Viden

Plastik af sukkerrør: Lego er klar med sine første bæredygtige klodserLego er klar til at producere bæredygtige klodser for første gang i virksomhedens historie.
2h
BBC News - Science & Environment

Diabetes is actually five separate diseases, research suggestsScandinavian researchers say a new classification would mean better treatment for patients.
44min
Ingeniøren

Leder: Lad os få fart på cyklerne uden at vælte sikkerheden
4h

LATEST

New Scientist - News

A weird underground plant has been rediscovered after 151 yearsA species of subterranean plant was only seen once, in 1866, and was assumed to be extinct – until researchers stumbled across living specimens in Borneo
5min
Ingeniøren

Ugens it-job: 3 Shape, Siemens og Bloom jagter it-professionellePå dagens liste er der job for både udviklere, chefer og specialister. Find det rette job for dig.
15min
Ingeniøren

Her er ingeniørarbejdspladserne, der er udpeget til strejkeAkademikerne har i dag sendt konfliktvarsel for cirka 6.000 statsansatte. De skal forberede sig på at nedlægge arbejdet, hvis der ikke indgås en aftale med arbejdsgiverne inden 4. april.
22min
Dagens Medicin

Senderovitz bliver formand for europæisk samarbejdeLægemiddelstyrelsens formand bliver ny formand for det europæiske lægemiddelagenturs management group.
28min
Science | The Guardian

The unwelcome revival of ‘race science’Its defenders claim to be standing up for uncomfortable truths, but race science is still as bogus as ever. By Gavin Evans One of the strangest ironies of our time is that a body of thoroughly debunked “science” is being revived by people who claim to be defending truth against a rising tide of ignorance. The idea that certain races are inherently more intelligent than others is being trumpeted b
31min
EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Spring is springing earlier in polar regions than across the rest of earthFor every 10 degrees north from the equator you move, spring arrives about four days earlier than it did a decade ago, according to a study led by UC Davis. This is three times greater than what previous studies indicated. The authors connect such differences to more rapid warming at higher latitudes.
36min
EurekAlert! - Breaking News

How records of earth's past can better predict future climate responsesIn Scientific Reports today, UConn researchers report a novel approach to reconstructing ancient climates using analyses of organic compounds in sediments and soils.
36min
EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Previously unknown 'supercolony' of Adélie penguins discovered in AntarcticaIn a paper released on March 2nd in the journal Scientific Reports, the scientists announced the discovery of a previously unknown 'supercolony' of more than 1,500,000 Adélie Penguins in the Danger Islands, a chain of remote, rocky islands off of the Antarctic Peninsula's northern tip.
36min
EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Fossilised plant leaf wax provides new tool for understanding ancient climatesNew research, published in Scientific Reports, has outlined a new methodology for estimating ancient atmospheric water content based on fossil plant leaf waxes.
36min
EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Payments to protect carbon stored in forests must increase to defend against rubberEfforts to protect tropical forests in Southeast Asia for the carbon they store may fail because protection payments are too low.A Nature Communications study finds that schemes designed to protect tropical forests from clearance based on the carbon they store do not pay enough to compete financially with potential profits from rubber plantations.Without increased financial compensation for forest
36min
EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Blocking a protein could improve the effectiveness of intravascular cellular 'policing'CNIC researchers have identified a function of a protease that could be a target for the treatment of infection and even cancer.
36min
EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Two species of ravens nevermore? New research finds evidence of 'speciation reversal'A new study almost 20 years in the making provides some of the strongest evidence yet of the 'speciation reversal' phenomenon -- where two distinct lineages hybridize and eventually merge into one -- in two lineages of common ravens.
36min
Science | The Guardian

Two become one: two raven lineages merge in 'speciation reversal'After up to two million years of separate evolution, two types of common raven have been ‘caught in the act’ of consolidation, say scientists Speciation, where one species diverges into two, is a well-known concept in the theory of evolution. But a new study based on almost 20 years of research has revealed that “speciation reversal”, the merging of two previously distinct lineages, may also play
44min
BBC News - Science & Environment

Penguin super-colony spotted from spaceScientists stumble across a huge group previously unknown Adélie penguins on the Antarctic Peninsula.
44min
Science : NPR

National Weather Service Forecast: Cloudy, With A Chance Of Budget CutsThe National Weather Service, already understaffed, would lose at least 200 positions in the White House's proposed budget for fiscal year 2019. (Image credit: Andy Newman/AP)
57min
Dagens Medicin

Læger varsler strejke mod tre styrelserForeningen af Speciallæger og Yngre læger har i dag sammen med de øvrige organisationer i Akademikerne afleveret strejkevarsler for medlemmer i Sundhedsstyrelsen, Lægemiddelstyrelsen og Styrelsen for Patientsikkerhed. Strejkevarslet er en konsekvens af de sammenbrudte ok-forhandlinger i staten.
58min
Ingeniøren

Matematisk formel skal forudsige fejlklip fra gensaksenDet berømte og berygtede genredigeringsværktøj Crispr/Cas9 rammer ikke altid helt rigtigt. En matematisk formel skal hjælpe med at forudsige fejlene.
1h
Science | The Guardian

Barbra Streisand’s dog cloning is a modern tragedy. Pets are meant to die | Stuart HeritageTo own an animal is to learn about the inevitability of dying – not that loved ones can be replicated if we cough up the cash Barbra Streisand might not brim with the white-hot cultural relevance she used to, but nobody can deny that she’s a trier. For example, when everyone’s back was turned, she went off and created her very own Black Mirror episode. In her episode, a broken-hearted millionaire
1h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Cobalt boom turns life upside down in DR CongoIn early 2014, according to local folklore, a man digging a septic tank or a well in his garden in Kasulo came across rocks with a distinctive grey-green sheen: cobalt.
3h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Samoa creates huge shark sanctuaryThe island nation of Samoa has declared its waters a shark sanctuary, joining a string of other Pacific countries in protecting the marine predators.
3h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Indonesia scrubbing the 'world's dirtiest river'The scabies on Indonesian rice farmer Yusuf Supriyadi's limbs are a daily reminder of the costs of living next to the "world's dirtiest river".
3h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Proposal advances to store nuclear waste in New MexicoA new proposal to store nuclear waste underground in southern New Mexico—this time from nuclear reactors across the country—has cleared an initial regulatory hurdle and can now be vetted for detailed safety, security and environmental concerns, the Nuclear Regulatory Commission announced Thursday.
3h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Twitter CEO asks for help on 'civility'; YouTube stumblesTwitter CEO Jack Dorsey is asking for help improving the openness and civility of conversation on Twitter, saying the company failed to prevent misinformation, echo chambers and abuse of its global messaging service.
3h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Cambodian genocide documented in victims' preserved clothesAs a leader in the field of textile conservation, Julia Brennan has worked to preserve many glamorous and historic articles of clothing, from a kimono presented to Babe Ruth, to singer James Brown's jumpsuit, to a British aristocrat's coronation gown.
3h
Ingeniøren

Machine learning gætter Version2's emneord med en træfsikkerhed på 98 pct.Kunstig intelligens og machine learning kan lyde kryptisk. Her piller vi mystikken af og gennemgår en klassisk algoritme - med kode og hele baduljen.
3h
cognitive science

The Struggles of Women Who Mask Their Autism. By “camouflaging” their condition, many women on the spectrum learn to fit in—and risk psychological harm.submitted by /u/thedabarry [link] [comments]
4h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Two-year study of gun policy research finds gaps, proposes fixesThe nation is once again debating whether to adopt new regulations on guns, but what does the evidence say about what has been done thus far? One of the largest-ever studies of US gun policy finds there is a shortage of evidence about the effects of most gun laws, although researchers say there is persuasive evidence about the effects of child access prevention laws and several other common gun po
5h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Sedative may prevent delirium in the ICUA low dose of the sedative dexmedetomidine given at night may prevent delirium in critically ill patients, according to new research published online in the American Thoracic Society's American Journal of Respiratory and Critical Care Medicine.
5h
Ingeniøren

Danskere ramt af udbredt ransomware: Antivirus-firma har nøglerneRumænske Bitdefender har frigivet et værktøj til dekryptering af filer krypteret af ransomwaren Grandcrab.
5h
The Atlantic

Radio Atlantic: Goodbye Black History Month, Hello Black FutureMoviegoers across America are filling theaters to see, as The Atlantic ’s Adam Serwer describes it , “a high-tech utopia that is a fictive manifestation of African potential unfettered by slavery and colonialism.” Wakanda, the setting of Marvel’s blockbuster film Black Panther , is suddenly everywhere, which means people the world over are seeing something that’s never had this widespread an audi
5h
Science : NPR

Science Provides Few Facts On Effects Of Gun Policies, Report FindsA review by the RAND Corporation finds little evidence as to whether many popular gun control policies do or don't affect gun violence. In many cases, solid studies just haven't been done. (Image credit: Anadolu Agency/Getty Images)
5h
NYT > Science

Europe Was Colder Than the North Pole This Week. How Could That Be?Europe is being battered by unusually frigid conditions even as temperatures in the North Pole soar well above normal. Here's the connection, according to experts.
6h
Ingeniøren

Energinet: Danmark er perfekt til fremtidens energiværkerFrem mod 2035 vokser mængden af vind- og solstrøm så meget i det Nordeuropæiske energi­system, at omdannelse af el til andre energiprodukter på store, nye energiværker bliver økonomisk interessant – især i Danmark
6h
Dagens Medicin

Yngre læger udfordrer ældre lægerEt usædvanligt samarbejde mellem kaospiloter og Aarhus Universitetshospital har hjulpet yngre læger til at udfordre kommunikationsvejene og den hierarkiske opbygning blandt ældre læger.
8h
Dagens Medicin

Danmarks (måske) første akutmedicinerAkutafdelingerne har hårdt brug for speciallæger i akutmedicin til at tage ansvaret for udredning og behandling. Det vurderer formand for Dansk Selskab for Akutmedicin Christian Skjærbæk, der selv satser på at blive godkendt som speciallæge i akutmedicin.
8h
Dagens Medicin

Akutmedicineren bliver flowmaster for de akutte patienterDe kommende speciallæger i akutmedicin kommer til at varetage en helt ny funktion i akutafdelingerne, hvor de ud fra deres første vurdering af patienten skal iværksætter en kvalificeret handlingsplan og får alle aktører at arbejde sammen.
9h
Dagens Medicin

Akutmedicin risikerer at tage stillinger fra andre specialerRegioner får ikke nødvendigvis flere penge til at etablere hoveduddannelsesstillinger til det nye akutmedicinske speciale. I værste fald kan det blive nødvendigt at konvertere andre specialers stillinger, siger enhedschef fra SST.
9h
Dagens Medicin

Akutafdelingerne skal skrue introduktionsstillinger sammenDe tre videreuddannelsesregioner i Nord, Syd og Øst kan først slå introduktionsstillinger i akutmedicin op, når de har modtaget de specifikke afdelingers beskrivelse af, hvordan de konkret vil sammenstykke uddannelsesforløbene.
9h
Feed: All Latest

Twitter Seeks Health Metrics To Help It Improve Its PlatformThe social network is asking experts to help it learn to be a less toxic place online.
9h
NYT > Science

Richard E. Taylor, Nobel Winner Who Plumbed Matter, Is Dead at 88Dr. Taylor, of Stanford, shared the 1990 physics prize for the discovery of quarks, one of the fundamental particles in the universe.
9h
Scientific American Content: Global

Some Lichen Fungi Let Genes Go ByeA study of 22 different types of lichens revealed that 10 included fungi that had lost a gene for energy production, making them completely dependent on their algal partner. -- Read more on ScientificAmerican.com
9h
Dagens Medicin

Patienter med symptomer fra mave og tarm havner ofte i forkerte kræftpakkeforløbHver tyvende patient, som frikendes for kræft, bliver henvist til et nyt kræftpakkeforløb inden for seks måneder. Særligt mave-tarm-patienter gennemgår flere kræftpakkeforløb, inden diagnosen stilles, viser nyt dansk studie.
10h
Dagens Medicin

Patienter med type 2-diabetes har høj forekomst af hjerte-kar-sygdomFlere end hver femte patient med type 2-diabetes i almen praksis har mindst én hjertekarsygdom, viser dansk registerstudie. Praktiserende læger bør overveje nyere diabetesmidler for at reducere risiko for hjertekardødelighed, mener forsker.
10h
Feed: All Latest

How to Preorder the Samsung Galaxy S9How to preorder the Galaxy S9, and a few other weekend tech deals you should check out!
10h
Futurity.org

Cows pick up E. coli from farm water troughsWater troughs on farms are a conduit for the spread of toxic E. coli in cattle, which can then spread the pathogen to people through bacteria in their feces, a new paper suggests. “Farmers do not see a problem because there are no clinical signs in cows; it is totally invisible…” “Water troughs appeared in our mathematical model as a place where water can get contaminated and a potential place wh
10h
Dagens Medicin

Alt for få er klar over at selvmord kan udløse erstatningPatienterstatningen modtager et meget lille antal anmeldelser om selvmord og selvmordsforsøg i psykiatrien, fordi patienter, pårørende og sundhedspersonale ikke er klar over, at selvmord kan udløse erstatning.
11h
New Scientist - News

There may be five kinds of diabetes, not just types 1 and 2Researchers propose splitting diabetes into five subtypes instead of the current type 1 and type 2 diagnoses. It may help, but we need to know much more
11h
Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

Songs in the key of life: The linguistic universals of adapting sound to artistic expressionA new study of how tone languages are sung has implications for the way humans manipulate and adapt the sounds of their language to artistic expression.
11h
Futurity.org

How a biased industry group affects Medicare pricingEven though members of an advisory committee for Medicare are biased toward physician specialties, the bias often bridges across specialty lines and may actually improve the quality of the group’s price-setting recommendations, new research finds. For the first time, David Chan, faculty fellow at the Stanford University’s Institute for Economic Policy Research, and Michael Dickstein of New York U
11h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Focusing on cholera hotspots could cut Africa's cholera burden in halfBetter targeting at the district and neighborhood level could make anti-cholera efforts much more effective and dramatically reduce the burden of this disease, according to two new studies led by scientists at Johns Hopkins Bloomberg School of Public Health.
11h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Paradigm shift in the diagnosis of diabetesA completely new classification of diabetes which also predicts the risk of serious complications and provides treatment suggestions. We are now seeing the first results of ANDIS -- a study covering all newly diagnosed diabetics in southern Sweden -- published in The Lancet Diabetes & Endocrinology.
11h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Calcium supplements may boost risk of abnormal bowel growths (polyps)Calcium supplements, taken with or without vitamin D, may increase the risk of small growths in the large bowel (colon) called polyps, suggest results from a large US trial published online in the journal Gut.
11h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Moms-to-be can exercise in warm weather and use saunas without getting too hotPregnant women can safely exercise in warm weather and take short hot baths or saunas without risking critical elevations in body temperature that could harm their unborn child, finds a review of the available evidence published online in the British Journal of Sports Medicine.
11h
Science | The Guardian

Five categories for adult diabetes, not just type 1 and type 2, study showsFindings shed light on variations in response to treatment between diabetics –and could help identify those at high risk of complications Diabetes that begins in adulthood falls into five distinct categories, new research has revealed, with scientists suggesting it is time to ditch the idea that diabetes is largely split into two types. Researchers say all of the newly classified subgroups are ge
11h
Futurity.org

Social media doesn’t hurt your face-to-face socializingSocial media use doesn’t negatively affect our social interactions or social well-being in a significant way, a new study reports. “The current assumption is that when people spend more time on apps like Facebook and Snapchat, the quality of their in-person social interactions decreases…” The adoption of new technologies, such as television, smartphones, and social media, often leads to fears of
11h
Feed: All Latest

Can These Small Satellites Solve the Riddle of Internet From Space?Startup Astranis hopes to blanket the Earth with dozens of satellites the size of a mini-fridge.
11h
The Atlantic

The Atlantic Daily: To Pursue JobsWhat We’re Following Tariff Tales: President Trump announced a plan to impose new tariffs on steel and aluminum imports. The stated goals are to protect American manufacturers from competition and reduce dependence on imported metals for security reasons. Yet the plan could backfire by raising consumer prices and threatening key alliances. The decision—which reportedly took many White House staff
11h
cognitive science

Improving the trafficking of cellular proteins in brain cells holds possibilities for new treatments and even prevention for Alzheimer's disease, results of a new study suggestsubmitted by /u/SophiaDevetzi [link] [comments]
11h
Feed: All Latest

In the US v. Microsoft Supreme Court Case, an Old Law Leaves Few Good OptionsIf oral argument in *US v. Microsoft* proved anything, it's that no one involved wants the courts to decide—including the justices.
11h
Dagens Medicin

Steno vil skræddersy nyt tilbud til psykisk sårbareTo nyansatte psykologer på Steno Diabetes Center Copenhagen skal udvikle særlige behandlingstilbud til psykisk sårbare diabetespatienter.
12h
The Atlantic

Trump's ‘Smart’ Tariffs Don't Make Economic SensePresident Donald Trump’s long-anticipated tariffs are finally here: 25 percent on imported steel and 10 percent on imported aluminum, with a formal announcement on the measures to be made next week. The White House has argued that the tariffs would punish China for unfair trade practices and help American blue-collar workers afflicted by decades of manufacturing job losses and wage stagnation. “W
12h
Science : NPR

Experts Aghast At Russian Claim Of Nuclear-Powered Missile With Unlimited RangeThe U.S. tested similar concepts in the 1960s but abandoned them over concerns of radioactive contamination. Russia's claim seems so fantastic that some analysts didn't believe initial reports. (Image credit: Alexander Zemlianichenko/AP)
12h
Live Science

Can Sound Be Used As a Weapon?Were foreign diplomats and tourists attacked with a "sonic weapon," or was it something else? Ultrasound researchers dissect the bizarre case and offer a reasonable explanation.
12h
Live Science

Giant Family Tree of 13 Million People Just CreatedGenealogists have created the largest-known family tree, finding connections between a whopping 13 million people - greater than the population of Cuba.
12h
Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

Incivility at work: Is 'queen bee syndrome' getting worse?Women report more incivility at work than men, and according to new research, it's other women who are responsible for it.
12h
Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

Déjà vu and feelings of prediction: They're just feelingsPsychologists have recreated déjà vu in human subjects in order to examine the feeling of premonition during the déjà vu state.
12h
Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

Distortive effects of short distance photographs on nasal appearance: The selfie effectNasal distortions in selfies taken at close range are prompting people to seek out surgeons to make their noses smaller. Such was the experience of a facial plastic surgeon who worked with a mathematician to develop a model to show patients how much their nose becomes distorted in close-up photos.
12h
Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

Holding hands can sync brainwaves, ease pain, study showsA new study by a pain researcher shows that when a romantic partner holds hands with a partner in pain, their brain waves sync and her pain subsides.
12h
The Atlantic

The Atlantic Politics & Policy Daily: There's a New Tariff in TownToday in 5 Lines President Trump said he will impose tariffs on steel and aluminum imports, drawing criticism from Republicans and prompting the Dow to drop 420 points. MSNBC reports that the White House is preparing to replace National-Security Adviser H.R. McMaster “as early as next month.” The Senate Intelligence Committee found that Republicans on the House Intelligence Committee leaked priva
12h
Live Science

'Bomb Cyclone' Will Pummel Parts of the US East Coast Starting TonightRecent warm temperatures in the northeastern U.S. might have convinced you that spring is on the way, but winter isn't done quite yet.
12h
Feed: All Latest

Jaguar's New Electric SUV Aims to End Tesla's Luxury EV MonopolyThe I-Pace, set to enter production later this year, brings fresh design to a segment long dominated by Elon Musk.
12h
The Atlantic

Children of the NightA day at Camp Sundown begins just after the last rays of the sun have disappeared from the horizon. Shielded by a cloak of darkness, campers flood the grounds to play soccer and drive Go-Karts. These children, who suffer from a rare UV light-sensitivity disorder, are essentially allergic to sunlight. They rarely see the light of day. Sundown , directed by Liza Mandelup, is an intimate portrait of
13h
Dana Foundation

Free Public Event: Buildings and the BrainImage: Shutterstock “We shape our buildings and afterwards our buildings shape us” – Winston Churchill When he made this remark, the great orator was actually speaking about the reconstruction of the House of Commons, but the sentiment is equally true for the more modest buildings we see around us every day and the spaces we inhabit regularly. Using scientific methodology, architects and neurosci
13h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Hormones may affect girls' interests, but not their gender identity or playmatesPrenatal exposure to male hormones influences which activities girls are interested and engage in, but the effects of those hormones don't extend to gender identity or who they socialize with, according to Penn State researchers.
13h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

A power boost for mobile technologiesImagine you are shopping on your iPad for a new merino wool sweater for the winter, and when you visit a retail site, you can not only see countless views of your prospective purchase but you can reach out and feel the texture of the fabric. Or more consequentially: you are a physician performing an operation remotely using a telemedicine application, and you can virtually feel the patient upon wh
13h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News

TGen-led study finds potent anti-cancer drug effect in rare ovarian cancerAn anti-cancer drug used to fight leukemia shows promise against a rare and aggressive type of ovarian cancer -- small cell carcinoma of the ovary hypercalcemic type (SCCOHT) -- which strikes young women and girls, according to a study led by the TGen. Ponatinib was found in TGen-led drug screens and preclinical studies to significantly delay tumor growth and reduce tumor volume in SCCOHT, accordi
13h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

In Florida, texting and driving still not a primary offenseWill Florida join most of the rest of the country and place an outright ban on texting and driving? Probably not anytime soon.
13h
New on MIT Technology Review

Human brains and AIs can be hacked with these weird tweaked photos
13h
Science : NPR

Forecast For National Weather Service Is Cloudy, With A Chance Of Budget CutsThe Trump administration is looking to slash the National Weather Service's budget at a time when the service already has hundreds of unfilled positions — all while extreme weather is increasing. Now, meteorologists are speaking out, warning about being understaffed and the risks to keeping the public informed.
13h
Popular Science

Watch live as NASA launches the future of weather forecastingSpace NASA’s new weather satellite will show us wildfires and storms in insane detail. At 5:02 PM eastern time on March 1, NASA is scheduled to launch the GOES-S satellite, with the capability to monitor the weather of the United States in incredible…
13h
Latest Headlines | Science News

Early land plants led to the rise of mudNew research suggests early land plants called bryophytes, which include modern mosses, helped shape Earth’s surface by creating clay-rich river deposits.
13h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Why Amazon is sending you pictures of your front porchHave you suddenly started getting porch snapshots from your Amazon delivery person? You're not alone.
13h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Hormones may affect girls' interests, but not their gender identity or playmatesPrenatal exposure to androgens is not associated with girls spending more or less time with other girls, but was associated with an increased interest in activities that have traditionally been thought of as masculine, according to Penn State researchers, who say it supports the idea that gender development is complex and does not solely rely on either biological or social factors.
13h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Patients with head injuries do better when treated by trauma centers, even if it means bypassing other hospitalsPatients who sustain severe head injuries tend to have better outcomes if they are taken to a designated trauma center, but 44 percent of them are first taken to hospitals without these specialized care capabilities, according to new research from the Perelman School of Medicine at the University of Pennsylvania.
13h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Incivility at work: Is 'queen bee syndrome' getting worse?Women report more incivility at work than men, and according to new research, it's other women who are responsible for it.
13h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Miami's airport wants to read your face. You might be happy about thatFace it, going through airport security is a vital, but time-consuming pain in the you-know-where.
13h
Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

Successful synthesis of gamma-lactam rings from hydrocarbonsScientists have designed a novel strategy to synthesize ring-shaped cyclic molecules, highly sought-after by pharmaceutical and chemical industries, and known as gamma-lactams. This study describes how these five-membered rings can be prepared from inexpensive and readily available feedstock hydrocarbons, as well as from complex organic molecules, such as amino acids and steroids.
13h
Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

Mitochondria-to-nucleus messenger protein discoveredResearchers have identified a protein, G-Protein Pathway Suppressor 2 (GPS2), that moves from a cell's mitochondria to its nucleus in response to stress and during the differentiation of fat cells. While proteins with similar functions had previously been found in yeast and worms, this is first direct messenger discovered in the cells of mammals.
13h
Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

Practical spin wave transistor one step closerPhysicists have managed to alter the flow of spin waves through a magnet, using only an electrical current. This is a huge step towards the spin transistor that is needed to construct spintronic devices. These promise to be much more energy efficient than conventional electronics.
13h
Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

Yellow fever virus is detected in urine and semen almost a month after infectionThe confirmation involved one single patient; Brazilian investigators say it suggests the virus may be contagious for a period which stretches longer than previously thought. Scientists especulate whether the use of urine samples could allow for positive diagnosis in asymptomatic patients, who comprise half of the cases of yellow fever's infection.
13h
Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

Permian carbo-loading: How starchy treats helped build an ancient worldEveryone loves a nice plate of pasta. After all, starch is the ultimate energy food. Now, we have proof that carbo-loading has been a thing for at least 280 million years.
13h
Big Think

The downside to greater gender equality: fewer women go after STEM degreesThe reason why reveals a near-universal difference in the academic strengths of each sex. Read More
13h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Apple plans largest iPhone ever and a cheaper alternative, report saysLooking for an iPhone later this year? Apple wants to cover your needs, whatever those may be.
13h
TED Talks Daily (SD video)

To learn is to be free | Shameem AkhtarShameem Akhtar posed as a boy during her early childhood in Pakistan so she could enjoy the privileges Pakistani girls are rarely afforded: to play outside and attend school. In an eye-opening, personal talk, Akhtar recounts how the opportunity to get an education altered the course of her life -- and ultimately changed the culture of her village, where today every young girl goes to school.
13h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News

New in the Hastings Center Report: January-February 2018Rationing health care through inconvenience, tackling obesity by regulating sugar, the vulnerability of the ACA's nondiscrimination protections, a special report on governance of emerging technologies, and more in the latest issue.
13h
Inside Science

Bison Slaughter’s Destructive Legacy for Native AmericansBison Slaughter’s Destructive Legacy for Native Americans When the bison were exterminated from North America, indigenous populations lost an inch of height in just a generation. Bison_topNteaser.jpg Image credits: Agricultural Research Service via Wikipedia Culture Thursday, March 1, 2018 - 11:00 Katharine Gammon, Contributor (Inside Science) -- In 1870, there were at least 10 million bison in t
13h
The Atlantic

Trade and the Art of Motorcycle TariffsPresident Donald Trump has repeatedly said the U.S. is being ripped off by its trading partners—so much so that on Thursday he vowed he would impose steep tariffs on steel and aluminum imports to, as he sees it, protect local manufacturers from having to compete with underpriced foreign imports. The specifics of the plan are still unclear: He did not say, for instance, whether the barriers would
14h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Jim Rossman: Are you ready to ride? Tech expert takes on Six Flags' new VR coasterSo are you a roller coaster person or not?
14h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

NASA's GPM observes Arkansas and Tennessee flooding downpoursThe Global Precipitation Measurement mission or GPM core satellite provided forecasters with a look at the rainfall rates in storms drenching Arkansas and Tennessee.
14h
Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

Crowdsourced family tree yields new insights about humanityResearchers have amassed a family tree of 13 million people to trace the last 500 years of Western marriage and migration patterns. They also show that the genetic basis of longevity is lower than many have suggested.
14h
Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

DNA scissors can cut RNA, tooThe bacterial immune system 'CRISPR-Cas9' is known to eliminate invading DNA. Scientists now discovered that it can also readily target RNA -- a result with potentially far-reaching ramifications.
14h
Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

Scientists create complex transmembrane proteins from scratchMolecular engineers have now show that it is possible to build complex, custom-designed transmembrane proteins from scratch. In the living world, transmembrane proteins naturally occur embedded in the membranes of cells and cellular organelles. They are essential for a number of functions, such as movement of signals or substances from inside or outside a living cell. The ability to design synthet
14h
Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

Hubble observes exoplanet atmosphere in more detail than ever beforeAn international team of scientists has used the NASA/ESA Hubble Space Telescope to study the atmosphere of the hot exoplanet WASP-39b. By combining this new data with older data they created the most complete study yet of an exoplanet atmosphere. The atmospheric composition of WASP-39b hints that the formation processes of exoplanets can be very different from those of our own Solar System giants
14h
Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

Ecotourism direct payment approach for wildlife sightings reduces illegal huntingA new study finds that an ecotourism strategy based on 'direct payments,' where local people are compensated for the amount of wildlife seen by tourists, has resulted in a reduction in illegal hunting and an increase in wildlife sightings.
14h
Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

Mass media exposure increases demand for vaccinationsAccording to a new study, researchers monitored daily immunization rate reports during the detected outbreak and discovered a significant increase in both bivalent oral poliovirus vaccines (bOPV) and other vaccinations during the period there was constant media exposure.
14h
Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

Teachers and other school-based professionals can treat children's mental health problemSchool-based services delivered by teachers and other school-based professionals can help reduce mental health problems in elementary-aged children.
14h
Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

Do you know where your xenon is?The paradox of the missing xenon might sound like the title of the latest airport thriller, but it's actually a problem that's stumped geophysicists for decades. New work provides the first experimental evidence of previously theorized compounds of iron and xenon existing under the conditions found in the Earth's core, potentially explaining why our planet's atmosphere is much more depleted in xen
14h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Apple surges ahead in wearables on smartwatch sales: surveyStrong holiday season sales of Apple's newest smartwatch propelled the California tech giant into the lead in wearable tech in 2017, a market tracker said Thursday.
14h
Big Think

The meaning of life: Albert Camus on faith, suicide, and absurdityAlbert Camus was a Franco-Algerian philosopher with some great insights on the meaning of life, why you should look to this life and not the next, and why suicide is a poor choice. Read More
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Big Think

Men want beauty, women want wealth, and other unscientific toshIf mating preferences are biologically predetermined, individual sexism shouldn’t have an impact. But it does. Read More
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Blog » Languages » English

Monthly Stats for Eyewire: February 2018The shortest month of the year has of course rolled right by! Was it even really February at all? Phew. Well, in that time we did manage to squeeze in our second Eyewire Winter Games, as well as completing 21 cells and racking up a bunch of new millionaire accomplishments. Check the stats below! New Scouts: muriat Hcom3 willowbyrn colleencat xCuriousCatx SpookyGrowly New Scythes: juneyang2005 New
14h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News

They grin, you bear it -- research reveals physical impact of a smileResearch led by Jared Martin, a psychology graduate student at the University of Wisconsin-Madison, shows that smiles meant to convey dominance are associated with a physical reaction -- a spike in stress hormones -- in their targets. On the other hand, smiles intended as a reward, to reinforce behavior, appear to physically buffer recipients against stress.
14h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News

NASA's GPM observes Arkansas and Tennessee flooding downpoursThe Global Precipitation Measurement mission or GPM core satellite provided forecasters with a look at the rainfall rates in storms drenching Arkansas and Tennessee.
14h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

New US satellite to boost weather forecasts poised to launchA new US satellite that offers speedy, high-resolution images of storms and may save lives by making forecasts more accurate is poised to launch from a NASA launchpad Thursday, officials said.
14h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Beware of replicating sexism in AI, experts warnArtificial intelligence could emulate human bias, including sexism, if there is no oversight on data used to create it, experts at the world's largest mobile phone fair in Barcelona warned Thursday.
14h
Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

No laughing matter, yet humor inspires climate change activismMelting icecaps, mass flooding, megadroughts and erratic weather are no laughing matter. However, a new study shows that humor can be an effective means to inspire young people to pursue climate change activism. At the same time, fear proves to be an equally effective motivator and has the added advantage of increasing people's awareness of climate change's risks.
14h
Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

Common bricks can be used to detect past presence of uranium, plutoniumResearchers have demonstrated a technique that can determine whether bricks -- the common building material -- have ever been near a radiological source, and identify the specific type of source, such as high enriched uranium or plutonium.
14h
Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

Leishmaniasis strain in Iraq outbreak identifiedIn the hot, dry border region between northern and central Iraq, Leishmania parasite infections are so common that they've been dubbed 'Baghdad sores.' Now, for the first time, researchers have studied the prevalence of different Leishmania species and strains in the region. Most cases of leishmaniasis in Iraq match an Iranian strain.
14h
Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

Networks of brain activity predict vulnerability to depressionTapping into the electrical chatter between different regions of the brain may provide a new way to prevent and treat depression. Scientists showed that mice that were more susceptible to developing depression-like symptoms displayed different networks of electrical brain activity than more resilient mice. These results could be the first step toward a test to predict a person's vulnerability to d
14h
Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

In nature, an imperfect immune system drives the evolution of deadly pathogensNew research shows that, in the case of a common backyard bird, imperfect immunity to a dangerous pathogen that causes 'bird pink eye' actually makes the pathogen stronger and more dangerous for its next victim.
14h
Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

New insights into how a virus-blocking bacterium operates in mosquitoesNew research reveals details of the mechanism by which the bacterium Wolbachia blocks viruses in mosquito cells, suggesting that it reduces viral replication inside cells and that rapid degradation of viral RNA is involved.
14h
Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

Scientists design new skin cell culture technique to study human papillomavirusA new cell culture strategy promises to illuminate the mysterious early stages of human papillomavirus (HPV) infection, according to researchers.
14h
Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

Stem-cell study points to new approach to Alzheimer's diseaseImproving the trafficking of brain-cell proteins to reduce toxic buildup holds possibilities for new therapies against Alzheimer's disease.
14h
Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

Hail technology: Deep learning may help predict when people need ridesComputers may better predict taxi and ride sharing service demand, paving the way toward smarter, safer and more sustainable cities, according to an international team of researchers.
14h
Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

Nerve damage in type 2 diabetes can be detected in the eyeBy examining the cornea of the eye with a special microscope it may be possible within ten minutes to diagnose if a person with type 2 diabetes has nerve damage.
14h
Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

Memory overload? That's when the eyes step inWhen you want to remember a phone number, you likely repeat the digits to yourself again and again. We unknowingly do something similar with our eyes to help us recall what we see and we do this more often when we're older.
14h
Popular Science

Twitter is killing its terrible Mac app. Here are your options for replacing it.Technology Find the best way to use Twitter from your Mac. We try some of the highest-rated methods for using Twitter on a Mac.
14h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Study shows smartphones and data centres harm the environmentData centres and smartphones will be the most damaging information and communications technologies to the environment by 2040, according to new research from W Booth School's Lotfi Belkhir.
14h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

No laughing matter, yet humor inspires climate change activismMelting icecaps, mass flooding, megadroughts and erratic weather are no laughing matter. However, a new study shows that humor can be an effective means to inspire young people to pursue climate change activism. At the same time, fear proves to be an equally effective motivator and has the added advantage of increasing people's awareness of climate change's risks.
14h
Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

Omega fish oils don’t improve school children’s reading skills or memory, study findsNew research has found no evidence Omega-3 fish oil supplements help aid or improve the reading ability or memory function of underperforming schoolchildren.
14h
Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

Voice problems: Updates to treatment and care of patients with hoarsenessUpdated guideline provides some substantially revised, evidence-based recommendations for healthcare providers when treating patients with hoarseness, a very common complaint that affects nearly one-third of the population at some point in their life.
14h
Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

Smartphones and data centers harm the environment, study showsData centres and smartphones will be the most damaging information and communications technologies to the environment by 2040, according to new research.
14h
Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

In pursuit of pleasure, brain learns to hit the repeat buttonIn a scientific first, researchers have observed in mice how the brain learns to repeat patterns of neural activity that elicit the all-important feel-good sensation. This research offers key insights into how brain activity is shaped and refined as animals learn to repeat behaviors that evoke a feeling of pleasure. The findings also point to new strategies for targeting disorders characterized by
14h
Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

New speed record for trapped-ion 'building blocks' of quantum computersResearchers have set a new speed record for the 'logic gates' that form the building blocks of quantum computing -- a technology that could transform the way we process information.
14h
Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

Women, wages and housework: How closing the gender pay gap splits chores more evenlyEliminating the gender gap in wages would lead to married women doing much less housework.
14h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Permian carbo-loading: How starchy treats helped build an ancient worldEveryone loves a nice plate of pasta. After all, starch is the ultimate energy food. Now, we have proof that carbo-loading has been a thing for at least 280 million years.
14h
Live Science

A Single Psychedelic Drug Trip Can Change Your Personality for YearsWhen your trip ends, does your mind stay on vacation?
14h
Science : NPR

The Oscar For Best Snack Goes To ... Popcorn, The 6,000-Year-Old Aztec GoldZoom in and behold the science secrets behind popcorn's airy crunch — and learn about the snack's ancient origin — in this bite-sized video. (Image credit: Adam Cole/Murry Gans)
14h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Songs in the key of life: The linguistic universals of adapting sound to artistic expressionA new study of how tone languages are sung has implications for the way humans manipulate and adapt the sounds of their language to artistic expression. The study, "Tone-tune association in Tommo So (Dogon) folk songs", by Laura McPherson (Dartmouth College) and Kevin Ryan (Harvard University), will be published in the March, 2018 issue of the scholarly journal Language.
14h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

NASA finds a large amount of water in an exoplanet's atmosphereMuch like detectives study fingerprints to identify the culprit, scientists used NASA's Hubble and Spitzer space telescopes to find the "fingerprints" of water in the atmosphere of a hot, bloated, Saturn-mass exoplanet some 700 light-years away. And, they found a lot of water. In fact, the planet, known as WASP-39b, has three times as much water as Saturn does.
14h
Feed: All Latest

Carbon Fiber-Loaded GMC Sierra Denali One-Ups Ford's F-150The latest version of the high-end pickup comes with a host of fancy features, including a bed made of carbon fiber.
14h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News

No laughing matter, yet humor inspires climate change activismMelting icecaps, mass flooding, megadroughts and erratic weather are no laughing matter. However, a new study shows that humor can be an effective means to inspire young people to pursue climate change activism. At the same time, fear proves to be an equally effective motivator and has the added advantage of increasing people's awareness of climate change's risks.
14h
The Scientist RSS

Cancer-Fighting Chemical Found in Human Skin BacteriaA molecule produced by a strain of Staphylococcus epidermis interferes with DNA synthesis.
14h
The Scientist RSS

Drug for Stills Disease Shows Promise in Phase 2 TrialPatients with the rare autoimmune condition, highlighted in the Oscar-nominated film The Big Sick, currently have limited treatment options.
14h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Hubble observes exoplanet atmosphere in more detail than ever beforeAn international team of scientists has used the NASA/ESA Hubble Space Telescope to study the atmosphere of the hot exoplanet WASP-39b. By combining this new data with older data they created the most complete study yet of an exoplanet atmosphere. The atmospheric composition of WASP-39b hints that the formation processes of exoplanets can be very different from those of our own Solar System giants
14h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Common bricks can be used to detect past presence of uranium, plutoniumResearchers from North Carolina State University have demonstrated a technique that can determine whether bricks - the common building material - have ever been near a radiological source, and identify the specific type of source, such as high enriched uranium or plutonium. The technique is possible when there are no chemical residues left behind, and has security and nuclear nonproliferation appl
14h
Live Science

What Caused This Eerie White Ring in a Woman's Eye?An unusual white ring in the front of a woman's eyeball was the result of a very rare condition.
15h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Practical spin wave transistor one step closerUniversity of Groningen physicists have managed to alter the flow of spin waves through a magnet, using only an electrical current. This is a huge step towards the spin transistor that is needed to construct spintronic devices. These promise to be much more energy efficient than conventional electronics. The results were published on 2 March in Physical Review Letters.
15h
New on MIT Technology Review

A massive study of family trees finds no gene for longevity
15h
Live Science

This is the World's Last Male Northern White Rhino — And He's SickSudan, a 45-year-old rhino, is suffering from an age-related infection.
15h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Common bricks can be used to detect past presence of uranium, plutoniumResearchers have demonstrated a technique that can determine whether bricks -- the common building material -- have ever been near a radiological source, and identify the specific type of source, such as high enriched uranium or plutonium.
15h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Prediabetes patients at heightened risk for cardiovascular and chronic kidney diseasesResearchers at the Emory Rollins School of Public Health and US Centers for Disease Control and Prevention have found that high proportions of patients with prediabetes are at substantial risk for cardiovascular disease and chronic kidney disease.
15h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Study shows smartphones and data centers harm the environmentData centers and smartphones will be the most damaging information and communications technologies to the environment by 2040, according to new research from W Booth School's Lotfi Belkhir.
15h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News

NASA finds a large amount of water in an exoplanet's atmosphereMuch like detectives study fingerprints to identify the culprit, scientists used NASA's Hubble and Spitzer space telescopes to find the 'fingerprints' of water in the atmosphere of a hot, bloated, Saturn-mass exoplanet some 700 light-years away.
15h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Songs in the key of life: The linguistic universals of adapting sound to artistic expressionA new study of how tone languages are sung has implications for the way humans manipulate and adapt the sounds of their language to artistic expression. The study, 'Tone-tune association in Tommo So (Dogon) folk songs,' by Laura McPherson (Dartmouth College) and Kevin Ryan (Harvard University), will be published in the March 2018 issue of the scholarly journal Language.
15h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Permian carbo-loading: How starchy treats helped build an ancient worldEveryone loves a nice plate of pasta. After all, starch is the ultimate energy food. Now, we have proof that carbo-loading has been a thing for at least 280 million years.
15h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Hubble observes exoplanet atmosphere in more detail than ever beforeAn international team of scientists has used the NASA/ESA Hubble Space Telescope to study the atmosphere of the hot exoplanet WASP-39b. By combining this new data with older data they created the most complete study yet of an exoplanet atmosphere. The atmospheric composition of WASP-39b hints that the formation processes of exoplanets can be very different from those of our own solar system giants
15h
Popular Science

Venus may once have been habitable. Now it can tell us if other worlds might be as well.Space It’s time to return to our hellish neighbor. Researchers say studying Venus, which may have once been habitable, could help us understand what makes Earth—and other planets like it—livable.
15h
New on MIT Technology Review

If you’re so smart, why aren’t you rich? Turns out it’s just chance.The most successful people are not the most talented, just the luckiest, a new computer model of wealth creation confirms. Taking that into account can maximize return on many kinds of investment.
15h
BBC News - Science & Environment

Gove lambasts water company chiefsThe Environment Secretary attacks water industry bosses' salaries and lack of investment.
15h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Twitter seeks help measuring 'health' of its worldTwitter Tweets J. DorseyTwitter on Thursday asked for outside help assessing the health of its world of rapid-fire commentary in the hope of finding cures for trolls, bots, echo chambers and other ills.
15h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

More diversity needed in medical school textbooksDepictions of race and skin tone in anatomy textbooks widely used in North American medical schools could be contributing to racial bias in medical treatment, new research suggests.
15h
Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

Durable wood 'sponges' act as green sensors of mechanical strainStriking just the right balance between softness and sturdiness, balsa wood is a choice material for crafting anything from model airplanes to full-size wind turbine blades. Scientists have opened up a new realm of possibilities for balsa by hijacking its natural structure with chemical and physical treatments to transform it into a 'wood carbon sponge' capable of enduring repeated compression and
15h
Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

Cigarette smoking behavior helps identify genes that regulate blood pressureUsing a technique that is opening the door to more complex analyses of the human genome, researchers have identified dozens of new genetic variations that affect blood pressure. Scientists discovered the new genetic regions -- and confirmed the role of many previously known ones -- by looking specifically at cigarette smoking behavior, one of many lifestyle factors that impact blood pressure.
15h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Yellow fever virus is detected in urine and semen almost a month after infectionThe confirmation involved one single patient; Brazilian investigators say it suggests the virus may be contagious for a period which stretches longer than previously thought. Scientists especulate whether the use of urine samples could allow for positive diagnosis in asymptomatic patients, who comprise half of the cases of yellow fever's infection.
15h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Practical spin wave transistor one step closerUniversity of Groningen physicists have managed to alter the flow of spin waves through a magnet, using only an electrical current. This is a huge step towards the spin transistor that is needed to construct spintronic devices. These promise to be much more energy efficient than conventional electronics. The results were published on March 2 in Physical Review Letters.
15h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Successful synthesis of gamma-lactam rings from hydrocarbonsIBS scientists have designed a novel strategy to synthesize ring-shaped cyclic molecules, highly sought-after by pharmaceutical and chemical industries, and known as gamma-lactams. This study describes how these five-membered rings can be prepared from inexpensive and readily available feedstock hydrocarbons, as well as from complex organic molecules, such as amino acids and steroids.
15h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Scientists create complex transmembrane proteins from scratchMolecular engineers have now show that it is possible to build complex, custom-designed transmembrane proteins from scratch. In the living world, transmembrane proteins naturally occur embedded in the membranes of cells and cellular organelles. They are essential for a number of functions, such as movement of signals or substances from inside or outside a living cell. The ability to design synthet
15h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Voice problems: Updates to treatment and care of patients with hoarsenessThe American Academy of Otolaryngology--Head and Neck Surgery Foundation published the Clinical Practice Guideline: Hoarseness (Dysphonia) (Update) today in Otolaryngology-Head and Neck Surgery. The updated guideline provides some substantially revised, evidence-based recommendations for healthcare providers when treating patients with hoarseness, a very common complaint that affects nearly one-th
15h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Insights from putting science under the microscopeTheories, data and knowledge continue to accumulate and become refined across many scientific fields -- but what do we know about science itself? In this Review, Santo Fortunato et al. highlight efforts to understand the 'science of science,' insights from which could be used to optimize the pursuit of knowledge and better society.
15h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Catch 22: Immune systems protect hosts, but drive bacterial evolutionImmune systems that develop only partial immunity to a bacterial pathogen drive the evolution of more potent strains of the bacteria, a new study in house finches reveals.
15h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Rooting sedimentary rock with terrestrial plantsGeological records reveal that mudrocks emerged around roughly the same time as plants did, 500 million years ago, a new study reports.
15h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Using crowdsourced data, scientists build massive family tree that tells tales of humanityTaking advantage of an online database of public data shared by genealogy enthusiasts, researchers have created a massive, crowd-sourced 'family tree.'
15h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News

In nature, an imperfect immune system drives the evolution of deadly pathogensNew research shows that, in the case of a common backyard bird, imperfect immunity to a dangerous pathogen that causes 'bird pink eye' actually makes the pathogen stronger and more dangerous for its next victim. The findings -- from a multi-university team.
15h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Crowdsourced family tree yields new insights about humanityIn a new study in Science, researchers amass a family tree of 13 million people to trace the last 500 years of Western marriage and migration patterns. They also show that the genetic basis of longevity is lower than many have suggested.
15h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News

In pursuit of pleasure, brain learns to hit the repeat buttonIn a scientific first, researchers have observed in mice how the brain learns to repeat patterns of neural activity that elicit the all-important feel-good sensation. This research offers key insights into how brain activity is shaped and refined as animals learn to repeat behaviors that evoke a feeling of pleasure. The findings also point to new strategies for targeting disorders characterized by
15h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Scientists design new skin cell culture technique to study human papillomavirusA new cell culture strategy promises to illuminate the mysterious early stages of human papillomavirus (HPV) infection, according to research published in PLOS Pathogens by Malgorzata Bienkowska-Haba and colleagues at Louisiana State University.
15h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News

New insights into how a virus-blocking bacterium operates in mosquitosNew research reveals details of the mechanism by which the bacterium Wolbachia blocks viruses in mosquito cells, suggesting that it reduces viral replication inside cells and that rapid degradation of viral RNA is involved. Professor Scott O'Neill, Program Director of the World Mosquito Program, led by Australia's Monash University, and colleagues report their findings in PLOS Pathogens.
15h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Leishmaniasis strain in Iraq outbreak identifiedIn the hot, dry border region between northern and central Iraq, Leishmania parasite infections are so common that they've been dubbed 'Baghdad sores.' Now, for the first time, researchers have studied the prevalence of different Leishmania species and strains in the region. Most cases of leishmaniasis in Iraq, they report this week in PLOS Neglected Tropical Diseases, match an Iranian strain.
15h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Creating diverse schools and workplaces requires inclusion, not just numbersNew research shows when it comes to successfully engaging and including minorities in the workforce and schools, organizations need to focus on inclusion. Several social psychology researchers will share details of their results at the SPSP Annual Convention on March 2nd.
15h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Uber starts offering rides to the doctorUber Rides ServiceUber is driving deeper into health care by offering to take patients in every U.S. market where it operates to their next medical appointment.
15h
New Scientist - News

Biggest ever family tree shows when cousins stopped having sexA family tree of 13 million people has been built using data from an ancestry website, and it reveals when and why people started avoiding marrying close relations
15h
The Atlantic

The 'Genome Hacker' Who Mapped a 13-Million-Person Family TreeYaniv Erlich has been a white-hat hacker and a geneticist at Columbia University, and now he works for a genealogy company. This unusual career trajectory has led, most recently, to a 13-million-person family tree unveiled today in Science . The massive trove of data comes from public profiles on the crowdsourced genealogy website Geni.com, and it sheds light on human longevity and dispersal over
15h
The Atlantic

How a Black Panther Music Video Taps Into an Old TrendIf someone had enough popularity among black Americans to resurrect a discussion about migrating back to Africa, that might just be Kendrick Lamar. The rapper’s new song with SZA for the Black Panther soundtrack, “All the Stars,” came to life in a music video that dropped ahead of the film’s release. In the video, which has more than 43 million views on YouTube, Lamar goes on a visually stunning
15h
Science current issue

Science of scienceIdentifying fundamental drivers of science and developing predictive models to capture its evolution are instrumental for the design of policies that can improve the scientific enterprise—for example, through enhanced career paths for scientists, better performance evaluation for organizations hosting research, discovery of novel effective funding vehicles, and even identification of promising re
15h
Science current issue

Nature's strategies: Squirrels with a rainy day fund
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Science current issue

Nature's strategies: A plant that stands and fights
15h
Science current issue

Seeking resilience in marine ecosystems
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Science current issue

What makes a terrestrial ecosystem resilient?
15h
Science current issue

Engineering a designer immunotherapy
15h
Science current issue

pHirst sour taste channels pHound?
15h
Science current issue

Microbial warfare against viruses
15h
Science current issue

Early plants and the rise of mud
15h
Science current issue

Fermi arcs connect topological degeneracies
15h
Science current issue

Linking climate policies to advance global mitigation
15h
Science current issue

Looking home from the heavens
15h
Science current issue

Evolution's amazing arms race
15h
Science current issue

Agricultural policy can reduce wildfires
15h
Science current issue

Rethinking wildfires and forest watersheds
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Science current issue

Invest long term in Canada's wilderness
15h
Science current issue

Changing coats with the season
15h
Science current issue

A trehalose tool for tuberculosis
15h
Science current issue

Mudrocks get a vegetative assist
15h
Science current issue

Tracking regulatory DNA in action
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Science current issue

The proton channel behind sour taste
15h
Science current issue

Advancing astronomy, one screen saver at a time
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Science current issue

Individually optimized exosuit
15h
Science current issue

Guiding nitrenes away from a migration
15h
Science current issue

Ratcheting up wild virulence
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Science current issue

The whys and wherefores of SciSci
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Science current issue

How to select and shape neural activity
15h
Science current issue

Maps of defense arsenals in microbial genomes
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Science current issue

Exploring photonic topology
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Science current issue

Membrane protein oligomers by design
15h
Science current issue

An off switch for helminth immunity
15h
Science current issue

Engineering cytokine-receptor pairs
15h
Science current issue

Fostering the resilience of ecosystems
15h
Science current issue

Dectin-1 limits allergic responses
15h
Science current issue

Tracking inflammation in the colon
15h
Science current issue

Ablaze in Pleistocene Italy
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Science current issue

Commensals direct wound healing
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Science current issue

Why don't astronomers publish observations?
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Science current issue

Context for immune responses
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Science current issue

Regulated tether controls asymmetric cell fate
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Science current issue

A fitting way to finish
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Science current issue

F caught in a bridge
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Science current issue

Observation of bulk Fermi arc and polarization half charge from paired exceptional pointsThe ideas of topology have found tremendous success in closed physical systems, but even richer properties exist in the more general open or dissipative framework. We theoretically propose and experimentally demonstrate a bulk Fermi arc that develops from non-Hermitian radiative losses in an open system of photonic crystal slabs. Moreover, we discover half-integer topological charges in the polar
15h
Science current issue

Ideal Weyl points and helicoid surface states in artificial photonic crystal structuresWeyl points are the crossings of linearly dispersing energy bands of three-dimensional crystals, providing the opportunity to explore a variety of intriguing phenomena such as topologically protected surface states and chiral anomalies. However, the lack of an ideal Weyl system in which the Weyl points all exist at the same energy and are separated from any other bands poses a serious limitation
15h
Science current issue

Selective formation of {gamma}-lactams via C-H amidation enabled by tailored iridium catalystsIntramolecular insertion of metal nitrenes into carbon-hydrogen bonds to form -lactam rings has traditionally been hindered by competing isocyanate formation. We report the application of theory and mechanism studies to optimize a class of pentamethylcyclopentadienyl iridium(III) catalysts for suppression of this competing pathway. Modulation of the stereoelectronic properties of the auxiliary bi
15h
Science current issue

Evolution of alluvial mudrock forced by early land plantsMudrocks are a primary archive of Earth’s history from the Archean eon to recent times, and their source-to-sink production and deposition play a central role in long-term ocean chemistry and climate regulation. Using original and published stratigraphic data from all 704 of Earth’s known alluvial formations from the Archean eon (3.5 billion years ago) to the Carboniferous period (0.3 billion yea
15h
Science current issue

Evidence for a neural law of effectThorndike’s law of effect states that actions that lead to reinforcements tend to be repeated more often. Accordingly, neural activity patterns leading to reinforcement are also reentered more frequently. Reinforcement relies on dopaminergic activity in the ventral tegmental area (VTA), and animals shape their behavior to receive dopaminergic stimulation. Seeking evidence for a neural law of effe
15h
Science current issue

Incomplete host immunity favors the evolution of virulence in an emergent pathogenImmune memory evolved to protect hosts from reinfection, but incomplete responses that allow future reinfection may inadvertently select for more-harmful pathogens. We present empirical and modeling evidence that incomplete immunity promotes the evolution of higher virulence in a natural host-pathogen system. We performed sequential infections of house finches with Mycoplasma gallisepticum strain
15h
Science current issue

Winter color polymorphisms identify global hot spots for evolutionary rescue from climate changeMaintenance of biodiversity in a rapidly changing climate will depend on the efficacy of evolutionary rescue, whereby population declines due to abrupt environmental change are reversed by shifts in genetically driven adaptive traits. However, a lack of traits known to be under direct selection by anthropogenic climate change has limited the incorporation of evolutionary processes into global con
15h
Science current issue

Selective targeting of engineered T cells using orthogonal IL-2 cytokine-receptor complexesInterleukin-2 (IL-2) is a cytokine required for effector T cell expansion, survival, and function, especially for engineered T cells in adoptive cell immunotherapy, but its pleiotropy leads to simultaneous stimulation and suppression of immune responses as well as systemic toxicity, limiting its therapeutic use. We engineered IL-2 cytokine-receptor orthogonal ( ortho ) pairs that interact with on
15h
Science current issue

Accurate computational design of multipass transmembrane proteinsThe computational design of transmembrane proteins with more than one membrane-spanning region remains a major challenge. We report the design of transmembrane monomers, homodimers, trimers, and tetramers with 76 to 215 residue subunits containing two to four membrane-spanning regions and up to 860 total residues that adopt the target oligomerization state in detergent solution. The designed prot
15h
Science current issue

An evolutionarily conserved gene family encodes proton-selective ion channelsIon channels form the basis for cellular electrical signaling. Despite the scores of genetically identified ion channels selective for other monatomic ions, only one type of proton-selective ion channel has been found in eukaryotic cells. By comparative transcriptome analysis of mouse taste receptor cells, we identified Otopetrin1 (OTOP1), a protein required for development of gravity-sensing oto
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Science current issue

Transcription-coupled changes in nuclear mobility of mammalian cis-regulatory elementsTo achieve guide RNA (gRNA) multiplexing and an efficient delivery of tens of distinct gRNAs into single cells, we developed a molecular assembly strategy termed chimeric array of gRNA oligonucleotides (CARGO). We coupled CARGO with dCas9 (catalytically dead Cas9) imaging to quantitatively measure the movement of enhancers and promoters that undergo differentiation-associated activity changes in
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Science current issue

{beta}2-adrenergic receptor-mediated negative regulation of group 2 innate lymphoid cell responsesThe type 2 inflammatory response is induced by various environmental and infectious stimuli. Although recent studies identified group 2 innate lymphoid cells (ILC2s) as potent sources of type 2 cytokines, the molecular pathways controlling ILC2 responses are incompletely defined. Here we demonstrate that murine ILC2s express the β 2 -adrenergic receptor (β 2 AR) and colocalize with adrenergic neu
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New Products
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My year as a fed
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Systematic discovery of antiphage defense systems in the microbial pangenomeThe arms race between bacteria and phages led to the development of sophisticated antiphage defense systems, including CRISPR-Cas and restriction-modification systems. Evidence suggests that known and unknown defense systems are located in "defense islands" in microbial genomes. Here, we comprehensively characterized the bacterial defensive arsenal by examining gene families that are clustered ne
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Transparent author credit
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Science current issue

News at a glance
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Asia's hunger for sand takes toll on ecology
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Arecibo telescope saved by university consortium
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Restraining immunity could lower high blood pressure
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Science current issue

Genome editor gets more versatile and precise
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Better atomic clocks herald new era of timekeeping
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Cosmic dawn signal holds clue to dark matter
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The roots of resilience
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After the deluge
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Nature's strategies: Fish that switch sex to thrive
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Lessons in resilience
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Nature's strategies: Resilience by regeneration
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Nature's strategies: Stealing genes to survive
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Bending to the water's will
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Researchers Used This Genealogy Site to Build a 13 Million-Person Family TreeOne of the members is Kevin Bacon.
15h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Researchers reveal findings about virus that lives in Yellowstone hot springsFor seven years as a graduate student at Montana State University, Rebecca Hochstein hiked into the backcountry of Yellowstone National Park.
15h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Sounding rocket mission will trace auroral windsFrom the ground, the dance of the northern lights, or aurora borealis, can look peaceful. But those shimmering sheets of colored lights are the product of violent collisions between Earth's atmosphere and particles from the Sun.
15h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Researchers discover mitochondria-to-nucleus messenger proteinResearchers have identified a protein, G-Protein Pathway Suppressor 2 (GPS2), that moves from a cell's mitochondria to its nucleus in response to stress and during the differentiation of fat cells. While proteins with similar functions had previously been found in yeast and worms, this is first direct messenger discovered in the cells of mammals.
15h
NYT > Science

Trilobites: When Did Americans Stop Marrying Their Cousins? Ask the World’s Largest Family TreeResearchers assembled 5 million family trees using data from the website Geni.com to test several genetic and historical hypotheses.
15h
Big Think

Putin claims Russia has "invincible" nuclear weapons that can bypass U.S. defensesRussian Missile V. PutinIn a state-of-the-nation speech just weeks before Russia’s presidential election, President Vladimir Putin claimed his country had two new nuclear-powered weapons systems. Read More
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Successful synthesis of gamma-lactam rings from hydrocarbonsA team of researchers at the Center for Catalytic Hydrocarbon Functionalizations, within the Institute for Basic Science (IBS, South Korea), have designed a novel strategy to synthesize ring-shaped cyclic molecules, highly sought-after by pharmaceutical and chemical industries, and known as gamma-lactams. This study describes how these five-membered rings can be prepared from inexpensive and readi
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Scientists create complex transmembrane proteins from scratchIt is now possible to create complex, custom-designed transmembrane proteins from scratch, scientists report this week. The advance, led by molecular engineers at the University of Washington Institute for Protein Design, will enable researchers to create transmembrane proteins not found in nature to perform specific tasks.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Crowdsourced family tree yields new insights about humanityThanksgiving gatherings could get bigger —a lot bigger—as science uncovers the familial bonds that bind us. From millions of interconnected online genealogy profiles, researchers have amassed the largest, scientifically-vetted family tree to date, which at 13 million people, is slightly bigger than a nation the size of Cuba or Belgium. Published in the journal Science, the new dataset offers fresh
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Durable wood 'sponges' act as green sensors of mechanical strainStriking just the right balance between softness and sturdiness, balsa wood is a choice material for crafting anything from model airplanes to full-size wind turbine blades. Scientists in the United States and China have opened up a new realm of possibilities for balsa by hijacking its natural structure with chemical and physical treatments to transform it into a "wood carbon sponge" capable of en
15h
Science : NPR

Widespread Drought Across U.S. Stokes Fears About A Repeat Of 2012's WrathIf rainfall doesn't come soon, it could cost billions in devastation — a difficult fallout considering the USDA expects farmers' incomes to hit a 12-year low even if crop yields stay high. (Image credit: Saul Loeb/AFP/Getty Images)
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

Repeated anesthesia in infancy increases anxiety-linked behavior in nonhuman primatesAnimals exposed to anesthesia 3x in infancy later displayed increased anxiety-linked behaviors such as scratching, self-touching and self-grooming when under mild stress.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

How reliable is diagnostic testing for Zika?Globally, Brazil has been the hardest hit by the current Zika outbreak. Almost all cases of Zika-associated malformations in newborns have been reported from this country. Scientists have shown that molecular diagnostic tests for the Zika virus in Brazil are not always reliable. Almost two thirds of all laboratories showed false-positive or false-negative results.
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Multimodal approach to pain management reduces opioids, prescriptions after joint replacementA multimodal approach to pain management (using two or more different methods or medications to manage pain) rather than using opioids alone was associated with a decrease in opioid use, opioid prescriptions and common opioid-related complications in patients undergoing total hip or knee replacements, according to a study published today in the Online First edition of Anesthesiology, the peer-revi
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The Atlantic

The World’s Most Difficult Mountain May Soon Be Fully ConqueredThere’s no one reason that K2 is often considered the most difficult mountain to climb. It’s not the world’s tallest mountain. It doesn’t have the highest fatality rate. It’s known for its steepness, yes, and for the unusually long distance mountaineers must trek just to get to its base, with no villages to stop at and restock supplies. But those factors alone don’t explain K2’s nickname, “Savage
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The Atlantic

Atlanta and the Anxiety of FameIn 2016, when the first season of Atlanta debuted, Donald Glover was relatively famous. He’d been nominated for two Grammy Awards for his 2013 album, Because the Internet , he’d starred in the NBC sitcom Community, and he’d had smaller roles in hit movies including The Martian and Magic Mike XXL. But post- Atlanta , which became a critical and commercial hit and won Glover two Emmys, and two Gold
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

Virus that lives in Yellowstone hot springs describedA new study explains how a lemon-shaped virus assembles itself and how the virus ejects the DNA it carries into host cells.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

Secret of magmas that produce global treasuresSouth Africa's history and economy has been built on its rich natural treasures of a number of precious metals, stones and minerals. The country's mineral deposits have been created over hundreds of millions of years through processes that are still not completely understood. One of these processes is the origin of chromitite layers hosted by layered intrusions - a major source of chromium on our
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Viden

VIDEO Sådan fungerer Googles førerløse bilSe hvordan en autonom bil kortlægger al trafik omkring sig - helt op til flere hundrede meter væk.
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NYT > Science

In a Gamble to Make Climate Change a Political Win, a Governor Pursues a Carbon TaxA statehouse vote was canceled, but Gov. Jay Inslee is making climate a central plank in his political platform, perhaps ahead of a 2020 presidential run.
16h
Live Science

How a Little Bit of Anxiety May Improve Your MemoryCan anxiety be a good thing?
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Live Science

'Resurrected' Shark Species Found Dwelling Deep in the AtlanticThe Atlantic sixgill shark is a different species than its Pacific relatives.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

Nature can reduce pesticide use, environment impactFarmers around the world are turning to nature to help them reduce pesticide use, environmental impact and, subsequently, and in some cases, increasing yields.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

Violence against girls in conflict-affected populations reinforces gender normsIn some areas affected by conflict, adolescent girls and young women are perceived as responsible for their own safety and considered as burdens and threats to family honor should they become victims of violence or pregnant prior to marriage, according to a new study. This latest research on gender based violence also indicates that girls need to take responsibility for managing their interactions
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

New approach uses single PET scan to personalize cancer treatmentResearchers have developed a same-day, noninvasive PET-based imaging approach to assess PD-L1 positive tumors, which could help guide cancer treatment decisions and assess treatment response.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

In-depth mineral review provides foundational resource for dairy scientistsLife is dependent on minerals. Accordingly, the diets of animals must contain certain minerals in both large amounts, via marcrominerals, and small amounts, via microminerals. In a thorough and wide-ranging review, researchers examined necessary minerals as well as the mechanisms for their absorption in cows, providing insight into these vital elements.
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New Scientist - News

Mind-reading AI uses brain scans to guess what you’re looking atAn artificial intelligence can write a caption for a picture a person is looking at without seeing the original image, but looking at a brain scan instead
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Malaysia to press EU on planned palm oil ban in biofuelsMalaysia will press the European Union not to ban palm oil in biofuels during talks this week, the country's trade minister said Thursday, warning the move would hit the rural poor.
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The Atlantic

The White House Melts Down Over SteelFor a few months this fall and winter, someone who was squinting just right could see the Trump administration starting to finally get its footing. Chief of Staff John Kelly’s tenure had started off bumpily, with Trump’s sort-of backing for white supremacists after Charlottesville , but there had been some calming effect. Kelly improved the quality of information getting to the president and calm
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The Atlantic

Finalists From Smithsonian Magazine's 2017 Photo ContestThe editors of Smithsonian magazine have just announced the 60 finalists in their 15th annual photo contest, selected from more than 48,000 entries sent in from 155 countries. They've once more allowed me to share a selection of these images here from the competition's six categories: The Natural World, The American Experience, Travel, People, Altered Images and Mobile. Captions were written by t
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Caught on camera: Amazonian crop raidersPapped snaffling in the jungle, a striking set of photos reveal the secret lives of Amazonian crop-raiding animals.
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News

MSU researchers reveal findings about virus that lives in Yellowstone hot springsRebecca Hochstein, who earned her doctorate in MSU's Department of Microbiology and Immunology in 2015, is lead author of a study that explains how a lemon-shaped virus assembles itself and how the virus ejects the DNA it carries into host cells.
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Prognostic role of elevated mir-24-3p in breast cancerUsing nanostring and RNA-sequencing technologies researchers from the NYU School of Medicine, the Perlmutter Cancer Center, UT MD Anderson Cancer Center, and the University of Massachusetts Medical School identified mi R-24-3p as a potential novel marker of breast cancer metastases in breast cancer.
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Researchers use cigarette smoking behavior to identify genes that regulate blood pressureUsing a technique that is opening the door to more complex analyses of the human genome, researchers have identified dozens of new genetic variations that affect blood pressure. Scientists discovered the new genetic regions--and confirmed the role of many previously known ones--by looking specifically at cigarette smoking behavior, one of many lifestyle factors that impact blood pressure.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Harley-Davison invests in electric vehicle companyHarley-Davidson says it will collaborate with Alta Motors on the motorcycle maker's plans for an electric bike.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Facebook apologises for censoring prehistoric Venus statueFacebook apologised on Thursday for censoring the prehistoric "Venus of Willendorf" figurine, considered a masterpiece of the paleolithic era.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

UK scraps plans for new inquiry into media wrongdoingThe British government on Thursday scrapped plans for an inquiry into allegations of media law-breaking, a decision praised by press organizations but condemned by victims of tabloid intrusion.
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News

A spinning top of lightShort, rotating pulses of light reveal a great deal about the inner structure of materials. An international team of physicists led by Professor Misha Ivanov of the Max Born Institute for Nonlinear Optics and Short Pulse Spectroscopy (MBI) has now developed a new method for precisely characterizing such extremely short light pulses. The research results have been published in Nature Communications
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News

More diversity needed in medical school textbooks: StudyDepictions of race and skin tone in anatomy textbooks widely used in North American medical schools could be contributing to racial bias in medical treatment, new research suggests.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Shelters with echoes thought to be preferred sites for prehistoric rock artThe acoustic qualities of a rock shelter may have been a key factor in its selection as a site for rock art and indicate a spiritual significance to the practice, according to a recent study, while scientists are also looking into whether some caves were chosen as artistic sites because of the view.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Mobile phones help transform disaster reliefMobile phones are helping transform how relief agencies respond to humanitarian crises by enabling them to pin point where aid is needed most after hurricanes, earthquakes and other disasters.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Health of world's last male northern white rhino in declineThe health of the world's last male northern white rhino has deteriorated, bringing the rhino subspecies a step closer to extinction caused by poaching.
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Popular Science

Your skin is crawling with bacteria, and some of them might help fight cancerHealth Common microbes seem to help treat cancer—at least in mice. Researchers identified a specific strain of bacteria that could protect against cancer, and potentially even help treat it once it’s formed.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Brazil court largely upholds law that some fear hurts AmazonBrazil's Supreme Court has batted down challenges to key parts of a law that environmentalists say has contributed to increasing deforestation in the Amazon rainforest.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Dyson shifts up a gear with electric car hubJames Dyson, the Brexit-backing billionaire behind the vacuum cleaners that bear his name, is establishing a new UK research hub as he shifts up a gear in his drive into electric cars.
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Quanta Magazine

Why Don’t Patients Get Sick in Sync? Modelers Find Statistical CluesIn late March of 1914, the town of Hanford, California, was rocked by contagion. First, a few people got sick. Then over the next month, nearly a hundred more followed, vomiting and shivering with fever, and blood tests made it clear they had typhoid. All of them, it turned out, had been exposed to the pathogen on the same day. At a church luncheon and dinner on March 17, they had been served foo
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New on MIT Technology Review

Ethereum’s smart contracts are full of holesBlockchain-powered computer programs promise to revolutionize the digital economy, but new research suggests they’re far from secure.
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News

New research points to better way to treat depressionScientists on the Florida campus of The Scripps Research Institute (TSRI) have discovered a new target for treating major depressive disorder, a disease that affects more than 16 million American adults.
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Déjà vu and feelings of prediction: They're just feelingsColorado State University psychologist Anne Cleary has a new paper in Psychological Science. It details how she and her team recreated déjà vu in human subjects in order to examine the feeling of premonition during the déjà vu state.
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Unlocking a cell's potential to regenerate the heartInspired by fish or salamanders that have a remarkable ability to repair their own injured organs, scientists have been trying for years to find a way to get human adult cells to divide and regenerate tissue in a similar way. A team at Gladstone, led by Deepak Srivastava, finally developed the first reliable method to make adult cells divide and repair hearts damaged by heart attacks, at least in
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News

No link between current or previous marijuana use and kidney disease, say researchersMarijuana is the most commonly used illicit drug in the United States, with an increasing trend of use among middle-aged and older individuals. However, potential health effects of marijuana use in the general population have not been extensively studied, and little is known about potential effects on kidney function. According to a new cross-sectional study of adults aged 18-59 in the US, there i
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Creating diverse schools and workplaces requires inclusion, not just numbersNew research shows when it comes to successfully engaging and including minorities in the workforce and schools, organizations need to focus on inclusion. Several social psychology researchers will share details of their results at the SPSP Annual Convention on March 2.
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Caught on camera: Amazonian crop raidersCaught on camera in the jungle, a striking set of photos from the University of East Anglia (UK) reveal the secret lives of Amazonian crop-raiding animals.Researchers spent a year working with 47 Amazonian communities in the Juruá region of Amazonas, Brazil.They set up 132 motion-activated camera traps and took over 61,000 photos that reveal the Amazon's 'worst offending' crop destroyers.
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Johns Hopkins researchers invent new technology for cancer immunotherapyJohns Hopkins researchers have invented a new class of cancer immunotherapy drugs that are more effective at harnessing the power of the immune system to fight cancer. This new approach, which was reported in Nature Communications, results in a significant decrease of tumor growth, even against cancers that do not respond to existing immunotherapy.
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Promising therapeutic approach for spinal cord injuriesThe healing ability of the central nervous system is very limited and injuries to the brain or spinal cord often result in permanent functional deficits. Researchers at Karolinska Institutet in Sweden report in the scientific journal Cell that they have found an important mechanism that explains why this happens. Using this new knowledge, they were able to improve functional recovery following spi
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Researchers discover mitochondria-to-nucleus messenger proteinResearchers have identified a protein, G-Protein Pathway Suppressor 2 (GPS2), that moves from a cell's mitochondria to its nucleus in response to stress and during the differentiation of fat cells. While proteins with similar functions had previously been found in yeast and worms, this is first direct messenger discovered in the cells of mammals.
17h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Durable wood carbon sponge could be the future of wearable sensors, pollutant treatmentEngineers have for the first time demonstrated that wood can be directly converted into a carbon sponge capable of enduring repeated compression and other extreme mechanical conditions. This new wood carbon sponge overcomes several limiting factors of other lightweight, compressible carbon sponges because it is simpler, less expensive, and more sustainable to produce. It can be used in various app
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Retraining the brain's vision center to take actionCan any part of the brain control a brain-machine interface? Apparently yes, says a new UC Berkeley and Columbia University study. Researchers hijacked the output of neurons in the visual cortex to control a computer-generated tone, though the neurons could just as easily have controlled a prosthetic arm. A key part of the circuit is the underlying striatum, which together with some unknown struct
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News

DNA scissors can cut RNA, tooThe bacterial immune system 'CRISPR-Cas9' is known to eliminate invading DNA. Würzburg scientists now discovered that it can also readily target RNA -- a result with potentially far-reaching ramifications.
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Stem-cell study points to new approach to Alzheimer's diseaseImproving the trafficking of brain-cell proteins to reduce toxic buildup holds possibilities for new therapies against Alzheimer's disease.
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Networks of brain activity predict vulnerability to depressionTapping into the electrical chatter between different regions of the brain may provide a new way to prevent and treat depression. Duke University scientists showed that mice that were more susceptible to developing depression-like symptoms displayed different networks of electrical brain activity than more resilient mice. These results could be the first step toward a test to predict a person's vu
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Durable wood 'sponges' act as green sensors of mechanical strainStriking just the right balance between softness and sturdiness, balsa wood is a choice material for crafting anything from model airplanes to full-size wind turbine blades. Scientists have opened up a new realm of possibilities for balsa by hijacking its natural structure with chemical and physical treatments to transform it into a 'wood carbon sponge' capable of enduring repeated compression and
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Cyberattack against German government 'ongoing'Germany's government IT network is suffering an "ongoing" cyberattack, the parliamentary committee on intelligence affairs said Thursday, without confirming a media report that Russian hackers were behind the assault.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Remove 'terror content' within an hour, EU tells web firmsOnline platforms should take down "terrorist content" within an hour of it being reported, the EU said Thursday in new recommendations to internet companies to stem the flow of harmful content on the web.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

A new discovery that makes possible prediction immediately before plasma lossIn phenomena occurring in nature and in society, it is often commented that "Something may happen at any time, but it is difficult to predict when that something may occur." Solar flares, volcanic eruptions, extreme rainfall, and economic crises are examples of this. Such cases are called sudden phenomena. Prediction of sudden phenomena is one of the important issues in physics. By comparing physi
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

Diet, bugs and beating high blood pressureIt is known that changing diet can be effective in reducing high blood pressure but now new research has revealed that people's natural gut bacteria can alter the effectiveness of dietary change.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

Challenges of food allergies connected to personality traits for first timeThe first study published connecting challenges of food allergies with personality traits finds that higher openness to experience is the biggest predictor of more allergy issues, while neuroticism does not lead to more frequent allergy issues. The study could improve the quality of life of people with allergies, by helping them understand how their personality traits might help or hinder their ma
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Scientific American Content: Global

E.U. Expected to Vote on Pesticide Ban after Major Scientific ReviewA survey of more than 1,500 studies concludes neonicotinoids harm bees -- Read more on ScientificAmerican.com
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The Atlantic

Why a Podcast About R.E.M. Is a Must-ListenThe premise of Scott Aukerman and Adam Scott’s new podcast could never be described as topical. It’s hard to imagine why the mere announcement of an ongoing series in which a comedian and an actor go through the discography of the rock band R.E.M. (the “Everybody Hurts” one, the one that broke up in 2011) caused such a stir in the comedy world. To describe it, R U Talkin’ R.E.M. Re: Me? sounds li
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The Atlantic

People Don't Actually Know Themselves Very WellWhen Donald Trump tweeted that he was a “ very stable genius ,” he was accused of lacking self-awareness by journalists and comedians . But the truth is that no one has perfect self-awareness—you probably believe more than a few things about yourself that are false. Whether it’s in trying to land a job or impress a date, people spend a staggering amount of time making claims about themselves. It
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Food abundance driving conflict in Africa, not food scarcityIn Africa, food abundance may be driving violent conflict rather than food scarcity, according to a study published in the American Journal of Agricultural Economics, a publication of the Agricultural & Applied Economics Association.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Mobile network equipment makers eye 5G windfallStruggling mobile network equipment makers are eyeing a possible boom in business from the first rollout of super-fast 5G wireless networks.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Anger as rail construction begins in Nairobi National ParkKenyan conservationists expressed outrage Thursday after construction of a railway line began inside Nairobi's famed national park, saying this defied a court order halting the project.
17h
Big Think

New drug kills flu virus in one day, gets fast-tracked to approvalWelcome news as the flu pandemic begins to subside. Read More
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Story tips from the Department of Energy's Oak Ridge National Laboratory, March 2018ORNL's new model could better predict tiny pockets of methylmercury lurking in creek algae; engines work smarter with new fuel innovation; making high-purity metallic structures narrower than a cold virus could advance tiny electronics, drug delivery and more; insights on certain enzymes that try to break down antibiotics may inform better drug designs for fighting resistant bacteria; ORNL is prep
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News

New report examines Social Security's process for determining disability in adultsA new report from the National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine examines to what extent and in which ways health care utilization -- such as in-patient hospitalizations, emergency department use, and hospital readmission -- reflects disease severity, disability, and ability to perform gainful activity.
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Trial of omega fatty acid supplementation in toddlers born preterm shows promising resultsThirty-one toddlers who were born prematurely participated. For three months, half took a daily dietary supplement that contained a special combination of omega-3 and omega-6 fatty acids, and half took a placebo. The group that took the daily omega fatty acid supplement exhibited a greater reduction in ASD symptoms than those who took the placebo, according to ratings provided by the children's pa
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The Economist: The world this week

Kal's cartoon
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The Economist: The world this week

Business this week
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The Economist: The world this week

Politics this week
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

A bird in the bush equals money in the handA new study by the Wildlife Conservation Society (WCS) and Foundations of Success (FOS) finds that an ecotourism strategy based on "direct payments," where local people are compensated for the amount of wildlife seen by tourists, has resulted in a reduction in illegal hunting and an increase in wildlife sightings.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

France cracks down on undeclared Airbnb listingsThe French government announced plans Thursday to clamp down on Airbnb, saying it would fine the home-sharing giant for carrying ads from people who do not register their properties with local authorities.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Equifax finds additional 2.4 million impacted by 2017 breachEquifax said Thursday that an additional 2.4 million Americans were impacted by last year's data breach, however these newly disclosed consumers had significantly less personal information stolen.
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Chrome's WebUSB Feature Leaves Some Yubikeys Vulnerable to AttackWhile still the best protection against phishing attacks, some Yubikey models are vulnerable after a recent update to Google Chrome.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Deadly blizzards lash Europe, air travel disruptedHeavy snowfall and deadly blizzards lashed Europe Thursday, forcing airports to cancel or delay flights around the continent, as a deep freeze gripped countries from the far north to the Mediterranean beaches in the south.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Researchers create an AI to help us make sense of privacy policiesIf you're anything like the average Internet user, you probably didn't spend the estimated 244 hours it would take to read every privacy policy for every website you visited last year. That's exactly why a team led by Carnegie Mellon University just launched an interactive website aimed at helping users make sense of their privacy on the web.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Distortive effects of short distance photographs on nasal appearance: The selfie effectDoes my smartphone make my nose look big? It might, according to researchers at Rutgers New Jersey Medical School.
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Live Science

Birdwatchers Are Flocking to Alabama to See This Bird: Why It's So SpecialApparently, there's a one-in-a-million chance of spotting the yellow mutant bird.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Just conservation is where environmental issues and social justice commingleMore people, limited resources. Environmental ethicists consider best practices for conflict resolution and fairness when people and the environment are at odds.
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Science | The Guardian

Does my nose look big in this? Plastic surgeons reassure those worried by selfiesPictures taken close to the face distort the proportions of your features, study emphasises If a penchant for selfies has left you worried about the size of your nose, you might want to consider a selfie-stick. Researchers say selfie-lovers should be aware that snapping a picture with the camera close to your face distorts the proportions of your features. Continue reading...
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Native wildflowers bank on seeds underground to endure droughtNative wildflowers were surprisingly resilient during California's most recent drought, even more so than exotic grasses. But signs of their resilience were not evident with showy blooms aboveground. Rather, they were found mostly underground, hidden in the seed bank, according to a study from the University of California, Davis.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

A model determines the quantity of bisphenol A that reaches the fetus through the motherThis research may be extremely useful for predicting the risk of developing metabolic, immunological or reproductive disorders and neurological diseases caused by this chemical.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

Female hunting spiders do not respond to chemical signals given out by potential mates, preferring silk-wrapped food gifts insteadUnlike many other species, male hunting spiders do not use chemical signals such as sex pheromones to attract a mate. Instead, they make their mark by uniquely exploiting a female hunting spider's interest in food. Research now shows that male hunting spiders wrap morsels of food in their silk and offer these as gifts to prospective mates.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

A near-universal way to measure enzyme inhibitionResearchers have invented a new technique for measuring how quickly drugs interact with their molecular targets. The discovery provides scientists with a new way to investigate the effectiveness of drug candidates that might otherwise have been overlooked.
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Scientific American Content: Global

Surgery Near End of Life Is Common, CostlyMore than 30 percent of Medicare patients undergo an operation during the year before death -- Read more on ScientificAmerican.com
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

New study confirms Cambodia's last leopards on brink of extinctionA new study has confirmed that the world's last breeding population of leopards in Cambodia is at immediate risk of extinction, having declined an astonishing 72% during a five-year period. The population represents the last remaining leopards in all of eastern Indochina - a region incorporating Cambodia, Laos and Vietnam.
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Viden

Derfor sner det: Snefnug er fyldt med bakterierSnefnug opstår i atmosfæren og daler ned mod jorden. Men vidste du, at de fleste af dem opstår på grund af særlige bakterier i luften?
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Heart attacks often follow dramatic changes in outdoor temperatureLarge day-to-day swings in temperature were associated with significantly more heart attacks in a study being presented at the American College of Cardiology's 67th Annual Scientific Session. Given that some climate models link extreme weather events with global warming, the new findings suggest climate change could, in turn, lead to an uptick in the occurrence of heart attacks, researchers said.
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Food abundance driving conflict in Africa, not food scarcityIn Africa, food abundance may be driving violent conflict rather than food scarcity, according to a study published in the American Journal of Agricultural Economics, a publication of the Agricultural & Applied Economics Association. The study refutes the notion that climate change will increase the frequency of civil war in Africa as a result of food scarcity triggered by rising temperatures and
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Distortive effects of short distance photographs on nasal appearance: The selfie effectNasal distortions in selfies taken at close range are prompting people to seek out surgeons to make their noses smaller. Such was the experience of Rutgers facial plastic surgeon Boris Paskhover, who worked with a Stanford mathematician to develop a model to show patients how much their nose becomes distorted in close-up photos. The model is published in JAMA Facial Plastic Surgery.
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News

For pregnant soldiers, recent deployment linked to higher risk of premature deliveryFemale soldiers who give birth within six months of returning from military deployment face twice the risk of having a preterm baby as other active-duty servicewomen, a new study from the Stanford University School of Medicine has found.
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Ingeniøren

Dansk startup bygger elcykel med batteribank og solcellepanelEn ny elcykel med egen strømforsyning fra solceller er på vej fra den danske startup Kværn. Cyklen skal i første omgang lanceres via en crowfunding-kampagne.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

Beneficial skin bacteria protect against skin cancerScience continues to peel away layers of the skin microbiome to reveal its protective properties. Researchers now report on a potential new role for some bacteria on the skin: protecting against cancer.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

Social media does not decrease face-to-face interactionsNow, researchers have found that social media use has no significant negative effect on social interactions or social well-being.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

A neuron can cause a domino effectIf the sense of smell disappears, this can indicate a disease such as Alzheimer's or Parkinson's disease. However, unlike previously assumed, general degenerations in the nervous system do not play a leading role in the loss of the sense of smell with increasing age, but individual nerve cells or classes of nerves are decisive.
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The Atlantic

Martin Luther King Jr.’s Daughter Embraces His Hope for the FutureEditor’s Note: Read The Atlantic ’s special coverage of Martin Luther King Jr.’s legacy. Bernice A. King, the youngest child of Martin Luther King Jr. and Coretta Scott King, was 5 years old when her father was assassinated. A mediator, orator, and minister, she has been the CEO of the Martin Luther King Jr. Center for Nonviolent Social Change, in Atlanta, since 2010. A pril 4, 2018 , marks the 5
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The Atlantic

How Poverty and Racism Persist in MississippiEditor’s Note: Read The Atlantic ’s special coverage of Martin Luther King Jr.’s legacy. I did not understand how poor my family was until my maternal grandmother told me a story about sackcloth dresses and beans. I was in my 20s, and we were sitting in her kitchen, the tickle of cool air from the window air-conditioning unit barely on us, when she told me that while she was a child, her mother m
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A 1.3Tbs DDoS Hit GitHub, the Largest Yet RecordedGitHub DDoS AttacksOn Wednesday, a 1.3Tbps DDoS attack pummeled GitHub for 15-20 minutes. Here's how it stayed online.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Scientists believe they may have discovered the crucial ingredients for a winning soccer teamAssociate Professor Anthony Leicht from James Cook University's Sport and Exercise Science group was part of an international team of scientists who examined variables within 240 matches in the Chinese Super League (China's top-ranked league).
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Popular Science

This 18-mile stretch of Georgia highway is a living laboratory for clean energyNexus Media News The Ray is a rural testing ground for cutting-edge tech. The Anderson family turned an 18-mile stretch of rural Georgia highway into a living laboratory for clean energy innovation.
18h
Live Science

Selfies Distort Your Face by 30% — And Here's the Math to Back It UpIf you've ever taken an unflattering selfie, it's not you — it's geometry.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Why the web has challenged scientists' authority – and why they need to adaptAcademia is in the midst of a crisis of relevance. Many Americans are ignoring the conclusions of scientists on a variety of issues including climate change and natural selection. Some state governments are cutting funding for higher education; the federal government is threatening to cut funding for research. Resentful students face ever increasing costs for tuition.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Mars Express views moons set against Saturn's ringsNew images and video from ESA's Mars Express show Phobos and Deimos drifting in front of Saturn and background stars, revealing more about the positioning and surfaces of the Red Planet's mysterious moons.
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Behind the Scenes of Hollywood's Real and Imagined WorldsJust in time for the Oscars, a new book explores the line between reality and fantasy in Hollywood.
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Just conservation is where environmental issues and social justice commingleSocial justice and environmental conservation are considered great values in our society. However, in some conservation efforts, conflicts arise. A team led by Michigan Technological University explore ethical frameworks to resolve these conflicts.
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Mothers need better safe infant feeding support post-disaster, UGA study findsA new study from the University of Georgia highlights the need for humanitarian aid groups to be trained in safe infant and young child feeding protocols, following the 2015 earthquake in Nepal, which killed nearly 9,000 people and damaged almost half a million homes.
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News

New study confirms Cambodia's last leopards on brink of extinctionA new study has confirmed that the world's last breeding population of leopards in Cambodia is at immediate risk of extinction, having declined an astonishing 72 percent during a five-year period. The population represents the last remaining leopards in all of eastern Indochina -- a region incorporating Cambodia, Laos and Vietnam.
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The Scientist RSS

New Methods to Detect CRISPR Off-Target MutationsResearchers have developed a variety of techniques to detect when CRISPR misses the mark
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TED Talks Daily (SD video)

How we look kilometers below the Antarctic ice sheet | Dustin SchroederAntarctica is a vast and dynamic place, but radar technologies -- from World War II-era film to state-of-the-art miniaturized sensors -- are enabling scientists to observe and understand changes beneath the continent's ice in unprecedented detail. Join radio glaciologist Dustin Schroeder on a flight high above Antarctica and see how ice-penetrating radar is helping us learn about future sea level
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New Scientist - News

Very creative people have a special kind of brain activityA type of brainwave is associated with creativity, and a study of improvising musicians has found that the stronger your alpha waves, the better you play
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Easy printing of biosensors made of grapheneCell-based biosensors can simulate the effect of various substances, such as drugs, on the human body in the laboratory. Depending on the measuring principle, though, producing them can be expensive. As a result, they are often not used. Cost factors for sensors that perform measurements electrically are the expensive electrode material and complex production. Fraunhofer scientists are now produci
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

New optical size spectrometer for probing atmospheric particulatesThe global environment is suffering from air pollution due to excess particulate matters, resulting in huge societal and economic costs. Air quality is usually characterized by the mass concentration of fine particulate matters with aerodynamic diameters smaller than 2.5 µm (PM2.5), which is mainly contributed by micron-sized particles, whereas the hazard induced by ultrafine particulates (with di
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The Atlantic

The Gripping History of The Looming TowerIn 2017, the third most-read page on Wikipedia.org was an article on Queen Elizabeth. Out of the top 50 , Queen Victoria came in at No. 13, Princess Margaret at No. 37, and Prince Philip at No. 44. This sudden surge of interest in the British royal family wasn’t just Anglophilia: It was also related to the popularity of Peter Morgan’s Netflix show The Crown and the PBS/ITV drama Victoria . Both s
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The Atlantic

The Design Bible That Changed How Americans Bike in CitiesWhen I first started working in New York, in 2007, bicycling seemed like an activity best left to the pros. One of the city’s stock characters was the fearless bicycle messenger, wearing a heavy chain lock around the waist and whipping through traffic with supreme confidence. Ten years later, the bicycle always feels like an option. It’s not my primary means of transit, but I’ve racked up 723 mil
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Nature can reduce pesticide use, environment impactFarmers around the world are turning to nature to help them reduce pesticide use, environmental impact and, subsequently, and in some cases, increasing yields.
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Social media does not decrease face-to-face interactions, MU study findsNow, researchers at the University of Missouri and the University of Kansas have found that social media use has no significant negative effect on social interactions or social well-being.
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News

In-depth mineral review provides foundational resource for dairy scientistsLife is dependent on minerals. Accordingly, the diets of animals must contain certain minerals in both large amounts, via marcrominerals, and small amounts, via microminerals. In a thorough and wide-ranging review published in the Journal of Dairy Science®, Jesse Goff, D.V.M., Ph.D., professor and Anderson Chair in Veterinary Medicine at Iowa State University, examined necessary minerals as well a
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Researchers develop new approach that uses single PET scan to personalize cancer treatmentResearchers have developed a same-day, noninvasive PET-based imaging approach to assess PD-L1 positive tumors, which could help guide cancer treatment decisions and assess treatment response. The study is presented in the featured article of The Journal of Nuclear Medicine's March issue.
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Violence against girls in conflict-affected populations reinforces gender normsIn some areas affected by conflict, adolescent girls and young women are perceived as responsible for their own safety and considered as burdens and threats to family honor should they become victims of violence or pregnant prior to marriage, according to a new study. This latest research on gender based violence also indicates that girls need to take responsibility for managing their interactions
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News

A bird in the bush equals money in the handA new study by the Wildlife Conservation Society (WCS) and Foundations of Success (FOS) finds that an ecotourism strategy based on 'direct payments,' where local people are compensated for the amount of wildlife seen by tourists, has resulted in a reduction in illegal hunting and an increase in wildlife sightings.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Monsoon runoff generates cool tendrils at surface, cuts off nutrientsEach summer, the South Asian monsoon transforms parts of India from semi-arid into lush green lands able to support farming. The annual infusion of rainfall and resulting runoff into the Ganges, Brahmaputra, and other rivers in the region also has a very different, but no less dramatic, impact on the Bay of Bengal in the northeast Indian Ocean.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

A near-universal way to measure enzyme inhibitionResearchers at McGill University have invented a new technique for measuring how quickly drugs interact with their molecular targets. The discovery provides scientists with a new way to investigate the effectiveness of drug candidates that might otherwise have been overlooked.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Defying the koi herpes virusWhether grilled, spicy with bell peppers or breaded in flour and fried floating in oil – the carp is one of the most popular edible fish. A dreaded threat to the up to 15 kilos fried fish: the koi herpes virus (KHV). It can be dormant in the carp for months before the most deadly KHV infection erupts – enough time to infect numerous other farmed fish. Together with three other partners, Fraunhofer
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Chemistry can change the ingredients in planet formationPlanet and star formation starts with a lot of material collapsing, falling down onto itself because of gravity. In the middle of this, a protostar is being formed. This star will then start to get warm and eventually glow. "Around this forming star, there will be a round, circulating area. This area is called a disk and is full of a lot of material. We're talking about a lot of gas, for example,
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

How are hadrons born at the huge energies available in the LHC?Our world consists mainly of particles built up of three quarks bound by gluons. The process of the sticking together of quarks, called hadronisation, is still poorly understood. Physicists from the Institute of Nuclear Physics Polish Academy of Sciences in Cracow, working within the LHCb Collaboration, have obtained new information about it, thanks to the analysis of unique data collected in high
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Why Barbra Streisand's cloned dogs aren't identical to the original petWouldn't it be wonderful if we could bring back a deceased loved one? Such ideas used to be pure science fiction, but recent advances in biotechnology seem to have brought this possibility within reach (at least for the wealthy).
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Futurity.org

Did the moon form inside a ‘spinning donut’ Earth?The moon may have formed inside the Earth when our planet was a seething, spinning cloud of vaporized rock, called a synestia, a new explanation for the moon’s origin suggests. Researchers say the new model, described in the Journal of Geophysical Research–Planets , resolves several problems in lunar formation. “The new work explains features of the moon that are hard to resolve with current idea
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Science : NPR

3 Ways To Elevate The Debate About GunsUnderstanding the authority of science means, when it comes to factual claims, intuitions and gut feelings won't cut it — whichever side of the political aisle they come from, says Tania Lombrozo. (Image credit: Miami Herald/TNS via Getty Images)
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Image conscious people are more likely to give to crowdfunding campaignsPeople who are more image conscious tend to support more crowdfunding campaigns according to a new study.
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Dagens Medicin

Regioner opretter nyt nationalt diabetesnetværkNyt nationalt netværk på diabetesområdet skal skabe et bedre samarbejde på tværs af regioner og samle trådene fra de fem nye Steno Diabetes-centre.
19h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News

A near-universal way to measure enzyme inhibitionResearchers at McGill University have invented a new technique for measuring how quickly drugs interact with their molecular targets. The discovery provides scientists with a new way to investigate the effectiveness of drug candidates that might otherwise have been overlooked.
19h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Virtual predator is self-aware, behaves like living counterpartScientists report in the journal eNeuro that they've built an artificially intelligent ocean predator that behaves a lot like the original flesh-and-blood organism on which it was modeled. The virtual creature, 'Cyberslug,' reacts to food and responds to members of its own kind much like the actual animal, the sea slug Pleurobranchaea californica, does.
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Memory overload? That's when the eyes step in eyesWhen you want to remember a phone number, you likely repeat the digits to yourself again and again. We unknowingly do something similar with our eyes to help us recall what we see and we do this more often when we're older, according to recently published findings in the Journal of Experimental Psychology: Human Perception and Performance.
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Researchers from MIPT study a nanoscaffold for heart cellsIn this paper, researchers observed some important aspects of the cell-fiber interaction using three independent methods. The experiments showed that during cell development on a nanofibrous scaffold, cardiomyocytes wrap the fibers on all sides creating a 'sheath' structure. Fibroblasts, by contrast, have a more rigid structure and a much smaller area of interaction with the substrate, touching it
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News

How reliable is diagnostic testing for Zika?Molecular diagnostic tests for the Zika virus in Brazil are not always reliable.
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Nerve damage in type 2 diabetes can be detected in the eyeBy examining the cornea of the eye with a special microscope it may be possible within ten minutes to diagnose if a person with type 2 diabetes has nerve damage. This according to a study among diabetics in Skelleftea, north Sweden.
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Native wildflowers bank on seeds underground to endure droughtNative wildflowers were surprisingly resilient during California's most recent drought, even more so than exotic grasses. To see this resilience, UC Davis researchers of a new study had to look underground to the seed bank. Native wildflowers increased the seeds they stored underground by 201 percent during the drought.
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News

A new discovery that makes possible prediction immediately before plasma lossAt the National Institutes of Natural Sciences National Institute for Fusion Science we have clarified for the first time a trigger event for sudden phenomena in which part of a magnetically confined plasma has been suddenly lost in the Large Helical Device (LHD). By capturing that change, we have become able to predict phenomena immediately before they occur. These results will contribute signifi
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

New speed record for trapped-ion 'building blocks' of quantum computersResearchers at Oxford University have set a new speed record for the 'logic gates' that form the building blocks of quantum computing - a technology that could transform the way we process information.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Palm oil in the amazon—threat or opportunity?Small migratory farming is responsible for 70 percent of the annual deforestation in Peru. Can palm oil address this problem and lead the change towards sustainable development in the Peruvian Amazon?
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Can sound be used as a weapon?Editor's note: Government and academic investigators continue to probe reports from Cuba that, starting in 2016 and continuing through 2017, U.S. and Canadian diplomats and tourists may have been subjected to a "sonic weapon," damaging their hearing, causing nausea, speech problems and potentially even mild brain injuries.
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Live Science

Ancient Native American Burial Site Discovered Off the Coast of FloridaA 7,000-year-old Native American ancestral burial site has turned up off the coast of Venice, Florida.
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Futurity.org

Tinkering with T-cells aims them at deadly brain cancerGenetically engineered cancer-killing T-cells can hunt and attack brain tumors that display a new molecular target that is highly prevalent on brain cancer cells, report researchers. “Glioblastoma is a tumor of the brain that has a very low chance of being cured with current available therapies.” The engineered T-cells both prolonged survival and controlled tumor growth in experiments with mice a
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

Robotic spiders and bees: The rise of bioinspired microrobotsJumping robot spiders and swarms of robotic bees sounds like the stuff of science fiction, but researchers are already working on such projects.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

Converting CO2 into usable energyScientists show that single nickel atoms are an efficient, cost-effective catalyst for converting carbon dioxide into useful chemicals.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

Recycled carbon fiber improve permeable pavementA research team is solving a high-tech waste problem while addressing the environmental challenge of stormwater run-off. The researchers have shown they can greatly strengthen permeable pavements by adding waste carbon fiber composite material. Their recycling method doesn't require using much energy or chemicals -- a critical factor for recycling waste materials.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

Certain smiles aren't all they're cracked up to beResearchers measured cortisol levels in the saliva of male undergraduate students as an indicator of HPA axis activity. They discovered that 'dominance' smiles, which challenge social standing and signal disapproval, were associated with higher HPA axis activity, such as increases in heart rate and salivary cortisol. Individuals perceiving 'dominance' smiles also took longer to return to their bas
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Techies Pitch Barack Obama on Building Startups Outside Silicon ValleyPresident Obama spent his time in office spreading the gospel of tech around Washington, D.C. Now, he's meeting with Rise of the Rest to take tech's mission further.
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The Best Smart Speakers: Alexa, Google Assistant, Siri, CortanaSmart speakers with Google Assistant, Alexa, and Siri are popular, but which one is right for you?
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Feed: All Latest

How Flight Simulation Tech Can Help Turn Robots Into SurgeonsA heaving robotic platform adapted from the tech that powers flight simulators could help train other robots to do surgery.
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New Scientist - News

Shock collars are a bad way to train dogs so let’s ban themThere are growing calls for wider prohibition of dog collars that jolt pets with electricity to train them. About time, says Danny Chambers
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The Atlantic

A Horrifying Path to America for Hotel WorkersF our people in need of work went to the first meeting and gave the man money, but Racida Eslabon was the only one who made it to the United States. She had already worked in a factory in Japan, and when she got back to the Philippines, she wanted to leave again so she could send money home to her mother, who was sick. She had been trying to get a job through a placement agency but with no succes
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The Atlantic

The 'CNN Effect' Dies in SyriaIn the 1990s, a term emerged for the role that vivid coverage of humanitarian crises by 24-hour news networks played in the U.S. government’s decisions to use military force. In that era, America intervened in conflicts it might have otherwise ignored, from Iraq and Somalia to Bosnia and Kosovo . Academic research has never proven a clear “CNN effect”—certainly nothing as straightforward as the p
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Fear and conflict obstructs Māori land aspirations"Idle," "unproductive," "marginal," "isolated" – Māori land often gets a bad rap. But a University of Auckland researcher is challenging this view, and offering a fresh approach to unlocking the potential of the whānau-owned whenua.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Do you know where your xenon is? Maybe it's hanging out with iron and nickel in the Earth's coreThe paradox of the missing xenon might sound like the title of the latest airport thriller, but it's actually a problem that's stumped geophysicists for decades. New work from an international team including Carnegie's Alexander Goncharov and Hanyu Liu, and Carnegie alumni Elissaios Stavrou and Sergey Lobanov, is chasing down the solution to this longstanding puzzle.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Converting CO2 into usable energyImagine if carbon dioxide (CO2) could easily be converted into usable energy. Every time you breathe or drive a motor vehicle, you would produce a key ingredient for generating fuels. Like photosynthesis in plants, we could turn CO2 into molecules that are essential for day-to-day life. Now, scientists are one step closer.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Modified switchgrass has no negative effect on soilsOvercoming the natural resistance of plant cell walls to deconstruction, known as recalcitrance, is a major bottleneck to cost-effective biofuel production. In response, scientists modified lignin. Lignin is one of the polymers responsible for recalcitrance and crucial for structural support within plant tissues. Modifying lignin improved the conversion of plant biomass to fuel. Yet a question rem
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Can strongly lensed type Ia supernovae resolve one of cosmology's biggest controversies?In 1929 Edwin Hubble surprised many people – including Albert Einstein – when he showed that the universe is expanding. Another bombshell came in 1998 when two teams of astronomers proved that cosmic expansion is actually speeding up due to a mysterious property of space called dark energy. This discovery provided the first evidence of what is now the reigning model of the universe: "Lambda-CDM,"
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Female nursery web spiders judge males based on gift quality, not the wrapping paperOne of the central features of courtship behavior in the nursery-web spider (Pisaura mirabilis) is that the male must have a gift on hand in order to make a good impression on the females. So before setting out to look for a mate, the male spider traps a prey insect and wraps it festively in silk threads ready for presentation. If accepted, the food parcel is consumed by the female during mating.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Consumers look to escapism when sentiment goes southMovie demand provides a handy barometer for the economy, and a pointer to the types of business that do well in a downturn, according to new research examining the world's largest film industry, Bollywood.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Researchers track down "forged" superfoodsChia seeds, Moringa powder, Açai or Goji berries, the list of foods with alleged health benefits is increasing constantly. Health-conscious consumers love "superfoods" that are attributed stress-reducing and detoxifying properties as well as properties strengthening the immune system. Now, in the cold season in particular, there is a growing trend of consumers to use not only proven household reme
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Diet, bugs and beating high blood pressureIt is known that changing diet can be effective in reducing high blood pressure but now new research, led by a scientist at the University of Kent, has revealed that people's natural gut bacteria can alter the effectiveness of dietary change.
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News

New study reveals the secret of magmas that produce global treasuresSouth Africa's history and economy has been built on its rich natural treasures of a number of precious metals, stones and minerals. The country's mineral deposits have been created over hundreds of millions of years through processes that are still not completely understood. One of these processes is the origin of chromitite layers hosted by layered intrusions -- a major source of chromium on our
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Repeated anesthesia in infancy increases anxiety-linked behavior in nonhuman primatesAnimals exposed to anesthesia 3x in infancy later displayed increased anxiety-linked behaviors such as scratching, self-touching and self-grooming when under mild stress.
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Crowdlending: Anatomy of a successful strategyThe ingredients for entrepreneurial success are risk taking, cooperation and competition. These were studied by CNRS and ESCP Europe researchers, decoding the strategy for conquering a new market space -- crowdlending -- that an entrepreneur started between 2014 and 2016. He created a competition-free niche, all the while contributing to implementing a long-term regulation on crowdlending in Franc
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Nuptial gifts beat pheromonesUnlike many other species, male hunting spiders do not use chemical signals such as sex pheromones to attract a mate. Instead, they make their mark by uniquely exploiting a female hunting spider's interest in food. Research led by Cristina Tuni of the Ludwig Maximilian University in Munich in Germany now shows that male hunting spiders wrap morsels of food in their silk and offer these as gifts to
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Hail technology: Deep learning may help predict when people need ridesComputers may better predict taxi and ride sharing service demand, paving the way toward smarter, safer and more sustainable cities, according to an international team of researchers.
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Fixing damaged ecosystems: How much does restoration help?Billions of dollars are spent annually on repairing ecosystems damaged by people. A new meta-analysis of 400 studies that document recovery from such large-scale disturbances worldwide suggests that while ecosystems can bounce back, they rarely mend completely, with the final stages of recovery being most difficult. The study also found that more costly active restoration efforts did not consisten
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Cancer survivors need better support to get jobs and access loans, say researchersSupport for people who survive cancer and the research that underpins their care is insufficient, particularly when it comes to non-medical issues. A new special issue of the Journal of Cancer Policy shines a light on the issues and calls for more long-term research, better cross-analysis of different cancer types and better support for those who survive the disease.
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Great mystery unravelled: Most viruses and bacteria fall from the skyThe mechanisms responsible for the dispersal of these microorganisms at the global scale are still practically unknown. However, this pioneering project marks the first time that researchers have quantified the amount of viruses and bacteria deposited in the high mountains of Sierra Nevada after travelling thousands of kilometers in the Earth's atmosphere. The research team was also able to determ
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Ingeniøren

Fem ting vi har lært af lidar-striden i de amerikanske retssaleRetssagen mellem Uber og Google om stjålen lidar-teknologi afslører kommercielle mærkværdigheder samt nag til Elon Musk og udstiller tech-giganternes værste sider.
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Scientific American Content: Global

Key Missile Defense Installation Will be Uninhabitable in Less Than 20 YearsRising seas will ruin Kwajalein Atoll site where 1,300 work and live -- Read more on ScientificAmerican.com
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

New study reveals the secret of magmas that produce South Africa's national treasuresSouth Africa's history and economy has been built on its rich natural treasures of a number of precious metals, stones and minerals.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Solution to the hyperfine puzzle in reachLast year, physicists at TU Darmstadt cast doubt on our current understanding of the interplay between electrons and atomic nuclei, and are now upping the ante by proposing a solution to this so-called "hyperfine puzzle." New measurements of the magnetic properties of bismuth atomic nuclei are now published in an article in Physical Review Letters.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Cities urged to work with scientists on climate changeAn urban environment expert at ANU has warned that city councils acting alone to address climate change, in the absence of an evidence-based systems approach, can have unintended consequences.
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Futurity.org

A.I. better predicts demand for taxis and ride-sharesNeural networks could pave the way for smarter, safer, and more sustainable cities by better predicting demand for taxi and ride-sharing services. In a study, the researchers used two types of neural networks—computational systems modeled on the human brain—that analyzed patterns of taxi demand. This deep learning approach, which lets computers learn on their own, could then predict the demand pa
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Popular Science

From albums to phone cases, here's how to bring your digital photos into the real worldDIY Five ways to print your pics. You've saved some great photos on your smartphone—don't leave them gathering digital dust. Here are six suggestions for bringing them into the real world.
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Dagens Medicin

Rigshospitalet åbner verdens første hovedpinecenterDansk Hovedpinecenter på Rigshospitalet, Glostrup er flyttet ind i et nyt byggeri, som styrker rammerne for både patientbehandling og forskning.
20h
Dagens Medicin

DSAM: Lov om genomcenter bryder med princippet om retten til privatlivÆndringerne i lovforslaget om Nationalt Genom Center er ikke tilstrækkelige, mener Anders Beich. Han mener, at patientens ret til privatliv bliver ignoreret.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

American kestrels, most common predatory birds in U.S., can reduce need for pesticide useFarmers are reducing the environmental impacts of pesticide use by attracting birds of prey to their lands. In some areas, American kestrels—small falcons—are replacing chemicals by keeping pests and invasive species away from crops.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Curing blindness with stem cells – here's the latest scienceIn 2006, Nature published a paper describing how stem cells could be used to restore sight in blind mice. This study, and similar subsequent studies, created a lot of excitement about the potential of stem cells to cure blindness in humans. Fast forward 12 years and we still don't seem to be quite there – one notable human clinical trial in Japan was stopped in 2015 due to a risk of tumour develop
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NYT > Science

Trilobites: They’re Hosting Parasitic Worms in Their Bodies to Help Treat a Neglected Disease17 healthy volunteers were paid to help prove a method of testing vaccines for schistosomiasis, which can be lethal, but some researchers are conflicted about the trial.
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NYT > Science

Cellphones on the Moon? Not So FastNokia and Vodaphone say they plan to put a high-speed cellular network on the moon. If recent history is a guide, don’t expect this to go exactly to plan.
20h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News

New speed record for trapped-ion 'building blocks' of quantum computersResearchers at Oxford University have set a new speed record for the 'logic gates' that form the building blocks of quantum computing -- a technology that could transform the way we process information.
20h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Challenges of food allergies connected to personality traits for first timeThe first study published connecting challenges of food allergies with personality traits finds that higher openness to experience is the biggest predictor of more allergy issues, while neuroticism does not lead to more frequent allergy issues. The study could improve the quality of life of people with allergies, by helping them understand how their personality traits might help or hinder their ma
20h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Do you know where your xenon is?The paradox of the missing xenon might sound like the title of the latest airport thriller, but it's actually a problem that's stumped geophysicists for decades. New work from a team including several Carnegie scientists and alumni provides the first experimental evidence of previously theorized compounds of iron and xenon existing under the conditions found in the Earth's core, potentially explai
20h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News

A model determines the quantity of bisphenol A that reaches the fetus through the motherThis research may be extremely useful for predicting the risk of developing metabolic, immunological or reproductive disorders and neurological diseases caused by this chemical. The model has been created by researchers from the Centre for Environmental, Food and Toxicological Technology (Tecnatox), from Universitat Rovira i Virgili.
20h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Research highlights the need to support family carers when discharging dying patientsNew research funded by Marie Curie has highlighted the importance of identifying the support needs of family carers before dying patients are discharged from hospital so that carers are better prepared for end of life caregiving at home.
20h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News

A neuron can cause a domino effectIf the sense of smell disappears, this can indicate a disease such as Alzheimer's or Parkinson's disease. However, unlike previously assumed, general degenerations in the nervous system do not play a leading role in the loss of the sense of smell with increasing age, but individual nerve cells or classes of nerves are decisive.
20h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Innovative 'invisible ink' detects TBScientists have pioneered a process to detect TB bacteria by adding a molecule to the bacteria's own armor that lights up under fluorescent light.
20h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News

2008 Great Recession led to increase in obesity, diabetes and mental health issuesThe 2008 Great Recession resulted in changes to individuals' health behavior, with a significant increase in the likelihood of obesity, diabetes and mental health problems, according to a new study from City, University of London and King's College London.
20h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News

How are hadrons born at the huge energies available in the LHC?Our world consists mainly of particles built up of three quarks bound by gluons. The process of the sticking together of quarks, called hadronisation, is still poorly understood. Physicists from the Institute of Nuclear Physics Polish Academy of Sciences in Cracow, working within the LHCb Collaboration, have obtained new information about it, thanks to the analysis of unique data collected in high
20h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Teachers and other school-based professionals can treat children's mental health problemsSchool-based services delivered by teachers and other school-based professionals can help reduce mental health problems in elementary-aged children, reports a study published in the March 2018 issue of the Journal of the American Academy of Child and Adolescent Psychiatry.
20h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Ethnic differences in need for heart pacemakers may have genetic linkEvidence suggests South Asian people are less likely to require a pacemaker for abnormally low heart rate than white people of European origin.
20h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Image conscious people are more likely to give to crowdfunding campaignsPeople who are more image conscious tend to support more crowdfunding campaigns according to a new study.
20h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Holding hands can sync brainwaves, ease pain, study showsA new study by a University of Colorado Boulder pain researcher shows that when a romantic partner holds hands with a partner in pain, their brain waves sync and her pain subsides.
20h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Soccer success study kicks goalsScientists believe they may have discovered the crucial ingredients for a winning soccer team.
20h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Seeing nanoscale details in mammalian cellsW. E. Moerner and his lab members peer inside mammalian cells, producing intricately detailed, 3-D images of the tiny structures within and tracking molecules' subtle movements.
20h
Big Think

Can you eat fast food on the Keto diet?It is possible to eat fast food and stay true to the keto diet. Just be wary of eliminating everything from life (and avoid the sauces). Read More
20h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Corals living in highly saline waters may be more tolerant to rising water temperaturesScientists have long suspected that corals living in very salty water can also tolerate higher water temperatures, but the link has never been verified. Now, KAUST researchers have shown that salinity directly influences the ability of the coral model organism Aiptasia to cope in warmer water and may have identified the compound that helps this process.
20h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

AI can now create fake porn, making revenge porn even more complicatedIn January this year, a new app was released that gives users the ability to swap out faces in a video with a different face obtained from another photo or video – similar to Snapchat's "face swap" feature. It's an everyday version of the kind of high-tech computer-generated imagery (CGI) we see in the movies.
20h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Signal detected from the first stars in the universe, with a hint that dark matter was involvedA signal caused by the very first stars to form in the universe has been picked up by a tiny but highly specialised radio telescope in the remote Western Australian desert.
20h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Structure of a stem cell nicheStem cells—specialized cells that can self-renew and generate functional cells—maintain adult tissues. They reside in a specialized microenvironment, known as a niche, that regulates their self-renewal and activities. Understanding the structure and signaling of the niche is important for developing stem-cell based regenerative therapies.
20h
New Scientist - News

Don’t panic – homes in the UK won’t run out of gas for heatingDemand is expected to exceed supply on Thursday and possibly Friday too, but that just means some factories will have to use less gas
20h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Girls at single-sex schools up to 85% more likely to take advanced STEM subjects than co-ed girlsNew research from Monash University has found that girls in single-sex schools are more likely to study chemistry, intermediate mathematics, advanced mathematics and physics in their senior years when compared to their co-ed counterparts.
20h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Dying reefs bigger threat to coasts than rising seasThe death of coral reefs is a more significant factor in the erosion of tropical coastlines than rising sea levels, a new international study has revealed.
20h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Search for vanishing frogs leads to discovery of new speciesFIU biologist Alessandro Catenazzi went in search of vanishing frogs in the Amazon. What he found was an entirely new species.
20h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Engineered metasurfaces replace adhesive tape in specialized microscopeThe latest advance in a new type of optics aimed at improving microscopy started with a game of tennis three years ago.
20h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

The shape of things to come for quantum materials?For the first time, researchers isolated and characterized atomically thin 2-D crystals of pentagons bonded together in palladium diselenide (PdSe2). The research confirmed predictions that the puckered structure would be stable.
20h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Mass media exposure increases demand for vaccinationsAccording to a new study in the journal Vaccine, researchers monitored daily immunization rate reports during the detected outbreak and discovered a significant increase in both bivalent oral poliovirus vaccines (bOPV) and other vaccinations during the period there was constant media exposure.
20h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Certain smiles aren't all they're cracked up to beResearchers measured cortisol levels in the saliva of male undergraduate students as an indicator of HPA axis activity. They discovered that 'dominance' smiles, which challenge social standing and signal disapproval, were associated with higher HPA axis activity, such as increases in heart rate and salivary cortisol. Individuals perceiving 'dominance' smiles also took longer to return to their bas
20h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Can strongly lensed type 1a supernovae resolve cosmology's biggest controversy?Astrophysicists at Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory (Berkeley Lab) and University of Portsmouth discovered how to control the 'micolensing' effects of strongly lensed Type 1a Supernovae with supercomputers at NERSC. Armed with this knowledge they believe they will be able to find 1,000 strongly lensed Type Ia supernovae in realtime from LSST data -- that's 20 times more than previous expectat
20h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Study: Brain stimulation helps younger, not older, adults' memoryA study conducted at the University of Illinois at Chicago found that while the younger adults showed memory improvement from transcranial direct current stimulation, the older adults did not.
20h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Study: Brain injury may boost risk of Alzheimer's earlier in lifeConcussions and other traumatic brain injuries may increase the risk of developing Alzheimer's disease earlier in life, according to a study from UT Southwestern's Peter O'Donnell Jr. Brain Institute.
20h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Skull optical clearing window for cortical imagingA non-invasive approach for creating an optical window in the skull to enable the brains of living mice to be imaged has been demonstrated by Dan Zhu et al from HUST. The work has been reported in NPG journal Light: Science and Applications.
20h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Genital inflammation reduces efficacy of tenofovir gelA new study shows that genital inflammation significantly reduces the effectiveness of tenofovir gel in preventing HIV infection in women. These findings indicate that both genital inflammation and adherence need to be addressed to improve the effectiveness of topical pre-exposure prophylaxis strategies for HIV prevention in women.
20h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Videos help medical students master physiology concepts, study findsPhysiology may be one of the toughest courses that first-year medical students take as part of a curriculum that's filled with daunting amounts of complex information. However, researchers at the University of Illinois College of Medicine and Carle Illinois College of Medicine have found that creating short videos that explain information presented during physiology lectures makes teaching easier
20h
The Atlantic

Uber, but for Getting to the HospitalThe ride-sharing company Uber is launching a new service that will allow hospitals and doctors to book rides for their patients. The new Uber Health dashboard, which has been tested by a beta group of about 100 hospitals and doctors’ offices since July, will allow medical and administrative staff to either call an Uber to the office to drive a specific patient home, or to dispatch an Uber to the
20h
Feed: All Latest

Living in 'Demon's Souls' as the Servers Shut DownA dispatch from the final hours that the game's online features were available.
20h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Study suggests exploring values can enhance science educationNew research from UT Dallas indicates that values should play a bigger role in the study of science in schools.
20h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Deep learning may help predict when people need ridesComputers may better predict taxi and ride sharing service demand, paving the way toward smarter, safer and more sustainable cities, according to an international team of researchers.
20h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Newly discovered giant viruses have 'the most complete translational apparatus of known virosphere'A team of researchers with members from several institutions in France, Brazil and Sweden has discovered two new strains of giant viruses, which they note have "the most complete translational apparatus of the known virosphere." In their paper published in the journal Nature Communications, the group describe characteristics of the viruses including details about their genomes.
20h
BBC News - Science & Environment

Swarm of starlings causes 'roadblock' in NorfolkThe birds were captured at about 14:30 GMT on Wednesday at Flitcham, near King's Lynn.
20h
Scientific American Content: Global

A Chance to Reboot the House Science CommitteeThe antiscience chair of the science, space and technology panel is leaving -- Read more on ScientificAmerican.com
20h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Plants fix DNA differently from animalsp53 is a famous tumor suppressor in mammalian cells. The equivalent in plants is suppressor of gamma response 1 (SOG1). Japanese scientists report that although the two factors interact with genes responsible for the cell cycle and DNA repair, SOG1 prefers genes regulating homologous recombination. Also, unlike p53, SOG1 has immune function. Because of its role in plant cell division and death, mo
20h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Assessing quantum dot photoemissionsRecent research from Kumamoto University in Japan has revealed that polyoxometalates (POMs), typically used for catalysis, electrochemistry, and photochemistry, may also be used in a technique for analyzing quantum dot (QD) photoluminescence (PL) emission mechanisms.
20h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

NASA InSight mission to Mars arrives at launch siteNASA's InSight spacecraft has arrived at Vandenberg Air Force Base in central California to begin final preparations for a launch this May. The spacecraft was shipped from Lockheed Martin Space, Denver, today and arrived at Vandenberg at 3:49 p.m. PST (6:49 p.m. EST). The launch period for InSight opens May 5 and continues through June 8. InSight will be the first mission to look deep beneath the
20h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Curiosity tests a new way to drill on MarsNASA's Mars Curiosity rover has conducted the first test of a new drilling technique on the Red Planet since its drill stopped working reliably.
20h
The Scientist RSS

Image of the Day: Whistling CaterpillarNessus sphinx hawkmoth larvae make alarm calls using mechanics similar to rocket engines.
20h
Viden

Californien tillader bilkørsel uden chaufførDen amerikanske stat er klar at slippe de selvkørende biler fri - så længe de kan fjernbetjenes. Forbruger-organisation advarer om, at det bliver et "dødbringende videospil".
21h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Study presents L.A. with a path to independence from imported waterDuring the height of the California drought that began in late 2011, Los Angeles imported 89 percent of its water from more than 200 miles away—an energy-intensive process. After a yearlong reprieve, Southern California is again under severe water scarcity conditions: Only 2 1/2 inches of rain have fallen in Los Angeles during the past 12 months.
21h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Image: Snowbound ItalyItaly is usually associated with relatively warm weather, but this week it, too, has fallen victim to the cold snap nicknamed the Beast from the East.
21h
Ingeniøren

Rystede forskere: Analysefejl sår tvivl om det danske vandmiljøEt laboratorium, der kontrollerer sig selv, en metode, der videnskabeligt er stemplet som uegnet, og målinger, der afviger fra udlandets. Det er historien om næsten et årti med forkerte vandprøver.
21h
Ingeniøren

Kronik: Faglig stolthed skal tiltrække unge til ingeniørfaget
21h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

CUORE experiment constrains neutrino propertiesThe neutrino is one of the least understood particles. One of the biggest open questions is whether it is its own antiparticle. If it is, it would help explain why there is more matter in the universe than antimatter. Scientists working a joint Italian-U.S. experiment released new results on a search for an extremely rare event that can only occur if neutrinos are their own antiparticles. After tw
21h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Heart attacks often follow dramatic changes in outdoor temperatureLarge day-to-day swings in temperature were associated with significantly more heart attacks in a study being presented at the American College of Cardiology's 67th Annual Scientific Session. Given that some climate models link extreme weather events with global warming, the new findings suggest climate change could, in turn, lead to an uptick in the occurrence of heart attacks, researchers said.
21h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News

A positive outlook may improve outcomes for people with chest painWhen it comes to coping with chronic angina -- chest pain or pressure that comes on when the heart isn't getting enough oxygen, usually during physical activity -- a positive outlook may help improve outcomes over time, according to a study being presented at the American College of Cardiology's 67th Annual Scientific Session.
21h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Music boosts exercise time during cardiac stress testingIf you exercise while listening to music, you may have noticed it can help boost your energy and make your workout seem quicker. Similarly, a study being presented at the American College of Cardiology's 67th Annual Scientific Session suggests listening to music during a standard cardiac stress test can help extend the time someone is able to perform the test, yielding important information about
21h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Regular walking may protect against heart failure post menopauseWalking for at least 40 minutes several times per week at an average to fast pace is associated with a near 25 percent drop in the risk of heart failure among post-menopausal women, according to new research being presented at the American College of Cardiology's 67th Annual Scientific Session. The benefit appears to be consistent regardless of a woman's body weight or whether she engages in other
21h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Inflammatory bowel disease increases likelihood of a heart attackAn analysis of medical-record data from more than 17.5 million patients found that people with inflammatory bowel disease (IBD) are at elevated risk for a heart attack, regardless of whether or not they have traditional risk factors for heart disease such as high cholesterol, high blood pressure and smoking. People between the ages of 18 and 24 are at the highest risk, according to research presen
21h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Lake Montcortès in Spain reveals the ecological footprint of climate change from the last 500 yearsOxygen decline in water masses is an environmental problem in lakes and ponds around the world. This phenomenon, which alters the conditions of continental water ecosystems, seems to be linked to global warming.
21h
The Atlantic

Conservatives Are Losing the Culture War Over GunsWho’s winning the post-Parkland debate over guns? It depends where you look. Legislatively, anti-gun control forces remain in control. President Donald Trump, after veering towards the NRA earlier in the week, veered away from it during a meeting with lawmakers on Wednesday. But he did something similar in January, vowing in a bipartisan meeting to legalize the immigrant “Dreamers” only to pull b
21h
The Atlantic

Bitcoin Is Falling Out of Favor on the Dark WebOf all of bitcoin’s uses—as a currency, a payment system, an investment, a commodity, a technology, a remittance network, a market hedge—perhaps its most notorious is as a facilitator of online drug transactions. For years now, the cryptocurrency has allowed anonymous purchasers to pay anonymous vendors on eBay-like markets, avoiding the use of the formal financial system and thus the easy interv
21h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Researchers study flower that catapults pollenFlowers are just about the last thing in nature you'd list as fast, but the mountain laurels' filaments are an exception.
21h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Successful anti-poaching operation leads to five-year conviction for three poachers in Republic of CongoThree poachers responsible for slaughtering eleven elephants in and around Nouabale-Ndoki National Park in January were convicted to five years' imprisonment by the local district court last week, according to WCS (Wildlife Conservation Society). The poachers, who had ventured deep into the remote Ndoki forest and spent three weeks killing elephants for their ivory, walked into an ambush setup by
21h
Popular Science

If the Earth is spinning, why can’t I feel it?Space Asking for a friend... Congratulations: you’re currently spinning at about 1,000 miles an hour without even trying! So why can’t you feel it?
21h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Study suggests indigenous hunters mistakenly blamed for caribou population decline in northern CanadaA trio of researchers from the University of Alberta, Memorial University of Newfoundland and the University of Saskatchewan has conducted a study of population trends for Caribou in the Northwest Territories (NWT) in Canada and has found evidence suggesting population declines are not due to indigenous hunting. In their paper published on the open access site Science Advances, Brenda Parlee, John
21h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Researchers study how Restaurant Day became the world's largest food carnivalThe world's largest food carnival, Restaurant Day, spread to more than 70 countries because it operated in a completely different way than popular consumer movements in general. Usually, the leaders of a movement determine what the movement does and then try to inspire others to join their vision. Restaurant Day, however, gave everyone an opportunity to be as creative as they wanted, say researche
21h
Feed: All Latest

Embattled Tech Companies Charge Deeper Into Health CareGoogle sibling Verily wants to help insurers; Apple's collecting health data through its apps; and Amazon has joined with other big employers to address health care costs.
21h
Feed: All Latest

Considering the Obamas’ Evolution in the Cultural ImaginationIt's been a little over a year since they left the White House and nostalgia for Barack and Michelle Obama is spilling over into fervor.
21h
Science | The Guardian

A distraction? Far from it – your smartphone is your best friend | Phoebe-Jane BoydHave those psychologists who criticise mobile phone use ever had to IMDb the plot of Tango & Cash to save a friendship? Whether you’re someone who keeps yours on the table during dinners with friends, or one who gets offended at new-message-checking between courses, there’s no denying that mobile phones cause problems. Tools of distraction and distancing that chip away at our attention spans with
21h
Scientific American Content: Global

Supreme Court Skeptical of Microsoft's Ireland E-Mail Privacy ClaimsJustices are considering whether a law passed prior to the Web and cloud computing allows companies to hide data stored abroad -- Read more on ScientificAmerican.com
21h
Dagens Medicin

Sundhedsplatformen gør viden om fødsler usikkerDen nye årsrapport på fødselsområdet afslører problemer med viden om fødsler. Sundhedsplatformen er synderen.
22h
The Scientist RSS

Researchers Publish First Pan-Cancer Genomic Analyses in Pediatric PatientsTwo large-scale studies reveal new insights into the genomic characteristics of childhood cancers.
22h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Why Russian attitudes to fatherhood are taking so long to changeRussian Missile V. PutinWhile middle-class men are increasingly adopting new attitudes to fatherhood and often share parenting responsibilities with their wives, the situation has hardly changed at all for working-class families in which conservative stereotypes about men as breadwinners and defenders and women bearing the entire responsibility for homemaking and childcare still hold strong.
22h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

New study finds flood risk for Americans is greatly underestimatedA groundbreaking new study, led by the University of Bristol, has found that 41 million Americans are at risk from flooding rivers, which is more than three times the current estimate—based on regulatory flood maps—of 13 million people.
22h
Ingeniøren

Airbus-fly med 'ultra-rækkevidde' klar til brug i årDen første ULR-version af A350 skal nu testes udendørs en periode, frem til der påmonteres motorer, og det skal flyve. Det skal sættes i drift senere i 2018.
22h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Researchers develop dyes for 'live' extremophile labelingResearchers from MIPT and their colleagues from Research Center Juelich (Germany) and Dmitry Mendeleev University of Chemical Technology of Russia have described a new method for studying microorganisms that can survive in extreme conditions. The scientists identified a fluorescent dye that enabled them to observe the life cycle of bacteria in real time.
22h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Why premature cell division promotes cancersThe accumulation of mutations in the human genome is at the origin of cancers, as well as the development of resistance to treatments. The Cyclin E and Myc genes are active in the control of cell division. When they mutate in response to a carcinogen, these genes induce cells to replicate their DNA prematurely during the cell cycle. This abnormal cell division causes a tumor to develop. Why is thi
22h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Pesticides found to accumulate in fat tissuePesticides accumulate in bodies with high fat content. This conclusion has been reported by scientists from the Far Eastern Federal University (FEFU), who have been studying seabirds and marine mammals of the Sea of Okhotsk and the Bering Sea for several years.
22h
Live Science

What Happens If You Don't Poop for 40 Days?It's not a pretty situation.
22h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Converting CO2 into usable energyScientists show that single nickel atoms are an efficient, cost-effective catalyst for converting carbon dioxide into useful chemicals.
22h
Scientific American Content: Global

3 Ways to End Polio Once and for AllLast year there were only 22 reported cases—but until the disease is completely wiped out, there's a chance of a tragic resurgence -- Read more on ScientificAmerican.com
22h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Aqueous storage device needs only 20 seconds to goA KAIST research team has developed a new hybrid energy storage device that can be charged in less than a half-minute. It employs aqueous electrolytes instead of flammable organic solvents, so it is both environmentally friendly and safe. It also facilitates a boosting charge with high energy density, which makes it suitable for portable electronic devices.
22h
Live Science

Tick Bites Tick! Tiny Male Puts the Bite on an Engorged FemaleA tiny tick had an even tinier bloodsucking hitchhiker.
22h
The Atlantic

How Bollywood's Sridevi Should Be RememberedWhen Sridevi rose to prominence in the Hindi film industry, Bollywood, in the 1980s, it was at its tawdriest. The auteurs had left the building and a new, intensely commercial Hindi cinema had taken root. Appealing to the lowest common denominator became the industry mantra as more theaters cropped up around India and films became more profitable. Heroines were mostly cast for their sex appeal an
22h
Feed: All Latest

This Smart Mouthguard Can Monitor ConcussionsPrevent Biometrics thinks its smart mouthguard can make contact sports safer for athletes.
22h
Feed: All Latest

Why Artificial Intelligence Needs To Learn How To Follow Its GutWIRED contributor Joi Ito on the importance of developing intuition and common sense in artificial intelligence machines.
22h
Feed: All Latest

Why Are There Few Women in Tech? Watch a Recruiting SessionNew Stanford research shows how companies alienate women before they start working.
22h
Latest Headlines | Science News

It’s official: Termites are just cockroaches with a fancy social lifeOn their latest master list of arthropods, U.S. entomologists have finally declared termites to be a kind of cockroach.
22h
Scientific American Content: Global

Caught on Camera: Ancient Greenland SharksScientists captured rare underwater footage of the predators in the Canadian Arctic -- Read more on ScientificAmerican.com
22h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

New insight on the formation of East Asian floraWu & Wu (1996) first proposed the former Eastern Asiatic region to be an independent Floristic kingdom. However, there are still some questions that need to be discussed. As many living fossil plants (Cenozoic plant relicts) are only found in East Asia today, many researchers have suggested that the East Asiatic Floristic is an ancient flora and the cradle of North American, European floras, and e
22h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Experimentally demonstrated a toffoli gate in a semiconductor three-qubit systemA new progress in the scaling of semiconductor quantum dot-based qubits has been achieved b y researchers at the University of Science and Technology of China. Professor GUO Guoping with his co-workers, XIAO Ming, LI Haiou and CAO Gang, designed and fabricated a quantum processor with six quantum dots, and experimentally demonstrated quantum control of the Toffoli gate. This is the first realizati
22h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Maize fields entice geese to winter in DenmarkIncreasing numbers of geese remain in Denmark for the winter. They forage in the growing number of maize fields all over the country. Researchers warn that in the long term, these geese may cause problems for agriculture.
22h
Scientific American Content: Global

Meet TESS, NASA's Next Step in the Quest for Alien EarthsLaunching in April on a two-year primary mission, the observatory could ultimately discover 20,000 planets—some of which could be much like our own -- Read more on ScientificAmerican.com
23h
New on MIT Technology Review

From the factory floor to the OR, robots can make great teammatesJulie Shah is figuring out the best ways for us to interact with our future robotic colleagues.
23h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Simulating molecular spectroscopy with circuit quantum electrodynamicsSimulation of quantum chemistry is one of the killer applications of quantum computers. In recent years, Google, IBM and other IT companies have been engineering increasingly good superconducting qubits for the purpose of simulating molecular structures. In the beginning, the quantum phase estimation algorithm was considered for obtaining the ground-state energies of molecules. However, the scalab
23h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

'Random walk' of heat carriers in amorphous polymersThe intrinsic structure of amorphous polymers is highly disordered with long, entangled molecular chains. They are usually considered as thermal insulators due to their ultra-low thermal conductivity. One effective way to improve the thermal conductivity of amorphous polymers is modulating the chain conformation by external field, such as stretching force and electric field.
23h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Nanostructuring increases efficiency of metal-free photocatalysts by factor 11One of the major challenges of the renewable energy transition is to supply energy even in the absence of sunlight. Hydrogen production by splitting water with the help of sunlight could offer a solution. Hydrogen is a good energy storage medium, and can be used in many ways. However, catalysts are needed to split water. Platinum is often used, but it is rare and expensive. Researchers therefore s
23h
Dagens Medicin

Regionshospitalet Horsens får ny ledende overlægeElse Marie Vestergaard bliver ny ledende overlæge i Blodprøver og Biokemi på Regionshospitalet Horsens.
23h
Ingeniøren

Bombe under landbrugspakken: Analysefejl har tegnet skønmaleri af det danske vandmiljøBrug af uegnet analysemetode har i næsten et årti tegnet et billede af danske farvande i fremgang. Nye rapporter viser, at det billede er forkert, og forskere har svært ved at overskue følgerne.
23h
The Atlantic

Democrats' Biggest Threat in 2018The biggest threat to Democrats in the 2018 election may be the risk of repeating their biggest mistake in the 2016 election. That mistake was Hillary Clinton’s decision to focus almost all of her effort on convincing voters that Donald Trump did not share their values, while failing to effectively challenge his promise that he would represent their economic interests. That failure helped Trump w
23h
The Atlantic

Where the Gun-Control Movement Goes SilentIn 1991, the conservative former chief justice, Warren Burger, launched a broadside against the document that for 30 years on the Supreme Court, it was his job to interpret. “If I were writing the Bill of Rights now,” he said in an interview on the MacNeil/Lehrer NewsHour , “there wouldn’t be any such thing as the Second Amendment.” Burger went on to say that the 27-word amendment referencing “th
23h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Sunlight funnel collects light from all directionsResearchers have designed a light-harvesting funnel that absorbs sunlight from any direction and concentrates it onto smaller areas, such as high-performance solar cells. By stacking multiple funnels, each tuned to a different wavelength of light, the researchers expect that it could be possible to convert the entire solar spectrum into electricity with high efficiency.
23h

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BioNyt Videnskabens Verden (www.bionyt.dk) er Danmarks ældste populærvidenskabelige tidsskrift for naturvidenskab. Det er det eneste blad af sin art i Danmark, som er helliget international forskning inden for livsvidenskaberne.

Bladet bringer aktuelle, spændende forskningsnyheder inden for biologi, medicin og andre naturvidenskabelige områder som f.eks. klimaændringer, nanoteknologi, partikelfysik, astronomi, seksualitet, biologiske våben, ecstasy, evolutionsbiologi, kloning, fedme, søvnforskning, muligheden for liv på mars, influenzaepidemier, livets opståen osv.

Artiklerne roses for at gøre vanskeligt stof forståeligt, uden at den videnskabelige holdbarhed tabes.