NYT > Science

U.S. Lifts Ban on Some Elephant and Lion TrophiesThe federal Fish and Wildlife Service will consider allowing some hunters to bring home tusks and hides from certain African countries, overturning an Obama-era prohibition.
13h
Ingeniøren

Rod i elnettet: Derfor går uret i din mikroovn forkertPå grænsen mellem Serbien og Kosovo er 113 GWh el forsvundet, og det har trukket frekvensen ned for hele det synkrone europæiske net. Nu skal kraftværkerne helt konkret, op i omdrejninger for at indhente seks minutter.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Amazon to quiet Alexa's cacklingAlexa Amazon EchoAmazon on Wednesday promised to keep virtual assistant Alexa from spontaneously cackling, giving people eerie feelings about what the artificial intelligence might be plotting.
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Scientific American Content: Global

Is Daylight Saving Time Good or Bad for You?Research shows that the benefits may outweigh the drawbacks -- Read more on ScientificAmerican.com
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Popular Science

23andMe can now test for BRCA mutations. Here's what you need to know.Health There's only so much the test can actually tell you about breast cancer. You can buy your BRCA test online and get results a few months later—without seeing a genetic counselor or doctor. But it's not quite as easy as it sounds.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Study assesses the strengths of research synthesis over 40 yearsFiguring out what is true in science when researchers are bombarded with information from many different studies is a challenge. A new paper, published in Nature, reveals that the power of meta-analysis in research synthesis over the past 40 years has transformed scientific thinking and research approaches. Meta-analysis has also become invaluable to making advances in many scientific fields, incl
9min
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

New insights into biodiversity hotspots could help protect them from potential deep-sea miningNew insights into animal patterns around extinct submarine volcanoes could inform measures used to protect marine ecosystems from human activities, such as trawling and deep-sea mining. These insights have been published today in Nature Scientific Reports, and show that the structure of marine life communities depends on depth and small-scale features on the sea floor.
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Futurity.org

Lots of ‘I, me, my’ doesn’t make you a narcissistRather than narcissism, frequent use of first-person singular pronouns—I, me, and my—may indicate a tendency for emotional distress, new research finds. A 2015 study , also from the University of Arizona, debunked the link between these pronouns and narcissism. Research at other institutions has suggested that I-talk, though not an indicator of narcissism, may be a marker for depression. While th
16min
The Atlantic

Intersectionality Is Not the ProblemEarlier this week, an auditorium of young people at Lewis & Clark Law School was prevented from hearing the ideas of a speaker whom a student organization invited to campus when protesters exercised a heckler’s veto to bring her remarks to a halt. “Most of the students, conservatives & progressives, were civil,” the speaker later declared . “A noisy minority was willing to impose its will on ever
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The Atlantic

The Best Argument for Welfare Is About Kids“Welfare makes people lazy.” The notion is buried so deep within mainstream political thought that it can often be stated without evidence. It was explicit during the Great Depression, when Franklin D. Roosevelt’s WPA (Works Progress Administration) was nicknamed “We Piddle Around” by his detractors. It was implicit in Bill Clinton’s pledge to “end welfare as we know it.” Even today, it is an int
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The Atlantic

Julie Washington’s Quest to Get Schools to Respect African-American EnglishStudying African-American Vernacular English wasn’t Julie Washington’s plan. But one day in the fall of 1990, her speech-pathology doctorate fresh in hand, she found herself sitting with a little girl at a school outside Detroit. The two were reading the classic P. D. Eastman picture book Are You My Mother? , which tells the tale of a lost hatchling trying to find its way home. The girl—4 years o
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Science | The Guardian

From spy novels to Skripal: the myth of the untraceable poisonThe idea of a poison that can’t be detected is terrifying, but there is no such thing The news of the apparent poisoning of Sergei Skripal and his daughter Yulia produced a lot of speculation over what might have made two people very ill so suddenly. All sorts of wild theories can emerge in situations like this where so little information is known for certain. Identifying poisonous substances is
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The Scientist RSS

Image of the Day: Living ColorBiodegradable pigments could be custom-grown by bacteria in the future, say researchers.
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The Scientist RSS

John Cacioppo, a Founder of Social Neuroscience, DiesThe University of Chicago psychology professor made fundamental contributions to understanding the neural mechanisms of social experiences.
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Dying for Uber and Lyft's Secrets, Cities Get CreativeResearchers want to know how ride-hailing companies are affecting their streets, but don't have much information to help them.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

'Booth babes' on verge of extinction at Geneva Motor ShowLong synonymous with scantily-clad women draped over pricy vehicles, this year's Geneva Motor Show is almost void of "booth babes", as automakers strive to polish their images following the #MeToo movement.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

German government calculates deaths from nitrogen dioxideThousands of people die prematurely each year in Germany from the harmful effects of nitrogen dioxide, a gas that's produced by diesel engines, according to a government-sponsored report published Thursday.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Digital publishing to boost Axel Springer again in 2018German media giant Axel Springer, owner of the top-selling Bild newspaper, on Thursday said its thriving digital publishing business would again drive profits in 2018, after a strong performance last year.
27min
Science-Based Medicine

It doesn’t have to hurt: Strategies to reduce vaccine painTo address anti-vaccine views, try to understand the underlying motives for these perspectives. Some reject vaccines because of underlying fears of the pain of vaccination. Several strategies can effectively decrease vaccine pain.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Uncovering the secrets of the human body's perception of touchScientific research has yielded deep understanding on the human senses of sight, hearing, smell, and taste. But knowledge about bodily perceptions of the sense of touch is still limited. For example, during a handshake, who is shaking whose hand? The answer to this question is just one of the multifaceted aspects of touch being studied by 'haptics scientist' Masashi Nakatani. "I am intrigued by hu
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Catalyst made from iron can drive an important reaction for making organic compoundsA simple iron catalyst can replace costly ruthenium in a reaction that can be used to generate diverse libraries of complex organic compounds, three researchers at Keio University have shown1. This finding promises to make it cheaper to produce complex organic molecules such as organic electronic materials and therapeutic drugs.
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BBC News - Science & Environment

Jupiter's winds run deep into the planetNasa's Juno mission begins to unravel the mysteries of the gas giant's interior structure.
39min
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Drone rapidly converts aerial photos into valuable information about crop healthProgeny Drone Inc., a Purdue-affiliated startup, has created software that rapidly converts aerial crop photos into useful information for plant breeding, crop modeling and precision agriculture.
45min
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Data processing architecture can reconfigure content within IoT data processing streamFujitsu Laboratories Ltd. today announced the development of the Dynamically Reconfigurable Asynchronous Consistent EveNt-processing Architecture (Dracena), a stream processing architecture that can add or change content while processing large volumes of IoT data, without stopping. With recent advances in IoT technologies, it is expected that many real-time services will be created to utilize the
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Researchers invent nano-drops that improve nearsightedness and farsightednessA revolutionary, cutting-edge technology, developed by researchers at Bar-Ilan University's Institute of Nanotechnology and Advanced Materials (BINA), has the potential to provide a new alternative to eyeglasses, contact lenses, and laser correction for refractive errors.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Determining the cause of difficult-to-control mitochondrial diseasesA Japanese research group has discovered that taurine is conjugated with mitochondrial transfer RNAs (tRNAs), small RNAs that decode genetic information, and that taurine deficiency in tRNA dramatically reduces both mitochondrial protein translation and impairs mitochondrial membrane integrity. Subsequently, many mitochondrial proteins are unable to localize on mitochondria and end up forming toxi
57min
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

A global conflict: Agricultural production vs. biodiversitySmart land-use planning could ease the conflict between agricultural production and nature conservation. A team of researchers from the University of Göttingen, the German Centre for Integrative Biodiversity Research (iDiv), the UFZ and the University of Münster integrated global datasets on the geographical distributions and ecological requirements of thousands of animal species with detailed inf
57min
Scientific American Content: Global

$1 Fentanyl Test Strip Could Be a Major Weapon against Opioid ODsAs the deadly crisis refuses to wane, cities search for unconventional responses to overdoses -- Read more on ScientificAmerican.com
59min
New Scientist - News

Could a bedtime pill protect you from morning heart attacks?Most people are protected from early morning heart attacks by compounds in their blood. Could giving these substances to people with heart disease save lives?
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Live Science

Florida Woman Viciously Attacked by Possibly Rabid River OtterSurprisingly, this is not the first otter attack seen in Florida.
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Feed: All Latest

Facebook Didn't Kill Online Sketch Comedy—The Entire Internet DidWhile some writers blame Facebook's ever-shifting algorithm, sketch comedy has evolved in the social-media age to favor the person, not the premise.
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Starsky Robotics' Truck Takes Its First Human-Free TripUber Driver TrucksThe robo-trucking startup moves closer to starting commercial deliveries, no humans needed.
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How the Stock Market Could Help Fight Climate ChangeA new working paper considers whether environmental factors can actually increase returns on investment.
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How ISIS and Russia Manufactured Crowds on Social MediaWIRED’s newest columnist Renee DiResta on the similarities between ISIS and Russia’s social media strategies—and what needs to be done to stop them.
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Latest Headlines | Science News

50 years ago, pulsars burst onto the sceneThousands of pulsars have been discovered since the announcement of their detection 50 years ago.
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Scientific American Content: Global

Salvador Dalí and the HypercubeThe surrealist artist had a lifetime fascination with science and mathematics, which greatly influenced his art -- Read more on ScientificAmerican.com
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Scientific American Content: Global

Spotlight on Women in ScienceIn honor of International Women’s Day, 2018, our latest coverage of women at the forefront of science -- Read more on ScientificAmerican.com
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

North Pacific climate patterns influence El Nino occurrencesFor decades, scientists have observed the phenomena known as El Niño and La Niña. Both significantly impact the global climate and both pose a puzzle to scientists since they're not completely understood. Now, a new study clarifies some of the obscurity surrounding El Niño and La Niña, which together are called the El Niño Southern Oscillation (ENSO). This new study examines ENSO frequency asymmet
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The Atlantic

The Second Amendment Does Not Transcend All OthersPart of the miserable ritual that follows American mass shootings is the lament that nothing can be done unless we get rid of the Second Amendment. New York Times columnist Bret Stephens reasoned thus : There’s a good case to be made for owning a handgun for self-defense, or a rifle for hunting. There is no remotely sane case for being allowed to purchase, as [Las Vegas mass murderer] Paddock did
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Ingeniøren

Avis: Skat betalte fremtidskonsulenter 55.000 kroner for workshopDaredisrupt, der stod bag Kommunernes Landsforenings fremtidskatalog, har fået store beløb for ydelser i stat og kommuner.
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Ingeniøren

Bornholmsk forsøg flytter en tredjedel af elforbrugetDet er muligt at flytte mindst 30 procent af husstandenes elforbrug væk fra timer med høj belastning. Det viser et forskningsprojekt, der har demonstreret fleksibelt elforbrug i næsten 800 husstande.
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Researchers rescue embryos from brain defects by re-engineering cellular voltage patternsTufts University biologists have demonstrated for the first time that electrical patterns in the developing embryo can be predicted, mapped, and manipulated to prevent defects caused by harmful substances such as nicotine. The research, published today in Nature Communications, suggests that targeting bioelectric states may be a new treatment modality for regenerative repair in brain development a
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Science : NPR

What We Know About Russian Spies And Nerve AgentsBritish authorities say that a former Russian spy and his daughter were poisoned by a nerve agent in England this week. Steve Inskeep speaks with Alastair Hay, a toxicologist at Leeds University.
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New Scientist - News

What was the nerve agent used to poison Sergei Skripal?Former spy Sergei Skripal and his daughter were poisoned with a nerve agent, say police. But what are nerve agents - and what do they do?
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The Atlantic

The Health-Care Gap Between Red and Blue AmericaThe battle over health care is moving to the states. The most immediate effect of the recent steps taken by President Trump and congressional Republicans to unravel the Affordable Care Act will be to create an even deeper gulf between red and blue states in the availability and quality of health insurance. An array of blue states is exploring ways not only to blunt Trump’s moves, but also to reac
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Science : NPR

America's Oil Boom Is Fueled By A Tech BoomThe U.S. is on track to become the world's biggest oil producer. Technology advances and automation mean this can happen with fewer workers than during the last boom. (Image credit: Mose Buchele/KUT)
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Report: Big tobacco is targeting the world's most vulnerable to increase profitsNew report says the tobacco industry is increasingly targeting vulnerable populations in emerging markets, such as Africa, Asia, and the Middle East.
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BBC News - Science & Environment

Red squirrels boosted by pine martensRed squirrel numbers in Scotland are being boosted by the activity of pine martens.
3h
Ingeniøren

Sådan ombygger Stena færge til fuld batteridrift på 12 årIndtil Stena Lines Jutlandica-færge udelukkende kan sejle på batteridrift, vil fartøjet både være drevet af diesel og batterier.
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Science | The Guardian

Bridging the gender gap: Why do so few girls study Stem subjects?To attract more girls to study Stem subjects at university, we need to tackle the stereotypes they are exposed to early on You will no doubt be aware that women are underrepresented in Stem (science, technology, engineering and maths) occupations. They make up 14.4% of all people working in Stem in the UK, despite being about half of the workforce. This is well short of the country’s goal of a cr
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Neanderthals' lack of drawing ability may relate to hunting techniquesNeanderthals had large brains and made complex tools but never demonstrated the ability to draw recognizable images, unlike early modern humans who created vivid renderings of animals and other figures on rocks and cave walls. That artistic gap may be due to differences in the way they hunted, suggests a University of California, Davis, expert on predator-prey relations and their impacts on the ev
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Scientists help robots understand humans with board game ideaInformation scientists at the U.S. Army Research Laboratory and the University of Michigan have borrowed from the popular game "20 Questions," to make an important step towards helping robots maintain continuous and purposeful conversation with humans. They have developed an optimal strategy for asking a series of yes/no questions that rapidly achieves the best answer.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Researchers to study ramps' market, flavor profile, vulnerability to pestA good way to describe ramps, it has been said, is to note what they are not. Ramps are not leeks, nor are they scallions or shallots. Ramps look like scallions, but they're smaller and have one or two broad, flat leaves.
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Ingeniøren

Fejl i database kostede mobil- forbindelsen til 1,85 millioner danskereTDC har nu lokaliseret den fejl der mandag kostede forbindelsen hos op mod 1,85 millioner mobilkunder.
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Got the message? Your brainwaves will tellThe new technique was developed by Professor Tom Francart and his colleagues at KU Leuven, Belgium, in collaboration with the University of Maryland. It will allow for a more accurate diagnosis of patients who cannot actively participate in a speech understanding test because they're too young, for instance, or because they're in a coma. In the longer term, the method also holds potential for the
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Diver films rubbish wasteland in Bali watersMillions of tourists are drawn to Bali's palm-fringed scenery and rich marine life, but a British diver has released stark footage highlighting a growing problem in its famously crystal-clear waters: plastic rubbish.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

China plans panda park that will dwarf YellowstoneChina will create a bastion for giant pandas three times the size of Yellowstone National Park to link up and encourage breeding among existing wild populations of the notoriously slow-reproducing animal, state media reported Thursday.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Navy starts under-ice submarine exercise off Alaska's coastThe U.S. Navy has begun five weeks of submarine training and testing off Alaska's north coast that will include breaching the massive underwater vessels through Arctic sea ice.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Japan penalizes several cryptocurrency exchanges after hackThe Japanese government is slapping penalties on several cryptocurrency exchanges in the country, after 58 billion yen ($530 million) of virtual coins were lost earlier this year from hacking.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Paralympic snowboarder designs innovative gear—for rivalsAdaptive snowboarder Mike Schultz could very well have the winning formula at the Paralympics—whether or not he even crosses the finish line in first.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Manure could heat your homeFarm manure could be a viable source of renewable energy to help reduce greenhouse gas emissions that cause global warming.
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Ingeniøren

Avancerede IoT-angreb er en blevet en hyldevareDet kræver ikke længere ekstreme hackerfærdigheder at trænge ind i industrielle IoT-systemer. Alle komponenterne kan hentes som hyldevarer fra nettet – også rollen som projektleder for angrebet.
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Ingeniøren

Danmark kæmper imod, at browsere som standard afviser tracking-cookiesPrivacy-by-default skal ikke bestemme over brugeren, siger erhvervsminister Brian Mikkelsen.
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Science | The Guardian

Australian scientists move closer to world-beating quantum computerLed by Australian of the year Michelle Simmons, team has built qubits from single phosphorus atoms in silicon Australian scientists, led by Australian of the year Michelle Simmons , have made a significant step in creating a world-beating, single-atom quantum computer. Simmons and her Australian team announced on Wednesday they had built quantum bits, known as qubits, from single phosphorus atoms
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Watching others makes people overconfident in their own abilitiesWatching YouTube videos, Instagram demos, and Facebook tutorials may make us feel as though we're acquiring all sorts of new skills but it probably won't make us experts, according to research published in Psychological Science, a journal of the Association for Psychological Science.
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Manure could heat your homeFarm manure could be a viable source of renewable energy to help reduce greenhouse gas emissions that cause global warming.
8h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Unique inflammation patterns emerging in patients with type 1 diabetesAnalysis of the inflammation-promoting proteins in the blood of patients with type 1 diabetes and related kidney disease indicates that the promoters of inflammation are diverse even in the same medical condition and that patients likely would benefit from an anti-inflammatory treatment that directly targets theirs, scientists report.
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Saliva plays a role in the body's defense against traveler's diarrheaResearchers have identified a protein in saliva (histatin-5) that protects the body from traveler's diarrhea.The findings, available online in the Journal of Infectious Diseases, may lead to the development of new preventive therapies for the disease.
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Marine charities net more than iconic fishery: MassachusettsMassachusetts boasts one of the most iconic fisheries in the US, but new research suggests that protecting marine coastlines has surpassed commercial fishing as an economic driver.The study is the first to calculate the economic value of coastal preservation in Massachusetts. The research finds these efforts contributed $179 million to the state's economy in 2014, more than finfish landings ($105
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Studies examine trends in pain medication useA new study reveals that acetaminophen use and over-dosing rise in cold/flu season in the United States, primarily due to increased use of over-the-counter combination medications treating upper respiratory symptoms. Another study reports that acetaminophen is the most commonly used analgesic in France, with more high-dose tablets being consumed in recent years. The findings, which are published i
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Marine charities net more than iconic fisheryMassachusetts boasts one of the most iconic fisheries in the U.S., but new research suggests that protecting marine coastlines has surpassed commercial fishing as an economic driver.
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New Scientist - News

Leopards that live in cities are protecting people from rabiesWild leopards wander into the Indian city of Mumbai to prey on feral dogs – and in doing so they stop the dogs biting people and passing on the rabies virus
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Ingeniøren

Kampdag: Gådefulde 4,3 procent skal frem i lysetKvindelige ingeniører tjener 4,3 procent mindre i løn end fuldt sammenlignelige mandlige kolleger. I dag, på Kvindernes Internationale Kampdag, sætter IDA og 37 andre fagforbund fokus på den skæve løn.
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NYT > Science

Columbia Removes Thomas Jessell, Renowned Neuroscientist, From His PostsUniversity officials said the scientist violated Columbia’s “policies and values,” but did not describe the infractions.
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BBC News - Science & Environment

Climate change 'impacts women more than men'Women are disproportionately affected by the impacts of changing weather patterns, studies show.
11h
Live Science

What Is the Greenhouse Effect?The greenhouse effect occurs when Earth's atmosphere traps solar radiation because of the presence of certain gases, which causes temperatures to rise.
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NYT > Science

Rome’s Subway Project Keeps Digging Up Archaeological MarvelsA second-century domus, or house, with at least 14 rooms and a fountain is the latest discovery to emerge during the construction of a new subway line.
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Combating childhood obesity by preventing 'fatty liver' in fetusNew research published in The Journal of Physiology indicates that an obese pregnant mother and exposure to a high fat, high sugar diet during pregnancy produces a 'fatty liver' in the fetus, potentially predisposing children to obesity, metabolic and cardiovascular disorders later in life.
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Live Science

Ice Crystals Are Forming Strange Patterns Above NYCA powerful storm is causing ice crystals to form strange, radar-confusing patterns above New York City.
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Futurity.org

Measuring growth of the universe reveals a mysteryAstronomers have made the most precise measurement to date of the rate at which the universe is expanding. But there’s also some unsettling news: The new number remains at odds with independent measurements of the early universe’s expansion, which could mean that there is something unknown about the makeup of the universe. Is something unpredicted going on in the depths of space? “The community i
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Futurity.org

Listen: How the US can reduce mass incarcerationThe revolving door of mass incarceration returning individuals to jail is “the definition of insanity,” according to Matt Epperson, especially for individuals suffering from mental illness and drug addiction who failed to receive the help they truly needed. Epperson, associate professor in the School of Social Service Administration at the University of Chicago, has seen the failures of mass inca
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Futurity.org

Slow-release hydrogel doses tumors with drugsAn immunotherapy drug embedded in a slow-release hydrogel appears to be highly effective at killing cancer cells, according to new research. STINGel combines a new class of immunotherapy drugs called stimulator of interferon gene (STING) agonists with an injectable hydrogel that releases the drug in a steady dose to activate the immune system to kill cancer cells. In clinical trials, immunotherap
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Futurity.org

How climate boosts the spread of rotavirusClimate in the tropics has a larger influence on transmission of the sometime deadly rotavirus than previously shown, report researchers. Using sophisticated modeling, researchers showed that communities drawing water from large, slow-moving or stagnant sources in cooler seasons have more transmission of the virus than those that access free-flowing water. “Our research shows water can both disse
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Futurity.org

Map shows how humans and nature affect Hawaii’s coral reefsAs a way of understanding which factors had the biggest impacts on Hawaii’s coral reefs, researchers have created the first-ever comprehensive map showing how both humans and natural events influence overall reef health. Many of Hawaii’s once-thriving coral reefs are now struggling to recover from recent extreme coral bleaching caused by rising water temperatures. Experts suspect these periodic i
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Futurity.org

Scientists control tiny ‘factories’ in engineered cellsResearchers have discovered how to dynamically manage the allocation of essential resources inside engineered cells. The research could advance the potential of synthetically programming cells to combat disease and produce new drugs. They developed a way to efficiently control the distribution of ribosomes—microscopic “factories” inside cells that build proteins that keep the cell alive and funct
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Science | The Guardian

US cancer network recommending expensive drugs based on weak evidence, study findsStudy raises concerns about National Comprehensive Cancer Network, which publishes guidelines for American oncologists Guidelines for American oncologists often recommend expensive and harmful cancer drugs for patients based on “weak evidence”, according to a new study in the British Medical Journal . Related: Cancer patients shed new light on rheumatoid arthritis Continue reading...
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Science | The Guardian

Vitamin D may offer protection against cancers, study saysExperts remain split over whether it is worth taking supplements Vitamin D may offer protection against cancers, new research suggests, although experts are split over whether individuals should start taking supplements. The vitamin plays an important role in the body, including in bone health and muscle strength and in preventing conditions such as rickets. Continue reading...
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

NASA Juno finds Jupiter's jet-streams are unearthlyData collected by NASA's Juno mission to Jupiter indicate that the atmospheric winds of the gas-giant planet run deep into its atmosphere and last longer than similar atmospheric processes found here on Earth.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

Diamond discovery under pressureFor the first time, scientists have found Earth's fourth most abundant mineral -- calcium silicate perovskite -- at Earth's surface.
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The Atlantic

The Radicalization of Richard PainterRichard Painter, a former White House ethics lawyer with little public profile before 2016, has emerged as a prominent critic of Donald Trump. The 56-year-old law professor has tried to discredit the president through op-eds, countless television appearances, and a high-profile lawsuit. Now, he’s considering turning his anti-Trump crusade into an actual campaign. “If I choose to enter this race,
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Should doctors recommend acupuncture for pain?Some see acupuncture as a safe alternative to drugs, while others argue there's no convincing evidence of clinical benefit and potential for harm. So should doctors recommend acupuncture for pain? Experts debate the issue in The BMJ today.
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News

US cancer treatment guidelines 'often based on weak evidence'Cancer treatment guidelines produced by the US National Comprehensive Cancer Network (NCCN) are often based on low quality evidence or no evidence at all, finds a study published by The BMJ today.
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Higher Vitamin D levels may be linked to lower risk of cancerHigh levels of vitamin D may be linked to a lower risk of developing cancer, including liver cancer, concludes a large study of Japanese adults published by The BMJ today.
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Popular Science

These massive, mysterious storms on Jupiter look totally surrealSpace Plus: new insights into the planet’s interior. Jupiter is a giant and familiar world to us all, but new observations show that there’s a lot more to this planetary leviathan than meets the eye.
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The Atlantic

The Atlantic Daily: The Question Is ...What We’re Following Talking’s Tough: How should Donald Trump’s administration approach North Korea’s reported offer to negotiate on its nuclear program? This week’s breakthrough might be merely an attempt to drive a wedge between Washington and Seoul, although that could be all the more reason to give direct diplomacy a try. If that happens, the president may have to resist the impulse to demand
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The Atlantic

The Russian Ex-Spies Who Got Poisoned in BritainSergei Skripal RussianWhen Sergei Skripal and his daughter Yulia both suddenly collapsed onto a shopping center bench on Monday, it immediately looked suspicious. The two had been out together in the southern English city of Salisbury, and there was no apparent reason both would have taken ill at the same time. But there were reasons to think something else was going on. After all, Skripal had served for several years
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The Atlantic

The Atlantic Politics & Policy Daily: ‘California, We Have a Problem’Today in 5 Lines Hours after the Trump administration sued California over its immigration policies, Attorney General Jeff Sessions blasted state officials in a speech, saying, “California, we have a problem.” President Trump is expected to formally announce tariffs on steel and aluminum imports on Thursday. The White House said that Mexico and Canada may be exempt from the tariffs. A grand jury
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Popular Science

Mophie's Powerstation AC fuels everything from laptops to curling ironsGadgets A solid emergency backup battery that's worth its extra heft. With enough juice to fully charge a MacBook Pro, this 1.6-pound battery pack is worth a little extra weight.
14h
Live Science

This Tiny Diamond Contains a Mineral That's Never Been Seen BeforeA mine renowned for its gigantic diamonds has helped scientists uncover a mineral never seen before in nature.
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New on MIT Technology Review

Inside the Chinese lab that plans to rewire the world with AIAlibaba is investing huge sums in AI research and resources—and it is building tools to challenge Google and Amazon.
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Latest Headlines | Science News

Some meteorites contain superconducting bitsScientists find materials that conduct electricity without resistance in two meteorites.
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NYT > Science

Arizona State Suspends Lawrence Krauss During Inquiry Over Sexual Misconduct AccusationsDr. Krauss, a leading figure in the “skeptics” movement, was placed on paid leave and barred from campus after a report was published by BuzzFeed.
15h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Researcher makes bold move by releasing nanotech 'recipe'In a rare move, a Houston Methodist researcher is sharing his recipe for a new, more affordable way to make nanoparticles. This will empower any laboratory in the world to easily create similar nanoparticles and could lead to a whole new way of delivering biotherapeutic drugs and do it more quickly.
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Live Science

An Electro-Blob Under Africa May Be 'Ground Zero' for Earth's Magnetic Field ReversalMinerals locked in clays burnt by ancient African farmers reveal the history of Earth's magnetic field.
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News

First look at Jupiter's poles show strange geometric arrays of stormsWith NASA's Juno spacecraft, scientists have gotten a good look at the top and bottom of the planet for the first time. What they found astounded them: bizarre geometric arrangements of storms, each arrayed around one cyclone over the north and south poles -- unlike any storm formation seen in the universe.
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Houston Methodist researcher makes bold move by releasing nanotech 'recipe'In a rare move, a Houston Methodist researcher is sharing his recipe for a new, more affordable way to make nanoparticles. This will empower any laboratory in the world to easily create similar nanoparticles and could lead to a whole new way of delivering biotherapeutic drugs and do it more quickly. Ennio Tasciotti, Ph.D., and his team describe their findings in a paper appearing March 7 in Advanc
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The Scientist RSS

Hungry Macrophages Keep Tattoos on Mices SkinA new study reveals that a constant stream of ink-gobbling immune cells helps hold tattoos in place.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

Living in a sunnier climate as a child and young adult may reduce risk of MSPeople who live in areas where they are exposed to more of the sun's rays, specifically UV-B rays, may be less likely to develop multiple sclerosis (MS) later in life, according to a new study. Exposure in childhood and young adulthood may also reduce risk.
15h
Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

Epilepsy: Biologists link protein, seizure suppressionSeizure suppression is the focus of an original research -- and they have the pictures to prove it. Their new work sheds new light on epilepsy, a chronic neurological disorder marked by recurrent, unprovoked seizures.
15h
Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

Diverse tropical forests grow fast despite widespread phosphorus limitationEcological theory says that poor soils limit the productivity of tropical forests, but adding nutrients as fertilizer rarely increases tree growth, suggesting that productivity is not limited by nutrients after all. Researchers resolved this apparent contradiction, showing that phosphorus limits the growth of individual tree species but not entire forest communities. Their results have sweeping im
15h
Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

36 new genes implicated in cardiac diseaseA professor has developed a new personalized method to discover genes implicated in complex diseases. One of the ultimate goals of the research is to create personalized therapeutic drugs to reverse heart disease.
15h
Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

New approach to measuring stickiness could aid micro-device designAt the scale of microdevices, adhesion is one of the most important forces that engineers need to contend with. Researchers have come up with a new way to measure it.
15h
Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

Molecular imaging strategy for determining molecular classifications of NSCLCRecent findings suggest a novel positron emission tomography (PET) imaging approach determining epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR) mutation status for improved lung cancer patient management.
15h
Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

High-resolution brain imaging provides clues about memory loss in older adultsAs we get older, it's not uncommon to experience 'senior moments,' in which we forget where we parked our car or call our children by the wrong names. And we may wonder: Are these memory lapses a normal part of aging, or do they signal the early stages of a severe disorder such as Alzheimer's disease? Currently, there's no good way to tell.
15h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

NASA will fly you to the sun— or at least your nameNASA will fly you to the sun—or at least your name.
15h
Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

Optical tools to detect metabolic changes linked to diseaseA team led by engineers has opened a window into the cell by developing an optical tool that can read metabolism at subcellular resolution, without having to perturb cells with contrast agents, or destroy them to conduct assays. The researchers were able to use the method to identify specific metabolic signatures that could arise in diabetes, cancer, cardiovascular and neurodegenerative diseases.
15h
Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

All power to the proton: Researchers make battery breakthroughResearchers have demonstrated for the first time a working rechargeable 'proton battery' that could re-wire how we power our homes, vehicles and devices.
15h
Viden

Skiftende nattevagter kan give dig diabetesNattevagten vender op og ned på sunde vaner, og det forhøjer risikoen, forklarer forsker.
15h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Researchers develop optical tools to detect metabolic changes linked to diseaseMetabolic changes in cells can occur at the earliest stages of disease. In most cases, knowledge of those signals is limited, since we usually detect disease only after it has done significant damage. Now, a team led by engineers at Tufts University School of Engineering has opened a window into the cell by developing an optical tool that can read metabolism at subcellular resolution, without havi
16h
Science : NPR

A Look At Just How Invasive The Brown Marmorated Stink Bug IsThe brown marmorated stink bug first showed up in the United States about 20 years ago, and has been terrorizing homeowners and farmers ever since. NPR's Ari Shapiro talks with Kathryn Schulz, who writes about the invasive insect in the latest issue of The New Yorker.
16h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Greehey Institute team finds link between BRCA1 and Ewing sarcomaScientists with the Greehey Children's Cancer Research Institute at UT Health San Antonio have discovered a surprising connection between a breast cancer protein, BRCA1, and a pediatric cancer called Ewing sarcoma. Their findings were made public March 7 online in the journal Nature.
16h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Recovery from spinal cord injuries can be predictedInjuries to the spinal cord result in tissue loss in the spinal cord and brain. These neurodegenerative changes can be analyzed in detail using neuroimaging methods. UZH researchers have now for the first time been able to reliably predict the extent of functional recovery in patients suffering from a spinal cord injury two years after a trauma based on the extent and progression of neurodegenerat
16h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Living in a sunnier climate as a child and young adult may reduce risk of MSPeople who live in areas where they are exposed to more of the sun's rays, specifically UV-B rays, may be less likely to develop multiple sclerosis (MS) later in life, according to a study published in the March 7, 2018, online issue of Neurology®, the medical journal of the American Academy of Neurology. Exposure in childhood and young adulthood may also reduce risk.
16h
Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

Two new species of stone centipedes found hiding in larch forests in ChinaScientists described two species of previously unknown stone centipedes from China. Now housed at the Hengshui University, China, the studied specimens were all collected in the leaf litter or under rocks in larch forests.
16h
Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

Super sniffer: Dog's nose inspires new gas sensor materialsIt is well known that dogs have a better sense of smell than humans. For years, researchers have been trying to develop an artificial detector that is just as good as a canine's nose. Now, one group reports that they were able to mimic a dog's sniffer with graphene-based nanoscrolls.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Want to see Disneyland without going there? Try Street ViewAnyone who has even been to Disneyland will tell you at least two things about the place. One, the Pirates of the Caribbean ride is awesome. Two, the crowds are awesome, too, but not necessarily in the same awesome vein as Pirates of the Caribbean.
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Popular Science

How to get comets, animals, math problems, and more named after youScience Hint: You don't have to discover something, but it could help. There are a few different ways to put your name down in the history books, along with scientists and inventors. Which way will you choose?
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Science | The Guardian

The Weirdest Stars in the UniverseHow big can a star get? Why would a star only pretend to explode? Can you hide one star inside another? The Perimeter Institute public lectures are back, with this evening (7 March) Emily Levesque talking about some of the strangest stellar phenomena in the universe. From the biggest, brightest, and most volatile stars to the explosive fireworks of core-collapse supernovae and the fascinating phy
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Winds of change: What will power the Northwest's future?Carl Borgquist wants to spend more than $1 billion to transform a remote butte fringed by pine trees into a giant water battery.
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Researchers develop optical tools to detect metabolic changes linked to diseaseA team led by engineers at Tufts University School of Engineering has opened a window into the cell by developing an optical tool that can read metabolism at subcellular resolution, without having to perturb cells with contrast agents, or destroy them to conduct assays. As reported today in Science Advances, the researchers were able to use the method to identify specific metabolic signatures that
16h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Severe electrical storms in the brain -- biologists link protein, seizure suppressionSeizure suppression is the focus of an original research article by researchers at the Department of Biology at Syracuse University -- and they have the pictures to prove it. Their new work sheds new light on epilepsy, a chronic neurological disorder marked by recurrent, unprovoked seizures.
16h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Mental health treatment for victims of human trafficking -- Journal of Psychiatric Practice presents initial recommendationsCognitive therapies should be considered when addressing the harmful psychological consequences of trauma in victims of human trafficking, according to a review and recommendations in the Journal of Psychiatric Practice. The journal is published by Wolters Kluwer.
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NYT > Science

Trilobites: The Weird World Inside a Pitcher PlantA species of pitcher plant found in Singapore isn’t very good at dissolving the prey it catches, but it gets nutritional help from worm larvae that live and eat within its maws.
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New on MIT Technology Review

Why humans learn faster than AI—for nowA clever study of video games reveals how the background knowledge people take for granted gives us an edge over machine learning.
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TED Talks Daily (SD video)

The wonderful world of life in a drop of water | Simone Bianco and Tom Zimmerman"Hold your breath," says inventor Tom Zimmerman. "This is the world without plankton." These tiny organisms produce two-thirds of our planet's oxygen -- without them, life as we know it wouldn't exist. In this talk and tech demo, Zimmerman and cell engineer Simone Bianco hook up a 3D microscope to a drop of water and take you scuba diving with plankton. Learn more about these mesmerizing creatures
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

MoviePass crafts wider offerings for movie nightMoviePass Location AppMoviePass is eyeing a broadening of its app capabilities to create a full-featured movie-going experience by tracking where people go before and after the film, the company said Monday night.
16h
Big Think

How do we understand sexual pleasure in this age of ‘consent’?Debates about the kind of sex that we should be having are focused on the issue of individual choice and sexual autonomy. We are living, it seems, in the age of consent. Read More
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

Young Southern white rhinos may produce four distinct, context-dependent callsYoung Southern white rhinos may produce four distinct calls in differing behavioral contexts, according to a new study.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

Nervous system discovery could inform stroke, pain therapiesScientists used advanced imaging techniques to ascertain the resting state of an acid-sensing ion channel. Acid-sensing ion channels are believed to play a role in pain sensation as well as psychiatric disorders. Scientists expect the basic science research will spur new research and development into therapeutic agents targeting the channel.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

Birth of new neurons in the human hippocampus ends in childhoodOne of the liveliest debates in neuroscience over the past half century surrounds whether the human brain renews itself by producing new neurons throughout life, and whether it may be possible to rejuvenate the brain by boosting its innate regenerative capacity.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

New molecular target could help ease asthmaResearchers have shown that the protein vascular endothelial growth factor A -- or VEGFA -- plays a major role in the inflammation and airway obstruction associated with asthma. The finding may eventually lead to new asthma treatments targeting VEGFA.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

We're not addicted to smartphones, we're addicted to social interactionMobile-device habits may not be anti-social, but rather hyper-social -- stemming from a healthy human need to socialize. This is the finding of a new review of the dysfunctional use of smart technology, which concludes that the most addictive smartphone functions all share a common theme: they tap into the human desire to connect with other people.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

Software aims to reduce food waste by helping those in needA research team is testing a new online tool to provide food to those in need by reducing food waste.
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The Atlantic

Human Landscapes of GermanyGermany has been populated by humans for at least 600,000 years. Modern Germans, as well as their ancestors, have been reshaping the land to their needs for most of that time, much of that impact visible from aerial and satellite photography—from fortresses and palaces to factories, enormous cities, massive mines, farms, and more. Over the past few weeks, I took a virtual tour with Google Earth,
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

How Domino's used technology to woo millennials and beat rival Pizza HutDomino's Pizza spent a good part of the last decade chasing what seemed like every digital doodad to deliver pizza—sometimes to the scorn of observers who pointed out that the business was, after all, popping topping-covered dough in an oven and delivering it.
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Mechanical harvesting of papayas might be a reality with computational techniqueBy employing algorithms and digital imaging, Brazilian researchers design a non-invasive system which performs the tricky task of identifying different stages of fruit ripening with an accuracy rate of 95%.
16h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Study suggests why food assistance for homeless young adults is inadequateThough young homeless adults make use of available food programs, these support structures still often fail to provide reliable and consistent access to nutritious food, according to the results of a new study by a University at Buffalo social work researcher. The findings, which fill an important gap in the research literature, can help refine policies and programs to better serve people experien
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

How people speak Spanish drives judgment, new study findsIn Miami—the most Latin and most Spanish-speaking metropolitan region in the United States—people likely judge others on how they speak Spanish, according to a new study.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

New study takes the guesswork out of selecting and seeding teams for 'March Madness'New research has developed an automated approach for narrowing down and ranking the field of Division 1 college basketball teams from 351 to the 68 that would play in the annual 'March Madness' basketball tournaments, watched by more than 80 million people each year.
16h
Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

Slow-release hydrogel aids immunotherapy for cancerAn immunotherapy drug embedded in a slow-release hydrogel appears to be highly effective at killing cancer cells.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

Tropical birds live longer than temperate counterpartsAn international research team has found strong evidence that passerine birds near the equator live longer than their higher latitude counterparts.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

Mapping battery materials with atomic precisionAn international team used advanced techniques in electron microscopy to show how the ratio of materials that make up a lithium-ion battery electrode affects its structure at the atomic level, and how the surface is very different from the rest of the material.
16h
Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

New insights into biodiversity hotspots could help protect them from potential deep-sea miningNew insights into animal patterns around extinct submarine volcanoes could inform measures used to protect marine ecosystems from human activities, such as trawling and deep-sea mining. These insights show that the structure of marine life communities depends on depth and small-scale features on the sea floor.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

New prostate cancer risk model could better guide treatmentA new model could change treatment guidelines for nearly two-thirds of men with localized prostate cancer.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

Discovery fills gap in search for better treatments for Ebola, other virusesResearchers have found the Ebola polymerase (enzyme), which may lead to more effective research and better treatments for the often fatal infection, and other related viral diseases.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

When it comes to fuel efficiency, size matters for hummingbirdsNew research finds that larger hummingbirds show better mechanochemical efficiency -- the first time this has been observed in birds.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

When sepsis patients face brain impairment, is gut bacteria to blame?Halting the voyage of gut bacteria to the brain could help prevent harmful brain inflammation after a sepsis infection, a new study shows.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

Weather satellites aid search and rescue capabilitiesThe same satellites that identify severe weather can help save you from it. NOAA's GOES series satellites carry a payload supported by NASA's Search and Rescue (SAR) office, which researches and develops technologies to help first responders locate people in distress worldwide, whether from a plane crash, a boating accident or other emergencies.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

Wildfires set to increase: could we be sitting on a tinderbox in Europe?2017 was one of the worst years on record for fires in Europe, with over 800,000 hectares of land burnt in Portugal, Italy and Spain alone.
16h
Scientific American Content: Global

Does the Adult Brain Really Grow New Neurons?A new study stirs up debate over a long-held finding, and could dim hopes for the treatment of neurodegenerative diseases -- Read more on ScientificAmerican.com
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Philips Lighting joins Amsterdam's top-tier AEX indexPhilips Lighting which split from its electronics giant parent company to list as a standalone on the Amsterdam stock exchange in 2016, announced Wednesday it was joining the market's top-tier AEX index.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

France pumped up over cargo airshipsFrance will pump up to 25 million euros ($31 million) into a fleet of rigid airships for transporting heavy cargo, the country's public investment bank said in a statement Wednesday.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Aurora, a beloved polar bear, dies at upstate New York zooA beloved polar bear has died at the Seneca Park Zoo in Rochester, New York.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

On Medicaid? Amazon offers recipients a Prime discountAmazon has taken another step to woo low-income shoppers to its site and away from rival Walmart.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Geometric clusters of cyclones churn over Jupiter's polesJupiter's poles are blanketed by geometric clusters of cyclones and its atmosphere is deeper than scientists suspected.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

When fee-pressured audit offices focus on non-audit services, financial statements sufferFirms hire auditors to create independent assessments of their financial statements, providing assurance to investors and outside parties that they are free from material misstatement.
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News

All power to the proton: RMIT researchers make battery breakthroughAustralian researchers have demonstrated for the first time a working rechargeable 'proton battery' that could re-wire how we power our homes, vehicles and devices.
17h
Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

With a TENG, solar cells could work come rain or shineDespite the numerous advances in solar cells, one thing remains constant: cloudy, rainy conditions put a damper on the amount of electricity created. Now researchers have developed hybrid solar cells that can generate power from raindrops.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

More realistic and accurate organs-on-chipsIn a step toward better diagnosis and treatment of digestive conditions, such as inflammatory bowel disease, scientists report that they have developed a first-of-its-kind collagen-based membrane for use in microchips. The membrane is more natural than others that are available, and it could allow organs-on-chips to more accurately replicate how healthy intestinal cells become diseased and how the
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

Supportive colleagues could be the key to health and fairness at workThe attitudes and behaviors of colleagues towards people returning to work from sick leave can have a big impact on whether or not a worker feels they are fairly treated by their organization.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

Applied math reveals the key to stopping norovirus lies -- literally -- in our own handsFrom stately cruise ships to Olympic host cities, recent headline-grabbing outbreaks prove that norovirus, an incapacitating stomach bug, can strike anywhere and anytime. A new study uses mathematical modelling and data from real-world cruise ship outbreaks to find the best way of stopping the disease's spread. Their surprising results reveal that washing your hands is more effective than surface
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

Mapping the genome jungle: Unique animal traits could offer insight into human diseaseAn interdisciplinary team of scientists are using animals' unique traits to pinpoint regions of the human genome that might affect health.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

Mosquito brain atlas aims to reveal neural circuitry of behaviorResearchers have built mosquitobrains.org, the first map of the female mosquito brain. The new resource may ultimately uncover the circuitry behind biting and other behaviors.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

Lithium-related discovery could extend battery life and improve safetyNew research shows using a 3-dimensional layer of Polydimethylsiloxane (PDMS) as the substrate of lithium metal anode has been found to mitigate dendrite formation and stands to both dramatically extend battery life and diminish safety risks.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

How the brain tracks objects in motionResearchers found that people make much more accurate estimates when they have access to information about both the speed of a moving object and the timing of its rhythmic patterns.
17h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

New approach to measuring stickiness could aid micro-device designBrown University engineers have devised a new method of measuring the stickiness of micro-scale surfaces. The technique, described in Proceedings of the Royal Society A, could be useful in designing and building micro-electro-mechanical systems (MEMS), devices with microscopic moving parts.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Combination of old and new yields novel power grid cybersecurity toolAn innovative R&D project led by Berkeley Lab researchers that combines cybersecurity, machine learning algorithms and commercially available power system sensor technology to better protect the electric power grid has sparked interest from U.S. utilities, power companies and government officials.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

NASA finds heavy rain in new Tropical Cyclone Hola near VanuatuNASA obtained rainfall data on newly formed Tropical Cyclone Hola as it triggered warnings in Vanuatu in the South Pacific Ocean.
17h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Diverse tropical forests grow fast despite widespread phosphorus limitationAccepted ecological theory says that poor soils limit the productivity of tropical forests, but adding nutrients as fertilizer rarely increases tree growth, suggesting that productivity is not limited by nutrients after all. Researchers at the Smithsonian Tropical Research Institute (STRI) resolved this apparent contradiction, showing that phosphorus limits the growth of individual tree species bu
17h
Live Science

How Swallowing a Slug Left a Teen ParalyzedAn Australian teenager who ate a garden slug on a dare was infected by a parasite that caused a debilitating brain disease, leaving him paralyzed from the neck down.
17h
Feed: All Latest

The Vatican Hosts a HackathonLeaders at the Catholic Church organized VHacks to use technology to solve issues of social inclusion, interfaith dialogue, and resources for refugees.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Instability of wildlife trade does not encourage trappers to conserve natural habitatsMuch of the global wildlife trade originates in nations with rich biodiversity and high levels of poverty as the act of trapping and trading local wildlife allows people to generate extra income.
17h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Tropical birds live longer than temperate counterpartsAn international research team has found strong evidence that passerine birds near the equator live longer than their higher latitude counterparts.
17h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Some teachers don't talk to anyone about violent incidentsOne in five teachers who were the victims of physical or verbal violence at their schools didn't report the incidents to school administrators, according to a nationwide study.
17h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News

New approach to measuring stickiness could aid micro-device designAt the scale of microdevices, adhesion is one of the most important forces that engineers need to contend with. Brown University researchers have come up with a new way to measure it.
17h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Northeastern researchers identify 36 new genes implicated in cardiac diseaseA Northeastern University professor has developed a new personalized method to discover genes implicated in complex diseases. One of the ultimate goals of the research is to create personalized therapeutic drugs to reverse heart disease.
17h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Experts issue recommendations to manage unwanted hair growth in womenAll women who have unwanted dark, course hair growing on the face, chest or back should undergo testing for polycystic ovary syndrome (PCOS) and other underlying health problems, Endocrine Society experts concluded in an updated Clinical Practice Guideline released today.
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Feed: All Latest

MoviePass Customer Service Complaints Grow Along With Its Subscriber BaseMoviePass Location AppAs MoviePass shoots from 20,000 subscribers to 2 million, lapses in customer service have begun to take a toll.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Two new species of stone centipedes found hiding in larch forests in ChinaScientists described two species of previously unknown stone centipedes from China. Now housed at the Hengshui University, China, where all members of the team work, the studied specimens were all collected in the leaf litter or under rocks in larch forests.
17h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

New study takes the guesswork out of selecting and seeding teams for 'March Madness'New research has developed an automated approach for narrowing down and ranking the field of Division 1 college basketball teams from 351 to the 68 that would play in the annual "March Madness" basketball tournaments, watched by more than 80 million people each year.
17h
Inside Science

Chimps May Play Dumb to Fit InChimps May Play Dumb to Fit In Migrating chimpanzees appear to conform to local nut-cracking culture, even when they know a better way. Chimpanzee.jpg Image credits: Afrika Force via Flickr Rights information: CC BY 2.0 Creature Wednesday, March 7, 2018 - 14:00 Nala Rogers, Staff Writer (Inside Science) -- Doing something just for the sake of fitting in may seem like a uniquely human sort of fool
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Mapping battery materials with atomic precisionLithium-ion batteries are widely used in home electronics and are now being used to power electric vehicles and store energy for the power grid. But their limited number of recharge cycles and tendency to degrade in capacity over their lifetime have spurred a great deal of research into improving the technology.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Weather satellites aid search and rescue capabilitiesThe same satellites that identify severe weather can help save you from it.
17h
Popular Science

Samsung is trying to replace smart home hubs with giant TVsSamsung TV QLEDTechnology The company's QLED television lineup takes aim at controlling smart homes and displaying info. Samsung's new QLED TVs have a built-in digital assistant and…
17h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News

When fee-pressured audit offices focus on non-audit services, financial statements suffer, study shoAccording to new research from the University of Notre Dame, as companies pressure auditors to lower their fees as a way to reduce costs, auditors place greater emphasis on more-profitable non-audit services, which can negatively impact audit quality.
17h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Diverse tropical forests grow fast despite widespread phosphorus limitationEcological theory says that poor soils limit the productivity of tropical forests, but adding nutrients as fertilizer rarely increases tree growth, suggesting that productivity is not limited by nutrients after all. Researchers at the Smithsonian Tropical Research Institute (STRI) resolved this apparent contradiction, showing that phosphorus limits the growth of individual tree species but not ent
17h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Slow-release hydrogel aids immunotherapy for cancerAn immunotherapy drug embedded in a slow-release hydrogel invented at Rice University in collaboration with the University of Texas Health Science Center at Houston (UTHealth) appears to be highly effective at killing cancer cells.
17h
Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

Adult chimpanzees play more than adult lowland gorillas in captivityPlay is more frequent in captive adult chimpanzees than in captive adult lowland gorillas, according to a new study.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

Animals shield their families from a harsh worldAnimals living in volatile habitats can gain major evolutionary benefits by shielding their families from the changing environment, new research suggests. Biologists investigated an overlooked reason for widespread cooperation amongst animals. The team showed that when the environment is prone to fluctuate unexpectedly, staying at home to help raise relatives can be much better than going solo.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

Why the latest shingles vaccine is more than 90 percent effectiveA new study has shown how the body's immune system responds to the new shingles vaccine, Shingrix, making it more than 90 percent effective at protecting against the virus.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

New drugs could help prevent hearing lossResearchers have discovered that inhibiting an enzyme called cyclin-dependent kinase 2 (CDK2) protects mice and rats from noise- or drug-induced hearing loss. The study suggests that CDK2 inhibitors prevent the death of inner ear cells, which has the potential to save the hearing of millions of people around the world.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

How cats and dogs are consuming and processing parabensMany households can claim at least one four-legged friend as part of the family. But pets that primarily stay indoors can have increased rates of diseases, such as diabetes, kidney diseases and hypothyroidism compared with those that stay exclusively outside. Some scientists propose that chemical substances in the home could contribute to these illnesses.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

Why people experience seasonal skin changesA new study provides information that may help explain why many people experience eczema and dry skin in the winter.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

Icelandic program seeks to eliminate HCVA new Journal of Internal Medicine study describes an innovative program to eliminate hepatitis C virus (HCV) as a public health threat in Iceland.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

Warm showers and ball exercises may help women during childbirthA new study demonstrates that during childbirth, women may benefit from warm showers, perineal exercises with a ball, or the combination of both strategies.
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The Scientist RSS

Science Behind Hunting Quotas Unavailable: StudyA large-scale survey of wild game regulations in North America finds science-based policies lacking, and poor transparency on the part of agencies may contribute.
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The Scientist RSS

Study Finds No Neurogenesis in Adult Humans HippocampiFailure to produce evidence of neural precursor cells and immature neurons raises questions about the role of the process in learning and memory.
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Science : NPR

Sorry, Adults, No New Neurons For Your Aging BrainsThe brains of birds and mice continue to produce new nerve cells in the hippocampus throughout life. But research now suggests the human brain stops doing this around adolescence. (Image credit: Science Source/Getty Images)
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

When it comes to fuel efficiency, size matters for hummingbirdsA new U of T Scarborough study has found that when it comes to fuel efficiency, bigger is better for hummingbirds.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

NASA's Aqua Satellite finds Dumazile shearedVertical wind shear is an adversary of tropical cyclones because it can blow them apart, and NASA's Aqua satellite found wind shear pushing Tropical Cyclone Dumazile's clouds south of its center.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

Sinking land will exacerbate flooding from sea level rise in Bay AreaHazard maps use estimated sea level rise due to climate change to determine flooding risk for today's shoreline, but don't take into account that some land is sinking. A precise study of subsidence around San Francisco Bay shows that for conservative estimates of sea level rise, twice the area is in danger of flooding by 2100 than previously thought. Some landfill is sinking 10 mm per year, threat
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

Seeing is believing: Precision atom qubits achieve major quantum computing milestoneA unique approach to creating quantum bits from precisely positioned individual atoms in silicon is reaping major rewards, with scientists showing for the first time that they can make two of these atom qubits 'talk' to each other. The team has the ability to see the exact position of their qubits in the solid state.
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Viden

Stamceller giver halskræft-patienter livskvaliteten tilbageNy dansk forskning kan hjælpe tusindvis af kræftpatienter, der får spytkirtlerne ødelagt af stråleterapi.
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The Atlantic

What's at Stake as Trump Replaces Gary CohnGary Cohn, President Trump’s top economic adviser, announced Tuesday he’d be stepping down, and he used his resignation to make his point in a way that would be heard. The resignation “hit global equities, U.S. stock futures and the currencies of America’s trade partners, as many investors judged the news meant President Trump was pushing forward with tariffs,” The Wall Street Journal reported .
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Half of Scots 'not confident' in giving CPR, study findsHalf of the Scottish adult population do not feel confident administering CPR -- and more than a fifth do not know when it is required, according to a new study led by the University of Stirling.
18h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Study suggests molecular imaging strategy for determining molecular classifications of NSCLCRecent findings suggest a novel positron emission tomography (PET) imaging approach determining epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR) mutation status for improved lung cancer patient management. The findings are published in the March 7 issue of Science Translational Medicine.
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Insights into how brain cancer evades the immune systemA new study by investigators from Brigham and Women's Hospital finds that some types of glioblastoma tumors may be able to shed extracellular vesicles (EVs) -- small packages of biomaterial -- that can help to suppress the body's ability to mount an immune response against the tumor.
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Renowned cardiologist says new blood pressure guidelines not good for allOne of the nation's leading cardiologists is challenging the new hypertension guidelines, perhaps sparing up to 10 million people from unnecessarily aggressive blood pressure treatments. Houston Methodist's Dr. Robert A. Phillips and his colleagues say while patients at higher risk for cardiovascular disease benefited from the stricter guidelines, those with lower risk had more harm than benefit f
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Wildlife conservation in North America may not be science-based after allA study led by recent SFU Ph.D. alumnus Kyle Artelle has unveiled new findings that challenge the widespread assumption that wildlife management in North America is science-based. He conducted the study with SFU researchers John Reynolds and Jessica Walsh, as well as researchers from other institutions.
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Do US and Canadian governments base their hunt management plans on science?The majority of hunt management policies in the US and Canada do not include science-based approaches in their composition, a new study finds. According to the authors, the results highlight the need for management agencies to more routinely adopt and adhere to science-based approaches, thus leading to better management of natural resources.
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Sinking ground in San Francisco Bay will worsen flooding from rising sea levelsASU-led research using radar imaging to measure elevations uncovers an important gap in planning for sea level rise in the San Francisco Bay Area.
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Supplement for pregnant women with malaria could improve birth outcomesPregnant women infected with malaria have lower levels of an essential amino acid called L-arginine, which may help to explain why these women are more likely to experience complications such as stillbirths and low birth weight infants.
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Imaging agent helps predict success of lung cancer therapyDoctors contemplating the best therapy for lung cancer patients may soon be able to predict the efficacy of a widely used lung cancer drug based on an imaging agent and a simple scan, according to the findings of a new clinical trial co-led by researchers at the Stanford University School of Medicine.
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Sinking land will exacerbate flooding from sea level rise in Bay AreaHazard maps use estimated sea level rise due to climate change to determine flooding risk for today's shoreline, but don't take into account that some land is sinking. A precise study of subsidence around San Francisco Bay shows that for conservative estimates of sea level rise, twice the area is in danger of flooding by 2100 than previously thought. Some landfill is sinking 10 mm per year, threat
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Young Southern white rhinos may produce four distinct, context-dependent callsYoung Southern white rhinos may produce four distinct calls in differing behavioral contexts, according to a study published March 7, 2018 in the open-access journal PLOS ONE by Sabrina Linn and Marina Scheumann from the University of Veterinary Medicine Hannover and Serengeti-Park Hodenhagen, Germany, and colleagues.
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Adult chimpanzees play more than adult lowland gorillas in captivityPlay is more frequent in captive adult chimpanzees than in captive adult lowland gorillas, according to a study published March 7, 2018 in the open-access journal PLOS ONE by Giada Cordoni and Elisabetta Palagi from Univerity of Pisa in collaboration with Ivan Norscia from University of Turin.
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Many clinical trial status discrepancies identified between ClinicalTrials.gov and EUCTRApproximately one-sixth of clinical trials registered on both ClinicalTrials.gov and the EU Clinical Trials Register (EUCTR) have discrepancies in their completion status, according to a study published March 7, 2018 in the open-access journal PLOS ONE by Jessica Fleminger and Ben Goldacre from the University of Oxford, UK.
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Popular Science

Winter Storm Quinn is a weirdo—and it probably won't be this year's lastNexus Media News East Coasters could see more than a foot. Just days after Winter Storm Riley slammed the East Coast, another nor’easter is on its way. Winter Storm Quinn is expected to deliver heavy snowfall.
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New Scientist - News

Parts of San Francisco are sinking faster than the sea is risingRising seas are already boosting the flood risk in places like San Francisco, but the problem is even worse than that because land is also subsiding
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Big Think

Scientists restore vision in blind mice using gold and titanium nanowire arraysA new study from scientists in China suggests that medical devices could one day restore vision to the blind. Read More
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Science | The Guardian

Nasa spacecraft reveals Jupiter's interior in unprecedented detailJuno mission paints dramatic picture of the turbulence within the solar system’s largest planet Jupiter’s interior has been revealed in unprecedented detail in observations by Nasa’s Juno spacecraft that show it to be as strange and turbulent as the planet’s surface. Despite extensive studies of Jupiter’s surface, including its distinctive dark and light bands and “great red spot”, little had pre
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Feed: All Latest

Sea Level Rise in the SF Bay Area Just Got a Lot More DireSea levels are rising. But the San Francisco Bay Area has another problem: It's sinking. By 2100, it could lose 165 square miles to the sea.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Sinking ground in San Francisco Bay will worsen flooding from rising sea levelsNew research shows that sections of the San Francisco Bay shoreline are sinking at rates of nearly half an inch (10 millimeters) a year.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Wildlife conservation in North America may not be science-based after allA study led by recent SFU PhD alumnus Kyle Artelle has unveiled new findings that challenge the widespread assumption that wildlife management in North America is science-based. He conducted the study with SFU researchers John Reynolds and Jessica Walsh, as well as researchers from other institutions.
18h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Adult chimpanzees play more than adult lowland gorillas in captivityPlay is more frequent in captive adult chimpanzees than in captive adult lowland gorillas, according to a study published March 7, 2018 in the open-access journal PLOS ONE by Giada Cordoni and Elisabetta Palagi from Univerity of Pisa in collaboration with Ivan Norscia from University of Turin.
18h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Young Southern white rhinos may produce four distinct, context-dependent callsYoung Southern white rhinos may produce four distinct calls in differing behavioral contexts, according to a study published March 7, 2018 in the open-access journal PLOS ONE by Sabrina Linn and Marina Scheumann from the University of Veterinary Medicine Hannover and Serengeti-Park Hodenhagen, Germany, and colleagues.
18h
Live Science

Why Thousands of Cheerleaders Might Be at Risk for the MumpsThousands of cheerleaders who attended a national competition last month recently received some not-so-cheery news: They may have been exposed to mumps.
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Live Science

San Francisco's Airport is Sinking into the BaySinking could make flooding in the Bay Area worse than sea level rise alone would predict.
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Scientific American Content: Global

U.S. Scientists Plot Return to the Moon's SurfaceLunar researchers want to take advantage of Trump administration’s political interest -- Read more on ScientificAmerican.com
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

Feeling anxious? Blame the size of your waistline!Anxiety is one of the most common mental health disorders, and it's more likely to affect women, especially middle-aged women. Although anxiety can be caused by many factors, a new study suggests that the amount of abdominal fat a woman has could increase her chances of developing anxiety.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

Mapping a genetic riskClinicians and health researchers often look at gene mutation to predict whether a fetus is at risk for a birth defect, or a person is at risk of developing a disease, but these predictions are not always accurate. Researchers have discovered an important factor that changes our understanding of the relationship between gene mutations (genotype) and how they present in people (phenotype) that may,
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Scientific American Content: Global

Juno Peers Deep into Jupiter's Abyss to Reveal Weird WindsBreakthrough measurements of Jupiter’s hidden interior could revolutionize our understanding of giant planets -- Read more on ScientificAmerican.com
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Live Science

The Chinese Space Station Is Falling Back to Earth, But It Probably Won't Hit YouWhat do the Powerball jackpot and Tiangong-1, the Chinese space station hurtling toward Earth, have in common? It's highly unlikely that either will physically impact your life in the slightest way.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

Some teachers don't talk to anyone about violent incidentsOne in five teachers who were the victims of physical or verbal violence at their schools didn't report the incidents to school administrators, according to a nationwide study. The results showed that significant minorities of teachers who experienced violence also didn't tell their colleagues (14 percent) or family (24 percent).
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

Direct observation of topology hidden inside materialsTopology hidden inside materials in the matter group called cerium monopnictides has been determined for the first time in the world.
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The Atlantic

The Epistolary Heart of An American MarriageReading someone else’s private letters feels almost as intrusive as spying on them through their living-room window. The personalized salutation, the handwriting quirks, and the inside jokes sprinkled throughout offer a glimpse at an interior world only the recipient is meant to see. There is no performance, no act put on for third-party observers. And while perusing just one letter between two p
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The Atlantic

Hard Sun Is Almost Impressively DementedThe labyrinthine, Gordian tangle of plots, subplots, complications, and revelations crammed into the six episodes of Hard Sun include a serial killer convinced he’s God’s messenger on earth, a stoic detective whose schizophrenic son tries to kill her and set her house on fire, an ethically dubious detective who may or may not have murdered his partner, a man dying of cancer who runs a cult for pe
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Scientific American Content: Global

Nominee to Lead USGS Is Hard to ReadIn hearings, James Reilly II supports scientific integrity but sidesteps climate questions -- Read more on ScientificAmerican.com
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Popular Science

IBM wants to replace antibiotics with these big ol' synthetic moleculesHealth Researchers think the molecule might be better at keeping up with evolving bacteria. Researchers at IBM are working on a synthetic molecule that works in a novel way to attack a bacterium and kill it from the inside out.
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News

High-resolution brain imaging provides clues about memory loss in older adultsAs we get older, it's not uncommon to experience 'senior moments,' in which we forget where we parked our car or call our children by the wrong names. And we may wonder: are these memory lapses a normal part of aging, or do they signal the early stages of a severe disorder such as Alzheimer's disease? Currently, there's no good way to tell.
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News

New research discovers genetic defect linked to African Americans with heart failureHeart failure is more common, develops earlier and results in higher rates of illness and death in African Americans than in whites. Now, the first genetic study of its kind to examine the genetic basis of heart failure in African Americans, led by the University of South Florida (USF), Tampa, Fla., has identified a genetic defect linked specifically to heart failure in this population. The discov
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News

NASA's Aqua satellite finds Dumazile shearedVertical wind shear is an adversary of tropical cyclones because it can blow them apart, and NASA's Aqua satellite found wind shear pushing Tropical Cyclone Dumazile's clouds south of its center.
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News

What influences older adults' preferences for care?Until now, we haven't had a good understanding of how older adults form care preferences. To learn more about care preferences and how they might be influenced for older adults with advanced illnesses, a team of researchers from the United Kingdom searched for existing medical studies about the topic and collected the results. They published their findings in the Journal of the American Geriatrics
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Birth of new neurons in the human hippocampus ends in childhoodOne of the liveliest debates in neuroscience over the past half century surrounds whether the human brain renews itself by producing new neurons throughout life, and whether it may be possible to rejuvenate the brain by boosting its innate regenerative capacity.
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Nervous system discovery could inform stroke, pain therapiesScientists at OHSU used advanced imaging techniques to ascertain the resting state of an acid-sensing ion channel. Acid-sensing ion channels are believed to play a role in pain sensation as well as psychiatric disorders. OHSU scientists expect the basic science research will spur new research and development into therapeutic agents targeting the channel.
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Diamond discovery under pressureFor the first time, scientists have found Earth's fourth most abundant mineral -- calcium silicate perovskite -- at Earth's surface.
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Animals shield their families from a harsh worldAnimals living in volatile habitats can gain major evolutionary benefits by shielding their families from the changing environment, new research suggests.Biologists from the University of Bristol, the University of Exeter and UCL investigated an overlooked reason for widespread cooperation amongst animals. In a study published today in Nature, the team showed that when the environment is prone to
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New Scientist - News

Elon Musk wants to turn our homes into one big power plantTesla has already built a massive battery in Australia, and now plans to fit more in 50,000 homes to create the world's largest virtual power plant
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

European clocks slowed by lag in continent's power gridMillions of Europeans who arrived late to work or school Wednesday had a good excuse—an unprecedented lag in the continent's electricity grid that's slowing down some clocks.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Animals shield their families from a harsh worldAnimals living in volatile habitats can gain major evolutionary benefits by shielding their families from the changing environment, new research suggests.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Super-deep diamond provides first evidence in nature of Earth's fourth most abundant mineralFor the first time, scientists have found Earth's fourth most abundant mineral—calcium silicate perovskite—at Earth's surface.
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The Atlantic

Jupiter Will Never Stop Surprising ScientistsFor the last year and a half, the NASA spacecraft Juno has been circling Jupiter and collecting reams of data. Juno spends most of its time a good distance away from Jupiter, safe from the worst of the planet’s intense radiation belts. But once every orbit, the spacecraft comes swooping toward Jupiter and directs its instruments—protected by 400 pounds of titanium—toward the perpetually stormy cl
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The Atlantic

Do Adult Brains Make New Neurons? A Contentious New Study Says NoIn 1928, Santiago Ramón y Cajal, the father of modern neuroscience, proclaimed that the brains of adult humans never make new neurons. “Once development was ended,” he wrote, “the founts of growth and regeneration ... dried up irrevocably. In the adult centers the nerve paths are something fixed, ended and immutable. Everything must die, nothing may be regenerated.” Ninety years later, it’s still
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The Atlantic

Trump Barely Has Anyone to Talk to North KoreaNorth Korean US SouthUpdated at 5:46 p.m. ET There is no U.S. ambassador to South Korea. The U.S. diplomat in charge of negotiations with North Korea recently quit—and no replacement has yet been named. The State Department official in charge of East Asian affairs is a career diplomat who is serving in an acting capacity. So if North Korea does end up talking with the U.S., as the South says it’s offered to, whom exa
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Science | The Guardian

Sergei Skripal case: what do nerve agents do and how hard are they to make?The ingredients for the lethal substances apparently involved in the poisoning of Sergei Skripal are easy to obtain and are usually absorbed quickly through the skin or inhalation After days of analysis, police investigators announced on Wednesday that they believe a nerve agent was used to poison former Russian agent Sergei Skripal and his daughter on Sunday, raising questions of how it was crea
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Latest Headlines | Science News

4 surprising things we just learned about JupiterPolar cyclones, surprisingly deep atmosphere and a fluid mass spinning as a rigid body are among the latest discoveries at Jupiter.
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Mapping battery materials with atomic precisionAn international team led by researchers at Berkeley Lab used advanced techniques in electron microscopy to show how the ratio of materials that make up a lithium-ion battery electrode affects its structure at the atomic level, and how the surface is very different from the rest of the material.
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Treating hypothyroidism to stop a stubborn surgical complicationFor the first time, researchers have linked radiation-damaged thyroid glands to poor surgical outcomes. The solution may be as simple as a common hormone supplement.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Airbus to axe 3,700 jobs in EuropeAircraft giant Airbus is to axe around 3,700 jobs in Europe as it cuts back production of its troubled A380 superjumbo and A400M military transporter, the company and union officials said Wednesday.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Researcher: New forensic analysis indicates bones were Amelia Earhart'sBone measurement analysis indicates that the remains found on a remote island in the South Pacific were likely those of legendary American pilot Amelia Earhart, according to a UT researcher.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

More realistic and accurate organs-on-chipsIn a step toward better diagnosis and treatment of digestive conditions, such as inflammatory bowel disease, scientists report in ACS Biomaterials & Engineering that they have developed a first-of-its-kind collagen-based membrane for use in microchips. The membrane is more natural than others that are available, and it could allow organs-on-chips to more accurately replicate how healthy intestinal
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Live Science

Behemoth Snowstorm Watched by Satellites As It Hits US NortheastA powerful nor'easter is expected to dump more than a foot of snow in some regions of the U.S. northeast today (March 7) and satellites are tracking the snowstorm from space.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Taming biofuel-loving microbesMost people are cautious around gasoline and diesel for good reason, but some microbes love the stuff—especially biofuels that contain fatty acid derivatives. So, as the world tries to go "green," it also has to consider the slime that such microbes leave behind, clogging up equipment and killing engines. An article in Chemical & Engineering News (C&EN), the weekly newsmagazine of the American Che
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Super sniffer: Dog's nose inspires new gas sensor materialsIt is well known that dogs have a better sense of smell than humans. For years, researchers have been trying to develop an artificial detector that is just as good as a canine's nose. Now, one group reports in ACS Nano that they were able to mimic a dog's sniffer with graphene-based nanoscrolls.
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Slow-release hydrogel aids immunotherapy for cancerAn immunotherapy drug embedded in a slow-release hydrogel invented at Rice University in collaboration with the University of Texas Health Science Center at Houston appears to be highly effective at killing cancer cells.
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Two new species of stone centipedes found hiding in larch forests in ChinaScientists described two species of previously unknown stone centipedes from China. Now housed at the Hengshui University, China, the studied specimens were all collected in the leaf litter or under rocks in larch forests. The research is published in the open access journal ZooKeys.
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News

We're not addicted to smartphones, we're addicted to social interactionMobile-device habits may not be anti-social, but rather hyper-social -- stemming from a healthy human need to socialize. This is the finding of a new review of the dysfunctional use of smart technology, which concludes that the most addictive smartphone functions all share a common theme: they tap into the human desire to connect with other people.
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News

New study takes the guesswork out of selecting and seeding teams for 'March Madness'New research has developed an automated approach for narrowing down and ranking the field of Division 1 college basketball teams from 351 to the 68 that would play in the annual 'March Madness' basketball tournaments, watched by more than 80 million people each year.
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Software aims to reduce food waste by helping those in needAn Iowa State University research team is testing a new online tool to provide food to those in need by reducing food waste.
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Tropical birds live longer than temperate counterpartsAn international research team has found strong evidence that passerine birds near the equator live longer than their higher latitude counterparts.
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Non-smokers with oral precancerous lesions at increased risk of cancerAlthough tobacco use is still one of the strongest risk factors associated with mouth cancers, precancerous lesions in the mouths of non-smokers are more likely to progress to cancer than those in smokers, new research from the University of British Columbia has found.
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News

NASA finds heavy rain in new Tropical Cyclone Hola near VanuatuNASA obtained rainfall data on newly formed Tropical Cyclone Hola as it triggered warnings in Vanuatu in the South Pacific Ocean.On March 6, 2018 at 3:25 a.m. EST (0825 UTC) the GPM or Global Precipitation Measurement mission core observatory satellite flew above a forming tropical cyclone in the southern Pacific Ocean just east of Vanuatu.
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New on MIT Technology Review

A new tool helps us understand what an AI is actually thinking
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

Estimates overstated for Mongolian rangelands damaged by livestockAn estimated 70 percent of the rangelands in Mongolia are damaged by livestock and unregulated land use. But new research found less irreversible damage -- up to 10 percent at most -- from livestock in Mongolia's rangelands.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

Double disinfection treatment for safer drinking waterIn spite of good progress in water hygiene during the recent decades, contaminated water still causes millions of diseases every year. Most of these diseases are caused by enteric viruses, and better water disinfection methods could help prevent discomfort and even save lives. A new study shows that a combined disinfection treatment with chlorine and UV radiation can be highly effective in water d
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

A global conflict: agricultural production vs. biodiversitySmart land-use planning could ease the conflict between agricultural production and nature conservation. A team of researchers has integrated global datasets on the geographical distributions and ecological requirements of thousands of animal species with detailed information on the production of the world ’s major agricultural crops.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

Graphene promise for more efficient fertilizersFertilizers with lower environmental impacts and reduced costs for farmers are being developed by researchers in the world-first use of the new advanced material graphene as a fertilizer carrier.
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NYT > Science

Forests Protect the Climate. A Future With More Storms Would Mean Trouble.With an increase in extreme weather expected in the years to come, forests could be changed permanently as the world continues to warm.
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Instability of wildlife trade does not encourage trappers to conserve natural habitatsThe collection of wildlife for trade is unreliable and financially risky, thus limiting opportunities to incentivise biodiversity conservation at a local level, according to research by the University of Kent.
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Bundled payments for hip/knee surgeries appears to work better for higher-volume hospitalsMedicare's experimental mandatory bundled payment model for knee and hip replacements is more likely to yield cost savings when the surgeries are performed in larger hospitals that do more of these procedures, according to a new study. The study, published this week in JAMA, could influence the U.S. government's Centers for Medicare and Medicaid Services (CMS) in their eventual determination of ho
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News

When sepsis patients face brain impairment, is gut bacteria to blame?Halting the voyage of gut bacteria to the brain could help prevent harmful brain inflammation after a sepsis infection, a new study shows.
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News

When it comes to fuel efficiency, size matters for hummingbirdsNew research finds that larger hummingbirds show better mechanochemical efficiency -- the first time this has been observed in birds.
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Discovery fills gap in search for better treatments for Ebola, other virusesUniversity of Alberta researchers have found the Ebola polymerase (enzyme), which may lead to more effective research and better treatments for the often fatal infection, and other related viral diseases.
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News

New prostate cancer risk model could better guide treatmentA new model developed by Michigan Medicine researchers could change treatment guidelines for nearly two-thirds of men with localized prostate cancer.
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News

The brain's immune system may be key to new Alzheimer's treatmentsIn two new published studies, researchers have revealed how TREM2, a receptor found on immune cells in the brain, interacts with toxic amyloid beta proteins to restore neurological function. The research suggests boosting TREM2 levels in the brain may prevent or reduce the severity of neurodegenerative disorders including Alzheimer's disease.
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News

High-resolution brain imaging provides clues about memory loss in older adultsAs we get older, it's not uncommon to experience 'senior moments.' But currently, it's difficult to determine which memory lapses are normal parts of aging and which may signal the early stages of a severe disorder like Alzheimer's disease. In a study appearing March 7 in the journal Neuron, researchers report that high-resolution functional brain imaging can be used to show some of the underlying
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

New forensic analysis indicates bones were Amelia Earhart'sBone measurement analysis indicates that the remains found on a remote island in the South Pacific were likely those of legendary American pilot Amelia Earhart, according to new research.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

Smart glass made better, and cheaperNew 'smart glass' technology could make curtains and blinds obsolete and provide an instant toggle between light and dark for windshields and roof panes. While this isn't the first 'smart glass' ever developed, it is about one-tenth the price of other versions and more transparent in its transparent state and more reflective in its reflective state than competitors.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

The brain's internal clock continually takes its temperatureCircuits in the brain act as an internal clock to tell us it is time to sleep and to control how long we then stay asleep. A new study in flies suggests a part of that clock constantly monitors changes in external temperature and integrates that information into the neural network controlling sleep.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

New insights could pave the way for self-powered low energy devicesResearchers have discovered more details about the way certain materials hold a static charge even after two surfaces separate, information that could help improve devices that leverage such energy as a power source.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

Why rare plants are rareRare plant species suffer more from disease than commoner species. The fact that rare species are more susceptible to attack by micro-organisms living in the soil, such as fungi and bacteria, may in fact be one of the reasons they are rare. Biologists have been trying to work out why some species are rare, while others are common, since Darwin's time and a new study provides a possible answer.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

With a TENG, solar cells could work come rain or shineDespite the numerous advances in solar cells, one thing remains constant: cloudy, rainy conditions put a damper on the amount of electricity created. Now researchers reporting in the journal ACS Nano have developed hybrid solar cells that can generate power from raindrops.
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Quanta Magazine

Oxygen and Stem Cells May Have Reshaped Early Complex AnimalsWhen Emma Hammarlund of Lund University in Sweden first reached out to her colleague Sven Påhlman for help with her research, he was skeptical he’d have much insight to offer. He was a tumor biologist, after all, and she was a geobiologist, someone who studied the interplay between living organisms and their environment. Påhlman didn’t see how his work could possibly inform her search for answers
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The Atlantic

Drone Swarms Are Going to Be Terrifying and Hard to StopAs regular people purchase more drones, the small, unmanned aerial systems keep dropping in price and growing in capability. Once expensive, underpowered, remotely piloted toys with blink-of-an-eye battery life, consumer drones can now operate far more independently and for longer periods of time. They are nothing like the heavily armed fixed-wing drones such as the Reaper, which American forces
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The Atlantic

The NASCAR Driver Who Made HistoryNASCAR driver Wendell Scott began his career in the South during the Jim Crow era in 1952. His son and grandson remember what it was like for Wendell as one of the first African-American drivers in NASCAR. They describe him as exceptionally talented and driven, “like Picasso—a great artist doing his work.” Despite receiving death threats and having first-place accolades consistently stripped due
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Some teachers don't talk to anyone about violent incidentsOne in five teachers who were the victims of physical or verbal violence at their schools didn't report the incidents to school administrators, according to a nationwide study. The results showed that significant minorities of teachers who experienced violence also didn't tell their colleagues (14 percent) or family (24 percent).
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Weather satellites aid search and rescue capabilitiesThe same satellites that identify severe weather can help save you from it. NOAA's GOES series satellites carry a payload supported by NASA's Search and Rescue (SAR) office, which researches and develops technologies to help first responders locate people in distress worldwide, whether from a plane crash, a boating accident or other emergencies.
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Smart glass made better, and cheaperNew 'smart glass' technology developed at the University of Delaware could make curtains and blinds obsolete and provide an instant toggle between light and dark for windshields and roof panes. While this isn't the first 'smart glass' ever developed, it is about one-tenth the price of other versions and more transparent in its transparent state and more reflective in its reflective state than comp
20h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Marker involved in lymphatic system connected to heart failureResearchers at Lund University in Sweden have found a new marker in the blood that is associated with an increased risk of heart failure. Surprisingly, the marker is not directly involved in how the heart functions, unlike most of the previously known markers. Instead, the new marker affects processes in the lymphatic system.
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Scientific American Content: Global

Surprise Graphene Discovery Could Unlock Secrets of SuperconductivityPhysicists make misaligned sheets of the carbon material conduct electricity without resistance -- Read more on ScientificAmerican.com
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Scientific American Content: Global

China's Power MoveReading between the (transmission) lines on Beijing’s global infrastructure projects -- Read more on ScientificAmerican.com
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

EU women earn 16 percent less than men: EurostatWomen in the European Union earned an average of 16 percent less than their male peers in 2016, official statistics agency Eurostat said Wednesday.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Wildfires set to increase: Could we be sitting on a tinderbox in Europe?2017 was one of the worst years on record for fires in Europe, with over 800,000 hectares of land burnt in Portugal, Italy and Spain alone.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

How cats and dogs are consuming and processing parabensMany households can claim at least one four-legged friend as part of the family. But pets that primarily stay indoors can have increased rates of diseases, such as diabetes, kidney diseases and hypothyroidism compared with those that stay exclusively outside. Some scientists propose that chemical substances in the home could contribute to these illnesses. One group has examined how pets could be e
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Nobel-winning ICAN condemns surge in nuclear arms investmentsGlobal nuclear tensions helped boost investments in atomic weapons production by around $81 billion last year, campaigners said Wednesday, urging investors to blacklist the companies that stock the world's nuclear arsenals.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

One-month worth of memory training results in 30 minutesA significant part of working memory training effects is a result of a fast development of task-specific strategies during training, rather than an increase in working memory capacity.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

Determining the cause of difficult-to-control mitochondrial diseasesA research group has discovered that the 'non-essential' amino acid taurine is important for protein translation in mitochondria and is involved in mitochondrial disease development. The group also discovered that a taurine-conjugated compound was able to ameliorate the symptoms of mitochondrial dysfunction through taurine-deficiency.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

Signaling pathway involving the Golgi apparatus identified in cells with Huntington's diseaseWorking with cells grown in the lab, researchers have identified a biochemical pathway that allows a structure within cells, called the Golgi apparatus, to combat stress caused by free radicals and oxidants. The research team showed that this pathway can be activated by a drug called monensin, which is commonly used as an antibiotic in animal feed.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

Yes! The brain can be trained to avoid dyslexia, study suggestsThe ability of the brain to synchronize with the tone and intonation of speech influences how language is processed. Study results could help design more effective activities to train the brain in order to avoid future disorders such as dyslexia. Over the years, several neuro-scientific studies have shown that the auditory regions of the brain synchronize with external auditory stimuli. That is to
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The Atlantic

The Ripple Effect of the West Virginia Teachers' VictoryWest Virginia lawmakers at last reached a deal on Tuesday to raise teachers’ salaries by 5 percent. The agreement—along with the prospect of policy solutions to the educators’ other demands—brought to a close a teachers’ strike that had kept K–12 classrooms across all the state’s 55 counties closed for nine school days. Even though the West Virginia walkout is over, however, observers suspect tha
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Flying cars eye takeoff at Geneva Motor ShowAfter gracing our screens for decades, flying cars are about to shift gears from dream to reality, with the unveiling of a commercial model in Geneva this week.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Another snowstorm hits the Northeast, threatens more outagesThe second big, blustery storm to hit the Northeast in less than a week began bringing wet, heavy snow Wednesday to a corner of the country where tens of thousands of people were still waiting for the power to come back on from the first bout of wintry weather.
20h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

'Explosive' eruptions at Japan volcanoPowerful eruptions at a volcano in southern Japan spewed ash thousands of metres into the air Wednesday, as authorities warned locals not to approach the mountain.
20h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Zuckerberg, Chan give $30M to Harvard and MIT for literacyFacebook founder Mark Zuckerberg and his wife, Priscilla Chan, are giving Harvard University and the Massachusetts Institute of Technology $30 million to help improve the literacy skills of elementary school students across the nation.
20h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Researcher: New forensic analysis indicates bones were Amelia Earhart'sBone measurement analysis indicates that the remains found on a remote island in the South Pacific were likely those of legendary American pilot Amelia Earhart, according to a UT researcher.
20h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Taming biofuel-loving microbesMost people are cautious around gasoline and diesel for good reason, but some microbes love the stuff -- especially biofuels that contain fatty acid derivatives. So, as the world tries to go 'green,' it also has to consider the slime that such microbes leave behind, clogging up equipment and killing engines. An article in Chemical & Engineering News (C&EN), the weekly newsmagazine of the American
20h
Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

Parents’ lives made more miserable by the ‘boomerang generation’ returning homeAdult children who return to live with their parents, the so-called ‘boomerang generation’, cause a significant decline in parents’ quality of life and well-being, according to new research.
20h
Ingeniøren

Ny undersøgelse: Ingen klar sammenhæng mellem vindmøllestøj og hjertesygdomLænge ventet delundersøgelse af helbredseffekter af vindmøllestøj finder ikke afgørende bevis for sammenhæng mellem vindmøllestøj i en kort periode og blodprop i hjertet eller slagtilfælde, men antyder problemer med lavfrekvent støj om natten.
21h
New on MIT Technology Review

Most Americans are already using AI
21h
New Scientist - News

Allow lesbians to use ‘three-parent’ baby IVF to have childrenMitochondrial replacement techniques should be used to help same-sex female couples have children genetically-related to both partners, says Alex Pearlman
21h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News

New insights could pave the way for self-powered low energy devicesResearchers have discovered more details about the way certain materials hold a static charge even after two surfaces separate, information that could help improve devices that leverage such energy as a power source.
21h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News

More realistic and accurate organs-on-chipsIn a step toward better diagnosis and treatment of digestive conditions, such as inflammatory bowel disease, scientists report in ACS Biomaterials & Engineering that they have developed a first-of-its-kind collagen-based membrane for use in microchips. The membrane is more natural than others that are available, and it could allow organs-on-chips to more accurately replicate how healthy intestinal
21h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News

On the immortality of stem cellsStem cells are considered to be immortal in culture and, therefore, of great interest for aging research. This immortality is regulated by increased proteostasis, which controls the quality of proteins. A team of researchers led by David Vilchez of the Cluster of Excellence CECAD at the University of Cologne found a link between increased proteostasis and immortality of human embryonic stem cells.
21h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Creating complex molecules in just a few stepsResearchers have found a way to convert single bonds between carbon and hydrogen atoms in a chemical molecule into carbon-carbon bonds. This so-called C-H activation is considered a promising strategy for producing complex molecules from simple starting materials in just a few steps. The main problem so far had been the specific conversion of individual bonds. The researchers have now succeeded in
21h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Study draws links between physical characteristics, like age and body mass index, and brain healthMount Sinai researchers have shown, for the first time, the complex web of links between physical and behavioral characteristics, like age, body mass index (BMI), and substance use, and specific patterns of brain structure and function in patients with psychosis. The study is important because many of these characteristics can be targeted clinically to improve brain health in these patients.
21h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Racial differences in age at breast cancer diagnosis challenges use of single age-based screening guidelinesAmong women in the US diagnosed with breast cancer, a higher proportion of nonwhite patients were diagnosed at younger than 50 years of age compared to white patients, suggesting that age-based screening guidelines that do not account for race may result in underscreening of nonwhite women.
21h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News

CHOP urologist and colleagues address unmet global burden of surgical disease in IndiaAseem R. Shukla, M.D., a pediatric urologist at Children's Hospital of Philadelphia, along with several of his colleagues from around the world, have created an innovative program to help address urological needs in India. The team is specifically addressing bladder exstrophy, a complex, rare disorder that occurs during fetal development when the bladder does not form completely and drains onto th
21h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Breast cancer screening guidelines may lead to delayed diagnosis in nonwhite womenThe current guidelines for mammographic breast cancer screening, which are based on data from primarily white populations, may lead to delayed diagnosis in nonwhite women, according to a report from Massachusetts General Hospital investigators.
21h
Science | The Guardian

Britons in favour of editing genes to correct inherited diseasesBut designer babies, micro-pigs and fluorescent carrots get the thumbs-down, Royal Society survey finds Britons are broadly in favour of rewriting the genetic code of human embryos to prevent children from inheriting devastating diseases – but draw the line at designer babies and creating “cosmetic” organisms such as micro-pigs, fluorescent fish and perfect carrots. The views were revealed in one
21h
Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

Staying clean keeps seafish smart"Vet" service provided by smaller fish is key to keeping coral reefs healthy, a new study finds.
21h
Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

On the immortality of stem cellsStem cells are considered to be immortal in culture and, therefore, of great interest for aging research. This immortality is regulated by increased proteostasis, which controls the quality of proteins. A team of researchers found a link between increased proteostasis and immortality of human embryonic stem cells.
21h
Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

Creating complex molecules in just a few stepsResearchers have found a way to convert single bonds between carbon and hydrogen atoms in a chemical molecule into carbon-carbon bonds. This so-called C-H activation is considered a promising strategy for producing complex molecules from simple starting materials in just a few steps. The main problem so far had been the specific conversion of individual bonds. The researchers have now succeeded in
21h
Popular Science

People used to drill holes in their skulls, and we're still not sure whyScience Myths about migraines have been greatly exaggerated. Recent authors have acknowledged there is little evidence to suggest that trepanning was meant to cure headaches. So where did this persistent idea come from?
21h
New Scientist - News

23andMe’s breast cancer test may create false sense of securityGenomics firm 23andMe is the first to receive approval for direct-to-consumer cancer gene tests in the US, but will recipients misunderstand the results?
21h
Feed: All Latest

New Food Preservation Technology Means No Need to RefrigerateScientists are experimenting with everything from microwave sterilization to blasts of plasma to ensure food stays appetizing longer.
21h
Live Science

Google Wants to Make Military Spy Drones Even SmarterGoogle has partnered with the military to enhance surveillance drone software.
21h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Estimates overstated for Mongolian rangelands damaged by livestockLivestock and wildlife graze on rangelands, grasslands, savannas and marshes that cover 45 percent of Earth's land surface. Damage or degradation on these lands is a major concern globally, and the subject of widespread scientific study in countries including Mongolia.
21h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Want to predict March Madness? New method identifies key statistics, outperforms others in accuracyUniversity of Illinois researchers have developed a method using causal inference for predicting upsets in the NCAA Men's Basketball Tournament that outperforms many other techniques. In addition to improved accuracy, the method stands out because it relies on publicly available data, making it reproducible and more accessible for others to use.
21h
Futurity.org

Software to make it easier to donate extra foodA new software prototype called eFeed-Hungers makes it easier to donate extra food, which might otherwise go to waste. Sugam Sharma remembers as a child listening to his parents talk about hunger. While his family always had enough to eat, hunger was prevalent and something he regularly witnessed growing up and as a young adult in India. “There is no scarcity of food. We see this as a way to take
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Science : NPR

Life Hacking Life: The Scary Premise Of 'Annihilation'As with Ex Machina , says Marcelo Gleiser, director Alex Garland is sending a warning: We are now hacking life itself and will continue to do so with growing efficiency. Are we creating our own doom? (Image credit: Paramount Pictures)
21h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Signaling pathway involving the Golgi apparatus identified in cells with Huntington's diseaseWorking with cells grown in the lab, Johns Hopkins researchers have identified a biochemical pathway that allows a structure within cells, called the Golgi apparatus, to combat stress caused by free radicals and oxidants. The research team showed that this pathway can be activated by a drug called monensin, which is commonly used as an antibiotic in animal feed.
21h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News

The brain's internal clock continually takes its temperatureCircuits in the brain act as an internal clock to tell us it is time to sleep and to control how long we then stay asleep. A new study in flies suggests a part of that clock constantly monitors changes in external temperature and integrates that information into the neural network controlling sleep. The study was published in Nature and was supported by the National Institute of Neurological Disor
21h
TED Talks Daily (SD video)

How shocking events can spark positive change | Naomi KleinThings are pretty shocking out there right now -- record-breaking storms, deadly terror attacks, thousands of migrants disappearing beneath the waves and openly supremacist movements rising. Are we responding with the urgency that these overlapping crises demand from us? Journalist and activist Naomi Klein studies how governments use large-scale shocks to push societies backward. She shares a few
21h
New Scientist - News

People with Tourette’s may find it easier to pick up new skillsPeople with Tourette’s syndrome are better at learning tasks unconsciously – an ability that may make it easier for them to learn a second language or to drive
21h
New Scientist - News

Smart toys predict which pups will make the best guide dogsIs your dog tough enough? As 60 per cent of all guide dogs fail guide dog training, smart toys that predict which ones will can save time and money
21h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Gyroscopic spin with petunia seeds helps them fly fartherA team of researchers from Pomona College and the Rancho Santa Ana Botanic Garden has figured out how a wild petunia plant is able to fling its seeds so far. In their paper published in the Journal of the Royal Society Interface, the team outlines their study of the plant and its seeds and what they found.
21h
Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

Teen gamers have as many friends as non-gamersYoung digital gamers do not have fewer friends at school than their non-gamer peers, two new research articles from indicate.
21h
Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

Desertification and monsoon climate change linked to shifts in ice volume and sea levelThe East Asian summer monsoon and desertification in Eurasia is driven by fluctuating Northern Hemisphere ice volume and global sea level during the Ice Age, as shown in a new study. Today, two thirds of the world’s population is dependent on agriculture sustained by rains of the East Asian summer monsoon, and future climate change in this region can therefore have a major impact on global food pr
21h
Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

Scientists help robots understand humans with 20 questions game ideaInformation scientists have borrowed from the popular game "20 Questions," to make an important step towards helping robots maintain continuous and purposeful conversation with humans. They have developed an optimal strategy for asking a series of yes/no questions that rapidly achieves the best answer.
21h
Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

Depression, anxiety high in graduate students, survey showsGraduate students are more than six times as likely to experience depression and anxiety as compared to the general population, according to a comprehensive survey of 2,279 individuals conducted via social media and direct email.
21h
Latest Headlines | Science News

This baby bird fossil gives a rare look at ancient avian developmentA 127 million-year-old fossil of a baby bird suggests diversity in how a group of extinct birds grew.
21h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Cosmic bow shocksImagine an object moving at super-sonic speed. This object, as it moves through a medium, causes the material in the medium to pile up, compress, and heat up. The result is a type of shock wave, known as a bow shock.
21h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News

With a TENG, solar cells could work come rain or shineDespite the numerous advances in solar cells, one thing remains constant: cloudy, rainy conditions put a damper on the amount of electricity created. Now researchers reporting in the journal ACS Nano have developed hybrid solar cells that can generate power from raindrops.
21h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Wildfires set to increase: Could we be sitting on a tinderbox in Europe?Scientists at the Joint Research Centre, the European Commission's science and knowledge service, modelled fire danger for several weather and climate scenarios in Europe up to the year 2100.
21h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News

One-month worth of memory training results in 30 minutesA significant part of working memory training effects is a result of a fast development of task-specific strategies during training, rather than an increase in working memory capacity.
21h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Desertification and monsoon climate change linked to shifts in ice volume and sea levelThe East Asian summer monsoon and desertification in Eurasia is driven by fluctuating Northern Hemisphere ice volume and global sea level during the Ice Age, as shown in a study published in Nature Communications. Today, two thirds of the world's population is dependent on agriculture sustained by rains of the East Asian summer monsoon, and future climate change in this region can therefore have a
21h
Futurity.org

Did reality TV win Trump the election?New research examines how television viewers’ parasocial bonds with Donald Trump,, formed through watching his reality TV shows The Apprentice and The Celebrity Apprentice , contributed to his being elected President of the United States. While many factors account for Donald Trump’s 2016 presidential election victory, Americans would be doing a disservice to their understanding of the country’s
21h
New on MIT Technology Review

GE hopes giant grid batteries can save the planet (and its fortunes)
21h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Homo naledi had wear-resistant molarsHomo naledi's relatively taller and more wear resistant molars enabled it to have a much more abrasive diet than other South African hominins. This is the result of a recent study by researchers from the Max Planck Institute for Evolutionary Anthropology in Leipzig, the University of Durham in the United Kingdom and the University of Arkansas in the United States. The researchers conclude that Hom
21h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Double disinfection treatment for safer drinking waterIn spite of good progress in water hygiene during the recent decades, contaminated water still causes millions of diseases every year. Most of these diseases are caused by enteric viruses, and better water disinfection methods could help prevent discomfort and even save lives. A new study from the University of Eastern Finland shows that a combined disinfection treatment with chlorine and UV radia
21h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Creating complex molecules in just a few stepsResearchers have found a way to convert single bonds between carbon and hydrogen atoms in a chemical molecule into carbon-carbon bonds. This so-called C-H activation is considered a promising strategy for producing complex molecules from simple starting materials in just a few steps. The main problem so far had been the specific conversion of individual bonds. The researchers have now succeeded in
21h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Researchers discover evidence of earthquakes that affected Chilean coast in the past 9,000 yearsA scientific team has discovered the geological footprint of earthquakes and tsunamis that affected the Aysén region (southern Chile) up to 9,000 years ago. This new study improves the assessment of seismic hazard in a wide area of the American continent prone to large earthquakes.
21h
Ingeniøren

Alle offentligt ansatte IDA-medlemmer risikerer lockoutÉn efter én har arbejdsgiverne i staten, regionerne og kommunerne i dag udsendt lockoutvarsel til deres medarbejdere som modsvar til sidste uges strejkevarsel. Både lønmodtagere og arbejdsgivere bedyrer, at de ikke ønsker konflikt.
21h
Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

Ant raids: It’s all in the genesCertain ants attack and enslave other species, and integrate their offspring into their own colonies in order to survive. Researchers have recently discovered that the raids required to achieve this are controlled by different genes in each of several closely related ant species of the genus Temnothorax. This indicates that the evolution of closely related species through changes in the genetic ma
21h
Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

ALMA reveals inner web of stellar nurseryNew data from the Atacama Large Millimeter/submillimeter Array (ALMA) and other telescopes have been used to create this stunning image showing a web of filaments in the Orion Nebula. These features appear red-hot and fiery in this dramatic picture, but in reality are so cold that astronomers must use telescopes like ALMA to observe them.
21h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

On the immortality of stem cellsStem cells are considered to be immortal in culture and, therefore, of great interest for aging research. This immortality is regulated by increased proteostasis, which controls the quality of proteins. A team of researchers led by David Vilchez of the Cluster of Excellence CECAD at the University of Cologne found a link between increased proteostasis and immortality of human embryonic stem cells.
21h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Desertification and monsoon climate change linked to shifts in ice volume and sea levelThe East Asian summer monsoon and desertification in Eurasia is driven by fluctuating Northern Hemisphere ice volume and global sea level during the Ice Age, as shown in a study published in Nature Communications. Today, two thirds of the world's population is dependent on agriculture sustained by rains of the East Asian summer monsoon, and future climate change in this region can therefore have a
21h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Teen gamers have as many friends as non-gamersYoung digital gamers do not have fewer friends at school than their non-gamer peers, two new research articles from Uppsala University indicate.
21h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Study debunks myth that some nations are happier than othersA new study from The Australian National University (ANU) has challenged the notion that some nations' citizens are happier than others, finding that inequalities within nations have a greater influence on people's happiness.
22h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Solar-powered project prints sanitation solution to plastics problemSolar powered 3-D printers designed to repurpose ubiquitous plastic rubbish and help improve access to clean water supply have been successfully trialled in the Solomon Islands.
22h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

New view on electron interactions in grapheneElectrons in graphene—an atomically thin, flexible and incredibly strong substance that has captured the imagination of materials scientists and physicists alike—move at the speed of light, and behave like they have no mass. Now, scientists at Washington University in St. Louis have demonstrated how to view many-particle interactions in graphene using infrared light. The research will be presented
22h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Improved X-ray computed tomography for quality control of advanced manufactured partsA consequence of advanced manufacturing technologies is that some internal structures tend to be inaccessible and so quality control is necessarily destructive. This is clearly problematic for high-added value products, where customers nonetheless expect reliability and certified quality. Computed tomography (CT) has been heralded as an answer, making visible as it does internal structures and mor
22h
The Atlantic

Conservatives Have Only Themselves to Blame for Trump's TariffsConservatives in Congress have roundly condemned President Trump for calling for steep across-the-board steel and aluminum tariffs. Gary Cohn has resigned as his top economic adviser, in part, it seems , because he is so appalled by the move. And I get it. Trump’s tariffs are unlikely to do much good, as any benefit to domestic steel and aluminum producers is likely to be greatly outweighed by th
22h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News

A global conflict: Agricultural production vs. biodiversitySmart land-use planning could ease the conflict between agricultural production and nature conservation. A team of researchers from the University of Göttingen, the German Centre for Integrative Biodiversity Research (iDiv), the UFZ and the University of Münster integrated global datasets on the geographical distributions and ecological requirements of thousands of animal species with detailed inf
22h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News

MIPT physicists tune a spin diodePhysics modeled a spin diode, placing the device between two kinds of antiferromagnetic materials. Turning those antiferromagnets layers changes the resistance and resonant frequency of sandwich.
22h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News

New molecular target could help ease asthmaResearchers at UC Davis Health and Albany Medical College have shown that the protein vascular endothelial growth factor A -- or VEGFA -- plays a major role in the inflammation and airway obstruction associated with asthma. The finding may eventually lead to new asthma treatments targeting VEGFA.
22h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Taking near-Earth space research to the next level with Arctic phased array radarsWith the unprecedented promise that the EU-supported EISCAT3D radar infrastructure holds for investigation into near-earth space phenomena, system accuracy and efficiency is paramount. The recently closed EISCAT3D_PfP project successfully demonstrated the viability of the initiative, launching it into the implementation phase.
22h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Programmable multicore optical fibres set to keep movies and music streaming into late 2020sThe volume of data traffic traversing the world's optical fibre networks is growing by more than 40 percent per year as data-hungry services like streaming audio and video become ever more popular. So that future networks have the capacity to cope with this ever-swelling traffic, and also handle emerging applications that will boost it still more—from connected cars to mobile HD video and the Inte
22h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Physicists observe long-sought nanoscale phenomenonPreparing the perfect nanoscale sandwich from oxygen-based ingredients was no picnic.
22h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Ice-age echoes affect present-day sea levelA new study has, for the first time, cut a clear path through a nettlesome problem: accurately measuring a powerful effect on global sea level that lingers from the last ice age.
22h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Making climate models open source makes them even more usefulDesigning climate experiments is all but impossible in the real world. We can't, for instance, study the effects of clouds by taking away all the clouds for a set period of time and seeing what happens.
22h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Unique gene expression patterns underlying ant slavemaker raiding and host defensive phenotypesCertain ants attack and enslave other species, and integrate their offspring into their own colonies in order to survive. Researchers at the Senckenberg Nature Research Society and the Johannes-Gutenberg University Mainz have recently discovered that the raids required to achieve this are controlled by different genes in each of several closely related ant species of the genus Temnothorax. This in
22h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Keeping ocean currents from carrying disease to farmed salmonCurrents in the ocean and fjords spread viruses that are killing large numbers of farmed salmon. Where should fish farms be built? And should they all be in use at the same time? Norwegian researchers are using computer modelling to figure out how best to site farms to protect fish and the coastline.
22h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Will water ever be worth more than oil?Nature has declared that the world's supply of water is fixed. As a means of keeping humanity alive, it has no substitute.
22h
The Atlantic

Letting the Korean Breakthrough Run Its CourseNorth Korean US SouthAfter dramatic diplomatic maneuvers by South Korea and an unexpectedly warm response from North Korea, the United States finds itself in a position that many thought would never come again: planning for a discussion with Kim Jong Un that includes denuclearization. Yesterday, a delegation of special envoys from Seoul agreed to hold working-level consultations with Pyongyang in late April, establis
22h
Science : NPR

21 Tech Companies Band Together Against Wildlife TraffickingThe effort involves tech leaders such as Alibaba, Baidu, eBay, Facebook and Instagram who have pledged to try to reduce trafficking across their platforms by 80 percent by 2020. (Image credit: Sia Kambou/AFP/Getty Images)
22h
Big Think

Does fat acceptance mean we're giving up?More overweight people are no longer trying to lose weight and the health implications are not good. Read More
22h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Estimates overstated for Mongolian rangelands damaged by livestockAn estimated 70 percent of the rangelands in Mongolia are damaged by livestock and unregulated land use. But new research found less irreversible damage -- up to 10 percent at most -- from livestock in Mongolia's rangelands.
22h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Determining the cause of difficult-to-control mitochondrial diseasesA Japanese research group has discovered that the 'non-essential' amino acid taurine is important for protein translation in mitochondria and is involved in mitochondrial disease development. The group also discovered that a taurine-conjugated compound was able to ameliorate the symptoms of mitochondrial dysfunction through taurine-deficiency.
22h
NYT > Science

Kimba Journal: A Farming Town Divided: Do We Want a Nuclear Site that Brings Jobs?Wheat farming has been the economic mainstay of Kimba, South Australia. Now, the town is bitterly split over a plan to host a medical nuclear waste site.
22h
BBC News - Science & Environment

Ocean mappers line up for XPRIZE finalNine teams, including one from the UK, will demonstrate new technology to map the sea floor.
22h
Scientific American Content: Global

How Does Sand Get Its Color?Sand’s color is derived from its mineralogy, or the physical structure of the crystals that populate the sand. -- Read more on ScientificAmerican.com
22h
Dagens Medicin

Sundhedsminister: Sundhedsplatformens udfordringer er uholdbareSundhedsministeren har rejst kritikpunkt over for for Region Sjælland og Hovedstaden om, at de udfordringer, som Sundhedsplatformen forårsager i sundhedsvæsenet, er uholdbare.
22h
Dagens Medicin

Regionerne varsler lockoutBåde på det statslige og regionale området har chefforhandlerne nu varslet lockout. Det sker efter, at de faglige organisationer har bebudet strejke.
22h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Research provides framework for understanding how populations handle random disturbancesResearch at Oregon State University has provided a mathematical framework for understanding how population-reducing events of varying frequency and intensity, like fires, floods, storms and droughts, can affect a species' longtime survival ability.
22h
The Atlantic

AIPAC's Struggle to Avoid the Fate of the NRACommentators sometimes compare the American Israel Public Affairs Committee to the National Rifle Association. Both are powerful, controversial, single-issue, lobbying organizations. And both have had enormous success in shaping the Washington agenda. But in their DNA, the two groups are utterly different. The NRA thrives on culture war. It produces videos attacking “lying member[s] of the media,
22h
Popular Science

How to save all the cool posts you find on social mediaDIY Bookmark your favorite things. Sometimes you encounter a tweet, Facebook post, or Instagram photo that you know you'll want to revisit later. Here's how to bookmark those social media posts.
22h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News

North Pacific climate patterns influence El Nino occurrencesPrevious studies have investigated the relationship between ENSO and PDO but none have examined if the warm (positive) and cool (negative) phases of PDO in the North Pacific influence the frequency of ENSO events in the tropical Pacific. For the first time, scientists from the Institute of Atmospheric Physics, Chinese Academy of Sciences, quantitatively demonstrated that El Nino is 300 percent mor
22h
Ingeniøren

White hat-hackere: Cheferne er nemme ofre for hackingI stort set alle forsøg får penetrationstestere adgang til kritiske virksomhedsdata via ledelsen, fortæller it-sikkerhedseksperter.
22h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Self-domesticating mice show changes similar to intentionally domesticated animalsA large team of researchers working over a period of 15 years in Switzerland has found that self-domesticating mice tend to evolve in ways similar to some animals that are intentionally domesticated by humans. In their paper published in the journal Royal Society Open Science, the group describes their project and their findings.
22h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Computer modeling of WNK kinase inhibitors could offer new tools for understanding hypertensionResearchers from North Carolina State University have modeled and analyzed the binding modes of 210 molecules previously reported to inhibit the function of a family of enzymes involved in regulating salt and blood pressure in the human body. Their findings could help researchers better understand the complex relationships between salt regulation, hypertension and high blood pressure.
22h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Maxwell's demon in the quantum Zeno regimeIn the original Maxwell's demon thought experiment, a demon makes continuous measurements on a system of hot and cold reservoirs, building up a thermal gradient that can later be used to perform work. As the demon's measurements do not consume energy, it appears that the demon violates the second law of thermodynamics, although this paradox can be resolved by considering that the demon uses inform
22h
Futurity.org

Teens can teach classmates to recognize depressionHigh school students can improve their peers’ understanding of depression, and their attitudes about seeking help for themselves or others, according to a new study. Nationwide, about 7.5 percent of teens have experienced depression in the past year. The findings come from a rigorous evaluation of a program created by the University of Michigan Depression Center, which students and educators used
22h
New on MIT Technology Review

US trade wars could soon extend to electronics
22h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Direct observation of topology hidden inside materialsTopology hidden inside materials in the matter group called cerium monopnictides has been determined for the first time in the world.
23h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Mapping a genetic riskClinicians and health researchers often look at gene mutation to predict whether a fetus is at risk for a birth defect, or a person is at risk of developing a disease, but these predictions are not always accurate. University of Calgary researchers have discovered an important factor that changes our understanding of the relationship between gene mutations (genotype) and how they present in people
23h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Depression, anxiety high in graduate students, survey showsGraduate students are more than six times as likely to experience depression and anxiety as compared to the general population, according to a comprehensive survey of 2,279 individuals conducted via social media and direct email. The research team includes Teresa Evans, Ph.D., and Lindsay Bira, Ph.D., of UT Health San Antonio.
23h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Russian scientists prove the possibility of creating liposomal form of porphyrazine photosensitizerA team of Nizhny Novgorod researchers led by Dr. V.A. Vodeneev, head of the Laboratory for Optical Theranostics at the Institute of Biology and Biomedicine of the Lobachevsky University (UNN), is working to develop effective ways to combat cancer.
23h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Sexual harassment, gender stereotypes prevalent among youthYoung women enrolled in high schools and colleges told Washington State University researchers that people routinely make sexual comments, both in-person and online, about them and their bodies.
23h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Researchers identify new drugs that could help prevent hearing lossResearchers from St. Jude Children's Research Hospital have discovered that inhibiting an enzyme called cyclin-dependent kinase 2 (CDK2) protects mice and rats from noise- or drug-induced hearing loss. The study, which will be published March 7 in the Journal of Experimental Medicine, suggests that CDK2 inhibitors prevent the death of inner ear cells, which has the potential to save the hearing of
23h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Why the latest shingles vaccine is more than 90 percent effectiveA new study has shown how the body's immune system responds to the new shingles vaccine, Shingrix, making it more than 90 percent effective at protecting against the virus.
23h
Feed: All Latest

Best Price for DJI Mavic Pro and Other Great Tech DealsFrom drones to duffel bags, we got your back.
23h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Researchers work with communities to shore up effects of erosionMayor Hannah Anderson, a fifth-generation resident, remembers the thrill of sledding down from the sand dunes above Weko Beach right onto frigid Lake Michigan with her friends on winter days in the 1950s.
23h
Scientific American Content: Global

If You Think It's Love, Switch to Decaf: How We Misinterpret Emotional ArousalPsychology shows a great date might be more than just a walk in the park. -- Read more on ScientificAmerican.com
23h
New on MIT Technology Review

BlackBerry is suing Facebook for infringing its patents
23h
cognitive science

A paper in Psychological Science explores how you can consistently be disappointed with choices in the absence of decision bias.submitted by /u/markmana [link] [comments]
23h
Dagens Medicin

Region Syddanmark klar med 15 særlige pladser til psykisk sygeNyt forløb på psykiatrisk afdeling i Vejle skal højne funktionsniveauet for psykiske syge, hvor patienterne indgår i et tværfagligt forløb, før de skal tilbage til kommunale bosteder.
23h
Dagens Medicin

Minister vil lockoute fire ud af fem statsansatteChefforhandleren for de statsansatte er klar til at sende 120.000 statsansatte hjem uden løn, hvis det kommer til en storkonflikt. Det gælder også ansatte på sundhedsområdet.
23h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Cosmologists find way to verify if the universe is hotter at one end than the otherScientists have long observed an apparent gradient in the cosmic microwave background but have been unable to determine how much is real and how much is perceived. USC Dornsife researchers appear to have found a way to an answer.
23h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Explaining rare plant speciesRare plant species suffer more from disease than common species. The fact that rare species are more susceptible to attack by micro-organisms living in the soil, such as fungi and bacteria, may in fact be one of the reasons they are rare. Biologists have been trying to work out why some species are rare, while others are common, since Darwin's time and a new study from researchers at the Universit
23h
Futurity.org

Risks of this IV device short-term outweigh benefitsA new study finds that 1 in 4 times health care providers insert a certain type of intravenous device, the patient doesn’t need it long enough to justify the risks of using it. These days, many hospital patients get medicine or nutrition delivered straight into their bloodstream through a tiny device called a PICC. In just a decade, these peripherally inserted central catheters have become the go
23h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Gender inequality is alive and kicking in technologyOn International Women's Day, it's worth a harsh reminder: Women working in science, technology, engineering and mathematics (STEM) careers represent a mere 20 per cent of the current job force in the field.
23h
Ingeniøren

Kamp om bilfri zone i Paris: Først var bilerne væk – nu er de tilbageDen franske hovedstad får nu underkendt sit bil-forbud af en domstol. Borgmesteren kæmper fortsat for et forbud, og Københavns overborgmester bakker op.
23h
The Scientist RSS

Image of the Day: 3-D NanofibersResearchers created a nanofibrous scaffold to see how it supports cell growth.
23h
Scientific American Content: Global

Is Truth an Outdated Concept?Are we living in a post-truth world? -- Read more on ScientificAmerican.com
23h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Scientists' warning to humanity 'most talked about paper'Twenty-five years after the first World Scientists' Warning to Humanity, a new report is continuing to gain momentum and is already one of the most talked about papers globally since Altmetric records began. Three letters in comment, as well as a response companion piece by the Warning authors publish today in the peer-reviewed journal BioScience, highlighting two key areas for action in policy an
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Technology-based process boosts cardiac rehab referral ratesSimply changing cardiac referral processes to opt-out rather than opt-in significantly increased referral rates, according to a study presented at the American College of Cardiology's NCDR Annual Conference (NCDR.18) in Orlando. The technology-based program also provides resources to staff and patients about the significance and impact of cardiac rehab.
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News

How cats and dogs are consuming and processing parabensMany households can claim at least one four-legged friend as part of the family. But pets that primarily stay indoors can have increased rates of diseases, such as diabetes, kidney diseases and hypothyroidism compared with those that stay exclusively outside. Some scientists propose that chemical substances in the home could contribute to these illnesses. One group has examined how pets could be e
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Super sniffer: Dog's nose inspires new gas sensor materialsIt is well known that dogs have a better sense of smell than humans. For years, researchers have been trying to develop an artificial detector that is just as good as a canine's nose. Now, one group reports in ACS Nano that they were able to mimic a dog's sniffer with graphene-based nanoscrolls.
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Dagens Medicin

Slagelse Sygehus aflyser alle planlagte operationerInfluenzaepidemien har fået Slagelse Sygehus til at aflyse alle planlagte operationer resten af ugen.
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Dagens Medicin

Bent Deleuran er ny professor i inflammationssygdommeBent Deleuran er tiltrådt som professor i inflammationssygdomme på Aarhus Universitet og Aarhus Universitetshospital. Han skal fordele sin arbejdstid mellem patientkontakt og forskning i immunsystemet.
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Popular Science

You can thank the Madden-Julian Oscillation for this wild winterScience Swings in temperature are what the MJO does best. All in all, it’s made for a pretty satisfying winter, despite the La Niña conditions that normally would have made the past three months feel unseasonable most of the…
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Live Science

Every Year, the Swiss Cover Their Melting Glaciers in White BlanketsSummer's coming, which means that soon enough it'll be time to tuck the glaciers in.
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The Atlantic

For 10 Years, I Read the CommentsIn 2008, I started an experiment that became a career. I began posting photo stories focused on the news that were made up of large images all on a single web page—as opposed to tiny slideshows, which were the standard back then. That first photo blog, “The Big Picture” at the Boston Globe , always included a space for user comments at the bottom of each page. My next photo blog here at The Atlan
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Feed: All Latest

How Leaked NSA Spy Tool 'EternalBlue' Became a Hacker FavoriteEternalBlue leaked to the public nearly a year ago. It's wreaked havoc ever since.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Advance could enable novel high-performance materialsAn engineering physics professor at the University of Wisconsin–Madison has created new materials that behave in an unusual way that defies the standard theory engineers use for designing things like buildings, airplanes, bridges and electronic devices.
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Science : NPR

A 'Floating Fillet': Rice Farmers Grow Bugs To Replenish California's SalmonInsect-rich floodplain water once supported the threatened fish, but it has been diverted. The project's end goal is to improve the likelihood that Chinook survive the trek to the ocean and back. (Image credit: Ezra David Romero/Capital Public Radio)
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Dana Foundation

Two Successful Aging & Your Brain Programs in NYCAre you interested in learning about the brain and living a brain-healthy lifestyle as you age? Do you live in New York City? Then look no further, there are two free Successful Aging & Your Brain programs on Tuesday, March 13 th ! Both programs begin with discussions on memory, normal age-related changes in the brain, brain diseases and disorders, and tips for keeping the brain healthy as we age
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Scientific American Content: Global

Sentient Robots, Conscious Spoons and Other Cheerful FolliesHow blind spots of critical thinking are distorting our collective intuitions of plausibility -- Read more on ScientificAmerican.com
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

How teens use fake Instagram accounts to relieve the pressure of perfectionFake Instagram accounts, often referred to as "finstas" or "spam accounts", have become the norm for many teens – but their reasoning for creating these is not as sinister as you think.
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Science-Based Medicine

Too Many Too Soon? No!The results of a study looking at, in part, the "too many, too soon" complaints of antivaccination activists were completely negative. There was no difference in vaccine antigen exposure between two groups who differed in the number of infections over a two year period. Therefore there is no correlation between vaccine antigen exposure and susceptibility to other infections.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Image: ESA's first Automated Transfer VehicleIt's a bird. It's a plane. It's Jules Verne!
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Physicists tune a spin diodeA team of physicists at MIPT has offered a new design of a spin diode, placing the device between two kinds of antiferromagnetic materials. By adjusting the orientation of their antiferromagnetic axes, it is possible to change the resistance and the resonant frequency of the diode. In addition, this approach triples the range of frequencies on which the device can rectify alternating current. At t
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Graphene promise for more efficient fertilisersFertilisers with lower environmental impacts and reduced costs for farmers are being developed by University of Adelaide researchers in the world-first use of the new advanced material graphene as a fertiliser carrier.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Social status influences infection risk and disease-induced mortalitySpotted hyena cubs of high-ranking mothers have a lower probability of infection with and are more likely to die from canine distemper virus (CDV) than cubs of low-ranking mothers. In subadults and adults, the picture is reversed—high-ranking females exhibit a higher infection probability than low-ranking females whereas mortality was similar for both groups. These are the surprising results of a
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Current deforestation pace will intensify global warming, study alertsThe global warming process may be even more intense than originally forecast unless deforestation can be halted, especially in the tropical regions. This warning has been published in Nature Communications by an international group of scientists. "If we go on destroying forests at the current pace—some 7,000 km² per year in the case of Amazonia—in three to four decades, we'll have a massive accumu
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Researchers reshape the energy landscape of phonons in nanocrystalsPhonons, packets of vibrational waves that propagate in solids, play a key role in condensed matter and are involved in various physical properties of materials. In nanotechnology, for example, they affect light emission and charge transport of nanodevices. As the main source of energy dissipation in solid-state systems, phonons are the ultimate bottleneck that limits the operation of functional n
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

A treasure trove for nanotechnology expertsA team from EPFL and NCCR Marvel has identified more than 1,000 materials with a particularly interesting 2-D structure. Their research, published in Nature Nanotechnlogy, paves the way for groundbreaking technological applications.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Glaciers provide clues to combat desertificationResearchers at KAUST, with colleagues in Italy and Greece, have analyzed the bacterial content of the soil formed behind the receding Midtre Lovénbreen Arctic glacier in the island of Svalbard, Norway, one of the world's northernmost inhabited areas.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Image: The case of the Martian boulder pilesThis image was originally meant to track the movement of sand dunes near the North Pole of Mars, but what's on the ground in between the dunes is just as interesting!
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Scientific American Content: Global

FDA Approves First Direct-to-Consumer Test for Breast Cancer RiskThe 23andMe genetic offering “has a lot of caveats” -- Read more on ScientificAmerican.com
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Dagens Medicin

Ny programchef skal føre kvalitetsarbejde fra overenskomst til virkelighedRikke Agergaard bliver chef for ’Program for Kvalitetsudvikling’, der er en del af den nye overenskomst for almen praksis.
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Ingeniøren

Spådom i 1968: Vi skal køre i førerløse taxaer og tale i billedtelefonerTrafikplanlæggeren Kaj Lemberg blev i Ingeniørens magasin Management bedt om at give et bud på den fagre nye trafikverden i 1985. Cyklen spåede han ikke nogen fremtid, men forudså, at fremtidens teknologi ville gøre det muligt at holde ‘telemøder’ med 3D-fjernsyn.
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Live Science

Here's the Best Way to Protect Yourself from a Norovirus OutbreakIt's a vacation nightmare: You board a cruise ship for a weeklong getaway, only to have an outbreak of norovirus, or "stomach bug," take the ship by storm.
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Live Science

Ex-Russian Spy and Daughter Attacked With Nerve Agent, Not RadiationThe ex-Russian Spy and his daughter were likely attacked with a type of highly poisonous chemical known as a nerve agent.
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The Atlantic

The Musician Who Insists That Optimism Isn't NaïveI first discovered the music of Joan Wasser—better known by her stage name, Joan As Police Woman—the year I moved to a tiny town in the Northwoods of Minnesota. It was the middle of winter. Far from most of the people I knew and loved, I felt lost and isolated. I’d often sit in my car before work blasting Wasser’s debut album, Real Life , the wind battering against the window, and weep. Her music
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Feed: All Latest

Publishers Could Get a New Weapon Against Facebook and GoogleProposal would grant publishers an antitrust exemption to seek concessions from tech giants, who dominate online advertising.
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Feed: All Latest

The CDC Can't Fund Gun Research. What if that Changed?Scientists want to know more about risk factors, gun epidemiology, and whether laws work.
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Feed: All Latest

Leaked NSA Tool 'Territorial Dispute' Reveals the Agency's List of Enemy HackersA leaked NSA tool offers a glimpse into what the NSA knows about the hacking operations of adversaries—some of which may still be secretly ongoing.
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Latest Headlines | Science News

Humans don’t get enough sleep. Just ask other primates.Short, REM-heavy sleep bouts separate humans from other primates, scientists find. Sleeping on the ground may have a lot to do with it.
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Scientific American Content: Global

Foresee and Forget: How to Remember the FutureThanks to memory, we are able to recall the past. But we also need it to implement new ideas in the future -- Read more on ScientificAmerican.com
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Live Science

The Fascinating Story Behind the Oldest Message in a BottleThe oldest message in a bottle on record wasn't discovered by a historian, but by a woman picking up trash strewn across the coastal dunes of Western Australia.
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Dagens Medicin

Alder og arbejdsglæde er afgørende for lægers empatiNyt studie blandt praktiserende læger i Danmark viser, at de 45-54-årige er de mindst empatiske. Samtidig fastslår det en sammenhæng mellem opnåelse af arbejdsglæde og graden af empati hos den enkelte praktiserende læge.
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New Scientist - News

Cancer algorithm uses game theory to double survival timeUsing algorithms to monitor cancer evolution and apply game theory to their treatment has doubled the survival time of men with advanced prostate cancer
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Scientific American Content: Global

Does a Quantum Equation Govern Some of the Universe's Large Structures?A new paper uses the Schrödinger equation to describe debris disks around stars and black holes—and provides an object lesson about what “quantum” really means -- Read more on ScientificAmerican.com
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Dagens Medicin

Direktør på Odense Universitetshospital går på pensionJudith Mølgaard forlader til sommer sin stilling som direktør på Odense Universitetshospital for at gå på pension.
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News

ALMA reveals inner web of stellar nurseryNew data from the Atacama Large Millimeter/submillimeter Array (ALMA) and other telescopes have been used to create this stunning image showing a web of filaments in the Orion Nebula. These features appear red-hot and fiery in this dramatic picture, but in reality are so cold that astronomers must use telescopes like ALMA to observe them.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Our circadian clock sets the rhythm for our cells' powerhousesCountless genetically controlled clocks keep time in different body parts, such as the liver, kidneys and heart. Among other things, they initiate metabolic processes, ensuring that these occur at the optimal time of day. Mitochondria, cellular organelles that produce energy, play an important role in these processes. Until now, it was unclear how exactly the 24-hour circadian rhythm regulated ene
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

ALMA reveals inner web of stellar nurseryThis spectacular and unusual image shows part of the famous Orion Nebula, a star formation region lying about 1350 light-years from Earth. It combines a mosaic of millimetre-wavelength images from the Atacama Large Millimeter/submillimeter Array (ALMA) and the IRAM 30-metre telescope, shown in red, with a more familiar infrared view from the HAWK-I instrument on ESO's Very Large Telescope, shown i
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Scientists developed a material for the new type of liquid crystal displaysA team from the Faculty of Physics, MSU together with their foreign colleagues developed a new liquid crystal material with high potential as a basis for brighter, faster, energy saving displays with higher resolution. The results of the work were published in Advanced Functional Materials.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Scarce metals going unrecovered from end-of-life vehiclesVast quantities of scarce metals are being lost from Europe's urban mine of vehicles, including 20 tonnes of gold each year—and the proportion of critical metals in vehicles is continuing to increase. A database has been published that charts the metals and facilitates recycling. On 8 March Maria Ljunggren Söderman, researcher at Chalmers University of Technology, will present the results at IEA's
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Engine maker Rolls-Royce powers back into profitRolls-Royce, the British maker of plane engines and other power systems, roared back into net profit last year, largely as the pound recovered, the company revealed on Wednesday.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

EU firms lash out at new net privacy rulesDozens of European media, telecom and internet firms criticised Wednesday the EU's new online privacy rules, saying they will effectively hand US tech giants even greater power over user data.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

EU urges Germany to introduce air pollution tollGerman cities should fight air pollution by charging drivers tolls according to their vehicle's emissions, rather than slapping general bans on older models, European Transport Commissioner Violeta Bulc said Wednesday.
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Ingeniøren

Banedanmark: Strejke kan indstille al togtrafik i DanmarkAlle tog i Danmark kan komme til at holde stille, hvis for mange af Banedanmarks ansatte strejker. Det er simpelthen for risikabelt at forsøge at fortsætte driften, hvis for mange medarbejdere er væk.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Fukushima plant ice wall partly reduces radioactive waterA government-commissioned group of experts has concluded that a costly underground ice wall is only partially effective in reducing the ever-growing amount of contaminated water at Japan's destroyed Fukushima nuclear plant, and other measures are needed as well.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Seeing is believing—precision atom qubits achieve major quantum computing milestoneThe unique Australian approach of creating quantum bits from precisely positioned individual atoms in silicon is reaping major rewards, with UNSW Sydney-led scientists showing for the first time that they can make two of these atom qubits "talk" to each other.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Turning landfill into energyLandfill is both ugly and polluting. But a new breed of technology promises to make it a thing of the past, transforming a huge portion of landfill material into clean gas.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Identifying ammonia hotspots in China using national observation networkThe limited availability of ammonia (NH3) measurements is currently a barrier to understanding the vital role of NH3 in secondary aerosol formation during haze pollution events, and prevents a full assessment of the atmospheric deposition of reactive nitrogen. Experiments have been carried out to measure the NH3 concentration across China, but most of the previous measurements were limited to a fe
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Reducing the loss of light at the surface of semiconductor nanostructuresA technique for reducing the loss of light at the surface of semiconductor nanostructures has been demonstrated by scientists at KAUST. Some materials can efficiently convert the electrons in an electrical current into light. These so-called semiconductors are used to create light-emitting diodes or LEDs: small, light, energy-efficient, long-lasting devices that are increasingly prevalent in both
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Enhanced weathering of rocks could reduce atmospheric CO2 with limited effectWeathering of huge amounts of tiny rocks could be a means to reduce greenhouse gases in the atmosphere. While this is normally a slow, natural process during which minerals chemically bind CO2, technological upscaling could make this relevant for so-called negative emissions to help limit climate risks. Yet, the CO2 reduction potential is limited and would require strong CO2 pricing to become econ
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Ingeniøren

Google tager førertrøjen inden for kvantecomputereMed en chip med 72 kvantebits overhaler Google IBM og Intel i kampen om den største kvantecomputer. Microsoft ligger stadig på baghjul.
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Seeing is believing -- precision atom qubits achieve major quantum computing milestoneThe unique Australian approach of creating quantum bits from precisely positioned individual atoms in silicon is reaping major rewards, with UNSW Sydney-led scientists showing for the first time that they can make two of these atom qubits 'talk' to each other. The team -- led by UNSW Professor Michelle Simmons, Director of the Centre of Excellence for Quantum Computation and Communication Technolo
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Caregivers face strain when patients receive heart pumpsWhen heart failure patients receive a heart pumping device known as a left ventricular assist device (LVAD), their caregivers seem to suffer, too -- at least initially, according to research in Journal of the American Heart Association (JAHA), the Open Access Journal of the American Heart Association/American Stroke Association.
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Ingeniøren

Universiteter brygger på nationalt certifikat til forskere, der kan håndtere persondataDatabeskyttelse kan blive en konkurrencefaktor for danske universiteter og forskere, mener DPO.
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The Atlantic

The U.S. Teeters on the Edge of Another Catastrophic WarDonald Trump repeatedly called his predecessor dumb for intervening in Syria. Congress has declined to vote to authorize a war in Syria. And the U.S. Armed Forces are now led by a commander in chief who lacks the experience, wisdom, steadfastness, and popular support to prosecute a complex war in a faraway country where a misstep could lead to regional conflagration or even nuclear world war. Yet
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The Atlantic

Kim Jong Un Makes America IrrelevantNorth Korean US SouthThe news that North Korea’s leader Kim Jong Un has offered to hold talks about getting rid of his nuclear weapons has fueled new hopes that the deadly standoff with North Korea may be easing. So far, only South Korea has said these talks will happen. While it remains to be seen what exactly North Korea has offered to discuss if it does indeed confirm its participation—it’s speculated that sanctio
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Ingeniøren

Alvorlig brand på helt nyt Mærsk-skib i det arabiske havFire besætningsmedlemmer savnes, efter en alvorlig brand brød ud på et containerskib fra Maersk Line på vej fra Singapore til Suez. De øvrige 23 besætningsmedlemmer er blevet overført til et andet skib og situationen betegnes som kritisk.
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Science : NPR

Patients Like Hospital Care At Home, But Some Insurers Are SkepticalSome health systems are encouraging selected emergency room patients who are sick but stable and don't need intensive, round-the-clock care to opt for hospital-level care at home, instead. (Image credit: Trina Dalziel/Getty Images/Ikon Images)
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The Atlantic

The Fish That Makes Other Fish SmarterIt’s not easy for fish to clean themselves, without limbs or digits to scrub those hard-to-reach places. Fortunately for them, coral reefs come with cleaning stations. At particular sites, an itchy individual can attract the attention of the bluestreak cleaner wrasse—a slender fish, with blue and yellow markings and a prominent black stripe. On seeing these colors, the itchy “client” strikes a sp
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Ingeniøren

Energiselskaber halter bagefter med it-sikkerhedenSeks energiselskaber har ikke afleveret it-relaterede risikovurderinger og beredskabsplaner i tide. Det har kostet dem påbud fra myndighederne. De nye risikovurderinger og beredskabsplaner skal sikre det danske energinet mod cyberangreb.
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Nyheder - Forskning - Videnskab

Fejl i cellens antenne koblet til misdannede organer hos zebrafiskEt protein i bunden af ”antennen” hos mange af kroppens celler er afgørende for en...
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Ingeniøren

Regeringen hastebehandler overvågning af børnefamilierSelvom regeringen selv sagde, at det var nødvendigt at evaluere forskellige idéer og forsøg, så bliver muligheden for registersamkørsel for myndighederne alligevel implementeret til 25. maj - uden der er foretaget en officiel evaluering.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Termites sacrifice their elderly in ant wars: studyWhen termites go to war, the oldest soldiers fight on the front lines, being closer to death anyway, a study revealed on Wednesday.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Britain hopes to keep stars aligned with EU's space projectsDressed in a white protective suit, British astronaut Tim Peake listened attentively as technicians explained details of their new satellite—a European project in Brexit Britain.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Amazon CEO's wealth soars to new heights while Trump's sinksAmazon CEO Jeff Bezos has become the first $100 billion mogul to top Forbes' annual rankings of the world's richest people. But President Donald Trump's fortune sank during his first year in office despite a surging stock market.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

'Dieselgate' sees Toyota gain in EuropeAn auto industry turning away from diesel and European drivers increasingly favouring hybrid cars: add it up and the result is clear—advantage Toyota.
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Science | The Guardian

The odd history of horses | Elsa PanciroliNew research sheds light on the origins of domestic horses, and asks: just how many toes does a horse have? We’re so used to seeing horses, we often forget just what a bunch of weirdos they are. Let’s start with their feet: can you name another animal with only one hoof? If you said cow, sheep or goat, then you need to take a closer look next time you’re on the farm, because they all have two hoo
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Science | The Guardian

You can deny environmental calamity – until you check the facts | George MonbiotRosy worldviews that rely on avoiding inconvenient truths should always set alarm bells ringing One of the curiosities of our age is the way in which celebrity culture comes to dominate every aspect of public life. Even the review pages of the newspapers sometimes look like a highfalutin version of gossip magazines. Were we to judge them by the maxim “Great minds discuss ideas; average minds disc
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Science | The Guardian

Hundreds of lung cancer patients may be dying early each yearMore than 800 die prematurely each year due to disparities in treatment across England, research suggests Hundreds of lung cancer patients may be dying prematurely every year as a result of disparities in rates of treatment across England, new research suggests. The team behind the study say more than 800 patients a year could have their lives extended if the rates of treatment in the top 20% of
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Viden

Verdensrekord: 132 år gammel tysk flaskepost fundet i AustralienAustralsk familie har fundet verdens ældste flaskepost, der i 1886 var med i et tysk videnskabeligt forsøg.
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Ingeniøren

Overlæge: Sundhedsplatformen årsag til daglige graverende fejlSundhedsplatformen er både usikker og farlig for patienterne og der sker fejl i behandlingerne, mener overlæge på Roskilde Sygehus.
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Ingeniøren

Netsundhedsplejerske.dk hacket: Brugernes e-mailadresser og passwords lækketNetsundhedsplejerske.dk er blevet hacket, og brugernes password til siden samt e-mailadresser er i den forbindelse blevet lækket. De er nu mulige at finde på internettet.
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NYT > Science

A Celebrated Physicist With a Passion for MusicFabiola Gianotti, the first woman to direct CERN, dreamed of becoming a ballerina, studied piano, but ultimately chose a career in science.
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Feeling anxious? Blame the size of your waistline!Anxiety is one of the most common mental health disorders, and it's more likely to affect women, especially middle-aged women. Although anxiety can be caused by many factors, a new study suggests that the amount of abdominal fat a woman has could increase her chances of developing anxiety. Study results are published online today in Menopause, the journal of The North American Menopause Society (N
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Older adult falls lead to substantial medical costsIn 2015, the estimated medical costs attributable to both fatal and nonfatal falls in older US adults was approximately $50 billion.
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Icelandic program seeks to eliminate HCVA new Journal of Internal Medicine study describes an innovative program to eliminate hepatitis C virus (HCV) as a public health threat in Iceland.
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Why people experience seasonal skin changesA new British Journal of Dermatology study provides information that may help explain why many people experience eczema and dry skin in the winter.
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Warm showers and ball exercises may help women during childbirthA new International Journal of Nursing Practice study demonstrates that during childbirth, women may benefit from warm showers, perineal exercises with a ball, or the combination of both strategies.
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Causes of death in rheumatoid arthritis patientsMortality rates were increased for patients with rheumatoid arthritis relative to the general population across all causes of death in a recent Arthritis Care & Research analysis.
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Weight loss surgery linked to an increased risk of inflammatory bowel diseaseA new Alimentary Pharmacology & Therapeutics analysis has found a link between the development of inflammatory bowel disease (IBD) and a past history of weight loss surgery.
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Study reveals that Italian adolescents are heavy consumers of caffeineMore than three-quarters (76 percent) of Italian adolescents who completed anonymous questionnaires consumed caffeine on a daily basis and nearly half (46 percent) exceeded the upper limits recommended by the American Academy of Pediatrics. The findings are published in Acta Paediatrica.
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Examining preferences for centralizing cancer surgery servicesCentralization of cancer surgery services aims to reduce variations in quality of care and improve health outcomes for patients, but it can also increase travel demands on patients and families.
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Research reveals risk factors for urgency urinary incontinenceIn a large representative British population of individuals in their late 60s, the prevalence of urinary incontinence was 15 percent in men and 54 percent in women.
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Study points to potential misuse/abuse of ADHD drugsA new British Journal of Clinical Pharmacology study indicates that methylphenidate, a central nervous system stimulant approved to treat attention deficit hyperactivity disorder (ADHD) and narcolepsy, may be subject to misuse and/or abuse.
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BBC News - Science & Environment

Red squirrel numbers boosted by predatorWhy red squirrel numbers are boosted by the activity of their natural predator, the pine marten.
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Live Science

What Is Ovulation?Ovulation occurs when an egg moves from the ovaries into the fallopian tubes and is ready for fertilization.
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Ingeniøren

Dansk forskning forbinder dieseleksponering med ALSMennesker, der udsættes for dieselforurening på jobbet, kan have øget risiko for at blive ramt af den uhelbredelige neurologiske sygdom ALS, som folk dør af inden for få år.
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Scientific American Content: Global

Human Echolocators Use Tricks Similar to BatsPeople who use echolocating mouth clicks to compensate for low vision increase the number and intensity of clicks when objects are harder to detect. Christopher Intagliata reports. -- Read more on ScientificAmerican.com
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BBC News - Science & Environment

Cars buck falling CO2 emissions trendBritain's carbon emissions have sunk to the level last seen in 1890, helped by reduced coal use.
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Feed: All Latest

At This Crypto Event, the Attendees Really Were HighAttendees at Crypto Sanctum in New York last week consumed "infused" food and drink, many without realizing it.
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NYT > Science

Nakesha Williams Died Homeless on a Manhattan Street. Should She Have Been Forced Into Treatment?The Times’s story about a woman crippled by mental illness left many readers asking what could have been done under the law. An expert on homelessness offers some answers.
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The Atlantic

The Atlantic Daily: A Spectacle Like ThisWhat We’re Following A Big Step Forward? Not only did North Korea’s leader, Kim Jong Un, host South Korean officials in Pyongyang, he also indicated that he might be willing to negotiate with the U.S. about ending his country’s nuclear program, according to South Korea. If confirmed, this could be a sign that President Trump’s bellicose rhetoric toward North Korea has worked—or it could mean that
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Social status influences infection risk and disease-induced mortalitySpotted hyena cubs of high-ranking mothers have a lower probability of infection with and are less likely to die from canine distemper virus (CDV) than cubs of low-ranking mothers. In subadults and adults, the picture is reversed -- high-ranking females exhibit a higher infection probability than low-ranking females whereas mortality was similar for both groups. These are the results of a long-ter
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Chimpanzees help researchers improve machine learning of animal simulationsResearchers at The University of Manchester are using computer simulations of chimpanzees to improve not only our understanding of how the animals walk, but also the technology we use to do it.
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Supportive colleagues could be the key to health and fairness at workThe attitudes and behaviors of colleagues towards people returning to work from sick leave can have a big impact on whether or not a worker feels they are fairly treated by their organization.
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Staying clean keeps seafish smart'Vet' service provided by smaller fish is key to keeping coral reefs healthy, a Canadian study finds.
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Futurity.org

Next-gen drones will enable cheap, credible threatsCountries that simply possess deadly, armed drones could change an adversary’s behavior without even striking them, according to new research. “Armed drones are likely to offer coercion ‘windows of opportunity’ in at least one important circumstance: states that have armed drones confronting states that do not,” says Amy Zegart, political scientist at Stanford University. “As wars grow longer and
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New Scientist - News

A deadly predator could save the UK’s threatened red squirrelsBritain’s native red squirrels have been retreating for decades in the face of invasive grey squirrels, but predators called pine martens could help save them
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Latest Headlines | Science News

These petunias launch seeds that spin 1,660 times a secondOne species of petunia spreads its seeds explosively, giving them a rotation of 1,660 times per second.
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Science : NPR

What You Might Not Realize About The Benefits Of Hand-WashingNorovirus is that awful ailment that can make you barf and suffer from diarrhea. A new study tries to figure out the best way to stop it. (Image credit: Jay Reed/NPR)
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Futurity.org

Poll: Older patients wonder ‘do I really need that test?’Doctors and older patients may disagree more often than they think about the necessity of certain medical tests or medicines, according to a new poll. The poll suggests that improving communication about that mismatch of opinions might reduce use of unneeded scans, screenings, medications, and procedures—and health care costs as well. “Patients should speak up when they aren’t sure if a test or m
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Futurity.org

Awfully few millennials have retirement accountsOnly 37.2 percent of working millennials have retirement accounts, according to new research. “Compared to older generations, millennials are less likely to have employer-provided pension or defined benefit retirement plans.” “While it could be assumed that millennials have plenty of time to save for retirement, they have to shoulder more responsibility than their parents and grandparents to do s
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Futurity.org

Turmeric component may ease Gulf War illness for vetsCurcumin, a component of the spice turmeric, may be able to reverse some of the effects of Gulf War illness (GWI), according to a new study Gulf War illness affects nearly 200,000 veterans of the first Gulf War who came home with symptoms that include sleep disorders, chronic fatigue, and memory problems. “More than 25 years later, many veterans are still affected by GWI.” Experts believe the sym
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Study suggests native UK Pine martens are helping to control invasive gray squirrelsFor many years, populations of a little red squirrel with cute ear tufts, a native of Great Britain, Ireland and Europe, have been in serious decline because of competition for food from an invasive North American gray squirrel and a pox it carries for which the native animal has no defense. Now, new research suggests that native pine martens, also once on the decline, are suppressing the invading
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Chimpanzees help researchers improve machine learning of animal simulationsResearchers at The University of Manchester are using computer simulations of chimpanzees to improve not only our understanding of how the animals walk, but also the technology we use to do it.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Staying clean keeps seafish smartA team of international researchers led by a Canadian biologist has found that infection with parasites makes it harder for seafish living in coral reefs to think.
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The Atlantic

Gary Cohn Reaches the Breaking PointGary Cohn, President Trump’s top economic adviser and the director of the National Economic Council, will resign from the White House, according to multiple sources . Neither the White House nor Cohn has offered an official reason for the resignation—the latest in a string of noteworthy departures from an administration that appears to be descending into chaos. But it’s hard to ignore the fact th
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Futurity.org

Why the same medication can affect us differentlyMany small differences among individuals, rather than a single significant difference or a small number of large variations, may account for the differing effects of medications, new research suggests. Drugs are not equally effective for everyone, due, at least in part, to the fact that our bodies take up pharmaceutical substances to varying degrees. Despite the fact that drugs don’t affect us al
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Range Rover's $295K SV Coupe Has 2 Doors, Makes Some SenseIt's also stuffed with fancy features and a turbocharged V-8 engine good for a 5-second sprint from 0 to 60 mph.
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News

UMass Amherst expert, international team call for action on diabetes medicines in IndiaIndia has one of the highest rates of type 2 diabetes in the world, and there is now 'growing national and international concern' about the drug regulatory system there, which allows use of a drug treatment that has not been shown effective or safe, say researchers at the University of Massachusetts Amherst and the UK's Newcastle University in a paper published today in the British Medical Journal
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Treatment variations may be cutting short lives of lung cancer patients in EnglandDifferences in the active treatment of lung cancer across England may be cutting short the lives of hundreds of patients with the disease every year, concludes research published online in the journal Thorax.
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Cannabis compound may help curb frequency of epileptic seizuresA naturally occurring compound found in cannabis may help to curb the frequency of epileptic seizures, suggests a review of the available evidence, published online in the Journal of Neurology Neurosurgery & Psychiatry.
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Shoddy safety/effectiveness evidence behind India's top selling diabetes drug combosThe evidence on which India's top selling drug combinations for diabetes have been approved for sale is shoddy, with the requisite trial data falling well short of the international standards set by the World Health Organization (WHO), finds the first study of its kind published in the online journal BMJ Global Health.
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Futurity.org

Hepatitis-infected kidneys don’t infect transplant recipientsIn a small study, doctors have successfully transplanted kidneys infected with hepatitis C into non-infected patients without causing them to contract the disease. “Figuring out how to use these kidneys is a way to do more transplants and save more lives.” The success of the study, involving only 10 transplants, could eventually help make more organs available for the nearly 100,000 people in the
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NYT > Science

Trilobites: The Cells That Eat, Regurgitate and Eat Your Tattoos AgainIn a study of mice, scientists learned that macrophages are key to making tattoos permanent, knowledge that might help improve methods for removing them.
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Popular Science

She had a textbook medical condition, but it went undiagnosed for more than a yearHealth How stereotyping diseases hurts patients. Knowing a condition is more common in one gender tends to result in its under diagnosis in the other gender.
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Popular Science

Stopping package theft could be just the start for Amazon's smart camera plansTechnology The next step may involve AI and machine learning. Amazon recently purchased Ring, a company whose standout product is a doorbell that also doubles as a security camera.
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Live Science

Why Meteorologists Don't Know if Tonight's Nor'easter Will Bring Rain or SnowWhy is tomorrow's snowfall proving so tough to predict?
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NYT > Science

A Secret Superpower, Right in Your BackyardSmall, urban green spaces provide an unexpected benefit in the fight against climate change, a new study shows.
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The Scientist RSS

Prosthetic Retinas Help Blind Mice SeeArtificial photoreceptors made of nanowires help restore blind animals' sensitivity to light.
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The Scientist RSS

Brain Prize Laureate Will Donate Some Winnings to Anti-Brexit GroupAlzheimer's researcher John Hardy calls the departure 'an unmitigated disaster' for science and healthcare in Britain.
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The Scientist RSS

Book Excerpt from A Lab of Ones OwnIn chapter 16, 'Lessons of Science: Learning from the Past to Improve the Future,' author Patricia Fara examines where we've been and where we're going in terms of valuing the influence of women in science.
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Inside Science

BRIEF: Where Are the Electric Airplanes?BRIEF: Where Are the Electric Airplanes? Scientists discussed the feasibility of battery-operated semi-trucks and airplanes at a meeting of physicists in Los Angeles. N3-X_topNteaser.jpg An artist rendition for N3-X, a concept hybrid aircraft that propels using electric motors powered by a gas turbine generator. Image credits: NASA Technology Tuesday, March 6, 2018 - 16:45 Yuen Yiu, Staff Writer
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The Atlantic

The Atlantic Politics & Policy Daily: Can’t Guess With TexasToday in 5 Lines During a joint news conference with Swedish Prime Minister Stefan Löfven, President Trump said Russia “had no impact on our vote” in the 2016 election. Trump also told reporters that progress had been made with North Korea after Pyongyang suggested it'd be open to ending its nuclear weapons program. Special Counsel Robert Mueller has reportedly examined incidents involving Michae
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Dispelling the myth that scientists don't care about teachingA new study using surveys and classroom noise analysis shows the success of a three-year effort by faculty in the Biology Department at San Francisco State University to get smarter about their teaching. The results run counter to conventional wisdom that scientists care more about research than they do about the students in their classrooms.
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Scientific American Content: Global

EPA's Science Advisory Board Has Not Met in 6 MonthsAgency officials blame paperwork and the human resources department -- Read more on ScientificAmerican.com
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Dispelling the myth that scientists don't care about teachingSurveys and an analysis of classroom noise levels show the success of a three-year effort by the San Francisco State University Biology Department to get smarter about teaching.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

Chemists use technology to decode language of lipid-protein interactionTechnology has a massive impact on our day-to-day lives, right down to the cellular level within our own bodies. Chemists are using it to determine how lipids talk to each other when they interact with membrane proteins, one of the primary targets for drug discovery and potential treatments for any number of different diseases.
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The Atlantic

It's Time for Drag Race to Move Past the BinaryThis article contains spoilers for the latest episode of RuPaul’s Drag Race All Stars. Last week on RuPaul’s Drag Race All Stars , a fake ’50s housewife named BenDeLaCreme rewrote reality in Wite-Out. Every episode, the two top contestants fight a lip-sync battle, and the victor sends one of their competitors home—by revealing a preselected tube of lipstick with the doomed queen’s name on it. Thi
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Study reveals how the brain tracks objects in motionIn their new study, researchers from MIT found that people make much more accurate estimates when they have access to information about both the speed of a moving object and the timing of its rhythmic patterns.
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Lithium-related discovery could extend battery life and improve safetyNew research from Arizona State University shows using a 3-dimensional layer of Polydimethylsiloxane (PDMS) as the substrate of lithium metal anode has been found to mitigate dendrite formation and stands to both dramatically extend battery life and diminish safety risks.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Facebook, Twitter urged to do more to police hate on sitesTech giants Facebook, Twitter and Google are taking steps to police terrorists and hate groups on their sites but more work needs to be done, the Simon Wiesenthal Center said Tuesday.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Not so big chill: Arctic finishes warmest winter on recordWinter at the top of the world wimped out this year.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Canada expedition to livecast exploration of Pacific depthsA scientific expedition is set to unveil to Web surfers the secrets of unexplored parts of the Pacific seabed along the pristine coast of British Columbia, the Canadian government announced on Tuesday.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

False story says archaeologists unearth Exodus evidenceArchaeologists did not unearth the bones of Egyptian soldiers, weapons and chariots to prove the biblical account of the parting of the Red Sea, despite the false claims of many stories reporting otherwise.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

Spicing it up: High school students may prefer seasoned veggies over plainHigh school students may prefer seasoned vegetables more than plain, according to researchers who hope that this will lead to students liking and eating more veggies, and result in less food waste in school.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

Nanotechnology treasure troveScientists have identified more than 1,000 materials with a particularly interesting 2-D structure.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

Green spaces in cities help control floods, store carbonA new study shows that urban green spaces like backyards, city parks and golf courses contribute substantially to the ecological fabric of our cities -- and the wider landscape -- and they need to be added to the data ecologists currently use when exploring big questions about our natural world.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

Chlorine bleach is main ingredient in toxic cocktail that destroys bacteriaCertain white blood cells protect us from bacteria by engulfing them. A research team has now observed the process under the microscope, thanks to novel fluorescent proteins.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Hubble finds huge system of dusty material enveloping the young star HR 4796AAstronomers have used NASA's Hubble Space Telescope to uncover a vast, complex dust structure, about 150 billion miles across, enveloping the young star HR 4796A. A bright, narrow, inner ring of dust is already known to encircle the star and may have been corralled by the gravitational pull of an unseen giant planet. This newly discovered huge structure around the system may have implications for
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Research finds marine reserves sustain broader fishing effortsNew research from Florida Institute of Technology finds that fish born in marine reserves where fishing is prohibited grow to be larger, healthier and more successful at reproduction.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Marketers should match selling cues to products as well as to customersDescribing a toothpaste as "limited edition" or a Rolls Royce as a "best-seller" would sound off-key or even confusing to most consumers and could well steer them away from making a purchase. That's because, new research shows, individuals are inclined to have different mindsets depending on their consumption goals, and marketers should tailor their messages accordingly.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Einstein letter fetches $100,000 at Jerusalem auctionA letter penned by legendary physicist Albert Einstein discussing one of his groundbreaking theories sold in Jerusalem Tuesday for over $100,000 as part of trove of documents that went under the hammer.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Reality television played a key role in taking Trump from apprentice to presidentThere are many factors that account for Donald Trump's 2016 presidential election victory, but Americans would be doing a disservice to their understanding of the country's political system by ignoring Trump's 14-year starring role as a reality television personality, according to Shira Gabriel, an associate professor in the University at Buffalo Department of Psychology.
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The Atlantic

What If Trump's North Korea Bluster Actually Worked?North Korean US SouthPresident Trump has threatened to “ totally destroy North Korea ,” respond with “ fire and fury ” to its nuclear weapons, and said “they’re going to be in trouble like few nations ever have been in trouble in this world.” His remarks have caused commentators, including at The Atlantic , to worry that Trump could essentially taunt Kim Jong Un into a war . And then, suddenly, South Korea said Tuesd
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The Atlantic

23andMe Will Now Test for BRCA Breast-Cancer GenesOn Tuesday, 23andMe announced it will start telling customers of its mail-in DNA-testing kit about three mutations in the breast-cancer genes BRCA1 and BRCA2—a move officially sanctioned by the Food and Drug Administration. “My first thought is: We’re not in 2013 anymore, Toto,” says Misha Angrist, an associate professor at Duke University, who has followed 23andMe’s troubles with the FDA. In 201
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

Link between heart attacks and inflammatory bowel diseaseMedical researchers recently concluded a study of more than 22 million patients that suggests a strong connection between Inflammatory Bowel Disease (IBD) and the development of heart disease and heart attacks.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

Reshaping energy landscape of phonons in nanocrystalsPhonons, which are packets of vibrational waves that propagate in solids, play a key role in condensed matter and are involved in various physical properties of materials. In nanotechnology, for example, they affect light emission and charge transport of nanodevices. As the main source of energy dissipation in solid-state systems, phonons are the ultimate bottleneck that limits the operation of fu
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

Estimating lives saved by England's NHS Health Check programThe NHS Health Check program is estimated to prevent around 300 premature deaths and results in more people living free of cardiovascular disease in England each year, according to a new study. Feasible changes in the delivery of the program could result in up to a three-fold increase in the benefits.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

Mosquito gut may hold the key to preventing Dengue and ZikaA mosquito's ability to replicate and transmit a virus depends on the metabolic environment of tissues in its midgut: the primary site of infection. By targeting the sphingolipid pathway, which links together several pathways important for cell signaling and subcellular structure that are altered by virus infection, researchers could devise strategies that stall viral replication in the mosquito a
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

Physicists lay groundwork to better understand the birth of the universeScientists have developed the first techniques for describing the thermodynamics of very small systems with very high energy -- like the universe at the start of the Big Bang -- which could lead to a better understanding of the birth of the universe and other cosmological phenomena.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

Current deforestation pace will intensify global warming, study alertsScientists affirms the prolongation of an annual deforestation of 7,000 square km can nullify the efforts for reducing GHG emissions. The study brings a new assessment on the importance of tropical forests in world climate regulation, and calculates a 0,8 °C rise on Earth's temperature in a scenario in which they are extinct.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

Major step found in cellular response to stress caused by pathological insultA new study has revealed how a key protein residing in the endoplasmic reticulum (ER) helps cells respond to stress. This process is especially important for B cells to respond to severe stress conditions and their ability to produce antibodies.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Linking virus sensing with gene expression, a plant immune system course-correctsPlant immune systems, like those of humans and animals, face a difficult balancing act: they must mount responses against ever-evolving pathogens, but they must not overdo it. Immune responses require energy and resources and often involve plants killing their own infected cells to prevent the pathogens from spreading.
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TED Talks Daily (SD video)

How fashion helps us express who we are -- and what we stand for | Kaustav DeyNo one thinks twice about a woman wearing blue jeans in New York City -- but when Nobel laureate Malala wears them, it's a political act. Around the globe, individuality can be a crime, and clothing can be a form of protest. In a talk about the power of what we wear, Kaustav Dey examines how fashion gives us a nonverbal language of dissent and encourages us to embrace our authentic selves.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

Little difference among diet plans' long-term effectivenessWhether you pick low-carb, low fat or another diet plan, scientific research indicates each can help some people achieve modest long-term weight loss with potential improvement in health risks, according to a statement on managing obesity.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

Linking virus sensing with gene expression, a plant immune system course-correctsResearchers have identified a crucial link in the process of how plants regulate their antiviral responses.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

No fish story! Research finds marine reserves sustain broader fishing effortsIn their examination of marine reserves, also known as marine protected areas or MPAs, around coral reefs in the Philippines, Robert Fidler and Ralph Turingan found evidence that MPAs helped to produce and maintain the more desirable, large-bodied and older fish within populations that have been fished by local fishermen for centuries.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

BlackBerry sues Facebook over messaging apps (Update)Canadian telecommunications firm BlackBerry sued Facebook on Tuesday, accusing the American social media company of infringing on its patents for messaging apps.
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Popular Science

Some people's brains make them hear color and taste sounds. Genetics may explain why.Science Unraveling the real sixth sense. Researchers are beginning to unravel the molecular and genetic basis of sound-color synesthesia.
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New on MIT Technology Review

Uber’s self-driving truck plan relies heavily on humansUber Trucks Arizona
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The Atlantic

The Italian ImplosionROME—In Italy’s national elections on Sunday , Marco Minniti , Italy’s interior minister, a long-time spy chief and a member of the center-left Democratic Party, was soundly defeated in his parliamentary race by a candidate without a party. The winner was a man who had been kicked out of the anti-establishment Five-Star Movement because he admitted he’d broken a party rule and not tithed part of
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Different strokes for different folksIndividuals are inclined to have different mindsets depending on their consumption goals, and marketers should tailor their messages accordingly.
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News

BODE may overestimate transplant benefit in COPD patientsIn a new study published in the journal CHEST®, researchers aimed to determine if patients selected as transplant candidates have a better survival rate than the BODE score indicates.
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Researchers reshape the energy landscape of phonons in nanocrystalsPhonons, which are packets of vibrational waves that propagate in solids, play a key role in condensed matter and are involved in various physical properties of materials. In nanotechnology, for example, they affect light emission and charge transport of nanodevices. As the main source of energy dissipation in solid-state systems, phonons are the ultimate bottleneck that limits the operation of fu
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

Broad spectrum antiviral drug inhibits a range of emerging coronavirusesResearchers have long known that RNA viruses called coronaviruses cause the common cold and pneumonia. In the last two decades or so, though, researchers have found that these viruses can jump between animal and human hosts. In recent years, coronaviruses have caused lethal outbreaks of severe acute respiratory syndrome (SARS) and Middle East respiratory syndrome (MERS) that span multiple continen
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

The degradation status of modern polymeric museum artifacts can be classified by their smellBreath analysis in disease diagnostics is a promising research field, and the advances in instrumentation allows the accurate detection of metabolites. But not only the health status of patients, but also the preservation status of museum artifacts could be monitored. Heritage science researchers have investigated emissions of volatile organic compounds from plastics-based art objects and provided
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Live Science

The 'Skyrmion' May Have Solved the Mystery of Ball LightningAn experiment on ultracold atoms may have revealed the electromagnetic knot that traps the hot plasma of ball lightning.
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Live Science

Long-Lost Footage of 1906 San Francisco Earthquake Discovered at Flea MarketThis haunting film reel was lost for 100 years. Soon, the world will see its contents.
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The Atlantic

How It Feels to Be a Problem“Between me and the other world, there is ever an unasked question: How does it feel to be a problem?” That’s W.E.B. Du Bois, sociologist, historian, writer, and one of the co-founders of the NAACP, writing for The Atlantic in 1897. His article, “Strivings of the Negro People,” addresses the alienation experienced by emancipated slaves and their families three decades later—or, in his words, “the
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Science : NPR

After Decades Of Air Pollution, A Louisiana Town Rebels Against A Chemical GiantNeighborhoods around a Louisiana chemical plant have the highest cancer risk in the U.S. Residents felt powerless, until the Environmental Protection Agency released data on what they were breathing. (Image credit: Julie Dermansky)
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Live Science

Images: Rare Footage of the Devastation of the 1906 San Francisco EarthquakeThe devastation of the 1906 San Francisco earthquake is revealed through this long-lost footage discovered at a California flea market.
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New on MIT Technology Review

23andMe can now sell a genetic test for breast cancer to anyone who wants one
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The Scientist RSS

First Direct-to-Consumer BRCA Test Approved by FDAThe agency gave personal genomics company 23andMe the green light to screen samples for breast cancer-related genetic mutations.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

Scientists find power switch for musclesIf you've ever wondered how strenuous exercise translates into better endurance, researchers may now have your answer. Scientists have shown that the protein ERR? (ERR gamma) helps deliver many of the benefits associated with endurance exercise.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

The body's 'glucostat' identifiedIt is the pancreatic islets that have the overall responsibility for maintaining normal blood glucose levels in our bodies, according to a new study. The findings have important implications for certain diabetes treatments.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

Novel biomarkers for future dementia riskMedical researchers have identified novel biomarkers of risk for future dementia.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

A new tactic for eczema?Existing treatments for eczema, which affects about 17 percent of children in developed countries, are expensive or have side effects. A new study suggests a different approach to eczema, one that stimulates a natural brake on the allergic attack, made by T regulatory cells in the skin.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

Hubble finds huge system of dusty material enveloping the young star HR 4796AAstronomers have used NASA's Hubble Space Telescope to uncover a vast, complex dust structure, about 150 billion miles across, enveloping the young star HR 4796A.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

Scientists engineer crops to conserve water, resist droughtFor the first time, scientists have improved how a crop uses water by 25 percent, without compromising yield, by altering the expression of one gene that is found in all plants.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

Engineering a new spin for disease diagnosticsResearchers have created a new platform with the potential to extract tiny circulating biomarkers of disease from patient blood. This simple, fast and convenient technique could help realize liquid biopsy diagnostics -- a less invasive procedure than the current gold standard: tumor biopsies.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

A simple trick for modeling calciumCalcium ions enable cells to communicate with one another, allowing neurons to interact, muscles to contract, and the heart's muscle cells to synchronize and beat. To better understand these processes, researchers often use computer simulations, but accurate models are challenging and computationally expensive. Researchers demonstrate how a straightforward modification in a computer model leads to
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Moving toward a future free of drug-induced hearing lossA new special publication orchestrated by five of the nation's leading hearing experts compiles the latest research into hearing loss caused by drugs and solvents -- how it occurs, how to treat it, and how to prevent it. The compilation is being published online as a special research topic by the journal Frontiers in Cellular Neuroscience.
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Popular Science

Tattoos are permanent, but the science behind them just shiftedScience Your body never stops trying to contain the situation. If you ask most people how tattoos work, they’re likely to get it a little bit wrong. But a new study suggests we were all a little off the mark.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

Running on renewables: How sure can we be about the future?A variety of models predict the role renewables will play in 2050, but some may be over-optimistic, and should be used with caution, say researchers.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

New method to improve cropsResearchers have developed a new way to breed plants with better traits. By introducing a human protein into the model plant species Arabidopsis thaliana, researchers found that they could selectively activate silenced genes already present within the plant.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

People with depression have stronger emotional responses to negative memoriesPeople with major depressive disorder (MDD) feel more negative emotion when remembering painful experiences than people without the disorder, according to a new study. The study reports that people with MDD were able to control the negative emotions about as well as people unaffected by MDD, but used somewhat different brain circuits to do so.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

Waterfalls offer insights into how rivers shape their surroundsThe amount of water flowing through a river has little influence over long-term changes to its course and the surrounding landscape, research into waterfalls has shown.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

Ancient reptile Captorhinus could detach its tail to escape predator's graspA new study shows how a group of small reptiles who lived 289 million years ago could detach their tails to escape the grasp of their would-be predators -- the oldest known example of such behavior.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

Logo recognition associated with kids' choice of international junk foodsYoung children in six low- and middle-income countries prefer junk foods over traditional and home cooked meals, according to a new study. Researchers investigated the links between marketing and media exposure and the preference for fast food in Brazil, China, India, Nigeria, Pakistan, and Russia. Kids who easily identified the logos of international brands were more likely to request and prefer
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

Pain's origins may be significantly different in males and femalesNew research supports the growing consensus that pain begins differently for men and women at the cellular level. Medical researchers recently found that a specific manipulation of receptors in the nervous system for the neurotransmitter dopamine impairs chronic pain in male mice, but has no effect on females.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

Unclassified version of new report predicts small drone threats to infantry unitsThe emergence of inexpensive small unmanned aircraft systems (sUASs) that operate without a human pilot, commonly known as drones, has led to adversarial groups threatening deployed U.S. forces, especially infantry units.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

Our circadian clock sets the rhythm for our cells’ powerhousesCellular energy metabolism also follows the rhythm of the circadian clock. A new study has now shown exactly how this works by revealing the relationship between the circadian rhythm and the mitochondrial network for the first time.
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Live Science

Linebacker with One Hand Wows NFL: What Is Amniotic Band Syndrome?College football player Shaquem Griffin lost his left hand when he was 4 years old due to amniotic band syndrome.
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Linking virus sensing with gene expression, a plant immune system course-correctsResearchers at Durham University in the UK have identified a crucial link in the process of how plants regulate their antiviral responses. The research is published in the March 2 issue of the Journal of Biological Chemistry.
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Spicing it up: High school students may prefer seasoned veggies over plainHigh school students may prefer seasoned vegetables more than plain, according to Penn State researchers who hope that this will lead to students liking and eating more veggies, and result in less food waste in school.
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New on MIT Technology Review

The Defense Department is taking on ISIS with Google’s open-source AI software
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

Rigor mortis in worms offers new insight into deathA dying worm experiences rigor mortis early in the death process, rather than after the main event as it is for humans, according to a new study.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

Bioengineering team's 'circuit' work may benefit gene therapyResearchers have designed genetic 'circuits' out of living cellular material in order to gain a better understanding of how proteins function, with the goal of making improvements.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

Couples do poorly at knowing when their partner is sad or feeling downCouples do poorly at knowing when their partner is sad, lonely or feeling down, finds a new study. Couples do pretty well at picking up one another's more intense feelings, like happiness or anger, but they aren't as sensitive to 'soft negative' emotions. Since spouses are each other's primary source of social support, it's important they stay attuned to each other, said the psychologist who led t
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

CRISPR enhances cancer immunotherapyThe FDA recently approved the first cellular immunotherapies to treat certain blood cancers. But so far, these T cell immunotherapies can't be used if the T cells themselves are cancerous. Such 'CAR-T' cells kill each other because they resemble one another so closely. Scientists now have used the gene-editing technology CRISPR to engineer human T cells that can attack human T cell cancers without
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

Overlooked cell key player in preventing age-related vision lossResearchers have pinpointed a new therapeutic target for macular degeneration, an eye disease that affects over 10 million Americans and is the leading cause of blindness in adults over 60. The findings show that tree-shaped retinal cells called Müller glia play a key role in preventing degenerative vision loss in rats.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

Frequent 'I-Talk' may signal proneness to emotional distressPeople who talk a lot about themselves are not narcissists as one might expect. Instead, those who say 'I' and 'me' a lot may be prone to depression, anxiety and other negative emotions, researchers found.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

Shifting tundra vegetation spells change for arctic animalsFor nearly two decades, scientists have noted dramatic changes in arctic tundra habitat. Researchers set out to discover what could be behind the changes.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

How tattoos are maintained by macrophages could be key to improving their removalResearchers in France have discovered that, though a tattoo may be forever, the skin cells that carry the tattoo pigment are not. Instead, the researchers say, the cells can pass on the pigment to new cells when they die. The study suggests ways to improve the ability of laser surgery to remove unwanted tattoos.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

Teaching computers to guide science: Machine learning method sees forests and treesWhile it may be the era of supercomputers and 'big data,' without smart methods to mine all that data, it's only so much digital detritus. Now researchers have come up with a novel machine learning method that enables scientists to derive insights from systems of previously intractable complexity in record time.
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Research finds little difference among diet plans' long-term effectivenessWhether you pick low-carb, low fat or another diet plan, scientific research indicates each can help some people achieve modest long-term weight loss with potential improvement in health risks, according to the Scientific Statement the Endocrine Society issued today on managing obesity.
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News

UH researchers uncover link between heart attacks and inflammatory bowel diseaseUniversity Hospitals Harrington Heart & Vascular Institute researchers Muhammad Panhwar, MD, and Mahazarin Ginwalla, MD, recently concluded a study of more than 22 million patients that suggests a strong connection between Inflammatory Bowel Disease (IBD) and the development of heart disease and heart attacks.
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News

No fish story! Research finds marine reserves sustain broader fishing effortsIn their examination of marine reserves, also known as marine protected areas or MPAs, around coral reefs in the Philippines, Robert Fidler and Ralph Turingan found evidence that MPAs helped to produce and maintain the more desirable, large-bodied and older fish within populations that have been fished by local fishermen for centuries.
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Current deforestation pace will intensify global warming, study alertsIn a Nature Communications article, international group of scientists affirms the prolongation of an annual deforestation of 7,000 square km can nullify the efforts for reducing GHG emissions. The study brings a new assessment on the importance of tropical forests in world climate regulation, and calculates a 0,8 °C rise on Earth's temperature in a scenario in which they are extinct.
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News

High uptake and use of vaginal ring for HIV prevention observed in open-label studyNearly 90 percent of participants in an open-label study of a vaginal ring infused with a drug to prevent HIV are using the monthly ring at least some of the time, according to an interim analysis of study data. Additionally, the rate of HIV infection among participants in the study, which has no placebo arm for comparison, is half of what might be expected without the ring, according to mathemati
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Mouse healing may reveal targets to delay or prevent human heart failureIn a study of mouse healing after severe heart attacks, which may reveal therapeutic targets that can help humans avoid or delay heart failure, researchers looked at the heart and spleen over time and measured the types and numbers of immune cells involved; the types and amounts of lipid signaling compounds produced; the expression of the enzymes that produce those signaling compounds; and which e
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Chronic ill-health and the chances of surviving a heart attackNew research has identified the devastating impact of pre-existing health problems on recovery from a heart attack.
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Popular Science

Cryptocurrency millionaires are pushing up prices on some art and collectiblesTechnology The rise of Bitcoin and its ilk have seriously shifted some collectible prices. Magic: The Gathering and other markets have jumped thanks to cryptocurrency investors.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

New way to potentially fight EbolaResearchers have shown an innovative antibody delivery method could be an effective way to prevent and treat Ebola infection. They demonstrated that delivering a monoclonal antibody gene to a cell through a viral vector -- a process that bypasses the need for the host to generate a natural immune response -- provided up to 100-per-cent protection against infection in mice. The mice expressed the a
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

For blind gamers, equal access to racing video gamesA computer scientist has developed the RAD -- a racing auditory display -- to enable visually impaired gamers play the same types of racing games that sighted players play with the same speed, control, and excitement as sighted players. Developers can integrate the audio-based interface, which a player can listen to using a standard pair of headphones, into almost any racing video game, making a p
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Physicists lay groundwork to better understand the birth of the universeSebastian Deffner at UMBC and Anthony Bartolotta at Caltech have developed the first techniques for describing the thermodynamics of very small systems with very high energy -- like the universe at the start of the Big Bang -- which could lead to a better understanding of the birth of the universe and other cosmological phenomena. The work builds on the burgeoning field of quantum stochastic therm
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NYT > Science

Google Researchers Are Learning How Machines LearnSo-called neural networks have greatly advanced artificial intelligence. But understanding how computers make their decisions can be difficult.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

Where fresh is cool in Bay of BengalEach summer, the South Asian monsoon transforms parts of India from semi-arid into lush green lands able to support farming. The annual infusion of rainfall and resulting runoff into the Ganges, Brahmaputra, and other rivers in the region also has a very different, but no less dramatic, impact on the Bay of Bengal in the northeast Indian Ocean.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

Environmental exposures more determinant of respiratory health than inherited geneticsResearchers have found strong evidence that environmental exposures, including air pollution, affect gene expressions associated with respiratory diseases much more than genetic ancestry. The study analyzed more than 1.6 million data points from biological specimens, health questionnaires and environmental datasets, making this study one of the largest ever to examine the relationship between gene
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

Teachers, pedagogical skills, and the obstacle of intuitionWhen a task calls for intuitive, its complexity goes unnoticed. However, when intuitions are not mobilized, the task is considered difficult, and seemingly requires the use of specific educational strategies. Researchers have demonstrated that teachers struggle to understand the difficulties encountered by pupils when attempting to solve apparently intuitive problems that are in fact difficult. Th
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

Technique allows live imaging of 'ubiquitous' player in cellular housekeepingAutophagy is an important regulator of cellular housekeeping that uses ubiquitin to target and remove harmful proteins. However, the ubiquitin chains used in this process are complex and incompletely understood. Researchers have developed a system that allows ubiquitin chains to be imaged in living cells, and identified a ubiquitin residue previously not known to be involved in autophagy. The syst
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

Metal-free Catalyst Extends the Range of Ester SynthesisResearchers produce valuable esters in high yield using environment-friendly catalyst.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

Who makes the NCAA tournament?The field for NCAA Tournament will be announced March 11, and basketball fans want to know which teams will be a part of March Madness. Researchers may have discovered the secret to forecasting the field. They also make a case that the much-maligned RPI really is a dependable tool for tournament decision-makers.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

Strict eating schedule can lower Huntington disease protein in miceNew research suggests that following a strict eating schedule can help clear away the protein responsible for Huntington disease in mice.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

Glaciers in Mongolia's Gobi Desert actually shrank during the last ice ageHigh in Mongolia's Gobi Desert, the climate is so dry and cold that glaciers shrank during the last ice age. Dating of rock deposits shows how glaciers in this less-studied region behave very differently as the climate shifts.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

Towards an unconscious neural reinforcement intervention for common fearsScientists have moved one major step towards the development of a novel form of brain-based treatment for phobia that may soon be applicable to patients.
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Big Think

SpaceX sent a satellite “the size of a city bus” into space, marking Falcon 9's 50th launchMarch 6 marked the 50th successful launch of SpaceX’s Falcon 9, which the company plans to soon use to send humans into space. Read More
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Mosquito gut may hold the key to preventing dengue and ZikaA mosquito's ability to replicate and transmit a virus depends on the metabolic environment of tissues in its midgut: the primary site of infection. By targeting the sphingolipid pathway, which links together several pathways important for cell signaling and subcellular structure that are altered by virus infection, researchers could devise strategies that stall viral replication in the mosquito a
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Study: 'Dual mobility' hip replacement reduces risk of dislocationDislocation is one of the most common complications after hip replacement and the number one reason for revision surgery. Researchers at Hospital for Special Surgery found that study patients who received a newer implant known as a 'dual mobility' hip replacement had zero dislocations.
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Interim open-label study results suggest higher dapivirine vaginal ring use, lower HIV riskInterim data from a large open-label study of the monthly dapivirine ring have found increased product use compared to a previous Phase III study. In addition, modeling data suggest that women's HIV-1 risk in the open-label study, known as DREAM, was reduced by more than half. Developed by the nonprofit International Partnership for Microbicides (IPM), the monthly ring slowly releases the antiretr
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Reality television played a key role in taking Trump from apprentice to presidentMany factors account for Donald Trump's presidential election victory, but Americans would be doing a disservice to their understanding of the country's political system by ignoring his role as a reality television personality, according to a forthcoming study that is the first to scientifically examine how parasocial relationships formed through 'The Apprentice' and "The Celebrity Apprentice" con
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Women's use of vaginal ring is higher in open-label study, as is level of HIV protectionMidway into a study in which all participants are offered use of a monthly vaginal ring containing an antiretroviral drug called dapivirine, researchers have seen women's risk of acquiring HIV reduced by more than half. Preliminary results of the HOPE open-label study of the dapivirine ring also suggest that women are using the ring more than they did in the parent ASPIRE Phase III trial, research
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

Who's a good boy? Why 'dog-speak' is important for bonding with your petScientists have shown that the way we speak to our canine friends is important in relationship-building between pet and owner, similar to the way that 'baby-talk' is to bonding between a baby and an adult.
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Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences current issue

Reply to Rosenberg et al.: Diet, gut bacteria, and assortative mating in Drosophila melanogaster [Biological Sciences]Rosenberg et al. (1) suggest that the lack of evidence for assortative mating we reported (2) in comparison with a previous study (3) could be due to gut microbiomes in Drosophila melanogaster being affected by differing dietary history before culturing on the CMY (0.65% agar, 7.6% cornmeal, 7.6% molasses, 5%...
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Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences current issue

Heritability of trust and distrust remains unknown [Social Sciences]In “Trust is heritable, whereas distrust is not,” Reimann et al. (1) analyze data from monozygotic (MZ) and dizygotic (DZ) twins and conclude that “the disposition to trust is explained to some extent by heritability but not by shared socialization, [whereas] the disposition to distrust is explained by shared socialization...
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Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences current issue

Reply to Goldfarb et al.: On the heritability and socialization of trust and distrust [Social Sciences]Our article (1) presents evidence for the heritability of trust and the shared socialization of distrust. Goldfarb et al. (2) downloaded our dataset, which we had made publicly available for all researchers. We thank them for their reanalysis, which precisely replicated all point estimates reported in our article (1). Our...
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Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences current issue

Diet-induced mating preference in Drosophila [Biological Sciences]Diet-induced mating preference was initially observed by Dodd (1). Subsequently, we reported that diet-induced mating preference occurred in Drosophila melanogaster. Treatment of the flies with antibiotics abolished the mating preference, suggesting that fly-associated commensal bacteria were responsible for the phenomenon (2). The hypothesis was confirmed when it was shown that...
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Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences current issue

Fast flow-based algorithm for creating density-equalizing map projections [Applied Mathematics]Cartograms are maps that rescale geographic regions (e.g., countries, districts) such that their areas are proportional to quantitative demographic data (e.g., population size, gross domestic product). Unlike conventional bar or pie charts, cartograms can represent correctly which regions share common borders, resulting in insightful visualizations that can be the basis...
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Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences current issue

Mitotic waves in the early embryogenesis of Drosophila: Bistability traded for speed [Biophysics and Computational Biology]Early embryogenesis of most metazoans is characterized by rapid and synchronous cleavage divisions. Chemical waves of Cdk1 activity were previously shown to spread across Drosophila embryos, and the underlying molecular processes were dissected. Here, we present the theory of the physical mechanisms that control Cdk1 waves in Drosophila. The in...
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Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences current issue

Prospective forecasts of annual dengue hemorrhagic fever incidence in Thailand, 2010-2014 [Statistics]Dengue hemorrhagic fever (DHF), a severe manifestation of dengue viral infection that can cause severe bleeding, organ impairment, and even death, affects between 15,000 and 105,000 people each year in Thailand. While all Thai provinces experience at least one DHF case most years, the distribution of cases shifts regionally from...
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Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences current issue

OligoMiner provides a rapid, flexible environment for the design of genome-scale oligonucleotide in situ hybridization probes [Applied Biological Sciences]Oligonucleotide (oligo)-based FISH has emerged as an important tool for the study of chromosome organization and gene expression and has been empowered by the commercial availability of highly complex pools of oligos. However, a dedicated bioinformatic design utility has yet to be created specifically for the purpose of identifying optimal...
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Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences current issue

Entropy drives selective fluorine recognition in the fluoroacetyl-CoA thioesterase from Streptomyces cattleya [Biochemistry]Fluorinated small molecules play an important role in the design of bioactive compounds for a broad range of applications. As such, there is strong interest in developing a deeper understanding of how fluorine affects the interaction of these ligands with their targets. Given the small number of fluorinated metabolites identified...
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Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences current issue

Translational control in the tumor microenvironment promotes lung metastasis: Phosphorylation of eIF4E in neutrophils [Biochemistry]The translation of mRNAs into proteins serves as a critical regulatory event in gene expression. In the context of cancer, deregulated translation is a hallmark of transformation, promoting the proliferation, survival, and metastatic capabilities of cancer cells. The best-studied factor involved in the translational control of cancer is the eukaryotic...
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Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences current issue

Functional and physical interaction between yeast Hsp90 and Hsp70 [Biochemistry]Heat shock protein 90 (Hsp90) is a highly conserved ATP-dependent molecular chaperone that is essential in eukaryotes. It is required for the activation and stabilization of more than 200 client proteins, including many kinases and steroid hormone receptors involved in cell-signaling pathways. Hsp90 chaperone activity requires collaboration with a subset...
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Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences current issue

Porin self-association enables cell-to-cell contact in Providencia stuartii floating communities [Biophysics and Computational Biology]The gram-negative pathogen Providencia stuartii forms floating communities within which adjacent cells are in apparent contact, before depositing as canonical surface-attached biofilms. Because porins are the most abundant proteins in the outer membrane of gram-negative bacteria, we hypothesized that they could be involved in cell-to-cell contact and undertook a structure-function...
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Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences current issue

Tracking the route of molecular oxygen in O2-tolerant membrane-bound [NiFe] hydrogenase [Biophysics and Computational Biology][NiFe] hydrogenases catalyze the reversible splitting of H2 into protons and electrons at a deeply buried active site. The catalytic center can be accessed by gas molecules through a hydrophobic tunnel network. While most [NiFe] hydrogenases are inactivated by O2, a small subgroup, including the membrane-bound [NiFe] hydrogenase (MBH) of...
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Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences current issue

Light-activated protein interaction with high spatial subcellular confinement [Cell Biology]Methods to acutely manipulate protein interactions at the subcellular level are powerful tools in cell biology. Several blue-light-dependent optical dimerization tools have been developed. In these systems one protein component of the dimer (the bait) is directed to a specific subcellular location, while the other component (the prey) is fused...
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Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences current issue

STED nanoscopy of the centrosome linker reveals a CEP68-organized, periodic rootletin network anchored to a C-Nap1 ring at centrioles [Cell Biology]The centrosome linker proteins C-Nap1, rootletin, and CEP68 connect the two centrosomes of a cell during interphase into one microtubule-organizing center. This coupling is important for cell migration, cilia formation, and timing of mitotic spindle formation. Very little is known about the structure of the centrosome linker. Here, we used...
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Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences current issue

Robo and Ror function in a common receptor complex to regulate Wnt-mediated neurite outgrowth in Caenorhabditis elegans [Developmental Biology]Growing axons are exposed to various guidance cues en route to their targets, but the mechanisms that govern the response of growth cones to combinations of signals remain largely elusive. Here, we found that the sole Robo receptor, SAX-3, in Caenorhabditis elegans functions as a coreceptor for Wnt/CWN-2 molecules. SAX-3...
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Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences current issue

Global rise in emerging alien species results from increased accessibility of new source pools [Ecology]Our ability to predict the identity of future invasive alien species is largely based upon knowledge of prior invasion history. Emerging alien species—those never encountered as aliens before—therefore pose a significant challenge to biosecurity interventions worldwide. Understanding their temporal trends, origins, and the drivers of their spread is pivotal to...
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Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences current issue

The timescale of early land plant evolution [Evolution]Establishing the timescale of early land plant evolution is essential for testing hypotheses on the coevolution of land plants and Earth’s System. The sparseness of early land plant megafossils and stratigraphic controls on their distribution make the fossil record an unreliable guide, leaving only the molecular clock. However, the application...
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Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences current issue

Climate-mediated hybrid zone movement revealed with genomics, museum collection, and simulation modeling [Evolution]Climate-mediated changes in hybridization will dramatically alter the genetic diversity, adaptive capacity, and evolutionary trajectory of interbreeding species. Our ability to predict the consequences of such changes will be key to future conservation and management decisions. Here we tested through simulations how recent warming (over the course of a 32-y...
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Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences current issue

NLR surveillance of essential SEC-9 SNARE proteins induces programmed cell death upon allorecognition in filamentous fungi [Genetics]In plants and metazoans, intracellular receptors that belong to the NOD-like receptor (NLR) family are major contributors to innate immunity. Filamentous fungal genomes contain large repertoires of genes encoding for proteins with similar architecture to plant and animal NLRs with mostly unknown function. Here, we identify and molecularly characterize patatin-like...
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Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences current issue

Carbon monoxide protects the kidney through the central circadian clock and CD39 [Immunology and Inflammation]Ischemia reperfusion injury (IRI) is the predominant tissue insult associated with organ transplantation. Treatment with carbon monoxide (CO) modulates the innate immune response associated with IRI and accelerates tissue recovery. The mechanism has been primarily descriptive and ascribed to the ability of CO to influence inflammation, cell death, and repair....
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Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences current issue

Genetic rescue of lineage-balanced blood cell production reveals a crucial role for STAT3 antiinflammatory activity in hematopoiesis [Immunology and Inflammation]Blood cell formation must be appropriately maintained throughout life to provide robust immune function, hemostasis, and oxygen delivery to tissues, and to prevent disorders that result from over- or underproduction of critical lineages. Persistent inflammation deregulates hematopoiesis by damaging hematopoietic stem and progenitor cells (HSPCs), leading to elevated myeloid cell...
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Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences current issue

Role of glutathione metabolism in host defense against Borrelia burgdorferi infection [Immunology and Inflammation]Pathogen-induced changes in host cell metabolism are known to be important for the immune response. In this study, we investigated how infection with the Lyme disease-causing bacterium Borrelia burgdorferi (Bb) affects host metabolic pathways and how these metabolic pathways may impact host defense. First, metabolome analysis was performed on human...
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Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences current issue

MHC-mismatched mixed chimerism restores peripheral tolerance of noncross-reactive autoreactive T cells in NOD mice [Immunology and Inflammation]Autoimmune type 1 diabetes (T1D) and other autoimmune diseases are associated with particular MHC haplotypes and expansion of autoreactive T cells. Induction of MHC-mismatched but not -matched mixed chimerism by hematopoietic cell transplantation effectively reverses autoimmunity in diabetic nonobese diabetic (NOD) mice, even those with established diabetes. As expected, MHC-mismatched...
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Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences current issue

Sarcomeric perturbations of myosin motors lead to dilated cardiomyopathy in genetically modified MYL2 mice [Medical Sciences]Dilated cardiomyopathy (DCM) is a devastating heart disease that affects about 1 million people in the United States, but the underlying mechanisms remain poorly understood. In this study, we aimed to determine the biomechanical and structural causes of DCM in transgenic mice carrying a novel mutation in the MYL2 gene,...
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Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences current issue

Epigenetic alterations in longevity regulators, reduced life span, and exacerbated aging-related pathology in old father offspring mice [Medical Sciences]Advanced age is not only a major risk factor for a range of disorders within an aging individual but may also enhance susceptibility for disease in the next generation. In humans, advanced paternal age has been associated with increased risk for a number of diseases. Experiments in rodent models have...
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Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences current issue

Diagnostic utility of telomere length testing in a hospital-based setting [Medical Sciences]Telomere length (TL) predicts the onset of cellular senescence in vitro but the diagnostic utility of TL measurement in clinical settings is not fully known. We tested the value of TL measurement by flow cytometry and FISH (flowFISH) in patients with mutations in telomerase and telomere maintenance genes. TL had...
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Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences current issue

Rocaglates as dual-targeting agents for experimental cerebral malaria [Microbiology]Cerebral malaria (CM) is a severe and rapidly progressing complication of infection by Plasmodium parasites that is associated with high rates of mortality and morbidity. Treatment options are currently few, and intervention with artemisinin (Art) has limited efficacy, a problem that is compounded by the emergence of resistance to Art...
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Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences current issue

In vivo repressed genes of Vibrio cholerae reveal inverse requirements of an H+/Cl- transporter along the gastrointestinal passage [Microbiology]The facultative human pathogen Vibrio cholerae changes its transcriptional profile upon oral ingestion by the host to facilitate survival and colonization fitness. Here, we used a modified version of recombination-based in vivo expression technology to investigate gene silencing during the in vivo passage, which has been understudied. Using a murine...
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Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences current issue

Defining the sizes of airborne particles that mediate influenza transmission in ferrets [Microbiology]Epidemics and pandemics of influenza are characterized by rapid global spread mediated by non-mutually exclusive transmission modes. The relative significance between contact, droplet, and airborne transmission is yet to be defined, a knowledge gap for implementing evidence-based infection control measures. We devised a transmission chamber that separates virus-laden particles by...
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Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences current issue

Axogenic mechanism enhances retinal ganglion cell excitability during early progression in glaucoma [Neuroscience]Diseases of the brain involve early axon dysfunction that often precedes outright degeneration. Pruning of dendrites and their synapses represents a potential driver of axonopathy by reducing activity. Optic nerve degeneration in glaucoma, the world’s leading cause of irreversible blindness, involves early stress to retinal ganglion cell (RGC) axons from...
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Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences current issue

Environmental enrichment and exercise are better than social enrichment to reduce memory deficits in amyloid beta neurotoxicity [Neuroscience]Recently, nongenetic animal models to study the onset and development of Alzheimer’s disease (AD) have appeared, such as the intrahippocampal infusion of peptides present in Alzheimer amyloid plaques [i.e., amyloid-β (Aβ)]. Nonpharmacological approaches to AD treatment also have been advanced recently, which involve combinations of behavioral interventions whose specific effects...
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Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences current issue

Long-term potentiation expands information content of hippocampal dentate gyrus synapses [Neuroscience]An approach combining signal detection theory and precise 3D reconstructions from serial section electron microscopy (3DEM) was used to investigate synaptic plasticity and information storage capacity at medial perforant path synapses in adult hippocampal dentate gyrus in vivo. Induction of long-term potentiation (LTP) markedly increased the frequencies of both small...
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Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences current issue

Structure-based discovery of selective positive allosteric modulators of antagonists for the M2 muscarinic acetylcholine receptor [Pharmacology]Subtype-selective antagonists for muscarinic acetylcholine receptors (mAChRs) have long been elusive, owing to the highly conserved orthosteric binding site. However, allosteric sites of these receptors are less conserved, motivating the search for allosteric ligands that modulate agonists or antagonists to confer subtype selectivity. Accordingly, a 4.6 million-molecule library was docked...
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Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences current issue

Placental physiology monitored by hyperpolarized dynamic 13C magnetic resonance [Physiology]Placental functions, including transport and metabolism, play essential roles in pregnancy. This study assesses such processes in vivo, from a hyperpolarized MRI perspective. Hyperpolarized urea, bicarbonate, and pyruvate were administered to near-term pregnant rats, and all metabolites displayed distinctive behaviors. Little evidence of placental barrier crossing was observed for bicarbonate,...
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Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences current issue

Desynchrony between brain and peripheral clocks caused by CK1{delta}/ϵ disruption in GABA neurons does not lead to adverse metabolic outcomes [Physiology]Circadian disruption as a result of shift work is associated with adverse metabolic consequences. Internal desynchrony between the phase of the suprachiasmatic nuclei (SCN) and peripheral clocks is widely believed to be a major factor contributing to these adverse consequences, but this hypothesis has never been tested directly. A GABAergic...
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Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences current issue

Transcriptome dynamics at Arabidopsis graft junctions reveal an intertissue recognition mechanism that activates vascular regeneration [Plant Biology]The ability for cut tissues to join and form a chimeric organism is a remarkable property of many plants; however, grafting is poorly characterized at the molecular level. To better understand this process, we monitored genome-wide gene expression changes in grafted Arabidopsis thaliana hypocotyls. We observed a sequential activation of...
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Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences current issue

Distinct sets of tethering complexes, SNARE complexes, and Rab GTPases mediate membrane fusion at the vacuole in Arabidopsis [Plant Biology]Membrane trafficking plays pivotal roles in various cellular activities and higher-order functions of eukaryotes and requires tethering factors to mediate contact between transport intermediates and target membranes. Two evolutionarily conserved tethering complexes, homotypic fusion and protein sorting (HOPS) and class C core vacuole/endosome tethering (CORVET), are known to act in...
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Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences current issue

Fundamental limits on dynamic inference from single-cell snapshots [Systems Biology]Single-cell expression profiling reveals the molecular states of individual cells with unprecedented detail. Because these methods destroy cells in the process of analysis, they cannot measure how gene expression changes over time. However, some information on dynamics is present in the data: the continuum of molecular states in the population...
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Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences current issue

Cooption of heat shock regulatory system for anhydrobiosis in the sleeping chironomid Polypedilum vanderplanki [Systems Biology]Polypedilum vanderplanki is a striking and unique example of an insect that can survive almost complete desiccation. Its genome and a set of dehydration–rehydration transcriptomes, together with the genome of Polypedilum nubifer (a congeneric desiccation-sensitive midge), were recently released. Here, using published and newly generated datasets reflecting detailed transcriptome changes...
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Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences current issue

Origins and genetic legacies of the Caribbean Taino [Anthropology]The Caribbean was one of the last parts of the Americas to be settled by humans, but how and when the islands were first occupied remains a matter of debate. Ancient DNA can help answering these questions, but the work has been hampered by poor DNA preservation. We report the...
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Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences current issue

Synthetic addiction extends the productive life time of engineered Escherichia coli populations [Applied Biological Sciences]Bio-production of chemicals is an important driver of the societal transition toward sustainability. However, fermentations with heavily engineered production organisms can be challenging to scale to industrial volumes. Such fermentations are subject to evolutionary pressures that select for a wide range of genetic variants that disrupt the biosynthetic capacity of...
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Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences current issue

Revealing nascent proteomics in signaling pathways and cell differentiation [Applied Biological Sciences]Regulation of gene expression at the level of protein synthesis is a crucial element in driving how the genetic landscape is expressed. However, we are still limited in technologies that can quantitatively capture the immediate proteomic changes that allow cells to respond to specific stimuli. Here, we present a method...
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Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences current issue

Substrate binding to BamD triggers a conformational change in BamA to control membrane insertion [Biochemistry]The β-barrel assembly machine (Bam) complex folds and inserts integral membrane proteins into the outer membrane of Gram-negative bacteria. The two essential components of the complex, BamA and BamD, both interact with substrates, but how the two coordinate with each other during assembly is not clear. To elucidate aspects of...
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Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences current issue

Identification of the YEATS domain of GAS41 as a pH-dependent reader of histone succinylation [Biochemistry]Lysine succinylation is a newly discovered posttranslational modification with distinctive physical properties. However, to date rarely have studies reported effectors capable of interpreting this modification on histones. Following our previous study of SIRT5 as an eraser of succinyl-lysine (Ksuc), here we identified the GAS41 YEATS domain as a reader of...
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Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences current issue

Irreversible inactivation of ISG15 by a viral leader protease enables alternative infection detection strategies [Biochemistry]In response to viral infection, cells mount a potent inflammatory response that relies on ISG15 and ubiquitin posttranslational modifications. Many viruses use deubiquitinases and deISGylases that reverse these modifications and antagonize host signaling processes. We here reveal that the leader protease, Lbpro, from foot-and-mouth disease virus (FMDV) targets ISG15 and...
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Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences current issue

Structure of full-length human TRPM4 [Biophysics and Computational Biology]Transient receptor potential melastatin subfamily member 4 (TRPM4) is a widely distributed, calcium-activated, monovalent-selective cation channel. Mutations in human TRPM4 (hTRPM4) result in progressive familial heart block. Here, we report the electron cryomicroscopy structure of hTRPM4 in a closed, Na+-bound, apo state at pH 7.5 to an overall resolution of...
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Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences current issue

Gi- and Gs-coupled GPCRs show different modes of G-protein binding [Biophysics and Computational Biology]More than two decades ago, the activation mechanism for the membrane-bound photoreceptor and prototypical G protein-coupled receptor (GPCR) rhodopsin was uncovered. Upon light-induced changes in ligand–receptor interaction, movement of specific transmembrane helices within the receptor opens a crevice at the cytoplasmic surface, allowing for coupling of heterotrimeric guanine nucleotide-binding pr
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Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences current issue

Molecular basis for diversification of yeast prion strain conformation [Biophysics and Computational Biology]Self-propagating β-sheet–rich fibrillar protein aggregates, amyloid fibers, are often associated with cellular dysfunction and disease. Distinct amyloid conformations dictate different physiological consequences, such as cellular toxicity. However, the origin of the diversity of amyloid conformation remains unknown. Here, we suggest that altered conformational equilibrium in natively disordered mo
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Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences current issue

Structural basis and energy landscape for the Ca2+ gating and calmodulation of the Kv7.2 K+ channel [Biophysics and Computational Biology]The Kv7.2 (KCNQ2) channel is the principal molecular component of the slow voltage-gated, noninactivating K+ M-current, a key controller of neuronal excitability. To investigate the calmodulin (CaM)-mediated Ca2+ gating of the channel, we used NMR spectroscopy to structurally and dynamically describe the association of helices hA and hB of Kv7.2...
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Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences current issue

Angiogenic patterning by STEEL, an endothelial-enriched long noncoding RNA [Cell Biology]Endothelial cell (EC)-enriched protein coding genes, such as endothelial nitric oxide synthase (eNOS), define quintessential EC-specific physiologic functions. It is not clear whether long noncoding RNAs (lncRNAs) also define cardiovascular cell type-specific phenotypes, especially in the vascular endothelium. Here, we report the existence of a set of EC-enriched lncRNAs and...
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Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences current issue

Pulmonary alveolar type I cell population consists of two distinct subtypes that differ in cell fate [Developmental Biology]Pulmonary alveolar type I (AT1) cells cover more than 95% of alveolar surface and are essential for the air–blood barrier function of lungs. AT1 cells have been shown to retain developmental plasticity during alveolar regeneration. However, the development and heterogeneity of AT1 cells remain largely unknown. Here, we conducted a...
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Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences current issue

Demographic compensation does not rescue populations at a trailing range edge [Ecology]Species’ geographic ranges and climatic niches are likely to be increasingly mismatched due to rapid climate change. If a species’ range and niche are out of equilibrium, then population performance should decrease from high-latitude “leading” range edges, where populations are expanding into recently ameliorated habitats, to low-latitude “trailing” range edges,...
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Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences current issue

Trophic redundancy reduces vulnerability to extinction cascades [Ecology]Current species extinction rates are at unprecedentedly high levels. While human activities can be the direct cause of some extinctions, it is becoming increasingly clear that species extinctions themselves can be the cause of further extinctions, since species affect each other through the network of ecological interactions among them. There...
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Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences current issue

Metabolic division of labor in microbial systems [Engineering]Metabolic pathways are often engineered in single microbial populations. However, the introduction of heterologous circuits into the host can create a substantial metabolic burden that limits the overall productivity of the system. This limitation could be overcome by metabolic division of labor (DOL), whereby distinct populations perform different steps in...
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Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences current issue

Unexpected transformation of dissolved phenols to toxic dicarbonyls by hydroxyl radicals and UV light [Environmental Sciences]Water treatment systems frequently use strong oxidants or UV light to degrade chemicals that pose human health risks. Unfortunately, these treatments can result in the unintended transformation of organic contaminants into toxic products. We report an unexpected reaction through which exposure of phenolic compounds to hydroxyl radicals (•OH) or UV...
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Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences current issue

Select and resequence reveals relative fitness of bacteria in symbiotic and free-living environments [Evolution]Assays to accurately estimate relative fitness of bacteria growing in multistrain communities can advance our understanding of how selection shapes diversity within a lineage. Here, we present a variant of the “evolve and resequence” approach both to estimate relative fitness and to identify genetic variants responsible for fitness variation of...
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Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences current issue

Unleashing meiotic crossovers in hybrid plants [Genetics]Meiotic crossovers shuffle parental genetic information, providing novel combinations of alleles on which natural or artificial selection can act. However, crossover events are relatively rare, typically one to three exchange points per chromosome pair. Recent work has identified three pathways limiting meiotic crossovers in Arabidopsis thaliana that rely on the...
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Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences current issue

Massive crossover elevation via combination of HEI10 and recq4a recq4b during Arabidopsis meiosis [Genetics]During meiosis, homologous chromosomes undergo reciprocal crossovers, which generate genetic diversity and underpin classical crop improvement. Meiotic recombination initiates from DNA double-strand breaks (DSBs), which are processed into single-stranded DNA that can invade a homologous chromosome. The resulting joint molecules can ultimately be resolved as crossovers. In Arabidopsis, competing pa
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Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences current issue

Signal peptide of HIV envelope protein impacts glycosylation and antigenicity of gp120 [Immunology and Inflammation]The HIV-1 envelope protein (Env) of early-replicating viruses encodes several distinct transmission signatures. One such signature involves a reduced number of potential N-linked glycosylation sites (PNGs). This transmission signature underscores the importance of posttranslational modifications in the fitness of early-replicating isolates. An additional signature in Env involves the overrepresent
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Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences current issue

Neutrophils recruited through high endothelial venules of the lymph nodes via PNAd intercept disseminating Staphylococcus aureus [Immunology and Inflammation]Staphylococcus aureus is a skin- and respiratory tract-colonizing bacterium and is the leading cause of community-acquired skin infections. Dissemination of these bacteria into systemic circulation causes bacteremia, which has a high mortality rate. Therefore, understanding the immunologic barriers that prevent dissemination is critical to developing novel treatments. In this study,...
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Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences current issue

Tim-3 co-stimulation promotes short-lived effector T cells, restricts memory precursors, and is dispensable for T cell exhaustion [Immunology and Inflammation]Tim-3 is highly expressed on a subset of T cells during T cell exhaustion in settings of chronic viral infection and tumors. Using lymphocytic choriomeningitis virus (LCMV) Clone 13, a model for chronic infection, we found that Tim-3 was neither necessary nor sufficient for the development of T cell exhaustion....
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Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences current issue

Viral insulin-like peptides activate human insulin and IGF-1 receptor signaling: A paradigm shift for host-microbe interactions [Medical Sciences]Viruses are the most abundant biological entities and carry a wide variety of genetic material, including the ability to encode host-like proteins. Here we show that viruses carry sequences with significant homology to several human peptide hormones including insulin, insulin-like growth factors (IGF)-1 and -2, FGF-19 and -21, endothelin-1, inhibin,...
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Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences current issue

Molecular signatures of circulating melanoma cells for monitoring early response to immune checkpoint therapy [Medical Sciences]A subset of patients with metastatic melanoma have sustained remissions following treatment with immune checkpoint inhibitors. However, analyses of pretreatment tumor biopsies for markers predictive of response, including PD-1 ligand (PD-L1) expression and mutational burden, are insufficiently precise to guide treatment selection, and clinical radiographic evidence of response on therapy...
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Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences current issue

Theory of signs and statistical approach to big data in assessing the relevance of clinical biomarkers of inflammation and oxidative stress [Medical Sciences]Biomarkers are widely used not only as prognostic or diagnostic indicators, or as surrogate markers of disease in clinical trials, but also to formulate theories of pathogenesis. We identify two problems in the use of biomarkers in mechanistic studies. The first problem arises in the case of multifactorial diseases, where...
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Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences current issue

Transcriptional factor ICER promotes glutaminolysis and the generation of Th17 cells [Medical Sciences]Glutaminolysis is a well-known source of energy for effector T cells but its contribution to each T cell subset and the mechanisms which are responsible for the control of involved metabolic enzymes are not fully understood. We report that Th17 but not Th1, Th2, or Treg cell induction in vitro...
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Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences current issue

MotAB-like machinery drives the movement of MreB filaments during bacterial gliding motility [Microbiology]MreB is a bacterial actin that is important for cell shape and cell wall biosynthesis in many bacterial species. MreB also plays crucial roles in Myxococcus xanthus gliding motility, but the underlying mechanism remains unknown. Here we tracked the dynamics of single MreB particles in M. xanthus using single-particle tracking...
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Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences current issue

The secreted metabolome of Streptomyces chartreusis and implications for bacterial chemistry [Microbiology]Actinomycetes are known for producing diverse secondary metabolites. Combining genomics with untargeted data-dependent tandem MS and molecular networking, we characterized the secreted metabolome of the tunicamycin producer Streptomyces chartreusis NRRL 3882. The genome harbors 128 predicted biosynthetic gene clusters. We detected >1,000 distinct secreted metabolites in culture supernatants, only
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Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences current issue

Structures of the prefusion form of measles virus fusion protein in complex with inhibitors [Microbiology]Measles virus (MeV), a major cause of childhood morbidity and mortality, is highly immunotropic and one of the most contagious pathogens. MeV may establish, albeit rarely, persistent infection in the central nervous system, causing fatal and intractable neurodegenerative diseases such as subacute sclerosing panencephalitis and measles inclusion body encephalitis. Recent...
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Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences current issue

Controlling of glutamate release by neuregulin3 via inhibiting the assembly of the SNARE complex [Neuroscience]Neuregulin3 (NRG3) is a growth factor of the neuregulin (NRG) family and a risk gene of various severe mental illnesses including schizophrenia, bipolar disorders, and major depression. However, the physiological function of NRG3 remains poorly understood. Here we show that loss of Nrg3 in GFAP-Nrg3f/f mice increased glutamatergic transmission, but...
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Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences current issue

Adult-born neurons boost odor-reward association [Neuroscience]Olfaction is an important sensory modality driving fundamental behaviors. During odor-dependent learning, a positive value is commonly assigned to an odorant, and multiple forms of plasticity are involved when such odor–reward associations are formed. In rodents, one of the mechanisms underlying plasticity in the olfactory bulb consists in recruiting new...
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Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences current issue

From global scaling to the dynamics of individual cities [Physics]Scaling has been proposed as a powerful tool to analyze the properties of complex systems and in particular for cities where it describes how various properties change with population. The empirical study of scaling on a wide range of urban datasets displays apparent nonlinear behaviors whose statistical validity and meaning...
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Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences current issue

Membrane protein MHZ3 stabilizes OsEIN2 in rice by interacting with its Nramp-like domain [Plant Biology]The phytohormone ethylene regulates many aspects of plant growth and development. EIN2 is the central regulator of ethylene signaling, and its turnover is crucial for triggering ethylene responses. Here, we identified a stabilizer of OsEIN2 through analysis of the rice ethylene-response mutant mhz3. Loss-of-function mutations lead to ethylene insensitivity in...
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Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences current issue

Algorithms in the historical emergence of word senses [Psychological and Cognitive Sciences]Human language relies on a finite lexicon to express a potentially infinite set of ideas. A key result of this tension is that words acquire novel senses over time. However, the cognitive processes that underlie the historical emergence of new word senses are poorly understood. Here, we present a computational...
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Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences current issue

Within- and across-trial dynamics of human EEG reveal cooperative interplay between reinforcement learning and working memory [Psychological and Cognitive Sciences]Learning from rewards and punishments is essential to survival and facilitates flexible human behavior. It is widely appreciated that multiple cognitive and reinforcement learning systems contribute to decision-making, but the nature of their interactions is elusive. Here, we leverage methods for extracting trial-by-trial indices of reinforcement learning (RL) and working...
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Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences current issue

Contribution of NIH funding to new drug approvals 2010-2016 [Social Sciences]This work examines the contribution of NIH funding to published research associated with 210 new molecular entities (NMEs) approved by the Food and Drug Administration from 2010–2016. We identified >2 million publications in PubMed related to the 210 NMEs (n = 131,092) or their 151 known biological targets (n =...
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Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences current issue

Crop intensification, land use, and on-farm energy-use efficiency during the worldwide spread of the green revolution [Sustainability Science]We analyzed crop production, physical inputs, and land use at the country level to assess technological changes behind the threefold increase in global crop production from 1961 to 2014. We translated machinery, fuel, and fertilizer to embedded energy units that, when summed up, provided a measure of agricultural intensification (human...
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Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences current issue

A comprehensive model for the proliferation-quiescence decision in response to endogenous DNA damage in human cells [Systems Biology]Human cells that suffer mild DNA damage can enter a reversible state of growth arrest known as quiescence. This decision to temporarily exit the cell cycle is essential to prevent the propagation of mutations, and most cancer cells harbor defects in the underlying control system. Here we present a mechanistic...
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Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences current issue

Correction for Leftwich et al., Gut microbiomes and reproductive isolation in Drosophila [Correction]EVOLUTION Correction for “Gut microbiomes and reproductive isolation in Drosophila,” by Philip T. Leftwich, Naomi V. E. Clarke, Matthew I. Hutchings, and Tracey Chapman, which was first published November 6, 2017; 10.1073/pnas.1708345114 (Proc Natl Acad Sci USA 114:12767–12772). The authors note that on page 12768, left column, first full paragraph,...
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Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences current issue

Correction for Meslin et al., Structural complexity and molecular heterogeneity of a butterfly ejaculate reflect a complex history of selection [Correction]EVOLUTION Correction for “Structural complexity and molecular heterogeneity of a butterfly ejaculate reflect a complex history of selection,” by Camille Meslin, Tamara S. Cherwin, Melissa S. Plakke, Brandon S. Small, Breanna J. Goetz, Nathan I. Morehouse, and Nathan L. Clark, which was first published June 19, 2017; 10.1073/pnas.1707680114 (Proc Natl...
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Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences current issue

In This Issue [This Week in PNAS]NIH funding and drug development Flow of NIH funding to US congressional districts associated with drugs approved during 2010–2016. The impact of public sector funding on drug development is not well understood, partly because this funding is focused on basic research, the translational impact of which is difficult to quantify....
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Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences current issue

Profile of Michael Strand [Profiles]“Life on Earth would cease to function without insects,” says University of Georgia entomologist Michael Strand, whose passion for his work is unmistakable as he explains the importance of invertebrates to ecosystems. Strand’s research shows how basic science is fundamental to understanding the roles insects play in agriculture and disease...
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Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences current issue

Race to the native state [Chemistry]In contrast to other biopolymers such as RNA, most foldable protein sequences have a single, unique native structure, which is the most stable conformation. Understanding this remarkable property has been the long-held goal of protein folding research (1, 2). Once folded, proteins will undergo transitions between different conformational states within...
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Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences current issue

New sources for the emergence of new invaders [Ecology]Biological invasions continue to occur worldwide, resulting in substantial impacts on ecosystems as well as human health and economies (1, 2). One of the fundamental tasks associated with managing these invasions is to predict which species are most likely to be future invaders—a task that has become increasingly challenging due...
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Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences current issue

Neutrophils in hot pursuit of MRSA in the lymph nodes [Immunology and Inflammation]Neutrophils traffic in the bloodstream as initial responders against invading pathogens. In particular, neutrophils are critically important in combatting Staphylococcus aureus, which is a Gram-positive extracellular bacterial pathogen that is the most common cause of skin infections and a prime cause of life-threatening infections such as pneumonia and bacteremia. Over...
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Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences current issue

Variational structure of Luttinger-Ward formalism and bold diagrammatic expansion for Euclidean lattice field theory [Applied Mathematics]The Luttinger–Ward functional was proposed more than five decades ago and has been used to formally justify most practically used Green’s function methods for quantum many-body systems. Nonetheless, the very existence of the Luttinger–Ward functional has been challenged by recent theoretical and numerical evidence. We provide a rigorously justified Luttinger–Ward...
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Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences current issue

Doubly hybrid density functionals that correctly describe both density and energy for atoms [Applied Physical Sciences]Recently, it was argued [Medvedev MG, et al. (2017) Science 355:49–52] that the development of density functional approximations (DFAs) is “straying from the path toward the exact functional.” The exact functional should yield both exact energy and density for a system of interest; nevertheless, they found that many heavily fitted...
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Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences current issue

Three-dimensional virtual histology enabled through cytoplasm-specific X-ray stain for microscopic and nanoscopic computed tomography [Applied Physical Sciences]Many histological methods require staining of the cytoplasm, which provides instrumental details for diagnosis. One major limitation is the production of 2D images obtained by destructive preparation of 3D tissue samples. X-ray absorption micro- and nanocomputed tomography (microCT and nanoCT) allows for a nondestructive investigation of a 3D tissue sample,...
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Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences current issue

News Feature: Can predators have a big impact on carbon emissions calculations? [Earth, Atmospheric, and Planetary Sciences]Models suggest that predators and even biodiversity in general play a potentially significant role in carbon sequestration. But whether such results buttress conservation arguments remains a matter of debate. Gray wolves lie at the heart of vigorous debate about the costs and benefits of conservation. But they also might inform...
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Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences current issue

Rainfall statistics, stationarity, and climate change [Earth, Atmospheric, and Planetary Sciences]There is a growing research interest in the detection of changes in hydrologic and climatic time series. Stationarity can be assessed using the autocorrelation function, but this is not yet common practice in hydrology and climate. Here, we use a global land-based gridded annual precipitation (hereafter P) database (1940–2009) and...
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Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences current issue

Optically functional isoxanthopterin crystals in the mirrored eyes of decapod crustaceans [Ecology]The eyes of some aquatic animals form images through reflective optics. Shrimp, lobsters, crayfish, and prawns possess reflecting superposition compound eyes, composed of thousands of square-faceted eye units (ommatidia). Mirrors in the upper part of the eye (the distal mirror) reflect light collected from many ommatidia onto the photosensitive elements...
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The Atlantic

The Bloody Pirate Life of One of the Ocean’s Most Elusive CreaturesWhen the current dragged the giant squid toward a Spanish beach in October 2016, the creature was already near death. Wounded and suffocating, she stayed alive in the shallows—far from the deep, frigid ocean she came from—long enough for a tourist to snap some photos. Then she died and washed ashore. Realizing he’d seen something unusual, the tourist, Javier Onicol, called up the president of a c
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New on MIT Technology Review

Maybe Uber and Lyft drivers *can* make a livingUber Drivers Trucks
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Hubble finds huge system of dusty material enveloping the young star HR 4796AAstronomers have used NASA's Hubble Space Telescope to uncover a vast, complex dust structure, about 150 billion miles across, enveloping the young star HR 4796A.
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Broad spectrum antiviral drug inhibits a range of emerging coronavirusesResearchers have long known that RNA viruses called coronaviruses cause the common cold and pneumonia. In the last two decades or so, though, researchers have found that these viruses can jump between animal and human hosts. In recent years, coronaviruses have caused lethal outbreaks of severe acute respiratory syndrome (SARS) and Middle East respiratory syndrome (MERS) that span multiple continen
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Big Think

An 8-ton Chinese space lab will crash into Europe or the U.S. Don't panic yet.Experts can't agree on exactly when or where, however. Read More
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Another strong quake shakes remote Papua New Guinea regionAnother strong earthquake has shaken a remote Papua New Guinea region that was badly damaged by a powerful quake last week.
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The Atlantic

A New Documentary Honors the Work and Life of Photojournalist Chris HondrosConflict photographer Chris Hondros, working for Getty Images, covered major events from the attacks of September 11 through the wars in Iraq and Afghanistan, the civil war in Liberia, and the chaos of the Arab Spring in Egypt and Libya. Hondros was killed while on assignment in Libya in 2011 in an attack that also took the life of photojournalist Tim Hetherington. The attack took place while the
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Blog » Languages » English

The Age-Old Saga: Apples vs. WindowsWhat do you mean “these two things have nothing in common”? Of course they do. Get ready for the ultimate fructo-fenestral battle! If you had to use one of these things for the rest of your life, which would you pick? The competition starts at 11 AM EST on 3/8 and goes for 24 hours! Apples More edible Shiny and crunchy Uh… really expensive??? Windows Most homes have them Can be installed with var
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Lithuania plans hackathon to mint digital collector coinLithuania's central bank on Tuesday said it wants to issue the world's first digital collector coin to mark this year's centenary of the Baltic state's independence.
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Major step found in cellular response to stress caused by pathological insultA new study conducted by researchers at The Wistar Institute revealed how a key protein residing in the endoplasmic reticulum (ER) helps cells respond to stress. This process is especially important for B cells to respond to severe stress conditions and their ability to produce antibodies. The research was published online in the Journal of Cell Biology.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

The latest apps for home layouts, inside and outPlanning out how to arrange furniture in your home—or plants in your garden—used to involve a pencil, graph paper, a measuring tape and a lot of imagination.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

How class and social capital affect university studentsThere's a great deal of comfort to be had in the idea that success at university is primarily or exclusively the result of a student's hard work. All that's needed is for students to do their best and fairness will prevail. Students who don't apply themselves will fail. End of story.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Bold steps are needed toward a 'new normal' that allocates water fairly in South AfricaDiscussions of the water crisis that has hit Cape Town tend to focus on supply and demand. In other words, a severe and unusual drought has created a situation in which there is not enough water (supply) to meet people's needs (demand).
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Bearded pigs adapting to oil palmBearded pigs in Borneo are successfully adapting to palm oil expansion but still require significant protected forest areas, finds new research by the Sabah Wildlife Department, Danau Girang Field Centre, Cardiff University and University of Berkeley.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Un-mixing using lasers to make new crystalsScientists have managed to separate two liquids in a mixture using a laser, which they claim will lead to new ways of manipulating matter and creating crystals for industry.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

We can't say if touchscreens are impacting children's handwriting—in fact, it may be quite the oppositeParents the world over are concerned that touchscreen and tablet technology is negatively impacting children's handwriting. But while some say that technology overuse will impact developing dexterity and handwriting skills, the fact is that there has been no research to date which systematically examines the relationship between technology use, hand strength and handwriting production.
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Science | The Guardian

The Guardian view on mental health: saving lives requires money and monitoring | EditorialLessons are not being learned from the deaths of hundreds of mental health patients, despite the warnings of coroners More than 270 mental health patients have died over the last six years after failings in NHS care. These cases are more devastating to those who loved these people because in many cases the deaths could have been prevented; better care might have saved them. Too often, services did
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Handwritten Einstein note up for auction in JerusalemFor Albert Einstein, it turns out the law of attraction was relative.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

SpaceX racks up 50th launch of Falcon 9 rocketSpaceX is marking the 50th launch of a Falcon 9 rocket, its satellite-delivery workhorse.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Geneva car show: Electrics buzz but gas-guzzlers still shine (Update)This year's Geneva auto show is crowded with new cars flaunting electric and autonomous technologies meant to help unclog city streets and fight global warming and air pollution.
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Live Science

No, Those Aren’t Animal Tracks on MarsA United Kingdom-based researcher claims he's seen evidence of ancient animal tracks on Mars, but don't get too excited. The features he's talking about are widely documented by NASA as interesting crystal shapes that likely formed in water.
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The Atlantic

Why So Many of Us Die of Heart DiseaseThe Assyrians treated the “hard-pulse disease” with leeches. The Roman scholar Cornelius Celsus recommended bleeding, and the ancient Greeks cupped the spine to draw out animal spirits. Centuries later, heart disease remains America’s number one killer , even though medical advances have made it so that many more people can survive heart attacks. Some parts of the country are especially hard-hit:
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The Atlantic

SkyKnit: How an AI Took Over an Adult Knitting CommunityJanelle Shane is a humorist who creates and mines her material from neural networks, the form of machine learning that has come to dominate the field of artificial intelligence over the last half-decade. Perhaps you’ve seen the candy-heart slogans she generated for Valentine’s Day : DEAR ME, MY MY, LOVE BOT, CUTE KISS, MY BEAR, and LOVE BUN. Or her new paint-color names : Parp Green, Shy Bather,
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News

A new tactic for eczema?Existing treatments for eczema, which affects about 17 percent of children in developed countries, are expensive or have side effects. A study in Science Immunology suggests a different approach to eczema, one that stimulates a natural brake on the allergic attack, made by T regulatory cells in the skin.
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Big Think

Why Silicon Valley elites swear by ice baths and "positive stress"So-called 'positive stress' has been growing in popularity among Silicon Valley workers. Read More
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

Sea level rise urgently requires new forms of decision makingUS cities facing sea level rise need to look beyond traditional strategies for managing issues such as critical erosion and coastal squeeze, according to new research. Civil society initiatives must now play a crucial role in adapting society to climate change, the study argues.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Bioengineering team's 'circuit' work may benefit gene therapyResearchers at The University of Texas at Dallas have designed genetic "circuits" out of living cellular material in order to gain a better understanding of how proteins function, with the goal of making improvements.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Research brief: Shifting tundra vegetation spells change for arctic animalsFor nearly two decades, scientists have noted dramatic changes in arctic tundra habitat. Ankle-high grasses and sedges have given way to a sea of woody shrubs growing to waist- or neck-deep heights. This shrubification of the tundra challenges animals like caribou that are adapted to low-stature arctic vegetation.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Photosynthesis originated a billion years earlier than we thought, study showsAncient microbes may have been producing oxygen through photosynthesis a billion years earlier than we thought, which means oxygen was available for living organisms very close to the origin of life on earth. In a new article in Heliyon, a researcher from Imperial College London studied the molecular machines responsible for photosynthesis and found the process may have evolved as long as 3.6 bill
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Dana Foundation

Newly Translated Graphic Novel Tells the Life Story of Nobel Prize Winning Neuroscientist“Life does not end with death. What you pass on to others remains. Immortality is not the body, which will one day die. That does not matter… of importance is the message you leave to others. That is immortality,” said founding European Dana Alliance for the Brain (EDAB) member Rita Levi-Montalcini, winner of the 1986 Nobel Prize in Physiology and Medicine for the discovery of nerve growth factor
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Doctor reviews on hospital websites vs. reviews on independent physician rating sitesWhen looking for a doctor, many consumers turn to websites that post physician ratings and reviews. A study at Hospital for Special Surgery (HSS) found a discrepancy between doctor reviews provided by hospital websites and those posted on independent physician rating websites such as Healthgrades.com and Vitals.com.
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Study reveals novel biomarkers for future dementia riskSudha Seshadri, M.D., founding director of the Glenn Biggs Institute for Alzheimer's & Neurodegenerative Diseases at UT Health San Antonio, is co-leader and senior author on research announced March 6 that identifies novel biomarkers of risk for future dementia.
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News

The body's 'glucostat' identifiedIt is the pancreatic islets that have the overall responsibility for maintaining normal blood glucose levels in our bodies, according to a new study by researchers at Karolinska Institutet in Sweden and the University of Miami Miller School of Medicine, USA. The findings, published in the scientific journal Cell Metabolism, have important implications for certain diabetes treatments.
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Salk scientists find power switch for musclesERRγ gene enables endurance exercise and repairs type of damage seen in neuromuscular diseases.
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News

HIV in sub-Sahara Africa: Testing and treatment start at home improves therapyHome-based HIV testing and prompt treatment with antiretroviral therapy increases the number of patients under treatment as well as treatment success. This is the key result of a clinical trial in Lesotho carried out by the Swiss Tropical and Public Health Institute, in collaboration with SolidarMed and the Government of Lesotho. The results published today in the Journal of the American Medical A
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Controlling ceramides could help treat heart diseaseSBP researchers have discovered that accumulation of ceramides--a type of lipid (fat)-- plays a crucial role in lipotoxic cardiomyopathy (LCM)--a heart condition that often occurs in patients with diabetes and obesity. The study, published in Cell Reports, also identified several potential therapeutic targets that could prevent or reverse the effects of LCM.
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Rigor mortis in worms offers new insight into deathA dying worm experiences rigor mortis early in the death process, rather than after the main event as it is for humans, according to a new study by an international team of scientists at UCL and Washington University.
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Brown fat flexes its muscle to burn energyScientists at the University of California, Berkeley, have discovered that the same kind of fat cells that help newborn babies regulate their body temperature could be a target for weight-loss drugs in adults.
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Genomes of seven unusual animals reveal new parts of the human genome for diseaseTo unearth new functional regions in the human genome with potential roles in shaping clinically important traits, researchers searched for how elephants, hibernating bats, orcas, dolphins, naked mole rats, and ground squirrels changed critical parts of the human genome that are shared with most other mammals. These regions are highly conserved, but to evolve their highly distinctive traits, these
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Mapping the genome jungle: Unique animal traits could offer insight into human diseaseAn interdisciplinary team of scientists at University of Utah Health are using animals' unique traits to pinpoint regions of the human genome that might affect health. The results of this project are available in the March 6 issue of the journal Cell Reports.
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New Scientist - News

Drones reveal huge colonies of 1.5 million penguins on islandsTwo massive colonies of Adélie penguins have been discovered on the Danger Islands off the coast of Antarctica, bringing the global population to 8 million
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Video: What do crime scene investigators actually do?Television crime dramas have huge audiences, but their popularity has come with some unexpected consequences.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Waterfalls offer insights into how rivers shape their surroundsHow much water flows through a river has little influence over long-term changes to its course and the surrounding landscape, a study of waterfalls shows.
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BBC News - Science & Environment

Alzheimer's researchers win brain prizeFour dementia scientists share this year's 1m euro prize for their pivotal work.
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BBC News - Science & Environment

Last male northern white rhino Sudan's health improves slightlySudan, whose future was "not looking bright", rallies slightly as his carers treat his wounds.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Who's a good boy? Why 'dog-speak' is important for bonding with your petScientists at the University of York have shown that the way we speak to our canine friends is important in relationship-building between pet and owner, similar to the way that 'baby-talk' is to bonding between a baby and an adult.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Conservationists find birds in central African rain forest are facing major threats from bushmeat huntingIn a new study released this month, conservationists are sounding the alarm about a growing hunting crisis plaguing rainforests in central Africa. The study, published in the journal Biological Conservation, found that more large forest birds such as raptors and hornbills are being killed to provide bushmeat (wildlife taken for food) than previously thought. Researchers concluded that unless the t
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

NASA examines Tropical Cyclone Dumazile's flooding rainfallTropical cyclone Dumazile formed east of Madagascar on March 3, 2018 and brought soaking rainfall to Madagascar. The GPM or Global Precipitation Measurement mission core satellite obtained a look at the soaking Dumazile gave the island nation.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Engineering team develops radiation-resistant computers capable of high-performance computing in the harshness of spaceIn T minus 8,760 hours, or roughly one year, the Space Test Program-Houston 6 (STP-H6) hybrid and reconfigurable space supercomputer will board the International Space Station. The newest mission to the ISS featuring research and technology from the University of Pittsburgh's NSF Center for Space, High-performance, and Resilient Computing (SHREC) will bring an unprecedented amount of computing pow
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Researchers develop new method to improve cropsA team of University of Georgia researchers has developed a new way to breed plants with better traits. By introducing a human protein into the model plant species Arabidopsis thaliana, researchers found that they could selectively activate silenced genes already present within the plant.
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Latest Headlines | Science News

When bogs burn, the environment takes a hitBogs and other peatlands around the world store outsized amounts of carbon. Climate change and agriculture are putting them at risk.
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New on MIT Technology Review

Washington is the first state to pass its own net neutrality laws
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Rigor mortis in worms offers new insight into deathA dying worm experiences rigor mortis early in the death process, rather than after the main event as it is for humans, according to a new study by an international team of scientists at UCL and Washington University.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Mapping the genome jungle: Unique animal traits could offer insight into human diseaseFrom a bat's wings to an elephant's cancer resistance, an interdisciplinary team of scientists at University of Utah Health are using animals' unique traits to pinpoint regions of the human genome that might affect health. The results of this project are available in the March 6 issue of the journal Cell Reports.
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