EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Advanced spatial planning models could promise new era of sustainable ocean developmentResearchers have developed a novel marine spatial planning strategy that accounts for and quantifies relevant environmental, industrial and societal interests in formulating optimized, sustainable spatial plans.
20h

Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

Gastric bypass surgery can give better control for diabetes and obesity than lifestyle modificationPatients treated with a form of bariatric surgery did significantly better than patients provided with an intensive diabetes and weight management program.
20h

Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

Sustainable ocean developmentEarth's vast and vital oceans are a critical source of economic productivity, but issues of space management, interindustry conflict and environmental degradation often limit sustainable commercial development.
20h

Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

It's not you, it's me: How customers break up with sellersCompanies invest billions each year in expensive customer service programs, sales forces, and sophisticated discounting programs such as Groupon to lure and retain customers only to find that churn remains one of their biggest, most expensive challenges. According to a new study, customers have a tendency to send clear signals before they 'break up' with a company, but you have to know what to be
20h

Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

Researchers pinpoint gene responsible for neurodevelopmental disorders, including autismResearchers found alterations of the gene thousand and one amino-acid kinase 2, known as TAOK2, plays a direct role in neurodevelopmental disorders, including autism. This is the first comprehensive study that supports previous research suggesting the involvement of this gene.
20h

Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

Modified, 3D-printable alloy shows promise for flexible electronics, soft robotsResearchers have taken a key step toward the rapid manufacture of flexible computer screens and other stretchable electronic devices, including soft robots.
20h

EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Roton quasiparticles observed in quantum gasAn team of physicists from Innsbruck and Hannover has for the first time observed so-called roton quasiparticles in a quantum gas. Empirically introduced by Landau to explain the bizarre properties of superfluid liquid Helium, these quasiparticles reflect an 'energy softening' in the system as precursor of a crystallization instability. The new work published in Nature Physics demonstrate similar
20h

EurekAlert! - Breaking News

How does resolving cannabis problems differ from problems with alcohol or other drugs?Individuals who report having resolved a problem with cannabis use appear to have done so at younger ages than those who resolved problems with alcohol or other drugs and were less likely to use any formal sources of assistance or support, report investigators from the Recovery Research Institute at Massachusetts General Hospital.
20h

EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Arms races and cooperation among amoebae in the wildThe social amoeba Dictyostelium discoideum is a powerful social study system because of the hard work of generations of cell and molecular biologists who have figured out many of the mechanisms of its social process. But it takes studies in nature to understand whether Dicty's cooperative behavior benefits relatives, and even whether its social activities occur frequently in nature. New gene seque
20h

EurekAlert! - Breaking News

New dual-atom catalyst shows promise to yield clean energy by artificial photosynthesisAn international team of researchers from the US and China has synthesized a dispersed catalyst featuring two atoms, yielding a stable and highly active platform that could facilitate solar water oxidation for the production and storage of clean energy, the team reports in the latest Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences.
20h

EurekAlert! - Breaking News

UMBC physicists show interactions between smoke and clouds have unexpected cooling effectAtomspheric physicists have found that the way wildfire smoke from Africa interacts with clouds over the Atlantic Ocean results in a net cooling effect, which is contrary to previous understanding and has implications for global climate models. The smoke particles serve as 'seeds' for the clouds, making them bigger and brighter and increasing their reflectivity, which more than compensates for the
20h

EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Reviewers of NIH grants cannot distinguish the good from the greatNIH invested more than $27 billion in biomedical research through competitive grants during its 2017 fiscal year, based on scores assigned by, and conversation between, expert peer reviewers. This peer review process is a bedrock feature of doling out dollars for scientific projects with careful deliberation. But new findings by University of Wisconsin-Madison researchers suggest that reviewers ar
20h

EurekAlert! - Breaking News

U CO2 sensor network shows effects of metro growthIn a study published today in Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences, a team led by atmospheric scientists Logan Mitchell and John Lin report that suburban sprawl increases CO2 emissions more than similar population growth in a developed urban core.
20h

EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Submerged aquatic vegetation return is sentinel of Chesapeake Bay ecosystem recoveryA new research article published today in the Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences analyzes the positive impact of long-term nutrient reductions on an important and valuable ecosystem in the Chesapeake Bay. Scientists indicate the resurgence of underwater grasses supports nutrient reductions from EPA's Total Maximum Daily Load (TMDL) along with conservation incentives have resulted in a
20h

EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Seeing sounds: Researchers uncover molecular clues for synesthesiaOne in 25 people have synesthesia, perceiving the world in unusual ways. An experience with one sense automatically leads to perception in another sense: for example, seeing colors when listening to music. Now researchers at the Max Planck Institute for Psycholinguistics and the University of Cambridge report clues into biological origins of such variations in human perception. They studied famili
20h

Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Cancer claim for Monsanto's Roundup gets judge's scrutinyClaims that the active ingredient in the widely used weed killer Roundup can cause cancer have been evaluated by international agencies, U.S. and foreign regulators and the product's manufacturer—agribusiness giant Monsanto.
20h

Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

Comet 'Chury's' late birthComets which consist of two parts, like Chury, can form after a catastrophic collision of larger bodies. Such collisions may have taken place in a later phase of our solar system, which suggests that Chury can be much younger than previously assumed.
20h

Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

Babies who look like their father at birth are healthier one year laterInfants who resemble their father at birth are more likely to spend time together with their father, in turn, be healthier when they reach their first birthday, according to new research.
20h

Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Restaurant review platform The Infatuation buys ZagatRestaurant discovery platform The Infatuation says it has entered into an agreement with Google to purchase Zagat, known for its heavily-quoted, crowd-sourced restaurant reviews in the pre-internet era.
20h

Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Who makes the NCAA tournament? Researchers at the University of Illinois can helpThe field for NCAA Tournament will be announced March 11, and basketball fans want to know which teams will be a part of March Madness. Researchers at the University of Illinois may have discovered the secret to forecasting the field. They also make a case that the much-maligned RPI really is a dependable tool for tournament decision-makers.
20h

Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Millennials are not adequately saving for retirement, study findsAccording to the U.S. Census, millennials accounted for more than 25 percent of the population in 2015, yet this significant segment of the workforce might not be prepared for retirement. In a new study, researchers from the University of Missouri found that only 37.2 percent of working millennials have retirement accounts, demonstrating a need for increased financial education for retirement. Thi
20h

Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Researchers model tradeoffs and opportunities for aquaculture development in the Southern California BightEarth's vast and vital oceans are a critical source of economic productivity, but issues of space management, interindustry conflict and environmental degradation often limit sustainable commercial development.
20h

Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Submerged aquatic vegetation return is sentinel of Chesapeake Bay ecosystem recoveryA new research article published today in the Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences analyzes the positive impact of long-term nutrient reductions on an important and valuable ecosystem in the Chesapeake Bay. Scientists indicate the resurgence of underwater grasses supports nutrient reductions from EPA's Total Maximum Daily Load (TMDL) along with conservation incentives have resulted in a
20h

Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

CO2 sensor network shows effects of metro growthIn February 2001, before the Olympic cauldron in Salt Lake City roared to life and focused the world's spotlight on Utah, scientists at the University of Utah placed the first of several carbon dioxide (CO2) sensors atop a building on campus.
20h

Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Reviewers of NIH grants cannot distinguish the good from the great: studyThe National Institutes of Health (NIH) invested more than $27 billion in biomedical research through competitive grants during its 2017 fiscal year. Those grants were awarded based on scores assigned by, and conversation between, expert peer reviewers.
20h

Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Physicists show interactions between smoke and clouds have unexpected cooling effectAtomspheric physicists have found that the way wildfire smoke from Africa interacts with clouds over the Atlantic Ocean results in a net cooling effect, which is contrary to previous understanding and has implications for global climate models.
20h

Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

New dual-atom catalyst shows promise to yield clean energy by artificial photosynthesisLooking for new solutions to more efficiently harvest and store solar energy, scientists from the U.S. and China have synthesized a new, dual-atom catalyst to serve as a platform for artificial photosynthesis, the team reported today in the Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences.
20h

Live Science

Why Can Some People 'Hear' Colors?About 4 percent of the people on Earth experience a mysterious phenomenon called synesthesia.
20h

Latest Headlines | Science News

Pollution regulations help Chesapeake Bay seagrass reboundRegulations that have reduced nitrogen runoff into the Chesapeake Bay are driving the recovery of underwater vegetation.
20h

EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Who makes the NCAA tournament? Researchers at the University of Illinois can helpThe field for NCAA Tournament will be announced March 11, and basketball fans want to know which teams will be a part of March Madness. Researchers at the University of Illinois may have discovered the secret to forecasting the field. They also make a case that the much-maligned RPI really is a dependable tool for tournament decision-makers.
20h

EurekAlert! - Breaking News

TSRI researchers uncover culprit in Parkinson's brain cell die-offResearchers investigate the connection between misfolded proteins and the destruction of mitochondria in neurons.
20h

EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Greenhouse gas emissions of hydropower in the Mekong River Basin can exceed fossil fuel sourcesHydropower is commonly considered as a clean energy source to fuel Southeast Asian economic growth. Recent study published in Environmental Research Letters finds that hydropower in the Mekong River Basin, largest river in Southeast Asia, might not always be climate friendly.
20h

Science : NPR

Grass Is Back In The Chesapeake, And Crabs Will FollowIn the Chesapeake Bay, underwater seagrass beds are growing, sheltering crabs and fish. The long-awaited recovery depends on efforts by farmers to prevent nutrients from polluting the giant estuary. (Image credit: Peter Essick/Getty Images/Aurora Creative)
20h

Big Think

Is God really dead? Nietzsche, Russell and ChristianityNietzsche is an influential thinker, but he is not without critics. One of the best of them is British philosopher Bertrand Russell. Read More
21h

Live Science

This Is One of the Tiniest Ancient Birds, and It Lived Alongside Giant DinosaursAbout 127 million years ago, tiny birds the size of grasshoppers lived alongside some of the biggest animals to walk the Earth, including the long-necked sauropods, a new study finds.
21h

Big Think

Massive stellar flare scorches hope of discovering life on Earth’s nearest exoplanetSince 2016, the exoplanet Proxima b has been a top candidate in the search for alien life. But new findings show that a stellar flare might have scorched that hope entirely. Read More
21h

EurekAlert! - Breaking News

NCDR annual conference highlights the power of clinical dataThe American College of Cardiology's NCDR Annual Conference begins on Wednesday, March 7, 2018, in Orlando. The conference brings together registry professionals, quality improvement professionals, physicians and administrators involved in the NCDR suite of cardiovascular data registries.
21h

EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Millennials are not adequately saving for retirement, MU study findsIn a new study, researchers from the University of Missouri found that only 37.2 percent of working millennials have retirement accounts, demonstrating a need for increased financial education for retirement. This study is among the first to examine the state of millennials' retirement savings.
21h

The Atlantic

America's Gun-Culture ProblemIn the weeks since the deadly school shooting that killed 17 students and teachers in Parkland, Florida, it really has seemed as if American voters might finally start punishing their elected officials for inaction on legislation that might make such incidents less likely or less frequent. Those same elected officials, of course, such as Florida’s own Senator Marco Rubio, have been quick to point
21h

The Atlantic

Letters: Why Carry a Gun?What Critics Don't Understand About Gun Culture In an essay last week on TheAtlantic.com, the writer and Iraq War veteran David French explained why he carries a gun. David French’s article about the mentality of gun owners is meant, I think, to make gun owners seem sympathetic, but instead it encapsulates everything damaging about gun culture. First, fear and paranoia are the motives for gun own
21h

NYT > Science

Mind: Trump Wants More Asylums — and Some Psychiatrists AgreeThere are far too few psychiatric beds in the United States, researchers say. But debate rages over what to do with those who require long-term care.
21h

NYT > Science

Trilobites: This Hummingbird Chirps Like an Insect. Can It Hear Its Own Sound?A South American hummingbird’s noise is well above the normal hearing range of most birds, perhaps to stand out amid the din of other species in its habitat.
21h

Live Science

SpaceX's Roadster Could Be a Martian 'Biothreat'Elon Musk's spacefaring Tesla Roadster is likely carrying the biggest bacteria payload to ever leave Earth.
21h

New on MIT Technology Review

Amazon wants to start offering bank accountsAmazon Product Company
21h

Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

Healthy diet may not offset high salt intakeA healthy diet may not offset the effects of a high salt intake on blood pressure, suggests a new study. The research, from scientists at a number of institutions, including Imperial College London and Northwestern University, analysed the diets of over 4,000 people. The results, published in the journal Hypertension, showed that people eating higher amounts of salt had higher blood pressure -- no
21h

Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

For flour beetles, it's better to be a woman in a man's worldResearchers have shown that female red flour beetles reproduce better in male-dominated groups than in unbiased or female-dominated groups. The research demonstrates that this effect is because female beetles wage a chemical war against each other using the chemicals ethyl bezoquinone and methyl benzoquinone to reduce each other's reproduction.
21h

EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Fish 'super power' may offer clues about biodiversity evolutionA group of international scientists, including a University of Central Florida biologist, recently discovered that a species of fish living in the north Atlantic Ocean has an ability to adapt to changing environmental conditions that are linked to the depth of its watery habitat. The unknown mechanism, which gives the roundnose grenadier its 'super power,' appears to be coded into the species' gen
22h

EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Sustainable ocean developmentEarth's vast and vital oceans are a critical source of economic productivity, but issues of space management, interindustry conflict and environmental degradation often limit sustainable commercial development.
22h

Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Neutrons provide new polish for petroleum processing and moreUniversity of Notre Dame researchers are using neutrons at the Department of Energy's (DOE's) Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) to study how specialized molecules might improve petroleum production processes, as well as their potential uses in advanced photovoltaic technologies.
22h

Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

NASA sees powerful storms around Dumazile's eyeWhen NASA's Aqua satellite and NASA-NOAA's Suomi NPP satellites passed over Tropical Cyclone Dumazile in the Southern Indian Ocean it measured cloud top temperatures and saw its eye circled by a ring of strong thunderstorms.
22h

The Scientist RSS

Social Dominance Comes At a CostDominant male mammals are particularly at risk of infection by parasites.
22h

Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

Biochemists zero in on key molecules that enable cells to crawlBiochemists have made a discovery that sheds light on the molecular machinery that allows some cells, such as immune cells or even malignant cancer cells in humans, to wiggle their way through tissues like organs, skin or bones.
22h

Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

Polygenic risk score may identify Alzheimer's risk in younger populationsFor the first time, scientists have determined that an Alzheimer's disease (AD) polygenic risk score can be used to correctly identify adults with mild cognitive impairment (MCI) who were only in their 50s.
22h

Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

Drug-producing bacteria possible with synthetic biology breakthroughBacteria could be programmed to efficiently produce drugs, thanks to breakthrough research into synthetic biology using engineering principles.
22h

Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

Novel PET imaging agent targets copper in tumors, detects prostate cancer recurrence earlyA new study demonstrates that a novel nuclear medicine imaging agent targeting copper accumulation in tumors can detect prostate cancer recurrence early in patients with biochemical relapse (rising prostate-specific antigen [PSA] level).
22h

Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

Algorithm for large-scale brain simulationsResearchers have made a decisive step towards being able to simulate brain-scale networks on future supercomputers of the exascale class. The breakthrough algorithm allows larger parts of the human brain to be represented, using the same amount of computer memory. Simultaneously, the new algorithm significantly speeds up brain simulations on existing supercomputers.
22h

Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

Chemical sleuthing unravels possible path to forming life's building blocks in spaceScientists have used experiments to retrace the chemical steps leading to the creation of complex hydrocarbons in space. They showed pathways to forming 2-D carbon-based nanostructures in a mix of heated gases.
22h

Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

Ball or stuffed toy -- Do dogs 'know' what they're smelling?Dogs' excellent sense of smell is well-known, whether it is in the context of searching for people or for contraband substances. However, the question of how dogs understand what they perceive with their sense of smell has largely been unexplored. Scientists have now found evidence that dogs create a 'mental representation' of the target when they track a scent trail.
22h

Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

Epigenetics therapy shows promise in patients with lymphomaNew compounds targeting epigenetics have shown remarkable early activity in patients with lymphoma, according to new data.
22h

Feed: All Latest

Oscars 2018: Movies Always Reflect the World. So Did This Year's AwardsFrances McDormand's acceptance speech was just one of the moments that made last night's Oscars feel like real change was happening.
22h

Latest Headlines | Science News

By 2100, damaged corals may let waves twice as tall as today’s reach coastsStructurally complex coral reefs can defend coasts against waves, even as sea levels rise.
22h

EurekAlert! - Breaking News

NASA sees powerful storms around Dumazile's eyeWhen NASA's Aqua satellite and NASA-NOAA's Suomi NPP satellites passed over Tropical Cyclone Dumazile in the Southern Indian Ocean it measured cloud top temperatures and saw its eye circled by a ring of strong thunderstorms.
22h

EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Babies who look like their father at birth are healthier one year laterInfants who resemble their father at birth are more likely to spend time together with their father, in turn, be healthier when they reach their first birthday, according to new research co-conducted by faculty at Binghamton University, State University of New York.
22h

EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Engineers, physicians, team to replace heart valves using personalized modelingEngineers are exploring applications for 3-D printers in the medical field, and the newest research is now going from the lab to the operating room. Experts at The Ohio State University Wexner Medical Center use CT scans to model a patient's aorta, then create a 3D-printed replica down to its exact texture based on the calcification in a patient's tissue.
22h

Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Uber sued after data stolen by hackers covered upPennsylvania's attorney general is suing the ride-hailing company Uber, saying it broke state law when it failed to notify thousands of drivers for a year that hackers stole their personal information.
22h

The Atlantic

The 2018 Sony World Photography AwardsThe Sony World Photography Awards , an annual competition hosted by the World Photography Organisation, just announced its shortlist of winners for 2018. This year's contest attracted nearly 320,000 entries from more than 200 countries. The organizers have again been kind enough to share some of their shortlisted and commended images with us, gathered below. Overall winners are scheduled to be an
22h

Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

These tropical hummingbirds make cricket-like sounds other birds can't hearResearchers have found that a tropical species of hummingbird called a black jacobin makes vocal sounds with an unusually high-frequency pitch that falls outside birds' normal hearing range. It's not yet clear whether the hummingbirds can even hear themselves, the researchers say.
22h

Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

Retaining talent is paramount for successful firm acquisitionsA recent study found that when acquiring firms avoid the exodus of scientists from the target firms, their likelihood of creating highly impactful knowledge increases.
22h

Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

Lens-free fluorescent microscopeEngineers are developing their FlatScope as a fluorescent microscope able to capture three-dimensional data and produce images from anywhere within the field.
22h

Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

Deep-sea fish choose habitat according to genotype, new research saysScientists have found evidence of natural selection in a deep-sea fish species adapting to the depth of ocean that it inhabits.
22h

Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

Strong relationships in midlife may offset health risks for victims of childhood abuseResearch has linked childhood abuse to many adverse health outcomes in adulthood, including premature mortality, but according to new research, supportive relationships in midlife can partly compensate for the mortality risks linked to childhood abuse.
22h

Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

It's not you, it's me: How customers break up with sellersCompanies invest billions each year in expensive customer service programs, sales forces, and sophisticated discounting programs such as Groupon to lure and retain customers only to find that churn remains one of their biggest and most expensive challenges. According to a new study, customers have a tendency to send clear signals before they "break up" with a company, but you have to know what to
22h

NYT > Science

Trilobites: A Supercolony of Penguins Has Been Found Near AntarcticaSatellite images and a drone discovered about 1.5 million Adélie penguins living in the Danger Islands, one of two species whose habitats require ice.
22h

EurekAlert! - Breaking News

How the brain represents sound elevationChanging the shape of human participants' ears has provided new insight into how the brain represents the location of a sound source. The research, published in JNeurosci, highlights the link between sensory encoding and perception.
22h

Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Biochemists zero in on key molecules that enable cells to crawlBiochemists have made a discovery that sheds light on the molecular machinery that allows some cells, such as immune cells or even malignant cancer cells in humans, to wiggle their way through tissues like organs, skin or bones.
22h

Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Deep-sea fish choose habitat according to genotype, new research saysScientists have found evidence of natural selection in a deep-sea fish species adapting to the depth of ocean that it inhabits.
22h

Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Study: Retaining talent is paramount for successful firm acquisitionsA recent UT Dallas study found that when acquiring firms avoid the exodus of scientists from the target firms, their likelihood of creating highly impactful knowledge increases.
22h

Live Science

Man's Foot Blister Turns Out to Be Deadly Flesh-Eating BacteriaA Texas man who thought he had a simple blister on his foot turned out to have a life-threatening infection.
22h

Scientific American Content: Global

From Einstein to GPS to the Back SeatWill the US continue to lead the world in science? -- Read more on ScientificAmerican.com
22h

The Atlantic

Martin Luther King Jr. Changed a Nation in Only 13 YearsMartin Luther King Jr. was just 2 6 when he came to prominence, by leading a bus boycott in Montgomery, Alabama. He was only 39 when he was killed. January 15, 1929: Michael King Jr. is born in Atlanta to Michael King Sr., a prominent local preacher and civil-rights leader, and Alberta King, a former schoolteacher. In 1934, his father changes both of their first names to Martin—by various account
22h

Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Adopted children need closer ties to their birth families, according to national enquiryResearch headed by a University of Huddersfield professor has caused an influential social work organisation to call for a major review of UK adoption law, so that children who have been adopted could retain much closer contact with their birth families.
22h

Big Think

Does Steven Pinker's gospel of data hide dark gaps?Almost every reader will learn from the vast erudition (and biblical proportions) of Steven Pinker's 'Enlightenment Now'. But it's data-lit gospel of progress hides darker biases. Read More
22h

Big Think

These are the women behind the Intellectual Dark WebA number of important women are working outside mainstream media to build platforms that address the gray areas in challenging topics. Read More
22h

Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

FlatScope: Team designs lens-free fluorescent microscopeLenses are no longer necessary for some microscopes, according to Rice University engineers developing FlatScope, a thin fluorescent microscope whose abilities promise to surpass those of old-school devices.
22h

Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

How are we related? A Compara-bly easy workflow to find gene familiesPublished in GigaScience, the open source Galaxy workflow allows researchers to make easier work of finding gene families; an important tool when it comes to analysing the evolution, structure and function of genes across species.
22h

EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Alternative technique can improve brain imaging for restless childrenChildren often find it difficult to remain still for MRI examinations, but an alternative method to conventional MRI for pediatric patients has shown promise in reducing motion-related artifacts in brain imaging, according to an article published online ahead of print from the April 2018 issue of the American Journal of Roentgenology (AJR).
23h

EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Fall detection devices for seniors are falling shortLack of real-world testing and input from older adults and caregivers limits effectiveness of technology, new study shows.
23h

EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Modified, 3-D printable alloy shows promise for flexible electronics, soft robotsResearchers have taken a key step toward the rapid manufacture of flexible computer screens and other stretchable electronic devices, including soft robots.
23h

EurekAlert! - Breaking News

It's not you, it's me: How customers break up with sellersCompanies invest billions each year in expensive customer service programs, sales forces, and sophisticated discounting programs such as Groupon to lure and retain customers only to find that churn remains one of their biggest, most expensive challenges. According to a new study, customers have a tendency to send clear signals before they 'break up' with a company, but you have to know what to be
23h

EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Polygenic risk score may identify alzheimer's risk in younger populationsFor the first time, an international team of scientists, led by researchers at University of California San Diego School of Medicine, have determined that an Alzheimer's disease (AD) polygenic risk score can be used to correctly identify adults with mild cognitive impairment (MCI) who were only in their 50s. MCI is considered a precursor to Alzheimer's disease.
23h

EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Researchers pinpoint gene responsible for neurodevelopmental disorders, including autismResearchers found alterations of the gene thousand and one amino-acid kinase 2, known as TAOK2, plays a direct role in neurodevelopmental disorders, including autism. This is the first comprehensive study that supports previous research suggesting the involvement of this gene.
23h

Scientific American Content: Global

Latest U.S. Weather Satellite Highlights Forecasting ChallengesResearchers begin to tackle the technical obstacles to incorporate observations from space into weather models -- Read more on ScientificAmerican.com
23h

Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Inventor's firm says creator of the wind-up radio has diedTrevor Baylis, creator of the clockwork or wind-up radio, has died at 80.
23h

Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

NewsGuard, new venture to combat 'fake news'Two prominent American journalists announced plans Monday to launch a venture called NewsGuard which will provide online users with "reliability ratings" for media outlets.
23h

Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Qualcomm requests national security review of Broadcom bidUS chipmaker Qualcomm postponed its annual shareholders' meeting after secretly requesting a national security review of Broadcom's bid to take over the company, the Singapore-based Broadcom announced Monday.
23h

cognitive science

AI's dirty little secret: It's powered by peoplesubmitted by /u/trot-trot [link] [comments]
23h

NYT > Science

Take a Number: Afraid of Snakes? Wasps and Dogs Are DeadlierPeople killed by animals were most often attacked by bees, hornets and dogs, a new analysis finds.
23h

Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Beetles face extinction due to loss of old treesNearly a fifth of Europe's wood beetle species face extinction because the old, decaying trees they depend on have been cleared from forests, scientists warned Monday.
23h

Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Plants share defensive proteins in evolutionary pick 'n' mixThe recent research, led by the Krasileva Group of Earlham Institute and The Sainsbury Laboratory, used phylogenetics (the study of how DNA sequences are related) to identify how these 'bait' genes are distributed throughout various wild and domestic grasses, including important crop plants such as wheat, barley, maize and rice. This fresh evidence could help scientists and breeders especially in
23h

Popular Science

Go ahead, marry your cousin—it's not that bad for your future kidsHealth Just don't turn it into a family tradition. Marrying your first cousin, while illegal in many states, is not the worst thing you could do. But the situation gets hairy if several generations follow do the same.
23h

EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Biochemists zero in on key molecules that enable cells to crawlBiochemists at the University of Oregon have made a discovery that sheds light on the molecular machinery that allows some cells, such as immune cells or even malignant cancer cells in humans, to wiggle their way through tissues like organs, skin or bones.
23h

EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Mortality in HIV+ immunosuppressed adults: Intensive screening is equivalent to preventive treatmentThe STATIS trial (sponsor Inserm-ANRS) has compared two innovative strategies designed to reduce mortality in severely immunosuppressed HIV-infected adults. Coordinated by Professors François-Xavier Blanc (CHU de Nantes) and Serge Domoua (Programme PAC-CI, CHU de Treichville, Abidjan), the trial is being conducted in Cambodia, Côte d'Ivoire, Uganda, and Vietnam. The results will be presented this
23h

New on MIT Technology Review

Silicon Valley is dead. Long live Silicon Valley!
23h

Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

New national guideline sets out best practices for treating opioid addictionA new guideline for managing opioid use disorders lays out the optimal strategies for the treatment of opioid addiction, including recommending opioid agonist treatment with buprenorphine-naloxone as the preferred first-line treatment. The guideline was created for a wide range of health care providers to address an urgent need for evidence-based treatment of opioid use causing overdoses and death
23h

Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

Gene editing method with absolute precisionResearchers report a new gene editing method that can modify a single DNA base in the human genome with absolute precision.
23h

Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

Researchers want to teach computers to learn like humansA new study describes a new cloud-based learning platform for artificial intelligence (A.I.) that teaches machines to learn like humans.
23h

Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

New tool for the crystallization of proteinsResearchers have developed a new method of crystallizing large membrane proteins in order to determine their structure. This will be of benefit to biological research and the pharmaceutical industry.
23h

EurekAlert! - Breaking News

These tropical hummingbirds make cricket-like sounds other birds can't hearResearchers reporting in Current Biology on March 5 have found that a tropical species of hummingbird called a black jacobin makes vocal sounds with an unusually high-frequency pitch that falls outside birds' normal hearing range. It's not yet clear whether the hummingbirds can even hear themselves, the researchers say.
23h

The Atlantic

Preventing Atrocity in the Age of TrumpThere is no phrase in foreign policy as simultaneously compelling and suggestive of a goal beyond reach as never again. These words, which allude to the Holocaust, urge action in the face of atrocities. But they are most often honored in the breach. Consider the recent record. At the end of February, the UN Security Council dithered for days over an ineffective ceasefire resolution while troops u
23h

New Scientist - News

AI reconstructs whatever you see just by reading a brain scanAn algorithm can reconstruct pictures a person is looking at from brain scans, could one day be used to tell what someone is thinking
23h

Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

Changing size of neurons could shed light on new treatments for motor neuron diseaseNew research improves our understanding of how motor nerve cells (neurons) respond to motor neuron disease, which could help us identify new treatment options.
23h

Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

Comparison shows value of DNA barcoding in selecting nanoparticlesThe first direct comparison of in vitro and in vivo screening techniques for identifying nanoparticles that may be used to transport therapeutic molecules into cells shows that testing in lab dishes isn't much help in predicting which nanoparticles will successfully enter the cells of living animals.
23h

Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

US dyslexia policies ‘ignore scientific evidence’, experts sayMany of the current US Federal and State dyslexia laws should be scrapped as they ignore scientific evidence and privilege some poor readers at the expense of huge numbers of others, according to a leading expert in reading disability.
23h

Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

These tropical hummingbirds make cricket-like sounds other birds can't hearResearchers reporting in Current Biology on March 5 have found that a tropical species of hummingbird called a black jacobin makes vocal sounds with an unusually high-frequency pitch that falls outside birds' normal hearing range. It's not yet clear whether the hummingbirds can even hear themselves, the researchers say.
23h

EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Strong relationships in midlife may offset health risks for victims of childhood abuseResearch has linked childhood abuse to many adverse health outcomes in adulthood, including premature mortality, but according to new Northwestern University research, supportive relationships in midlife can partly compensate for the mortality risks linked to childhood abuse.
1d

EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Adopted children need closer ties to their birth families, according to national enquiryThe enquiry into adoption in the UK was led by Huddersfield and Royal Holloway universities and commissioned by the British Association of Social Workers.
1d

NYT > Science

Global Health: Yellow Fever Circles Brazil’s Huge CitiesWith an outbreak in its second year, officials are trying to vaccinate 23 million people against the virus. The government was slow to act, critics say.
1d

Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

A leopard may not change its spots but venomous creatures change their venom recipe oftenFor a long time scientists believed that an animal's venom was consistent over time. However, through a close study of sea anemones, researchers found that animals change their venom several times over the course of a lifetime, adapting the potency and makeup of their venom to suit changing predators and aquatic environments.
1d

Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

Rare mineral discovered in plants for first timeA rare mineral that holds enticing potential as a new material for industrial and medical applications has been discovered on alpine plants.
1d

Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

'Filter' hones GWAS results to help researchers avoid dead endsA genetics research team has solved a dilemma facing researchers who use genomewide association studies (GWAS) by developing a new approach that strategically 'filters' which genes are worth further study. The researchers hope this strategy will accelerate the study of diseases such as Parkinson's, Alzheimer's, schizophrenia and even addiction by helping researchers avoid 'dead-end paths.' They ar
1d

Quanta Magazine

New Giant Viruses Further Blur the Definition of LifeFor decades, descriptions of viruses have straddled life and nonlife, a divide that usually isn’t difficult to navigate. Their hallmark characteristics, namely their small size, tiny genomes and parasitic dependence on cellular hosts for replication, set them apart from all other living things despite their animation. But that story has gotten far more puzzling — particularly since the discovery
1d

EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Surgeon scientists losing ground to other medical researchers for NIH fundingSurgeons have made many significant contributions to science in the 20th century, but the specialty has been losing ground to other medical researchers in terms of government funding over the past decade, according to a study published on the website of the Journal of the American College of Surgeons.
1d

EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Deep-sea fish choose habitat according to genotype, new research saysScientists have found evidence of natural selection in a deep-sea fish species adapting to the depth of ocean that it inhabits.
1d

EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Researchers find algorithm for large-scale brain simulationsResearchers have made a decisive step towards being able to simulate brain-scale networks on future supercomputers of the exascale class. The breakthrough algorithm allows larger parts of the human brain to be represented, using the same amount of computer memory. Simultaneously, the new algorithm significantly speeds up brain simulations on existing supercomputers.
1d

EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Study: Retaining talent is paramount for successful firm acquisitionsA recent UT Dallas study found that when acquiring firms avoid the exodus of scientists from the target firms, their likelihood of creating highly impactful knowledge increases.
1d

The Atlantic

Someone Was Missing at the 2018 OscarsLast year, there was a discernible shadow looming over the 2017 Academy Awards, saturating Jimmy Kimmel’s opening monologue, popping up in acceptance speeches throughout the night, and even making its presence felt via tweets projected onto the backdrop of the Dolby Theatre. Back then, the Donald Trump presidency was just a month old (even if it felt older, given the temporal slowdown of this adm
1d

Popular Science

A hundred years later, we're still not sure why the Spanish flu killed so many peopleHealth Historical disease detectives are solving mysteries of the 1918 flu. By understanding the epidemiological patterns associated with this and other pandemics, public health officials can better prepare for future health disasters.
1d

Live Science

Why 17 People Volunteered to Be Infected with Parasitic WormsAt a university hospital in the Netherlands, 17 students have a tropical parasitic disease.
1d

Futurity.org

Why 2D materials fall short of predictionsWhy do synthetic 2D materials often perform orders of magnitude worse than predicted? A new understanding of this scenario could improve the materials’ performance in future electronics, photonics, and memory storage. 2D materials are films only an atom or two thick. Researchers make 2D materials by the exfoliation method—peeling a slice of material off a larger bulk material—or by condensing a g
1d

Science | The Guardian

Monsanto says its pesticides are safe. Now, a court wants to see the proof | Carey GillamThis week’s events will mark the first time that the science used to justify certain pesticides will be analyzed under oath for all to see On Monday, a federal court hearing in San Francisco will turn a public spotlight onto the science surrounding the safety of one of the world’s most widely used pesticides, a weed killing chemical called glyphosate that has been linked to cancer and is commonly
1d

EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Drug-producing bacteria possible with synthetic biology breakthroughBacteria could be programmed to efficiently produce drugs, thanks to breakthrough research into synthetic biology using engineering principles, from the University of Warwick and the University of Surrey.
1d

EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Rice team designs lens-free fluorescent microscopeRice University engineers are developing their FlatScope as a fluorescent microscope able to capture three-dimensional data and produce images from anywhere within the field.
1d

EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Novel PET imaging agent targets copper in tumors, detects prostate cancer recurrence earlyAn Italian study featured in the March issue of The Journal of Nuclear Medicine demonstrates that a novel nuclear medicine imaging agent targeting copper accumulation in tumors can detect prostate cancer recurrence early in patients with biochemical relapse (rising prostate-specific antigen [PSA] level).
1d

EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Plants share defensive proteins in evolutionary pick 'n' mixPublished in Genome Biology, novel research has shed further light on how plants can use 'baits' to recognise and trap disease-causing pathogens before infection can take hold.
1d

EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Culturing cheaper stem cellsHuman pluripotent stem cells (hPSCs) can infinitely self-renew and develop into all major cell types in the body, making them important for organ repair and replacement. But culturing them in large quantities can be expensive. Now, scientists at Japan's Kyoto University, with colleagues in India and Iran, have developed a more cost-effective culture by using a new combination of chemical compounds
1d

EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Chaperones can hold protein in non-equilibrium statesChaperones are specialized proteins in the cell that help other proteins to reach their functional 3-D shapes, which correspond to the states preferred at thermodynamic equilibrium. But a new study by EPFL, UNIL and INSERM (France) scientists shows that chaperones can also maintain proteins in non-equilibrium states, potentially altering their fate. The work is published in Nature Chemical Biology
1d

EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Massive astrophysical objects governed by subatomic equationSurprisingly, a quintessential equation of quantum mechanics emerges while studying astronomical disks of orbiting material.
1d

EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Models show how to limit global temperature rise to 1.5°CThere are several ways to limit global temperature rise to 1.5°C by 2100, and new research led by IIASA researcher Joeri Rogelj shows under what conditions this could happen.
1d

EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Chemical sleuthing unravels possible path to forming life's building blocks in spaceScientists have used experiments at Berkeley Lab to retrace the chemical steps leading to the creation of complex hydrocarbons in space. They showed pathways to forming 2-D carbon-based nanostructures in a mix of heated gases.
1d

EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Insulator or superconductor? Physicists find graphene is bothInsulator or superconductor? MIT physicists find graphene is both, at a 'magic angle.'
1d

EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Is strength of state firearm laws associated with firearm homicide, suicide rates?Strong state firearm laws were associated with lower rates of firearm homicide, firearm suicide and suicide overall.
1d

EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Communication training for health care professionals may help adolescents start, finish HPV vaccinationA training intervention to help health care professionals better communicate about human papillomavirus (HPV) vaccines with adolescent patients and their parents increased initiation and completion of HPV vaccine series among both boys and girls.
1d

EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Technique to see objects hidden around cornersSomeday your self-driving car could react to hazards before you even see them, thanks to a laser-based imaging technology being developed by Stanford researchers that can peek around corners.
1d

EurekAlert! - Breaking News

How a yeast cell helps crack open the 'black box' behind artificial intelligenceUC San Diego School of Medicine researchers developed a visible neural network and used it to build DCell, a virtual model of a functioning brewer's yeast cell. To do this, they amassed all knowledge of cell biology in one place and created a hierarchy of these cellular components. Then they mapped standard machine learning algorithms to this knowledgebase. DCell can be viewed at d-cell.ucsd.edu.
1d

EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Researchers convert CO to CO2 with a single metal atomResearchers from Washington State University and Tufts University have demonstrated for the first time that a single metal atom can act as a catalyst in converting carbon monoxide into carbon dioxide, a chemical reaction that is commonly used in catalytic converters to remove harmful gases from car exhaust.The research, published today in the journal Nature Catalysis, could improve catalytic conve
1d

EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Nerve cells found to suppress immune response during deadly lung infectionsNeurons that carry nerve signals to and from the lungs suppress immune response during fatal lung infections with the bacterium Staphylococcus aureus.Animal experiments show that disabling these neurons can boost immune response and promote bacterial clearance to aid recovery.Targeting neuro-immune signaling in the lungs can pave the way to nonantibiotic therapies for bacterial pneumonia.
1d

EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Researchers identify renegade cells that portend relapse in children with leukemiaResearchers at the Stanford University School of Medicine have developed a technique that allowed them to determine at diagnosis whether children with acute lymphoblastic leukemia would relapse following treatment.
1d

EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Potential drug targets for ALS revealed in Stanford-led study using CRISPRIn a new application of gene-editing technology, researchers at the Stanford University School of Medicine have gleaned insights into the genetic underpinnings of amyotrophic lateral sclerosis, a neurodegenerative disease that's notoriously tricky to parse.
1d

Live Science

This Weird Google Earth Picture Does Not Show a Crashed UFOA popular YouTube channel is trying to convince viewers that photos of an avalanche on an island near Antarctica depict an alien spaceship crash site.
1d

Live Science

Bizarre, Parasitic 'Fairy Lantern' Reappears in the Rainforest After 151 YearsA strange plant that needs no sunlight and sucks on underground fungi for nutrients has turned up in Borneo, Malaysia, 151 years after the last time a scientist found it.
1d

Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

How microplastics are affecting marine organismsA group of scientists who use Crepdiula onyx as a model organism to test microplastics immunity have found that they will threaten other marine organisms that are less resilient towards mircoplastic pollution.
1d

Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

Producing handy gels from a protein found in human bloodFrom blood to the lab: the protein albumin is responsible for many vital processes in the human body. In nature it only appears as a solution when dissolved in water. Chemists have developed a method of producing various albumin-based gels. Their findings may one day help to develop innovative drug carrier systems that more easily reach the bloodstream.
1d

Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

Cognitive benefits of bilingualism overstatedBilingualism is naturally very useful in communication between people, but a new meta-analysis shows that it does not seem to increase the cognitive skills related to executive functions.
1d

New Scientist - News

A twist in graphene lets you switch superconductivity on and offTwo atomically thin layers of graphene can be misaligned just slightly to produce a superconductive material for super-efficient energy delivery
1d

The Atlantic

'Corporations Are People' Is Built on an Incredible 19th-Century LieSomewhat unintuitively, American corporations today enjoy many of the same rights as American citizens. Both, for instance, are entitled to the freedom of speech and the freedom of religion. How exactly did corporations come to be understood as “people” bestowed with the most fundamental constitutional rights? The answer can be found in a bizarre—even farcical—series of lawsuits over 130 years ag
1d

The Atlantic

Captive Orangutans Are Curious (But Wild Ones Are Not)When Carel van Schaik reached the top of his rope ladder, his first thought was: “Oh shit, there’s an orangutan here.” He was trying to measure the climate in the canopy of the Sumatran rain forest, using sensors that he had hoisted into the treetops. The devices were incredibly delicate: “You’d touch them and they’d break,” van Schaik recalls. So when he saw an orangutan ambling around, he feare
1d

The Atlantic

The Power-Structure OscarsThe Academy Awards began as an effort of appeasement . It was the late 1920s, and Louis B. Mayer—the studio head who was one of the founders of Metro-Goldwyn-Mayer—was worried about the spread of unionization throughout the movie industry. Wanting to keep the studio workers in his employ from organizing, he came up with a canny solution: He founded a collective, the Academy of Motion Picture Arts
1d

Science | The Guardian

New laser technology lets driverless cars see round cornersA new laser-based system could allow vehicles to ‘see’ obstacles before they come into view, scientists say Whether it’s a child running after a ball, a herd of cows or a broken-down car, unexpected obstacles can prove deadly to drivers. But scientists say the cars of the future might be able to anticipate such perils. A team of researchers have come up with a new laser-based system that efficien
1d

Feed: All Latest

Wanna See Around Corners? Better Get Yourself a LaserA clever system uses lasers and algorithms to map out-of-sight objects in 3-D. That could be great news for self-driving cars.
1d

New on MIT Technology Review

This cauliflower-picking robot aims to make up for a shortage of human labor in the UK
1d

TED Talks Daily (SD video)

What I learned when I conquered the world's toughest triathlon | Minda DentlerA 2.4-mile swim, a 112-mile bicycle ride and then a full-length marathon on hot, dry ground -- with no breaks in between: the legendary Ironman triathlon in Kona, Hawaii, is a bucket list goal for champion athletes. But when Minda Dentler decided to take it on, she had bigger aspirations than just another medal around her neck. She tells the story of how she conquered this epic race, and what it i
1d

Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Technique to see objects hidden around cornersA driverless car is making its way through a winding neighborhood street, about to make a sharp turn onto a road where a child's ball has just rolled. Although no person in the car can see that ball, the car stops to avoid it. This is because the car is outfitted with extremely sensitive laser technology that reflects off nearby objects to see around corners.
1d

Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Chemical sleuthing unravels possible path to forming life's building blocks in spaceScientists have used lab experiments to retrace the chemical steps leading to the creation of complex hydrocarbons in space, showing pathways to forming 2-D carbon-based nanostructures in a mix of heated gases.
1d

Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Massive astrophysical objects governed by subatomic equationQuantum mechanics is the branch of physics governing the sometimes-strange behavior of the tiny particles that make up our universe. Equations describing the quantum world are generally confined to the subatomic realm—the mathematics relevant at very small scales is not relevant at larger scales, and vice versa. However, a surprising new discovery from a Caltech researcher suggests that the Schröd
1d

Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

When rotated at a 'magic angle,' graphene sheets can form an insulator or a superconductorIt's hard to believe that a single material can be described by as many superlatives as graphene can. Since its discovery in 2004, scientists have found that the lacy, honeycomb-like sheet of carbon atoms - essentially the most microscopic shaving of pencil lead you can imagine - is not just the thinnest material known in the world, but also incredibly light and flexible, hundreds of times stronge
1d

Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Chaperones can hold protein in non-equilibrium statesChaperones are specialized proteins in the cell that help other proteins to reach their functional 3-D shapes, which correspond to the states preferred at thermodynamic equilibrium. But a new study by EPFL, UNIL and INSERM (France) scientists shows that chaperones can also maintain proteins in non-equilibrium states, potentially altering their fate. The work is published in Nature Chemical Biology
1d

Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Researchers convert CO to CO2 with a single metal atomResearchers from Washington State University and Tufts University have demonstrated for the first time that a single metal atom can act as a catalyst in converting carbon monoxide into carbon dioxide, a chemical reaction that is commonly used in catalytic converters to remove harmful gases from car exhaust.
1d

Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

How a yeast cell helps crack open the 'black box' behind artificial intelligenceUC San Diego School of Medicine researchers developed a visible neural network and used it to build DCell, a virtual model of a functioning brewer's yeast cell.
1d

Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Models show how to limit global temperature rise to 1.5 CThere are several ways to limit global temperature rise to 1.5°C by 2100, and new research led by IIASA researcher Joeri Rogelj shows under what conditions this could happen.
1d

Ingeniøren

Skjult kode gør det umuligt at gentage studier i kunstig intelligensNår nye forskningsresultater inden for kunstig intelligens bliver præsenteret, er det ofte umuligt at efterprøve resultaterne. I en stikprøve med 400 forskningsartikler havde kun 6 procent delt koden bag algoritmen.
1d

EurekAlert! - Breaking News

How are we related? A Compara-bly easy workflow to find gene familiesResearchers at Earlham Institute have released 'GeneSeqToFamily', an open-source Galaxy workflow that helps scientists to find gene families based on the powerful 'EnsemblCompara GeneTrees' pipeline.
1d

Scientific American Content: Global

Should We Open Some Sealed Moon Samples?Now might be the best time to study unexamined caches of lunar material from the Apollo missions -- Read more on ScientificAmerican.com
1d

Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

AI's dirty little secret: It's powered by peopleThere's a dirty little secret about artificial intelligence: It's powered by an army of real people.
1d

Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

MATISSE instrument sees first light on ESO's Very Large Telescope InterferometerThe new MATISSE instrument on ESO's Very Large Telescope Interferometer (VLTI) has now successfully made its first observations at the Paranal Observatory in northern Chile. MATISSE is the most powerful interferometric instrument in the world at mid-infrared wavelengths. The first MATISSE observations used the VLTI's Auxiliary Telescopes to examine some of the brightest stars in the night sky, inc
1d

Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Ball or stuffed toy—do dogs 'know' what they're smelling?Dogs' excellent sense of smell is well-known, whether it is in the context of searching for people or for contraband substances. However, the question of how dogs understand what they perceive with their sense of smell has largely been unexplored. In a study published today in the Journal of Comparative Psychology, scientists at the Max Planck Institute for the Science of Human History and the Dep
1d

Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Squaring the circle: Merchandising embarrassing productsBuying an intimate personal care product can be embarrassing, especially if the act is observed by acquaintances or perfect strangers. From selecting the product to carrying it to a register, to placing it on the counter in full view of the checkout line...the experience can be excruciating. New research shows how packagers and retailers can make such in-store purchases easier for the typical self
1d

Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

The family-owned-franchise penaltyWhile a family-owned business may have marketing appeal, franchisees that are family-owned don't, on average, perform as well financially as non-family owned franchisees. That critical insight was revealed in recent research that analyzed both existing franchise data and field research.
1d

Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Team invents new way to 'see' the quantum worldJILA scientists have invented a new imaging technique that produces rapid, precise measurements of quantum behavior in an atomic clock in the form of near-instant visual art.
1d

Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

127-million-year-old baby bird fossil sheds light on avian evolutionThe tiny fossil of a prehistoric baby bird is helping scientists understand how early avians came into the world in the Age of Dinosaurs. The fossil, which dates back to the Mesozoic Era (250-65 million years ago), is a chick from a group of prehistoric birds called, Enantiornithes. Made up of a nearly complete skeleton, the specimen is amongst the smallest known Mesozoic avian fossils ever discov
1d

EurekAlert! - Breaking News

JILA team invents new way to 'see' the quantum worldJILA scientists have invented a new imaging technique that produces rapid, precise measurements of quantum behavior in an atomic clock in the form of near-instant visual art.
1d

EurekAlert! - Breaking News

The family-owned-franchise penaltyWhile a family-owned business may have marketing appeal, franchisees that are family-owned don't, on average, perform as well financially as non-family owned franchisees.
1d

EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Squaring the circle: Merchandising embarrassing productsPackaging shapes and colors of embarrassing products, as well as where the products are placed in stores, make a difference in how likely shoppers are to follow through on purchase intentions
1d

EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Method to predict drug stability could lead to more effective medicinesResearchers from the UK and Denmark have developed a new method to predict the physical stability of drug candidates, which could help with the development of new and more effective medicines for patients. The technology has been licensed to Cambridge spin-out company TeraView, who are developing it for use in the pharmaceutical industry in order to make medicines that are more easily released in
1d

EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Ball or stuffed toy -- Do dogs 'know' what they're smelling?Dogs' excellent sense of smell is well-known, whether it is in the context of searching for people or for contraband substances. However, the question of how dogs understand what they perceive with their sense of smell has largely been unexplored. In a study published today in the Journal of Comparative Psychology, scientists investigated this question and found evidence that dogs create a 'mental
1d

EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Spanish scientists discover the cause of accelerated atherosclerosis and premature death in progeriaThe study, published in Circulation, shows that vascular smooth muscle cells are the main cause of accelerated atherosclerosis and premature death in an experimental model of progeria.
1d

Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Method to predict drug stability could lead to more effective medicinesResearchers from the UK and Denmark have developed a new method to predict the physical stability of drug candidates, which could help with the development of new and more effective medicines for patients. The technology has been licensed to Cambridge spin-out company TeraView, who are developing it for use in the pharmaceutical industry in order to make medicines that are more easily released in
1d

The Atlantic

China Is Not a Garden-Variety DictatorshipThe Chinese National People’s Congress is convening to consider among other things a “ recommendation ” to abolish term limits for China’s president and vice president. The outcome of that deliberative process is unusually un-suspenseful. President Xi Jinping will soon rule for life, confirming him as the most absolute ruler of China since the death of Mao Zedong. Chinese authorities have decisiv
1d

NYT > Science

The Price They PayMillions of Americans can't afford their prescriptions. These are portraits of a few patients struggling to manage their drug bills.
1d

Scientific American Content: Global

Millennials' Climate Views Could Sway 10 House Elections This NovemberTwo studies reveal congressional districts where younger voters could make a big difference -- Read more on ScientificAmerican.com
1d

Popular Science

Last week in tech: Everything you missed while preparing your Oscars partyTechnology Shake off your Academy Awards haze and check out all the top tech stories you missed last week. Amazon bought Ring, we met some new smartphones, and Legos are going greener.
1d

Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

Mammals share mechanisms controlling the heart with a 400 million-year-old fishPrimitive air-breathing fish, whose direct ancestors first appeared around 400 million years ago, show mechanisms controlling the heart which were previously considered to be found only in mammals -- according to a new study.
1d

Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

Ancient Nubia (present-day Sudan): In the footsteps of the Napata and Meroe kingdomsThe archaeological site of Sedeinga is located in Sudan, a hundred kilometers to the north of the third cataract of the Nile, on the river’s western shore. Known especially for being home to the ruins of the Egyptian temple of Queen Tiye, the royal wife of Amenhotep III, the site also includes a large necropolis containing sepulchers dating from the kingdoms of Napata and Mereo (seventh century BC
1d

Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

Controlled coupling of light and matterResearchers have built the foundations for a new field of nano-optics: they have succeeded in controlling the coupling of light and matter at room temperature.
1d

Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

Photosynthetic microalgae as biocatalystsBiotechnological production of chemicals using enzymes coupled with the photosynthesis of microalgae is the topic of the new project.
1d

Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

Capturing brain signals with soft electronicsScientists have developed new technology for long-term stable neural recording. It is based on a novel elastic material composite, which is biocompatible and retains high electrical conductivity even when stretched to double its original length.
1d

Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

Birth control pills increase risk of ischemic strokeOral contraceptives increase the risk of ischemic stroke, but this risk is very small among women who do not have other stroke risk factors, according to a new report.
1d

Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Dying for the group: What motivates the ultimate sacrifice?Whether idolised as heroes or demonised and labelled terrorists, throughout history people have been willing to die for their groups and the causes they believe in. But why?
1d

Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Rare mineral discovered in plants for first timeScientists at Sainsbury Laboratory Cambridge University have found that the mineral vaterite, a form (polymorph) of calcium carbonate, is a dominant component of the protective silvery-white crust that forms on the leaves of a number of alpine plants, which are part of the Garden's national collection of European Saxifraga species.
1d

EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Scientists created multifunctional protein-polymer filmsA team from MSU together with foreign and Russian colleagues found that when mixing dendrimers (tree-like polymers) and proteins, multilayer films are spontaneously formed. They are easily formed and retain the activity and function of protein enzymes, which determines their potential as a material for creating biosensors and medical products. The results of the study are published in the journal
1d

EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Scientists found a way to postpone cell deathA team of MSU-scientists and the Institute of Theoretical and Experimental Biophysics of Russian Academy of Sciences studied the mechanisms of interaction between the Fas-ligand protein that causes cell death and a respective membrane receptor. It turned out that to initiate the deadly scenario, the ligand needs to contact with a specific protein component of the cell -- caveolin. If the caveolin-
1d

EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Controlled coupling of light and matterResearchers from Würzburg and London have built the foundations for a new field of nano-optics: they have succeeded in controlling the coupling of light and matter at room temperature.
1d

EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Broadly neutralizing antibody treatment may target viral reservoir in monkeysAfter receiving a course of antiretroviral therapy for their HIV-like infection, approximately half of a group of monkeys infused with a broadly neutralizing antibody to HIV combined with an immune stimulatory compound suppressed the virus for six months without additional treatment, according to NIAID-supported scientists. The therapy may have targeted the viral reservoir -- populations of long-l
1d

EurekAlert! - Breaking News

'Filter' hones GWAS results to help researchers avoid dead endsA genetics research team at Johns Hopkins Medicine has solved a dilemma facing researchers who use genomewide association studies (GWAS) by developing a new approach that strategically 'filters' which genes are worth further study. The researchers hope this strategy will accelerate the study of diseases such as Parkinson's, Alzheimer's, schizophrenia and even addiction by helping researchers avoid
1d

EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Risk of cognitive decline reduced for people 85 and older with high cholesterolPeople with increasing total cholesterol aged 85 and older had a reduced risk for marked cognitive decline compared to people 75-84 whose risk was significantly elevated.
1d

Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

World's largest ivory burn delivered a strong message—but who received it?Media coverage of the torching of huge caches of ivory presented a strong message against elephant poaching and ivory trade, but many of those who needed to hear it most may not have received it, an international study has found.
1d

Ingeniøren

Dansk firma flytter indendørs-GPS fra modeltog til industrienModeltog var første skridt på vejen for den indendørs positionsteknologi baseret på ultralyd fra it-firmaet GamesOnTrack. Næste mål er robotter og droner i industrien.
1d

Big Think

Creativity is a distinct mental state that you can trainA recent study from Ontario measured the brain waves of improvisational jazz pianists, finding that the more training they had, the more creative they were rated. Read More
1d

Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

Greenhouse gas emissions of hydropower in the Mekong River Basin can exceed those of fossil fuel energy sourcesHydropower is commonly considered as a clean energy source to fuel Southeast Asian economic growth. A recent study finds that hydropower in the Mekong River Basin, largest river in Southeast Asia, might not always be climate friendly.
1d

Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

Impact of fishing fleets on the most threatened marine birdsAccidental by-catch –- which affects around 5,000 birds stuck in longlines every year -- is the most severe effect on marine birds by the fishing activity in the Mediterranean. The exploitation of fishing resources is threatening more and more the future of many marine birds with regression populations, such as Cory’s shearwater or the Balearic shearwater.
1d

Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

Hydrogen extraction breakthrough could be game-changerResearchers have successfully tested a new material that can be used for cheap and large-scale production of hydrogen – a promising alternative to fossil fuel.
1d

Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

Genes for age-linked brain deterioration identifiedA group of genes and genetic switches involved in age-related brain deterioration have been identified. The research found that changes to one of these genes, called Dbx2, could prematurely age brain stem cells, causing them to grow more slowly.
1d

Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Comparison shows value of DNA barcoding in selecting nanoparticlesThe first direct comparison of in vitro and in vivo screening techniques for identifying nanoparticles that may be used to transport therapeutic molecules into cells shows that testing in lab dishes isn't much help in predicting which nanoparticles will successfully enter the cells of living animals.
1d

Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Mammals share mechanisms controlling the heart with a 400 million-year-old fishPrimitive air-breathing fish, whose direct ancestors first appeared around 400 million years ago, show mechanisms controlling the heart which were previously considered to be found only in mammals – according to a new study.
1d

Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Simple arsenic sensor could save livesA low-cost, easy-to-use sensor which can test drinking water for arsenic in just one minute has been developed by Imperial and UCL researchers.
1d

Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Drug-producing bacteria possible with synthetic biology breakthroughBacteria could be programmed to efficiently produce drugs, thanks to breakthrough research into synthetic biology using engineering principles, from the University of Warwick and the University of Surrey.
1d

New on MIT Technology Review

Chinese cash says that a South American tech boom is incoming
1d

EurekAlert! - Breaking News

How the diagnosing of lung diseases can be improvedThe patient's airways can be viewed before transbrochial biopsy in a program developed by the students and employees of the Institute of Fundamental Education, Ural Federal University.
1d

EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Producing handy gels from a protein found in human bloodFrom blood to the lab: the protein albumin is responsible for many vital processes in the human body. In nature it only appears as a solution when dissolved in water. Chemists at Martin Luther University Halle-Wittenberg (MLU) have developed a method of producing various albumin-based gels. Their findings may one day help to develop innovative drug carrier systems that more easily reach the bloods
1d

EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Genes for age-linked brain deterioration identifiedA group of genes and genetic switches involved in age-related brain deterioration have been identified by scientists. The research found that changes to one of these genes, Dbx2, could prematurely age brain stem cells, causing them to grow more slowly. By comparing the genetic activity in brain cells from old and young mice, the scientists identified over 250 genes that changed their level of acti
1d

EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Magnetic nanoparticles will help stop internal bleeding 15 times more effectivelyScientists from ITMO University have found a way to effectively stop internal bleeding by magnetically-driven nanoparticles containing thrombin. A drug based on these nanoparticles can be injected intravenously and delivered straight to the site of a vascular injury. It can accelerate local clot formation and reduce overall blood loss by 15 times. The nanoparticles are not toxic to humans and can
1d

EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Sexual behavior of university studentsThe study used a sample of students from the University of Seville, who belonged to all the various departments. These students completed a questionnaire that consisted of three parts: sociodemographic variables, sexual and contraceptive experiences, and a last part about knowledge of and attitudes towards sexually transmitted infections, as well as about the use of contraceptive methods.
1d

EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Mammals share mechanisms controlling the heart with a 400-million-year-old fishPrimitive air-breathing fish, whose direct ancestors first appeared around 400 million years ago, show mechanisms controlling the heart which were previously considered to be found only in mammals -- according to a new study.
1d

EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Weightlifting shows benefits for kidney disease patientsResearch encourages people with non-dialysis chronic kidney disease (CKD) to include resistance training in exercise programs.
1d

EurekAlert! - Breaking News

A leopard may not change its spots but venomous creatures change their venom recipe oftenFor a long time scientists believed that an animal's venom was consistent over time. However, through a close study of sea anemones, Dr. Yehu Moran of Hebrew University found that animals change their venom several times over the course of a lifetime, adapting the potency and makeup of their venom to suit changing predators and aquatic environments.
1d

EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Arctic Ny Alesund sees rapid warming, but not the warmestThe IAP team finds Ny Alesund has experienced the fastest warmup in the Arctic, and highest temperature in the recent warm wave. However, this is not the highest daily mean temperature in the historic February.
1d

Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

How to solve virtual reality's human perception problemVirtual reality isn't confined to the entertainment world. There has also been an uptake of VR in more practical fields – it's been used to piece together parts of a car engine, or to allow people to "try on" the latest fashion trends from the comfort of their home. But the technology is still struggling to tackle a human perception problem.
1d

Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Hydrogen extraction breakthrough could be game-changerResearchers at KTH Royal Institute of Technology have successfully tested a new material that can be used for cheap and large-scale production of hydrogen – a promising alternative to fossil fuel.
1d

Scientific American Content: Global

East of Siberia: Heeding the SignThings had gone from one dead tiger to one live tiger, to one live tiger and one dead bear, all in the span of about 45 minutes -- Read more on ScientificAmerican.com
1d

The Atlantic

Something Mysterious Is Killing Captive GorillasJ ust before 8 o’clock on a snowy Wednesday morning, deep in a maze of doors and steel fencing in the basement of the Cleveland Metroparks Zoo, a 30-year-old gorilla named Mokolo is getting a heart exam. He’s voluntarily shambled up to a stainless-steel fence, squatted on his stout legs, and pressed his belly to the mesh. Now he looks at the ceiling with thinly veiled exasperation, like a kid who
1d

Futurity.org

‘Friendly’ bacteria may prevent wheezing after RSVBabies with higher amounts of the bacterium Lactobacillus in their nose or upper part of the throat during an acute respiratory syncytial virus (RSV) infection are less likely to develop childhood wheezing later on, a new suggests. Lactobacillus is a type of “friendly” bacteria that normally live in the digestive, urinary, and genital systems without causing disease. RSV is one of the most common
1d

Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Deep-learning system generates specific genre-based musicIzaro Goienetxea, a UPV/EHU researcher, has developed a method for automatically generating new tunes on the basis of a collection or corpus comprising tunes used in bertso—a form of extempore, sung, Basque verse-making. She has also presented a new way of representing pieces of music, and developed a new method for automatically classifying music. PLOS ONE has reported on the research conducted i
1d



Vil du være med til at finde de mest interessante nyheder? Send email herom til BioNyt

Se nyheder fra en tidligere dato

Tegn abonnement på

BioNyt Videnskabens Verden (www.bionyt.dk) er Danmarks ældste populærvidenskabelige tidsskrift for naturvidenskab. Det er det eneste blad af sin art i Danmark, som er helliget international forskning inden for livsvidenskaberne.

Bladet bringer aktuelle, spændende forskningsnyheder inden for biologi, medicin og andre naturvidenskabelige områder som f.eks. klimaændringer, nanoteknologi, partikelfysik, astronomi, seksualitet, biologiske våben, ecstasy, evolutionsbiologi, kloning, fedme, søvnforskning, muligheden for liv på mars, influenzaepidemier, livets opståen osv.

Artiklerne roses for at gøre vanskeligt stof forståeligt, uden at den videnskabelige holdbarhed tabes.