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The Atlantic

A ‘Quiet Revolution’ Comes to IrelandUpdated at 1:51 p.m. ET DUBLIN—It was clear a big change was coming to Ireland even as the final votes were still being tallied: Exit polls Friday night showed an overwhelming majority of Irish citizens had voted “Yes” to overturn their country’s constitutional ban on abortion. And on Saturday, it was official. It was supposed to be a much closer contest, and the overwhelming margin in the final
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Scientific American Content: Global

The Pressing Need for Everyone to Quiet Their EgosWhy quieting the ego strengthens your best self -- Read more on ScientificAmerican.com
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Ingeniøren

Drop pessimismen – det går faktisk ret godtDe fleste af os hænger fast i en forældet forestilling om verdens virkelige tilstand, lyder det i en ny bog fra en folkekær svensk ekspert i visualisering af data.
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GoDaddy

How to get from 0 to 600 sites as a web designerThe journey of a freelance website designer is often like a turbulent, yet exciting, roller coaster ride.
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Big Think

DNA exhaust: How much control do you really have over your genetic data?You might want to think twice about handing your DNA over to a private company like 23andme, Ancenstry.com, and others that promise hereditary information. What, exactly, do they do with your DNA? Read More
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Science | The Guardian

Astronaut Alan Bean, fourth person to walk on the moon, dies aged 86Nasa and family announce death on Saturday Bean was lunar module pilot on Apollo 12 mission The astronaut Alan Bean, who in 1969 became the fourth person to walk on the moon, has died. He was 86. Related: Nasa's Golden Record may baffle alien life, say researchers Continue reading...
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Scientific American Content: Global

The Lowdown on LAZE: Kilauea's Most Recent HazardAcidic clouds rise from the water—what are they, and how dangerous can they be? -- Read more on ScientificAmerican.com
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NYT > Science

Hooking the Dinosaur of FishIt’s paddlefish season in Montana. Programs to harvest the giant’s caviar and sell it have helped to create a model for sustainable fishing.
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Space Photos of the Week: Meet TESS, the Exoplanet HunterNASA's satellite takes on the exploratory work of the Kepler mission, which so far has discovered more than 2,000 planets orbiting other stars.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

Potent new mechanism of action for treatment of inflammatory bowel disease revealedThrough research on the small molecule analogue of E6007 which is under clinical development as a treatment for inflammatory bowel disease, a novel mechanism of action was revealed in which this analogue inhibited the adhesion and infiltration of various leukocytes through the blockade of certain interaction.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

Which role does the brain play in prosocial behavior?This study suggests that our tactile cortices, primarily evolved to perceive touch and pain on our body, have an important social function. They contribute to prosocial decision-making by helping to transform the sight of bodily harm into an accurate feeling for how much pain the victim experiences. This feeling is necessary to adapt our helping to the needs of others.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

Failures in power grids: Dynamically induced cascadesA reliable functioning of technical infrastructure networks is essential for our modern, high-tech society. Cascading failures, i.e. chain reactions of failures of different infrastructures, are the cause of many failures of entire networks, e.g. large parts of the European power grids.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

Why bioelectrodes for energy conversion are not stableResearchers have discovered why bioelectrodes containing the photosynthesis protein complex photosystem I are not stable in the long term. Such electrodes could be useful for converting light energy into chemical energy in an environmentally friendly way. However, the proteins, which are stable in nature, are not functional in semi-artificial systems in the long term because reactive molecules are
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

Shine bright like a nanoaggregateChinese scientists have turned copper-iodine cluster molecules into aggregated, highly luminescent nanostructures for use in light-emitting diodes (LEDs). The solid-state assemblies made of complexes of the copper-iodine cluster with phosphor-organic compounds as ligands are easily prepared, cheap, and can emit light in many colors, they report. The nanoaggregates can be used as luminescent inks f
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VR Headsets That Will Transport You, Wherever the DestinationWhether you’re beaming up to the *Enterprise* or crashing your friend’s destination wedding from your sofa, these headsets take you there.
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Scientific American Content: Global

Of Yellowhammer and Corn BuntingNew World nine-primaried oscines aren’t just found in the New World... -- Read more on ScientificAmerican.com
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The Atlantic

North Korea Wants to End up Like Pakistan, Not LibyaWhen Donald Trump canceled his planned summit with North Korean leader Kim Jong Un—before hinting that it might happen anyway after all, as the South Koreans moved into damage-control mode on Saturday with an impromptu summit of their own—it followed days of discussion over a historical parallel: Libya. U.S. National-Security Adviser John Bolton said the basis for a deal with North Korea was the
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Popular Science

Save hundreds of dollars on a custom computer desk—by building it yourselfDIY A surprisingly easy step-by-step guide. You need a workstation big enough to fit your computer, monitors, and speakers. Here's how to build your own ergonomic, customized desk that displays all your tech,…
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T-Mobile Web Portal Exposed 74 Million Accounts, and and More Security News This WeekHacking back, Trump's poor security hygiene and more of the week's top security news.
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What Would Mind-Reading Really Be Like?Telepathy has been a common trope in sci-fi for decades, but how would it work if it was real?
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New on MIT Technology Review

The Best of the Physics arXiv (week ending May 26, 2018)This week’s most thought-provoking papers from the Physics arXiv.
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Latest Headlines | Science News

Black children commit suicide at twice the rate of white kidsThe suicide rates for young black kids are higher than those of their white counterparts, a pattern that flips in older kids, researchers find.
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Live Science

What's the Absolutely Amazing Theory of Almost Everything?Here's why the Standard Model of particle physics is seriously amazing.
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Scientific American Content: Global

Are the Benefits of Fish Oil Overrated?Fish oil supplements are the third most popular nutritional supplement. But just how firm is the evidence to support their use? -- Read more on ScientificAmerican.com
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Live Science

World's Oldest Dandruff Left Behind by Very Embarrassed DinosaursThe world's oldest dandruff has been found in a feathered dinosaur fossil — and scientists are stoked.
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Live Science

Here's What NASA's 'Toasty' Camera Saw As It Melted After a SpaceX LaunchWhen a SpaceX rocket launches, it's awesome. But when a SpaceX rocket launch sparks a brush fire that melts a NASA photographer's camera, it goes viral. Now you can see what the camera saw as it melted.
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Ingeniøren

Gamle negativer gjorde fotograf til iværksætterFotograf Simon Lautrop har udviklet en miniscanner, så gamle negativer og lysbilleder kan få nyt liv på nettet. Men et møde med Ingeniøren gav grå hår i hovedet.
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Viden

Analyse: Nu svarer Facebook (igen ikke) Europa-ParlamentetFacebook-stifter Mark Zuckerberg lovede at svare på ubesvarede spørgsmål fra tirsdagens høring i EU. Det har han nu gjort - men uden rigtigt at svare.
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The Atlantic

A Surprising Reason to Worry About Low Birth RatesDiscussion about the great American baby bust often seems meant to induce fear. The concern is that with fewer babies, economic growth will plummet, and too-few workers will have to shoulder the burden of an aging population. But if I’m being honest, the latest news about the drop in American births did not raise my blood pressure much. Maybe it’s because I, myself, am kind of “eh” on kids in gen
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Big Think

Yanis Varoufakis – Happiness, Inc. – Think Again - a Big Think Podcast #149The moral bankruptcy of the European Union, the backlash against Steven Pinker’s defense of progress, and where we go from here. Read More
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Scientific American Content: Global

Personality Tests with Deep-Sounding Questions Provide Shallow Answers about the "True" YouA desire for deep insight can lead to deep confusion -- Read more on ScientificAmerican.com
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The Atlantic

The Family Weekly: How Can School Shootings Be Prevented?This Week in Family On Friday, May 18th, a school shooting in Santa Fe, Texas, left 10 people dead and over a dozen injured. As shootings persist in America’s schools, families, educators, and politicians are debating how best to prevent a troubled teen from becoming the next gunman. Barbara Bradley Hagerty examined the history of American school shootings and prevention attempts, to get a better
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The Atlantic

What Would Actually Happen if Trump Refused a Subpoena?As President Trump and Special Counsel Robert Mueller continue to dance around the possibility of an interview, it is, perhaps, useful to think about how a confrontation between the two might play out. Imagine that negotiations come to an unsuccessful conclusion and Mueller is motivated to issue a subpoena to Trump. What happens then? As far as the public record reflects, a president has only bee
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Israel's Self-Flying 'Cormorant' Whisks Soldiers to SafetyTactical Robotics' autonomous aircraft may not look too cool, but it might make battlefields safer, and eventually help civilians fly around town.
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How Social Media Became a Pink Collar JobWhen companies ask for sociable, flexible, compassionate workers, they’re silently signaling women to sign-on to an undervalued job that powers the digital economy.
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A Classical Math Problem Gets Pulled Into Self-Driving CarsA century ago, the great mathematician David Hilbert posed a probing question in pure mathematics. A recent advance in optimization theory is bringing Hilbert’s work into the modern world.
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cognitive science

One of the difficulties with the diagnosis and treatment of depression is the variation in symptoms between different types of depression. New research suggests a blunted response to rewards could serve as a specific marker of melancholic depression.submitted by /u/randomusefulbits [link] [comments]
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Ingeniøren

Søværnets nye schweizerkniv skal hjælpe dansk havforskningAvanceret forsknings­udstyr og et fleksibelt helikopterdæk gør inspektions­skibet Lauge Koch til et deltids forskningsskib.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Baby panda born in Malaysia zoo makes public debutA baby panda born in a Malaysian zoo five months ago made her public debut Saturday.
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The Atlantic

‘There’s a Perception That Canada Is Being Invaded’It may seem paradoxical. Last year, Canadian Prime Minister Justin Trudeau appeared to issue an open invitation to refugees with a tweet declaring, “to those fleeing persecution, terror & war ... #WelcomeToCanada.” This year, his government is working hard to deter thousands of people who are walking over the U.S. border to seek asylum in Canada. Canada has begun granting refugee status to fewer
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Viden

Nys og kløe: Varmere klima giver værre allergiDrivhuseffekten gør kloden varmere. Det giver blandt andet mere pollen i luften og længere pollensæsoner.
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cognitive science

The Unconscious Rules of Personal Space: The distance you keep from others is an elaborate, instinctive dance.submitted by /u/thedabarry [link] [comments]
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cognitive science

The Link Between Creativity and Emotional Intelligence: Can creativity be taught? Some experts say yes, some no, others maybe. But new research identifies an underappreciated component of creativity that definitely can be learned: emotional intelligence.submitted by /u/thedabarry [link] [comments]
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NYT > Science

Have You Ever Seen Someone Be Killed?A single data point that complicates how we think about who is in prison.
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Science | The Guardian

Nasa's Golden Record may baffle alien life, say researchersExtraterrestrials will discover a species that loves to argue and sees beauty in flowers that roar like chainsaws It was launched to the stars as a portrait of humanity: an alien’s guide to life on Earth and the wonderful, rich culture of its dominant species. But the Golden Record , blasted into space by Nasa in 1977, may deliver an entirely different message to any extraterrestrials who happen
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Ingeniøren

Spørg Scientariet: Hvorfor får jeg ondt i ørerne i flyet?Et par læsere vil gerne vide mere om det tryk, der er i flyet, når det letter og lander, og hvorfor man kan opleve smerter i ørerne. Det svarer overlæge på Rigshospitalet på.
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Viden

Forskere advarer: Vi må ikke panikke og slette for mange dataEU’s data-lov får flere virksomheder til at rydde op med for hård hånd. Og det kan ramme forskningen, der har brug for data, mener eksperter.
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News

New method for finding disease-susceptibility genesA team of researchers, affiliated with South Korea's Ulsan National Institute of Science and Technology (UNIST) has unveiled a novel statistical algorithm, capable of identifying potential disease genes in a more accurate and cost-effective way.
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Science : NPR

Traces Of Opioids Found In Seattle-Area MusselsResearchers said the discovery of pharmaceuticals and illicit drugs in local harbors is not uncommon, but the agency noted that this is the first time that oxycodone has been found in shellfish. (Image credit: David Silverman/Getty Images)
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Live Science

What Is Blood Sugar?Blood sugar, or glucose, is the main sugar found in blood. It is an important source of energy and provides nutrients to the body.
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Gadget Lab Podcast: The Very Human Element of Self-Driving CarsWIRED’s Alex Davies and Aarian Marshall join this week’s Gadget Lab podcast to talk all things transportation–and yes, that includes Elon Musk.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

A genetic algorithm predicts the vertical growth of citiesThe increase of skyscrapers in a city resembles the development of some living systems. Researchers have created an evolutionary genetic algorithm that, on the basis of the historical and economic data of an urban area, can predict what its skyline could look like in the coming years. The method has been applied successfully to the thriving Minato Ward, in Tokyo.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

Goal conflict linked to psychological distressBeing torn about which personal goals to pursue is associated with symptoms of psychological distress, new research shows.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

Mars rocks may harbor signs of life from 4 billion years agoIron-rich rocks near ancient lake sites on Mars could hold vital clues that show life once existed there, research suggests.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

'Deforestation-free' palm oil not as simple as it soundsGenuinely 'deforestation-free' palm oil products are problematic to guarantee, according to a new study.
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NYT > Science

Nonfiction: What We Get Wrong About AnimalsFrom the marvelous to the utterly bizarre, the astonishing diversity of life is on display in Lucy’s Cooke’s “The Truth About Animals.”
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

New link found between alcohol, genes and heart failureScientists have revealed a new link between alcohol, heart health and our genes. The researchers investigated faulty versions of a gene called titin which are carried by one in 100 people or 600,000 people in the UK.
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New Scientist - News

Watch the weird new solutions to the baffling three-body problemThe three-body problem, which determines how objects orbit each other in space, is notoriously difficult to solve. Now there are 231 new valid orbits
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BBC News - Science & Environment

Virgin boss Sir Richard Branson readies himself for spaceThe UK entrepreneur puts himself through a gruelling training programme so he can rocket to space.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

Currents propel the spreading of invasive jellyfishTwelve years ago, the comb jelly Mnemiopsis leidyi, originating from the North American East Coast, appeared in northern European waters. Based on the first comprehensive data collection on the occurrence of this invasive jellyfish in Europe, scientists have now shown that ocean currents play a key role for this successful invasion.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

If solubility is the problem -- Mechanochemistry is the solutionChemists synthesize supersized nanographenes with ball milling.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

A new guide for explorers of the submicroscopic world inside usThe new guidelines will benefit the battle against diseases such as cancer, assist in the development of new drugs and ensure scientific results are accurate and can be reproduced.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

How scientists analyse cell membranesScientists have developed a method of visualizing an important component of the cell membrane in living cells. They synthesized a family of new substances.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

Biosensor technologies to offer more effective approaches to disease treatmentEvery cell in our bodies is shaped by its outer coating, or biomembrane, which wraps the cell in a supportive and protective blanket, allowing the cell to carry out its normal function while also defending it against attack. New technology has opened up an area of research that makes it possible to study how the biomembrane functions, including how it responds when a disease molecule attacks, pavi
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

Low-cost membrane cleans up light and heavy oils in a single stepResearchers have developed a low-cost membrane that effectively separates oil and water on demand -- potentially paving the way for faster cleanups of oil spills and improved treatment of industrial wastewater in the future.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

Bacteria and viruses ejected from the oceanCertain types of bacteria and viruses are readily ejected into the atmosphere when waves break; others less so, researchers reported. A team of chemists, oceanographers, microbiologists, geneticists, and pediatric medicine specialists are attempting to understand how far potentially infectious bacteria and viruses can travel and if those that pose the greatest risks to public health are among thos
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

How do insects survive on a sugary diet?Researchers show that bacteriocytes -- specific aphid cells that house the symbiotic bacteria -- have different DNA methylation patterns depending on what type of plant sap the aphid is consuming.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

Scientists introduce cosmochemical model for Pluto formationScientists integrated NASA's New Horizons discoveries with data from ESA's Rosetta mission to develop a new theory about how Pluto may have formed at the edge of our solar system.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

An elastic fiber filled with electrodes set to revolutionize smart clothesEPFL scientists have found a fast and simple way to make super-elastic, multi-material, high-performance fibers. Their fibers have already been used as sensors on robotic fingers and in clothing. This breakthrough method opens the door to new kinds of smart textiles and medical implants.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

Study suggests obese children who meet milk guidelines have less risk of metabolic syndromeObese children who consume at least two servings of any type of cow's milk daily are more likely to have lower fasting insulin, indicating better blood sugar control, according to researchers.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

People with dementia more likely to go missingThe tendency of people with dementia to wander and become lost has led researchers to recommend a 'Silver Alert' system, similar to Amber Alerts for missing children, be activated when someone with the diagnosis of dementia is reported lost.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

Professor replicates famous marshmallow test, makes new observationsA new replication study of the well-known 'marshmallow test' -- a famous psychological experiment designed to measure children's self-control -- suggests that being able to delay gratification at a young age may not be as predictive of later life outcomes as was previously thought.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

Some veterans at higher risk of Zika complicationsZika virus (ZIKV) has affected roughly half a million people in the Western hemisphere in recent years, including US veterans. Older veterans and those with comorbidities are at an increased risk of hospitalizations and neurological complications after a ZIKV infection, researchers now report.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

Did the Chicxulub asteroid knock Earth's thermometer out of the ballpark?When the Chicxulub asteroid smashed into Earth 65 million years ago, the event drove an abrupt and long-lasting era of global warming, with a rapid temperature increase of 5° Celsius (C) that endured for roughly 100,000 years, a new study reports.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

Short bursts of intense exercise are a HIIT, even with less active peopleA recent study comparing inactive people's feelings and enjoyment of HIIT to traditional long-duration aerobic exercise has found that inactive people who tried the high intensity exercise for the first time found it just as enjoyable as traditional exercise.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

Polymer crystals hold key to record-breaking energy transportScientists have found a way to create polymeric semiconductor nanostructures that absorb light and transport its energy further than previously observed.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

Revealed mechanism behind citrus canker bacteria's defense system for predatorsA new study describes one of Xanthomonas citri's secretion systems and a signaling pathway that enhances its resistance against amoebae. Investigations might contribute for future forms of intervening and putting a stop on the development of X. citri, known for its persistency.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

How humans and apes are different, and why it mattersWhy it's important to study the deep similarities, and the critical differences, between humans and the apes to seek an anthropological and evolutionary explanation.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

How greener grids can stay litWithout careful management, distributed energy resources have the potential to cause unreliable power delivery, or even outages, and lead utility companies to overcharge customers. A new index will help ISOs and utilities account for uncertainties introduced by both the electricity market and DERs so utility companies can balance the distribution grid and find the fairest customer rates.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

Rare element to provide better material for high-speed electronicsResearchers have discovered a new two-dimensional material, derived from the rare element tellurium, to make transistors that carry a current better throughout a computer chip.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

New parts of the brain become active after students learn physicsA new study showed that, when confronted with physics problems, new parts of a student's brain are utilized after receiving instruction in the topic.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

Chemists develop new blood test to quickly detect liver damageChemists have developed a 'quick and robust' blood test that can detect liver damage before symptoms appear, offering what they hope is a significant advance in early detection of liver disease. Their new method can detect liver fibrosis, the first stage of liver scarring that can lead to fatal disease if left unchecked, from a blood sample in 30-45 minutes.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

Adolescents with hay fever have higher rates of anxiety and depressionA new article shows allergies can have serious, far-reaching consequences, especially on adolescent sufferers.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

In-home therapy effective for stroke rehabilitation, study showsStroke remains a leading cause of human disability and rehabilitation therapy can help. Supervised in-home rehabilitation therapy delivered via telemedicine can be as effective as in-clinic rehabilitation program as an alternative for stroke survivors who can't sustain in-person visits for reasons that may include high cost, difficulty traveling to a provider or few regionally available care provi
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

Lack of paid sick leave increases povertyA new study has quantified, for the first time, the relationship between lack of paid sick leave and poverty in the United States. The data indicates that, even when controlling for education, race, sex, marital status and employment, working adults without paid sick leave are three times more likely to have incomes below the poverty line. People without paid sick leave benefits also are more like
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

Transgender brains are more like their desired gender from an early ageBrain activity and structure in transgender adolescents more closely resembles the typical activation patterns of their desired gender, according to new research. The findings suggest that differences in brain function may occur early in development and that brain imaging may be a useful tool for earlier identification of transgenderism in young people.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

Facial recognition software could help endangered primates, slow illegal traffickingNew facial recognition software can help protect endangered primates -- more than 60 percent of which face extinction.
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Science | The Guardian

Breast cancer screening error may affect thousands moreInvitation glitch could date back further than previously thought, says cancer specialist Many more women could have missed out on breast cancer screening invitations dating back further than previously thought, according to a cancer expert. The health secretary, Jeremy Hunt, said this month that women’s lives may have been cut short by an IT error , which meant 450,000 patients in England missed
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The Atlantic

The Atlantic Daily: Defensible SpaceWhat We’re Following Summit Saved? Just a day after he suddenly canceled his planned meeting with North Korean leader Kim Jong Un, Trump responded warmly to a conciliatory statement from Kim, suggesting the summit could still take place as planned. The back-and-forth between the two leaders suggests a mutual attempt to prove that the other party wants the meeting more. National Security Adviser J
22h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Study shows star-shaped bread popular with children and could encourage more healthy eatingNew research on different colors and shapes of bread, presented at this year's European Congress on Obesity in Vienna, Austria (May 23-26), shows that star-shaped bread is particularly popular with young children and could help them make healthy food choices.
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Study finds that chewing gum while walking affects both physical and physiological functions, especially in middle-aged and elderly menNew research presented at this year's European Congress on Obesity (ECO) in Vienna, Austria (May 23-26) shows chewing gum while walking increases heart rate and energy expenditure. The study was conducted by Dr Yuka Hamada and colleagues at Waseda University, Graduate School of Sport Sciences, Saitama, Tokyo, Japan.
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Study finds that weight loss after obesity surgery can rapidly restore testosterone production and sex drive in morbidly obese menNew research presented at this year's European Congress on Obesity (ECO) in Vienna, Austria (May 23-26) shows that weight reduction following a sleeve gastrectomy (obesity surgery), which reduces the size of the stomach, can rapidly reverse obesity-related hypogonadism in morbidly obese men, restoring normal levels of testosterone and sex drive.
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Google search data shows weight loss searches have increased over time while those on obesity have decreasedNew research on Google trends data presented at this year's European Congress on Obesity in Vienna, Austria (May 23-26) shows that over time, searches using the terms weight loss have increased, while those using the word obesity have decreased, potentially suggesting a normalization of obesity in society.
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News

By 2035 over 4 million adults will be morbidly obese across England, Wales, and ScotlandAcross England, Wales, and Scotland, morbid obesity (BMI of 40kg/m² or over) rates in adults are expected to soar over the next 17 years, with the number of morbidly obese adults likely to exceed 4 million by 2035 -- more than double the 1.9 million in 2015, according to new research being presented at this year's European Congress on Obesity (ECO) .
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Science | The Guardian

Formula meal diet plan can tackle obesity in short termFour drinks a day over eight weeks can help those at risk of heart disease, says study Obesity can be successfully tackled, at least in the short term, by giving up real food for formula meals for eight weeks, which removes temptation and any need to make difficult decisions about what to eat, a new study has found. The research, by the former government obesity advisor Professor Susan Jebb of Ox
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Popular Science

New science books to read this weekendEntertainment Disasters, kindness, oceans and more. Here are some science-related books that debuted over the past month to fill your weekend reading list.
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New on MIT Technology Review

Yes, Alexa is recording mundane details of your life, and it’s creepy as hellI’m not kicking our smart speaker out of the house just yet, but the consequences of having it in my family’s life are becoming clear.
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Former Trump Campaign Aide: My Russia Ties Are Not Nefarious!Michael Caputo is helping launch a video startup that involves a bunch of Russians. He’s also sending a Russian ballerina on tour. But that doesn’t make him a Putin stooge, he insists.
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Blog » Languages » English

Beta Test: NotificationsHi Eyewirers! We’re excited to invite you to beta test a big new feature: Notifications! The MVP (minimum viable product) consists of five notification types: one for each category of competitions (HH, versus, marathon) and two for custom text-based notifications, one with image and one without. We’ll also be testing individual notifications and notifications to different classes of players. Futu
23h
The Scientist RSS

Another Retraction for Discredited ResearcherRobert Ryan was forced to resign from the University of Dundee in 2016 following an investigation of misconduct.
23h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

New US tariffs a headache for foreign automakersUS President Donald Trump's threat to impose steep tariffs on auto imports will hit foreign automakers that export a large number of vehicles to the US market, but many also manufacture cars domestically.
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The Atlantic

Radio Atlantic: Is the Israeli-Palestinian Conflict Past Solving?The decades-old dispute between Israelis and Palestinians seems to be at a new low these days. Two American-born writers – an Israeli author and a Muslim journalist – join editor-in-chief Jeffrey Goldberg and global editor Kathy Gilsinan to grapple with the bleak state of affairs. Yossi Klein Halevi is the author of the new book Letters to My Palestinian Neighbor . Wajahat Ali recently traveled t
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

Tumor cells evade death through in extremis DNA repairp38 blockage has been shown to increase the death of tumor cells, thus causing tumors to shrink. The combination of p38 inhibitors with chemotherapeutic drugs (taxanes) strengthens, accelerates or prolongs the antitumor effect in patient-derived tumors grown in mice.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

By forming clots in tumors, immune cell aids lung cancer's spreadResearchers report that for a particular subset of lung cancer tumors, there is a high prevalence of immune cells called inflammatory monocytes. These immune cells, which normally help to build clotting scaffolds to promote wound healing, also make it possible for tumor cells to migrate and spread to other parts of the body.
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NYT > Science

Q&A: Straight Talk on Why Wrapping Paper CurlsThe alignment of paper fibers and the manufacturing process contribute to flat paper getting unruly.
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The Atlantic

Actually, Kissing Is GoodIn one of the loveliest scenes of Book Club , the newest addition to the Diane Keaton oeuvre, our beloved matriarch sits across from her dashing pilot paramour (Andy Garcia) as the two dine with the hilariously CGI-ed Santa Monica sunset behind them. Their banter is sweet, the current between them electric even though the recently widowed Diane had been apprehensive about returning to the world o
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Heightened debate in US as EU privacy rules take effectAmid a global scramble to comply with new EU data protections laws, the debate on privacy has intensified in the United States with some calling for similar measures for Americans, and others warning the rules could fracture the global internet.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Hawaii volcano sends another ash cloud high into the airAuthorities say an eruption at the summit of a volcano on Hawaii's Big Island has sent an ash cloud about 10,000 feet (3,048 meters) into the air.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

'Smart' gadgets: Ways to minimize privacy and security risksRevelations that an Amazon Echo smart speaker inadvertently sent a family's private conversation to an acquaintance highlights some unexpected risks of new voice-enabled technologies.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

Biologist advocates ecological approach to improving human healthChronic diseases like cancer, autoimmune disorders and obesity may ultimately vanquish the efforts of medical intervention unless people change their diet, a biologist argues in a paper published this week.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

Top nitrogen researchers imagine world beyond fossil fuelsAt the invitation of the U.S. Department of Energy's Office of Basic Energy Sciences, 17 top experts in nitrogen research gathered to discuss nitrogen activation chemistry and the field's future.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

Why motor neurons die in patients with motor neuron diseaseA group of clinical neurologists, molecular biologists and computer scientists have worked together to solve the mystery of why motor neurons die in patients with motor neuron disease.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

Ruthenium found to have unique magnetic properties at room temperatureA new finding demonstrates that the chemical element ruthenium (Ru) is the fourth single element to have unique magnetic properties at room temperature. The discovery could be used to improve sensors, devices in the computer memory and logic industry, or other devices using magnetic materials.
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The Atlantic

The Atlantic Politics & Policy Daily: Zero Summit Game-Written by Elaine Godfrey ( @elainejgodfrey ) Today in 5 Lines President Trump seemed to suggest the United States’ historic summit with North Korea is back on the table, telling reporters that the White House is “ talking to them now .” Trump cancelled the meeting in a letter to Kim Jong Un on Thursday. During his commencement address at the U.S. Naval Academy, Trump praised efforts to boost de
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Live Science

Intriguing Gold Coin and Other Treasures Uncovered in EgyptArchaeologists in Egypt have unearthed the remains of a huge, red, brick building — likely the remnants of a Roman bath — as well as a mountain of treasures, including a statue of a ram and a gold coin featuring King Ptolemy III.
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cognitive science

Personality trait linked to lower IQ test scores, not necessarily lower intelligence. (I made the article headline more honest)submitted by /u/moodog72 [link] [comments]
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

Phosphorus nutrition can hasten plant and microbe growth in arid, high elevation sitesGlacial retreat in cold, high-altitude ecosystems exposes environments that are extremely sensitive to phosphorus input, new research shows. The finding upends previous ecological assumptions, helps scientists understand plant and microbe responses to climate change and could expand scientists' understanding of the limits to life on Earth.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

Lung-on-a-chip simulates pulmonary fibrosisNew biotechnology could make testing potential medicine for pulmonary fibrosis, one of the most common and serious forms of lung disease, quicker and less expensive. The innovation, lung-on-a-chip technology, relies on the same technology used to print electronic chips, photolithography.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

The big clean up after stressWhen cells become stressed, they activate specific response patterns. Researchers have identified new details of these responses, which can help to get a better understanding of neurodegenerative diseases.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

Using the K computer, scientists predict exotic 'di-Omega' particleBased on complex simulations of quantum chromodynamics performed using the K computer, one of the most powerful computers in the world, scientists have predicted a new type of 'dibaryon' -- a particle that contains six quarks instead of the usual three. Studying how these elements form could help scientists understand the interactions among elementary particles in extreme environments such as the
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

How other people affect our interpersonal spaceA study has shown for the first time how the size of your interpersonal space can be affected by the tone and content of conversations taking place between other people nearby.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

Disadvantaged students with lower grades do just as well on medical degreesStudents from some of England's worst performing secondary schools who enroll on medical degrees with lower A Level grades, on average, do at least as well as their peers from top performing schools, a new study has revealed.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

Black Americans face education, income barriers to healthy behaviors, study findsA new study reports educational opportunities and higher incomes may be key to closing the health gap between most black and white Americans. Researchers say socioeconomic factors, mainly wealth and education, influenced the differences in health behaviors between the groups more than other variables.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

For the past 70 years, the Danube has almost never frozen overSince the 1950s, warmer and warmer winters and man-made inflows have largely prevented ice formation on Europe's second-largest river.
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