New on MIT Technology Review

Google has built the world’s most advanced quantum chip
2h
Viden

Ny kampagne: Nedsæt din risiko for kræft ved at ændre på ti vanerMed en ny kampagne skal danskerne blive sundere. På den måde kan man undgå fire ud af ti tilfælde af kræft.
3h
Ingeniøren

Mistanke om manglende armering i fatalt colombiansk brokollapsFotos af den kollapsede skråstagsbro Puente Chirajara viser, at der var en stor revne i en bjælke på den pylon, der kollapsede med ti dødsfald til følge.
12h

LATEST

The Atlantic

Rich People Are Ruining WineSeven years ago, Donald Trump bought a vineyard and winery in Albemarle County, Virginia, a few miles south of Monticello. The property had belonged to the ex-wife of John Kluge, the late founder of Metromedia (which later transformed into Fox News) and once the richest man in America. Kluge’s 1,300-acre property went to his former wife, Patricia, in a divorce settlement, and it was she who had t
8min
New Scientist - News

We could find advanced aliens by looking for their space junkIf there are alien civilisations as technologically advanced as us, we could possibly find them by looking for rings of orbiting satellites around their worlds
8min
EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Research brief: Shifting tundra vegetation spells change for arctic animalsFor nearly two decades, scientists have noted dramatic changes in arctic tundra habitat. UMN researchers set out to discover what could be behind the changes.
13min
EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Frequent 'I-Talk' may signal proneness to emotional distressPeople who talk a lot about themselves are not narcissists as one might expect. Instead, those who say 'I' and 'me' a lot may be prone to depression, anxiety and other negative emotions, University of Arizona researchers found.
13min
EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Overlooked cell key player in preventing age-related vision lossResearchers have pinpointed a new therapeutic target for macular degeneration, an eye disease that affects over 10 million Americans and is the leading cause of blindness in adults over 60. The findings show that tree-shaped retinal cells called Müller glia play a key role in preventing degenerative vision loss in rats.
13min
EurekAlert! - Breaking News

New study finds couples do poorly at knowing when their partner is sad or feeling downCouples do poorly at knowing when their partner is sad, lonely or feeling down, finds a new study from Southern Methodist University, Dallas. Couples do pretty well at picking up one another's more intense feelings, like happiness or anger, but they aren't as sensitive to 'soft negative' emotions. Since spouses are each other's primary source of social support, it's important they stay attuned to
13min
EurekAlert! - Breaking News

CRISPR enhances cancer immunotherapyThe FDA recently approved the first cellular immunotherapies to treat certain blood cancers. But so far, these T cell immunotherapies can't be used if the T cells themselves are cancerous. Such 'CAR-T' cells kill each other because they resemble one another so closely. Scientists at Washington University School of Medicine in St. Louis now have used the gene-editing technology CRISPR to engineer h
13min
EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Bioengineering team's 'circuit' work may benefit gene therapyResearchers at The University of Texas at Dallas have designed genetic 'circuits' out of living cellular material in order to gain a better understanding of how proteins function, with the goal of making improvements.
13min
EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Pain's origins may be significantly different in males and femalesNew research from The University of Texas at Dallas supports the growing consensus that pain begins differently for men and women at the cellular level. Dr. Ted Price, Dr. Salim Megat and their colleagues in the Pain Neurobiology Research Group recently found that a specific manipulation of receptors in the nervous system for the neurotransmitter dopamine impairs chronic pain in male mice, but has
13min
NYT > Science

Trilobites: How the Shape of Your Ears Affects What You HearWe’re able to locate sound because our brains grasp the shape of our ears. When that shape changes, we need time and practice to adapt.
23min
Popular Science

With wind farms, bias is in the eye of the beholderNexus Media News They can be beautiful monuments or ugly eyesores depending on how you feel about clean energy. Depending on your ideas about renewable power, you may view a towering, twirling wind turbine as the paragon of elegance or a hideous monstrosity.
27min
The Atlantic

How Kim Jong Un Seized Control of the Nuclear CrisisKim Jong Un just made two extraordinary moves. First, a man who hasn’t encountered another head of state and rarely interacts with foreign officials, who hasn’t traveled abroad since becoming North Korea’s leader and whose most prominent international contacts include a Japanese sushi chef and Dennis Rodman, played statesman by hosting top South Korean officials for dinner and hours of meetings i
27min
Quanta Magazine

Physicists Find a Way to See the ‘Grin’ of Quantum GravityIn 1935, when both quantum mechanics and Albert Einstein’s general theory of relativity were young, a little-known Soviet physicist named Matvei Bronstein, just 28 himself, made the first detailed study of the problem of reconciling the two in a quantum theory of gravity. This “possible theory of the world as a whole,” as Bronstein called it, would supplant Einstein’s classical description of gra
28min
EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Determinant factors for chronic kidney disease after partial nephrectomyMinimally invasive surgery appears to offer broader therapeutic scope for the renal masses without compromising oncological outcomes in proper hands.
35min
EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Unclassified version of new report predicts small drone threats to infantry unitsThe emergence of inexpensive small unmanned aircraft systems (sUASs) that operate without a human pilot, commonly known as drones, has led to adversarial groups threatening deployed U.S. forces, especially infantry units.
35min
EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Logo recognition associated with kids' choice of international junk foodsYoung children in six low- and middle-income countries prefer junk foods over traditional and home cooked meals, according to a new University of Maryland School of Public Health study. Researchers investigated the links between marketing and media exposure and the preference for fast food in Brazil, China, India, Nigeria, Pakistan, and Russia. Kids who easily identified the logos of international
35min
EurekAlert! - Breaking News

What do crime scene investigators actually do? (video)Television crime dramas have run up a huge audience, but their popularity has come with some unexpected consequences. They have generated interest in forensic science, but they've also distorted our expectations of the forensic profession and what's going on in the lab. Reactions explains what it's really like to be a crime scene investigator with a little help from analytical chemist Dr. Raychell
35min
EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Environmental exposures more determinant of respiratory health than inherited geneticsResearchers have found strong evidence that environmental exposures, including air pollution, affect gene expressions associated with respiratory diseases much more than genetic ancestry. The study, published today in Nature Communications, analyzed more than 1.6 million data points from biological specimens, health questionnaires and environmental datasets, making this study one of the largest ev
35min
EurekAlert! - Breaking News

One-off PSA screening for prostate cancer does not save livesInviting men with no symptoms to a one-off PSA test for prostate cancer does not save lives according to results from the largest ever prostate cancer trial conducted over 10 years by Cancer Research UK-funded scientists and published today (Tuesday) in JAMA.
35min
EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Infants who receive multiple vaccinations not at increased risk for infectionInfants who receive multiple vaccines as part of the routine vaccination schedule are unlikely to be more susceptible to other infections not targeted by those vaccines in the two years following vaccination, according to a study from Kaiser Permanente published today in the Journal of the American Medical Association.
35min
EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Does single PSA test have effect on prostate cancer detection, death?A screening program that invited men to a clinic to undergo a single prostate-specific antigen (PSA) test increased detection of low-risk prostate cancer but made no significant difference in prostate cancer deaths after 10 years.
35min
EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Opioids not better at reducing pain to improve function for chronic back, knee and hip painOpioid medications were not better at improving pain that interfered with activities such as walking, work and sleep over 12 months for patients with chronic back pain or hip or knee osteoarthritis pain compared to nonopioid medications.
35min
EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Engineering a new spin for disease diagnosticsResearchers at the National University of Singapore have created a new platform with the potential to extract tiny circulating biomarkers of disease from patient blood. This simple, fast and convenient technique could help realize liquid biopsy diagnostics -- a less invasive procedure than the current gold standard: tumor biopsies. Details of the new technique, which utilizes standard laboratory e
35min
EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Scientists engineer crops to conserve water, resist droughtFor the first time, scientists have improved how a crop uses water by 25 percent, without compromising yield, by altering the expression of one gene that is found in all plants.
35min
EurekAlert! - Breaking News

A simple trick for modeling calciumCalcium ions enable cells to communicate with one another, allowing neurons to interact, muscles to contract, and the heart's muscle cells to synchronize and beat. To better understand these processes, researchers often use computer simulations, but accurate models are challenging and computationally expensive. In this week's Journal of Chemical Physics, researchers demonstrate how a straightforwa
35min
Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

How a fish species in Lake Tanganyika works together to secure additional food sourcesA tiny striped fish called Neolamprologus obscurus only found in Lake Tanganyika in Zambia excavates stones to create shelter and increase the abundance of food for all fish in the group. This study is the first to document how team work in fish helps them to acquire more food.
38min
Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

Enhanced weathering of rocks can help to pull CO2 out of the air -- a littleWeathering of huge amounts of tiny rocks could be a means to reduce the greenhouse gases in the atmosphere. While this is normally a slow natural process during which minerals chemically bind CO2, technological upscaling could make this relevant for so-called negative emissions to help limit climate risks. Yet, the CO2 reduction potential is limited and would require strong CO2 pricing to become e
38min
The Atlantic

What Makes for an 'Oscar Movie' Is Changing FastAs the 90th Academy Awards drew close, prognosticators wondered if , like last year, an upset was at hand. The shocking triumph of Moonlight over La La Land at the 2017 ceremony hadn’t just been great television; it had also been an indication that the Academy’s push to diversify and modernize its member rolls was working. Could something similar happen this year? Could a horror movie like Get Ou
49min
TED Talks Daily (SD video)

Do you really know why you do what you do? | Petter JohanssonExperimental psychologist Petter Johansson researches choice blindness -- a phenomenon where we convince ourselves that we're getting what we want, even when we're not. In an eye-opening talk, he shares experiments (designed in collaboration with magicians!) that aim to answer the question: Why we do what we do? The findings have big implications for the nature of self-knowledge and how we react i
50min
Feed: All Latest

What Sea Slugs Can Teach Us About Saving the EnvironmentIt turns out that kleptopredation is an environmentally friendly strategy. Perhaps there really is honor among thieves.
50min
Futurity.org

‘Vintage’ telescope reveals inside of dead starResearchers have created a model of the interior of a white dwarf star similar to our own sun. A telescope and instrument considered “vintage” by today’s standards allowed one the researchers to succeed in making a discovery that wouldn’t have been possible with only the advanced satellite instrument that collected the initial data. A pulsating ‘corpse’ It all began when data taken by NASA’s Kepl
50min
BBC News - Science & Environment

Satellite links to optimise European airspaceThe next phase of the Iris project to streamline European air traffic management is initiated.
53min
EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Waterfalls offer insights into how rivers shape their surroundsThe amount of water flowing through a river has little influence over long-term changes to its course and the surrounding landscape, research into waterfalls has shown.
56min
EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Escape artistA new study by the University of Toronto Mississauga research team led by Professor Robert Reisz and PhD student Aaron LeBlanc, published March 5 in the open source journal, Scientific Reports, shows how a group of small reptiles who lived 289 million years ago could detach their tails to escape the grasp of their would-be predators -- the oldest known example of such behaviour.
56min
EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Running on renewables: How sure can we be about the future?A variety of models predict the role renewables will play in 2050, but some may be over-optimistic, and should be used with caution, say researchers.
56min
EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Where fresh is cool in Bay of BengalEach summer, the South Asian monsoon transforms parts of India from semi-arid into lush green lands able to support farming. The annual infusion of rainfall and resulting runoff into the Ganges, Brahmaputra, and other rivers in the region also has a very different, but no less dramatic, impact on the Bay of Bengal in the northeast Indian Ocean.
56min
EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Paying attention as the eyes moveThe visual system optimally maintains attention on relevant objects even as eye movements are made, shows a study by the German Primate Center.
56min
EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Photosynthesis originated a billion years earlier than we thought, study showsAncient microbes may have been producing oxygen through photosynthesis a billion years earlier than we thought, which means oxygen was available for living organisms very close to the origin of life on earth. In a new article in Heliyon, a researcher from Imperial College London studied the molecular machines responsible for photosynthesis and found the process may have evolved as long as 3.6 bill
56min
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Straightforward technique allows for accurate computer simulations of calcium signalingCalcium is essential for our bodies to function. Calcium ions enable cells to communicate with one another, allowing neurons to interact, muscles to contract, and the heart's muscle cells to synchronize and beat. To better understand these processes, in which calcium ions interact with biological molecules such as proteins, researchers often use computer simulations. But accurate models are challe
56min
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Scientists engineer crops to conserve water, resist droughtAgriculture already monopolizes 90 percent of global freshwater—yet production still needs to dramatically increase to feed and fuel this century's growing population. For the first time, scientists have improved how a crop uses water by 25 percent without compromising yield by altering the expression of one gene that is found in all plants, as reported in Nature Communications.
56min
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Engineering a new spin for disease diagnosticsResearchers at the National University of Singapore have created a new platform with the potential to extract tiny circulating biomarkers of disease from patient blood. This simple, fast and convenient technique could help realize liquid biopsy diagnostics—a less invasive procedure than the current gold standard: tumor biopsies. Details of the new technique, which utilizes standard laboratory equi
56min
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Green spaces in cities help control floods, store carbonFor many ecologists, fieldwork involves majestic mountains or rushing rivers or large tracts of wilderness. At the very least, it means exploring natural areas that aren't defined by human development.
1h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Fish team up for more foodCooperative behaviour to acquire food resources has been observed in hunting carnivores and web-building social spiders. Now researchers have found comparable behaviours in a fish species. A tiny striped fish called Neolamprologus obscurus only found in Lake Tanganyika in Zambia excavates stones to create shelter and increase the abundance of food for all fish in the group. Led by Hirokazu Tanaka
1h
Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

How thalidomide is effective against cerebral infarctionScientists have studied thalidomide's target protein, cereblon (CRBN), and its binding protein, AMP-activated protein kinase (AMPK), which plays an important role in maintaining intracellular energy homeostasis in the brain. Through their study, they revealed that thalidomide inhibits the activity of AMPK via CRBN under oxidative stress and suppresses nerve cell death.
1h
Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

Stab injury of zebrafish unveils regenerative processes by neural stem cells in the brainResearchers recently elucidated the regenerative processes by neural stem cells using a stab injury model in the optic tectum, a less studied area of the brain, of adult zebrafish. This study has brought them a step closer to shedding light on how an injured, human central nervous system (CNS) could be restored.
1h
Scientific American Content: Global

How to Understand, and Help, the Vaccine DoubtersUnderstand the values behind people’s fears -- Read more on ScientificAmerican.com
1h
Live Science

Why Some Babies Get a Boost from Looking Like DadBabies who look like their dads are healthier, likely because they get more love and "paternal investment" from their fathers.
1h
HumanBrainProject (uploads) on YouTube

The Human Brain ProjectModern neuroscience compels us to answer fundamental questions about what makes us human. Learn more about the work of the Ethics & Society group in the Human Brain Project From: HumanBrainProject
1h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Who's a good boy? Why 'dog-speak' is important for bonding with your petScientists at the University of York have shown that the way we speak to our canine friends is important in relationship-building between pet and owner, similar to the way that 'baby-talk' is to bonding between a baby and an adult.
1h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News

NASA examines Tropical Cyclone Dumazile's flooding rainfallTropical cyclone Dumazile formed east of Madagascar on March 3, 2018 and brought soaking rainfall to Madagascar. The GPM or Global Precipitation Measurement mission core satellite obtained a look at the soaking Dumazile gave the island nation.
1h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Neuroprotective mechanisms of gene and cell therapy of spinal cord injuriesGenetically modified stem and progenitor cells overexpressing NTFs have recently attracted special attention of researchers and are most promising for the purposes of regenerative medicine. Therefore, we have studied the effect of genetically modified human umbilical cord blood mononuclear cells on the expression of stem cell molecular determinants in spinal cord injuries.
1h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Only two US programs now scientifically proven to decrease ACL injury and improve neuromuscularAccording to the Burden of Musculoskeletal Diseases in the United States, females are four to five times more likely than males to sustain non-contact anterior cruciate ligament (ACL) injuries. While 36 intervention training programs have been described in literature since 1995, few have been scientifically proven to decrease ACL injury incidences and alter potentially dangerous neuromuscular move
1h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Conservationists find birds in central African rain forest are facing major threats from bushmeat huntingIn a new study released this month, conservationists are sounding the alarm about a growing hunting crisis plaguing rainforests in central Africa. The study, published in the journal Biological Conservation, found that more large forest birds such as raptors and hornbills are being killed to provide bushmeat (wildlife taken for food) than previously thought. Researchers concluded that unless the t
1h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News

BU study: Insurance status affects in-hospital complication rates after total knee arthroplastyIn-hospital complications following total knee arthroplasty (TKA) are higher among Medicare and Medicaid patients compared to those with private insurance. The study, which appears in the journal Orthopedics, is believed to the largest and most comprehensive assessment of medical and surgical com¬plications after TKA and of specifically how patients' insurance status affects overall complication r
1h
Feed: All Latest

Volvo's Polestar, VW Unveil New Electric Rivals for TeslaAt the ultra-flashy Geneva Motor Show, the revived Polestar, VW, and other automakers showed off cars they hope will let them dominate the growing electric car market.
1h
Science : NPR

Florida's Long-Lost Wild Flamingos Were Hiding In Plain SightScientists thought Florida's native flamingo population had been hunted out of existence by the 19th century plume trade. A new study suggests the birds have been there all along. (Image credit: Joe Raedle/Getty Images)
1h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Teaching computers to guide science: Machine learning method sees forests and treesWhile it may be the era of supercomputers and "big data," without smart methods to mine all that data, it's only so much digital detritus. Now researchers at the Department of Energy's Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory (Berkeley Lab) and UC Berkeley have come up with a novel machine learning method that enables scientists to derive insights from systems of previously intractable complexity in
1h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Drilling holes in the skull was never a migraine cure – but it was long thought to beTrepanation – the technique of removing bone from the skull by scraping, sawing, drilling or chiselling – has long fascinated those interested in the darker side of medical history. One stock tale is that trepanning is one of the most ancient treatments for migraines. As I study the history of the migraine, it certainly has always caught my attention.
1h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News

People with depression have stronger emotional responses to negative memoriesPeople with major depressive disorder (MDD) feel more negative emotion when remembering painful experiences than people without the disorder, according to a new study in Biological Psychiatry: Cognitive Neuroscience and Neuroimaging. The study reports that people with MDD were able to control the negative emotions about as well as people unaffected by MDD, but used somewhat different brain circuit
1h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Many small differences contribute to a large variationThere is no single main reason why certain drugs affect people differently, but rather many small factors. ETH researchers demonstrated this with a model system. They believe that, in order to test the effectiveness of certain drugs, it is necessary to look at the biological system as a whole.
1h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Teachers, pedagogical skills, and the obstacle of intuitionWhen a task calls for intuitive, its complexity goes unnoticed. However, when intuitions are not mobilized, the task is considered difficult, and seemingly requires the use of specific educational strategies. Researchers at UNIGE have demonstrated that teachers struggle to understand the difficulties encountered by pupils when attempting to solve apparently intuitive problems that are in fact diff
1h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News

UGA researchers develop new method to improve cropsA team of University of Georgia researchers has developed a new way to breed plants with better traits. By introducing a human protein into the model plant species Arabidopsis thaliana, researchers found that they could selectively activate silenced genes already present within the plant.
1h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Chlorine bleach is the main ingredient in a toxic cocktail that destroys bacteriaCertain white blood cells protect us from bacteria by engulfing them. A research team headed by Prof Dr Lars Leichert, head of the research group Microbial Biochemistry, Prof Dr Konstanze Winklhofer from the Department of Molecular Cell Biology at Ruhr-Universität Bochum as well as Prof Dr Andreas Meyer from the University of Bonn were the first ones to observe the process under the microscope, th
1h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Perioperative short haul air travel associated with increased risk of venous thromboembolismNew research presented at the 2018 Annual Meeting of the American Academy of Orthopaedic Surgeons (AAOS) found a correlation between flying following hip or knee arthroplasty and an increased risk of venous thromboembolism (VTE). This is the first study to identify such a risk as previous studies found no additional risk from perioperative air travel in patients following lower limb arthroplasty (
1h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Our circadian clock sets the rhythm for our cells' powerhousesCellular energy metabolism also follows the rhythm of the circadian clock. A University of Basel study has now shown exactly how this works by revealing the relationship between the circadian rhythm and the mitochondrial network for the first time.
1h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Pre-surgery counseling, non-opioid pain relievers shown to reduce post-surgery opioid useTwo new studies presented at the 2018 Annual Meeting of the American Academy of Orthopaedic Surgeons (AAOS) demonstrated that pre-operative counseling resulted in a significant decrease in opioid use after hand surgery and patients who used non-opioid pain relievers following surgery experienced a similar pain experience and benefit with less adverse events than those that received opioids.
1h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Stem cell centers on the rise, claim high efficacy for treatment of knee osteoarthritisEven with a lack of peer-reviewed evidence, the number of centers advertising stem cell therapies for osteoarthritis (OA) of the knee are increasing in the United States. These centers claim an 80 percent success rate, according to research presented this week at the 2018 Annual Meeting of the American Academy of Orthopaedic Surgeons (AAOS).
1h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Vitamin D deficiency and insufficiency impacts children's risk for severe forearm fracturesChildren who are vitamin D deficient have a greater risk of having more severe forearm fractures requiring surgical treatment, according to a new study presented today at the 2018 Annual Meeting of the American Academy of Orthopaedic Surgeons (AAOS). This is the first report that shows the important link between low vitamin D levels and the severity of fractures in children caused by low-energy, l
1h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News

The growing trend of youth sports specializationYouth sports has experienced a paradigm shift over the past 15 to 20 years. Gone are the days filled with pick-up basketball games and free play. Kids are increasingly specializing in sports.
1h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Stab injury of zebrafish unveils regenerative processes by neural stem cells in the brainWaseda University researchers recently elucidated the regenerative processes by neural stem cells using a stab injury model in the optic tectum, a less studied area of the brain, of adult zebrafish. This study has brought them a step closer to shedding light on how an injured, human central nervous system (CNS) could be restored.
1h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Untapped gold mine is lost from end-of-life vehiclesVast quantities of scarce metals are being lost from Europe's urban mine of vehicles, including 20 tonnes of gold each year -- and the proportion of critical metals in vehicles is continuing to increase. A database is now being published that charts the metals and facilitates recycling. On 8 March Maria Ljunggren Söderman, researcher at Chalmers University of Technology, will present the results a
1h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Poor mothers face greater scrutiny over their children's weightLow-income mothers who use food assistance programs face a high level of surveillance over their children's health and weight, new UBC research suggests. The study found low-income mothers, especially black and Latina mothers, of children who are either overweight or underweight face greater accusations from doctors, nutritionists and social workers that they don't properly feed their children com
1h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Green spaces in cities help control floods, store carbonA new study shows that urban green spaces like backyards, city parks and golf courses contribute substantially to the ecological fabric of our cities -- and the wider landscape -- and they need to be added to the data ecologists currently use when exploring big questions about our natural world.
1h
Futurity.org

Colony of 1.5 million penguins ‘hid’ from scientistsScientists recently discovered a “supercolony” of more than 1,500,000 Adélie penguins in the Danger Islands, a chain of remote, rocky islands off the Antarctic Peninsula’s northern tip. For the past 40 years, the total number of Adélie penguins, one of the most common on the Antarctic peninsula, has been steadily declining—or so biologists thought. “Until recently, the Danger Islands weren’t know
1h
New on MIT Technology Review

Uber may be planning to work with WaymoUber Drivers Company
1h
Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

Photosynthesis originated a billion years earlier than we thought, study showsThe earliest oxygen-producing microbes may not have been cyanobacteria. Ancient microbes may have been producing oxygen through photosynthesis a billion years earlier than we thought, which means oxygen was available for living organisms very close to the origin of life on earth. Researchers studied the molecular machines responsible for photosynthesis and found the process may have evolved as lon
1h
Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

70-year-old mystery of how magnetic waves heat the Sun crackedScientists have discovered that magnetic waves crashing through the Sun may be key to heating its atmosphere and propelling the solar wind.
1h
Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

Paying attention as the eyes moveThe visual system optimally maintains attention on relevant objects even as eye movements are made, shows a new study.
1h
Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

New test extends window for accurate detection of ZikaDiagnosis of Zika infection is complex. Molecular tests for exposure are only reliable in the first two to three weeks after infection. Antibody tests are confounded by cross-reactivity of antibodies to Zika with similar viruses like dengue and yellow fever. A new blood test called ZIKV-NS2B-concat ELISA is faster, less expensive, and extends the window of accurate detection to months after onset
1h
Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

Helmet use associated with reduced risk of cervical spine injury during motorcycle crashesDespite claims that helmets do not protect the cervical spine during a motorcycle crash and may even increase the risk of injury, researchers found that, during an accident, helmet use lowers the likelihood of cervical spine injury (CSI), particularly fractures of the cervical vertebrae.
1h
Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

Without 46 million year-old bacteria, turtle ants would need more bite and less armorSocially transmitted, nitrogen-providing microbes have opened a new ecological frontier for herbivorous turtle ants.
1h
Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

Bacteria resistant to last-resort antibiotic, missed by standard testsMicrobiologists have detected "heteroresistance" to colistin, a last-resort antibiotic, in already highly resistant Klebsiella pneumoniae, a bacterium that causes blood, soft tissue and urinary tract infections.
1h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Teachers, pedagogical skills, and the obstacle of intuitionWhen a task calls for intuitive knowledge, as in "subtracting means taking something away," its complexity often goes unnoticed. However, when intuitions are not mobilized – having to grasp, for instance, that subtracting means "finding the difference" – the task is considered difficult, and seemingly requires the use of specific educational strategies. Researchers at the University of Geneva (UNI
1h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Chlorine bleach is the main ingredient in a toxic cocktail that destroys bacteriaCertain white blood cells protect us from bacteria by engulfing them. A research team headed by Prof Dr. Lars Leichert, head of the research group Microbial Biochemistry, Prof Dr. Konstanze Winklhofer from the Department of Molecular Cell Biology at Ruhr-Universität Bochum as well as Prof Dr. Andreas Meyer from the University of Bonn were the first ones to observe the process under the microscope,
1h
Futurity.org

Laser system could let self-driving cars see around cornersResearchers have created an algorithm that could work alongside an extremely sensitive laser technology that reflects off nearby objects to help self-driving cars see around corners. Imagine that a driverless car is making its way through a winding neighborhood street, about to make a sharp turn onto a road where a child’s ball is rolling across the street. Although no person in the car can see t
1h
The Scientist RSS

Infographic: Relaying Stress Signals in BacteriaWidening the gap between a bacterium's cell wall and its outer membrane impairs its ability to respond to stress-inducing signals.
1h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Oxygen loss could be a huge issue for oceansA major study into an ancient climate change event that affected a significant percentage of Earth's oceans has brought into sharp focus a lesser-known villain in global warming: oxygen depletion.
1h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

New transistor concept, solar cell includedICN2 researchers have developed a novel concept in transistor technology: a two-in-one power source plus transistor device that runs on solar energy. Published in Advanced Functional Materials, lead author Amador Pérez-Tomás is calling it the "solaristor."
1h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

'Rheostat' identified that helps regulate cell death versus survival decisionsSt. Jude Children's Research Hospital scientists have determined how a protein's disordered region serves as a molecular rheostat to help regulate cell survival.
1h
Live Science

Nor'easter Exposes Revolutionary-War-Era Shipwreck on Maine BeachA shipwreck that may date to the Revolutionary War era was exposed on a Maine beach after the recent "bomb cyclone."
1h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

New molecule can kill five types of deadly drug-resistant superbugsAn international research team led by the Institute of Bioengineering and Nanotechnology (IBN) of the Agency for Science, Technology and Research (A*STAR) and IBM Research developed a synthetic molecule that can kill five deadly types of multidrug-resistant bacteria with limited, if any, side effects. Their new material could be developed into an antimicrobial drug to treat patients with antibioti
1h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Ancient reptile Captorhinus could detach its tail to elude predatorsImagine a voracious carnivore sinking its teeth into the tail of a small reptile, anticipating a delicious lunch, when, in a flash, the reptile is gone and the carnivore is left holding a wiggling tail between its jaws.
1h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Do LEGO instructions hinder skills for the future?Just as rules are made to be broken, instructions aren't necessarily made to be followed. What impact do LEGO instructions have on inspiring and developing the builders of tomorrow?
1h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Milky Way vs Andromeda (because now we're in with a chance)Buckle up and pack your popcorn: we're in for some intergalactic fireworks, only not quite like we were expecting.
1h
Feed: All Latest

Uber's Self-Driving Truck Scheme Hinges on Logistics, Not TechUber Drivers CompanyAnd the ride-hailing giant is hard to beat when it comes to piling up data about where and when things go.
1h
Ingeniøren

Hurtig opladning af bilen: Dansk firma sætter batteri på laderenNy type oplader til elbiler baseret på batterilager gør det muligt at tanke strøm væsentligt hurtigere uden at overbelaste elnettet.
1h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Queen's scientists crack 70-year-old mystery of how magnetic waves heat the SunScientists at Queen's University Belfast have led an international team to the ground-breaking discovery that magnetic waves crashing through the Sun may be key to heating its atmosphere and propelling the solar wind.
2h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Study shows cycling as number one cause of cervical fractures in menSporting-related cervical fractures increased by 35 percent from 2000 to 2015, mainly due to an increase in cycling-related injuries, according to research presented at the 2018 Annual Meeting of the American Academy of Orthopaedic Surgeons (AAOS). Men experienced the most fractures due to cycling, while the most common cause of fractures in women was horseback riding. The most common cause of cer
2h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Scientists developed a material for the new type of liquid crystal displaysA team from the Faculty of Physics, MSU together with their foreign colleagues developed a new liquid crystal material with high potential as a basis for brighter, faster, energy saving displays with higher resolution. The results of the work were published in Advanced Functional Materials journal.
2h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Fish team up for more foodA tiny striped fish called Neolamprologus obscurus only found in Lake Tanganyika in Zambia excavates stones to create shelter and increase the abundance of food for all fish in the group. Led by Hirokazu Tanaka of the University of Bern in Switzerland and the Osaka City University in Japan, this study is the first to document how team work in fish helps them to acquire more food. The research is p
2h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Cleaning nanowires to get out more lightA simple chemical surface treatment improves the performance of nanowire ultraviolet light-emitting diodes.
2h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Glaciers provide clues to combat desertificationUnderstanding how bacteria help convert glacier bedrock into soil could help address desertification.
2h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Enhanced weathering of rocks can help to suck CO2 out of the air -- a littleWeathering of huge amounts of tiny rocks could be a means to reduce the greenhouse gases in the atmosphere. While this is normally a slow natural process during which minerals chemically bind CO2, technological upscaling could make this relevant for so-called negative emissions to help limit climate risks. Yet, the CO2 reduction potential is limited and would require strong CO2 pricing to become e
2h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

The degradation status of modern polymeric museum artifacts can be classified by their smellBreath analysis in disease diagnostics is a promising research field, and the advances in instrumentation allows the accurate detection of metabolites. But not only the health status of patients, but also the preservation status of museum artifacts could be monitored. In their publication in Angewandte Chemie, heritage science researchers have investigated emissions of volatile organic compounds f
2h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Cutting pollution in the Chesapeake Bay has helped underwater grasses reboundSeagrasses are the "coastal canaries" of oceans and bays. When these underwater flowering plants are sick or dying, it means the ecosystem is in big trouble – typically due to pollution that reduces water quality. But when they are thriving and expanding, it is a sign that the ecosystem is becoming healthier.
2h
New Scientist - News

England needs to go on a diet, but new calorie plan won’t workPublic Health England is launching new schemes to reduce people’s calorie intake, but history suggests they won’t solve the growing obesity problem
2h
Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

Engineer creates solution to cheaper, longer lasting battery packsThe new technology called a bilevel equalizer is the first hybrid that combines the high performance of an active equalizer with the low cost of the passive equalizer.
2h
Popular Science

The best apps for overworked parentsDIY Tech help for bringing up baby. Raising kids of any age tends to create chaos. Luckily, your smartphone can help you reclaim your time. Here are seven parenting apps for bringing up baby.
2h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News

How thalidomide is effective against cerebral infarctionScientists at Waseda University and Tokyo University of Pharmacy and Life Sciences studied thalidomide's target protein, cereblon (CRBN), and its binding protein, AMP-activated protein kinase (AMPK), which plays an important role in maintaining intracellular energy homeostasis in the brain. Through their study, they revealed that thalidomide inhibits the activity of AMPK via CRBN under oxidative s
2h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Return to play checklist reduces re-injury for athletes following anterior cruciate ligamentA new study presented at the 2018 Annual Meeting of the American Academy of Orthopaedic Surgeons (AAOS) looked at primary anterior cruciate ligament (ACL) reconstructions among high-level athletes, and found that a return to play checklist decreased the incidence of injury to the knee following ACL reconstruction.
2h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Comet Chury formed by a catastrophic collisionComets made up of two lobes, such as Chury, visited by the Rosetta spacecraft, are produced when the debris resulting from a destructive collision between two comets clumps together again. Such collisions could also explain some of the enigmatic structures observed on Chury. This discovery, made by an international team coordinated by Patrick Michel, CNRS researcher at the laboratoire Lagrange (CN
2h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Projected volume of primary and revision total joint replacement in the US 2030 to 2060Total joint replacement (TJR) is one of the most commonly performed, elective surgical procedures in the United States, and the volume of primary and revision TJR procedures has risen continuously in recent decades. A new study presented at the 2018 Annual Meeting of the American Academy of Orthopaedic Surgeons (AAOS) analyzed models to more accurately predict the future volume of TJA procedures i
2h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Return to play for soccer athletes and risk for future injuryA new study presented at the 2018 Annual Meeting of the American Academy of Orthopaedic Surgeons (AAOS) looked at soccer athletes who sustained an anterior cruciate ligament (ACL) reconstruction to better understand the average return to play time and their risk of injury following a revision ACL reconstruction.
2h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Identifying ammonia hotspots in China using national observation networkResearchers from the CAS institute of Atmospheric Physics implemented a passive ammonia monitoring network based on the diffusive technique with monthly integrated measurements at 53 sites since September 2015 and presented the spatial distributions and seasonal variations in atmospheric NH3 on a national scale in China.
2h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News

You don't think your way out of a tiger attackAssistant Professor of Cognitive Neuroscience Dean Mobbs and other researchers have discovered the presence of two 'fear' circuits in the brain. One circuit deals with immediate threats without using conscious thought. The other circuit deals with more distant threats in a cognitive, strategic fashion.
2h
New on MIT Technology Review

Flippy the burger-making robot has started its shift
2h
Live Science

Tattoos Last Forever Because Your Immune Cells Are Hungry for Dead SkinTattooed mice reveal why some ink never fades.
2h
Science | The Guardian

Brain prize winner calls Brexit a 'disaster' for the NHS and sciencePioneering dementia scientist Prof John Hardy to donate prize money to anti-Brexit group A predicted exodus of European doctors, nurses and care workers following Brexit will be disastrous for Alzheimer’s patients and their families, according to a pioneering dementia scientist who was on Tuesday named as a joint recipient of the world’s most prestigious prize in neuroscience . Speaking at a pres
2h
Viden

Verdens største hjerne-pris går til banebrydende Alzheimers-forskningPatienter med Alzheimers har fået bedre diagnoser, behandling og medicin på grund af de fire forskere, der i dag modtog 'The Brain Prize' i København.
2h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Teaching computers to guide science: Machine learning method sees forests and treesWhile it may be the era of supercomputers and 'big data,' without smart methods to mine all that data, it's only so much digital detritus. Now researchers at the Department of Energy's Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory (Berkeley Lab) and UC Berkeley have come up with a novel machine learning method that enables scientists to derive insights from systems of previously intractable complexity in
2h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Study advances research in pelvic organ prolapse among womenBy measuring the sagging of the vaginal walls in more than a thousand volunteers for up to nine years annually, a team of Baltimore physicians reports the creation of a long-awaited baseline measure of the rate of progression of so-called pelvic organ prolapse. The baseline, they say, should provide a foundation for reliable studies and a more rational search for factors that prevent or ease the c
2h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Preventing exhaustion in immune cells boosts immunotherapy in miceImmunotherapy does not work for a majority of cancer patients. Preventing or reversing metabolic exhaustion in cancer-killing T-cells could boost its effectiveness.
2h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News

How tattoos are maintained by macrophages could be key to improving their removalResearchers in France have discovered that, though a tattoo may be forever, the skin cells that carry the tattoo pigment are not. Instead, the researchers say, the cells can pass on the pigment to new cells when they die. The study, which will be published March 6 in the Journal of Experimental Medicine, suggests ways to improve the ability of laser surgery to remove unwanted tattoos.
2h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Metal-free catalyst extends the range of ester synthesisA Japanese research team at Nagoya University created a versatile, metal-free catalyst for trans-esterification. Conventional catalysts for this reaction, which is a major source of esters, contain metals that are expensive, polluting, or interfere with chelating reactants. The new catalyst, an ammonium carbonate, can combine a wide range of alcohols and carboxylic esters into complex ester target
2h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Technique allows live imaging of 'ubiquitous' player in cellular housekeepingAutophagy is an important regulator of cellular housekeeping that uses ubiquitin to target and remove harmful proteins. However, the ubiquitin chains used in this process are complex and incompletely understood. Researchers at Tokyo Medical and Dental University (TMDU) developed a system that allows ubiquitin chains to be imaged in living cells, and identified a ubiquitin residue previously not kn
2h
Futurity.org

Optimistic chronic angina patients may have better outcomesChronic angina patients who are optimistic about their recovery appear to have better outcomes, a new study shows. The finding, to be presented at the American College of Cardiology annual meeting on March 10, adds to a growing body of evidence that a person’s state of mind can influence their physical health. “People often stop doing things they enjoy—playing with grandkids, exercising—because t
2h
Dagens Medicin

Ny aftale sætter rammerne for industri-betalt efteruddannelse i HovedstadenRegion Hovedstaden og Lægemiddelindustriforeningen har indgået en ny aftale, som sætter rammerne for samarbejde mellem industri og hospitalsansatte. Aftalen betyder bl.a. at afdelingsledelsen skal godkende efteruddannelsesarrangementer.
2h
New Scientist - News

Nice prize for Alzheimer’s work, shame about the lack of a cureThe prestigious annual Brain prize has gone to work on Alzheimer's disease. That's fine, but the failure to find new treatments is worrying, says Jacqui Wise
2h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Chemists use technology to decode language of lipid-protein interactionTechnology has a massive impact on our day-to-day lives, right down to the cellular level within our own bodies. Texas A&M University chemists are using it to determine how lipids talk to each other when they interact with membrane proteins, one of the primary targets for drug discovery and potential treatments for any number of different diseases.
2h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Metal-free catalyst extends the range of ester synthesisEsters are among the most important classes of compounds in organic chemistry. Simple esters are known for their pleasant, often fruity aromas. Meanwhile, the larger, more complex examples have a wide spectrum of industrial uses, ranging from lenses and moisturizers to "green" fuel (biodiesel).
2h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Thousands of starfish have washed up dead after the 'Beast from the East' – here's whyMany Europeans have been assessing the damage from the recent wintery weather dramatically nicknamed the "Beast from the East". But people visiting certain parts of the English coast found a particularly unwelcome surprise. Thousands of dead starfish and other sea creatures were washed up along the shores in Kent and East Yorkshire, creating surreal scenes reminiscent of post-apocalyptic horror mo
2h
Futurity.org

Home DNA tests put gene experts in an awkward spotHome genetic tests like AncestryDNA and 23andMe are more popular than ever, with sales topping $99 million in 2017. But having widespread access to personal genetic information—without the knowledge of how to interpret results—can lead to problems. A new study in Translational Behavioral Medicine is the first to examine the challenges that can arise when people contact healthcare providers about
2h
The Scientist RSS

Infographic: Increasing Optogenetic PrecisionA localizable opsin protein enables single-neuron stimulation.
2h
The Atlantic

Sam Nunberg's Spectacular StuntSam Nunberg Donald Trump“By the way, you know I’m the number one trending person on Twitter?” It was just after 8:00 p.m. on Monday night, and the suddenly-famous Sam Nunberg had phoned me from Dorrian’s Red Hand Restaurant, a yuppie hangout on Manhattan’s Upper East Side, where he was reveling in his triumph. After announcing earlier that day his intention to defy a grand-jury subpoena he says he received in the Russia
2h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Astronomers detect a circumbinary disk around the system Oph-IRS67ABAn international team of astronomers has discovered a circumbinary disk around the system Oph-IRS67AB and analyzed its chemistry as well as physical properties. The finding is detailed in a paper published February 26 on the arXiv pre-print repository.
2h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Many small differences contribute to a large variationThere is no single main reason why certain drugs affect people differently, but rather many small factors. ETH researchers demonstrated this with a model system. They believe that, in order to test the effectiveness of certain drugs, it is necessary to look at the biological system as a whole.
2h
Feed: All Latest

The Obsessive Hunters Chasing Weather Balloons All Over EuropeRadiosonde enthusiasts use a software and huge antennae to track balloons that have parachuted back to earth.
2h
Feed: All Latest

Demonstrations of Bernoulli's Principle You Can Try At HomeTo understand Bernoulli's principle, it helps to think of air as a bunch of tiny balls.
2h
Big Think

Strange new tardigrade species discovered in a parking lot in JapanThe 168th known tardigrade—a.k.a "water bear" or "moss piglet"—species can even reproduce in the lab. Read More
2h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

NASA satellite sees fires in southeastern U.S.The National Interagency Fire Center (NIFC) is not reporting many wildfires in the Southeast despite the number of hotspots that were detected by the Aqua satellite. One wildfire was noted on the border of Alabama and Florida and another in Georgia.
2h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Study: Mexico well ahead of U.S. in LGBTQ rightsCaroline Beer has spent her career researching comparative data between Latin American countries and the United States that often debunks false stereotypes. Her latest study showing Mexico as more progressive than the U.S. when it comes to LGBT rights, especially in the recognition of same-sex relationships, is no exception.
2h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

The universe is a hologram and other mind-blowing theories in theoretical physicsWhat if there is a deeper reality out there?
2h
Scientific American Content: Global

Tats Off: Targeting the Immune System May Lead to Better Tattoo RemovalA discovery about the body's cellular waste system could help us erase unwanted ink -- Read more on ScientificAmerican.com
2h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Texas A&M chemists use technology to decode language of lipid-protein interactionTechnology has a massive impact on our day-to-day lives, right down to the cellular level within our own bodies. Texas A&M University chemists are using it to determine how lipids talk to each other when they interact with membrane proteins, one of the primary targets for drug discovery and potential treatments for any number of different diseases.
2h
New on MIT Technology Review

Tech’s biggest takeover could be blocked by the US government
2h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Study traces the origins of a major potato pestA new study from a University of Maryland-led team of researchers confirms the long held idea that the Colorado potato beetle, by far the most damaging insect to the U.S. potato industry, originated in the Great Plains region of the United States. The findings dispel more recent theories that this beetle may have come from Mexico or other divergent populations.
3h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Researchers successfully sequence total RNA of single cellsBy combining a number of methods, researchers from the RIKEN Advanced Center for Computing and Communications (ACCC) in Japan have developed a method that allows full-length sequencing of the total RNA of a single cell. The ability to do such full-length sequencing is important for understanding how single cells develop and function in biological systems.
3h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Image: Building the Space StationIn this 2006 image, astronauts Joan Higginbotham (foreground) and Suni Williams refer to a procedures checklist as they work the controls of the Space Station Remote Manipulator System (SSRMS) or Canadarm2 in the Destiny laboratory of the International Space Station, during flight day four activities for space shuttle Discovery's STS-116 mission.
3h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Researchers show a cancer defense mechanism could be turned back to attack tumorsUCLA engineers and scientists have engineered a type of synthetic protein—a chimeric antigen receptor, or CAR, that responds to soluble protein targets. The advance shows great promise for helping the body's immune system seek out and destroy cancer because it could boost the effectiveness of immunotherapies against solid tumors that are otherwise highly resistant to the body's immune response.
3h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Tropical plant rediscovered after 150 yearsA small team of researchers with the Crop Research Institute and Palacký University, both in the Czech Republic, has rediscovered a plant first (and last) recorded over a century and a half ago. In their paper published in the journal Phytotaxa describing their find, Michal Sochor, Zuzana Egertova, Michal Hrones and Martin Dancak describe the plant, a mycoheterotroph called Thismia neptunis.
3h
Dagens Medicin

Region Sjælland vil etablere landets første E-hospitalRegion Sjælland vil styrke de digitale veje til et nært sundhedstilbud ved at etablere landets første E-hospital. Dette skal gøre afstanden mellem patienter og hospitaler kortere.
3h
Dagens Medicin

Sygehus Sønderjylland fordobler antallet af sommerpraktikanterSuccesen fra sidste år med sommerpraktik for medicinstuderende på Sygehus Sønderjylland har ført til, at sygehuset nu inviterer dobbelt så mange studerende i fire ugers sommerpraktik.
3h
Ingeniøren

Formand fyret i Danske Vandværker: Mistanke om aftalt spil med målerdataFormand, næstformand og direktøren er blevet fyret i Danske Vandværker. En strid om kartellignende priser på målerdata ligger bag afskedigelsen, ifølge den tidligere formand.
3h
Scientific American Content: Global

The Next Frontier in Planet HuntingTwo telescopes due to launch this year should reveal a host of new exoplanets -- Read more on ScientificAmerican.com
3h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Ancient Nubia—in the footsteps of the Napata and Meroe kingdomsThe archaeological site of Sedeinga is located in Sudan, a hundred kilometers to the north of the third cataract of the Nile, on the river's western shore. Known especially for being home to the ruins of the Egyptian temple of Queen Tiye, the royal wife of Amenhotep III, the site also includes a large necropolis containing sepulchers dating from the kingdoms of Napata and Mereo (seventh century BC
3h
Viden

VIDEO Sådan (for)bliver du skarp som VM-vinderen Rosa på 87 årHer er hjerneforskerens råd til, hvordan du holder dig frisk og stærk som 87-årige Rosa Pedersen, der har en krop som en 65-årig.
3h
Viden

VIDEO Når Morten dør, skal han tappes for blod og lægges i flydende nitrogenDen 37-årige ph.d.-studerende håber, at han kan tø op og leve videre i fremtiden. Professor tvivler, men tror, at såkaldt kryopræservering kan få stor betydning for medicinsk behandling.
3h
Viden

VIDEO Forskere vil dræbe celler, der gør os gamle og sygeØdelagte celler ophober sig i kroppen, når vi bliver ældre. Forskere arbejder på at kunne dræbe cellerne, så mennesker kan leve længere - uden at blive syge.
3h
Viden

Demens-spillet: Kan du undgå at blive dement?Hvor langt kan du hjælpe en neuron gennem hjernen, inden du bliver ramt af demens?
3h
Viden

Hjerne-dagbog: 6 måder din hjerne arbejder på i løbet af hverdagenMorgenmad, motion, sex og søvn - din hverdag påvirker forskellige områder i hjernen.
3h
Viden

Kunstig intelligens hjælper svagsynede Jens med at læse avisenEt lille kamera monteret på en brille kan affotograferer tekst og læser den højt i øret på den blinde eller svagsynede.
3h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Stopping the impact of fishing fleets on the most threatened marine birdsAccidental by-catch, which affects around 5,000 birds stuck in longlines every year, is the most severe effect on marine birds by the fishing activity in the Mediterranean. The exploitation of fishing resources threatens the future of many marine birds with regression populations, such as the Cory's shearwater or the Balearic shearwater.
3h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Comet Chury's late birthComets which consist of two parts, like Chury, can form after a catastrophic collision of larger bodies. Such collisions may have taken place in a later phase of our solar system, which suggests that Chury can be much younger than previously assumed. This is shown through computer simulations by an international research group with the participation of the University of Bern.
3h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

World-first firing of air-breathing electric thrusterIn a world first, an ESA-led team has built and fired an electric thruster to ingest scarce air molecules from the top of the atmosphere for propellant, opening the way to satellites flying in very low orbits for years on end.
3h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Researchers shed light on how African insects survive droughts through self-dryingA team of Russian and Japanese scientists led by Skoltech researcher Pavel Mazin have shed light on the evolutionary process by which the Polypedilum vanderplanki survives periods of drought. The team discovered that the insect has adapted a protein that helps it survive extremely dry conditions. Their findings elucidate some of the mysteries underpinning the self-drying process, and demonstrate h
3h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Rapid technique to determine the structure of any materialResearchers at the National Research Nuclear University MEPhI (Russia) have found a way to operate laser mass-spectrometers in a new mode to determine the elemental composition of materials without using so-called standard samples. The new method expedites the sampling process and reduces cost with a new compact device. The survey's results are published in the European Journal of Mass Spectrometr
3h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Scientists crack 70-year-old mystery of how magnetic waves heat the sunScientists at Queen's University Belfast have led an international team to the ground-breaking discovery that magnetic waves crashing through the sun may be key to heating its atmosphere and propelling the solar wind.
3h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News

UToledo engineer creates solution to cheaper, longer lasting battery packsThe new technology called a bilevel equalizer is the first hybrid that combines the high performance of an active equalizer with the low cost of the passive equalizer.
3h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Athens taxi drivers strike in Uber protestUber Drivers CompanyGreek commuters saw journeys disrupted Monday as taxi drivers downed tools to protest at competition from ride-sharing firm Uber on a day rail workers also held a 24-hour strike.
3h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Norway boosts quotas to revive whalingNorway announced Tuesday a 28 percent increase of its annual whaling quota to 1,278 whales in a bid to revive the declining hunt amid international controversy.
3h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Japanese volcano erupts, dozens of flights groundedA volcano in southern Japan that appeared in a James Bond film had its biggest eruption in years Tuesday, shooting smoke and ash thousands of meters (feet) into the sky and grounding dozens of flights at a nearby airport, officials said.
3h
New Scientist - News

Doctors race to identify poison affecting former Russian spyThe substance that left Sergei Skripal and his daughter Yulia Skripal in intensive care in hospital was either delivered in a massive dose, or is a rapidly-acting poison
3h
Popular Science

Influenza B is trying to escape our vaccineHealth Hell hath no fury like a virus scorned. The Flu feels like one big thing. You get your Flu Shot to protect against The Flu during Flu Season. But it’s an astonishingly diverse virus.
3h
The Scientist RSS

Image of the Day: Mosquito BrainResearchers have constructed the first neuroanatomy atlas of a female mosquito's brain.
3h
The Atlantic

The Perfect Man Who Wasn'tBy the spring of 2016, Missi Brandt had emerged from a rough few years with a new sense of solidity. At 45, she was three years sober and on the leeward side of a stormy divorce. She was living with her preteen daughters in the suburbs of St. Paul, Minnesota, and working as a flight attendant. Missi felt ready for a serious relationship again, so she made a profile on OurTime.com , a dating site
3h
Science : NPR

Mysteries of the Moo-crobiome: Could Tweaking Cow Gut Bugs Improve Beef?Microbe-free bovine life would be rough. Cows rely on single-cell accomplices for their digestion, so scientists are looking for ways to use these bugs to improve cows' eating and burping habits. (Image credit: Maskot/Getty Images/Maskot)
3h
Feed: All Latest

The Future of 'Fab Lab' FabricationFirst Moore, now Lass: As machinery gets cheaper and more digitized, could the number of fab labs, or such tools, really double every year and a half?
3h
Scientific American Content: Global

Climate Change and the Political LandscapeHow conservative lawmakers can start addressing the risks without losing their seats -- Read more on ScientificAmerican.com
3h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Culturing cheaper stem cellsHuman pluripotent stem cells (hPSCs) can infinitely self-renew and develop into all major cell types in the body, making them important for organ repair and replacement. But culturing them in large quantities can be expensive. Now, scientists at Japan's Kyoto University, with colleagues in India and Iran, have developed a more cost-effective culture by using a new combination of chemical compounds
4h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Scientists find a way to postpone cell deathA team of scientists from MSU and the Institute of Theoretical and Experimental Biophysics of Russian Academy of Sciences (located in Pushchino) have studied the mechanisms of interaction between the Fas-ligand protein that causes cell death and a respective membrane receptor. To initiate cell death, the ligand needs to contact with a specific protein component of the cell—caveolin. If the caveoli
4h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Controlled coupling of light and matterResearchers from Würzburg and London have succeeded in controlling the coupling of light and matter at room temperature. They have published their results in Science Advances.
4h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Scientists create multifunctional protein-polymer filmsA team from MSU, with international and Russian colleagues, has found that mixing dendrimers (tree-like polymers) and proteins induces spontaneous multilayer films. They are easily formed and retain the activity and function of protein enzymes, which determines their potential as a material for creating biosensors and medical products. The results of the study are published in the journal Polymer.
4h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Producing handy gels from a protein found in human bloodThe protein albumin is responsible for many vital processes in the human body. In nature, it only appears as a solution when dissolved in water. Chemists at Martin Luther University Halle-Wittenberg (MLU) have developed a method of producing various albumin-based gels. Their findings may one day help to develop innovative drug carrier systems that more easily reach the bloodstream. The study condu
4h
New Scientist - News

Australia’s cervical cancer vaccine might eradicate the diseaseA national school-based vaccination program has seen the number of young women with human papillomavirus (HPV) infections fall from 22.7 to 1.5 per cent
4h
Live Science

Microsoft Co-Founder Finds the WWII 'Ship That Saved Australia'The wreck had been lost to history.
4h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Study suggests native UK pine martens are helping to control invasive gray squirrelsFor many years, populations of a little red squirrel with cute ear tufts, a native of Great Britain, Ireland and Europe, have been in serious decline because of competition for food from an invasive North American gray squirrel and a pox it carries for which the native animal has no defense. Now, new research suggests that native pine martens, also once on the decline, are suppressing the invading
4h
Latest Headlines | Science News

In a pack hunt, it’s every goatfish for itselfPack hunting among goatfish is really about self-interest.
4h
The Scientist RSS

Researchers Identify Gene Variants Linked to SynesthesiaA whole-genome analysis of people who experience color when they listen to sounds points to a handful of genes involved in neural development.
4h
Feed: All Latest

*The Flavor Matrix* Helps Home Cooks Pair Foods According to their Flavor MoleculesIt teaches readers about the volatile compounds in food, and how to combine them in their cooking.
4h
Feed: All Latest

The Improbable Rise of the Daily News PodcastWIRED columnist Felix Salmon on how Serial paved the way for a new generation of daily news podcasts.
4h
Ingeniøren

De fleste vira og bakterier falder ned fra himlenForskningsprojekt i bjergregionen Sierra Nevada i Spanien viser samtidigt, at vira kan transporteres til økosystemer over meget større afstande end bakterier.
5h
Scientific American Content: Global

Exoplanet Everests May Be Detectable When Giant Telescopes Come OnlineAstronomers have proposed a way of finding mountains, oceans and volcanoes on distant planets that are much too small to observe directly -- Read more on ScientificAmerican.com
5h
Live Science

Archaeologists Closer to Finding Lost Viking SettlementThe famed Viking post has been described in sagas passed down over hundreds of years. But its location has been lost to history, until now.
5h
Ingeniøren

Tre ambulancer til Apples nye hovedkvarter: Ansatte løber ind i glasvæggeApples nye hovedkvarter til milliarder er en fælde for ansatte og gæster, der ikke kan se, hvor der er glasvægge - eller om de er på vej ind i en glasdør eller -væg.
5h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Bacteria resistant to last-resort antibiotic, missed by standard testsEmory microbiologists have detected "heteroresistance" to colistin, a last-resort antibiotic, in already highly resistant Klebsiella pneumoniae, a bacterium that causes blood, soft tissue and urinary tract infections.
5h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Strict eating schedule can lower Huntington disease protein in miceNew research from the University of British Columbia suggests that following a strict eating schedule can help clear away the protein responsible for Huntington disease in mice.
5h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News

New test extends window for accurate detection of ZikaDiagnosis of Zika infection is complex. Molecular tests for exposure are only reliable in the first two to three weeks after infection. Antibody tests are confounded by cross-reactivity of antibodies to Zika with similar viruses like dengue and yellow fever. A new blood test called ZIKV-NS2B-concat ELISA is faster, less expensive, and extends the window of accurate detection to months after onset
5h
BBC News - Science & Environment

Oldest message in a bottle found on Western Australia beachA family found the message, dropped in 1886 by a German ship, on a remote beach in West Australia.
5h
BBC News - Science & Environment

Water stressA report has said the south Indian city is likely to run out of water - but is this really the case?
5h
Live Science

10 Species That Are in So Much Danger They'll Be Featured on Limited-Edition ShirtsIn collaboration with the IUCN, sportswear brand Lacoste is temporarily booting its iconic crocodile embroidery from the chest of a limited number of its polos in favor of 10 endangered species.
5h
BBC News - Science & Environment

USS Lexington: Lost WW2 aircraft carrier found after 76 yearsThe aircraft carrier USS Lexington went down in the 1942 Battle of the Coral Sea, with 216 lives lost.
5h
BBC News - Science & Environment

Fast chargeA breakthrough in materials technology could see fast-charging supercapacitors rival lithium-ion batteries.
5h
Dagens Medicin

Social isolation er den største dræberPolitikernes overordnede ansvar for samfundets indretning og sundheden indeholder nu også ansvaret for at fremme socialiseringsprocesser og sociale kompetencer hos hver enkelt og forebygge ensomhed.
5h
Science : NPR

Hidden Brain: Relationship Between Having Babies And The EconomyAmericans tend to have more children in a strong economy. Research suggests that conceptions might be a leading economic indicator — meaning declines in conceptions can predict the next downturn.
5h
The Atlantic

Republicans Can't Stop Trump's Trade WarIt’s a major recurring theme of the Trump administration: The president threatens to betray a conservative principle, and Republicans in Congress try to talk him out of it. When Trump has veered left on immigration and told either Democratic leaders or bipartisan groups of lawmakers that he’d back a simple deal to give the so-called Dreamers a path to citizenship, conservatives on Capitol Hill—al
5h
The Atlantic

Where Fantasy Meets Black Lives MatterI f a “Black Lives Matter– inspired fantasy novel” sounds like an ungainly hybrid—a pitch gone wrong—think again. The seven-figure book advance and movie deal bestowed a year ago on Tomi Adeyemi suggest the opposite: a convergence of themes likely to appeal to a very wide audience. Adeyemi, whose Children of Blood and Bone is the first volume of a projected trilogy, is a 24-year-old newcomer to t
5h
Ingeniøren

Spotify slår ned på piratversioner af musiktjenestenMusiktjenesten har sendt en mail til en lang række brugere, der angiveligt benytter sig af modificerede apps, der fjerner begrænsninger i den gratis udgave af Spotify
5h
New Scientist - News

Google’s 72-qubit chip is the largest yetGoogle has announced Bristlecone, a 72-qubit quantum computer that may be the first to kickstart a new computing era by achieving quantum supremacy
6h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

India's endangered lion population increases to 600The endangered Asiatic lion, which only lives in one forest in India, has fought back from the verge of extinction, with its population increasing to more than 600, a minister said Tuesday hailing a major conservation campaign.
6h
Ingeniøren

Dansk mini-strømforsyning får verdenspremiereDanske forskere og virksomheder har udviklet en højfrekvent strømforsyning, der er fire gange mindre end tilsvarende kommercielle strømforsyninger. En funktionel prototype er nu klar til det voksende LED-marked.
6h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Crepidula onyx resilient towards microplastic dietCoastal marine organisms are hit hard by pollution and global climate change stress. Perhaps a result of publication bias, studies often focus on species that are negatively impacted. However, to better understand how the ecological communities would response to these human-induced stress, it is equally important to study organisms that are seeming pollutant tolerant.
6h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

The Latest: Flashy Ferrari unveils 488 Pista at Geneva showThe Latest on developments at the Geneva International Motor Show (all times local):
6h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

At Geneva, new electrics, but don't forget the horsepowerGlobal carmakers are showing off a mix of low-emission electric vehicles and high-end sports cars at the Geneva International Motor Show.
6h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

For flour beetles, it's better to be a woman in a man's worldFor red flour beetles, being a female in a male world is advantageous. Unlike humans, where this situation traditionally confers a disadvantage, female flour beetles in male-dominated groups seem to reproduce better and live longer than females in groups with equal sex ratios or in female-dominated groups.
6h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Ancient farming techniques could help mitigate climate changeHigh technology is being deployed to uncover long-forgotten irrigation systems and other features concealed in landscapes that farmers developed hundreds of years ago to nurture their land.
6h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Without 46-million-year-old bacteria, turtle ants would need more bite and less armorSocially transmitted, nitrogen-providing microbes have opened a new ecological frontier for herbivorous turtle ants.
6h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Rural claim lines with sleep apnea diagnoses increased 911 percent from 2014 to 2017From 2014 to 2017, private insurance claim lines with a diagnosis of sleep apnea -- a potentially serious disorder in which a person repeatedly stops and starts breathing while asleep -- increased by 911 percent in rural America, according to FAIR Health.
6h
Dagens Medicin

Danskerne er blevet mere usundeDanskernes sundhed har udviklet sig i en negativ retning, hvor specielt den mentale sundhed er forværret, viser ny undersøgelse blandt 180.000 danskere. Deprimerende læsning, siger Ulla Astman (S).
6h
Science : NPR

Tough Talk As Oklahoma's Wind Industry Becomes A Political TargetThough the wind industry was once a political darling in the state, some say Oklahoma can no longer afford the tax breaks that helped it thrive. (Image credit: Joe Wertz/StateImpact Oklahoma)
6h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Without 46 million year-old bacteria, turtle ants would need more bite and less armorYou've probably heard about poop pills, the latest way for humans to get benevolent bacteria into their guts. But it seems that a group of ants may have been the original poop pill pioneers—46 million years ago.
6h
New Scientist - News

Science too must tackle the gender pay gapIt’s high time countries enforced equal pay laws, as a New Scientist/SRG survey reveals the magnitude of the gender pay gap in science and engineering
7h
Dagens Medicin

Jacob Pontoppidan Thyssen er ny ‘eksemprofessor’ på KUTidligere overlæge på Hud- og allergiafdelingen på Herlev og Gentofte Hospital er tiltrådt sin nye stilling som professor i dermatologi på Københavns Universitet.
7h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Why 'cloud seeding' is increasingly attractive to the thirsty WestMachines that prod clouds to make snow may sound like something out of an old science fiction movie. But worsening water scarcity, combined with new proof that "cloud seeding" actually works, is spurring more states, counties, water districts and power companies across the thirsty West to use the strategy.
7h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Scientists hope to save northern white rhino from extinctionAs the health of the world's last male northern white rhino declines in Kenya, a global team of scientists and conservationists is pushing ahead with an ambitious effort to save the subspecies from extinction with the help of the two surviving females.
7h
Ingeniøren

Læg dig i slipstrømmen, og vind på skiSvenske forskere undersøger, hvordan ski-eliten taktisk kan gøre som cykelrytterne, selv om farten er meget lavere.
7h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Germany's Flixbus takes on Deutsche Bahn with train routesGerman bus start-up Flixbus on Tuesday said it will begin running two long-distance train services, in a challenge to the dominance of state-owned rail behemoth Deutsche Bahn.
8h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Indonesia blocks online-blogging site Tumblr over pornIndonesia has blocked online blogging service Tumblr over pornographic content, the government said Tuesday, in Jakarta's latest crackdown on obscenity.
8h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Facebook asked users if pedophiles should be able to ask kids for 'sexual pictures'Facebook Content SurveyFacebook is under fire after asking users whether pedophiles asking for "sexual pictures" from children should be permitted on the giant social network.
8h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Alaska city moose count relies on tips, DNA-extracting dartsMoose thrive in Alaska's largest city with little to fear from natural predators such as wolves or bears, but getting an accurate count of the largest member of the deer family remains a challenge for the state wildlife biologists who must manage their numbers.
8h
Science-Based Medicine

The Debate Is Over: Antidepressants DO Work Better Than PlaceboThe idea that antidepressants are no more effective than placebo has been put to rest. They clearly work when used appropriately, although the effect size is not as large as the published studies have suggested.
9h
Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

Dying for the group: What motivates the ultimate sacrifice?Whether idolized as heroes or demonized and labelled terrorists, throughout history people have been willing to die for their groups and the causes they believe in. But why? New research suggests that there is a unique psychological process that may play a crucial role in motivating the ultimate sacrifice: identity fusion.
9h
NYT > Science

ScienceTake: These Spiders Hunt Their Own KindResearchers have identified 18 previously unknown species of Pelican spiders in Madagascar.
9h
NYT > Science

Pelican Spiders, Ancient Assassins That Eat Their Own KindOnce thought extinct, pelican spiders have been found alive and thriving in Madagascar, South Africa and Australia.
9h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Shipments of protected African species to Asia soar: studyShipments of protected African species including tortoises, pythons and parrots to Asia have soared since 2006 as demand grows in the Far East for exotic pets, meats and other animal products, a new study warned Tuesday.
9h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Wreckage found of WWII aircraft carrier USS LexingtonWreckage from the USS Lexington, a US aircraft carrier which sank during World War II, has been discovered in the Coral Sea, a search team led by Microsoft co-founder Paul Allen announced Monday.
9h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

WeChat accounts cross one billion mark: CEOWeChat's worldwide accounts have crossed the one billion mark, according to the chief executive of its parent company Tencent.
9h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Taking on 'microfiber' pollution, a laundry room at a timeThe fight to keep tiny pollutants from reaching the dinner plate might start in the laundry room.
9h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Washington becomes first state to approve net-neutrality rulesFCC Neutrality Washington stateWashington became the first state Monday to set up its own net-neutrality requirements after U.S. regulators repealed Obama-era rules that banned internet providers from blocking content or interfering with online traffic.
9h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Glaciers in Mongolia's Gobi Desert actually shrank during the last ice ageThe simple story says that during the last ice age, temperatures were colder and ice sheets expanded around the planet. That may hold true for most of Europe and North America, but new research from the University of Washington tells a different story in the high-altitude, desert climates of Mongolia.
9h
Ingeniøren

Hackerdom fra Højesteret: Hacking giver lang fængselsstrafEn sag om hacking har for første gang i nyere tid nået Højesteret.
10h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Neurocognitive impairment linked to worse outcomes after total joint replacementResearch led by orthopedic surgeons at NYU Langone Health reveals that people with undiagnosed neurocognitive deficits are undergoing hip and knee replacements at high rates and are more likely to have poorer short-term outcomes after surgery than people without such deficits.
10h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News

New tool helps identify risk for post-surgical dislocations following hip replacementA study led by Jonathan Vigdorchik, MD, assistant professor of orthopedic surgery at NYU Langone Health, suggests that a new risk prediction model and treatment algorithm can help identify patients at high risk of postoperative dislocation after a hip replacement, and who may benefit from alternative implants.
10h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Study validates tool to assess mortality risk in older patients with orthopedic fracturesA new study provides further validation of a predictive analytics software tool, developed by orthopedic trauma surgeons at NYU Langone Health, that has been shown to identify which middle-aged and elderly patients who experience an orthopedic fracture may face a greater mortality risk after surgery.
10h
Science | The Guardian

Counter-mapping: cartography that lets the powerless speakHow a subversive form of mapmaking charts the stories and customs of those who would traditionally be ignored Sara is a 32-year-old mother of four from Honduras. After leaving her children in the care of relatives, she travelled across three state borders on her way to the US, where she hoped to find work and send money home to her family. She was kidnapped in Mexico and held captive for three mo
10h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Towards an unconscious neural reinforcement intervention for common fearsIn a collaboration between researchers based Advanced Telecommunications Research Institute International (ATR), Japan, and University of California, Los Angeles (UCLA) scientists have moved one major step towards the development of a novel form of brain-based treatment for phobia that may soon be applicable to patients
11h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Glaciers in Mongolia's Gobi Desert actually shrank during the last ice ageHigh in Mongolia's Gobi Desert, the climate is so dry and cold that glaciers shrank during the last ice age. Dating of rock deposits shows how glaciers in this less-studied region behave very differently as the climate shifts.
11h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Helmet use associated with reduced risk of cervical spine injury during motorcycle crashesDespite claims that helmets do not protect the cervical spine during a motorcycle crash and may even increase the risk of injury, researchers from the University of Wisconsin Hospitals and Clinics in Madison found that, during an accident, helmet use lowers the likelihood of cervical spine injury (CSI), particularly fractures of the cervical vertebrae.
11h
The Atlantic

Why Stop With the AR-15?Here are two pro-gun arguments, from people who are not bots and who don’t go in for the “you libtard cuck!” style of discourse. Obviously I disagree with their perspectives. But because they’re making sustained versions of two main arguments against current gun-control measures, I quote them at length. The first argument is that it’s meaningless to concentrate on one weapon, the AR-15, even thou
11h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Uncoordinated trade policies aid alien bee invasionsPatagonia may lose its only native bumblebee species due to invasions by alien bee species sanctioned by government policy.
11h
Scientific American Content: Global

Animal Coloration Can Serve Double DutyThe cinnabar moth caterpillar's coloration pattern warns predators close up, but camouflages the critter from a distance. -- Read more on ScientificAmerican.com
13h
Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

Uncoordinated trade policies aid alien bee invasionsPatagonia may lose its only native bumblebee species due to invasions by alien bee species sanctioned by government policy.
13h
BBC News - Science & Environment

Recycling gumA British designer wants used gum recycled into useful objects - also leading to cleaner streets.
13h
Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

One year posttransplant, recipients of hepatitis C kidneys disease-freeIn a small study, doctors have successfully transplanted 10 hepatitis C-infected kidneys into patients without hepatitis C and prevented the patients from becoming infected by hepatitis C. The success of these transplants could mean more organs being available for the nearly 100,000 people in the US currently waiting for a kidney transplant.
14h
Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

Moderate blood sugar control targets recommended for most patients with type 2 diabetesPatients with type 2 diabetes should be treated to achieve an A1C between 7 percent and 8 percent rather than 6.5 percent to 7 percent, the American College of Physicians recommends in a new evidence-based guidance statement.
14h
Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

Health data used to predict who will use opioids after hospitalizationUsing electronic health record data, researchers identified patient-specific variables which were highly associated with the progression to COT. These included having a history of substance use disorder, past year receipt of a benzodiazepine, receipt of an opioid at hospital discharge and high opioid requirements during hospitalization. The model correctly predicted chronic opioid therapy in 79% o
14h
Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

Arms races and cooperation among amoebae in the wildThe social amoeba Dictyostelium discoideum is a powerful social study system because of the hard work of generations of cell and molecular biologists who have figured out many of the mechanisms of its social process. But it takes studies in nature to understand whether Dicty's cooperative behavior benefits relatives, and even whether its social activities occur frequently in nature. New gene seque
14h
Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

Mothers who smoke while pregnant contribute to the severity of asthma and poor lung function in their childrenTobacco smoke exposure during pregnancy is worse for children with asthma than postnatal secondhand smoke exposure, according to a new study in the journal.
14h
Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

Chaperones can hold proteins in non-equilibrium statesChaperones are specialized proteins in the cell that help other proteins to reach their functional 3D shapes, which correspond to the states preferred at thermodynamic equilibrium. But a new study shows that chaperones can also maintain proteins in non-equilibrium states, potentially altering their fate.
14h
Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

Insulator or superconductor? Physicists find graphene is bothInsulator or superconductor? Physicists find graphene is both, at a 'magic angle.'
14h
Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

Nerve cells found to suppress immune response during deadly lung infectionsNeurons that carry nerve signals to and from the lungs suppress immune response during fatal lung infections with the bacterium Staphylococcus aureus. Animal experiments show that disabling these neurons can boost immune response and promote bacterial clearance to aid recovery. Targeting neuro-immune signaling in the lungs can pave the way to nonantibiotic therapies for bacterial pneumonia.
14h
Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

Potential drug targets for ALS revealed in study using CRISPRIn a new application of gene-editing technology, researchers have gleaned insights into the genetic underpinnings of amyotrophic lateral sclerosis, a neurodegenerative disease that's notoriously tricky to parse.
14h
Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

Renegade cells portend relapse in children with leukemiaResearchers have developed a technique that allowed them to determine at diagnosis whether children with acute lymphoblastic leukemia would relapse following treatment.
14h
Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

Squaring the circle: Merchandising embarrassing productsPackaging shapes and colors of embarrassing products, as well as where the products are placed in stores, make a difference in how likely shoppers are to follow through on purchase intentions.
14h
Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

Method to predict drug stability could lead to more effective medicinesResearchers have developed a new method to predict the physical stability of drug candidates, which could help with the development of new and more effective medicines for patients.
14h
Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

How are we related? Easy workflow to find gene familiesResearchers have released 'GeneSeqToFamily', an open-source Galaxy workflow that helps scientists to find gene families based on the powerful 'EnsemblCompara GeneTrees' pipeline.
14h
Blog » Languages » English

NEI Marathon: Results!Three cheers for Eyewire and the National Eye Institute! This special marathon finished in 10 hours 45 minutes; let’s welcome the NEI cell to so many others in our beautiful dataset. Stay tuned in a couple weeks for a big, fancy render coming from your own Nseraf, which will be printed and displayed in Washington D.C. at the NEI’s official birthday party later this month. In the meantime, enjoy y
14h
Feed: All Latest

Washington State Enacts Net Neutrality Law, in Clash with FCCFCC Neutrality Washington stateWashington Governor Jay Inslee Monday signed the nation’s first state law intended to protect net neutrality.
14h
BBC News - Science & Environment

Industry 'exaggerates plastics recycling success'Waste consultancy Eunomia claims English packaging firms need to step up on recycling rates.
15h
Science | The Guardian

China's Tiangong-1 space station will crash to Earth within weeksExperts say it is impossible to plot where module will re-enter the atmosphere, but the chance is higher in parts of Europe, US, Australia and New Zealand China’s first space station is expected to come crashing down to Earth within weeks, but scientists have not been able to predict where the 8.5-tonne module will hit. The US-funded Aerospace Corporation estimates Tiangong-1 will re-enter the at
15h
Live Science

Why DARPA Wants to 'Freeze' Soldiers on the BattlefieldA new military program aims to develop treatments that slow down the body's biochemical reactions, to buy time for battlefield injuries.
17h
Futurity.org

This lens-free microscope fits on a fingertipLenses are no longer necessary for some microscopes, according to the engineers developing FlatScope, a thin fluorescent microscope whose abilities promise to surpass those of old-school devices. A paper in Science Advances describes a wide-field microscope thinner than a credit card, small enough to sit on a fingertip, and capable of micrometer resolution over a volume of several cubic millimete
17h
Live Science

Remains of US Pilot from WWII Found at the Bottom of Pacific OceanMore than 70 years ago, during World War II, a U.S. pilot was shot down as he was flying over the Pacific. Over the decades, sand and sea life at the bottom of the ocean covered the wreckage, further obscuring it from view.
17h
The Atlantic

The Atlantic Daily: Closing In on an AnswerWhat We’re Following Subpoena Surprise: Sam Nunberg, an attorney and former Trump campaign aide, called in to MSNBC to declare that he would refuse to cooperate with Special Counsel Robert Mueller’s investigation. Yet that announcement is likely only to draw Mueller’s attention toward Nunberg—especially as Nunberg added that he thinks President Trump “may have done something during the election.
17h
Popular Science

Five new science books you should read this monthEntertainment Seeds, adventures, medicine, and more. While you patiently wait for spring to sprout, here's five science books to occupy your mind (and couch) with.
17h
NYT > Science

U.N. Chief Picks a Very Rich New Yorker (Not Named Trump) for Climate JobAntónio Guterres has appointed Michael R. Bloomberg, the former New York mayor, to be his special envoy for climate action.
17h
Feed: All Latest

Pennsylvania Sues Uber Over Data Breach DisclosurePennsylvania’s attorney general filed a lawsuit against the ride-hailing giant Monday for failing to disclose a massive hack for over a year—and may not be the last
17h
Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

Submerged aquatic vegetation return is sentinel of Chesapeake Bay ecosystem recoveryA new research article analyzes the positive impact of long-term nutrient reductions on an important and valuable ecosystem in the Chesapeake Bay. Scientists indicate the resurgence of underwater grasses supports nutrient reductions from EPA's Total Maximum Daily Load (TMDL) along with conservation incentives have resulted in a healthier Chesapeake Bay.
17h
Popular Science

The Apple HomePod smart speaker uses tons of tech to tweak its soundHomePod Apple SiriGadgets I put Apple's smart speaker in various nooks and crannies of my house to see how it sounds Apple's HomePod speaker is exactly the smart hub you'd expect from Apple.
17h
The Atlantic

The Atlantic Politics & Policy Daily: Master of NunbergToday in 5 Lines Former Trump aide Sam Nunberg said he won’t comply with a subpoena from Special Counsel Robert Mueller, and suggested that Mueller may have something on President Trump. White House Press Secretary Sarah Huckabee Sanders disputed Nunberg’s claim. During a meeting with Israeli Prime Minister Benjamin Netanyahu, Trump said he might attend the opening of a new U.S. embassy in Jerusa
18h
The Atlantic

Two Ways to Read Italy's Election ResultsItalian Matteo SalviniROME—Anyone who’s spent more than a vacation in Italy knows it’s a country with deep reserves of discontent, economic stagnation, and political dysfunction. So the anti-establishment Five-Star Movement , which promises universal basic income and says it wants to clean up politics, and the right-wing League party, which made immigration and economic anxiety central issues, had plenty of anger to t
18h
The Scientist RSS

US Scientists Running for Office in Record NumbersA science-oriented political action committee is supporting candidates across the country.
18h
Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

New gene therapy corrects a form of inherited macular degeneration in canine modelResearchers have developed a gene therapy that successfully treats a form of macular degeneration in a canine model. The work sets the stage for translating the findings into a human therapy for an inherited disease that results in a progressive loss of central vision and which is currently untreatable.
18h
Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

Seeing sounds: Researchers uncover molecular clues for synesthesiaOne in 25 people have synesthesia, perceiving the world in unusual ways. An experience with one sense automatically leads to perception in another sense: for example, seeing colors when listening to music. Now researchers report clues into biological origins of such variations in human perception. They studied families with synesthesia, and describe genetic changes that might contribute to their d
18h
Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

Plants share defensive proteins in evolutionary pick 'n' mixNovel research has shed further light on how plants can use 'baits' to recognize and trap disease-causing pathogens before infection can take hold.
18h
New on MIT Technology Review

On-Device Processing and AI Go Hand-in-HandAs on-device processing become more powerful, and AI grows more prevalent, our future will increasingly be defined by the convergence of these two game-changing trends.
18h
Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

Restoring lipid synthesis could reduce lung fibrosisIncreasing the body's ability to produce lipids in the lungs after damage prevents the progression of pulmonary fibrosis in preliminary studies.
18h
Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

New dual-atom catalyst shows promise to yield clean energy by artificial photosynthesisAn international team of researchers has synthesized a dispersed catalyst featuring two atoms, yielding a stable and highly active platform that could facilitate solar water oxidation for the production and storage of clean energy, the team reports.
18h
Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

Wildfires: Smoke and cloud interactions unexpectedly result in coolingFor years, scientists determined that smoke, overall, diminishes clouds' cooling effect by absorbing light that the clouds beneath the aerosols would otherwise reflect. This new study does not dispute that phenomenon. However, more dominantly, the new study found that smoke and cloud layers are closer to each other than previously thought. This makes the clouds more reflective of light and, thus,
18h
Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

New way to 'see' the quantum worldScientists have invented a new imaging technique that produces rapid, precise measurements of quantum behavior in an atomic clock in the form of near-instant visual art.
18h
Feed: All Latest

Recognizing the Women Who Wove the WebWomen helped create web domains and bookmarks, a neglected history explored in Claire L. Evans’ new book “Broad Band.”
18h
Latest Headlines | Science News

Google moves toward quantum supremacy with 72-qubit computerGoogle’s 72-qubit quantum chip may eventually perform a task beyond the ability of traditional computers.
18h
Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

'Epigenetic landscape' is protective in normal aging, impaired in Alzheimer's diseaseResearchers profiled the epigenomic landscape of Alzheimer's brains, specifically in one of the regions affected early in AD, the lateral temporal lobe. They compared these to both younger and elderly cognitively normal control subjects. The team described the genome-wide enrichment of a chemical modification of histone proteins that regulates the compaction of chromosomes in the nucleus. Changes
18h
The Atlantic

What Is Sam Nunberg Doing?Sam Nunberg Donald TrumpUpdated on March 6 at 10:36 a.m. ET When former Trump aide Sam Nunberg called into MSNBC on Monday to declare his intention to defy a grand-jury subpoena in the Russia investigation, Special Counsel Robert Mueller’s team was almost certainly watching with interest. “I’m not going to cooperate! Why do I have to spend 80 hours going over my emails that I’ve had with Steve Bannon and with Roger Ston
18h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Report: Amazon checking accounts? Something similar could be coming soonAmazon Product CompanyLove online shopping? Don't have a bank account?
18h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Restoring lipid synthesis could reduce lung fibrosisIncreasing the body's ability to produce lipids in the lungs after damage prevents the progression of pulmonary fibrosis in preliminary studies.
18h
The Atlantic

Nature’s Partnerships Might Break in a Warming WorldIn the spring of 2015, two-thirds of all the world’s saiga antelope dropped dead. Around 200,000 of these quizzical, endangered animals perished without any warning, over a 65,000-square-mile stretch of Mongolia. Now, Eleanor Milner-Gulland from the University of Oxford and her colleagues think they know why. As I reported earlier this year, they suspect that an extreme combination of heat and hu
18h
NYT > Science

Can This Judge Solve the Opioid Crisis?The Ohio federal judge overseeing hundreds of opioid lawsuits wants a swift settlement with solutions. But first he must tame skeptical legal lions.
18h
The Scientist RSS

Italian Scientists Retraction Count Hits 15Alfredo Fusco, a once prominent cancer researcher, has been under investigation for alleged research misconduct since 2012.
19h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Ex-NASA astronaut says it wouldn't be so bad to transfer space station to private managementWhen word got out that the Trump administration wanted to end government funding of the International Space Station by 2025, resistance to the idea was swift and forceful.
19h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

SpaceX poised for 50th launch of Falcon 9 rocketSpaceX is poised for the 50th launch of its signature Falcon 9 rocket early Tuesday, marking a swift ascent to a milestone many aerospace giants take far longer to attain.
19h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Storm leaves California with half of usual snow for yearCalifornia water officials tromped through long-awaited fresh snowdrifts in the Sierra Nevada mountains Monday, but a welcome late-winter storm still left the state with less than half the usual snow for this late point in the state's important rain and snow season.
19h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Monarch butterfly numbers off for 2nd year in Mexico (Update)The number of monarch butterflies wintering in Mexican forests declined for a second consecutive year, a government official said Monday.
19h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Spectacles at first did not succeed, but Snap will try, try again, report saysSnap Inc. is reportedly giving Spectacles, its camera-equipped sunglasses, at least two more tries.
19h
Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

How does resolving cannabis problems differ from problems with alcohol or other drugs?Individuals who report having resolved a problem with cannabis use appear to have done so at younger ages than those who resolved problems with alcohol or other drugs and were less likely to use any formal sources of assistance or support, report investigators.
19h
Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

Low blood sugar poses unaddressed threat to people with type 2 diabetesNew research finds that clinicians lack the resources to identify, assess and manage patients who are at a high risk of developing hypoglycemia, or episodes of dangerously low blood sugar.
19h
Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

Genetic 'seeds' of metastatic breast cancerResearchers have identified genetic clues that explain how breast cancer spreads, or metastasizes - findings that may lead to better treatments or approaches to prevent its spread at the onset.
19h
Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

Preschoolers exposed to nighttime light lack melatoninA new study found that preschoolers exposed to bright light at bedtime had an 88 percent reduction in melatonin levels. Anatomical differences in their young eyes may make them more vulnerable to adverse impacts of bright light, the researchers say.
19h
Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

Examination of nearly 100 prior studies on cell phone use in cars underscores hazardsAnalysis of research from 1991 to 2015 on talking on the phone while driving can inform lawmakers in crafting driver safety legislation.
19h
Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

Suburban sprawl worse than urban growth for CO2 emissionsAtmospheric scientists report that suburban sprawl increases CO2 emissions more than similar population growth in a developed urban core.
19h
Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

World's largest ivory burn delivered a strong message -- but who received it?Media coverage of the torching of huge caches of ivory presented a strong message against elephant poaching and ivory trade, but many of those who needed to hear it most may not have received it, an international study has found. University of Queensland researcher Alexander Braczkowski said an examination of the global media coverage of the world's largest ivory burn in Kenya in 2016, revealed th
19h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Researchers use health data to predict who will use opioids after hospitalizationUsing electronic health record data, researchers identified patient-specific variables which were highly associated with the progression to COT. These included having a history of substance use disorder, past year receipt of a benzodiazepine, receipt of an opioid at hospital discharge and high opioid requirements during hospitalization. The model correctly predicted chronic opioid therapy in 79% o
19h
The Atlantic

The Oscars' Gauzy Take on IntersectionalityIt’s the coalition that might just save America: queer people, black people, fish people. In the Best Picture winner, The Shape of Water , a mute maid, her gay best friend, her African American co-worker, and a merman team up to escape the menace of a straight white guy who works for the government. Though the period film laced with classic-cinema references had been knocked as a fairly safe, con
19h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Toyota to stop selling diesel cars in EuropeJapanese car giant Toyota announced Monday that it will stop selling diesel cars in Europe, beginning the phase-out this year.
19h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Tropical forest response to drought depends on ageTropical trees respond to drought differently depending on their ages, according to new research led by a postdoctoral scientist at the University of Wyoming.
19h
Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

Tropical forest response to drought depends on ageFactors most important for regulation of transpiration in young forests in Panama had to do with their ability to access water in the soil, whereas older forests were more affected by atmospheric conditions.
19h
Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

Roton quasiparticles observed in quantum gasAn team of physicists has for the first time observed so-called roton quasiparticles in a quantum gas. Empirically introduced by Landau to explain the bizarre properties of superfluid liquid Helium, these quasiparticles reflect an 'energy softening' in the system as precursor of a crystallization instability. The new work demonstrates similar phenomena in the quantum-gas phase thanks to magnetic i
19h
Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

Culprit in Parkinson's brain cell die-offResearchers investigate the connection between misfolded proteins and the destruction of mitochondria in neurons.
19h
Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

CO converted to CO2 with a single metal atomResearchers have demonstrated for the first time that a single metal atom can act as a catalyst in converting carbon monoxide into carbon dioxide, a chemical reaction that is commonly used in catalytic converters to remove harmful gases from car exhaust. The research could improve catalytic converter design and also has major implications in the field of computational catalysis.
19h
Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

Technique to see objects hidden around cornersSomeday your self-driving car could react to hazards before you even see them, thanks to a laser-based imaging technology that can peek around corners.
19h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Arms races and cooperation among amoebae in the wildMicrobes are fast becoming the darlings of the social behavior set because their interactions can be understood right down to their genes. They do interesting things, too: Bacteria steal iron from each other, kill each other with toxins that only close relatives can resist, and count each other with quorum sensors.
19h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Don't talk and drive: Examination of nearly 100 prior studies on cell phone use in cars underscores hazardsIn their detailed analysis of dozens of empirical studies on the effects of talking while driving, human factors researchers have provided a comprehensive and credible basis for governments seeking to enact legislation restricting drivers' use of cell phones. The analysis, just published in Human Factors: The Journal of the Human Factors and Ergonomics Society, is titled "Does Talking on a Cell Ph
19h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News

'Epigenetic landscape' is protective in normal aging, impaired in Alzheimer's diseaseResearchers profiled the epigenomic landscape of Alzheimer's brains, specifically in one of the regions affected early in AD, the lateral temporal lobe. They compared these to both younger and elderly cognitively normal control subjects. The team described the genome-wide enrichment of a chemical modification of histone proteins that regulates the compaction of chromosomes in the nucleus. Changes
19h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Parent mentors improve Latino children's health insurance coverage ratesLatino children have the highest uninsured rate in the United States. However, new study findings in the March issue of Health Affairs show parent mentors are highly effective at providing uninsured Latino children with health insurance coverage.
19h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Breast cancer care in US territories lags behind care in statesOlder women residing in the US territories are less likely to receive recommended or timely care for breast cancer compared with similar women residing in the continental United States, according to Yale researchers. Their findings were published in the March issue of Health Affairs.
19h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Fringe loan use linked to risk of poor healthMany poor and working class Americans who use fringe loan services not only face spiraling in debt due to exorbitant interest rates, they are also more likely to report having poor health. Researchers in public health and in public affairs call for changes in banking, welfare programs and labor protections to mitigate against the living problems fringe loans borrowers face. They also hope to clari
19h
Science : NPR

New Report Predicts Rising Tides, More FloodingThe report, obtained by NPR, shows that "sunny-day flooding" may be a regular occurrence in some areas. It sets out to give communities a clear guide to prepare for coastal flooding. (Image credit: David L. Ryan/Boston Globe via Getty Images)
19h
Big Think

Scientists fix the gene that causes intellectual disability in menResearchers use a cutting-edge technique to restore activity to the fragile X syndrome gene. Read More
19h
Popular Science

This little baby bird lived 127 million years ago and died the size of your pinkyAnimals Its adorable fossil is teaching scientists a lot about bird evolution. How much can scientists learn from one itty bitty baby bird? Well, if the bird in question is around 127 million years old...quite a lot.
19h
Big Think

Gender is dead, long live gender: just what is ‘performativity’?Gender is burdened by a lot of adjectives these days. It’s non-binary, it’s fluid, it’s ‘over’. According to the American rapper Young Thug, an artist at the helm of hip-hop who is known to occasionally wear dresses, ‘there’s no such thing as gender’ at all. These descriptions share the common ... Read More
20h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Tropical forest response to drought depends on ageFactors most important for regulation of transpiration in young forests in Panama had to do with their ability to access water in the soil, whereas older forests were more affected by atmospheric conditions.
20h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Study discovers South African wildfires create climate coolingFor years, scientists determined that smoke, overall, diminishes clouds' cooling effect by absorbing light that the clouds beneath the aerosols would otherwise reflect. This new study does not dispute that phenomenon. However, more dominantly, the new study found that smoke and cloud layers are closer to each other than previously thought. This makes the clouds more reflective of light and, thus,
20h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News

New gene therapy corrects a form of inherited macular degeneration in canine modelResearchers from the University of Pennsylvania have developed a gene therapy that successfully treats a form of macular degeneration in a canine model. The work sets the stage for translating the findings into a human therapy for an inherited disease that results in a progressive loss of central vision and which is currently untreatable.
20h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Don't talk and driveAnalysis of research from 1991 to 2015 on talking on the phone while driving can inform lawmakers in crafting driver safety legislation.
20h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Preschoolers exposed to nighttime light lack melatoninA new study from University of Colorado Boulder found that preschoolers exposed to bright light at bedtime had an 88 percent reduction in melatonin levels. Anatomical differences in their young eyes may make them more vulnerable to adverse impacts of bright light, the researchers say.
20h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News

UNC Lineberger researchers identify genetic 'seeds' of metastatic breast cancerUniversity of North Carolina Lineberger Comprehensive Cancer Center researchers have identified genetic clues that explain how breast cancer spreads, or metastasizes - findings that may lead to better treatments or approaches to prevent its spread at the onset.
20h
TED Talks Daily (SD video)

What soccer can teach us about freedom | Marc Bamuthi Joseph"Soccer is the only thing on this planet that we can all agree to do together," says theater maker and TED Fellow Marc Bamuthi Joseph. Through his performances and an engagement initiative called "Moving and Passing," Joseph combines music, dance and soccer to reveal accessible, joyful connections between the arts and sports. Learn more about how he's using the beautiful game to foster community a
20h
Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

Models show how to limit global temperature rise to 1.5°CThere are several ways to limit global temperature rise to 1.5°C by 2100, and new research shows under what conditions this could happen.
20h
Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

Massive astrophysical objects governed by subatomic equationSurprisingly, a quintessential equation of quantum mechanics emerges while studying astronomical disks of orbiting material.
20h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Social sensing emerges as a tool for Army leadersArmy and university scientists are turning to problems with social media to create social sensing as a scientific discipline. For the Army in particular, this emerging science space, they say, will better help commanders assess and comprehend the accuracy and true meaning of information on the battlefield.
20h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Low blood sugar poses unaddressed threat to people with type 2 diabetesNew research from the Endocrine Society and Avalere Health finds that clinicians lack the resources to identify, assess and manage patients who are at a high risk of developing hypoglycemia, or episodes of dangerously low blood sugar.
20h

Vil du være med til at finde de mest interessante nyheder? Send email herom til BioNyt

Se nyheder fra en tidligere dato

Tegn abonnement på

BioNyt Videnskabens Verden (www.bionyt.dk) er Danmarks ældste populærvidenskabelige tidsskrift for naturvidenskab. Det er det eneste blad af sin art i Danmark, som er helliget international forskning inden for livsvidenskaberne.

Bladet bringer aktuelle, spændende forskningsnyheder inden for biologi, medicin og andre naturvidenskabelige områder som f.eks. klimaændringer, nanoteknologi, partikelfysik, astronomi, seksualitet, biologiske våben, ecstasy, evolutionsbiologi, kloning, fedme, søvnforskning, muligheden for liv på mars, influenzaepidemier, livets opståen osv.

Artiklerne roses for at gøre vanskeligt stof forståeligt, uden at den videnskabelige holdbarhed tabes.