EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Potential new approach to the treatment of multiple sclerosisA prospective new method of treating patients with multiple sclerosis has been proposed by researchers of the Mainz University Medical Center working in cooperation with researchers of the University of Montreal. In model trials and experiments employing human endothelial cells, they discovered that the EGFL7 protein hinders the migration of immune cells into the central nervous system by stabiliz
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News

US healthcare system needs coordinated response to potential pediatric pandemicsResearchers at Children's Hospital Los Angeles (CHLA) have identified gaps in the United States healthcare system that make it inadequately prepared for the surge in pediatric patients that could result from an infectious disease pandemic.
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Rare mineral discovered in plants for first timeA rare mineral that holds enticing potential as a new material for industrial and medical applications has been discovered on alpine plants at Cambridge University Botanic Garden.
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Dying for the group: What motivates the ultimate sacrifice?Whether idolized as heroes or demonized and labelled terrorists, throughout history people have been willing to die for their groups and the causes they believe in. But why? New Oxford University research, suggests that there is a unique psychological process that may play a crucial role in motivating the ultimate sacrifice: identity fusion.
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Crepidula onyx resilient towards microplastic dietA group of scientists at the Chan Lab of the Division of Life Science, HKUST, uses Crepdiula onyx as a model organism to test microplastics immunity, and found that they will threaten other marine organisms that are less resilient towards mircoplastic pollution.
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Capturing brain signals with soft electronicsKlas Tybrandt, principal investigator at the Laboratory of Organic Electronics at Linköping University, has developed new technology for long-term stable neural recording. It is based on a novel elastic material composite, which is biocompatible and retains high electrical conductivity even when stretched to double its original length. The result has been achieved in collaboration with colleagues
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Cognitive benefits of bilingualism overstatedBilingualism is naturally very useful in communication between people, but a new meta-analysis shows that it does not seem to increase the cognitive skills related to executive functions.
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News

World's largest ivory burn delivered a strong message -- but who received it?Media coverage of the torching of huge caches of ivory presented a strong message against elephant poaching and ivory trade, but many of those who needed to hear it most may not have received it, an international study has found.University of Queensland researcher Alexander Braczkowski said an examination of the global media coverage of the world's largest ivory burn in Kenya in 2016, revealed tha
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Dagens Medicin

Politisk flertal vil sammenlægge to nordjyske hospitalerEn sammenlægning af hospitalet i Thisted og Aalborg Universitetshospital er på tegnebrættet. Politisk flertal i Region Nordjylland bakker op.
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New on MIT Technology Review

AI can help spot coding mistakes before they happen
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Funding renewable energy is easier than taxing carbonIt is not difficult to understand the appeal of a carbon tax. It's an elegant, straight-forward solution to the climate change crisis. The only problem with it is that it is politically infeasible in the United States and most other places on earth. Last week, we saw the carbon tax once again go down to defeat. Washington's Governor Jay Inslee, a strong supporter of the carbon tax, was unable to m
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

The Cold War's toxic legacy—costly, dangerous cleanups at atomic bomb production sitesSeventy-five years ago, in March 1943, a mysterious construction project began at a remote location in eastern Washington state. Over the next two years some 50,000 workers built an industrial site occupying half the area of Rhode Island, costing over US$230 million – equivalent to $3.1 billion today. Few of those workers, and virtually no one in the surrounding community, knew the facility's purp
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Landmark study reports on new layer of complexity in songbird communicationSome good news: songbirds living near oil and gas fields in Canada's prairies are indeed able to understand each other over the clamour of machines, an international research team reports.
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Inadequate state oil and gas regulations threaten groundwater resources, study findsDefinitions of 'protected groundwater' in 17 state oil and gas regulations are inconsistent and less protective than federal regulations used by US Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) and US Bureau of Land Management (BLM), according to a study published Friday, March 2, 2018 in Current Opinion in Environmental Science & Health. The findings demonstrate the nation's water supply is vulnerable to
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Materials 'sandwich' breaks barrier for solar cell efficiencyNanomaterials esearchers have devised a method to significantly improve the efficiency of organic solar cells. They used a squaraine molecule to both donate electrons and better orient the PBDB-T polymer with the ITIC non-fullerene acceptor. Combined with another design mechanism the group previously pioneered, they achieved efficiency gains of more than 10 percent in converting solar energy into
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News

New tool for the crystallization of proteinsETH researchers have developed a new method of crystallizing large membrane proteins in order to determine their structure. This will be of benefit to biological research and the pharmaceutical industry.
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News

For flour beetles, it's better to be a woman in a man's worldNational Centre for Biological Sciences (NCBS) researchers in Bangalore, India have shown that female red flour beetles reproduce better in male-dominated groups than in unbiased or female-dominated groups. The research from Deepa Agashe's and Radhika Venkatesan's groups at NCBS demonstrates that this effect is because female beetles wage a chemical war against each other using the chemicals ethyl
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Cancer stem cells, allies of the tumor and enemies of the patientResearch results point to a therapeutic value for the protein (Ahr) because controlling it might repress the pluripotency of the cancer stem cell and reduce the malignity of the tumour. Indeed, different naturally-occurring molecules have been identified that modulate the activity of this protein in specific ways. In addition, the dioxin receptor might also facilitate the development of tools for
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Birth control pills increase risk of ischemic strokeOral contraceptives increase the risk of ischemic stroke, but this risk is very small among women who do not have other stroke risk factors, according to a report in the journal MedLink Neurology by Loyola Medicine stroke specialists.
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Number of paid sick days directly impacts how Americans use preventive care like flu shotsIn the first study to measure the link between an employee's number of paid sick leave days and the use of vital preventive health care services like getting a flu shot, researchers found a 26 to 85 percent increase in preventive health care use among those with at least 10 or more paid sick leave days. For the female-focused preventive services, they showed a 55 percent increase in the use of pre
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Comparison shows value of DNA barcoding in selecting nanoparticlesThe first direct comparison of in vitro and in vivo screening techniques for identifying nanoparticles that may be used to transport therapeutic molecules into cells shows that testing in lab dishes isn't much help in predicting which nanoparticles will successfully enter the cells of living animals.
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New Scientist - News

Fossil shows a parent caring for its young 520 million years agoRare remains show a primitive shrimp-like creature apparently caring for four juveniles – the oldest example of parental care in the fossil record
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Magnetic nanoparticles will help stop internal bleeding 15 times more effectivelyScientists from ITMO University have found a way to effectively stop internal bleeding via magnetically driven nanoparticles containing thrombin. A drug based on these nanoparticles can be injected intravenously and delivered straight to the site of a vascular injury. It can accelerate local clot formation and reduce overall blood loss by 15 times. The nanoparticles are not toxic to humans and can
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

New technique opens new research possibilities for novel drugs and tasty foodScientists at Wageningen University have developed a new technique that opens new possibilities for research into novel drugs and tastier, healthier food. The new approach is called 'receptomics' and was published in the scientific journal Sensors. The technique measures the response of many different receptor proteins to series of extracts or pure substances in a flow cell, and predicts responses
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

How Earth's earliest lifeforms protected their genesThink your life is hard? Imagine being a tiny bacterium trying to get a foothold on a young and desolate Earth. The earliest lifeforms on our planet endured searing heat, ultraviolet radiation and an atmosphere devoid of oxygen.
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Dagens Medicin

Danskerne undervurderer usund livsstils betydning for kræftUsund livsstil har betydning for kræft, men det undervurderer danskerne, viser en ny undersøgelse fra Kræftens Bekæmpelse. Ny kampagne skal motivere til sundere livsstil.
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Futurity.org

Brain-gut link dials roundworm longevity up or downBrain-gut communication leads to an “axis of aging,” in which the brain and intestines work together to regulate longevity, new research with roundworms reveals. Recent research has shown that signaling between the intestine and brain can regulate a range of biological processes. So far, research has focused mainly on how signals from the gut can affect neurological functions, including some neur
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

How to reduce poverty and re-connect people to natureAccess to food and water —once considered common goods and a basic human right —are increasingly treated as commodities, like precious metals or lumber. Instead of being necessities for life that are available to all, they are being kept from people who cannot afford them.
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Ingeniøren

Færge i Danmark skal sejle på batterierDer er nu skrevet under på bestillingen af batterier til Jutlandica-færgen, der sejler mellem Frederikshavn og Gøteborg.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

'Warm Saturn' exoplanet discovered by astronomersUsing data from NASA's prolonged Kepler mission, known as K2, astronomers have found a new "warm Saturn" exoplanet. The newly discovered alien world, named EPIC 247098361 b, is similar in mass to Saturn, but much hotter. The finding is reported February 24 in a paper published on arXiv.org.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

What makes someone more likely to be bullied at work and how companies can help themBeing bullied as a child, being female, young, and neurotic are significant predictors of whether you might be bullied in the workplace, our online anonymous survey shows.
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Scientific American Content: Global

Trailblazers: Women in ScienceSally Ride, the first American woman to go to space, once said that she didn’t set out to be a role model, but after her first flight, she realized that she was one. Like her, the 12 women... -- Read more on ScientificAmerican.com
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Scientific American Content: Global

Pride May Come before a Fall--but Only MetaphoricallyPride and falls have a complex relationship -- Read more on ScientificAmerican.com
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

A better way to model stellar explosionsNeutron stars consist of the densest form of matter known: a neutron star the size of Los Angeles can weigh twice as much as our sun. Astrophysicists don't fully understand how matter behaves under these crushing densities, let alone what happens when two neutron stars smash into each other or when a massive star explodes, creating a neutron star.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Beyond beasts of burden—how to reward our animals for their workAnimals do a lot for us. So what should we do for them?
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

How thinking about murderers as hunters could help the policePsychological profiling, also called criminal personality assessment, is a useful weapon in the armoury of an investigator trying to solve a crime. It's a process that involves what Richard Kocsis, a forensic psychologist and criminologist, describes as collecting "leads and biological sketches of behavioural patterns, trends and tendencies".
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The Scientist RSS

EPAs Scott Pruitt Doesnt Buy EvolutionIn audio files from 2005, the future Administrator of the EPA said there's a lack of 'sufficient scientific facts' to back the theory.
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The Scientist RSS

Image of the Day: Moth ProboscisThe hawkmoth's brain uses a different area to search for food than it does to look for where to lay eggs.
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The Scientist RSS

Diabetes Is Five Diseases, Not TwoThe new classification system could help improve personalized medicine approaches to the disease.
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Dagens Medicin

Morten Noreng forlader sin stilling som lægefaglig direktørTil sommer mister Aalborg Universitetshospital sin lægefaglige direktør, Morten Noreng, da han efter 8 års tjeneste har valgt at søge nye udfordringer.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Biostasis aims to prevent death following traumatic injury by slowing biochemical reactions inside cellsWhen a Service member suffers a traumatic injury or acute infection, the time from event to first medical treatment is usually the single most significant factor in determining the outcome between saving a life or not. First responders must act as quickly as possible, first to ensure a patient's sheer survival and then to prevent permanent disability. The Department of Defense refers to this criti
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Chemists test Chematica's ability to generate synthetic routesA team of chemists working for MilliporeSigma, a company that purchased Chematica, a computer program that generates synthetic routes (the series of reactions necessary for the creation of a synthetic target), has tested its abilities in a lab. In their paper published in the journal Chem, the group describes giving the software eight targets and reports on its performance.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

The nucleus—coming soon in 3-DPhysicians have long used CT scans to get 3-D imagery of the inner workings of the human body. Now, physicists are working toward getting their first CT scans of the inner workings of the nucleus. A measurement of quarks in helium nuclei demonstrates that 3-D imaging of the inner structure of the nucleus is now possible.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Mekong River Basin hydropower carbon emissions can exceed those of fossil fuel energy sourcesHydropower is commonly considered as a clean energy source to fuel Southeast Asian economic growth. A recent study published in Environmental Research Letters finds that hydropower in the Mekong River Basin, the largest river in Southeast Asia, might not always be climate friendly. The median greenhouse gas (GHG) emission of hydropower was estimated to be 26 kg CO2e/MWh over 100-year lifetime, whi
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Capturing brain signals with soft electronicsKlas Tybrandt, principal investigator at the Laboratory of Organic Electronics at Linköping University, has developed new technology for long-term stable neural recording. It is based on a novel elastic material composite, which is biocompatible and retains high electrical conductivity even when stretched to double its original length.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

'Beast from the East' and freakishly warm Arctic temperatures are no coincidenceDuring the past week, bitterly cold weather has engulfed the UK and most of Northern Europe. At the same time, temperatures in the high Arctic have been 10 to 20°C above normal – although still generally below freezing.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

New tool for the crystallisation of proteinsETH researchers have developed a new method of crystallising large membrane proteins in order to determine their structure. This will be of benefit to biological research and the pharmaceutical industry.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

How landline phones made us happy and connectedSmartphones and the internet have revolutionised society, commerce, and politics, reshaping how we work and play, and how our brains are wired. They have even revolutionised how revolutions are made.
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Popular Science

When splashy headlines become the goal of science, the process suffersScience Internal and external pressure drive a rush toward prestige. Scientists are pressured to push for publication in the most prestigious journals—and, increasingly, to overstate their findings to the media.
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Minimally invasive surgeries underused in older patients, new study findsA study of more than 200,000 Medicare patients who had common surgical procedures shows that, compared to the general population, they underwent far fewer minimally invasive operations, whose benefits include lower rates of complications and readmissions, along with shorter hospital stays.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Is the tide of sexual misconduct allegations shifting the balance of power?University of Illinois educational psychology professor Anita Hund has a counseling practice and her research interests include sexual trauma. Hund spoke recently with News Bureau education editor Sharita Forrest about current attitudes toward sexual misconduct in the U.S.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Hubble's frenzy of starsDiscovered in 1900 by astronomer DeLisle Stewart and here imaged by the NASA/ESA Hubble Space Telescope, IC 4710 is an undeniably spectacular sight. The galaxy is a busy cloud of bright stars, with bright pockets—marking bursts of new star formation—scattered around its edges.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Donor star breathes life into zombie companionESA's Integral space observatory has witnessed a rare event: the moment that winds emitted by a swollen red giant star revived its slow-spinning companion, the core of a dead star, bringing it back to life in a flash of X-rays.
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Ingeniøren

650 ingeniører på sygehuse og i kommuner varsler strejkeAC har sendt konfliktvarsel for regionalt og kommunalt ansatte akademikere.
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The Atlantic

Retweets Are TrashAcouple of months ago, I made a small tweak to my Twitter account that has changed my experience of the platform. It’s calmer. It’s slower. It’s less repetitive, and a little less filled with outrage. All of these improvements came about because I no longer see retweets. When I joined Twitter, in late 2007, it was still a new medium—and a fun one. I felt as though we early users were discovering
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Live Science

Is Earth's Missing Xenon Hidden in the Core?Earth's xenon is missing. But a new experiment suggests it might have been right under our feet all along.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Using molecular spectroscopy to study reaction mechanismsGasoline, lubricants, and consumer products are improved by chemical additives. Making additives often involves a chemical reaction known as alkylation, the addition of a carbon chain to existing molecules. Chemists know acid catalysts are useful for alkylation, but how one of the most popular catalysts, acidic zeolites, perform alkylation in a condensed phase is not well understood.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Image: Saturn's greatest stormSaturn's storm are sights to behold. Unlike other planets in the Solar System, the ringed planet seems to store up huge amounts of energy over multiple Earth decades and then release it all at once in the form of a swirling and chaotic lightning storm.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Jellyfish adapt their venom to accommodate changing prey and sea conditionsMany animals use venom to protect themselves from predators and to catch prey. Some, like jellyfish, have tentacles, while others, like bees and snakes use stingers and fangs to inject their prey with venomous toxins.
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The Atlantic

This Democrat Is Running for Congress—but Not Against TrumpWASHINGTON, Pa.—Tall and trim, with a square jaw and tidy brown hair, everything about Conor Lamb, the 33-year-old Democrat running for Congress in Pennsylvania’s 18th district, is pleasantly inoffensive—like vanilla ice cream or a pair of well-pressed khaki pants. And people at the Giant Eagle grocery store loved him. “He’s a cutie,” an older employee told me, arranging a rack of Stacy’s Pita Ch
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Scientific American Content: Global

The Business Case for a Data RefineryCrude data is similar to crude oil—in its raw form, it’s usually too messy to be useful -- Read more on ScientificAmerican.com
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Science of Science authors hope to spark conversations about the scientific enterpriseA group of interdisciplinary scientists have put the practice of science itself under a microscope to begin quantifying the fundamental drivers of scientific discovery and to help develop tools and policies aimed at improving the scientific endeavor.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Nudging the city and residents of Cape Town to save waterCape Town could become the world's first major city to run out of water – what's been termed Day Zero. Sao Paulo faced similar difficulties in 2015 leading to significant social unrest.
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BBC News - Science & Environment

Sound of speedThe Bloodhound supersonic car will produce a huge amount of noise when it starts running later this year.
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Science : NPR

Why Won't The Old Caveman Stereotypes For Neanderthals Die?New evidence suggests Neanderthals made cave art — and they may also have created religious rituals. It's time to let go of Neanderthal-human "border policing," says anthropologist Barbara J. King. (Image credit: AFP/Getty Images)
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Science | The Guardian

‘I could hear things, and I could feel terrible pain’: when anaesthesia fails – podcastAnaesthesia remains a mysterious and inexact science – and thousands of patients still wake up on the operating table every year. • Read the text version here Subscribe via Audioboom , iTunes , Soundcloud , Mixcloud , Acast & Sticher and join the discussion on Facebook and Twitter Continue reading...
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Latest Headlines | Science News

Massive stellar flare may have fried Earth’s nearest exoplanetA massive flare made Proxima Centauri 1,000 times brighter in 10 seconds, dimming hopes that its planet may be habitable.
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Ingeniøren

Regeringen kræver lynhurtigt mobilnet: »Ingen evidens for behovet,« mener branchenEt nyt teleudspil fra regeringen skal sikre bedre dækning med mobilnet og bredbånd. Men skrappe krav kan være med til at hæmme udviklingen, mener branchen.
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Live Science

Experts Are Stumped by the Toad with a Stump for a FaceWhy does this toad have no face?
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Feed: All Latest

How Medicine's Long, Thin Supply Chain Threatens AmericansWIRED columnist Maryn McKenna on how offshoring drug and medical supply manufacturing puts patients and hospitals at risk.
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Feed: All Latest

Inside Cryoport, the Company Delivering Next-Gen Cancer ImmunotherapiesWhen you're sending a $500,000 vial of genetically engineered, cancer-fighting cells, a safe delivery can mean the difference between life and death.
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Feed: All Latest

The Decentralized Internet Is Here, With Some GlitchesPrivacy advocates and venture capitalists want to circumvent the tech giants with apps using encrypted data stored on networks of computers.
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Scientific American Content: Global

A Promising Backup to the Honeybee Is Shut DownThe world’s largest almond grower has suddenly closed an eight-year research project to develop a new commercial pollinator -- Read more on ScientificAmerican.com
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Ingeniøren

Nu står det klart: Prøver i det danske vandmiljø målte for lavt i ti årDet udskældte laboratoriefirma Eurofins forklarer i en redegørelse, at det allerede i 2008 tog en ny og misvisende metode i brug til at måle kvælstof i det danske vandmiljø.
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Scientific American Content: Global

"My Brain Made Me Do It" Is Becoming a More Common Criminal DefenseEthicists and scientists are considering the place of neuroscience in the courtroom -- Read more on ScientificAmerican.com
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Ingeniøren

Populære krypterings-tjenester i knæ mandag morgenBåde Telegram og Signal er gået i sort verden over.
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Ingeniøren

Danskernes tvivler på korrekt behandling af persondata i det offentligeBorgernes tillid til både offentlig og privat databehandling er udfordret, viser et nyt Tillidsbarometer fra PwC og Epinion.
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Live Science

1.6-Billion-Year-Old Breath of Life Frozen in StoneTiny voids in rock are the exhalations of ancient microbes.
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News

'Fighting my cancer as much as possible': Why many patients join phase 1 clinical trials'Fighting my cancer as much as possible' is why many patients participate in early stage clinical trials, according to research presented at the TAT (Targeted Anticancer Therapies) International Congress 2018 in Paris, France.
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Epigenetics therapy shows promise in patients with lymphomaNew compounds targeting epigenetics have shown remarkable early activity in patients with lymphoma, according to data presented at the TAT (Targeted Anticancer Therapies) International Congress 2018 in Paris, France. ESMO's phase-I oncology meeting featured early clinical studies with BET inhibitors and EZH2 inhibitors.
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New Scientist - News

Virtual reality lets doctors guide you through your own gutsPeople at Boston Children’s Hospital are taking tours of their own digestive tracts. Their doctor can point out anomalies and what they’ll do to fix them
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Ingeniøren

Techtopia #42: Dit testamente på BlockchainPodcast: Startuppen Testaviva har skabt en livsguide, som bygger på en blockchain, der holder styr på dokumenter og samarbejdspartnere, så man altid har styr på dokumenterne – lige fra skødet på huset til ægteskabet og testamentet.
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New Scientist - News

Does Cheddar Man show there is such a thing as bad publicity?When science is done by TV press release, it is science that usually comes off worst – just ask a geneticist studying skin colour
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Viden

Danske virksomheder bejler til verdens største forskningsprojekterDer var hundredevis af milliarder på spil, da dansk og international industri i denne uge mødtes til Big Science-konference i København for at forhandle om verdens største forskningsprojekter.
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Viden

BIG science: 4 af videnskabens vildeste byggeprojekterVerdens største forskningsprojekter kræver, at der tænkes stort - virkelig stort.
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Viden

Kæmpe rum-teleskop måske forsinket igenEn solskærm sidder fast på det teleskop, der skal afløse Hubble. Det kan forsinke teleskopet, som allerede har sprængt sin tidsplan.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Gene editing method produces perfect pluripotent stem cell twinsResearchers led by Dr. Knut Woltjen report a new gene editing method that can modify a single DNA base in the human genome with absolute precision. The technique, which is described in Nature Communications, is unique in that it guides the cell's own repair mechanisms by design, providing pairs of genetically matched cells for studying disease-related mutations.
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Dagens Medicin

Du har to måneder tilbage…Det er uvederhæftigt og uetisk over for det syge menneske at foregøgle en autoriseret viden om den præcise restlevetid og indirekte fastsætte en formodet dødsdato.
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Ingeniøren

TDC's kunder kan kun ringe 112Næsten en halv million er ramt af et nedbrud på TDC's netværk. Kunder, der har fastnettelefon sammen med en bredbåndslinje (IP-telefoni) kan ikke ringe 112.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Thawing permafrost causing the 'browning' of northern lakesThe organic carbon found in permafrost is being released as the ice melts after ages of confinement in the soil, and making its way into Arctic and subarctic lakes and ponds, modifying their composition. These are the findings of an international team of researchers that includes Professor Isabelle Laurion of INRS showing the influence that thawing permafrost has on surface water biogeochemistry.
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Healthy diet may not offset high salt intakeA healthy diet may not offset the effects of a high salt intake on blood pressure, suggests a new study. The research, from scientists at a number of institutions, including Imperial College London and Northwestern University, analyzed the diets of over 4,000 people. The results, published in the journal Hypertension, showed that people eating higher amounts of salt had higher blood pressure -- no
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News

127-million-year-old baby bird fossil sheds light on avian evolutionThe tiny fossil of a prehistoric baby bird is helping scientists understand how early avians came into the world in the Age of Dinosaurs.The fossil, which dates back to the Mesozoic Era (250-65 million years ago), is a chick from a group of prehistoric birds called, Enantiornithes. Made up of a nearly complete skeleton, the specimen is amongst the smallest known Mesozoic avian fossils ever discove
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Stem cell 'twins' to study diseaseResearchers report a new gene editing method that can modify a single DNA base in the human genome with absolute precision.
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Dietary sodium's impact may not be offset by other aspects of a dietAn international study suggests other aspects of the diet may not offset the harmful effect of sodium on blood pressure. The study, published in the American Heart Association's journal Hypertension, also reaffirms the need for widespread sodium reduction in the food supply.
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BBC News - Science & Environment

Baby bird fossil is 'rarest of the rare'Fossil gives a peek into the lives of primitive birds that shared the Earth with the dinosaurs.
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Dagens Medicin

First better – then fasterForhåbentlig vil både de medicinske specialer og de overordnede sundhedsmyndigheder tage ved lære af erfaringerne fra de ‘accelererede operationsforløb’. En »nedsættelse af farten«, som Michael Dupont foreslår, er kun en del af løsningen – det essentielle er, hvad tiden bruges til.
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Dagens Medicin

Radiologer og anæstesiologer er udtaget til strejkeKonfliktvarsel sendt for 2.500 kommunalt ansatte og 3.000 regionalt ansatte. På lægeområdet er radiologer og anæstesiologer udtaget.
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Science : NPR

This Chef Lost 50 Pounds And Reversed Prediabetes With A Digital ProgramPeople with prediabetes like a Washington state chef reversed the diagnosis using a digital program that harnesses the power of wearable devices, data, education, e-coaching and peer support. (Image credit: Katherine Streeter for NPR)
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Science : NPR

Like It Or Not, Personal Health Technology Is Getting SmarterTech evangelists say consumer electronics that sense, stream and interpret vital signs will lead to better health and lower costs. But skeptics say reliability and privacy issues still loom. (Image credit: martin-dm/Getty Images)
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

127-million-year-old baby bird fossil sheds light on avian evolutionThe tiny fossil of a prehistoric baby bird is helping scientists understand how early avians came into the world in the Age of Dinosaurs.
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Dagens Medicin

Lægegerning og strafansvarSvendborg-sagen afspejler mulige dysfunktioner og patientsikkerhedsbrister i system og kutymer. Men mindst af alt handler sagen om grovere eller gentagen lægefaglig forsømmelse eller skødesløshed.
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BBC News - Science & Environment

Body hackThe body-hackers who believe chips under the skin could replace keys and wallets in future.
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BBC News - Science & Environment

Lassa feverSince the beginning of the year, Nigeria has been gripped by an outbreak of the deadly Lassa fever.
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BBC News - Science & Environment

Tree loss pushing beetles to the brinkNearly a fifth of European beetles that live in old and hollowed wood are at risk of extinction.
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Ingeniøren

Tysk selskab vil varme danske byer op med geotermiE.ON satser på, at geotermisk varmeenergi kan give mere end nordsøolien. Men teknologien kan endnu ikke konkurrere med afgiftsfri biomasse.
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Ingeniøren

Ugens job: Rambøll, Cowi og FOSS har flere ledige jobsPå dagens liste finder du job for ingeniører og naturvidenskabelige kandidater i flere forskellige firmaer. Blandt andet som specialist, projektleder, konsulent og mere endnu.
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Nyheder - Forskning - Videnskab

Det koster kvinder 20 procent på lønnen at få børnTil trods for regler om ligeløn og barsels- og pasningsordninger har beslutningen om at få...
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Welcome snow slows California's plunge back to droughtWelcome drifts of fresh snow await California's water managers on their late-winter survey of the vital Sierra Nevada snowpack Monday after a massive winter storm slowed the state's plunge back into drought.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Japan car giants team up to build hydrogen stationsTop Japanese carmakers said on Monday they were teaming up to nearly double the amount of hydrogen stations in Japan, as the car-mad country seeks to head off competition from China and Germany.
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Feed: All Latest

The Oscars' Biggest Win? Acknowledging the Power of Genre MoviesHuge wins for 'Get Out' and 'The Shape of Water' prove genre fare can grapple with Big Ideas, and still connect with moviegoers.
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Science-Based Medicine

Texas: Ground zero for the politicization of school vaccine mandatesVaccine policies and school vaccine mandates have traditionally been as close to a nonpartisan issue as there can be in the US. Unfortunately, in Texas antivaccine activists and conservative activists threaten to change that. The antivaccine group Texans for Vaccine Choice has formed an unholy alliance with antiregulation conservative activists to attack school vaccine mandates. Antivaxers all ove
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Suicide prevention: Choosing the right wordA new study reveals the impact of the associative meaning of a single word on how readers subsequently view and refer to suicide.
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Science | The Guardian

A Neuroscientist Explains: is the internet addictive? - podcastDr Daniel Glaser is back. To kick off season two he asks whether there is a connection between reward and addiction. And can we really get addicted to Twitter? Subscribe and review on iTunes , and join the discussion on Facebook and Twitter A Neuroscientist Explains is finally back for its second season – meaning that in each episode, Dr Daniel Glaser and producer Max will revisit a column from D
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Ingeniøren

Horsens tracker turisterne via mobilens wifi-signal28 sensorer registrerer wifi-signaler fra mobiltelefoner i Horsens midtby for at kortlægge bevægelsesmønstre mellem butikker og turistattraktioner.
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The Guardian's Science Weekly

A Neuroscientist Explains: is the internet addictive? - podcastDr Daniel Glaser is back. To kick off season two he asks whether there is a connection between reward and addiction. And can we really get addicted to Twitter?
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News

UTSA researchers want to teach computers to learn like humansA new study by Paul Rad, assistant director of the UTSA Open Cloud Institute, and Nicole Beebe, Melvin Lachman Distinguished Professor in Entrepreneurship and director of the UTSA Cyber Center for Security and Analytics, describes a new cloud-based learning platform for artificial intelligence (A.I.) that teaches machines to learn like humans.
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Provide stroke patients with palliative care support minus the labelWhen caring for stroke patients, health care providers should focus on the social and emotional issues facing patients, rather than only physical rehabilitation, according to a new study published in CMAJ (Canadian Medical Association Journal).
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News

New national guideline sets out best practices for treating opioid addictionA new Canadian guideline for managing opioid use disorders lays out the optimal strategies for the treatment of opioid addiction, including recommending opioid agonist treatment with buprenorphine-naloxone as the preferred first-line treatment. The guideline, published in CMAJ, was created for a wide range of health care providers to address an urgent need for evidence-based treatment of opioid us
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Why US policies for dyslexia should be scrappedMany of the current US Federal and State dyslexia laws should be scrapped as they ignore scientific evidence and privilege some poor readers at the expense of huge numbers of others, according to a leading expert in reading disability.
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Ingeniøren

Internationale rapporter forventer langt flere elbiler end EnergistyrelsenNy rapport fra det internationale agentur for vedvarende energi, Irena, viser, at elbilerne kommer hurtigere end tidligere antaget og langt hurtigere, end Energistyrelsen regner med. Tallene bakkes op af lignende rapporter fra BP og Bloomberg.
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The Atlantic

Regulate Weapons Like We Do in the Military, Says an Army OfficerFor the list of previous entries in this series, please see the index at the end of the post. But: if you’re revving up to send me a note explaining what kind of ammunition the AR-15 uses, and how it is similar to (and different from) the military’s M-16 (and so on), please first at least look at this 8,000 word Atlantic article I did on that exact topic more than 35 years ago. For today’s instal
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Changing size of neurons could shed light on new treatments for motor neurone diseaseNew research published in The Journal of Physiology improves our understanding of how motor nerve cells (neurons) respond to motor neurone disease, which could help us identify new treatment options.
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Futurity.org

Why selfies make your nose look biggerResearchers have created a mathematical model that shows how selfies and other photos taken at close range can distort the appearance of the subject’s nose. “Young adults are constantly taking selfies to post to social media and think those images are representative of how they really look, which can have an impact on their emotional state,” says Boris Paskhover, an assistant professor at Rutgers
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Futurity.org

Success in reproduction is mostly about ‘not dying’“Dumb luck,” rather than individual superiority, may be the key to reproductive success, according to new research. A tree will drop hundreds of seedlings over the course of its lifetime, but only a small fraction will ever get to grow into the forest canopy like their progenitor. And studies have shown that dominant female birds can produce up to 95 percent of the offspring within a group. Why a
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Futurity.org

Tracing how words evolve may teach Siri a thing or twoResearchers have examined over 1,000 years of English language evolution and created computational models to track how words evolve to have multiple meanings over time. The research could help voice-controlled personal assistants like Alexa and Siri when they’re faced with words like “face” that have multiple meanings including a body part or an action. “…the ways in which words have developed ne
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Futurity.org

Lax laws miss health concerns around backyard chickensLocal ordinances aren’t adequately addressing human and animal health when it comes to keeping backyard chickens, and the laws that do exist don’t keep pace with those for commercial growers, a new study suggests. A growing number of chickens today are roaming or caged on small family farms and in backyards, as suburban and urban poultry gains more popularity. Many people prefer to raise their ow
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Futurity.org

Spring comes earlier the farther north you goFor every 10 degrees north from the equator you move, spring arrives about four days earlier than it did a decade ago, a new study suggests. This northward increase in the rate of springtime advance is roughly three times greater than what previous studies have indicated. For example, at southern to mid latitudes such as Los Angeles, New Orleans, or Dallas, the study, which appears in the journal
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Futurity.org

California’s wildflowers banked seeds to beat droughtNative wildflowers were surprisingly resilient during California’s most recent drought, but the signs weren’t evident with showy blooms aboveground. Rather, the gains were mostly underground, hidden in the seed bank, a new study suggests. For the study, researchers analyzed more than 22,000 seedlings from soil cores collected at the McLaughlin Natural Reserve in Northern California during the fal
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Futurity.org

Why wine and glass make the perfect pairingA new book looks at the science, technology, and history of the relationship between wine and glass. Jim and Penelope Shackelford’s love of wine, combined with his career as a materials scientist at the University of California, Davis, has produced a book, The Glass of Wine: The Science, Technology and Art of Glassware for Transporting and Enjoying Wine (Wiley, 2017). “Seeing the world of grape g
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

Broadly neutralizing antibody treatment may target viral reservoir in monkeysAfter receiving a course of antiretroviral therapy for their HIV-like infection, approximately half of a group of monkeys infused with a broadly neutralizing antibody to HIV combined with an immune stimulatory compound suppressed the virus for six months without additional treatment, according to a new study. The therapy may have targeted the viral reservoir -- populations of long-lived, latently
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Science | The Guardian

Starwatch: spectacular line-up of three bright planetsSaturn, Mars and Jupiter are all in a row this week in the pre-dawn south-eastern sky Early risers may have already noticed the beautiful planetary alignment taking place in the south-east before dawn. The bright planets of Saturn, Mars and Jupiter are strung out in a line. Saturn sits in Sagittarius , Mars in Ophiuchus and Jupiter in Libra . The colours of the planets are particularly notable. J
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NYT > Science

Trash in the Fjords? Norway Turns to DronesOslo hopes the technology will help identify types of litter so that human divers can scour it off the seabed.
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Broadly neutralizing antibody treatment may target viral reservoir in monkeysAfter receiving a course of antiretroviral therapy for their HIV-like infection, half of a group of monkeys infused with a broadly neutralizing antibody to HIV paired with an immune stimulatory compound suppressed the virus for over 4 months without additional treatment, according to NIAID-supported scientists. The therapy may have targeted the viral reservoir. The addition of the immune stimulato
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Big Think

Female nudity is powerful – but not necessarily empoweringCan female nudity ever be empowering? Read More
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Scientific American Content: Global

Worse and Worse: The Trump Administration's Continuing War on National ParksThe damage to our National Park Service will be catastrophic if Trump gets his way -- Read more on ScientificAmerican.com
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Big Think

Your supermarket may soon be plastic freeThe cumulative effect of plastics is taking its toll on the world. So supermarkets are starting to cut it out. Read More
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Feed: All Latest

How Technology Unsettled the Stock MarketThe rise of exchange-traded funds and algorithm-driven trading likely contributed to February's wild stock swings.
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Scientific American Content: Global

Winning, Losing and Learning to Be a Better Member of the TeamTough lessons from competition can help build stronger collaborators -- Read more on ScientificAmerican.com
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Big Think

Schizophrenia is likely a side effect of our brain’s complex evolutionThis discovery could lead to not only a better understanding of our evolution but to new treatment options for schizophrenics. Read More
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Big Think

Daylight saving time 2018: 7 myths and facts about changing the clockDST has implications on our history, our health, and even our chances of being the victim of a crime. Read More
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Profits, doubts in equal measure at Geneva Motor ShowGeneva Volkswagen JaguarThis year's Geneva Motor Show comes at a curious time for an auto world enjoying record profits yet also gripped by doubt midway through the grand transition from diesel to electric and self-driving vehicles.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Pet cloning is not just for celebrities anymoreAfter photographer Monni Must's 28-year-old daughter Miya committed suicide while in the midst of an abusive relationship, the grieving mother adopted Miya's spunky black Labrador, Billy Bean.
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Scientific American Content: Global

The Amazing, Inflatable Ankylosaur"Bloat and float" leads armored dinosaurs to wind up in unusual places -- Read more on ScientificAmerican.com
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Cameroon startup launches drones for global marketTalking fast and dreaming big, William Elong shows off the first "made in Cameroon" drone at his sixth-floor workshop in downtown Douala, minutes from the economic capital's Atlantic seafront.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

EU aims to tax internet giants at 'two to six percent': FranceThe EU will soon unveil a plan for taxing major internet companies like Amazon and Facebook by imposing a levy of two to six percent on revenues in every country where they operate, French finance minister Bruno Le Maire said Sunday.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Google expansion plans helping to turn NYC into tech hubAs New York City waits to hear whether it's been chosen as the site for Amazon's second headquarters, recent moves by another tech giant, Google, to expand its footprint in the city are helping to legitimize New York's claim to be Silicon Valley East.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Health savings outweigh costs of limiting global warming: studyThe estimated cost of measures to limit Earth-warming greenhouse gas emissions can be more than offset by reductions in deaths and disease from air pollution, researchers said on Saturday.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Record year for French champagne fails to cheer grape growersAt first glance, 2017 was a stellar year for French champagne, with 307 million bottles sold for a record 4.9 billion euros ($6.0 billion)—but many of those growing the grapes see little to celebrate.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Bruising Qualcomm-Broadcom battle heads for showdownWith a potential for the biggest-ever deal in the tech sector at stake, Qualcomm shareholders will have their say on a hostile bid for the US mobile chip giant by Singapore-based rival Broadcom.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

China to recruit civilian astronauts, boost crewed missionsChina will begin recruiting civilian astronauts for its military-backed space program and plans to increase the number of crewed missions to around two a year, a top official with the country's space program said.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Gaming lovers square off in Riyadh eSports tournamentHundreds of Saudi men and women squared off in a video game tournament in Riyadh at the weekend, organisers said, in the conservative kingdom's biggest ever eSports contest.
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The Atlantic

The Biggest Moments of the 2018 OscarsThe 90th Academy Awards were a strange, somewhat muted affair low on surprises—perhaps exactly what Hollywood wanted after the chaos of last year’s ceremony . The Shape of Water , Guillermo del Toro’s at once gentle and darkly violent fable of love between a mute woman and an amphibious creature, won four Oscars including Best Picture and Best Director, but the wealth was pretty evenly spread amo
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The Atlantic

Nine Notorious Dictators, Nine Shout-Outs From Donald TrumpThe Chinese Communist Party’s attempt to allow President Xi Jinping to rule indefinitely set off harsh criticism in China, as well as international opprobrium. But the power grab appears to have at least one fan: Donald Trump. “He’s now president for life. President for life. No, he’s great,” Trump said of Xi at a lunch and fundraiser at his Mar-a-Lago estate, according to CNN , which obtained a
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The Atlantic

El Salvador's Gangs Are Targeting Young GirlsSAN SALVADOR—At dusk on a dusty soccer field in San Salvador last April, three girls sat together on a bench. Dani, 12, and Sofia, 16, regularly played soccer with the boys; Diana, Sofia’s 14-year-old cousin, came to watch. What else do you do for fun? , I asked them. They scuffed their shoes in the dirt, uncertain how to respond. So I told them what I did at their age: Played in my suburban neig
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

Short-term increases in inhaled steroid doses do not prevent asthma flare-ups in childrenResearchers have found that temporarily increasing the dosage of inhaled steroids when asthma symptoms begin to worsen does not effectively prevent severe flare-ups, and may be associated with slowing a child's growth, challenging a common medical practice involving children with mild-to-moderate asthma.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

Kids persistently allergic to cow's milk are smaller than peers with nut allergiesChildren who experience persistent allergies to cow's milk may remain shorter and lighter throughout pre-adolescence when compared with children who are allergic to peanuts or tree nuts, according to a retrospective chart review.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

Hospital implanting Pascal system in patient with tricuspid regurgitationInterventional cardiologists have performed a world-first procedure. They implanted a new device called the Pascal system in a patient with tricuspid regurgitation -- a condition in which the valve separating the two right chambers of the heart is leaking.
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The Atlantic

The Young Man Who Became a Civil-Rights IconEditor’s Note: Read The Atlantic ’s special coverage of Martin Luther King Jr.’s legacy. Chicago Review Before Martin Luther King Jr. became a great man, he was a young man, and he often acted like one. In The Seminarian: Martin Luther King Jr. Comes of Age , to be published this spring, Patrick Parr focuses on the future icon’s three years at Crozer Theological Seminary, in Chester, Pennsylvania
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Ingeniøren

Donorafføring på kapsel skal afhjælpe betændelse og irritabel tyktarmAarhus Universitet er gået sammen med bl.a. privat­hospitalet Aleris-Hamlet om udvikling af en kapsel, som skal kunne få has på både irritabel tyktarm og blødende tyktarmsbetændelse.
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Scientific American Content: Global

The More We Know, the More Mystery There IsPhysicist Marcelo Gleiser muses over the paradoxes of scientific progress -- Read more on ScientificAmerican.com
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Feed: All Latest

This Week's Internet News: Social Media Can't Keep Up With the White HouseFrom the president to Jared Kushner to Hope Hicks, the Trump administration kept the internet on its toes last week.
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Live Science

A Woman Needed a New Hip Replacement Because of … a Dog ScratchFor one woman in the U.K., a dog scratch turned into a much bigger ordeal than she could've expected.
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Live Science

Will the US Be Able to Stop Russia's New Arsenal of Missile Defense-Piercing Nukes?Russia could soon be able to conduct nuclear strikes all over the world without any chance of being intercepted. Here's how we got to this point.
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Science : NPR

Family Tree Goes Back 11 Generations, Includes 13 Million PeopleThirteen million people and 11 generations later, researchers have mapped out what may be the largest family tree to date.
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Latest Headlines | Science News

In the future, an AI may diagnose eye problemsArtificial intelligence could help diagnose blinding eye diseases and other illnesses, speeding up medical care in areas where specialists might be scarce.
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Feed: All Latest

Social Inequality Will Not Be Solved By an AppWe need more intense attention on how artificial intelligence forestalls the ability to see what kinds of choices we are making.
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Ingeniøren

Oticon lader ørerne gå på nettetHøreapparater skal ikke længere blot efterligne den menneskelige hørelse. Nu skal de selv kommunikere med omverdenen, men det kræver både kreative hardwareløsninger og standarder for kommunikation.
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Scientific American Content: Global

How People Talk Now Holds Clues about Human Migration Centuries AgoResearchers are analyzing dialects and historical records to unravel the formation of a Creole language -- Read more on ScientificAmerican.com
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The Atlantic

Queer Eye Opens the Miraculous Gay WalletWho was shocked when a study last year found that gay men on average earn about 10 percent more than straight ones? TV and movies insist that the typical gay guy is a fashionably equipped, mimosa-swilling city dweller. But the truth is that the study was a milestone: The comparable research before it had shown a gay wealth gap, with homosexual men lagging behind heterosexuals in wages, more likel
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The Atlantic

What If America Didn't Have Public Schools?On a crisp fall morning, parents lined the school’s circular driveway in Audis, BMWs and Land Rovers, among other luxury SUVs, to drop their high-schoolers off at Detroit Country Day School. Dressed in uniforms—boys in button-down shirts, blazers with the school crest, khaki or navy dress pants, and ties; girls in largely the same garb, though without the ties and the option of wearing a skirt—th
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Feed: All Latest

Inside the Million-Dollar McLaren Senna SupercarThe British automaker's latest supercar is all about function—and fun—over form.
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Feed: All Latest

Mind Games: The Tortured Lives of ‘Targeted Individuals’Thousands of people think that the government is using implanted chips and electronic beams to control their minds. They are desperate to prove they aren’t delusional.
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Feed: All Latest

Elusive Higgs-Like State Created in Exotic MaterialsPatent Harvard BrainsTwo teams of physicists have figured out how to create a "mini universe," which could help researchers understand the strange behavior of deeply quantum systems.
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The Atlantic

A Bright Red Flag for DemocracyA week after the fatal shootings at Marjory Stoneman Douglas High School in Parkland, Florida, some of the high school’s surviving students traveled to Tallahassee, Florida, and Washington, D.C., to protest lawmakers who failed to pass gun-control legislation. These teenagers have become passionate advocates for change. Emma Gonzalez, a senior at Marjory Stoneman Douglas, had a memorable explanat
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The Atlantic

On the Language and Culture of Discussing What to Do About GunsPreviously in this series: “ Tanks vs. AK-47s ” “ A Gun Holdup Victim on Whether He Wishes He Had Been Armed ” “ White Male Privilege ” “ A Case Against Gun Control ” “ The Cultural Roots of a Gun-Massacre Society ” “ A Veteran on the Need to Control Civilian Arms ” “ ‘Show Us the Carnage,’ Continued ” “ Only in America ” “ Show Us the Carnage ” “ The Empty Rituals of an American Massacre ” and b
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Ingeniøren

Lille robot triller programmering ud i klasselokalerneTo studerende kastede sig efter studiet over en robot, som kan lære børn at programmere. Men udvikling tager tid, og man skal jo også lige lære hinanden ordentligt at kende.
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NYT > Science

Wounds From Military-Style Rifles? ‘A Ghastly Thing to See’Trauma surgeons tell what it is really like to try to repair such devastating injuries. “Bones are exploded, soft tissue is absolutely destroyed,” one said.
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The Atlantic

If America's Democracy Fails, Can Other Ones Survive?Almost everyone who writes about challenges to democracy sooner or later encounters the important work of Yascha Mounk. The list of his accomplishments is a long one: The German-born scholar lectures on political theory at Harvard, is a postdoctoral fellow at the Transatlantic Academy of the German Marshall Fund, and is a nonresident fellow at New America's Political Reform Program. He writes a w
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The Atlantic

Senator James Risch Explains His Warning About 'Biblical' Conflict With North KoreaAt a recent security conference in Munich, Senator James Risch cautioned that a “very brief” conflict “of biblical proportions” could erupt between the United States and North Korea, leaving in its wake “mass casualties the likes of which the planet has never seen.” He then promptly left his stunned audience to catch a flight. This week, back in Washington, D.C., the Idaho Republican explained th
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Science | The Guardian

Has dopamine got us hooked on tech?Silicon Valley is keen to exploit the brain chemical credited with keeping us tapping on apps and social media In an unprecedented attack of candour, Sean Parker, the 38-year-old founding president of Facebook, recently admitted that the social network was founded not to unite us, but to distract us. “The thought process was: ‘How do we consume as much of your time and conscious attention as poss
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Ingeniøren

Fjernsynet får en farvereportagevognDen ombyggede OB-vogn kan med sin ti mand store besætning og otte timers daglig brug producere mellem en halv og to timers farve-tv om ugen.
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Science | The Guardian

Antidepressants do work – but children need someone to talk toYoung people in mental distress need – and deserve – faster access to support services, as well as pills Nearly a decade ago I found myself perched on the edge of a hard chair in a dark doctor’s office. I was 13 and struggling a lot with self harm, body image, and the simple task of keeping myself alive. Shuffling my feet and wondering how I ended up here, I remember not fully understanding what
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Science | The Guardian

‘I have a loving husband and thought I was secure. Then a cat came into my life’Philippa Perry on her struggle with total devotion… to her cat, Kevin Pets can highlight your mental health issues. Ask my late dad how he was, he would tell you, “Fine”. If you wanted more information, it was best to ask him how the dog was. “Oh, the dog is depressed.” My dad was doing what Freud described as projection. This is when you split off a part of you that is too shameful for you to ow
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NeuWrite San Diego

Battling A Brain Tumor The Loki WayRecently a friend of mine took on the duty of bringing me up to speed on the Marvel cinematic universe. When we got around to watching the first installment in the Thor series, I was expecting more levelheadedness on the part of Thor, the soon-to-be crowned king of Asgard. Shortly after the opening sequence however, […]
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