantic

Jason Bateman’s Tired Defense of Jeffrey Tambor“What we do for a living is not normal,” Jason Bateman said in Wednesday’s New York Times interview with the cast of Arrested Development , in an effort to address his co-star Jeffrey Tambor’s admitted verbal abuse of Jessica Walter. “Therefore the process is not normal sometimes, and to expect it to be normal is to not understand what happens on set. Again, not to excuse it.” As Hollywood contin
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The Atlantic

The U.S.-China Confrontation Takes On a New DimensionIf China’s intentions in the South China Sea weren’t quite clear, this month should have removed doubt. News reports said China had installed anti-ship cruise missiles and surface-to-air missile systems on the disputed Spratly Islands—and had also built 400 buildings that can accommodate its military forces on a reef there. Then, China said it had landed bombers on manmade islands in disputed wat
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The Atlantic

The Word That Derailed the Trump-Kim SummitOf all the countries that might have acted as a spoiler for the summit in Singapore between Donald Trump and Kim Jong Un—China, Russia, Japan, the United States and North Korea themselves—the one that doomed it was unexpected. It isn’t even involved in North Korea diplomacy and is located a long 6,000 miles away from the Korean Peninsula. It’s Libya. Yet Libya ought to have been top of mind. It’s
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cognitive science

Research: Heading in soccer causes cognitive impairmentsubmitted by /u/davyeminy [link] [comments]
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Popular Science

Use all those GDPR privacy policy notifications to clean up your inbox and kill zombie accountsTechnology Now is a great time to scrub out those wayward apps, annoying newsletters, and forgotten subscriptions. Clean up your inbox to commemorate the implementation of GDPR.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Canada blocks China purchase of construction firm AeconCanada has blocked Chinese state-owned CCCC's acquisition of construction firm Aecon Group, citing on Thursday national security concerns in a decision widely expected to create a rift between Ottawa and Beijing.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Novel Kinect system helps keep Parkinson's patients movingA new system which helps people with Parkinson's disease overcome debilitating walking problems has been developed by researchers at Brunel University London.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Fewer hurricanes forecast for 2018 Atlantic hurricane seasonAfter the most expensive hurricane season on record last year, US officials said Thursday to expect a more normal Atlantic season in 2018 with five to nine hurricanes in total.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Less snow leaves weasels exposed to predators: scientistsFluffy white weasels that once frolicked in snowy fields unnoticed now have a target on their back thanks to global warming, scientists said Thursday.
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NYT > Science

Hurricane Season’s Around the Corner. Here’s What to Expect.The season begins June 1 and experts predict it will be near normal or above normal, but a single storm can cause tremendous damage if it makes landfall.
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NYT > Science

Is It a Migraine? Many Patients Don’t Realize What Causes Their SufferingHere’s a guide to help you recognize the symptoms of migraines, understand why the signs are so often missed, and think about treatment options.
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Science | The Guardian

London dig unearths Roman bones, jewels and single flake of goldMuseum to show rare artefacts alongside ethnically diverse human remains Archaeologists at the Museum of London have found a scrap of treasure missed by tomb raiders who broke into a Roman sarcophagus 300 years ago. Continue reading...
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

Bursts of brain activity linked to memory reactivationLeading theories propose sleep presents an opportune time for important, new memories to become stabilized. And it's long been known which brain waves are produced during sleep. In a new study, researchers set out to better understand the brain mechanisms that secure memory storage.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Rush to comply with new EU data lawCompanies made a last-minute rush Thursday to comply with new European Union data protection laws that Brussels says will protect consumers from being like "people naked in an aquarium".
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Putin taps firebrand to head embattled space agencyVladimir Putin on Thursday appointed a firebrand nationalist politician, who oversaw Russia's once proud space industry, to manage its space agency in a move analysts said spells more trouble for the embattled sector.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Facebook won't pay compensation for Cambridge Analytica caseFacebook GDPR EuropeFacebook said Thursday it will not compensate users in the scandal over the misuse of their personal data by political consultancy Cambridge Analytica.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Bold lizards of all sizes have higher mating successBoldness correlates with the mating success, but not body size or sex, of yellow-spotted monitor lizards roaming the remote Oombulgurri floodplains of tropical Western Australia, ecologists report in the Ecological Society of America's open access journal Ecosphere. But boldness has a cost: bold individuals expose themselves to much higher risk of being eaten by predators during the dangerous wet
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

400 million year-old evolutionary arms race helps researchers understand HIVUnderstanding the evolution of a 400 million-year-old anti-viral protein that first emerged in marine life, is helping researchers get the upper-hand on human immunodeficiency virus (HIV).
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Imminent extinction of northern white rhinoceros motivates genetic recovery effortsEarlier this year, the last remaining male Northern White Rhinoceros (NWR) died in captivity, nearly cementing the fate of this subspecies for extinction. In the wild, continuing threats of poaching, habitat destruction, and small population size have contributed to the rhinos' status as critically endangered. Yet, novel conservation efforts that make use of cryopreserved genetic material could sa
3h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

New app offers customized advice to improve learningUniversity of Colorado researchers have created on-demand, voice-activated apps to enhance learning and teaching for members of CU Anschutz Medical Campus and CU Denver.
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Scientific American Content: Global

As CO2 Levels Rise, Rice Becomes Less NutritiousNew findings raise public health concerns in poorer nations where rice is a major dietary staple -- Read more on ScientificAmerican.com
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New on MIT Technology Review

Robot worries could cause a 50,000-worker strike in Las Vegas
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Live Science

Can You Teach Evolution Without Saying the Word? Arizona Is About to Find Out.Mentions of evolution could be replaced with "change over time," according to the state's superintendent.
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BBC News - Science & Environment

How ancestors of living birds survived asteroid strikeSurvival depended on whether ancient 'birds' lived on the forest floor or in the branches, say scientists.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

How other people affect our interpersonal spaceHave you ever felt the urge to cross the road or move seats on a train after a conversation taking place nearby suddenly becomes aggressive? Well, for the first time a scientific study has shown how the size of your interpersonal space changes depending on the tone and content of other people's conversations.
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New Scientist - News

Bulletproof batteries could make body armour for combatThe US Air Force is developing bulletproof batteries to replace traditional armour. They are loaded with silica nanoparticles that become rigid upon impact
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The Atlantic

Your Collapsing Bridge“I remember seeing the ‘Galloping Gertie’ Tacoma Narrows Bridge collapse in a Physics class in high school,” Lucy Walker told The Atlantic , “and the surprising image of something as sturdy and robust-looking as a mighty bridge twisting and twirling like rope—and ultimately snapping—has always stayed with me.” In 2017, Walker, an Oscar-nominated documentary filmmaker, was asked to make a short fi
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Nyheder - Forskning - Videnskab

Persondata har været opbevaret forkertEn gennemgang af interne drev på Københavns Universitet har vist, at tusindvis af studerende...
3h
Nyheder - Forskning - Videnskab

Virksomheder, forskere og politikere skal i fællesskab redde verdenHverken virksomheder, politikere eller forskere kan alene løse de store problemer, verden står...
3h
Nyheder - Forskning - Videnskab

Dekan Ulla Wewer hædres for uselvisk indsats for forskning i sundhedsvidenskabEn eminent forsker, en kvalitetsbevidst og uselvisk leder og en fremtidsorienteret katalysator af dansk...
3h
Nyheder - Forskning - Videnskab

Royal anerkendelse til australske udvekslingsstuderendeFor 14. gang uddelte HKH Kronprinsessen legater til to australske udvekslingsstuderende på Københavns...
3h
Nyheder - Forskning - Videnskab

Ny forskning: Derfor har folkekirken et godt tag i danskerneDanskerne støtter langt mere op om folkekirken end de nationer, vi normalt sammenligner os med....
3h
Nyheder - Forskning - Videnskab

Forskere trodser biologien: Mus forbliver slanke på burger-diætKroppen er rigtig god til at lagre fedt fra mad i fedtvæv. Men i et nyt studie er det lykkedes...
3h
Nyheder - Forskning - Videnskab

Forskere finder forbindelse mellem døgnrytme og aggressionEt forskerhold med Det Sundhedsvidenskabelige Fakultet repræsenteret har i mus fundet et kredsløb...
3h
Nyheder - Forskning - Videnskab

Forskere "snigmyrder" sygdomsfremkaldende bakterier i tyndtarmen med cocktail af viraDet er lykkedes forskere fra Københavns Universitet at dræbe sygdomsfremkalende E. coli-bakterier...
3h
Nyheder - Forskning - Videnskab

2 år efter Taksøe: Danmark glider ned af den diplomatiske ranglisteDanmark er et lille land, men har tidligere kunnet bryste sig af en diplomatisk indflydelse, der var...
3h
Nyheder - Forskning - Videnskab

Sukkerstoffer styrer cellers optag af dårligt kolesterolSukkerstoffer har en afgørende betydning for, hvordan celler kan optage og fjerne det dårlige...
3h
Nyheder - Forskning - Videnskab

Sædcelleforsker vinder Ph.d.-cupAnders Rehfeld fra Det Sundhedsvidenskabelige Fakultet og Rigshospitalet har vundet formidlingskonkurrencen...
3h
New on MIT Technology Review

Machine learning could stop an online war of words before it starts
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Some like it hot!Ecologists have no doubt that climate change will affect the earth's animals and plants. But how exactly? This is often hard to predict. There are already indications that some species are shifting their distribution range. But it is much less clear how individual animals and populations are responding to the changes. Scientists at the UFZ have been studying nocturnal desert geckos to see how they
3h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Researcher studies math achievement among Hispanic high school studentsA researcher at The University of Texas at San Antonio has co-authored a study examining important cognitive and non-cognitive predictors of entering science, technology, engineering and mathematics (STEM) fields for Hispanic high school students.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

New technology and app could help endangered primates, slow illegal traffickingNew facial recognition software and app invented at Michigan State University can help protect endangered primates—more than 60 percent of which face extinction.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Video: Chameleons are masters of nanotechnologyChameleons are nature's most talented masters of color. They use their unique color-changing abilities for all sorts of reasons. But how do they alter their hue?
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

Why we won't get to Mars without teamworkIf humanity hopes to make it to Mars anytime soon, we need to understand not just technology, but the psychological dynamic of a small group of astronauts trapped in a confined space for months with no escape.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

Cold production of new seafloorMagma steadily emerges between oceanic plates. It pushes the plates apart, builds large underwater mountains and forms new seafloor. This is one of the fundamental processes that constantly change the face of the Earth. But there are also times when new seabed is created without any volcanism, by un-roofing mantle material directly at the seafloor. Scientists have now published the first estimatio
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The Atlantic

Elon Musk’s Silly War With the MediaElon Musk’s screed against the media began with a story about Tesla. “The holier-than-thou hypocrisy of big media companies who lay claim to the truth, but publish only enough to sugarcoat the lie, is why the public no longer respects them,” the entrepreneur tweeted Wednesday, with a link to a post on the website Electrek. The author of that post criticized news coverage of recent Tesla crashes a
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Science : NPR

NOAA Expects Hurricane Season For 2018 To Be Near Or Above NormalAfter a devastating 2017 hurricane season, the Atlantic isn't likely to get a break this year, NOAA says. The agency predicts 10 to 16 named storms this season, including up to four major hurricanes. (Image credit: Ricardo Arduengo/AFP/Getty Images)
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News

400-million-year-old evolutionary arms race helps researchers understand HIVResearchers at Western University were interested in the origin of a gene that encodes for protein, HERC5, shown to potently inhibit HIV. In a new study published in the Journal of Virology, Stephen Barr, Ph.D., assistant professor at Western's Schulich School of Medicine & Dentistry, shows that the gene first emerged in fish over 400 million years ago and has been involved in an evolutionary arms
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Hey Alexa: Amazon's virtual assistant becomes a personal assistant to software developersUBC computer scientists have turned Amazon Alexa into a tool for software engineers, tasking the virtual assistant to take care of mundane programming tasks, helping increase productivity and speed up workflow.
3h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Bold lizards of all sizes have higher mating successBoldness correlates with the mating success, but not body size or sex, of yellow-spotted monitor lizards roaming the remote Oombulgurri floodplains of tropical Western Australia, ecologists report in the Ecological Society of America's journal Ecosphere. Bold individuals expose themselves to much higher risk of being eaten by predators during the dangerous wet season. The researchers demonstrated
3h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Adolescents with hay fever have higher rates of anxiety and depressionAn article published in Annals of Allergy, Asthma and Immunology shows allergies can have serious, far-reaching consequences, especially on adolescent sufferers.
3h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Using the K computer, scientists predict exotic "di-Omega" particleBased on complex simulations of quantum chromodynamics performed using the K computer, one of the most powerful computers in the world, the HAL QCD Collaboration, made up of scientists from the RIKEN Nishina Center for Accelerator-based Science and the RIKEN Interdisciplinary Theoretical and Mathematical Sciences (iTHEMS) program, together with colleagues from a number of universities, have predic
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News

The big clean up after stressWhen cells become stressed, they activate specific response patterns. Würzburg researchers have identified new details of these responses, which can help to get a better understanding of neurodegenerative diseases.
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The Economist: The world this week

Politics this week
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The Economist: The world this week

KAL’s cartoon
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The Economist: The world this week

Business this week
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Nyheder - Forskning - Videnskab

Persondata har været opbevaret forkertEn gennemgang af interne drev på Københavns Universitet har vist, at tusindvis af studerende...
3h
Nyheder - Forskning - Videnskab

Virksomheder, forskere og politikere skal i fællesskab redde verdenHverken virksomheder, politikere eller forskere kan alene løse de store problemer, verden står...
3h
Nyheder - Forskning - Videnskab

Dekan Ulla Wewer hædres for uselvisk indsats for forskning i sundhedsvidenskabEn eminent forsker, en kvalitetsbevidst og uselvisk leder og en fremtidsorienteret katalysator af dansk...
3h
Nyheder - Forskning - Videnskab

Royal anerkendelse til australske udvekslingsstuderendeFor 14. gang uddelte HKH Kronprinsessen legater til to australske udvekslingsstuderende på Københavns...
3h
Nyheder - Forskning - Videnskab

Ny forskning: Derfor har folkekirken et godt tag i danskerneDanskerne støtter langt mere op om folkekirken end de nationer, vi normalt sammenligner os med....
3h
Nyheder - Forskning - Videnskab

Forskere trodser biologien: Mus forbliver slanke på burger-diætKroppen er rigtig god til at lagre fedt fra mad i fedtvæv. Men i et nyt studie er det lykkedes...
3h
Nyheder - Forskning - Videnskab

Forskere finder forbindelse mellem døgnrytme og aggressionEt forskerhold med Det Sundhedsvidenskabelige Fakultet repræsenteret har i mus fundet et kredsløb...
3h
Nyheder - Forskning - Videnskab

Forskere "snigmyrder" sygdomsfremkaldende bakterier i tyndtarmen med cocktail af viraDet er lykkedes forskere fra Københavns Universitet at dræbe sygdomsfremkalende E. coli-bakterier...
3h
Nyheder - Forskning - Videnskab

2 år efter Taksøe: Danmark glider ned af den diplomatiske ranglisteDanmark er et lille land, men har tidligere kunnet bryste sig af en diplomatisk indflydelse, der var...
3h
Nyheder - Forskning - Videnskab

Sukkerstoffer styrer cellers optag af dårligt kolesterolSukkerstoffer har en afgørende betydning for, hvordan celler kan optage og fjerne det dårlige...
3h
Nyheder - Forskning - Videnskab

Sædcelleforsker vinder Ph.d.-cupAnders Rehfeld fra Det Sundhedsvidenskabelige Fakultet og Rigshospitalet har vundet formidlingskonkurrencen...
3h
Science | The Guardian

Being excluded from EU Galileo satellite system creates 'irreparable security risk' for UK, say ministers - Politics liveRolling coverage of the day’s political developments as they happen Afternoon summary 4.17pm BST 4.05pm BST Ipsos MORI has released some polling today. Half think #Brexit is working out as expected while 4 in 10 think it is worse; confidence in the PM to get a good Brexit deal remains low: new @standardnews poll https://t.co/YVQ3CZKzb8 pic.twitter.com/lywF2w0cj2 Despite a torrid time on Brexit, M
4h
Live Science

This NASA Camera Melted During a SpaceX Rocket Launch, But the Photos Survived!Veteran NASA photographer Bill Ingalls is no stranger to rocket launches, but even he seemed surprised when one of his remote cameras melted in a fire sparked by a SpaceX Falcon 9 launch Tuesday and STILL managed to snap pictures.
4h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News

By forming clots in tumors, immune cell aids lung cancer's spreadIn the journal Nature Communications, researchers from the UNC Lineberger Comprehensive Cancer Center report that for a particular subset of lung cancer tumors, there is a high prevalence of immune cells called inflammatory monocytes. These immune cells, which normally help to build clotting scaffolds to promote wound healing, also make it possible for tumor cells to migrate and spread to other pa
4h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Optimizing taxi fleet size the subject of multi-university researchA study conducted by the Massachusetts Institute of Technology's Senseable City Laboratory - with important input from Steven Strogatz, the Jacob Gould Schurman Professor of Applied Mathematics at Cornell University - offers a network-based solution to size and operate a fleet of taxis.
4h
Ingeniøren

Vagthund holder fast i hvert et kritisk ord om salg af vaccine-fabrikVi har hørt det hele før, lyder det fra Rigsrevisionen, efter at Sundhedsministeriet har afvist dens kritik af salget af Statens vaccinefabrik. Formanden for statsrevisorerne taler nu om en åben krigserklæring.
4h
Scientific American Content: Global

Chances of Avoiding Dementia on Rise in U.S.More of us are getting at least a dozen good, happy years after 65 -- Read more on ScientificAmerican.com
4h
Live Science

Will AI Ever Become Conscious?How might artificial intelligence achieve consciousness?
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Don't force women to risk death, injury by having a babyA QUT legal academic says abortion can be decriminalised without society and governments making a moral judgement.
4h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Experts look back at the impact of a global surgical safety checklistA new BJS (British Journal of Surgery) article examines the past decade since the Safe Surgery Saves Lives Study Group at the World Health Organization introduced a surgical safety checklist.
4h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News

How other people affect our interpersonal spaceA study has shown for the first time how the size of your interpersonal space can be affected by the tone and content of conversations taking place between other people nearby.
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News

New study: 'Alarming' differences in nations' quality of and access to health careWhile health care access and quality have improved generally over the past several years, advancements in many countries have been slow or nonexistent as compared to the previous decade, according to a new scientific study.
4h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Study shows in-home therapy effective for stroke rehabilitationStroke remains a leading cause of human disability and rehabilitation therapy can help. Supervised in-home rehabilitation therapy delivered via telemedicine can be as effective as in-clinic rehabilitation program as an alternative for stroke survivors who can't sustain in-person visits for reasons that may include high cost, difficulty traveling to a provider or few regionally available care provi
4h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News

UTSA researcher studies math achievement among Hispanic high school studentsA researcher at The University of Texas at San Antonio has co-authored a study examining important cognitive and non-cognitive predictors of entering science, technology, engineering and mathematics (STEM) fields for Hispanic high school students.
4h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Theory gives free rein to superconductivity at room temperatureVictor Lakhno, head of the Laboratory of Quantum-Mechanical Systems of the Institute of Mathematical Problems of Biology, RAS has calculated a critical temperature of the transition, energy, heat capacity and heat of transition of an ideal three-dimensional Bose-condensate of translation-invariant bipolarons (TI-bipolarons). The results obtained offer an explanation of the experiments with high-te
4h
Nyheder - Forskning - Videnskab

Persondata har været opbevaret forkertEn gennemgang af interne drev på Københavns Universitet har vist, at tusindvis af studerende...
4h
Nyheder - Forskning - Videnskab

Virksomheder, forskere og politikere skal i fællesskab redde verdenHverken virksomheder, politikere eller forskere kan alene løse de store problemer, verden står...
4h
Nyheder - Forskning - Videnskab

Dekan Ulla Wewer hædres for uselvisk indsats for forskning i sundhedsvidenskabEn eminent forsker, en kvalitetsbevidst og uselvisk leder og en fremtidsorienteret katalysator af dansk...
4h
Nyheder - Forskning - Videnskab

Royal anerkendelse til australske udvekslingsstuderendeFor 14. gang uddelte HKH Kronprinsessen legater til to australske udvekslingsstuderende på Københavns...
4h
Nyheder - Forskning - Videnskab

Ny forskning: Derfor har folkekirken et godt tag i danskerneDanskerne støtter langt mere op om folkekirken end de nationer, vi normalt sammenligner os med....
4h
Nyheder - Forskning - Videnskab

Forskere trodser biologien: Mus forbliver slanke på burger-diætKroppen er rigtig god til at lagre fedt fra mad i fedtvæv. Men i et nyt studie er det lykkedes...
4h
Nyheder - Forskning - Videnskab

Forskere finder forbindelse mellem døgnrytme og aggressionEt forskerhold med Det Sundhedsvidenskabelige Fakultet repræsenteret har i mus fundet et kredsløb...
4h
Nyheder - Forskning - Videnskab

Forskere "snigmyrder" sygdomsfremkaldende bakterier i tyndtarmen med cocktail af viraDet er lykkedes forskere fra Københavns Universitet at dræbe sygdomsfremkalende E. coli-bakterier...
4h
Nyheder - Forskning - Videnskab

2 år efter Taksøe: Danmark glider ned af den diplomatiske ranglisteDanmark er et lille land, men har tidligere kunnet bryste sig af en diplomatisk indflydelse, der var...
4h
Nyheder - Forskning - Videnskab

Sukkerstoffer styrer cellers optag af dårligt kolesterolSukkerstoffer har en afgørende betydning for, hvordan celler kan optage og fjerne det dårlige...
4h
Nyheder - Forskning - Videnskab

Sædcelleforsker vinder Ph.d.-cupAnders Rehfeld fra Det Sundhedsvidenskabelige Fakultet og Rigshospitalet har vundet formidlingskonkurrencen...
4h
The Atlantic

In Praise of CivilityOne month before the 2016 presidential election, I spoke on a panel in Charlottesville, Virginia, on the topic of campus speech. The audience was generally enthusiastic and engaged. A tense moment arrived, however, when one individual, who identified himself as a “deplorable,” took issue with the composition of the panel (two white women and myself, an African American male). He explained that th
4h
The Atlantic

Trump’s Very Trumpian Letter to Kim Jong UnDonald Trump’s approach to North Korea has always been an intensely personal one—the president contended that his sheer force of will and negotiating prowess would win the day, and rather than use intermediaries, he planned for a face-to-face meeting, with himself and Kim Jong Un on either side of a table. So Trump’s notice on Thursday that he was canceling the June 12 summit in Singapore was fit
4h
Inside Science

BRIEF: First Tree-Dwelling Birds Died with the DinosaursBRIEF: First Tree-Dwelling Birds Died with the Dinosaurs The impact that killed the dinosaurs also caused mass deforestation and sent the first tree-dwelling birds to extinction. Fern-Spores.jpg These fossilized, microscopic fern spores helped scientists connect the destruction of the planet's forests about 66 million years ago to the extinction of the first tree-dwelling birds. Image credits: A.
4h
NYT > Science

Using Medicine and Science to Improve the Quality of LifeMedical and scientific breakthroughs, some with ethical concerns, are being used to help people.
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NYT > Science

Taking on Climate ChangeTrying to solve the problems that are affecting our world, and believing that they can make a difference.
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NYT > Science

Galinhos Journal: ‘This Noise That Never Stops’: Wind Farms Come to Brazil’s Atlantic CoastIn Brazil, the world’s eighth-largest producer of wind power, the wind industry brings both benefits and disappointment.
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The Atlantic

What the @RealDonaldTrump Ruling Actually Means“If my fellow citizens want to go to Hell,” Justice Oliver Wendell Holmes Jr. once wrote, “I will help them. It’s my job.” In our time, Twitter is the nearest thing I can think of to hell on earth. On Wednesday, U.S. District Judge Naomi Reice Buchwald of the Southern District of New York reopened to dissenting Americans the circle of hell that hosts President Trump’s Twitter feed. The judge was
4h
Big Think

The U.S. fertility rate has taken a nose dive and why is a complete mysteryThe effect of this trend will be with us for decades to come, experts say. Read More
4h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Study finds black Americans face education, income barriers to healthy behaviorsA new University of Iowa-led study reports educational opportunities and higher incomes may be key to closing the health gap between most black and white Americans. Researchers say socioeconomic factors, mainly wealth and education, influenced the differences in health behaviors between the groups more than other variables.
4h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News

MSU technology and app could help endangered primates, slow illegal traffickingNew facial recognition software and app invented at Michigan State University can help protect endangered primates - more than 60 percent of which face extinction.
4h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Microscopy advance reveals unexpected role for water in energy storage materialA material with atomically thin layers of water holds promise for energy storage technologies, and researchers have now discovered that the water is performing a different role than anyone anticipated. The finding was possible due to a new atomic force microscopy method that measures the sub-nanoscale deformation rate in the material in response to changes in the material caused by energy storage.
4h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Wood to supercapacitorsCarbon aerogels are ultralight, conductive materials, which are extensively investigated for applications in supercapacitor electrodes in electrical cars and cell phones. Chinese scientists have now found a way to make these electrodes sustainably. The aerogels can be obtained directly from cellulose nanofibrils, the abundant cell-wall material in wood, finds the study reported in the journal Ange
4h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News

For the past 70 years, the Danube has almost never frozen overToday, only the eldest inhabitants of the Danube Delta recall that, in the past, you could skate on the river practically every winter; since the second half of the 20th century, Europe's second-largest river has only rarely frozen over.
4h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News

ULB archaeologists discover a 1,000-year-old mummy in PeruA team from the Université libre de Bruxelles's centre for archaeological research (CReA-Patrimoine) has completed a significant excavation in Pachacamac, Peru, where they have discovered an intact mummy in especially good condition. Pachacamac's status as a Pre-Colombian pilgrimage site under the Inca empire. is confirmed by further evidence.
4h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Cold production of new seafloorMagma steadily emerges between oceanic plates. It pushes the plates apart, builds large underwater mountains and forms new seafloor. This is one of the fundamental processes that constantly change the face of the Earth. But there are also times when new seabed is created without any volcanism, by un-roofing mantle material directly at the seafloor. Scientists led by GEOMAR, Germany have published
4h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News

A system of check and balances in the bloodHematopoietic Stem Cells (HSCs) give rise to blood and immune cells of the body, and are therefore essential for our survival. The group of Manuela Baccarini at the Max F. Perutz Laboratories, a joint venture of the University of Vienna and the Medical University of Vienna, has now shown how intracellular signalling can safeguard this delicate balance between activation and dormancy. Their results
4h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Cancer cells co-opt pain-sensing 'wasabi receptor' to survive oxidative stressSome cancers express unusually high levels of a neural calcium channel known as the 'wasabi receptor,' which plays a role in detecting pain, cold and other sensations. New research finds cancer cells co-opt this neural channel to increase their tolerance against toxic oxidative stress. Blocking the activity of this channel in mice curbs tumor growth and makes cancer cells more sensitive to chemoth
4h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Bid to beat obesity focuses on fat that keeps us warmA new technique to study fat stores in the body could aid efforts to find treatments to tackle obesity, research from the University of Edinburgh suggests. The approach focuses on energy-burning tissues found deep inside the body -- called brown fat -- that help to keep us warm when temperatures drop.
4h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Tumor cells evade death through in extremis DNA repairp38 blockage has been shown to increase the death of tumor cells, thus causing tumors to shrink.The combination of p38 inhibitors with chemotherapeutic drugs (taxanes) strengthens, accelerates or prolongs the antitumor effect in patient-derived tumors grown in mice.
4h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Mongooses inherit behavior from role models rather than parentsYoung mongooses learn lifelong habits from role models rather than inheriting them from genetic parents, new research shows.
4h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Will treating sleep apnea with CPAP improve sexual quality of life?Long-term use of continuous positive airway pressure (CPAP) treatment for obstructive sleep apnea was associated an improvement in sexual quality of life for women, but not men.
4h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Is lower-fat diet associated with breast cancer overall survival?Women diagnosed with breast cancer during the Women's Health Initiative Dietary Modification trial who were following a lower-fat diet had increased breast cancer overall survival, although the increase was likely partly due to better survival from several causes of death.
4h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Selective neural connections can be reestablished in retina after injury, study findsThe brain's ability to form new neural connections, called neuroplasticity, is crucial to recovery from some types of brain injury, but this process is hard to study and remains poorly understood. A new study of neural circuit repair in the retina shows that neurons can make new connections to the right types of photoreceptors to restore selective connectivity after an injury.
4h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Gut bacteria play key role in anti-seizure effects of ketogenic diet, say UCLA scientistsUCLA scientists have identified specific gut bacteria that play an essential role in the anti-seizure effects of the ketogenic diet -- research published today in the journal Cell. The study is the first to establish a causal link between seizure susceptibility and the gut microbiota -- the 100-trillion-or-so bacteria and other microbes that reside in our intestines.
4h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News

A cascade of immune processes offers insights to triple-negative breast cancerResearchers at the University of Michigan Rogel Cancer Center have discovered that tumor cells reprogram metabolic pathways to gain control over a type of immune cell that allows cancer growth.
4h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Bursts of brain activity linked to memory reactivationLeading theories propose sleep presents an opportune time for important, new memories to become stabilized. And it's long been known which brain waves are produced during sleep. In a new study, researchers set out to better understand the brain mechanisms that secure memory storage. The team from Northwestern and Princeton universities set out to find more direct and precisely timed evidence for t
4h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News

What the asteroid that wiped out dinosaurs meant for birdsSixty-six million years ago, an asteroid struck the earth and wiped out non-avian dinosaurs. Now, researchers reporting in Current Biology on May 24 have pieced together what that asteroid impact meant for birds. From multiple lines of evidence, they show that the only birds to survive the Cretaceous-Paleogene (K-Pg) mass extinction event lived on the ground. That's apparently because the asteroid
4h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Reconstructing Zika's spreadThe urgent threat from Zika virus, which dominated headlines in early 2016, has passed. But research into how Zika and other mosquito-borne infections spread and cause epidemics is still very active. In a paper published May 24 in the journal Cell Host & Microbe, an international team of researchers reports new details of how Zika emerged from Brazil and spread throughout Mexico and Central Americ
4h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News

For banded mongooses, 'cultural inheritance' decides what's for dinnerIt's no surprise that people behave differently depending upon what they've learned from other people, from the language they speak to the foods they like to eat. But now researchers reporting in Current Biology on May 24 have found that the same is true of banded mongooses.
4h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News

When the dinosaurs died, so did forests -- and tree-dwelling birdsSixty-six million years ago, the world burned. An asteroid crashed to Earth with a force one million times larger than the largest atomic bomb, causing the extinction of the dinosaurs. But dinosaurs weren't the only ones that got hit hard -- in a new study, scientists learned that the planet's forests were decimated, leading to the extinction of tree-dwelling birds.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Company: Industrial hacking group has targets beyond MideastA U.S. cybersecurity company says the hacking group behind a worrying breed of destructive software is operating well beyond the Middle East, raising the possibility that it is laying the groundwork for dangerous cyberattacks around the world.
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Futurity.org

Facial recognition app tracks endangered primatesNew facial recognition software and an app can help protect endangered primates—more than 60 percent of which face extinction. “Intervention is necessary to halt and reverse these population declines…” Golden monkeys have lost so much habitat, that they are only found in a handful of national parks in Africa; farming and illegal hardwood trade in Madagascar is gobbling up the island’s forests and
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Popular Science

Why your office is so cold, and how to deal with itHealth The summer freeze is upon us. The great indoors is a chilly place, but we don’t have to suffer in over-chilled offices in silence.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

UK to demand EU repayment in Brexit satellite rowBritain ramped up a Brexit space row with the EU on Thursday, saying it will demand repayment if it is excluded from the Galileo satellite navigation project.
4h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

When the dinosaurs died, so did forests—and tree-dwelling birdsSixty-six million years ago, the world burned. An asteroid crashed to Earth with a force one million times larger than the largest atomic bomb, causing the extinction of the dinosaurs. But dinosaurs weren't the only ones that got hit hard—in a new study, scientists learned that the planet's forests were decimated, leading to the extinction of tree-dwelling birds.
4h
Nyheder - Forskning - Videnskab

Persondata har været opbevaret forkertEn gennemgang af interne drev på Københavns Universitet har vist, at tusindvis af studerende...
4h
Nyheder - Forskning - Videnskab

Virksomheder, forskere og politikere skal i fællesskab redde verdenHverken virksomheder, politikere eller forskere kan alene løse de store problemer, verden står...
4h
Nyheder - Forskning - Videnskab

Dekan Ulla Wewer hædres for uselvisk indsats for forskning i sundhedsvidenskabEn eminent forsker, en kvalitetsbevidst og uselvisk leder og en fremtidsorienteret katalysator af dansk...
4h
Nyheder - Forskning - Videnskab

Royal anerkendelse til australske udvekslingsstuderendeFor 14. gang uddelte HKH Kronprinsessen legater til to australske udvekslingsstuderende på Københavns...
4h
Nyheder - Forskning - Videnskab

Ny forskning: Derfor har folkekirken et godt tag i danskerneDanskerne støtter langt mere op om folkekirken end de nationer, vi normalt sammenligner os med....
4h
Nyheder - Forskning - Videnskab

Forskere trodser biologien: Mus forbliver slanke på burger-diætKroppen er rigtig god til at lagre fedt fra mad i fedtvæv. Men i et nyt studie er det lykkedes...
4h
Nyheder - Forskning - Videnskab

Forskere finder forbindelse mellem døgnrytme og aggressionEt forskerhold med Det Sundhedsvidenskabelige Fakultet repræsenteret har i mus fundet et kredsløb...
4h
Nyheder - Forskning - Videnskab

Forskere "snigmyrder" sygdomsfremkaldende bakterier i tyndtarmen med cocktail af viraDet er lykkedes forskere fra Københavns Universitet at dræbe sygdomsfremkalende E. coli-bakterier...
4h
Nyheder - Forskning - Videnskab

2 år efter Taksøe: Danmark glider ned af den diplomatiske ranglisteDanmark er et lille land, men har tidligere kunnet bryste sig af en diplomatisk indflydelse, der var...
4h
Nyheder - Forskning - Videnskab

Sukkerstoffer styrer cellers optag af dårligt kolesterolSukkerstoffer har en afgørende betydning for, hvordan celler kan optage og fjerne det dårlige...
4h
Nyheder - Forskning - Videnskab

Sædcelleforsker vinder Ph.d.-cupAnders Rehfeld fra Det Sundhedsvidenskabelige Fakultet og Rigshospitalet har vundet formidlingskonkurrencen...
4h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

China's Tencent: Tech world must tackle privacy concernsChina's biggest tech company says the industry needs to tackle users' privacy concerns and the risks posed by advancing technologies.
5h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Feds: Uber self-driving SUV saw pedestrian; did not brakeUber Arizona NTSB SelfThe autonomous Uber SUV that struck and killed an Arizona pedestrian in March spotted the woman about six seconds before hitting her, but did not stop because the system used to automatically apply brakes in potentially dangerous situations had been disabled, according to federal investigators.
5h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

France to pump 65 million euros into African startupsFrance will plough 65 million euros ($76 million) into startups in Africa, President Emmanuel Macron announced Thursday at a technology conference in Paris.
5h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Climate change: The families taking the EU to taskTen families and a group of reindeer-herding youngsters have filed suit against the European Union, seeking stronger measures against the global warming they say is already harming their livelihoods.
5h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Mongooses inherit behavior from role models rather than parentsYoung mongooses learn lifelong habits from role models rather than inheriting them from genetic parents, new research shows.Banded mongooses live in social groups where pups are consistently cared for one-to-one by a single adult known as an "escort—not their mother or father.
5h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

German officials order recall of Mercedes diesel vansAutomaker Daimler says it is being told to recall models of its Mercedes-Benz Vito delivery van by Germany's motor vehicle authority, which has ruled that the vehicle's diesel emissions controls do not meet legal requirements.
5h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Volcano 'libraries' could help plan for future volcanic crisesCrystals from the 2010 Eyjafjallajökull eruption have demonstrated a new way to recognise pre-eruption signals at Eyjafjallajökull and potentially other, similar volcanoes around the world.
5h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Simulating the prehistoric use of fire through computer modelsArchaeologists often use the percentages of heat-affected stone or bone artifacts found at archaeological sites as a way to determine how frequently fire was used by the inhabitants. Andrew Sorensen and Fulco Scherjon have come up with a computer model called 'fiReproxies' to simulate how fires used by prehistoric peoples affect artefacts buried in the substrate below. Publication in PLOS ONE.
5h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Better together: How ecosystem services and adaptive decision-making can improve land managementAn ecosystem services approach combined with adaptive decision-making can aid land and resource managers in administering their regions for the benefit of communities and stakeholders, according to a recent report by the U.S. Geological Survey and Resources for the Future.
5h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Lack of paid sick leave increases povertyResearch conducted by Florida Atlantic University and Cleveland State University has, for the first time, quantified the relationship between the lack of paid sick leave and poverty in the United States. The data indicates that, even when controlling for education, race, sex, marital status and employment, working adults without paid sick leave are three times more likely to have incomes below the
5h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Physical properties of solids elucidated by zooming in and out of high resolutionComputer simulations are used to understand the properties of soft matter—such as liquids, polymers and biomolecules like DNA -which are too complicated to be described by equations. They are often too expensive to simulate in full, given the intensive computational power required. Instead, a helpful strategy is to couple an accurate model—applied in the areas of the system that require greater at
5h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Giant clams tell the story of past typhoonsA team of researchers led by Tsuyoshi Watanabe of Hokkaido University has discovered that giant clams record short-term environmental changes, such as those caused by typhoons, in their shells. Analyzing the shell's microstructure and chemical composition could reveal data about typhoons that occurred before written records were available.
5h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Microscopy advance reveals unexpected role for water in energy storage materialA material with atomically thin layers of water holds promise for energy storage technologies, and researchers have now discovered that the water is performing a different role than anyone anticipated. The finding was possible due to a new atomic force microscopy (AFM) method that measures the sub-nanoscale deformation rate in the material in response to changes in the material caused by energy st
5h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Climate change could increase arable landClimate change could expand the agricultural feasibility of the global boreal region by 44 per cent by the end of the century, according to new research.
5h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Versions of Han Solo's blaster exist – and they're way more powerful than real lightsabers would bePeople who think physics is boring couldn't be more wrong. It can explain everything from spooky interactions on the tiny scale of atoms and particles to how the entire universe behaves. As if that wasn't enough, it can also be used to assess how realistic futuristic technology in science fiction is. My area of expertise – plasma physics – can explain many aspects of both lightsabers and the Death
5h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Fukushima radioactive particle release was significant says new researchIn the immediate aftermath of the Fukushima Daiichi nuclear accident, it was thought that only volatile, gaseous radionuclides, such as caesium and iodine, were released from the damaged reactors. However, in recent years it has become apparent that small radioactive particles, termed caesium-rich micro-particles, were also released. Scientists have shown that these particles are mainly made of gl
5h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Numbers about inequality don't speak for themselvesUsing statistics to inform the public about racial disparities can backfire. Worse yet, it can cause some people to be more supportive of the policies that create those inequalities, according to new Stanford research.
5h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Capturing CO2 using heat pumpsCapturing the greenhouse gas CO2 from industrial processes such as cement manufacture is a demanding and therefore expensive exercise. However, by introducing a renewable powered heat pump in the capture system, the energy required to capture CO2 is reduced by three quarters.
5h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Electronic nose recognizes a variety of scentsFreshly ground coffee, popcorn, biowaste or smoke – in the course of life, we get to know different scents and thanks to our nose, we distinguish and identify them even without seeing their source. Scientists of Karlsruhe Institute of Technology (KIT) have now developed a sensor that can be taught different scents. The "electronic nose" is to be suited for everyday use and to smell potential hazar
5h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Will London run out of water?Earlier this year, an unusual weather pattern dubbed the Beast from the East covered much of Britain in heavy snow. But once the beast had passed, things soon returned to normal and, at the beginning of March, the temperature in London jumped by more than 10℃ in just two days. Water pipes that had been frozen solid quickly thawed, and the sudden flood soon overwhelmed the capital's creaky infrastr
5h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Why plants need an identityPlant experts in South Africa have a challenging deadline to meet: gather everything that's known about the country's 21 000 indigenous plant species into a formal online record by 2020. Fortunately they are well on their way.
5h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Research sheds new light on understanding Pacific Trade WindsPioneering research has given a fascinating new insight into why the Pacific Trade Winds have seen "unprecedented strengthening" over recent decades.
5h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Engineers aim for the stars with new rocket engineA 'self-eating' rocket engine which could place small satellites in orbit more easily and more affordably is under development at universities in Scotland and Ukraine.
5h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Advanced mobile technology to manage underground utilitiesUtility companies from the UK alone create over 1.5 million street holes each year, often causing damage to third-party assets. Damage can be both expensive and dangerous, while also seriously impacting a company's reputation. Outdated and inefficient systems account for a great part of faulty interventions that costs the British economy in the region of 5.5 billion euro annually.
5h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Thin carbon sheets for shielding against microwavesCarbon composites have many useful properties, with new potential uses being discovered all the time. Researchers have developed a thin sheet variety to exploit its electromagnetic properties for microwave shielding.
5h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Orchard-specific fruit tree managementChemical applications to vineyards are currently based on land area. New technology that takes into account foliage dimensions will save on chemicals and reduce impact on the environment.
5h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Discovery of novel malaria parasite behaviour offers new target for treatmentResearchers have demonstrated novel parasite behaviour which offers a potential new target for malaria diagnosis and intervention.
5h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Gap between what the rich and poor spend on their kids is wideningIt may seem like common sense that rich parents spend more money on their children than poor parents do. A new study co-authored by a CSU faculty member shows that this financial gap is widening due to rising income inequality.
5h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

How remorse alone can sometimes change the past for those who have been wrongedRemorse is one of the most significant and least understood influences on the length of the sentence imposed by a criminal court. A survey of Crown Courts in England and Wales found that remorse was the single most common mitigating factor, mentioned in more than 20% of all cases as a reason why a sentence was being reduced, and is identified as an important consideration in formal sentencing guid
5h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

A beer that's truly out of this worldAussies are brewing a new generation of beer. One that will boldly go where no beer has gone before, solving the age-old problem of how to get drunk in space.
5h
Science | The Guardian

Birds had to relearn flight after meteor wiped out dinosaursFossil records suggest only flightless birds survived when T rex was wiped off the Earth Birds had to rediscover flight after the meteor strike that killed off the dinosaurs, scientists say. The cataclysm 66m years ago not only wiped out Tyrannosaurus rex and ground-dwelling dinosaur species, but also flying birds, a detailed survey of the fossil record suggests. Continue reading...
5h
The Atlantic

The Asteroid That Smote the Dinosaurs Burned the Birds Out of TreesAround 66 million years ago, at the end of the Cretaceous period, an asteroid the size of Mount Everest smote the Earth. It landed in Mexico’s Yucatan peninsula, punching a 20-mile deep crater into the ground. That impact, and the climatic upheaval that happened afterwards, ended the long reign of the dinosaurs. Of this dynasty of ruling reptiles, only the birds—a specialized group of feathered d
5h
The Atlantic

Vaccines Alone Won’t Beat EbolaThree people who had been infected with Ebola recently left an isolation ward at Wangata Hospital against medical advice, according to the Democratic Republic of the Congo’s Ministry of Health. The hospital lies in Mbandaka, a city of 1.2 million, where health workers are trying to contain the Congo’s ninth Ebola outbreak. One patient was on the mend, but decided to leave on Sunday and didn’t com
5h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Children and adolescents in high-risk environments more likely to become violent adultsChildren and adolescents who grow up with one or more of these environmental risk factors are likely to resort to violence, aggression and crime as adults, irrespective of an underlying mental illness. This is according to a new study in the journal Molecular Psychiatry, which is published by Springer Nature
5h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Ultrasound-firewall for mobile phonesMobile phones and tablets through so-called audio tracking, can be used by means of ultrasound to unnoticeably track the behaviour of their users: for example, viewing certain videos or staying in specific rooms and places. In the project SoniControl, St. Pölten University of Applied Sciences has developed a method for how this undetected (and usually unwanted) spying can be exposed and blocked. T
5h
Ingeniøren

NASA-ingeniør: Mars-helikopter vil fundamentalt ændre måden, vi udforsker planeter påDave Lavery er leder af den lille gruppe hos Nasa, der i 2020 sender en helikopter til Mars. I et møde med Ingeniøren fortæller han, hvordan eksperimentet kan bane vejen for helt ny planetudforskning.
5h
TED Talks Daily (SD video)

How to turn a group of strangers into a team | Amy EdmondsonBusiness school professor Amy Edmondson studies "teaming," where people come together quickly (and often temporarily) to solve new, urgent or unusual problems. Recalling stories of teamwork on the fly, such as the incredible rescue of 33 miners trapped half a mile underground in Chile in 2010, Edmondson shares the elements needed to turn a group of strangers into a quick-thinking team that can nim
5h
cognitive science

Hi all, as bot interactions move beyond utility to interactions based design, the role of UX will become increasingly important for anyone looking to build bots. Read all about UX for bots to understand more. Build your bot on Engati here -submitted by /u/kumars64 [link] [comments]
5h
The Atlantic

The Schools That Are Bringing Poor Kids Into the Middle ClassThe evidence is clear: A college degree is, in most cases, the key to more money and a more comfortable standard of living. But that pathway to higher earnings is more available to some than others: A lot of elite colleges do not enroll a lot of low-income students, and as a result they’re not boosting very many students from low-income households into the middle and upper classes. Dozens of top
5h
Nyheder - Forskning - Videnskab

Persondata har været opbevaret forkertEn gennemgang af interne drev på Københavns Universitet har vist, at tusindvis af studerende...
5h
Nyheder - Forskning - Videnskab

Virksomheder, forskere og politikere skal i fællesskab redde verdenHverken virksomheder, politikere eller forskere kan alene løse de store problemer, verden står...
5h
Nyheder - Forskning - Videnskab

Dekan Ulla Wewer hædres for uselvisk indsats for forskning i sundhedsvidenskabEn eminent forsker, en kvalitetsbevidst og uselvisk leder og en fremtidsorienteret katalysator af dansk...
5h
Nyheder - Forskning - Videnskab

Royal anerkendelse til australske udvekslingsstuderendeFor 14. gang uddelte HKH Kronprinsessen legater til to australske udvekslingsstuderende på Københavns...
5h
Nyheder - Forskning - Videnskab

Ny forskning: Derfor har folkekirken et godt tag i danskerneDanskerne støtter langt mere op om folkekirken end de nationer, vi normalt sammenligner os med....
5h
Nyheder - Forskning - Videnskab

Forskere trodser biologien: Mus forbliver slanke på burger-diætKroppen er rigtig god til at lagre fedt fra mad i fedtvæv. Men i et nyt studie er det lykkedes...
5h
Nyheder - Forskning - Videnskab

Forskere finder forbindelse mellem døgnrytme og aggressionEt forskerhold med Det Sundhedsvidenskabelige Fakultet repræsenteret har i mus fundet et kredsløb...
5h
Nyheder - Forskning - Videnskab

Forskere "snigmyrder" sygdomsfremkaldende bakterier i tyndtarmen med cocktail af viraDet er lykkedes forskere fra Københavns Universitet at dræbe sygdomsfremkalende E. coli-bakterier...
5h
Nyheder - Forskning - Videnskab

2 år efter Taksøe: Danmark glider ned af den diplomatiske ranglisteDanmark er et lille land, men har tidligere kunnet bryste sig af en diplomatisk indflydelse, der var...
5h
Nyheder - Forskning - Videnskab

Sukkerstoffer styrer cellers optag af dårligt kolesterolSukkerstoffer har en afgørende betydning for, hvordan celler kan optage og fjerne det dårlige...
5h
Nyheder - Forskning - Videnskab

Sædcelleforsker vinder Ph.d.-cupAnders Rehfeld fra Det Sundhedsvidenskabelige Fakultet og Rigshospitalet har vundet formidlingskonkurrencen...
5h
Big Think

If virtual reality frees us of our body, who will we become?Consciousness is body-dependent. VR enthusiasts are betting otherwise. Read More
5h
Big Think

How pulling just one all-nighter wreaks havoc on your bloodPeople who occasionally pull all-nighters are at greater risk for diabetes and other illnesses, and a new study identifies blood proteins as being behind the problem. Read More
5h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Sepsis patients treated and released from emergency departments do well with outpatient follow-upNational guidelines assume that all patients who're diagnosed with clinical sepsis in an emergency department will be admitted to the hospital for additional care, but new research has found that many more patients are being treated and released from the ED for outpatient follow-up than previously recognized.
5h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Solar energy: Mixed anion compounds with 'fluorine' works as new photocatalytic materialScientists in Japan have shown that an oxyfluoride is capable of visible light-driven photocatalysis. The finding opens new doors for designing materials for artificial photosynthesis and solar energy research.
5h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Volcano 'libraries' could help plan for future volcanic crisesCrystals from the 2010 Eyjafjallajökull eruption have demonstrated a new way to recognise pre-eruption signals at Eyjafjallajökull and potentially other, similar volcanoes around the world.
5h
Big Think

Unified theory of childhood leukemia reveals a cause—and a likely preventionA number of different things have to happen for a child to develop leukemia. Read More
5h
New on MIT Technology Review

Apple gets into the autonomous-vehicle race ... sort of
5h
Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

Understanding light-induced electrical current in atomically thin nanomaterialsScientists demonstrated that scanning photocurrent microscopy could provide the optoelectronic information needed to improve the performance of devices for power generation, communications, data storage, and lighting.
5h
Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

People with family history of alcoholism release more dopamine in expectation of alcoholPeople with a family history of alcohol use disorder (AUD) release more dopamine in the brain's main reward center in response to the expectation of alcohol than people diagnosed with the disorder, or healthy people without any family history of AUD, reports a new study.
5h
Futurity.org

Calculation untangles DNA mixtures at crime scenesA new way to sort out mixtures of DNA at crime scenes is freely available online . In 2017, the South Yorkshire Police contacted statistics researcher Therese Graversen of the University of Copenhagen’s mathematical sciences department for help with a homicide case that required her statistical analysis expertise. Someone had viciously beaten the victim to death in his home. English police had fo
5h
New on MIT Technology Review

California is throttling back record levels of solar—and that’s bad news for climate goalsWithout big changes, the oversupply of renewables will stall efforts to overhaul the power sector.
5h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Antiferromagnetic materials allow for processing at terahertz speedsData hurtle down fiber-optic cables at frequencies of several terahertz. As soon as the data arrive on a PC or television, this speed must be throttled to match the data processing speed of the device components, which currently is in the range of a few hundred gigahertz only. Researchers have now developed a technology that can process the data up to hundred times faster and thus close the gap be
5h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Matter-antimatter asymmetry may interfere with the detection of neutrinosFrom the data collected by the LHCb detector at the Large Hadron Collider, it appears that the particles known as charm mesons and their antimatter counterparts are not produced in perfectly equal proportions. Physicists from Cracow have proposed their own explanation of this phenomenon and presented predictions related to it, about consequences that are particularly interesting for high-energy ne
5h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Cell damage caused by the pesticide DDT is palliatedUniversity of Cordoba researchers manage to reduce oxidative stress brought about by this well-known pesticide in mice via a selenium-enriched diet.
5h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Physical properties of solids elucidated by zooming in and out of high resolutionA single simulation of a solid can have two different resolutions to minimise the amount of computational power required to understand such matter, according to a recent paper published in EPJ E. Maziar Heidari, from the Max Planck Institute for Polymer Research, Mainz, Germany and colleagues have devised a way of combining the simplicity of ideal models used at low resolution with the chemical ac
5h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Fukushima radioactive particle release was significant says new researchScientists say there was a significant release of radioactive particles during the Fukushima-Daiichi nuclear accident.The researchers identified the contamination using a new method and say if the particles are inhaled they could pose long-term health risks to humans.
5h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Better together: How ecosystem services and adaptive decision-making can improve land managementAn ecosystem services approach combined with adaptive decision-making can aid land and resource managers in administering their regions for the benefit of communities and stakeholders, according to a recent report by the US Geological Survey and Resources for the Future.
5h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Tick bite protection: New CDC study adds to the promise of permethrin-treated clothingThe case for permethrin-treated clothing to prevent tick bites keeps getting stronger. In new experiments conducted at the US Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, clothing treated with an insecticide known as permethrin had strong toxic effects on three primary species of ticks known to spread disease-causing pathogens in the United States. Exposure to permethrin interfered with the ticks'
5h
Futurity.org

Millennials may prefer reading paper books over e-booksYoung people may still prefer curling up with an actual paper book instead of an e-book—even more so than their older counterparts, a new study shows. The study also found that adults across all age groups perceive ownership of e-books very differently from ownership of physical books, and this could have important implications for those in the business of selling digital texts. “We looked at wha
5h
Futurity.org

Communities with these things say they’re healthier and happierDiversity, health centers, and commuter trains are among the community attributes linked to well-being and quality of life, according to new research. A new nationwide study of more than 300,000 adults shows that people who live in communities that offer racial diversity, access to preventive health care, and public transportation, among other things, are more likely to report high levels of well
6h
Live Science

Clothes Treated with 'Hot Feet' Coating Could Keep Ticks AwaySpray clothes with permethrin, researchers found, and ticks tend to fall off them and die.
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Feed: All Latest

Photographs of Buildings That Become Abstract ArtNikola Olic flattens out skylines to create beautiful, often witty juxtapositions.
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Feed: All Latest

Why Your Next Workplace Harassment Training Might Be in VRTraditionally, on-the-job training has been schlocky video or snoozy slide deck, but Morgan Mercer of Vantage Point wants to put you in the room.
6h
The Atlantic

Donald Trump’s Strange Letter to Kim Jong UnIt was going to be the first meeting between an American president and a North Korean leader in history—an audacious effort to resolve the crisis over North Korea’s development of nuclear weapons. But on Thursday—after days of bitter back-and-forth between the United States and North Korea over how to approach denuclearization, with a North Korean official threatening a “nuclear-to-nuclear showdo
6h
Ingeniøren

Batteri og superkondensatorer skal erstatte udtjente søkablerEn batteribank på 200 MWh kombineret med superkondensatorer skal gøre Gotland uafhængig af 30 år gamle kabler, lyder en af flere nye planer for den svenske ø.
6h
Ingeniøren

Vi sammenligner: Her er elcykel-loven i seks EU-landeI Danmark vil myndighederne lempe reglerne for de hurtigste elcykler. Vi tager et kig rundt i Europa for at finde ud af, hvordan andre lande håndterer de såkaldte speed pedelecs juridisk.
6h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Giant clams tell the story of past typhoonsA highly precise method to determine past typhoon occurrences from giant clam shells has been developed, with the hope of using this method to predict future cyclone activity.
6h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Switching with moleculesMolecular switch will facilitate the development of pioneering electro-optical devices
6h
Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

Complementing conventional antibioticsAntimicrobial resistance (AMR) is a major medical problem worldwide, impacting both human health and economic well-being. Scientists have now developed a new strategy for fighting bacteria. The scientists revealed the molecular action mechanism of a Legionella toxin and developed a first inhibitor.
6h
Live Science

Why Eerie Blue Flames Just Erupted from Hawaiian VolcanoEerie blue flames flared from the ground on Hawaii's Big Island on Tuesday night (May 22), marking a rarely seen phenomenon that can arise during volcanic eruptions.
6h
Big Think

Can we trust studies when humans have a vested interest in the outcome?Lack of replication is a serious problem in science. So far, no one has an answer. Read More
6h
New on MIT Technology Review

Russian hackers are targeting Ukraine (again)
6h
Big Think

Would you buy a smart phone that does less than your current model?The dumb phone revolution is here, and people are joining. Read More
6h
Popular Science

To save a dog breed, change itAnimals I'm raising the lundehund of the future. The Norwegian lundehund has an incredible history—and has become incredibly inbred. To save it, researchers mixed it with another breed to create something new.
6h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Cyclist/motorist crashes worse at stop/give way junctionsCyclists are being more seriously hurt in crashes with motor vehicles at intersections with 'Stop' or 'Give-way' signs than at intersections with traffic signals or without any signage, a study from QUT's Centre for Accident Research and Road Safety -- Queensland has found after examining police records.
6h
The Atlantic

The Lil Tay Saga Reaches Its Logical ConclusionIn mid-February, a mysterious 9-year-old by the name of Lil Tay began blowing up on Instagram. “This is a message to all y’all broke-ass haters, y’all ain't doing it like Lil Tay,” she shouts as she hops into a red Mercedes, hands full of wads of cash. “This is why all y’all fucking haters hate me, bitch. This shit cost me $200,000. I’m only 9 years old. I don’t got no license, but I still drive
6h
Dagens Medicin

Regeringen: Nærheds­mekanisme skal erstatte toprocentskravDet suspenderede toprocentskrav skal erstattes af en mekanisme, som sikrer, at patienterne behandles så tæt på hjemme som muligt, mener regeringen. Det skal flytte opgaver fra sygehusene til almen praksis og kommuner.
6h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Short bursts of intense exercise are a HIIT, even with less active peopleMatthew Stork, a Ph.D. candidate in the school of Health and Exercise Sciences at UBC's Okanagan campus recently completed a study comparing inactive people's feelings and enjoyment of HIIT to traditional long-duration aerobic exercise. He found that inactive people who tried the high intensity exercise for the first time found it just as enjoyable as traditional exercise.
6h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Using Facebook to help young adults quit smokingA national clinical trial testing a smoking cessation intervention for young adults that was conducted entirely on Facebook has found that smokers are 2.5 times more likely to quit after three months with the Facebook-based treatment than if they were referred to an online quit-smoking program.
6h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News

South Asian-Americans at higher risk for heart disease and strokeSouth Asians living in the United States are more likely to die of heart conditions caused by atherosclerosis, such as heart attacks and strokes, than East Asians and non-Hispanic whites in the US.
6h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Lack of paid sick leave increases povertyA new study has quantified, for the first time, the relationship between lack of paid sick leave and poverty in the US. The data indicates that, even when controlling for education, race, sex, marital status and employment, working adults without paid sick leave are three times more likely to have incomes below the poverty line. People without paid sick leave benefits also are more likely to exper
6h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Why we won't get to Mars without teamworkIf humanity hopes to make it to Mars anytime soon, we need to understand not just technology, but the psychological dynamic of a small group of astronauts trapped in a confined space for months with no escape, according to a paper published in American Psychologist, the flagship journal of the American Psychological Association.
6h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Risk of preterm birth reliably predicted by new testScientists at UC San Francisco have developed a test to predict a woman's risk of preterm birth when she is between 15 and 20 weeks pregnant, which may enable doctors to treat them early and thereby prevent severe complications later in the pregnancy.
6h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News

You are what your mother eatsIn a study published online in Nature Communications, a team of researchers, led by OHSU's Jae W. Lee, Ph.D., has demonstrated that two neurons key to growth and metabolism -- GHRH and AgRP -- are developmentally interconnected. This finding may help to explain why a mother's nutrition habits and metabolism directly impact the growth of her child.
6h
The Atlantic

'Maybe You Shouldn’t Be in the Country'President Trump, who has portrayed himself as a defender of free speech and foe of political correctness, told Fox News’s Brian Kilmeade in an interview aired Thursday that NFL players should be barred from the field—and should perhaps even leave the U.S.—if they seek to protest. “You have to stand proudly for the national anthem or you shouldn’t be playing,” Trump said in the interview. “You sho
7h
Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

Preserving a painter's legacy with nanomaterialsPaintings by Vincent van Gogh, Pablo Picasso and Johannes Vermeer have been delighting art lovers for years. But it turns out that these works of art might be their own worst enemy -- the canvases they were painted on can deteriorate over time. In an effort to combat this aging process, one group is reporting that nanomaterials can provide multiple layers of reinforcement.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

Abdominal fat secretes novel adipokine promoting insulin resistance and inflammationA novel adipokine that favors the development of insulin resistance and systemic inflammation has been identified by an international research team . In cases of severe obesity, this adipokine is secreted by the adipocytes of the abdominal fat tissue and released into the bloodstream. The new findings could contribute to the development of alternative approaches for the treatment of diseases cause
7h
Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

Helping dental retainers and aligners fight off bacteriaClear, plastic aligners have been growing in popularity as alternatives to bulky, metal braces. And once the teeth are straightened, patients graduate to plastic retainers to maintain the perfect smile. But these appliances can become contaminated, so one group is now reporting that they have developed a film to prevent bacteria from growing on them.
7h
Feed: All Latest

California's Heavy-Handed Plan to Regulate the Self-Driving Car BizSelf-driving industry reps are not happy with the Public Utilities Commission's proposed plan for how driverless taxis should operate—especially the requirements that they offer services for free and ban pooled rides.
7h
Feed: All Latest

10 Great Shows You Can Binge-Watch in a Single WeekendHappy long weekend, but RIP outside time. (And the feeling in your butt.)
7h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Study of Android users: Mobile security messages 20 percent more effective if warnings vary in appearanceUsing brain data, eye-tracking data and field-study data, researchers have confirmed something about our interaction with security warnings on computers and phones: the more we see them, the more we tune them out. But they've also found that slight changes to the appearance of warnings help users pay attention to and adhere to warnings 20 percent more of the time.
7h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News

3D printed sugar offers sweet solution for tissue engineering, device manufacturingUniversity of Illinois engineers built a 3D printer that offers a sweet solution to making detailed structures that commercial 3D printers can't: Rather than a layer-upon-layer solid shell, it produces a delicate network of thin ribbons of hardened isomalt, the type of sugar alcohol used to make throat lozenges. The water-soluble, biodegradable glassy sugar structures have multiple applications in
7h
Ingeniøren

Ikea tilbagekalder cykler: Drivremmen sprængerMøbelgiganten opfordrer nu alle købere af deres Sladda-cykel til at stoppe med at bruge cyklen øjeblikkeligt.
7h
Ingeniøren

Kronik: Byggeriets digitalisering – det må ikke blive en ommer!
7h
Ingeniøren

Brandslukning på KU: 600 medarbejdere havde ulovlig adgang til 13.600 CPR-numreEn lang række forskellige, følsomme data har ligget og flydt rundt omkring på Københavns Universitets servere. Præcis hvor mange og hvor længe ved universitet ikke.
7h
Futurity.org

Will new NFL policy stop kneeling during the national anthem?Following several seasons of controversy, NFL owners today adopted a new policy directed at football players who protest during the national anthem, with stiff penalties for teams when players kneel on the field. “…a First Amendment challenge based upon the Jehovah’s Witnesses litigation from the 1940s… may be the best avenue for the players.” Labor law expert William Gould, professor emeritus at
7h
Scientific American Content: Global

Hybrid Human–Chicken Embryos Illuminate Key Developmental MilestoneA new technique could replace the need for human embryos in some lab experiments -- Read more on ScientificAmerican.com
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

Depression speeds up brain aging, find psychologistsPsychologists have found a link between depression and an acceleration of the rate at which the brain ages.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

Determining effective methods of irrigation as water becomes increasingly scarceUS consumers prefer the idea of using fresh water for any watering needs. In most cases, plants irrigated with recycled water saw no negative impact when compared to the same types of plants irrigated with pure, non-recycled water.
7h
Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

Medication-related harm in older adults is common, costly, and preventableNew research indicates that harm from medicines is common in older adults following hospital discharge, and it results in substantial use of healthcare resources.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

Stricter approval procedures for plant protection products urgedA number of chemical plant protection products, also known as pesticides, show harmful effects on ecosystems and biodiversity in their current use. Besides climate change, changes in global nutrient cycles and habitat destruction through altered land-use, the utilization of pesticides has also led to a dramatic loss of biodiversity.
7h
HumanBrainProject (uploads) on YouTube

The Human Brain ProjectHighlights from a panel discussion held in Geneva on 3 May 2018, organised by the Swiss Swedish Chamber of Commerce and the Human Brain Project. From: HumanBrainProject
7h
Nyheder - Forskning - Videnskab

Persondata har været opbevaret forkertEn gennemgang af interne drev på Københavns Universitet har vist, at tusindvis af studerende...
7h
Dagens Medicin

Aarhus Universitet har fundet ny leder for Institut for Klinisk MedicinTil juli tiltræder professor og overlæge Jørgen Frøkiær som ny leder af Institut for Klinisk Medicin på Aarhus Universitet.
7h
Live Science

Here's What We Know About Russia's Hypersonic Waverider WeaponWarnings of a Russian hypersonic weapon that the U.S. can't defend against may have had you running for the bomb shelter last week. But what, exactly, is this weapon, and how does it work?
7h
Scientific American Content: Global

What Is Spacetime?Physicists believe that at the tiniest scales, space emerges from quanta. What might these building blocks look like? -- Read more on ScientificAmerican.com
7h
The Scientist RSS

Image of the Day: Pompeiian HorseArchaeologists unearthed the remains in a farm north of the doomed Italian city.
7h
The Scientist RSS

Deep Brain Stimulation Boosts Insulin SensitivityOne patient with diabetes was able to reduce his medication use while receiving targeted electrical pulses.
7h
The Scientist RSS

What Made Human Brains So Big?Ecological challenges such as finding food and creating fire may have led the organ to become abnormally large, a new computer model suggests.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

Cause of E. coli beach closings? GullsResearchers have recently published results identifying the major sources of E. coli breakouts on several beaches on Lake Michigan. They have also researched an effective method of reducing the breakouts and the resulting beach closings.
7h
Popular Science

What to expect from the new GMO labels we're getting in 2020Science Grocery stores may look a little different. The U.S. Department of Agriculture recently announced their plan for rolling out mandatory labels for all food products containing genetically modified organisms…
7h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Vast majority of poor, urban women don't use prenatal vitamins before pregnancy, study showsA study of more than 7,000 low-income, urban mothers enrolled in the Boston Birth Cohort found that fewer than 5 percent of them started folic acid supplementation and used it almost daily before pregnancy, a widely recommended public health measure designed to prevent potentially crippling birth defects.
7h
Futurity.org

Eczema drug eases most severe asthma symptomsTwo new studies of patients with difficult-to-control asthma show that a known eczema drug alleviates asthma symptoms and improves patients’ ability to breathe better than standard therapies. The Food and Drug Administration approved dupilumab, injectable anti-inflammatory drug, in 2017 as a treatment for eczema, a chronic skin disease. The more than 2,000 patients enrolled in the studies suffere
7h
New Scientist - News

Chimp evolution was shaped by sex with their bonobo relativesSome chimpanzee populations gained useful DNA from interbreeding with bonobos, and one may even have become more gentle and “bonobo-like” in its brain structure and behaviour
7h
Dagens Medicin

Syddanmark og Lif indgår aftale om lægers efteruddannelseNy aftale fastsætter retningslinjerne for samarbejde mellem lægemiddelvirksomheder og Region Syddanmark om efteruddannelse af læger. En aftale med de resterende tre regioner forventes på plads denne sommer.
8h
Live Science

HIV Can Lie Dormant in the Brain. Here's What That Means.The HIV virus, which causes AIDS, has long been known to target and disable cells of the immune system, which are responsible for fighting off invading microorganisms and for suppressing malignant cancers.
8h
Feed: All Latest

Students Turn Chevy's Camaro Into a Eco-Happy Future MachineCollege teams from around the country competed by making hybrid and electric versions of the muscle car.
8h
Feed: All Latest

Are Avocados Toast?What will we eat in 2050? California farmers are placing bets.
8h
Scientific American Content: Global

Daydreaming May Help You Become More Socially AdeptNew research explains why relationships take up so much of our mental energy -- Read more on ScientificAmerican.com
8h
Ingeniøren

Spildevand kan overføre antibiotikaresistens mellem bakterierResistens kan spredes mellem arter, der ikke er tæt beslægtede, viser spildevand fra et hospital. DTU og Københavns Universitet tror, at renseanlæg kan reducere spredningen af resistens.
8h
Viden

Efter dødsulykke: Uber dropper selvkørende biler i ArizonaFirmaet vil dog snart påbegynde testkørsler med autonome biler i andre amerikanske stater.
8h
BBC News - Science & Environment

Farne Island puffin population drop sparks concernInitial findings in the National Trust's five-yearly survey suggest an overall decline of 12%.
8h
BBC News - Science & Environment

Loch Ness Monster: DNA tests may offer new clueDNA research team say sampling of Loch Ness could uncover evidence of new creatures.
8h
Science | The Guardian

Spore heroes: unlocking the life-cycle secrets of the earliest land plantsFossils from 432m years ago push back the origin of the alternating life cycle still seen in ferns today Our world today is dominated by the flowering plants, or angiosperms , which appeared approximately 130m years ago and rapidly diversified to become the top dogs in most ecosystems. But there are plenty of other plants from more ancient lineages still around, doing deeply weird things in their
8h
Dagens Medicin

Algoritme ville have reduceret prisen for Xtandi markantRegneksempel viser, at danske hospitaler kunne opnå en besparelse på 230.000 kr. pr. behandling af prostatakræft ved at bruge den algoritme, som hollandske forskere har foreslået.
8h
Dagens Medicin

Forskere: Matematisk algoritme kan give markant billigere kræftmidlerHollandske forskere foreslår, at medicinalfirmaer skal udregne priser på kræftmedicin efter en fastlagt algoritme. Dansk sundhedsøkonom mener, at det kan give markant lavere priser.
8h
Scientific American Content: Global

First Woman Air and Space Museum Director Talks about Inspiring the Next GenerationEllen Stofan, head of the Smithsonian Air and Space Museum, told us about the power of museums to attract young scientists and combat attacks on science -- Read more on ScientificAmerican.com
8h
Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

Applying machine learning tools to earthquake data offers new insightsIn a new study, researchers show that machine learning algorithms could pick out different types of earthquakes from three years of earthquake recordings at The Geysers in California, a major geothermal energy field. The repeating patterns of earthquakes appear to match the seasonal rise and fall of water-injection flows into the hot rocks below, suggesting a link to the mechanical processes that
8h
Live Science

How Long Does It Take a Parked Car to Reach Deadly Hot Temperatures?It's well known that a car parked outside on a hot summer's day can turn into a scorching oven. But how fast does it take the inside of a car to heat up to deadly temperatures?
9h
Feed: All Latest

How a New Era of Privacy Took Over Your Email InboxEurope's GDPR, which takes effect Friday, was supposed to give consumers more insight into how their personal information is collected and used. It's not turning out that way---yet.
9h
Feed: All Latest

35 Best Memorial Day Sales (2018): Laptops, TVs, AppliancesSummer has begun, and so have a lot of 2018 Memorial Day sales on TVs, laptops, robovacs, appliances, and more.
9h
Feed: All Latest

Give the Robots Electronic TonguesRoboticists have to not only in create artificial senses of touch and taste, but figure out what robots should *ignore* in a human world.
9h
The Atlantic

Will Texas Follow Houston’s Lead on Drug-Policy Reform?HOUSTON—It’s hard to top Kim Ogg as a symbol for the rapid pace of political change in urban America, even in states that remain very conservative overall. Ogg is a left-leaning, openly gay Democratic attorney from this city. In 2016, she routed a Republican incumbent by just over 108,000 votes to win election as the district attorney for Harris County, which includes Houston and surrounding subu
9h
Latest Headlines | Science News

Plasma rain in the sun’s atmosphere falls in surprising placesScientists found rain in the sun’s corona where they didn’t expect it, which could help solve the mystery of why the corona is so hot.
9h
cognitive science

Have you built chatbots for Skype? Would you like to learn how it is done? Watch a 3 minute video of how you can. It’s easy, all it takes is 10 minutes to build your skype bot.submitted by /u/kumars64 [link] [comments]
9h
BBC News - Science & Environment

Brexit: UK wants £1bn back from EU if it is excluded from GalileoThe UK steps up its war of words with the EU over being shut out of new satellite navigation system.
9h
Scientific American Content: Global

We Need to Stop Moving the Goalposts for AutismThe incidence has skyrocketed since the disorder was first described in 1943, but much of that increase is misleading -- Read more on ScientificAmerican.com
9h
New Scientist - News

Mystery ozone-destroying gases linked to badly recycled fridgesLast week we learned a chemical that harms the ozone layer is being emitted in Asia – and now it seems sloppy recycling might be partly to blame
9h
New Scientist - News

How a change in tactics could help autism researchFor some, symptoms of autism can hamper their daily lives, but drugs to mitigate these have floundered during trials. Shafali Jeste has an idea of why
9h
The Atlantic

‘The Trust of the Reader Is Distrusted by Roth’Philip Roth died this week at the age of 85, six years after announcing his retirement from writing. Over the past five decades, the novelist has loomed almost as large in The Atlantic ’s pages as he has in the broader world of American letters. His name first appeared in the magazine when an excerpt of his third book, When She Was Good , was published in the November 1966 issue. By that time, Ro
9h
Scientific American Content: Global

A Conversation with Thomas Hertog, One of Stephen Hawking's Final CollaboratorsThe theoretical physicist talks with Scientific American about the far-reaching implications of his final collaboration with his late friend and mentor -- Read more on ScientificAmerican.com
9h
Ingeniøren

Fejl på milliarddyr vejrsatellit: Bliver for varm i rummetIngeniører kæmper for at fikse et problem i kølesystemet på den nyeste amerikanske vejrsatellit, GOES-17 til knap 20 mia. kroner, der blev opsendt i marts.
9h
Ingeniøren

Universal Robots: Data skal være, hvor brugeren erMediet er underordnet, så længe de relevante data når ud til den rigtige bruger, mener den succesrige danske robotvirksomhed.
9h
Science | The Guardian

Are smartphones causing more teen suicides?Increases in depression and suicide appeared among teens in 2012 – the same time smartphone ownership became the norm Around 2012, something started going wrong in the lives of teens. In just the five years between 2010 and 2015, the number of US teens who felt useless and joyless – classic symptoms of depression – surged 33% in large national surveys. Teen suicide attempts increased 23%. Even mo
9h
Dagens Medicin

Løft den etiske fordringMinimaletik udspiller sig hver dag i klinikken, når en behandling skal sættes i gang, eller når en patient skal rekrutteres til et forsøg.
10h
Science : NPR

What's Going On In Your Child's Brain When You Read Them A Story?There are many ways young children encounter stories. A new study finds a "Goldilocks effect," where a cartoon may be "too hot" and audiobooks "too cold" for learning readers. (Image credit: LA Johnson/NPR)
10h
Feed: All Latest

Europe's New Data Protections Will Affect You Too. Here's How.Yes, they mainly affect those who live inside the EU. But non-Europeans should pay attention too.
10h
Feed: All Latest

AI Chatbots Try to Schedule Meetings—Without Enraging UsHowever trivial it may sound, it's a monstrously difficult challenge. Luckily, the employees of X.ai are some of the most dedicated nerds you’ll ever meet.
10h
Feed: All Latest

Sony's 4K Projector Offers More Than Meets the EyeThe coffee-table-sized Sony LSPX-A1 conceals a powerful speaker system—plus provides ample storage for your art books.
10h
The Atlantic

Michael Avenatti Is the 1990s-Style Celebrity Lawyer of the Trump AgeOn cable news these days, there are very few people who have approached President Trump’s ubiquity. In fact, there is only one, and his name is Michael Avenatti. (Stormy who?) Avenatti is not the first attorney to understand how the publicity game is played. Litigators are often like this: brash, aggressive, and sophisticated media manipulators. But Avenatti is the first celebrity lawyer of the T
10h
The Atlantic

Fifteen Unanswered Criminal-Law Questions About TrumpPresident Trump speculated on Tuesday that “if” the FBI placed a spy inside his campaign, that would be one of the greatest scandals in U.S. history. On Wednesday morning on Twitter, the “if” dropped away—and Trump asserted yesterday’s wild surmise as today’s fact. By afternoon, a vast claque of pro-Trump talkers repeated the president’s fantasies and falsehoods in their continuing project to rep
10h
The Atlantic

Breaching Norms Has a PriceIf Donald Trump was elected with any mandate, it was to shake up the orthodoxy—to challenge the establishment and its established ways of operating. To drain the swamp. What he actually delivers, however, may be transformation that even many of his supporters come to regret. Nowhere has the mandate for change been more forcefully exercised than in the field of criminal and counterintelligence inv
10h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Scientists reveal atomic details for one of Legionella's enzymatic weapons and develop first inhibitorAntimicrobial resistance (AMR) is a major medical problem worldwide, impacting both human health and economic well-being. A new strategy for fighting bacteria has now been reported in the latest online issue of Nature by a research group headed by Prof. Ivan Dikic at the Goethe University Frankfurt. The scientists revealed the molecular action mechanism of a Legionella toxin and developed a first
10h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Strain directs spin wavesChip development is complicated by the increasing temperatures in modern electronic devices based on semiconductor materials. Therefore, the development of spin wave integrated circuits (ICs) that can perform information processing by manipulating spin, rather than heat-producing electron movements, has been gaining attention. Within this field, spin waves transmitted through a magnetic insulator
10h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Beyond the limits of conventional electronics: stable organic molecular nanowiresScientists at the Tokyo Institute of Technology created the first thermally stable organic molecular nanowire devices using a single 4.5-nm-long molecule placed inside electroless gold-plated nanogap electrodes.
10h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Team makes breakthrough in synthetic genome rearrangementA synthetic biology team at Tianjin University (TJU) has reported new methods and strategies for genome rearrangement and accelerated the evolution of yeast strains with their three latest studies published in Nature Communications on May 22, 2018.
10h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Recombinant E. coli as a biofactory for the biosynthesis of diverse nanomaterialsA metabolic research group at KAIST and Chung-Ang University in Korea has developed a recombinant E. coli strain that biosynthesizes 60 nanomaterials covering 35 elements on the periodic table. Among the elements, the team could biosynthesize 33 novel nanomaterials for the first time, advancing the design of nanomaterials through the biosynthesis of single and multiple elements.
10h
Ingeniøren

Tre danske virksomheder skal kæmpe om årets automationsprisDer automatiseres på fuld tryk rundt hos de danske industrivirksomheder. Dansk Robot Netværk har udvalgt tre, som har gjort det særlig godt.
10h
Viden

Hovsa: Virksomhed lægger medarbejderes CPR-numre og lønsedler frit fremVed en fejl offentliggør virksomheder følsomme oplysninger på nettet. Det øger risikoen for svindel og afpresning.
10h
Viden

GUIDE: Sådan gør hackerne og sådan sikrer du digKend hackernes metoder og lær, hvordan du sikrer dig, hvis du har en netværksharddisk.
10h
Viden

Gæld, diagnoser, cpr og kontoudtog: Mange offentliggør personlige ting på nettet uden at vide detVed en fejl kan alle kan se følsomme dokumenter, der kan misbruges af kriminelle.
10h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Could a particle accelerator using laser-driven implosion become a reality?Laser pulse compression technology invented in the late 1980s resulted in high-power, short-pulse laser techniques, enhancing laser intensity 10 million-fold in a quarter of a century.
10h
Dagens Medicin

Forskning finder sammenhæng mellem overvægt i barndommen og svær astmaPiger, der var overvægtig som børn, bliver oftere indlagt med svær astma, når de bliver voksne, viser dansk forskning.
10h
Ingeniøren

Hackere overtog routere: Myndigheder efterforsker angreb på tysk energiselskabHackere angreb sidste år et datterselskab til det tyske energiselskab EnBW gennem en ekstern tjenesteudbyders medarbejderkonto. Nu efterforsker føderale myndigheder angrebet, der ifølge den tyske avis Süddeutsche Zeitung formodentlig har tilknytning til Rusland.
10h
Ingeniøren

Ingeniøren lancerer medie for professionelle om data og analyticsMediehuset Ingeniøren lancerer i dag det andet medie i sin nye nichestrategi. DataTech er målrettet professionelle på tværs af brancher, der arbejder med data og analytics.
10h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Could a particle accelerator using laser-driven implosion become a reality?Scientists discovered a novel particle acceleration mechanism called 'Micro-bubble implosion,' in which super-high energy hydrogen ions (relativistic protons) are emitted at the moment when bubbles shrink to atomic size through the irradiation of hydrides with micron-sized spherical bubbles by ultraintense laser pulses.
10h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Each hour of delay in detecting abnormal lactates in patients with sepsis increases the odds of in-hospital deathBecause of a known association between elevated lactate levels and increased mortality, sepsis guidelines mandate that lactate levels should be tested soon after the onset of sepsis. A new study in the journal CHEST® found that a significant proportion of patients with suspected sepsis do not have their lactates measured within the recommended timeframe. These patients experienced delayed antibiot
10h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News

South Asian Americans are at high risk for heart disease and strokeSouth Asian Americans are more likely to die of atherosclerosis than other Asians and people of European ancestry. Higher rates of diabetes and lack of exercise appear to be important factors in their increased risk.
10h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Early lactate measurements appear to improve results for septic patientsThe controversial Severe Sepsis and Septic Shock Early Management Bundle study adds weight to the belief that early lactate measurements can make a big difference. This follow-up study found a two percent increase in mortality for each hour of delay in patients with an abnormal lactate value.
10h
Ingeniøren

Utætte kloakker koster 500 mio. kr. om året: Det kan ikke betale sig at reparere dem25-30 procent af det vand, der ledes til rensningsanlæg, burde aldrig være endt i kloakkerne, vurderer en ny undersøgelse. Men det er alt for dyrt at ordne kloakkerne.
11h
BBC News - Science & Environment

Car dealer tactics stall electric car sales"Dismissive" dealers are a major barrier to boosting sales of electric cars says a new study.
12h

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