Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Scientists observe a new quantum particle with properties of ball lightningScientists at Amherst College and Aalto University have created, for the first time a three-dimensional skyrmion in a quantum gas. The skyrmion was predicted theoretically over 40 years ago, but only now has it been observed experimentally.
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New on MIT Technology Review

GitHub just suffered the world’s biggest DDoS attack—and barely blinkedAttack DDoS GitHub
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Ingeniøren

Støjproblemer fører til dyr forsinkelse af nye kampflyDanmarks nye F-35 kampfly får en ny placering på Flyvestation Skrydstrup efter hård kritik fra lokale beboere. Det forsinker projektet med seks til tolv måneder, og kommer til at koste omkring 260 mio. kroner.
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This is what some of the earliest stars in the universe might have looked likeSpace Meanwhile in space: moon activity and satellites watching satellite launches . There's a lot happening here on the ground, but meanwhile, in space...
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The Atlantic

The Atlantic Daily: Faces Seen in DreamsWhat We’re Following Trading Places: The steep tariffs on steel and aluminum that President Trump announced on Thursday have parallels in a 1971 surtax imposed by President Richard Nixon—and could come with serious costs, David Frum writes. The restrictions also conflict with Trump’s goal of reducing low-skilled immigration, as U.S. manufacturers may struggle to make up the difference from import
16min
Latest Headlines | Science News

Penguin supercolony discovered in AntarcticaScientists have found a penguin supercolony living on tiny, remote Antarctic islands.
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Live Science

The 5 'New' Types of Diabetes, ExplainedDiabetes just got a little more complicated, or clearer, depending on your perspective. Researchers proposed classifying diabetes as five types.
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How Planes Land in Crazy CrosswindsBomb cyclone? Nor'easter? No problem! What looks terrifying from the cabin is more like a bit of fun for pilots who know how to crab and slip.
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Winter Storm Riley Brings Massive Flooding to New England—AgainAdd three to five feet of storm surge on top of a very high tide, and you've got a recipe for flooding.
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The Atlantic

The Atlantic Politics & Policy Daily: TarriftToday in 5 Lines Georgia Governor Nathan Deal killed a proposed tax break that would have benefited Delta Airlines after the airline cut ties with the National Rifle Association. White House Chief of Staff John Kelly defended his handling of the domestic-abuse allegations against former Trump staffer Rob Porter and offered his own timeline of the episode. In a series of morning tweets, President
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Popular Science

Here are the new phones and trends from Mobile World Congress 2018Technology Couldn't make it to Barcelona? No worries. Here's what you need to see. Sony has a new flagship phone, headphone jacks are pretty much dead, and phones have screen notches now for some reason.
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Live Science

Pollution from Ships Creates Massive Clouds Visible from SpaceThicker clouds above the North Atlantic, captured by NASA, are the result of pollution from ships passing below.
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Science : NPR

Here's Why Environmentalists Are Cheering The Latest Burger At Sonic Drive-InThe fast-food chain is about to roll out a new kind of burger made from a mixture of beef and mushrooms. Sonic calls it "uniquely delicious." Environmentalists say it could help save the planet. (Image credit: The Mushroom Council)
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How Facebook Could Play By Advertising's 'Equal Time' RuleWIRED columnist Antonio García Martínez on how the social media giant could even the playing field for political ads.
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Science : NPR

Some Of The Oldest-Ever Tattoos Found On Egyptian MummiesThanks to new technology, archaeologists in the British Museum have just discovered what they say are the earliest-known body art displaying figures. (Image credit: Courtesy of Renee Friedman)
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

Early psychosis programs significantly reduce patient mortality, study findsResearchers have found that specialized programs for early psychosis can substantially reduce patient mortality.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

Mammalian development: Blastocyst architectureThe mechanisms that underlie early embryonic development in humans and cattle are very similar. Therefore, researchers argue that bovine embryos might well be a better model for early human development than the mouse system.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

Want more efficient simulators? Store time in a quantum superpositionComputer models of systems such as a city's traffic flow or neural firing in the brain tends to use up a lot of memory. But a new approach with quantum simulators could significantly cut that memory use by taking a quantum approach to time, suggest researchers.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

No link between current or previous marijuana use and kidney disease, say researchersMarijuana is the most commonly used illicit drug in the United States, with an increasing trend of use among middle-aged and older individuals. However, potential health effects of marijuana use in the general population have not been extensively studied, and little is known about potential effects on kidney function. According to a new cross-sectional study of adults aged 18-59 in the US, there i
1h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Groups, US reach settlement on predator-killing poisonsU.S. officials have agreed to complete a study on how two predator-killing poisons could be affecting federally protected species as part of the settlement of a lawsuit filed by environmental and animal-welfare groups.
1h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Bitcoin heist: 600 powerful computers stolen in IcelandSome 600 computers used to "mine" bitcoin and other virtual currencies have been stolen from data centers in Iceland in what police say is the biggest series of thefts ever in the North Atlantic island nation.
1h
Live Science

Stephen Hawking Says He Knows What Happened Before the Big BangWhat was there before there was anything? Stephen Hawking might know the answer.
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Do racial and gender disparities exist in newer glaucoma treatments?The American Glaucoma Society today announced that it has awarded a grant to Mildred MG Olivier, MD, to study how often minimally invasive glaucoma surgery (MIGS) devices and procedures are used in black and Latino glaucoma patients and whether these devices perform similarly across races, ethnicities, genders, ages, and regions. The goal of Dr. Olivier's research is to increase quality care for g
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News

3-D-written model to provide better understanding of cancer spreadPurdue researcher Luis Solorio has helped create a lifelike cancer environment out of polymer to better predict how drugs might stop its course.
2h
The Atlantic

Can a New President Really Solve South Africa's Corruption Problem?“South Africa’s Lost Decade,” the Economist called it. Before being shoved from power last month, President Jacob Zuma enriched himself and his patrons while presiding over economic disaster for his citizens. The burden of public debt nearly doubled over the Zuma years. More than one in three working-age South Africans is jobless . Unemployed men turn to crime, tainting South Africa as one of the
2h
Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

Tracking changes in fish communitiesIn a study spanning twelve years, researchers have developed a method to calculate the fluctuating stability of a natural ecological community in Maizuru Bay.
2h
Live Science

Expedition to 'Hidden' Antarctic Ecosystem Turned Back by Heavy IceScientists on their way to investigate a mysterious region of Antarctica’s seafloor, hidden by thick ice for 120,000 years, have run into an obstacle: too much ice.
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Gastric bypass surgery can give better control for diabetes and obesity than lifestyle modificationPatients treated with a form of bariatric surgery did significantly better than patients provided with an intensive diabetes and weight management program.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

Researchers find transferable antibiotic resistance gene in pathogen of developing nationsA team of investigators has found that the mcr-1 drug resistance gene, which encodes resistance to a drug that is used as a last resort, has been found for the first time in Shigella flexneri. Shigella are one of the leading causes of diarrhea worldwide.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

Enrichment program boosts STEM for black students but leaves Latinos behindIn a new study that capitalizes on data from the National Center for Educational Statistics and methods that address causality, sociologists looked at an earlier portion of the pipeline -- in high school, when students' commitment to STEM fields tends to solidify.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

Improving pediatric asthma care is possibleA new study shows improved personalized inpatient assessments can enhance the accuracy of the prescribed asthma therapy a child receives. A physician's asking of the six key asthma control questions can help.
2h
Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

Backyard chickens need more regulationHistorically, keeping backyard chickens was a response to economic hardship -- whether it was in the Depression or during wartime food rationing. But a growing number of chickens today are roaming or are caged on small family farms and in backyards, as suburban and urban poultry gains more popularity among consumers.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

Unprecedentedly wide and sharp dark matter mapA research team released an unprecedentedly wide and sharp dark matter map based on the newly obtained imaging data by Hyper Suprime-Cam on the Subaru Telescope. The dark matter distribution is estimated by the weak gravitational lensing technique. The team found indications that the number of dark matter halos could be inconsistent with what the simplest cosmological model suggests. This could be
2h
Blog » Languages » English

NEI Marathon starts Monday!Hey folks! As detailed here , the National Eye Institute is celebrating its 50th birthday this year and we’re helping them kick it off with a special marathon and trivia day on Monday. Marathon signups are open now, and here’s a little reminder about what happens during a marathon, if you’re new! Starting at 8 AM EST on 3/5 , you will have 24 hours to grow and complete (in this case) the special
2h
Popular Science

Pooping on a mountain is even more complicated than it soundsEnvironment Our guide to evacuating ethically in the wilderness. Even most casual hikers know they should “pack out” their garbage—but plenty of them feign ignorance when it comes to packing out poop. And that's a huge problem.
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TED Talks Daily (SD video)

How to connect with depressed friends | Bill BernatWant to connect with a depressed friend but not sure how to relate to them? Comedian and storyteller Bill Bernat has a few suggestions. Learn some dos and don'ts for talking to people living with depression -- and handle your next conversation with grace and, maybe, a bit of humor.
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BBC News - Science & Environment

DNA sheds light on settlement of PacificTwo genetic studies has shed light on the epic journeys that led to the settlement of the vast Pacific region by humans.
3h
Blog » Languages » English

Eyewire Release Report 3/2/2018Happy Friday! Here are all changes on Eyewire since the last report, even if there was a separate post about something big, so that you have a comprehensive picture of everything new from the last few weeks. The “Events” and “Showcase” headings had been messed up on the Change Cell menu for a while, but now they’re fixed! We deployed a minor fix to prevent an error message about reapgrowing that
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Rome subway construction uncovers 2nd-century military homeArchaeologists say work to expand Rome's subway has unearthed a sprawling 2nd-century domus, or residence, of a military commander, complete with well-preserved geometric design mosaic, marble floors and frescoed walls.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Enrichment program boosts STEM for black students but leaves Latinos behindResearchers trying to figure out how to get more black and Latino students into science, technology, engineering and mathematics usually focus on those students' college years.
3h
Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

Scientists observe a new quantum particle with properties of ball lightningScientists have created, for the first time a three-dimensional skyrmion in a quantum gas. The skyrmion was predicted theoretically over 40 years ago, but only now has it been observed experimentally.
3h
Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

Mapping nanoscale chemical reactions inside batteries in 3-DResearchers have developed a new technique that lets them pinpoint the location of chemical reactions happening inside lithium-ion batteries in three dimensions at the nanoscale level.
3h
Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

Thawing permafrost causing the 'browning' of northern lakesAs ice the melts, the organic carbon found in permafrost is being released once again after ages of confinement in the soil. It is making its way into Arctic and subarctic lakes and ponds, and modifying their composition.
3h
Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

Children with marginally low birth weight needs treatmentChildren with a birth weight under 2.5 kilos stand at risk of becoming underweight and can experience cognitive difficulties as well as diabetes and cardiovascular disease later in life. However, early iron supplementation seems to provide some protection.
3h
NYT > Science

Q&A: Why That Sippy Cup Won’t Dry in the DishwasherPlastic containers remain wet while glass tends to dry. The reason lies in two physical processes.
3h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Antibiotics may impact cancer treatment efficacyThere is mounting laboratory evidence that in the increasingly complex, targeted treatment of cancer, judicious use of antibiotics also is needed to ensure these infection fighters don't have the unintended consequence of also hampering cancer treatment, scientists report.
3h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Planning for smallpox outbreak must consider immunosuppressionNew research from UNSW Sydney reveals that the number of people living with weakened immune systems must be examined when planning for the real risk of smallpox re-emerging in the world. The research poses a warning after Canadian scientists last year created a smallpox-like virus in a lab using just mail order DNA.
3h
Big Think

Friday essay: the myth of the ancient Greek ‘gay utopia’The persistent dream of a “gay utopia” is one of the constants in gay and lesbian historical imaginings over the last 200 years. But is it real? Read More
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Big Think

1.5 million penguin 'supercolony' discovered in AntarcticaA megalopolis of penguins has been found on the awesomely-named "Danger Islands" off of the coast of Antarctica thanks to drone pilots. Read More
3h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Backyard chickens need more regulationHistorically, keeping backyard chickens was a response to economic hardship—whether it was in the Depression or during wartime food rationing.
3h
cognitive science

Déjà vu and feelings of prediction: They're just feelingssubmitted by /u/symonsymone [link] [comments]
3h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

New study: Snowpack levels show dramatic decline in western statesA new study of long-term snow monitoring sites in the western United States found declines in snowpack at more than 90 percent of those sites - and one-third of the declines were deemed significant.
3h
Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

Dual frequency comb generated on a single chip using a single laserEngineers have miniaturized dual-frequency combs by putting two frequency comb generators on a single millimeter-sized silicon-based chip. This could lead to low-cost, portable sensing and spectroscopy in the field in real-time.
3h
Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

The principle of electric wind in plasmaScientists have identified the basic principle of electric wind in plasma. This finding will contribute to developing technology in various applications of plasma, including fluid control technology.
3h
Big Think

Is a standing desk actually bad for your health?A new study finds that supposedly healthier standing desks cause physical pain and slow down users’ thinking. Read More
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The Atlantic

Will the Last Person to Leave the West Wing Please Turn Out the Lights?It’s looking like it might be spring-cleaning season at the White House. Not only did Communications Director Hope Hicks announce her departure on Wednesday , ending her run as President Trump’s longest-tenured staffer, but a series of reports have suggested a number of other top-ranking officials might be clearing out their offices and desks soon. Those rumored to be considering exits include Ja
3h
Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

Nervous system puts the brakes on inflammationCells in the nervous system can 'put the brakes' on the immune response to infections in the gut and lungs to prevent excessive inflammation, according to new research. This insight may one day lead to new ways to treat diseases caused by unchecked inflammation, such as asthma and inflammatory bowel disease.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

Discovery shows wine grapes gasping for breathResearchers have discovered how grapes 'breathe', and that shortage of oxygen leads to cell death in the grape.
3h
Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

Rethinking childbirth education could save AU $97 million p.a.Research shows antenatal education not only reduces the rates of medical interventions during childbirth, but can save the healthcare system up to AU$97 million per year.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

Here's how viruses inactivate the immune system, causing cancerIt's no new news that viruses cause cancer. For example, human papillomavirus (HPV) causes almost all of the more than 500,000 annual worldwide cases of cervical cancer. This makes sense: By driving the proliferation of infected cells, viruses speed manufacture of more viruses, but excessive cellular proliferation is also a hallmark of cancer. Now a new review explores another strategy that viruse
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

Sedative may prevent delirium in the ICUA low dose of the sedative dexmedetomidine given at night may prevent delirium in critically ill patients, according to new research.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

Payments to protect carbon stored in forests must increase to defend against rubberEfforts to protect tropical forests in Southeast Asia for the carbon they store may fail because protection payments are too low. A new study finds that schemes designed to protect tropical forests from clearance based on the carbon they store do not pay enough to compete financially with potential profits from rubber plantations. Without increased financial compensation for forest carbon credits,
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

Patients with head injuries do better when treated by trauma centers, even if it means bypassing other hospitalsPatients who sustain severe head injuries tend to have better outcomes if they are taken to a designated trauma center, but 44 percent of them are first taken to hospitals without these specialized care capabilities, according to new research.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Mapping nanoscale chemical reactions inside batteries in 3-DResearchers from the University of Illinois at Chicago and Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory have developed a new technique that lets them pinpoint the location of chemical reactions happening inside lithium-ion batteries in three dimensions at the nanoscale level. Their results are published in the journal Nature Communications.
3h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

An 'insider's look' at Tropical Cyclone 11S from NASA's Aqua SatelliteInfrared imagery provides valuable temperature data in storms, and when NASA's Aqua satellite flew over newly developed Tropical Cyclone 11S in the Southern Indian Ocean, its gathered that data allowing forecasters to see where the strongest storms were located within.
3h
The Atlantic

Red Sparrow Is a Shockingly Brutal Espionage ThrillerA bit of service journalism ahead: Don’t go into Red Sparrow expecting an action-packed Cold War drama like last year’s Atomic Blonde , or the kind of humanistic spy thriller so well executed on television in FX’s The Americans . Sure, Francis Lawrence’s new film, starring Jennifer Lawrence, is a tale of espionage, of false identities, and of competing American and Russian interests. But it’s set
3h
Live Science

How Much Trash Is on the Moon?Moon-based detritus includes leftover urine-collection kits, an olive branch and tons of robotic equipment from lunar probes.
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Popular Science

Wishing your city had more wildlife? Just look a little closer.Animals Even urban areas have wild animals galore. From big-brained mice to feral pigeons, the city is positively teeming with wildlife.
4h
Live Science

Salmonella-Tainted Kratom Sickens a Dozen More People in OutbreakA dozen more people have been sickened in a Salmonella outbreak linked to kratom, the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) announced today (March 2).
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The Atlantic

Italy's Messy Politics Are No Longer LocalMILAN—The same day that left-wing groups and parties held an anti-fascist rally in Rome, protesting the apparent rise of the hard-right in Italy, the piazza in front of the Milan cathedral was filled with energized supporters of Matteo Salvini, the leader of Italy’s League party. The party is best known for its xenophobia and its flirtation with the idea of exiting the euro—and Salvini happens to
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BBC News - Science & Environment

Storm Emma: Weather causes accident and strands trainsStorm Emma combined with snow has been causing havoc across the UK.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

Spring is springing earlier in polar regions than across the rest of earthFor every 10 degrees north from the equator you move, spring arrives about four days earlier than it did a decade ago, according to a new study. This is three times greater than what previous studies indicated. The authors connect such differences to more rapid warming at higher latitudes.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

Eating fish may be tied to a reduced risk of MSEating fish at least once a week or eating fish one to three times per month in addition to taking daily fish oil supplements may be associated with a reduced risk of multiple sclerosis (MS), according to a preliminary study.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

Potent anti-cancer drug effect in rare ovarian cancerAn anti-cancer drug used to fight leukemia shows promise against a rare and aggressive type of ovarian cancer -- small cell carcinoma of the ovary hypercalcemic type (SCCOHT) -- which strikes young women and girls, according to a new study. Ponatinib was found in TGen-led drug screens and preclinical studies to significantly delay tumor growth and reduce tumor volume in SCCOHT.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

Hormones may affect girls' interests, but not their gender identity or playmatesPrenatal exposure to androgens is not associated with girls spending more or less time with other girls, but was associated with an increased interest in activities that have traditionally been thought of as masculine, according to researchers, who say it supports the idea that gender development is complex and does not solely rely on either biological or social factors.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

Crowdlending: Anatomy of a successful strategyThe ingredients for entrepreneurial success are risk taking, cooperation and competition. Scientists are decoding the strategy for conquering a new market space -- crowdlending -- that an entrepreneur started between 2014 and 2016.
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Dual frequency comb generated on a single chip using a single laserColumbia Engineers are the first to miniaturize dual-frequency combs by putting two frequency comb generators on a single millimeter-sized silicon-based chip. This could lead to low-cost, portable sensing and spectroscopy in the field in real-time. 'This is the first time a dual comb has been generated on a single chip using a single laser,' says Electrical Engineering Prof. Michal Lipson who led
4h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Scientists observe a new quantum particle with properties of ball lightningScientists at Amherst College and Aalto University have created, for the first time a three-dimensional skyrmion in a quantum gas. The skyrmion was predicted theoretically over 40 years ago, but only now has it been observed experimentally.
4h
Live Science

Unfortunate Python Paid 'Deerly' for a Too-Big MealA deer swallowed (and barfed up again) by a snake weighed more than its predator.
4h
Latest Headlines | Science News

Knotted structures called skyrmions seem to mimic ball lightningSkyrmions in a quantum state of matter have something surprising in common with ball lightning — linked magnetic fields.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Dual frequency comb generated on a single chip using a single laserIn a new paper published today in Science Advances, researchers under the direction of Columbia Engineering Professors Michal Lipson and Alexander Gaeta (Applied Physics and Applied Mathematics) have miniaturized dual-frequency combs by putting two frequency comb generators on a single millimeter-sized chip.
4h
New on MIT Technology Review

Cryptocurrency is terrible as money but “crypto-assets” are for real, says Bank of England’s chief
4h
Big Think

Study: Diabetes falls into five types, not just twoAfter examining thousands of diabetes patients, researchers in Finland and Sweden identified five distinct categories of diabetes. Read More
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The Atlantic

Photos of the Week: Monster Dog Pull, Drone Fashion, Battle SledgeTree weddings in Mexico, an armed church ceremony in Pennsylvania, freezing conditions in Europe, relentless airstrikes in Syria, the colors of Holi in India, the Pyramids of Giza in Egypt, bipedal robot fights in Japan, and much more.
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The Atlantic

Forgiving Jimmy Kimmel“That’s what this show will be: a joyous celebration of chauvinism!” That was Jimmy Kimmel, in 1999, announcing the guiding ethic of the new Comedy Central series he and Adam Carolla debuted that year. The Man Show , they declared, would be a show by men, for men, about men. It would be an exploration of Manliness itself, as an aspiration and an archetype: beer-chugging, boob-ogling, a little bit
5h
Big Think

Nationwide 5G mobile network: how fast will it be and how soon will it get here?AT&T, T-Mobile, Verizon, and Sprint have all recently unveiled plans for a nationwide 5G network in the US. Read More
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The Atlantic

Can Gun-Control Advocates Make the NRA Toxic?After the mass shooting in Parkland, Florida, supporters of more gun control quickly pressured numerous corporations to cut ties with the National Rifle Association: No longer will NRA members receive a pre-negotiated discount when flying United, renting a Hertz car, or patronizing a range of other companies. What remains to be seen is whether the success of #BoycottNRA merely denies NRA members
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The Scientist RSS

Slime Mold in ResidenceAt Hampshire College, students and faculty use the amoeba Physarum polycephalum-both a 'visiting scholar' and a model organism-to examine human societal and political quandaries.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

How extremophiles flourish in stressful environmentsThousands of molecules of ribonucleic acid make salt-loving microbes known as "extremophiles" highly resistant to the phenomenon oxidative stress -- the uncontrollable production of unstable forms of oxygen called "free radicals," which can negatively affect DNA, proteins, and lipids in cells.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

Snowpack levels show dramatic decline in western states, U.S.A new study of long-term snow monitoring sites in the western United States found declines in snowpack at more than 90 percent of those sites -- and one-third of the declines were deemed significant.
5h
Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

Tiny bubbles of oxygen got trapped 1.6 billion years agoTake a good look at these photos: They show you 1.6 billion years old fossilized oxygen bubbles, created by tiny microbes in what was once a shallow sea somewhere on young Earth.
5h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Researchers find transferable antibiotic resistance gene in pathogen of developing nationsA team of investigators has found that the mcr-1 drug resistance gene, which encodes resistance to a drug that is used as a last resort, has been found for the first time in Shigella flexneri. Shigella are one of the leading causes of diarrhea worldwide. The research is published March 2 in Applied and Environmental Microbiology, a journal of the American Society for Microbiology.
5h
Scientific American Content: Global

The Math behind the Perfect Free ThrowThe fate of a free throw is set the instant the ball leaves the player’s fingertips -- Read more on ScientificAmerican.com
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News

New method identifies splicing biomarkers for liver cancerother cancer types. The Takeaway:Researchers have developed a method for identifying a new kind of biomarker for liver cancer and possibly other cancers, based on spotting variations in the way RNA messages copied from genes are edited, or spliced.
5h
The Atlantic

Your 2018 Oscars Crash CourseThis year’s Oscars ceremony may not be able to promise the excitement of last year’s iconic envelope mix-up , but it’s sure to be an entertaining show nonetheless. With no definitive lead in the Best Picture category, the night could end up being almost anyone’s. As Sunday’s broadcast approaches, the pressure is mounting for viewers, both casual and die-hard, to be up-to-date on all the nominees,
5h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News

New study: Snowpack levels show dramatic decline in western statesA new study of long-term snow monitoring sites in the western United States found declines in snowpack at more than 90 percent of those sites -- and one-third of the declines were deemed significant.
6h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Mapping nanoscale chemical reactions inside batteries in 3-DResearchers from the University of Illinois at Chicago and Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory have developed a new technique that lets them pinpoint the location of chemical reactions happening inside lithium-ion batteries in three dimensions at the nanoscale level.
6h
Popular Science

Five rad and random items to entertain your kidsGadgets The end-of-week dispatch from PopSci's commerce editor. Vol. 39. Throughout the week I spend hours scouring the web for things that are ingenious or clever or ridiculously cheap.
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The Atlantic

Why Colleges Are Embracing the #NeverAgain MovementAs high-school students around the country organize in support of stronger gun-control legislation in the wake of the Parkland shooting, many are finding that, at the very least, one thing they don’t have to worry about is the possibility of disciplinary action hurting their chances of getting into college some day. Superintendents in some school districts have warned that students who participat
6h
New on MIT Technology Review

Seriously, how are Uber and Lyft drivers surviving?Uber Lyft Service
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Backyard chickens need more regulationAuthor recommends more laws that mandate vaccinations, manure management and general animal welfare. The most common guidelines for poultry ordinances pertain to housing design, placement and the sex of birds.
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The Guardian's Science Weekly

Cross Section: Steven Pinker – Science Weekly podcastWe ask Prof Steven Pinker whether today’s doom and gloom headlines are a sign we’re worse off than in centuries gone by, or if human wellbeing is at an all-time high
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Science | The Guardian

Cross Section: Steven Pinker – Science Weekly podcastWe ask Prof Steven Pinker whether today’s doom and gloom headlines are a sign we’re worse off than in centuries gone by, or if human wellbeing is at an all-time high Subscribe and review on Apple Podcasts , Soundcloud , Audioboom , Mixcloud and Acast , and join the discussion on Facebook and Twitter Cognitive psychologist and linguist Prof Steven Pinker of Harvard University is no stranger to int
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Study shows improving pediatric asthma care is possibleNew study findings published in the March issue of Hospital Pediatrics shows improved personalized inpatient assessments can enhance the accuracy of the prescribed asthma therapy a child receives. A physician's asking of the six key asthma control questions can help.
6h
Science | The Guardian

Gender stereotypes are still pervasive in our culture | LettersGirls’ subject choices in school are one clear symptom of their unequal experiences, says Julia Higgins of the Institute of Physics It is astonishing that, in 2018, girls still grow up being treated very differently from boys through entrenched stereotyping and unconscious biases. Girls’ subject choices in school are one clear symptom of their unequal experiences. One example is that four times as
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

How we discovered the strange physics of jets from supermassive black holesSupermassive black holes, which lurk at the heart of most galaxies, are often described as "beasts" or "monsters". But despite this, they are pretty much invisible. To show that they are there at all, astronomers typically have to measure the speed of the clouds of gas orbiting those regions.
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New Scientist - News

A mountain range on Saturn’s moon Iapetus may be a former ringFalling space debris should make craters on rocky surfaces. But on Saturn’s moon Iapetus, it might have created a belt of mountains around the equator
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New Scientist - News

We’ve evolved to sleep less and that may be causing Alzheimer’sHumans sleep less than any other primate and spend less time in deep, non-REM sleep – which may cause a high risk of Alzheimer’s
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New Scientist - News

Fish called ‘sarcastic fringehead’ has a wider mouth than bodySarcastic fringeheads have a truly spectacular threat display: they open their mouths until they’re gaping wide, displaying two rows of teeth and fluorescent cheeks
6h
The Atlantic

Maybe Blue States Won’t Take Serious Action on Climate ChangeAs President Trump has hacked his way through Obama-era climate policy over the past year, progressives have spread a comforting story. “The United States has not gone dark on climate action,” goes the tale . The federal government may have left the Paris Agreement, but dozens of U.S. companies and universities are still in . The president may repeal dozens of EPA regulations, but he’s just spurr
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Feed: All Latest

YouTube's Content Moderation Has Become an Inconsistent MessYouTube has struggled on multiple fronts with efforts to effectively moderate its platform.
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News

An 'insider's look' at Tropical Cyclone 11S from NASA's Aqua SatelliteInfrared imagery provides valuable temperature data in storms, and when NASA's Aqua satellite flew over newly developed Tropical Cyclone 11S in the Southern Indian Ocean, its gathered that data allowing forecasters to see where the strongest storms were located within.
7h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News

JHU scientists discover how extremophiles flourish in stressful environmentsRNA makes salt-loving microbes known as "extremophiles" highly resistant to the phenomenon oxidative stress - the uncontrollable production of unstable forms of oxygen called "free radicals."
7h
Big Think

Why philosophers say chimps have to be considered personsThe Nonhuman Rights Project turns to philosophy to persuade courts to honor chimpanzees’ rights. Read More
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Inside Science

BRIEF: Gridlike Cities Are HotterBRIEF: Gridlike Cities Are Hotter Researchers discover that the arrangement of cities’ streets and buildings affect how much heat they trap. heat-islands1.png An illustration of an urban heat island. Image credits: NASA/JPL-Caltech Earth Friday, March 2, 2018 - 11:00 Yuen Yiu, Staff Writer (Inside Science) -- The gridlike street network in Manhattan might be a breeze to navigate, but it actually
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The Atlantic

Trump Can't Have It Both WaysThere is a contradiction at the heart of Trumpism’s embrace of protectionism and restrictionism. President Donald Trump often portrays international trade less as a non-zero-sum form of cooperation and more as a battle to the death, in which wily foreigners have for years been winning at the expense of ordinary Americans, thanks in large part to the treacherousness of U.S. elites. His call for st
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The Atlantic

The Power of Grief-Fueled ActivismAs she stood in front of hundreds of gun-control advocates at a rally in Fort Lauderdale, Florida, late last month, the Marjory Stoneman Douglas High School senior Emma González told the audience that she and her peers should instead be at home grieving. Yet there González was, wiping tears from her eyes and delivering a now-viral speech demanding tougher gun laws in the U.S. A few days later, sh
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Scientific American Content: Global

Young-Blood Transfusions Are on the Menu at Society Gala“There’s no evidence in my mind that it’s going to work” -- Read more on ScientificAmerican.com
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Big Think

A penguin "mega-colony" has just been discovered, far away from humansIt's raining penguins! Read More
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Quanta Magazine

Solution: ‘When Probability Meets Real Life’When making hard decisions, do you go with your gut or try to calculate the risks? In many cases going with your gut is fine, but the answers to our February puzzle problems show how explicit probabilistic thinking can outperform intuitive estimates. They also highlight the differences between situations where an intuitive approach succeeds and ones where it fails. Our first problem was an excerp
7h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Enrichment program boosts STEM for black students but leaves Latinos behindIn a new study that capitalizes on data from the National Center for Educational Statistics and methods that address causality, Cornell sociologists looked at an earlier portion of the pipeline -- in high school, when students' commitment to STEM fields tends to solidify.
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Latest Headlines | Science News

Loner gas clouds could be a new kind of stellar systemWeird loner clumps of gas that have wandered for 1 billion years may have been stripped from a trio of larger galaxies.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

Previously unknown 'supercolony' of Adélie penguins discovered in AntarcticaIn a paper released on March 2nd in the journal Scientific Reports, the scientists announced the discovery of a previously unknown 'supercolony' of more than 1,500,000 Adélie Penguins in the Danger Islands, a chain of remote, rocky islands off of the Antarctic Peninsula's northern tip.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

Fossilised plant leaf wax provides new tool for understanding ancient climatesNew research has outlined a new methodology for estimating ancient atmospheric water content based on fossil plant leaf waxes.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

Native wildflowers bank on seeds underground to endure droughtNative wildflowers were surprisingly resilient during California's most recent drought, even more so than exotic grasses. To see this resilience, UC Davis researchers of a new study had to look underground to the seed bank. Native wildflowers increased the seeds they stored underground by 201 percent during the drought.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Vero: Hot Instagram alternative - but will it stick around?Instagram users fed up the service becoming more and more like Facebook are flocking to a hot new app called Vero.
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Dana Foundation

Brain Awareness Week 2018Guest post by Urooj Ansari, Social Media Chair at Be Brainy NYC In 2012, Be Brainy NYC, the Greater NYC Chapter of the Society for Neuroscience, held its first Brain Awareness Week. Launched by Ho Yu of Columbia University, the chapter was expanded by Heather McKellar of NYU, Paula Croxson of Mount Sinai, Kelley Remole of Columbia University, Ted Altschuler of Baruch College, and Heather Bowling,
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Ingeniøren

Nye legoklodser skal fremstilles af sukkerrørLegoæsker vil fremover have grønne palmeblade og træer, der er lavet af bioplast fremstillet af sukkerrør, men det er kun få af klodsgigantens varer, der kan gøres grønne.
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The Atlantic

Letters: Is the Munich Security Conference to Blame for the Void in International Relations?Witnessing the Collapse of the Global Elite This year’s security conference in Munich, Eliot Cohen argued , was a stark reminder that this class has nothing of substance to offer a world in turmoil. Eliot Cohen is one of my heroes. As a professor, he taught me the value of succinctness; as a friend, he taught me a lot more. I admire him for his historical knowledge and moral compass—and for his n
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Popular Science

Heart attacks seem more common after extreme temperature changesNexus Media News Unseasonably warm afternoons might not do us much good. New research shows that extreme temperature fluctuations raise the risk of heart attacks.
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TED Talks Daily (SD video)

How we became sisters | Felice Belle and Jennifer MurphyPoets Felice Belle and Jennifer Murphy perform excerpts from their play "Other Women," which is created and directed by Monica L. Williams. In a captivating journey, they weave together stories full of laughter, loyalty, tragedy and heartbreak, recalling the moments that made them sisters.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Vertical measurements of air pollutants in urban BeijingSevere haze episodes with surprisingly high concentrations of fine particles (PM2.5) still occur in fall and winter seasons in Beijing, although the air quality has been improved in recent years.
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Want to Take Stunning Photos? Turn Your Camera Upside DownAt least, it works for Arnau Rovira Vidal.
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Science : NPR

From Almonds To Rice, Climate Change Could Slash California Crop Yields By 2050An analysis of nearly 90 studies finds that warming temperatures may alter where key crops grow across the state, which provides about two-thirds of America's produce. (Image credit: David Paul Morris/Bloomberg/Getty Images)
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Thawing permafrost causing the 'browning' of northern lakesAs ice the melts, the organic carbon found in permafrost is being released once again after ages of confinement in the soil. It is making its way into Arctic and subarctic lakes and ponds, and modifying their composition. The portrait presented by an international team of researchers that includes Professor Isabelle Laurion of INRS shows the influence that thawing permafrost has on surface water b
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

Two species of ravens nevermore? New research finds evidence of 'speciation reversal'A new study almost 20 years in the making provides some of the strongest evidence yet of the 'speciation reversal' phenomenon -- where two distinct lineages hybridize and eventually merge into one -- in two lineages of common ravens.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

Brain stimulation helps younger, not older, adults' memoryA study found that while the younger adults showed memory improvement from transcranial direct current stimulation, the older adults did not.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

Seeing nanoscale details in mammalian cellsScientists peer inside mammalian cells, producing intricately detailed, 3-D images of the tiny structures within and tracking molecules' subtle movements.
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Science | The Guardian

Arctic spring is starting 16 days earlier than a decade ago, study showsClimate change is causing the season to start comparatively earlier the further north you go, say scientists The Arctic spring is arriving 16 days earlier than it did a decade ago, according to a new study which shows climate change is shifting the season earlier more dramatically the further north you go. The research, published on Friday in the journal Scientific Reports , comes amid growing co
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Science | The Guardian

Patricia Lindop obituaryPhysician who researched the effects of nuclear radiation and in the cold war years reached the peak of the new profession of radiobiology Patricia Lindop, who has died aged 87, was one of Europe’s most brilliant medical radiobiologists and a physician driven as much by compassion and wisdom as by natural skill. As well as setting up the medical radiobiology department at St Bartholomew’s hospital
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

NASA launches advanced weather satellite for western USNASA launched another of the world's most advanced weather satellites on Thursday, this time to safeguard the western U.S.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Re-think on energy charging could reduce bills for 70% of householdsResearchers have found that 70 percent of U.K. households would be better off if costs of government energy policy were removed from gas and electricity bills and applied according to household income.
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Simplifying samplesUsing nanotechnology, a team of researchers at Washington University in St. Louis has eliminated the need for refrigeration for biomarkers used in medical diagnostic testing. The researchers recently gave their new tech a real-world test by sending it through the mail.
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Mining hardware helps scientists gain insight into silicon nanoparticlesResearchers first developed a three-dimensional dynamic model of an interaction between light and nanoparticles. They used a supercomputer with graphic accelerators for calculations. Results showed that silicon particles exposed to short intense laser pulses lose their symmetry temporarily. Their optical properties become strongly heterogeneous. Such a change in properties depends on particle size
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Early psychosis programs significantly reduce patient mortality, study findsIn a new study, researchers at Lawson Health Research Institute (Lawson), Western University and the Institute for Clinical Evaluative Sciences (ICES) have found that specialized programs for early psychosis can substantially reduce patient mortality.
8h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Student-led depression awareness program boosts teens' understanding and help-seekingHigh school students can make a major impact on their schoolmates' understanding of depression, and their attitudes about seeking help for themselves or others, according to a new study using data from 10 high schools that implemented peer-led awareness campaigns.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Bubbles of life from the past: Tiny bubbles of oxygen got trapped 1.6 billion years agoTake a good look at these photos: They show you 1.6 billion years old fossilized oxygen bubbles, created by tiny microbes in what was once a shallow sea somewhere on young Earth.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Mining hardware helps scientists gain insight into silicon nanoparticlesResearchers have developed a three-dimensional dynamic model of an interaction between light and nanoparticles. They used a supercomputer using graphics accelerators for calculations. The results show that silicon particles exposed to short, intense laser pulses lose their symmetry temporarily. Their optical properties become strongly heterogeneous. Such a change in properties depends on particle
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Here's how viruses inactivate the immune system, causing cancerIt's no new news that viruses cause cancer. For example, human papillomavirus (HPV) causes almost all of the more than 500,000 annual worldwide cases of cervical cancer. This makes sense: By driving the proliferation of infected cells, viruses speed manufacture of more viruses, but excessive cellular proliferation is also a hallmark of cancer. Now a University of Colorado Cancer Center review publ
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Latest Headlines | Science News

How a vaporized Earth might have cooked up the moonA high-speed collision turned the early Earth into a hot, gooey space doughnut, and the moon formed within this synestia, a new simulation suggests.
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GMC's Carbon Fiber Sierra, Tesla Rivals, and More Car NewsPlus: Porsche's supercharging network, Ford's self-driving tests in Miami, and more news from an auto industry trying to rebuild.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

The hidden threat of teacher stressWhen a traumatic event such as the Florida school shooting takes place, often the focus afterward is on finding ways to make sure students and teachers are safe from violence and physical harm.
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Ingeniøren

Danmark haster videre med Femern-tunnel trods manglende godkendelseEt bredt flertal i Folketinget har vedtaget at byggemodne et område i Rødby, inden Tyskland har miljøgodkendt byggeriet.
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NYT > Science

They Died Near the Border. Art Students Hope to Bring Them Back.At the New York Academy of Art, facial reconstruction — fusing art and science — may help identify the missing, including migrants.
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The Atlantic

A Small Town Kept Walmart Out. Now It Faces Amazon.GREENFIELD, Mass.—Al Norman has been fighting to keep Walmart and other big-box retailers out of small towns like this one for 25 years. He’s been successful in Greenfield, his hometown and the site of his first battle with Walmart, and in dozens of other towns across the country—victories he documents on his website Sprawl-Busters , an “International Clearinghouse on Big Box Anti-Sprawl Informat
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The Atlantic

What Will Win at the Oscars?As I noted in my end-of-the-year movie wrap-up (which in addition to my top-10 list included such idiosyncratic awards as “Best Letter Writer” and “Most Successful Mushroom Recipe”), 2017 was an excellent year for film. And, for the most part, I think the Academy did a good job when it came to Oscar nominations. Four of my top five movies of the year were nominated for Best Picture, and of them I
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

Crucial ingredients for a winning soccer team: Kick goalsScientists examined variables within 240 matches in the Chinese Super League (China's top-ranked league).
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News

St. Michael's Hospital cardiology team reports a world firstInterventional cardiologist Dr. Neil Fam of St. Michael's Hospital has performed a world-first procedure, which he described in the Feb, 26 issue of the Journal of the American College of Cardiology: Cardiovascular Interventions.
8h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Scientists use satellites and drones to discover antarctic penguin 'super-colonies'A recent scientific expedition to the Danger Islands, a remote group of tiny islands along eastern side of the Antarctic Peninsula, used new technologies to discover and survey a breeding colony of more than 1.5 million penguins.
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News

New UTSA lab addresses pediatric feeding disordersBryant Silbaugh, assistant professor of special education in The University of Texas at San Antonio (UTSA) Department of Interdisciplinary Learning and Teaching, leads innovative behavioral research on pediatric feeding disorders in children with Autism Spectrum Disorder (ASD). In the Silbaugh Behavior Research Group (SBRG) Feeding Lab and during home or clinic visits in the community, Silbaugh an
8h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Bubbles of life from the pastTiny bubbles of oxygen got trapped 1.6 billion years ago.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Antarctic sea ice shrinks for second-straight yearSea ice cover in Antarctica has dropped to its second-lowest on record, Australian authorities said Friday, adding that it was not yet clear what was driving the reduction after several years of record-highs.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Capturing the balance of natureIn a study spanning 12 years, researchers from Kyoto University and Ryukoku University have developed a method to calculate the fluctuating stability of a natural ecological community in Maizuru Bay.Their findings, published in Nature, provide insight into and new methodologies for ecological and population research.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Want more efficient simulators? Store time in a quantum superpositionComputer models of systems such as a city's traffic flow or neural firing in the brain tends to use up a lot of memory. But a new approach with quantum simulators could significantly cut that memory use by taking a quantum approach to time. The only cost is a diminished record of the past.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Previously unknown 'supercolony' of Adélie penguins discovered in AntarcticaFor the past 40 years, the total number of Adélie Penguins, one of the most common on the Antarctic Peninsula, has been steadily declining—or so biologists have thought. A new study led by researchers from the Woods Hole Oceanographic Institution (WHOI), however, is providing new insights on of this species of penguin. In a paper released on March 2nd in the journal Scientific Reports, the scienti
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

A positive outlook may improve outcomes for people with chest painWhen it comes to coping with chronic angina -- chest pain or pressure that comes on when the heart isn't getting enough oxygen, usually during physical activity -- a positive outlook may help improve outcomes over time, according to a new study.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

Heart attacks often follow dramatic changes in outdoor temperatureLarge day-to-day swings in temperature were associated with significantly more heart attacks in a new study. Given that some climate models link extreme weather events with global warming, the new findings suggest climate change could, in turn, lead to an uptick in the occurrence of heart attacks, researchers said.
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Ingeniøren

Miljøstyrelsen overvejer at kræve erstatning for fejlramte vandprøverLaboratoriefirmaet Eurofins analyserede vandprøver fra danske åer og farvande i fem år uden at gøre opmærksom på, hvilken metode, der blev brugt. Nu risikerer firmaet erstatningskrav fra Miljøstyrelsen.
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Ingeniøren

Banedanmark weekendlukker S-bane for at teste ny softwareDa Banedanmark sidste år testede en softwareopgradering til S-banens nye signalsystem, afslørede testen væsentlige problemer. Nu lukker Banedanmark en S-bane-strækning henover weekenden for at teste en forbedring af opgraderingen.
8h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Study in six countries identifies groups that are vulnerable to severe mental illnessIn Brazil, a survey with nearly 3,000 people who have experienced first-episode psychosis concluded that young men, ethnic minorities and people living in socioeconomically disadvantaged areas are more likely to suffer from the typical symptoms.
8h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Want more efficient simulators? Store time in a quantum superpositionComputer models of systems such as a city's traffic flow or neural firing in the brain tends to use up a lot of memory. But a new approach with quantum simulators could significantly cut that memory use by taking a quantum approach to time, suggest researchers in Singapore.
8h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Mammalian development: Blastocyst architectureThe mechanisms that underlie early embryonic development in humans and cattle are very similar. Therefore, Ludwig-Maximilians-Universitaet (LMU) in Munich researchers argue that bovine embryos might well be a better model for early human development than the mouse system.
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Gadget Lab Podcast: Google’s AI-Powered Camera Exposes Photography’s FutureThis week on the Gadget Lab podcast, the innovative Google Clips camera, which uses AI to take fun, short videos of your family.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

A stellar system with three super-EarthsOver 3500 extra-solar planets have been confirmed to date. Most of them were discovered using the transit method, and astronomers can combine the transit light curves with velocity wobble observations to determine the planet's mass and radius, and thereby constrain its interior structure. The atmosphere can also be studied in a transit by using the fact that the chemical composition of the atmosph
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Evolving a more versatile CRISPR-Cas9For all of Cas9's potential in research and therapeutics, it—as well as other enzymes in the CRISPR-associated family—has limitations. In order to recognize and bind to a DNA sequence, Cas9 needs a particular stretch of base letters to accompany the target. This requirement makes much of the genome inaccessible to the enzyme, significantly reducing its range of applications.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Industrial fisheries in Southeast Asia divert millions of tonnes of fish to fishmealFour countries in Southeast Asia have diverted almost 40 million tonnes of fish towards fishmeal production in the past six decades, as opposed to making it available for direct human consumption.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Egyptian mummies found to have oldest figurative tattoosA team of researchers from across Europe has found tattoos on two mummies at the British Museum, making them the oldest known examples of figurative tattoos. In their paper published in Journal of Archaeological Science, the group describes their study of dark splotches on preserved mummy skin.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Using drones to feed billionsAs the population continues its rapid growth, food is becoming increasingly scarce. By the year 2050, we will need to double our current food production to feed the estimated 9.6 million mouths that will inhabit Earth.
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Futurity.org

Androgens in utero influence girls’ interests but not gender identityPrenatal exposure to male hormones influences the interests of girls and the activities they engage in, but the effects of those hormones don’t extend to gender identity or their social group, according to new research. “People used to think—and some still do—that gender development and behavior is based either on a person’s biology or social environment…” The researchers explored how prenatal ex
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Dagens Medicin

Ny ledende overlæge til Ortopædkirurgisk Afdeling på Regionshospitalet RandersMichael Tjørnild tiltræder 1. april som ny ledende overlæge på Regionshospitalet Randers.
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Dagens Medicin

Danske Patienter: Lov om genomcenter er bedste løsning for patienterneKritikere fremstiller det nye Genom Center som værende en ny måde at opbevare data på, men der er intet nyt, siger Morten Freil, direktør i Danske Patienter.
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The Atlantic

A Georgia Republican's Unethical RevengeDelta Air Lines NRALast weekend, Delta Airlines exercised its constitutional right to speak freely on political issues and to choose with whom it associates by announcing that it would no longer offer a special discount to members of the National Rifle Association. Soon after, Republicans in Georgia, where the Atlanta-based airline is headquartered, threatened to retaliate against the company unless it reversed its
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Popular Science

Take a break from Facebook and try one of these alternate social networksDIY Find a smaller, more specialized group. Spending too much time on big social media sites like Facebook can make you miserable. Instead, try out one of these more specialized smaller networks.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

How people talk now holds clues about human migration centuries agoOften, you can tell where someone grew up by the way they speak.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Bovine embryos as a model for early human developmentThe mechanisms that underlie early embryonic development in humans and cattle are very similar. Therefore, LMU researchers argue that bovine embryos might well be a better model for early human development than the mouse system.
8h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Like us, animals look up at the starsHumans are not the only species longing for the light of the stars. Animals, too, use the stars as guides to find their way.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Researcher solves the mystery of the stock market's "beta anomaly"One of the basic tenets of financial investing is that riskier stocks should offer—on average and in the long run—higher returns than less-risky investments.
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Deeper look at biopsy exposes mutation ready to ambush drug combinationA powerful resistance mutation that appeared to emerge in melanoma after a patient received a targeted therapy combination, instead was lurking in the tumor all along, primed to thwart treatment before it began, researchers at The University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center report online at Cancer Discovery.
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Capturing the balance of natureResearchers capture dynamic changes in marine life over twelve years.
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Vertical measurements of air pollutants in urban BeijingScientists from CAS Institute of Atmospheric Physics use vertically resolved observation system based on the Beijing 325m Meteorological Tower to gain an in-depth understanding of the vertical evolution characteristics of air pollutants within urban boundary layer.They find that that the temperature inversion coupled by the interactions of different air masses elucidated the 'blue sky -- haze' co-
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Futurity.org

Judging emotion across culture works surprisingly wellWe’re better at judging the emotions of people from our own country, according to research on the vocal expressions of people in the United States, Australia, India, Kenya, and Singapore. In a separate study, the researchers also discovered that Australians and Indians could read each other pretty well despite cultural barriers. When one native inflected differently on phrases, a person from the
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The Atlantic

How Italy's Five-Star Movement Is Winning the Youth VoteCASTELFRANCO VENETO, Italy—Eleonora Pettenuzzo, an 18-year-old high school student in this town of 33,000 about an hour’s drive outside Venice, doesn’t pay much attention to politics. Political headlines in Italy, she said, are “always about some scandals or corruption” and include “no messages to young people.” When I asked Pettenuzzo who she planned to vote for in the March 4 national elections
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Spring is springing earlier in polar regions than across the rest of earthSpring is arriving earlier, but how much earlier? The answer depends where on Earth you find yourself, according to a study led by the University of California, Davis.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Researchers find the ancestral function of the retinoic acid, an essential molecule in the evolution of vertebratesIn molecular biology, retinoic acid plays a key role in signalling pathways in the embryonic development of vertebrates. However, not much is known about its origins in the metazoan evolution. An international team has described for the first time the ancestral function of retinoic acid in the lineage of animals with bilateral symmetry, according to an article published in the journal Science Adva
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Two species of ravens nevermore? New research finds evidence of 'speciation reversal'For over a century, speciation—where one species splits into two—has been a central focus of evolutionary research. But a new study almost 20 years in the making suggests "speciation reversal"—where two distinct lineages hybridize and eventually merge into one—can also be extremely important. The paper, appearing March 2 in Nature Communications, provides some of the strongest evidence yet of the
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Ancient burial site found submerged off FloridaState officials say archaeologists have located a 7,000-year-old Native American ancestral burial site submerged in the Gulf of Mexico off the coast of Florida.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Payments to protect carbon stored in forests must increase to defend against rubberPayments to protect carbon stored in forests must increase to defend against rubber plantations
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Live Science

A Floating 'Brain' Will Assist Astronauts Aboard the Space StationThe crew on board the International Space Station (ISS) will soon welcome a new member, described by its creators as "a kind of flying brain."
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Futurity.org

Not using saline in IV bags would save livesMedical providers should stop using saline as intravenous fluid therapy for most patients, researchers say, following the release of two new studies that could improve survival and decrease kidney complications. Saline, used in medicine for more than a century, contains high concentrations of sodium chloride, which is similar to table salt. Researchers say patients would fare better, if they inst
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Bank of England chief slams cryptocurrencies; urges actionBank of England Governor Mark Carney has launched a withering attack on cryptocurrencies such as bitcoin Friday and urged regulators around the world to monitor them in the same way as other financial assets.
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The Scientist RSS

March 2018 TS CrosswordTry your hand at a sciency brain teaser.
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The Scientist RSS

March 2018 TS Crossword Puzzle AnswersSee how well you did.
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Unprecedentedly wide and sharp dark matter mapA research team released an unprecedentedly wide and sharp dark matter map based on the newly obtained imaging data by Hyper Suprime-Cam on the Subaru Telescope. The dark matter distribution is estimated by the weak gravitational lensing technique. The team found indications that the number of dark matter halos could be inconsistent with what the simplest cosmological model suggests. This could be
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Reducing a building's carbon output can also lower costsResearchers from Concordia University's Department of Building, Civil and Environmental Engineering have found a way to significantly reduce carbon emissions produced by residential and non-residential buildings, while also cutting costs.
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News

KAIST finds the principle of electric wind in plasmaA KAIST team identified the basic principle of electric wind in plasma. This finding will contribute to developing technology in various applications of plasma, including fluid control technology.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Fossilised plant leaf wax provides new tool for understanding ancient climatesNew research, published in Scientific Reports, has outlined a new methodology for estimating ancient atmospheric water content based on fossil plant leaf waxes.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Proteins date back to the time of sabre toothed catsPlant scientists at The University of Western Australia have discovered a completely new family of small proteins called PLPs (PawL Peptides) that form by piggybacking on other proteins.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Plasma bubbles help trigger massive magnetic events in outer spaceScientists at the U.S. Department of Energy's (DOE) Princeton Plasma Physics Laboratory (PPPL) have discovered key conditions that give rise to fast magnetic reconnection, the process that triggers solar flares, auroras, and geomagnetic storms that can disrupt signal transmissions and other electrical activities, including cell phone service. The process occurs when the magnetic field lines in pla
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Desert-dwelling bacteria offer clues to habitability on marsThe survival tricks adopted by microbes known as hypolithic cyanobacteria, which are found underneath quartz rocks in Earth's deserts, could point to how microbial life on Mars may live, say researchers.
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New Scientist - News

Automated dance teacher tells you when your moves are wrongStrictly and Dancing with the Stars judges could be replaced by a robot judge called HappyFeet. It can watch people dance and rate their moves
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If You Want a Robot to Stop Screwing Up, Hold Its HandWe can't trust robots to learn everything on their own. For one startup, the solution is a very human touch.
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'Florence' Is a Mobile Game That Captures the Power of TouchA story of a woman's first love, *Florence* gains immense power from remembering how meaningful tactility can be.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Assessing the impact of hurricanes on Puerto Rico's forestsBuilding on methods they used to assess the impact of hurricanes such as Katrina, Gustav, and Rita on forests and tree mortality, scientists at the Department of Energy's Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory (Berkeley Lab) have produced a rapid mapping of the disturbance intensity across Puerto Rico's forests with the help of Google Earth Engine.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

The impact of parental absence in rural ChinaChildren without any parent at home score much lower on primary school exams than children with one or both parents, which can hinder future prospects.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Ancient rootless plants linked to increase in production of mud rockA pair of geologists with the University of Cambridge has found a possible link between the evolution of ancient rootless plants and a marked increase in the production of ancient mud rock (fine-grained rock formed from silty clay deposits). In their paper published in the journal Science, William McMahon and Neil Davies describe their study and analysis of published papers reporting work with mud
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Scientific American Content: Global

The Day My School Was Attacked--with RocksAs a teacher, I can promise you the outcome would have been very different if the assailants had been carrying firearms -- Read more on ScientificAmerican.com
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News

New research showed better survival outcomes in one type of heart failureA joint 7-year cohort study in both Singapore's and New Zealand's hospitals, revealed answers to key questions about the epidemiology of heart failure. The study set out how two distinct forms of heart failure previously considered similar in prevalence and risk of death, are in fact very different.
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Here's how viruses inactivate the immune system, causing cancer'The same mechanisms that viruses use to cause cancer may be key in combating tumors with immune-based therapies or in keeping cancer from developing in the first place,' says Sharon Kuss-Duerkop, PhD.
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Rethinking childbirth education could save AU $97 million p.a.Research led by The University of Notre Dame Australia, NICM and Western Sydney University, shows antenatal education not only reduces the rates of medical interventions during childbirth, but can save the healthcare system up to AU$97 million per year.
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Discovery shows wine grapes gasping for breathUniversity of Adelaide researchers have discovered how grapes 'breathe', and that shortage of oxygen leads to cell death in the grape.
9h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Controlling skyrmions with lasersEPFL scientists have produced controllable stable skyrmions using laser pulses, taking a step towards significantly more energy-efficient memory devices. The work is published in Physical Review Letters.
9h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

3000 years of evolution with dingoes matters to bilbiesWild bilbies are more reluctant to leave their burrows when dog faeces has been placed nearby than when they are presented with the faeces of feral cats, which are major introduced predators of these small native Australian marsupials.
9h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Unprecedentedly wide and sharp dark matter mapA research team of multiple institutes, including the National Astronomical Observatory of Japan and University of Tokyo, released an unprecedentedly wide and sharp dark matter map based on the newly obtained imaging data by Hyper Suprime-Cam on the Subaru Telescope. The dark matter distribution is estimated by the weak gravitational lensing technique (Figure 1, Movie). The team located the positi
9h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Graphene material strengthens nerve signaling in the brainLess than 20 years after it was developed, a thin, resilient sheet of carbon atoms with remarkable properties known as graphene is transforming biomedical fields as far flung as tissue engineering, neuroprosthetics and drug discovery.
9h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Alarming projections for polar ice sheetsDrawing on international research, Professor Tim Naish from Victoria University of Wellington's Antarctic Research Centre took the second Pacific Climate Change Conference, co-hosted by Victoria and the Secretariat of the Pacific Regional Environment Programme, through some of the alarming latest projections for the polar ice sheets.
9h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Nervous system puts the brakes on inflammationCells in the nervous system can 'put the brakes' on the immune response to infections in the gut and lungs to prevent excessive inflammation, according to research by Weill Cornell Medicine scientists. This insight may one day lead to new ways to treat diseases caused by unchecked inflammation, such as asthma and inflammatory bowel disease.
10h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

How closing the gender pay gap splits chores more evenlyEliminating the gender gap in wages would lead to married women doing much less housework. That is one of the findings of research by Alexandros Theloudis in his working paper "Wages and Family Time Allocation."
10h
The Atlantic

The Slow-Motion Catastrophe Threatening 350-Year-Old FarmsOn the lower eastern shore of Maryland, the stately Almodington plantation overlooks the Manokin River as it drains into the Chesapeake Bay. First surveyed in 1663, the expansive farm sits a few miles from Princess Anne, a town named for the daughter of King George II. For 350 years, this region’s rich, sandy soils and warm, moist climate have been ideal for growing fruits and vegetable. Tomato p
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Dagens Medicin

Læger ønsker retningslinjer for klipning af tungebåndDanske familie rejser i stor stil til Holland for at få behandlet børn med stramt tungebånd. Det får nu danske læger og specialister til at bede om ens retningslinjer for hele landet.
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Ingeniøren

Gebyrfritagelse og mere klinisk forskning: Regeringen vil styrke dansk biotekTre ministre fremlagde i dag regeringens vækstplan for life science-området. Blandt de 36 punkter finder vi gebyrfritagelse og skattefradrag for forskere et øget fokus på klinisk forskning.
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The Scientist RSS

Image of the Day: Tardigrade EggsThe studded cells belong to a newly discovered species of water bear, Macrobiotus shonaicus.
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The Scientist RSS

New Enzyme Makes CRISPR More PowerfulxCas9 enables more precisely targeted gene editing.
10h
The Atlantic

Marijuana for MomsMany a meme has been made about “ wine moms ”—mothers who joke online about their love for a relaxing glass of cabernet, or three. But a new drug is gaining popularity with the playgroup circuit. As it becomes more socially acceptable, more moms are using marijuana and its various incarnations to deal with everything from the daily aches and stresses of motherhood, to postpartum depression and an
10h
The Atlantic

New Mexico’s Sad Bet on Space ExplorationS oon after departing the small resort town of Truth or Consequences, New Mexico, the video monitors on the bus come to life. Stars glitter in the night sky, a mystical flute soundtrack lilts, and a narrator’s voice intones: “All that you see around you was at the bottom of the sea.” The Conquistadors named the flat desert basin that formed after the sea receded Jornada del Muerto , or Journey of
10h
Popular Science

Stephen Hawking thinks he knows what happened before the beginning of timeSpace Neil deGrasse Tyson asks him to weigh in. Watch Neil deGrasse Tyson ask Stephen Hawking one of the most difficult questions in the universe.
10h
Feed: All Latest

GPS Isn't Very Secure. Here's Why We Need A BackupThe 24 satellites that keep GPS running in the US aren't especially secure. So private and federal groups are working on alternatives.
10h
Scientific American Content: Global

The Untold Story of the Women Who Made the Internet-- Read more on ScientificAmerican.com
10h
Scientific American Content: Global

A New Type of Tardigrade Just Turned Up in a Parking LotThis micro-creature was found on a small piece of moss in Japan -- Read more on ScientificAmerican.com
10h
Futurity.org

No, heart disease patients don’t benefit from ‘obesity paradox’Obese people live shorter lives and have a greater proportion of life with cardiovascular disease, a new study finds. The study debunks the “obesity paradox,” a counterintuitive finding that showed people diagnosed with cardiovascular disease live longer if they are overweight or obese than people who are normal weight at the time of diagnosis. “A healthy weight promotes healthy longevity or long
10h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Discovery shows wine grapes gasping for breathUniversity of Adelaide researchers have discovered how grapes "breathe," and report that shortage of oxygen leads to cell death in the grape.
11h
Live Science

Poop Stains Lead Researchers to Hidden 'Supercolony' of 1.5 Million PenguinsAntarctica's Danger Islands hold an adorable secret.
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Ingeniøren

GE udvikler verdens største havvindmølle på 12 MWVindmøllen skal have en rotordiameter på 220 meter, og LM Windpower skal levere de 107 meter lange vinger, der vil blive omkring 25 meter længere end de længste vinger på kommercielle havvindmøller.
11h
Futurity.org

Protein calls up ‘reserves’ to make stronger memoriesThe connections between neurons in the brain that form when we create memories can become stronger or weaker at a molecular level, new research shows. Neurons branch into many small fibers, called dendrites, that connect to other neurons across tiny gaps called synapses. Messages travel across synapses as chemical signals: A molecule, or neurotransmitter, is released on one side of the synapse an
11h
The Scientist RSS

13-Million-Person Family Tree Reveals Stories of Human HistoryCrowdsourced data from Geni.com, which includes the actor Kevin Bacon, answers questions about marriage, migration, and more.
11h
Live Science

Party Served Wild Boar Meat, and Guests Got This Rare InfectionA party in Northern California served a traditional raw pork dish, but then a dozen guests wound up sick.
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Live Science

Tripping on LSD Really Is Like Lucid DreamingLife is but a dream – if you're on LSD.
11h
The Atlantic

NASA’s Next Space Telescope Is Running Out of TimeThe world’s next great space telescope is falling behind. The James Webb Space Telescope, NASA ’s successor to the famed Hubble, is at risk of experiencing significant delays in development, according to a new report from a government agency that audits federal programs. Webb is an $8.8 billion project two decades in the making. Last September, NASA announced it was delaying the telescope’s launc
11h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

CRISPR-Cas9 can cut RNA, tooThe ability to edit genes at will, whether to reverse genetic diseases or improve food and energy crops, is undergoing a revolution. It is being driven by CRISPR-Cas9, a technology modeled on a cellular mechanism found in bacteria. CRISPR-Cas9 recognizes and cuts foreign genomic material from invading viruses and thus protects the bacteria from being infected.
11h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Power-to-gas facility with high efficiencyThe natural gas network may serve as a buffer for weather-dependent electricity from the wind and sun. This requires economically efficient processes to use electricity for the production of chemical energy carriers. The EU project HELMETH coordinated by KIT has now made an important step, demonstrating that high-temperature electrolysis and methanation can be combined in a power-to-gas process wi
11h
BBC News - Science & Environment

Largest population of penguins found in Antarctic PeninsulaOver 1.5m penguins, the largest population on the Antarctic Peninsula, has been found on the Danger Islands.
11h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Plants fix DNA differently from animalsIn mammalian cells, the transcription factor p53 most responsible for healthy growth of the organism. The equivalent in plants is Suppressor Of Gamma Response 1 (SOG1), a factor that does not share a common evolutionary ancestor with p53. While p53 has been exhaustively studied, much less is known about SOG1. A new study led by researchers at the Nara Institute of Science and Technology (NAIST) re
11h
Feed: All Latest

The Subtle Nudges That Could Unhook Us From Our PhonesFacebook Posts NewsPeople need help deciding where to place their attention. Tech companies could help ease our time-inconsistency.
11h
Feed: All Latest

The Secret to a High Tech Concierge Medical Office? DataManaging electronic medical records is still a pain, but if a start-up can figure it out, better records could lead to new cures
11h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Crowdlending: Anatomy of a successful strategyCrowdlending is participation in peer-to-peer financing that allows individuals to directly finance projects or companies by means of interest-bearing loans. Crowdfunding appeared at the start of the 2010s, and developed quickly via internet platforms. In 2017, it represented more than 190 million Euros of loans to companies in France. However, developing a crowdlending platform has not always bee
11h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Assessing quantum dot photoemissionsRecent research from Kumamoto University in Japan has revealed that polyoxometalates (POMs), typically used for catalysis, electrochemistry, and photochemistry, may also be used in a technique for analyzing quantum dot (QD) photoluminescence (PL) emission mechanisms.
11h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Noninvasive skull optical clearing window for cortical imagingResearchers have demonstrated a noninvasive approach for creating an optical window in the skulls of mice to image their brains. Prof. Dan Zhu and coworkers from Huazhong University of Science and Technology, China, tested the use of optical clearing agents (OCAs) that they applied to the bare skulls (hair and skin removed) of living mice. After treatment with OCAs, the skull becomes transparent w
11h
Latest Headlines | Science News

Extreme cold is no match for a new batteryA rechargeable battery that works at –70° C could be used in some of the coldest places on Earth or other planets.
11h
Scientific American Content: Global

Readers Respond to the November 2017 IssueLetters to the editor from the November 2017 issue of Scientific American -- Read more on ScientificAmerican.com
11h
Scientific American Content: Global

Russia's New Nukes Are Similar to a Risky Project the U.S. AbandonedThe U.S. Air Force’s Project Pluto sought to create nuclear-powered cruise missiles, but was terminated decades ago after second thoughts over the dangers -- Read more on ScientificAmerican.com
11h
Scientific American Content: Global

Getting the Inside Dope on Ketamine's Mysterious Ability to Rapidly Relieve DepressionThe notorious party drug may act as an antidepressant by blocking neural bursts in a little-understood brain region that may drive depression -- Read more on ScientificAmerican.com
11h
Futurity.org

Colon cancer patients who eat nuts have lower death riskPeople with stage III colon cancer who regularly eat nuts are at significantly lower risk of cancer recurrence and mortality than those who don’t, according to a new study. The study followed 826 participants in a clinical trial for a median of 6.5 years after they received treatment with surgery and chemotherapy. Those who regularly ate at least two, one-ounce servings of nuts each week demonstr
12h
Ingeniøren

Femern-entreprenører får op til en milliard kroner for at venteInterne dokumenter viser, at forsinkelsen af Femern-tunnelen koster op til en milliard kroner frem til 2019. Med byggestart i 2020 kan regningen blive endnu højere.
12h
The Atlantic

Trump Repeats Nixon's FollyPresident Trump just raised the price of cars, beer, vacations, and apartment rentals. That’s not what most headlines say. Those headlines say that Trump will raise tariffs on steel and aluminum. Higher tariffs mean higher prices for those inputs—and therefore for the products ultimately made from those outputs. Automotive and construction top the largest users of steel in the United States. Alum
12h
The Atlantic

The High Cost of Unlicensed Bail BondsEarly in February, a judge in Baltimore City District Court ruled that Tiffany Mack owed Baltimore’s Discount Bail Bonds a little more than $7,000. That in itself wasn’t unusual. Though the practice is under fire around the country, money bail remains a powerful force in many courts, making for a lucrative business for some bondsmen. What was unusual about this particular case was that Baltimore’
12h
Futurity.org

Faster, cheaper TB test makes diagnosis easier in rural areasScientists, working with doctors and public health researchers in South Africa, have created a new tuberculosis test that makes it easier to diagnose, and therefore treat, the disease. “I’m from Burundi—I grew up around infectious disease…” Tuberculosis, a distant memory to most Americans, remains a serious public-health threat in developing countries, in part because the most common test for the
12h
Big Think

Is it even possible to oppose capitalism anymore?"Global capitalism and local traditions are no longer opposites, they are on the same side," says Slavoj Zizek. The traditions of anti-capitalist protest are upended by this fact. Read More
12h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

New insight into nanopatterning diamondThe ability to etch nanostructures onto the surface of diamond is expected to have a wide variety of potential applications, but so far etching and patterning diamond at the nanoscale has been challenging, as diamond is highly chemically inert (unreactive). In a new study, researchers have investigated a technique in which an electron beam is used for nanopatterning diamond, with the results offer
12h
Ingeniøren

Hør ugens podcast om fejl i kvælstofmålinger og el-kabinecykelIngeniørens ugentlige podcast, Transformator, handler denne gang om, hvordan analysefejl har givet et skønmaleri af det danske vandmiljøs tilstand. Du kan også høre om en ny el-kabinecykel og en smart app, der guider bilisterne til ledige p-pladser.
12h
Viden

1,5 millioner pingviner er opdaget i AntarktisOverraskede forskere har fundet mange af de livlige adeliepingviner på Danger Islands i Antarktis.
12h
BBC News - Science & Environment

Mission to giant A-68 berg thwarted by sea-iceThe UK-led expedition to the waters around the world's biggest iceberg is forced to turn around.
12h

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