Science current issue

The spread of true and false news onlineWe investigated the differential diffusion of all of the verified true and false news stories distributed on Twitter from 2006 to 2017. The data comprise ~126,000 stories tweeted by ~3 million people more than 4.5 million times. We classified news as true or false using information from six independent fact-checking organizations that exhibited 95 to 98% agreement on the classifications. Falsehoo
3h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

The shapes of water: New research details water's mysterious phase transitionsWater, always important, always controversial, always fascinating, remains surprising. For a substance that is ubiquitous on Earth, three quarters of our planet is covered with it, researchers can still be surprised by some of its properties, according to Arizona State University chemist C. Austen Angell.
4h
Ingeniøren

Teleindustrien: Besynderligt at ubeboet ø skal dækkes med 50 Mbit/sTeleindustrien undrer sig over, at små ubeboede øer som Hesselø og Flakfortet skal dækkes med 50 Mb/s bredbånd, som en del af de dækningskrav Energistyrelsen har opsat i de kommende frekvensauktioner.
7h

LATEST

The Atlantic

The Atlantic Politics & Policy Daily: Frosty FlakeToday in 5 Lines Against the wishes of many of his advisers and fellow Republicans, President Trump signed an order imposing steep tariffs on steel and aluminum imports. Canada and Mexico are exempted from the tariffs, and other countries will reportedly be invited to negotiate exclusions from the measures. Arizona Senator Jeff Flake criticized the move in a statement, and pledged to draft and in
8min
EurekAlert! - Breaking News

UCLA researchers develop a new class of two-dimensional materialsA UCLA research team has developed a new kind of artificial "superlattices" -- materials comprised of alternating layers of ultra-thin "two-dimensional" sheets, which are only one or a few atoms thick. Unlike current state-of-the art superlattices, in which alternating layers have similar atomic structures, these alternating layers have radically different structures, properties and functions, som
43min
Latest Headlines | Science News

The debate over how long our brains keep making new nerve cells heats upAdult humans don’t have newborn nerve cells in a memory-related part of the brain, a controversial paper suggests.
44min
The Atlantic

The Whitewashing of King's AssassinationEditor’s Note: Read The Atlantic ’s special coverage of Martin Luther King Jr.’s legacy. Image Above: Three days after King is murdered in Memphis, soldiers patrol riot-torn Chicago. “W oe to you, because you build tombs for the prophets, and it was your ancestors who killed them.” Jesus’s rebuke to the Pharisees descended upon me on a cold January morning in 2017, in West Potomac Park in Washing
50min
The Scientist RSS

Hawaiian Spiders on Different Islands Evolved Same Disguise in ParallelIn an unusual evolutionary twist, local stick spiders have come up with an almost identical repertoire of color morphs in multiple locations.
52min
The Scientist RSS

Prominent Neuroscientist Fired by Columbia, HHMIThe specific reason for Thomas Jessell's dismissal has not been disclosed.
52min
EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Study predicts wildlife of Africa's Albertine Rift will be threatened by climate changeA new study by scientists from WCS (Wildlife Conservation Society) and other groups predicts that the effects of climate change will severely impact the Albertine Rift, one of Africa's most biodiverse regions and a place not normally associated with global warming.
1h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Thirdhand smoke found to increase lung cancer risk in miceResearchers at Berkeley Lab identified thirdhand smoke, the toxic residues that linger on indoor surfaces and in dust long after a cigarette has been extinguished, as a health hazard nearly 10 years ago. Now a new study has found that it also increases lung cancer risk in mice.
1h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

So much depends on the velocity of tiny droplets cast upwardA day at the beach beset by heavy clouds, or the sticky heat of a salty haze can seem like the work of large, unpredictable forces. But behind such atmospheric phenomena are billions of tiny interactions between the air and microscopic drops of saltwater cast upward as bubbles on the ocean's surface burst.
1h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

The 'architecture of life' described by computer modelingWhile most of biology and medicine focus on the key roles genes and chemicals play in the formation and control of living systems, the spatial arrangement of the components that make up those systems and the physical forces they experience are being increasingly recognized as equally important. Donald Ingber, M.D., Ph.D., Founding Director of the Wyss Institute at Harvard University, started inves
1h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News

For nanomedicine, cell sex matmonoclonal antibodies crucial to fighting emerging infectious diseases say NIAID officialsMonoclonal antibodies (mAbs) -- preparations of a type of antibody designed to bind to a single target -- have shown promise in the fight against cancer and autoimmune diseases. They also may play a role in future battles against emerging infectious disease outbreaks, according to an NEJM article by NIAID scientists. The article outlines the potential uses for mAbs as treatments for infectious dis
1h
Science | The Guardian

Spacewatch: engine fuelled by air will enable low-flying class of satellitesElectric thruster sucks in the scarce air molecules at the top of the Earth’s atmosphere, using them as propellant to fight drag The European Space Agency (ESA) has test-fired an engine that opens the path for a novel class of low-flying Earth-orbiting space missions. Called an air-breathing electric thruster, it is designed to work at the top of the Earth’s atmosphere. It sucks in the scarce air
1h
Inside Science

Chimps May Play Dumb to Fit InCreature Migrating chimpanzees appear to conform to local nut-cracking culture, even when they know a better way. 03/07/2018 Nala Rogers, Staff Writer https://www.insidescience.org/news/chimps-may-play-dumb-fit
1h
Latest Headlines | Science News

Give double-layer graphene a twist and it superconductsWhen graphene layers are twisted to a “magic angle,” the material superconducts.
1h
Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

How does the brain's spatial map change when we change the shape of the room?A new study explores the consequences of distorting the shape of the enclosing box on cognitive maps of space. The results detail how our cognitive maps adapt to changed environments and shed light on how distinct types of neurons may connect to form these maps.
1h
Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

Uncovering the genetics of skeletal muscle growth and regenerationTo investigate the mechanism behind skeletal muscle growth and regeneration, researchers bombarded zebrafish with chemical mutagen and screened for larvae with defective skeletal muscle structure. Using genetic mapping, they found that zebrafish larvae with a mutation in DDX27 showed reduced muscle growth and impaired regeneration.
1h
Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

City mouse-country mouse experiment shows link between environment, worm infectionsWorm infections were worse in mice living outdoors versus the lab, providing evidence that environment influences how the immune system responds to pathogens.
1h
Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

Mekong River dams could disrupt lives, environmentThe Mekong River traverses six Southeast Asian countries and supports the livelihoods of millions of people. New efforts to provide hydroelectric power to a growing and modernizing population include more than eight proposed main-stem dams and 60 or more existing tributary dams in the lower Mekong basin. A new article lays out what dam construction could mean for residents and the environment in t
1h
Science : NPR

FDA Approved At-Home Test For Breast Cancer Gene Now AvailableBut there are warnings to heed.
1h
Dana Foundation

The Story Collider: Brain Awareness EditionPhoto credit: Heather McKellar The ethos of the Story Collider is this: Science touches every part of our lives. It surrounds us, whether we notice it or not. Now in its eighth year, the live storytelling show travels to cities across the US (and soon the UK) to bring personal tales of science to the public through narratives that can be heartbreaking or hilarious. Though the theme sounds strictl
1h
Big Think

To achieve gender equality, we must first tackle our unconscious biasesPeople often argue that most Western societies have achieved gender equality. Despite this, feminists continue to argue that the battle is not yet won. Read More
2h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Social stress leads to changes in gut bacteria, study findsExposure to psychological stress in the form of social conflict alters gut bacteria in Syrian hamsters, according to a new study by Georgia State University.
2h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Gastrointestinal hormone measurably improved symptoms of non-alcoholic fatty liver diseaseThrough a randomized, double-blind, placebo-controlled phase II clinical trial, researchers at University of California San Diego School of Medicine report that small doses of NGM282, a non-tumorigenic variant of an endocrine gastrointestinal hormone, can significantly and rapidly decrease liver fat content in patients with non-alcoholic fatty liver disease (NAFLD) and nonalcoholic steatohepatitis
2h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Syracuse U. researchers close to understanding 'disease mechanisms' of ALSSyracuse University researchers are making strides in understanding the disease mechanism of amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS), also known as Lou Gehrig's disease.
2h
Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

So much depends on the velocity of tiny droplets cast upwardNew research describes the velocity of aerosols cast upward as bubbles on a liquid's surface burst. Above the ocean, these droplets transfer moisture, salt, and even toxins such as algae from water to air. Knowing the speed and height of aerosols applies to numerous areas of scientific and economic interest, including more accurate climate modeling or creating a perfect glass of champagne.
2h
Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

The 'architecture of life' described by computer modelingWhile most of biology and medicine focus on the key roles genes and chemicals play in living systems, the spatial arrangement of the components that make up those systems and the physical forces they experience are being increasingly recognized as equally important.
2h
Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

New method to create self-tinting windowsChemistry researchers have developed a simple, cost-effective technique for making smart windows that could lead the way for wide-scale adoption of this energy-saving technology.
2h
Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

Fiber-fermenting bacteria improve health of type 2 diabetes patientsThe fight against type 2 diabetes may soon improve thanks to a pioneering high-fiber diet study.
2h
Science | The Guardian

Fast food menu labelling hasn't made choices healthier, study shows‘When we assessed particular chains, it was really clear that there was no systematic change,’ researcher says Fast food sold in Australia is just as unhealthy as it ever was, despite the introduction of mandatory menu labelling, according to new analysis. A study by Cancer Council New South Wales and the George Institute for Global Health found the kilojoule content of foods sold at the top five
2h
The Atlantic

Women Are Redesigning the Dreaded SpeculumThe exam table with its stirrups. The cold, metal instruments lying in wait. The drape-sheet hiding the patient from herself. The invasive poking and prodding. A routine trip to the gynecologist can elicit anxiety and dread. One study attributed “negative affective, behavioral, and cognitive processes” to the pelvic exam, “unlike most other preventative care procedures.” Each year, some 60 millio
2h
Popular Science

These scientists think peace and quiet should be a human rightEnvironment Noise pollution is terrible for your health, but they want to find a solution. Silence is golden—and it shouldn't be luxury. These researchers are trying to figure out how to keep us safe from noise pollution in the busiest cities on earth.
2h
Science : NPR

Tattoo You: Immune System Cells Help Keep Ink In Its PlaceWhen you get a tattoo, your body mounts a battle against the ink. So how do ankle flowers and bicep hearts stick around so long? Researchers took a look at specialized cells that gobble up the ink. (Image credit: yulkapopkova/Getty Images)
2h
New on MIT Technology Review

Advanced nuclear technology just got a big green light from Congress
2h
Big Think

Why one of the best self-driving cars may come from one of the world's worst commuter citiesThe weather in most parts of Russia forces drivers to face harsh conditions—snow, mud, and poor visibility. It’s in this environment that Cognitive Technologies saw an opportunity. Read More
2h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News

How does the brain's spatial map change when we change the shape of the room?A new study, published today in Science, explores the consequences of distorting the shape of the enclosing box on cognitive maps of space. The results detail how our cognitive maps adapt to changed environments and shed light on how distinct types of neurons may connect to form these maps.
2h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Study shows bowel care is top concern for those with spinal cord injuryA study by SFU research Victoria Claydon reveals that bowel care, followed by sexual function, bladder function and pain were of key concern. Surprisingly, one of the lowest-ranked concerns was using a wheelchair for mobility.
2h
Latest Headlines | Science News

Newer drugs make hepatitis C-positive kidneys safe for transplantPeople without hepatitis C did not contract the disease after receiving successful transplants of infected kidneys along with newer antiviral drugs.
2h
Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

Is your stress changing my brain?Scientists have discovered that stress transmitted from others can change the brain in the same way as a real stress does.
2h
Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

Big steps toward control of production of tiny building blocksA new article describes in situ observation of plasma arc nanosynthesis that could lead to improved production of nanoparticles.
2h
Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

Exercise may decrease heart drug's effectivenessHealth care experts are quick to remind us that a healthy lifestyle includes regular exercise. But what if certain, potentially life-saving medications don't perform as well during exercise?
2h
Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

New way found to defeat HIV latencyResearchers have found a mechanism for making HIV come out of hiding and become susceptible to anti-HIV drugs.
2h
Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

A lifetime of regular exercise slows down aging, study findsA group of older people who have exercised all of their lives, were compared to a group of similarly aged adults and younger adults who do not exercise regularly. The results showed that those who have exercised regularly have defied the aging process, having the immunity, muscle mass, and cholesterol levels of a young person.
2h
Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

Gene knockout using new CRISPR tool makes mosquitoes highly resistant to malaria parasiteDeleting a single gene from mosquitoes can make them highly resistant to the malaria parasite and thus much less likely to transmit the parasite to humans, according to a new article.
2h
The Atlantic

Why DeVos's Parkland Visit FailedUpon hearing that U.S. Secretary of Education Betsy DeVos would visit the Marjory Stoneman Douglas High campus after the school shooting that killed 17 people, the student Emma González was wary: “Good thing I was already planning on sleeping in tomorrow,” she tweeted . Other students at Stoneman Douglas reacted in much the same way. “Literally no one asked for this,” Sarah Chadwick, another stud
2h
Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

Water's mysterious phase transitionsScientists have, for the first time, observed one of the more intriguing properties predicted by water theoreticians -- that, on sufficient super-cooling and under specific conditions it will suddenly change from one liquid to a different one.
2h
Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

Global fisheries to be, on average, 20 percent less productive in 2300, UCI study findsScientists expect the world's fisheries to be, on average, 20 percent less productive in the year 2300, with those in the North Atlantic down nearly 60 percent and those in much of the western Pacific experiencing declines of more than 50 percent.
2h
Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

Sewing atomic lattices seamlessly togetherScientists have revealed a technique to 'sew' two patches of crystals seamlessly together at the atomic level to create atomically-thin fabrics. (The smoother the seam between two materials, the more easily electrons flow across it -- essential for how well the electronic devices function.)
2h
Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

The enemy within: Gut bacteria drive autoimmune diseaseBacteria found in the small intestines of mice and humans can travel to other organs and trigger an autoimmune response, according to a new study. The researchers also found that the autoimmune reaction can be suppressed with an antibiotic or vaccine designed to target the bacteria, they said.
2h
Live Science

Russian Ex-Spy Poisoned: What Is a Nerve Agent?You can't see them, smell them, or taste them. By the time you feel them — it's already too late.
2h
Science : NPR

New Research Claims Bones Found 80 Years Ago On Pacific Atoll Likely Amelia Earhart'sAmelia Earhart Nikumaroro IslandRichard Jantz, a forensics expert at the University of Tennessee, reanalyzed measurements from the bones. He says they are female and the right size to be Earhart's. But questions linger. (Image credit: AP)
3h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News

The 'architecture of life' described by computer modelingWhile most of biology and medicine focus on the key roles genes and chemicals play in living systems, the spatial arrangement of the components that make up those systems and the physical forces they experience are being increasingly recognized as equally important. A new study from the Wyss institute finds that Nature uses tensional integrity, or 'tensegrity' (a principle well-known in architectu
3h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News

So much depends on the velocity of tiny droplets cast upwardNew research describes the velocity of aerosols cast upward as bubbles on a liquid's surface burst. Above the ocean, these droplets transfer moisture, salt, and even toxins such as algae from water to air. Knowing the speed and height of aerosols applies to numerous areas of scientific and economic interest, including more accurate climate modeling or creating a perfect glass of champagne.
3h
New on MIT Technology Review

Berkeley, California, is considering an ICO unlike any otherA city council member calls his plan to mint a new crypto-token an “initial community offering.” If it works, it could be revolutionary.
3h
Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

Researchers call for large-scale scientific investigation into fake newsThe indictment of 13 Russians in the operation of a "troll farm" that spread false information related to the 2016 U.S. presidential election has renewed the spotlight on the power of "fake news" to influence public opinion. Now, a professor who studies the spread of misinformation online is joining prominent legal scholars, social scientists and researchers in a global "call to action" in the fig
3h
The Atlantic

The Works of Photographer Toni FrissellToni Frissell began her career in photography in the 1930s, at first working as a fashion photographer for Vogue magazine. During World War II, she was, for a time, the official photographer for the American Red Cross, and later, the Women’s Army Corps. Her work took her to Europe, where she photographed soldiers and civilians affected by the war, including a famous series featuring the Tuskegee
3h
Popular Science

Science needs to be more inclusive and women are making it happenScience 500 Women Scientists, and counting, are changing the face of the field Scientists are people, and that means women too.
3h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Uber selling Southeast Asia operations to Grab: reportUber Drivers GrabUber is selling parts of its Southeast Asia operations to local rival Grab, getting a piece of the action in the process, according to US media reports.
3h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Early-killed rye shows promise in edamameWith the rise of herbicide-resistant weeds in most grain and vegetable crops, farmers are looking for alternatives to herbicides to control weeds. Cover crops offer one potential weed management tool. Their use in specialty crops is limited, and no testing has been done so far in edamame. However, a new University of Illinois study reports that early-killed cereal rye shows promise for edamame gro
3h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Study says Mekong River dams could disrupt lives, environmentThe Mekong River traverses six Southeast Asian countries and supports the livelihoods of millions of people. New efforts to provide hydroelectric power to a growing and modernizing population include more than eight proposed main-stem dams and 60 or more existing tributary dams in the lower Mekong basin. A new article from University of Illinois and Iowa State University scientists lays out what d
3h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Deep-sea observatories to offer new view of seabed earthquakesA mission to study New Zealand's largest fault by lowering two sub-seafloor observatories into the Hikurangi subduction zone is underway this week.
3h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Study says Mekong River dams could disrupt lives, environmentThe Mekong River, one of the world's largest, traverses six Southeast Asian countries and supports the livelihoods of millions of people. New efforts to provide hydroelectric power to a growing and modernizing population include more than eight proposed main-stem dams and 60 or more existing tributary dams in the lower Mekong basin. A new article from University of Illinois and Iowa State Universi
3h
Viden

Ligestillingskampen har ramt tech-giganterne som et lynI disse år er der stort fokus på køn i techverdenen. Et par markante sager om sexchikane og sexisme har pustet gang i debatten om ligestilling.
3h
Live Science

In Photos: Research Vessel Headed to 'Hidden' Antarctic EcosystemThe expedition was meant to explore the newly exposed seafloor that had been covered by the Larsen C Ice Shelf for about 120,000 years.
3h
BBC News - Science & Environment

Amelia Earhart: Island bones 'likely' belonged to famed pilotAmelia Earhart Nikumaroro IslandA new study claims the remains discovered on a Pacific island are a 99% match with the explorer.
3h
NYT > Science

Matter: How One Child’s Sickle Cell Mutation Helped Protect the World From MalariaThe genetic mutation arose 7,300 years ago in just one person in West Africa, scientists reported on Thursday. Its advantage: a shield against rampant malaria.
3h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Biological sex tweaks nervous system networks, plays role in shaping behaviorNew research published today in the journal Current Biology demonstrates how biological sex can modify communication between nerve cells and generate different responses in males and females to the same stimulus. The findings could new shed light on the genetic underpinnings of sex differences in neural development, behavior, and susceptibility to diseases.
3h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Early-killed rye shows promise in edamameWith the rise of herbicide-resistant weeds in most grain and vegetable crops, farmers are looking for alternatives to herbicides to control weeds. Cover crops offer one potential weed management tool. Their use in specialty crops is limited, and no testing has been done so far in edamame. However, a new University of Illinois study reports that early-killed cereal rye shows promise for edamame gro
3h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News

How common is food insecurity among older adults?Food insecurity occurs when people lack access to food or go hungry due to poverty or other challenges. It remains a serious problem for many older adults. Recently, a research team from the Institute for Health Research, Kaiser Permanente, Colorado, designed a study to learn more about food insecurity and older adults. Their study was published in the Journal of the American Geriatrics Society.
3h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Once degraded, Brazilian savanna does not regenerate naturallyAccording to study, after being converted to pastures, areas of the so-called 'Cerrado' become closed forest with poor biodiversity if not appropriately managed. This biome works as the source for much of Brazil's main river basins, and boasts biodiversity levels higher than tropical forests at the microscale.
3h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News

The shapes of waterIn a new piece of research just published in Science (March 9), C. Austen Angell of Arizona State University and colleagues from the University of Amsterdam have, for the first time, observed one of the more intriguing properties predicted by water theoreticians -- that, on sufficient super-cooling and under specific conditions it will suddenly change from one liquid to a different one.
3h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News

City mouse-country mouse experiment shows link between environment, worm infectionsWorm infections were worse in mice living outdoors versus the lab, providing evidence that environment influences how the immune system responds to pathogens.
3h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Researchers sew atomic lattices seamlessly togetherIn a study published March 8 in Science, Cornell University and University of Chicago scientists revealed a technique to 'sew' two patches of crystals seamlessly together to create atomically thin fabrics.
3h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Haphazard cholesterol checks put Australians at risk of heart diseaseNearly half of the Australians on stable lipid-lowering treatment may be having fewer than the recommended number of high-density lipoprotein (HDL-C) tests, while nearly one fifth are having more tests than is recommended, new research reveals.The study, published in today's BMJ Open, suggests many Australians may be at risk of developing cardiovascular disease because health checks are not being
3h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Fiber-fermenting bacteria improve health of type 2 diabetes patientsThe fight against type 2 diabetes may soon improve thanks to a pioneering high-fiber diet study led by a Rutgers University-New Brunswick professor.
3h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Gene knockout using new CRISPR tool makes mosquitoes highly resistant to malaria parasiteDeleting a single gene from mosquitoes can make them highly resistant to the malaria parasite and thus much less likely to transmit the parasite to humans, according to a new paper from scientists at Johns Hopkins Bloomberg School of Public Health's Malaria Research Institute.
3h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News

On Twitter, false news travels faster than true storiesA new study by three MIT scholars has found that false news spreads more rapidly on the social network Twitter than real news does -- and by a substantial margin.
3h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Menopausal hormone therapy linked to having a healthier heartWomen who use menopausal hormone therapy appear to have a heart structure and function that is linked to a lower risk of heart failure, according to a study led by Queen Mary University of London.
3h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News

The enemy within: Gut bacteria drive autoimmune diseaseBacteria found in the small intestines of mice and humans can travel to other organs and trigger an autoimmune response, according to a new Yale study. The researchers also found that the autoimmune reaction can be suppressed with an antibiotic or vaccine designed to target the bacteria, they said.
3h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News

A weakened gut barrier may contribute to autoimmune diseaseWhen the gut microbe Enterococcus gallinarum leaks out of the intestines and sets up camp in other organs such as the liver, it appears to trigger an autoimmune response similar to what's seen in lupus, a new study in mice reveals.
3h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News

High-fiber diets, with aid from gut microbes, can help treat type 2 diabetesScientists have identified a 'guild' of gut bacteria that helped alleviate symptoms of type 2 diabetes mellitus (T2DM) in patients eating a high-fiber diet. The authors say that promoting this exclusive microbial group via personalized nutrition may serve as a novel approach for maintaining the beneficial relationship between the body and its microbiome during T2DM.
3h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Fishery yields will be dramatically reduced by 2300, study suggesBy 2300, climate change may cause fishery yields to decline by as much as 20 percent around the globe, and by as much as 60% in the North Atlantic, a new modeling study suggests.
3h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News

On Twitter, false information travels farther and faster than the truthAn analysis of how true and false news stories spread on Twitter reveals that false news spreads substantially faster, and to far more people. Social media has created a boom in the spread of information, although little is known about how it has facilitated the spread of false information.
3h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Researchers sew atomic lattices seamlessly togetherScientists with the University of Chicago and Cornell revealed a technique to 'sew' two patches of crystals seamlessly together at the atomic level to create atomically-thin fabrics. (The smoother the seam between two materials, the more easily electrons flow across it -- essential for how well the electronic devices function.)
3h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News

False news spreads widely and easilyThree MIT researchers, Soroush Vosoughi and Deb Roy of the Media Lab and Sinan Aral of the Sloan School of Management, investigated all the true and false news stories verified by six independent fact checking organizations that were distributed on Twitter from 2006 to 2017. The researchers found that false news travels farther, faster, deeper and more broadly than the truth online in all categori
3h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Global fisheries to be, on average, 20 percent less productive in 2300, UCI study findsScientists expect the world's fisheries to be, on average, 20 percent less productive in the year 2300, with those in the North Atlantic down nearly 60 percent and those in much of the western Pacific experiencing declines of more than 50 percent.
3h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Researchers call for large-scale scientific investigation into fake newsAn Indiana University faculty member who studies the spread of misinformation online is joining prominent legal scholars, social scientists and researchers in a global 'call to action' in the fight against fake news.
3h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News

CRISPR/Cas9 technique suppresses malaria infection in mosquitoesUsing a gene editing technique known as CRISPR/Cas9, scientists have shown that inactivating the gene FREP1 reduces mosquitoes' susceptibility to infection with Plasmodium, a genus of parasites that causes malaria in humans. George Dimopoulos's group at Johns Hopkins University, present these findings in PLOS Pathogens.
3h
Latest Headlines | Science News

Diamonds reveal sign of the deepest water known inside EarthA rare form of ice crystal in the gems could have formed only at the crushing pressures found in the mantle.
3h
New Scientist - News

Fake news travels six times faster than the truth on TwitterNews Stories TwitterDespite the belief that armies of bots are spreading misinformation, it is people who are most likely to share incorrect information
3h
New Scientist - News

A high fibre diet helps treat diabetes by changing gut bacteriaA diet rich in wholegrains, seeds and vegetables can help treat type 2 diabetes – and it seems to do this by changing the bacteria that live in a person’s gut
3h
The Atlantic

The Grim Conclusions of the Largest-Ever Study of Fake NewsTwitter News Stories“Falsehood flies, and the Truth comes limping after it,” Jonathan Swift once wrote. It was hyperbole three centuries ago. But it is a factual description of social media, according to an ambitious and first-of-its-kind study published Thursday in Science . The massive new study analyzes every major contested news story in English across the span of Twitter’s existence—some 126,000 stories, tweete
3h
New on MIT Technology Review

Fake news spreads faster than the truth, and it’s all our fault
3h
Science | The Guardian

Scientists prove that truth is no match for fiction on TwitterResearchers find fake news reaches users up to 20 times faster than factual content – and real users are more likely to spread it than bots “Falsehood flies, and the truth comes limping after it,” wrote Jonathan Swift in 1710 . Now a group of scientists say they have found evidence Swift was right – at least when it comes to Twitter. In the paper, published in the journal Science , three MIT rese
3h
Inside Science

BRIEF: The Science of Fake NewsBRIEF: The Science of Fake News The reasons that misinformation spreads over Twitter are as human as they are technological. FakeNewsTop.jpg Image credits: baranq/ Shutterstock Culture Thursday, March 8, 2018 - 14:00 Jason Socrates Bardi, Editor (Inside Science) – Documented evidence of fake news in politics has been around for at least 500 years -- at least in fictional form. According to Shakes
3h
Science current issue

Health security's blind spot
3h
Science current issue

News at a glance
3h
Science current issue

Lithium-sulfur batteries poised for leap
3h
Science current issue

Germany's new government makes big promises
3h
Science current issue

Saildrone fleet could help replace aging buoys
3h
Science current issue

Study undercuts claims of new neurons in adult brains
3h
Science current issue

Slow coolant phaseout could worsen warming
3h
Science current issue

China hones plans for ambitious x-ray probe
3h
Science current issue

Looking for love
3h
Science current issue

Fever dilemma
3h
Science current issue

The science of fake news
3h
Science current issue

Intestinal barriers protect against disease
3h
Science current issue

Diverging roads to the heart
3h
Science current issue

Harmful networks in the brain and beyond
3h
Science current issue

Hemimethylation: DNA's lasting odd couple
3h
Science current issue

Will marine productivity wane?
3h
Science current issue

Capturing dynamic protein interactions
3h
Science current issue

Proteoforms as the next proteomics currency
3h
Science current issue

Behind the scenes of the built environment
3h
Science current issue

Who holds the power?
3h
Science current issue

The snow leopard's questionable comeback
3h
Science current issue

Nigeria's new GDP means scientists suffer
3h
Science current issue

Possible brooding of pterosaur parents
3h
Science current issue

Refining cell therapy
3h
Science current issue

The healing power of painful memories
3h
Science current issue

Building better bile ducts
3h
Science current issue

Toward a true cure for hearing impairment
3h
Science current issue

Coupling light to single spins
3h
Science current issue

Starving ocean productivity
3h
Science current issue

Microbial modulation of diabetes
3h
Science current issue

Unscientific hunt management plans
3h
Science current issue

Hemimethylation drives chromatin assembly
3h
Science current issue

Malaria relief, one amino acid at a time
3h
Science current issue

Encapsulating Earth's deep water filter
3h
Science current issue

Lies spread faster than the truth
3h
Science current issue

Regulating molecule proximity
3h
Science current issue

Fibroblasts as lung stem cell niche
3h
Science current issue

Coherent strained superlattices
3h
Science current issue

Unmasking supercooled water transitions
3h
Science current issue

Bacterial involvement in autoimmunity
3h
Science current issue

The mechanisms behind grid cell changes
3h
Science current issue

Overcoming a barrier to IBD
3h
Science current issue

Committing the heart
3h
Science current issue

Taking the heat together
3h
Science current issue

Curbing ILC2 enthusiasm
3h
Science current issue

Kinase networks in inflammation
3h
Science current issue

Gumming up the works
3h
Science current issue

Speed representation in the brain
3h
Science current issue

A simple theory for simple glass
3h
Science current issue

Protein kinase signaling without phosphorylation
3h
Science current issue

A solid electrolyte
3h
Science current issue

Scientific reasoning on paper
3h
Science current issue

Mesocrystal morphogenesis
3h
Science current issue

Single-cell Wnt signaling niches maintain stemness of alveolar type 2 cellsAlveoli, the lung’s respiratory units, are tiny sacs where oxygen enters the bloodstream. They are lined by flat alveolar type 1 (AT1) cells, which mediate gas exchange, and AT2 cells, which secrete surfactant. Rare AT2s also function as alveolar stem cells. We show that AT2 lung stem cells display active Wnt signaling, and many of them are near single, Wnt-expressing fibroblasts. Blocking Wnt se
3h
Science current issue

Strong spin-photon coupling in siliconLong coherence times of single spins in silicon quantum dots make these systems highly attractive for quantum computation, but how to scale up spin qubit systems remains an open question. As a first step to address this issue, we demonstrate the strong coupling of a single electron spin and a single microwave photon. The electron spin is trapped in a silicon double quantum dot, and the microwave
3h
Science current issue

A liquid-liquid transition in supercooled aqueous solution related to the HDA-LDA transitionSimulations and theory suggest that the thermodynamic anomalies of water may be related to a phase transition between two supercooled liquid states, but so far this phase transition has not been observed experimentally because of preemptive ice crystallization. We used calorimetry, infrared spectroscopy, and molecular dynamics simulations to investigate a water-rich hydrazinium trifluoroacetate s
3h
Science current issue

Coherent, atomically thin transition-metal dichalcogenide superlattices with engineered strainEpitaxy forms the basis of modern electronics and optoelectronics. We report coherent atomically thin superlattices in which different transition metal dichalcogenide monolayers—despite large lattice mismatches—are repeated and laterally integrated without dislocations within the monolayer plane. Grown by an omnidirectional epitaxy, these superlattices display fully matched lattice constants acro
3h
Science current issue

Ice-VII inclusions in diamonds: Evidence for aqueous fluid in Earths deep mantleWater-rich regions in Earth’s deeper mantle are suspected to play a key role in the global water budget and the mobility of heat-generating elements. We show that ice-VII occurs as inclusions in natural diamond and serves as an indicator for such water-rich regions. Ice-VII, the residue of aqueous fluid present during growth of diamond, crystallizes upon ascent of the host diamonds but remains at
3h
Science current issue

Sustained climate warming drives declining marine biological productivityClimate change projections to the year 2100 may miss physical-biogeochemical feedbacks that emerge later from the cumulative effects of climate warming. In a coupled climate simulation to the year 2300, the westerly winds strengthen and shift poleward, surface waters warm, and sea ice disappears, leading to intense nutrient trapping in the Southern Ocean. The trapping drives a global-scale nutrie
3h
Science current issue

Local transformations of the hippocampal cognitive mapGrid cells are neurons active in multiple fields arranged in a hexagonal lattice and are thought to represent the "universal metric for space." However, they become nonhomogeneously distorted in polarized enclosures, which challenges this view. We found that local changes to the configuration of the enclosure induce individual grid fields to shift in a manner inversely related to their distance f
3h
Science current issue

Gut bacteria selectively promoted by dietary fibers alleviate type 2 diabetesThe gut microbiota benefits humans via short-chain fatty acid (SCFA) production from carbohydrate fermentation, and deficiency in SCFA production is associated with type 2 diabetes mellitus (T2DM). We conducted a randomized clinical study of specifically designed isoenergetic diets, together with fecal shotgun metagenomics, to show that a select group of SCFA-producing strains was promoted by die
3h
Science current issue

Translocation of a gut pathobiont drives autoimmunity in mice and humansDespite multiple associations between the microbiota and immune diseases, their role in autoimmunity is poorly understood. We found that translocation of a gut pathobiont, Enterococcus gallinarum , to the liver and other systemic tissues triggers autoimmune responses in a genetic background predisposing to autoimmunity. Antibiotic treatment prevented mortality in this model, suppressed growth of
3h
Science current issue

C1orf106 is a colitis risk gene that regulates stability of epithelial adherens junctionsPolymorphisms in C1orf106 are associated with increased risk of inflammatory bowel disease (IBD). However, the function of C1orf106 and the consequences of disease-associated polymorphisms are unknown. Here we demonstrate that C1orf106 regulates adherens junction stability by regulating the degradation of cytohesin-1, a guanine nucleotide exchange factor that controls activation of ARF6. By limit
3h
Science current issue

Nascent DNA methylome mapping reveals inheritance of hemimethylation at CTCF/cohesin sitesThe faithful inheritance of the epigenome is critical for cells to maintain gene expression programs and cellular identity across cell divisions. We mapped strand-specific DNA methylation after replication forks and show maintenance of the vast majority of the DNA methylome within 20 minutes of replication and inheritance of some hemimethylated CpG dinucleotides (hemiCpGs). Mapping the nascent DN
3h
Science current issue

Thermal proximity coaggregation for system-wide profiling of protein complex dynamics in cellsProteins differentially interact with each other across cellular states and conditions, but an efficient proteome-wide strategy to monitor them is lacking. We report the application of thermal proximity coaggregation (TPCA) for high-throughput intracellular monitoring of protein complex dynamics. Significant TPCA signatures observed among well-validated protein-protein interactions correlate posi
3h
Science current issue

Defining the earliest step of cardiovascular lineage segregation by single-cell RNA-seqMouse heart development arises from Mesp1 -expressing cardiovascular progenitors (CPs) that are specified during gastrulation. The molecular processes that control early regional and lineage segregation of CPs have been unclear. We performed single-cell RNA sequencing of wild-type and Mesp1 -null CPs in mice. We showed that populations of Mesp1 CPs are molecularly distinct and span the continuum
3h
Science current issue

New Products
3h
Science current issue

Why our ways parted
3h
Science current issue

Comment on "The growth pattern of Neandertals, reconstructed from a juvenile skeleton from El Sidron (Spain)"Rosas et al . (Reports, 22 September 2017, p. 1282) calculate El Sidrón J1 to have reached only 87.5% of its adult brain size. This finding is based on an overestimation of Neandertal brain size. Pairwise comparisons with a larger sample of Neandertal fossils reveal that it is unlikely that the brain of El Sidrón would have grown appreciably larger.
3h
Science current issue

Response to Comment on "The growth pattern of Neandertals, reconstructed from a juvenile skeleton from El Sidron (Spain)"The comment by DeSilva challenges our suggestion that brain growth of the El Sidrón J1 Neandertal was still incomplete at 7.7 years of age. Evidence suggests that endocranial volume is likely to represent less than 90% adult size at El Sidrón as well as Neandertal male plus Krapina samples, in line with further evidence from endocranial surface histology and dural sinus groove size.
3h
Science current issue

Cover stories: Visualizing the spread of true and false news on social media
3h
Science current issue

Chemically induced proximity in biology and medicineProximity, or the physical closeness of molecules, is a pervasive regulatory mechanism in biology. For example, most posttranslational modifications such as phosphorylation, methylation, and acetylation promote proximity of molecules to play deterministic roles in cellular processes. To understand the role of proximity in biologic mechanisms, chemical inducers of proximity (CIPs) were developed t
3h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Big steps toward control of production of tiny building blocksArticle describes in situ observation of plasma arc nanosynthesis that could lead to improved production of nanoparticles.
4h
Latest Headlines | Science News

On Twitter, the lure of fake news is stronger than the truthAn analysis of more than 4.5 million tweets discussing false and true stories reveals that in the Twittersphere, fake news gets more views.
4h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Researchers sew atomic lattices seamlessly togetherJoining different kinds of materials can lead to all kinds of breakthroughs. It's an essential skill that allowed humans to make everything from skyscrapers (by reinforcing concrete with steel) to solar cells (by layering materials to herd electrons).
4h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

City mouse-country mouse experiment shows link between environment, worm infectionsWhen laboratory mice moved to the countryside where they could burrow in dirt, forage for food and generally live like ordinary mice, they became more susceptible to infection with parasitic whipworms than mice that stayed in the lab, a new study has found.
4h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Global fisheries to be, on average, 20 percent less productive in 2300, study findsUniversity of California, Irvine scientists expect the world's fisheries to be, on average, 20 percent less productive in the year 2300, with those in the North Atlantic down nearly 60 percent and those in much of the western Pacific experiencing declines of more than 50 percent.
4h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

'Bat detectives' train new algorithms to discern bat calls in noisy recordingsUsing data collected by citizen scientists, researchers have developed new, open-source algorithms to automatically detect bat echolocation calls in audio recordings. Oisin Mac Aodha, formerly of University College London, now at Caltech, and colleagues at University College London present their new approach in PLOS Computational Biology.
4h
Scientific American Content: Global

You Can't Handle the Truth--at Least on TwitterFalse information is about 70 percent more likely to be retweeted than faithful reports of actual events, researchers find -- Read more on ScientificAmerican.com
4h
Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

Hawaiian stick spiders re-evolve the same three guises every time they island hopWe don't usually expect evolution to be predictable. But Hawaiian stick spiders of the Ariamnes genus have repeatedly evolved the same distinctive forms, known as ecomorphs, on different islands, researchers report. Ecomorphs -- which look similar and live in similar habitats, but aren't as closely related as they appear -- are surprisingly rare. The researchers hope that these newly described one
4h
Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

Cueing newly learned information in sleep improves memory, and here's howScientists have long known that sleep is important to the formation and retention of new memories. Memory consolidation is associated with sudden bursts of oscillatory brain activity, called sleep spindles, which can be visualized and measured on an electroencephalogram (EEG). Now researchers have found that sleep spindles also play a role in strengthening new memories when newly learned informati
4h
Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

Exposure to childhood violence linked to psychiatric disordersInvesting in diminishing socioeconomic status inequalities and in preventing violent events during childhood may improve the mental health of youths from low socioeconomic status backgrounds. The results showed that having experienced any traumatic event and low socioeconomic status were associated with an internalizing disorder such as depression and anxiety and an externalizing disorder includin
4h
Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

Non-invasive brain stimulation improves gait impairment of Parkinson's disease patientsA new study suggests a novel way of treating the areas of the brain that apparently cause freezing of gait in patients with Parkinson's disease.
4h
Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

Scientists accurately model the action of aerosols on cloudsGlobal climate is a tremendously complex phenomenon, and researchers are making painstaking progress, year by year, to try to develop ever more accurate models. Now, an international group using the powerful K computer, have for the first time accurately calculated the effects of aerosols on clouds in a climate model.
4h
Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

Supply bottleneck impairs nerve functionImpaired transport processes in neurons contribute to diseases such as amyotrophic lateral sclerosis. Scientists have now identified key actors in these processes.
4h
Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

How cellular structure orchestrates immunologic memoryWith every infection or vaccination, memory cells form that the body uses to remember the pathogen. This has been known for decades -- but the structure of this cellular immunologic memory has previously proven impossible to pin down. Researchers have now identified a microanatomical region in memory cells that enables them to work rapidly in the first few hours of an immune response.
4h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Is your stress changing my brain?In a new study in Nature Neuroscience, Jaideep Bains, Ph.D., and his team at the Cumming School of Medicine's Hotchkiss Brain Institute (HBI), at the University of Calgary have discovered that stress transmitted from others can change the brain in the same way as a real stress does.
4h
Big Think

Documents show the FBI paid Geek Squad staff to inform on customersNewly released documents show how the FBI paid Best Buy Geek Squad employees to report customers who had child pornography on their computers, a relationship that might have violated customers’ Fourth Amendment rights. Read More
4h
Science | The Guardian

‘Race science’ depends on dubious genetics | LettersMartin Yuille , Steven Rose , Jonathan Bard , John Wilson and Iain Climie on the controversy over race and intelligence Gavin Evans’s criticisms of attempts to demonstrate a robust association between surrogate measures of ill-defined concepts (“race” and “intelligence”) are to the point ( The unwelcome return of ‘race science’ , The long read, 2 March). However, the dogma underpinning these atte
4h
Science | The Guardian

Experts hunt for traces of nerve agent in bid to track Skripals' attackerImpurities found in nerve agent may be key to identifying where it was made – if experts can locate a pure sample Forensic experts will be looking for traces of nerve agent on the clothes of Sergei Skripal and his daughter, Yulia, and in the area where the two were attacked, in an effort to track down where the deadly substance was made, researchers say. Related: Russian spy attack: police office
4h
Live Science

Mysterious Sandbar Island That Formed Last Summer Is Gone Once AgainShelly Island, which formed in June 2017 off the coast of North Carolina's barrier islands, has disappeared due to strong hurricanes and storms, new NASA images reveal.
4h
NeuWrite San Diego

The Art of Brainwashing[En español] Have you ever tried to convince someone of something? Or have you ever been convinced of something? Of course you have. Everyone has. We are constantly bombarded with commercials for products to buy, and exposed to people’s rants, in real life or online, about how we should be voting, and what we should […]
4h
New on MIT Technology Review

Twitter wants to reduce the “health” of its conversations to four numbers. Good luck, say experts.News Twitter StoriesWhat kind of thermometer do you need to take a social network’s temperature?
4h
BBC News - Science & Environment

Penguins pose for selfie in AntarcticaTwo Emperor penguins stumbled across a camera that was left by an Australian Antarctic explorer.
4h
The Atlantic

Which Fictional House Would You Most Like to Live In?Alexander Chee, author, How to Write an Autobiographical Novel The Nautilus from Jules Verne’s Twenty Thousand Leagues Under the Sea : Powered by salt water, full of masterpieces taken from shipwrecks and a collection of marine-life specimens from around the world, capable of taking me to tour the ocean or fight against its polluters, it is the only home I can imagine to which I would always retu
4h
Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

Surprise finding could lead to new MS treatmentsA discovery is providing hope of a new therapeutic target in Multiple Sclerosis (MS) patients that could one day be used to prevent the symptoms and progression of the disease. By removing a protein called calnexin in mice, researchers found the mice were provided with full protection from the mouse model of MS -- known as experimental autoimmune encephalomyelitis (EAE).
4h
Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

Decoy molecules target E. coli to treat UTI in miceResearchers have designed sugar molecules that block E. coli bacteria from binding to urinary tissues, allowing the bacteria to be washed out of the urinary tract. The compounds represent a step toward treating UTIs without antibiotics.
4h
Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

Transmission risk of familial human prion diseases to miceFamilial human prion diseases are passed within families and are associated with 34 known prion protein mutations. To determine whether three of the unstudied mutations are transmissible, scientists exposed research mice to brain samples from three people who died from a familial prion disease. After observing the mice for about two years, they found two of the mutations, Y226X and G131V, are tran
4h
Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

Scientists zero in on treatment for Charcot-Marie-Tooth diseaseScientists have now shown a path to developing treatments for disease subtype CMT2D.
4h
Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

Improving birth outcomes one amino acid at a timeA simple dietary supplement (L-arginine) was found to improve birth outcomes, paving the way for future clinical trials to test this inexpensive and safe intervention.
4h
Live Science

A Man with a Life-Threatening Heart Infection Was Saved by a Virus Plucked from a LakeA virus scooped up from a lake saved an 80-year-old Connecticut man who had a life-threatening bacterial infection in his heart.
4h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Women regret sex less when they take the initiativeWomen regret casual sex more than men do -- but less so if they take the initiative and the sex was good.
4h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News

MicroRNA predicts and protects against severe lung disease in extremely premature infantsResearchers report discovery of a strong predictive biomarker for bronchopulmonary dysplasia, and they show a role for the biomarker in the pathogenesis of this neonatal lung disease. These results open the path to possible future therapies to prevent or lessen BPD, which is marked by inflammation and impaired lung development, and mortality or morbidity.
4h
Ingeniøren

Optiske atomure baner vej for ny definition af sekundetMetrologieksperter har nu udstukket en plan, der på sigt skal ændre definitionen af sekundet fra en overgang i cæsium med en frekvens i gigahertzområdet til en atomovergang i den optiske frekvensområde, så tidsmålinger kan blive 100 gange mere præcise.
4h
Viden

Se hvordan din krop forandrer sig lige nuTast alder og køn ind og bliv klogere på, hvordan din krop ændrer sig.
4h
The Atlantic

An Ex-Russian Spy Was Poisoned by a Nerve Agent—How Does It Work?On Sunday, a former Russian spy named Sergei Skripal and his daughter collapsed near a bench in Salisbury, England. “Her eyes were just completely white. They were wide-open but just white and [she was] frothing at the mouth,” a man who found the couple told CBS . “Then the man went stiff. His arms stopped moving, but he’s still looking dead straight.” Classic signs of poisoning with a nerve agen
5h
New Scientist - News

Swarms of DIY drones are attacking missile defences in YemenHome-made drones are attacking the world’s most sophisticated defence systems. It’s not clear if the attacks have worked yet, but it’s a trend likely to continue
5h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Vatican invites hackers to fix problems, not breach securityComputer hackers with a heart are descending on the Vatican to help tackle pressing problems particularly dear to Pope Francis, including how to better provide resources for migrants and encourage solidarity for the poor.
5h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Trump meets with video game execs and criticsDonald Trump GamePresident Donald Trump revived a debate over the link between gun violence and graphic depictions of violence in video games Thursday, bringing members of the video game industry and some of their most vocal critics to the White House.
5h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Having children can make women's telomeres seem 11 years olderA study by George Mason University Researchers found that women who have given birth have shorter telomeres than those who haven't. Telomeres are the end caps of DNA on our chromosomes, which help in DNA replication and get shorter over time. The length of telomeres has been associated with morbidity and mortality previously, but this is the first study to examine links with having children.
5h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Engineered cartilage template to heal broken bonesA team of UConn Health researchers has designed a novel, hybrid hydrogel system to help address some of the challenges in repairing bone in the event of injury. The researchers described their findings in a recent issue of Journal of Biomedical Materials Research-Part B, where the work is featured on the journal cover.
5h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News

New 3-D measurements improve understanding of geomagnetic storm hazardsMeasurements of the three-dimensional structure of the earth, as opposed to the one-dimensional models typically used, can help scientists more accurately determine which areas of the United States are most vulnerable to blackouts during hazardous geomagnetic storms.
5h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

New 3-D measurements improve understanding of geomagnetic storm hazardsMeasurements of the three-dimensional structure of the earth, as opposed to the one-dimensional models typically used, can help scientists more accurately determine which areas of the United States are most vulnerable to blackouts during hazardous geomagnetic storms.
5h
Science | The Guardian

Richard Taylor obituaryScientist who shared the 1990 Nobel prize in physics for establishing that protons and neutrons are made up of quarks Richard Taylor, who has died aged 88, won a share of the Nobel prize in physics for establishing that protons and neutrons are made up of quarks. His discovery, in the late 1960s with Jerome Friedman, Henry Kendall and a team of researchers, was a fundamental breakthrough in the un
5h
Viden

VIDEO Det hader og elsker danskerne ved deres kroppeMange af os er utilfredse med vores krop, men faktisk kan noget så simpelt som en tur i skoven booste din selvtillid.
5h
The Atlantic

The Women's March Has a Farrakhan ProblemA year ago, the Women’s March punctuated Trump’s inauguration with what was likely the largest single-day mass demonstration in American history. Today, it finds itself embroiled in an unexpected controversy after the initial refusal of several of its leaders to distance themselves from one of America’s leading anti-Semites, the Nation of Islam’s Louis Farrakhan. It’s a conflict that stems from t
5h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

How brightly colored spiders evolved on Hawaii again and again... and againAbout 2 to 3 million years ago, a group of spiders let out long silk threads into the wind and set sail, so to speak, across the Pacific Ocean to Hawaii. These spiders were parasites of other spiders, invading their webs, snipping threads to steal insects that had been caught. But there weren't many webs to rob on Hawaii when they arrived. So they expanded their repertoire, looking for other ways
5h
New on MIT Technology Review

Tech talent actually shows promise for a more female future
5h
Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

Commercial pesticides: Not as safe as they seemThis is the first comprehensive review of gaps in risk assessments for adjuvants in pesticide formulations which are not currently subject to safety assessments. Ignoring the potential dangers of other ingredients in commonly used commercial pesticides leads to inaccuracies in the safety profile of the pesticide solution, as well as confusion in scientific literature on pesticide effects. The revi
5h
Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

Memories can be decoded from brain waves during sleep, say researchersResearch has shown that the content of newly formed memories can be decoded from brain activity whilst people are asleep.
5h
Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

No progress seen in reducing antibiotics among outpatientsDespite public health campaigns aimed at reducing unnecessary prescriptions for antibiotics, the drugs continue to be prescribed at startlingly high rates in outpatient settings, according to a new study. The researchers found that 98 million outpatient antibiotic prescriptions were filled by 39 million people from 2013 to 2015. Moreover, the researchers found no decline in the overall antibiotic
5h
Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

Inherited mutation leads to overproduction of erythropoietin in bloodA newly-discovered hereditary mutation is responsible for an increased production of erythropoietin (EPO) in the blood. This mutation causes a messenger RNA (mRNA) that is not normally involved in the formation of proteins to be reprogrammed so that it produces EPO, thus abnormally increasing the number of red blood cells.
5h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

'Darknet' market spokesman pleads guilty to federal chargeAn Illinois man who worked as a spokesman for a leading "darknet" marketplace that users accessed anonymously to buy and sell illicit goods pleaded guilty Thursday to a federal conspiracy charge in Atlanta.
5h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Fast, high capacity fiber transmission gets real for data centersA cutting edge, "off-line" signal transmission mechanism, experimentally demonstrated just a few years ago, is now on-line as a real-time bidirectional transmission system. At OFC 2018, the single-most important annual event in optical communications, being held March 11-15 in San Diego California, a research team from Nokia will report the real-time, bi-directional transmission of 78 interleaved,
5h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Researchers develop heat switch for electronicsResearchers at the University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign have developed a new technology for switching heat flows 'on' or 'off'. The findings were published in the article "Millimeter-scale liquid metal droplet thermal switch," which appeared in Applied Physics Letters.
5h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Criminologist, student team build database on US school shootingsA criminologist and her students at The University of Texas at Dallas are creating a database that tracks shootings at K-12 schools in the United States going back to 1990.
5h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

What do iPhones, Halloween candy, and sushi have in common?How people seek to express their uniqueness is played out in many ways - one of the more subtle ways is how they choose products when presented with product-related information in various colors, versus in black and white or a uniform color.
5h
The Economist: The world this week

Politics this week
5h
The Economist: The world this week

KAL’s cartoon
5h
The Economist: The world this week

Business this week
5h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Nanostructures made of previously impossible materialOne could think that mixing different materials is easy -- why not just melt them and pour them together? But if the goal is to create well-ordered crystals, things are more complicated. Scientists at TU Wien (Vienna) have now found a way to add large amounts of metal to semiconductor crystals, which changes their properties dramatically.
5h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News

New options for targeting gene mutation in FA described in nucleic acid therapeuticsResearchers have shown that a wide variety of synthetic antisense oligonucleotides with different chemical modifications can activate the frataxin gene, which contains a mutation that decreases its expression in the inherited neurologic disorder Friedreich's ataxia (FA).
5h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News

TSRI scientists zero in on treatment for Charcot-Marie-Tooth diseaseScientists at The Scripps Research Institute (TSRI) have now shown a path to developing treatments for disease subtype CMT2D.
5h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Research reveals a mechanism that drives ataxia type 1Researchers have learned that polyQ-ATAXIN1 and capicua form a complex that is sufficient to trigger spinocerebellar ataxia type 1 in mice.
5h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News

UBC researchers invent new method to create self-tinting windowsUBC chemistry researchers have developed a simple, cost-effective technique for making smart windows that could lead the way for wide-scale adoption of this energy-saving technology.
5h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Memories can be decoded from brain waves during sleep, say researchersResearch at the University of York has shown that the content of newly formed memories can be decoded from brain activity whilst people are asleep.
5h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News

New record set for carbon-carbon single bond lengthA stable organic compound has been synthesized with a record length for the bond between its carbon atoms, exceeding the assumed limit.
5h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Cancer 'signature' first step toward blood test for patientsA discovery by Melbourne researchers could help to identify patients with a particularly aggressive type of lung cancer that are likely to respond to immunotherapies currently used in the clinic to treat other cancers.The research has also revealed a unique molecular signature in the blood that could, in the future, be used to detect these aggressive lung cancers with a simple blood test.
5h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News

How brightly colored spiders evolved on Hawaii again and again...and againStick spiders with similar traits -- yellow and red coloring, for example -- live on different Hawaiian islands but aren't each other's closest relatives; they are a rare instance where a physical form has evolved separately on each island, according to a new study by scientists at the University of California, Berkeley.
5h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News

CRISPR-based system identifies important new drug targets in a deadly leukemiaScientists have harnessed CRISPR, the gene-editing tool, to find highly specific dependencies in a deadly subtype of leukemia. They used an experimental drug to target these, halting cancer growth in cultured cells. The discovery is the result of a broad search for potential therapeutic strategies against AML that began several years ago in the Vakoc lab at CSHL. 'We let the cancer cells tell us w
5h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Scientists develop new tool for imprinting biochipsThe new technology could allow researchers to fit more biochemical probes onto a single biochip and reduce the cost of screening and analyzing changes associated with disease development, detecting bioterrorism agents, and other areas of research.
5h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Hawaiian stick spiders re-evolve the same three guises every time they island hopWe don't usually expect evolution to be predictable. But Hawaiian stick spiders of the Ariamnes genus have repeatedly evolved the same distinctive forms, known as ecomorphs, on different islands, researchers report on March 8 in the journal Current Biology. Ecomorphs -- which look similar and live in similar habitats, but aren't as closely related as they appear -- are surprisingly rare. The resea
5h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Cueing newly learned information in sleep improves memory, and here's howScientists have long known that sleep is important to the formation and retention of new memories. Memory consolidation is associated with sudden bursts of oscillatory brain activity, called sleep spindles, which can be visualized and measured on an electroencephalogram (EEG). Now researchers reporting in Current Biology on March 8 have found that sleep spindles also play a role in strengthening n
5h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Neuroticism could be 'sleeper effect' in Trump and Brexit campaignsRegions where voters have more neurotic personality traits were more likely to vote for Donald Trump in the United States or for the Brexit campaign in the United Kingdom, revealing a new trend that could help explain the rise of fearmongering populist political campaigns across the world, according to new research published in the journal Social Psychological and Personality Science.
5h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

New butterfly species named for Field Museum's Emily GraslieAs the Field Museum's chief curiosity correspondent, Emily Graslie has plunged elbow-deep into wolf guts, dug up 52-million-year-old fish fossils and unpacked species classification using candy as stand-ins.
5h
New on MIT Technology Review

How to grow four tons of food a year in a metal box without sunlightJaime Silverstein is helping plants find a home in urban environments.
5h
The Atlantic

How Did Rex Tillerson Manage to Keep His Job?Policy differences with your boss, especially if he is the president, are one thing; reportedly calling him a “moron” and declining to say whether he represents American values are quite another. And yet a little more than a year after Rex Tillerson was sworn in as the U.S. secretary of state, and amid umpteen stories of his imminent departure from that position, including in The Atlantic , he’s
5h
The Atlantic

Hawaii: Where Evolution Can Be Surprisingly PredictableMost people go to Hawaii for the golden beaches, the turquoise seas, or the stunning weather. Rosemary Gillespie went for the spiders. Situated around 2,400 miles from the nearest continent, the Hawaiian Islands are about as remote as it’s possible for islands to be. In the last 5 million years, they’ve been repeatedly colonized by far-traveling animals, which then diversified into dozens of new
5h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

A peculiar galactic clashGalaxies are not static islands of stars—they are dynamic and ever-changing, constantly on the move through the darkness of the Universe. Sometimes, as seen in this spectacular Hubble image of Arp 256, galaxies can collide in a crash of cosmic proportions.
5h
Big Think

Two maps (and one graph) comparing obesity in America and EuropeIf your BMI is higher than 30, you're obese. These maps show how many people per European country (and U.S. state) suffer from that medical condition Read More
5h
Big Think

Simone de Beauvoir’s political philosophy resonates todayA less well-known facet of de Beauvoir's philosophy, particularly relevant today, is her political activism. Read More
5h
Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

New ultrafast measurement technique shows how lasers start from chaosLasers that emit ultrashort pulses of light are critical components of technologies, such as communications and industrial processing, and have been central to fundamental Nobel Prize-winning research in physics.
5h
Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

New insights into why patients have a higher risk of heart attack in the morningHeart disease patients have lower levels of an important family of protective molecules in their blood in the morning, which could be increasing risk of blood clots and heart attacks at those times, says early research.
5h
Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

Genetic origins of the two sexesThis new study punches a hole in the idea that increased genetic complexity of sex chromosomes accompanied the origin of sexes.
5h
Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

Heat switch developed for electronicsResearchers have developed new technology for switching heat flows 'on' or 'off'.
5h
Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

First laboratory simulation of exoplanet atmospheric chemistryScientists have conducted the first lab experiments on haze formation in simulated exoplanet atmospheres, an important step for understanding upcoming observations of planets outside the solar system with the James Webb Space Telescope.
5h
Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

Multiple optical measurements reveal the single cell activation without contrast agentResearchers developed a label-free multimodal microscopy platform that allows the non-invasive study of cellular preparations without the need of any additional chemicals or contrast agent. The parameters extracted from these measurements, coupled with machine algorithms, enable the study of fine cellular processes such as macrophage cells activation upon exposure to lipopolysaccharide (LPS).
5h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Study sheds light on the genetic origins of the two sexesA new study published in the journal Communications Biology has shed light on the earliest stages in the evolution of male-female differentiation and sex chromosomes—and found the genetic origins of the two sexes to be unexpectedly modest.
5h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Team performs first laboratory simulation of exoplanet atmospheric chemistryScientists have conducted the first lab experiments on haze formation in simulated exoplanet atmospheres, an important step for understanding upcoming observations of planets outside the solar system with the James Webb Space Telescope.
5h
The Scientist RSS

Flys Blood-Brain Barrier Has Circadian RhythmsIn Drosophila, the tissue is more permeable to drugs at night, offering a possible explanation for why some medicines work better at certain times of day.
5h
Quanta Magazine

To Test Einstein’s Equations, Poke a Black HoleIn November 1915, in a lecture before the Prussian Academy of Sciences, Albert Einstein described an idea that upended humanity’s view of the universe. Rather than accepting the geometry of space and time as fixed, Einstein explained that we actually inhabit a four-dimensional reality called space-time whose form fluctuates in response to matter and energy. Einstein elaborated this dramatic insig
6h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Inherited mutation leads to overproduction of EPOA newly-discovered hereditary mutation is responsible for an increased production of erythropoietin (EPO) in the blood. This mutation causes a messenger RNA (mRNA) that is not normally involved in the formation of proteins to be reprogrammed so that it produces EPO, thus abnormally increasing the number of red blood cells. Researchers from the Department of Biomedicine at the University of Basel a
6h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Suomi NPP Satellite sees Tropical Cyclone Hola over VanuatuWhen NASA-NOAA's Suomi NPP satellite passed over the South Pacific Ocean it captured a visible image of Tropical Cyclone Hola over Vanuatu.
6h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

New record set for carbon-carbon single bond lengthHokkaido University researchers have synthesized an organic compound with a longer bond between carbon atoms than ever before—exceeding the assumed limit for carbon-carbon single bond (C-C) lengths. The researchers termed it a "hyper-covalent bond."
6h
Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

Many adolescent and young adult cancer survivors have more social connections than peersSurvivors of adolescent and young adult cancer often have stronger social networks than their non-cancer peers, according to researchers, who hope to translate that support into better lives for the nation's growing population of cancer survivors.
6h
Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

Simulation and experiment help researchers study next-generation semiconductorsResearchers are refining methods for studying next-generation organic semiconductors by using a combination of experiments and supercomputing resources.
6h
Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

New Rx for allergic contact dermatitisResearch has found a promising new treatment for allergic contact dermatitis that offers an alternative to corticosteroids and their possible side effects.
6h
Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

Serious asthma attacks reduced by temporary quadrupling of steroid inhaler, study findsSerious asthma attacks in adults can be reduced by a temporary but significant increase in the dose of inhaled steroids during severe episodes of asthma, according to a new study.
6h
Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

A peculiar galactic clashGalaxies are not static islands of stars -- they are dynamic and ever-changing, constantly on the move through the darkness of the Universe. Sometimes, as seen in this spectacular Hubble image of Arp 256, galaxies can collide in a crash of cosmic proportions.
6h
Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

Enzyme ensures thick insulationResearchers have revealed that Schwann cells in the peripheral nervous system largely produce their own fatty acids in order to create electrical insulation for nerve fibers. This process relies on an enzyme whose absence leads to defective insulation and impaired motor function.
6h
Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

Air pollution linked to brain alterations and cognitive impairment in childrenA new study performed in the Netherlands has linked exposure to residential air pollution during fetal life with brain abnormalities that may contribute to impaired cognitive function in school-age children. The study reports that the air pollution levels related to brain alterations were below those considered to be safe.
6h
Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

Bullying based on stigma has especially damaging effectsIn a new study, two professors are looking at bullying based on stigma -- where one is treated unfairly or unjustly due to one's race, sexual orientation, gender, or other characteristic -- and examining the methods used to prevent this type of bullying and address it when it happens.
6h
New Scientist - News

Stretchy ‘electric skin’ generates power from your movementsThis flexible and transparent material generates electricity from your skin as you bend or stretch. It could be worn as a second skin to power wearable tech
6h
Scientific American Content: Global

A "Pit Bull" for Climate Could Soon Sit Next to TrumpBut would Peter Navarro change his positions to advance his political career? -- Read more on ScientificAmerican.com
6h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News

No progress seen in reducing antibiotics among outpatientsDespite public health campaigns aimed at reducing unnecessary prescriptions for antibiotics, the drugs continue to be prescribed at startlingly high rates in outpatient settings, according to a new study at Washington University School of Medicine in St. Louis. The researchers analyzed de-identified data from Express Scripts Holding Co. and found that 98 million outpatient antibiotic prescriptions
6h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Exposure to childhood violence linked to psychiatric disordersInvesting in diminishing socioeconomic status inequalities and in preventing violent events during childhood may improve the mental health of youths from low socioeconomic status backgrounds. The results showed that having experienced any traumatic event and low socioeconomic status were associated with an internalizing disorder such as depression and anxiety and an externalizing disorder includin
6h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Scientists discover a key function of ALS-linked proteinThe protein FUS, whose mutation or disruption causes many cases of amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS) and frontotemporal dementia (FTD), works as a central component of one of the most important regulatory systems in cells, according to a new study in Molecular Cell from scientists at Johns Hopkins Bloomberg School of Public Health.
6h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Regional levels of fear associated with Trump and Brexit votes, psychology study showsUnlike previous elections, fear and worry played a heavy hand in both the 2016 Donald Trump and Brexit elections, changing the script on how personality shapes political behavior, according to an international psychological study on voting behavior.
6h
Feed: All Latest

How Dutch Police Took Over Hansa, a Top Dark Web MarketDutch police detail for the first time how they secretly hijacked Hansa, Europe's most popular dark web market.
6h
Big Think

What happens to children’s attitudes when they play with counter-gender toys?This study also sheds some insight on whether gender identity is learned or is biological. Read More
6h
The Atlantic

A New Generation Redefines What It Means to Be a MissionaryChristianity is shrinking and aging in the West, but it’s growing in the Global South, where most Christians are now located. With this demographic shift has come the beginning of another shift, in a practice some Christians from various denominations embrace as a theological requirement. There are hundreds of thousands of missionaries around the world, who believe scripture compels them to sprea
6h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Commercial pesticides: Not as safe as they seemThis is the first comprehensive review of gaps in risk assessments for adjuvants in pesticide formulations which are not currently subject to safety assessments. Ignoring the potential dangers of other ingredients in commonly used commercial pesticides leads to inaccuracies in the safety profile of the pesticide solution, as well as confusion in scientific literature on pesticide effects. The revi
6h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Medical researchers find protein that marks difference between cancer and non-cancer cellsA discovery sheds light on how cancerous cells differ from healthy ones, and could lead to the development of new strategies for therapeutic intervention for difficult-to-treat cancers in the future.
6h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News

NIAID scientists assess transmission risk of familial human prion diseases to miceFamilial human prion diseases are passed within families and are associated with 34 known prion protein mutations. To determine whether three of the unstudied mutations are transmissible, scientists from the National Institute of Allergy and Infectious Diseases (NIAID) exposed research mice to brain samples from three people who died from a familial prion disease. After observing the mice for abou
6h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Decoy molecules target E. coli to treat UTI in miceResearchers at Washington University School of Medicine in St. Louis have designed sugar molecules that block E. coli bacteria from binding to urinary tissues, allowing the bacteria to be washed out of the urinary tract. The compounds represent a step toward treating UTIs without antibiotics.
6h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Surprise finding could lead to new MS treatmentsA discovery led by scientists at the University of Alberta and McGill University is providing hope of a new therapeutic target in Multiple Sclerosis (MS) patients that could one day be used to prevent the symptoms and progression of the disease. By removing a protein called calnexin in mice, researchers found the mice were provided with full protection from the mouse model of MS -- known as experi
6h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Study finds biomarker that predicts who responds best to common diabetic complicationResearchers at St. Michael's Hospital have found a biomarker from fluid in the eye that predicts which patients will respond best to current treatments for diabetic macular edema, one of the most common complications of diabetes.
6h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News

A lifetime of regular exercise slows down aging, study findsA group of older people who have exercised all of their lives, were compared to a group of similarly aged adults and younger adults who do not exercise regularly. The results showed that those who have exercised regularly have defied the aging process, having the immunity, muscle mass, and cholesterol levels of a young person.
6h
New on MIT Technology Review

Baidu has entered the race to build quantum computers
6h
The Atlantic

Claire's Camera and the Beguiling Films of Hong Sang-sooThe eponymous character of Claire’s Camera , played with unusual guilelessness by Isabelle Huppert, wanders from scene to scene like a motivational sprite, striking up conversations with strangers on a whim. As the film’s title suggests, Claire has a Polaroid camera with her, and she has the friendliness of a tourist, which she is—a Parisian on vacation, she’s accompanying a friend who has a movi
6h
Feed: All Latest

The High Cost of Lab-to-Table MeatThe results—and taste tests—have been promising. Now these ultramodern farmers need their science to scale.
6h
Futurity.org

Homeless young adults still hungry despite food programsWhile young homeless adults make use of available food programs, these support structures still often fail to provide reliable and consistent access to nutritious food, according to a new study. The findings could help refine policies and programs to better serve people who are homeless, particularly those between the ages of 18-24. “It may be tempting to think of food pantries, soup kitchens, an
6h
Science | The Guardian

Cycling keeps your immune system young, study findsThe sport also preserves muscle and helps maintains stable levels of body fat and cholesterol Cycling can hold back the effects of ageing and rejuvenate the immune system, a study has found. Scientists carried out tests on 125 amateur cyclists aged 55 to 79 and compared them with healthy adults from a wide age group who did not exercise regularly. Continue reading...
6h
Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

A new kind of starA new kind of star: Astronomers have developed a novel mathematical model that combines general relativity with the repulsive effect of quantum vacuum polarization. The inclusion of this repulsive force allows describing ultracompact configurations of stars, which were previously considered by scientists not to exist in equilibrium.
6h
Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

Researchers rescue embryos from brain defects by re-engineering cellular voltage patternsBiologists have demonstrated for the first time that electrical patterns in the developing embryo can be predicted, mapped, and manipulated to prevent defects caused by harmful substances such as nicotine. The research suggests that targeting bioelectric states may be a new treatment modality for regenerative repair in brain development and disease, and that computational methods can be used to fi
6h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Scientists accurately model the action of aerosols on cloudsGlobal climate is a tremendously complex phenomenon, and researchers are making painstaking progress in developing ever more accurate models. Now, an international group including researchers from the Advanced Institute for Computational Science (AICS) in Japan, using the powerful K computer, have for the first time accurately calculated the effects of aerosols on clouds in a climate model.
6h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Start-up develops special lens for 3-D photography and filmUntil now, photographers and filmmakers had to use special equipment if they wanted to change the focus area in post-processing or reproduce an object three-dimensionally. The start-up K-Lens has now developed a special lens that can turn any standard camera into a 3-D camera. What began as a research project of the Max Planck Institute for Informatics and Saarland University, and was developed fu
6h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Fish farms are helping to fight hungerOver the past three decades, the global aquaculture industry has risen from obscurity to become a critical source of food for millions of people. In 1990, only 13 percent of world seafood consumption was farmed; by 2014, aquaculture was providing more than half of the fish consumed directly by human beings.
6h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Plant fossils have a lot to teach us about Earth's historyThere's a particular feeling of excitement that comes from receiving a gift. It's a feeling of the unknown, of anticipation – and then you unwrap the package and find something spectacular.
6h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Artificial "maple seeds" from rocketsThe Space Team at TU Wien is launching an ambitious project together with the University of Würzburg. Measurement devices are going to be ejected from a rocket and will fall to Earth without a parachute.
6h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

The social life of the humble fruit fly revolves around alcoholHumans aren't the only species with a well-developed drinking culture. The social life of the humble fruit fly also revolves around alcohol.
6h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

With laser light, scientists create first X-ray holographic images of virusesHolography, like photography, is a way to record the world around us. Both use light to make recordings, but instead of two-dimensional photos, holograms reproduce three-dimensional shapes. The shape is inferred from the patterns that form after light ricochets off an object and interferes with another light wave that serves as a reference.
6h
Science : NPR

Calling Team Cephalopod: Why Octopuses Could Never DisappointEvidence for smart, sassy octopus behavior once again impresses our resident cephalopod fan Barbara J. King, who is standing up for octopuses against a recent broadside. (Image credit: Fred Tanneau/AFP/Getty Images)
6h
Live Science

Did Amelia Earhart Perish on the Pacific Island of Nikumaroro?A forensic anthropologist says he's 99 percent sure bones found on this Pacific Island belong to the lost Amelia Earhart.
6h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Fast, high capacity fiber transmission gets real for data centersA research team from Nokia will report the real-time, bi-directional transmission of 78 interleaved, 400 gigabit per second (Gb/s) channels with a 31.2 terabit per second (Tb/s) fiber capacity.
7h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News

NASA-NOAA's Suomi NPP Satellite sees Tropical Cyclone Hola over VanuatuWhen NASA-NOAA's Suomi NPP satellite passed over the South Pacific Ocean it captured a visible image of Tropical Cyclone Hola over Vanuatu.
7h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News

LSU Health New Orleans research discovers new Rx for allergic contact dermatitisResearch led by Nicolas Bazan, M.D., Ph.D., Boyd Professor and Director of the Neuroscience Center of Excellence at LSU Health New Orleans School of Medicine, has found a promising new treatment for allergic contact dermatitis that offers an alternative to corticosteroids and their possible side effects.
7h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Simulation and experiment help TU Dresden researchers study next-generation semiconductorsResearchers at TU Dresden are refining methods for studying next-generation organic semiconductors by using a combination of experiments and supercomputing resources at the Leibniz Supercomputing Centre.
7h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Illinois researchers develop heat switch for electronicsResearchers at the University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign have developed a new technology for switching heat flows 'on' or 'off'. The findings were published in the article 'Millimeter-scale liquid metal droplet thermal switch,' which appeared in Applied Physics Letters.
7h
Popular Science

Egg whites could help power a clean-energy futureNexus Media News Researchers have cracked into a carbon-free fuel source in this protein-packed food. Scientists have discovered how to use the protein found in eggs to extract hydrogen more efficiently.
7h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Marrying later is best for lasting happinessDelaying marriage could make you happier in the long run, according to new University of Alberta research.
7h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Discovery sheds light on ancient cell structureNew research by University of Alberta cellular biologists is putting into question existing theories about what's responsible for organizing a central part of our cells, known as the Golgi apparatus.
7h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Self-driving robots collect water samples to create snapshots of ocean microbesFor the first time, scientists from the University of Hawai'i at Mānoa (UH Mānoa) and the Monterey Bay Aquarium Research Institute (MBARI) will deploy a small fleet of long-range autonomous underwater vehicles (LRAUVs) that have the ability to collect and archive seawater samples automatically. These new robots will allow researchers to track and study ocean microbes in unprecedented detail.
7h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

To achieve gender equality, we must first tackle our unconscious biasesPeople often argue that most Western societies have achieved gender equality – women have all the same legal rights as men, and workplace discrimination based on gender is illegal. Despite this, feminists continue to argue that the battle for gender equality is not yet won.
7h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Capturing the value of place and time with geospatial-temporal insightsIBM Research is introducing an experimental offering named IBM PAIRS Geoscope (Physical Analytics Integrated Data Repository & Services), a unique cloud-centric geospatial information and analytics service that can accelerate the discovery of new insights.
7h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

How do sea snakes find their mates?Sight, touch and spatial memory are key ways sea snakes find their mates, says an Adelaide researcher.
7h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Plastic trash—the new threat for coral reefs worldwideCoral reefs are not getting a break. On top of climate change and bleaching, now tonnes of plastic trash are making them sick.
7h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Is a basic income the solution to persistent inequalities faced by women?March 8 is International Women's Day, and despite a range of laws and policy measures, many gender inequalities seem firmly entrenched. Given the persistence of such discrimination, what can be done? One innovative policy measure that came to the fore in the 2017 French presidential election is the basic income. A recent Council of Europe resolution confirmed the continuing interest, as do feasibi
7h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Enzyme ensures thick insulationETH researchers have revealed that Schwann cells in the peripheral nervous system largely produce their own fatty acids in order to create electrical insulation for nerve fibres. This process relies on an enzyme whose absence leads to defective insulation and impaired motor function.
7h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News

How the brain might compensate stress during learningWhen people have to assess a situation within seconds, it helps them to draw on learned categories. Psychologists from the Ruhr-Universität Bochum examined with the help of electroencephalography (EEG) how well category-learning works in a stressful episode. They published their research on a mechanism, the brain may compensate stress with, in the Journal of Cognitive Neuroscience.
7h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Study sheds light on the genetic origins of the two sexesThis new study punches a hole in the idea that increased genetic complexity of sex chromosomes accompanied the origin of sexes.
7h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News

A peculiar galactic clashGalaxies are not static islands of stars -- they are dynamic and ever-changing, constantly on the move through the darkness of the universe. Sometimes, as seen in this spectacular Hubble image of Arp 256, galaxies can collide in a crash of cosmic proportions.
7h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Best practices lacking for managing traumatic brain injury in geriatric patientsWhen older adults suffer a traumatic brain injury (TBI), they may benefit from aggressive treatment and rehabilitation, but the lack of evidence-based, geriatric-specific TBI guidelines presents barriers to optimal care.
7h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Non-invasive brain stimulation improves gait impairment of Parkinson's disease patientsA new Tel Aviv University study suggests a novel way of treating the areas of the brain that apparently cause freezing of gait in patients with Parkinson's disease.
7h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News

What do iPhones, Halloween candy, and sushi have in common?How people seek to express their uniqueness is played out in many ways -- one of the more subtle ways is how they choose products when presented with product-related information in various colors, versus in black and white or a uniform color.
7h
New on MIT Technology Review

Cryptocurrency exchanges are under scrutiny—prelude to a crackdown
7h
TED Talks Daily (SD video)

To solve the world's biggest problems, invest in women and girls | Musimbi KanyoroAs CEO of the Global Fund for Women, Musimbi Kanyoro works to support women and their ideas so they can expand and grow. She introduces us to the Maragoli concept of "isirika" -- a pragmatic way of life that embraces the mutual responsibility to care for one another -- something she sees women practicing all over the world. And she calls for those who have more to give more to people working to im
7h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Image: Made for MercuryOn 6 March 2018, the BepiColombo engineering model was delivered to ESA's mission control centre in Darmstadt, Germany.
7h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Sexism needs to be challenged in schools, not just workplacesSexism still exists in workplaces and schools despite more than 40 years of formal and informal activities to eliminate it, and the Australian government's acceptance that gender equality is linked to improved national productivity, innovation and economic growth.
7h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

New chemical mechanisms identified on road to cleaner, more efficient combustionSandia National Laboratories researchers have identified key chemical mechanisms for the first time that add to the fundamental knowledge of combustion chemistry and might lead to cleaner combustion in engines.
7h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Seasonally adaptable species may face greatest risk from climate changeA species of butterfly that changes its appearance through the seasons lacks the genetic variation needed to quickly evolve a different response to more unpredictable environmental conditions, such as those expected under a changing climate, according to an international study including researchers from Wageningen University & Research.
7h
Scientific American Content: Global

Watch Now: The Weirdest Stars in the UniverseAstronomer Emily Levesque discusses the strangest stellar phenomena known to science -- Read more on ScientificAmerican.com
7h
New on MIT Technology Review

Fast genome tests are diagnosing some of the sickest babies in time to save themRapid DNA sequencing is helping doctors treat critically ill infants in days rather than weeks.
7h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News

New ultrafast measurement technique shows how lasers start from chaosLasers that emit ultrashort pulses of light are critical components of technologies, such as communications and industrial processing, and have been central to fundamental Nobel Prize-winning research in physics.
7h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Neuroticism could be 'sleeper effect' in Trump and Brexit campaignsRegions where voters have more neurotic personality traits were more likely to vote for Donald Trump in the United States or for the Brexit campaign in the United Kingdom, revealing a new trend that could help explain the rise of fearmongering populist political campaigns across the world, according to new research published in the journal Social Psychological and Personality Science.
7h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Troubling trend in antibiotic prescriptions in the outpatient settingAntibiotics continue to be prescribed at alarming rates in outpatient settings, despite increased national attention to curtail inappropriate use of these drugs, according to a study published in Infection Control & Hospital Epidemiology, the journal of the Society for Healthcare Epidemiology of America. The findings suggest that current initiatives to improve the use of antibiotics in outpatient
7h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Multi-tasking clays can clean up soil contaminationAn Adelaide researcher has modified natural clays so that they can clean up multiple soil contaminants simultaneously.
7h
New on MIT Technology Review

A new AI system can explain itself—twice
7h
New on MIT Technology Review

How to keep global warming below 1.5 °C
7h
Big Think

Sweden's latest fitness craze combines physical and environmental healthPlogging represents the intersection of personal and ecological health. Read More
7h
Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

Link between BRCA1 and Ewing sarcomaScientists have discovered a surprising connection between a breast cancer protein, BRCA1, and a pediatric cancer called Ewing sarcoma.
7h
The Scientist RSS

PD-L1 in Extracellular Vesicles May Help Glioblastoma Evade ImmunotherapiesThe discovery suggests that the immune checkpoint can operate at a further distance from tumor cells than previously believed.
7h
Feed: All Latest

Can Humans Survive on Water Vapor Alone?Technologies like hydropanels could keep us hydrated in a hotter, drier future.
8h
Dagens Medicin

Storkonflikt vil ramme SundhedsplatformenEn storkonflikt vil udfordre Sundhedsplatformen, da de tekniske medarbejdere, der udvikler og vedligeholder it-systemet, vil blive ramt af strejke og lockout.
8h
Dagens Medicin

Sådan vil en konflikt ramme digEr du i tvivl om, hvordan en strejke eller lockout vil påvirke dit arbejde og din økonomi, får du her et overblik over de mest centrale punkter.
8h
Dagens Medicin

Rathcke: Lockout er en aggressiv optrapningStaten, regionerne og kommunerne er klar til lockoute op til 440.000 offentligt ansatte. Formanden for Yngre Læger mener, at det er en »voldsom« optrapning af konflikten, men er klar til at forhandle et nødberedskab på plads.
8h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News

New insights into why patients have a higher risk of heart attack in the morningHeart disease patients have lower levels of an important family of protective molecules in their blood in the morning, which could be increasing risk of blood clots and heart attacks at those times, says early research by Queen Mary University of London.
8h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Improving birth outcomes one amino acid at a timeA simple dietary supplement (L-arginine) was found to improve birth outcomes, paving the way for future clinical trials to test this inexpensive and safe intervention.
8h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News

A new kind of starA new kind of star comes up from a study by SISSA's postdoctoral researcher Raúl Carballo-Rubio. In a piece of research recently published in Physical Review Letters, Carballo-Rubio has developed a novel mathematical model that combines general relativity with the repulsive effect of quantum vacuum polarization. The inclusion of this repulsive force allows describing ultracompact configurations of
8h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Scientists accurately model the action of aerosols on cloudsGlobal climate is a tremendously complex phenomenon, and researchers are making painstaking progress, year by year, to try to develop ever more accurate models. Now, an international group including researchers from the Advanced Institute for Computational Science (AICS) in Japan, using the powerful K computer, have for the first time accurately calculated the effects of aerosols on clouds in a cl
8h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Serious asthma attacks reduced by temporary quadrupling of steroid inhaler, study findsSerious asthma attacks in adults can be reduced by a temporary but significant increase in the dose of inhaled steroids during severe episodes of asthma, according to a new UK-wide study led by asthma experts at the University of Nottingham.
8h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News

A research study analyzes the mental health care community modelResults from the citizen science project 'Juegos x la salud mental', that analyzes interactions in the community formed by people with mental health problems, their family members, and caregivers, were presented and appeared in the journal Scientific Reports. This project, in which Universidad Carlos III de Madrid participated, has been carried out by Universitat de Barcelona (UB) and Federació de
8h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Unveiling the depths of Jupiter's windsAre the colorful bands just a pretty surface phenomenon, or are they a significant stratum of the planet? The Weizmann Institute's Professor Yohai Kaspi led this research in which measurements from NASA's Juno spacecraft were analyzed to reveal that the stripes -- belts of strong winds circling the planet -- extend to a depth of about 3,000 km.
8h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Air pollution linked to brain alterations and cognitive impairment in childrenA new study performed in the Netherlands has linked exposure to residential air pollution during fetal life with brain abnormalities that may contribute to impaired cognitive function in school-age children. The study, published in Biological Psychiatry, reports that the air pollution levels related to brain alterations were below those considered to be safe.
8h
Futurity.org

More translated books by women are on their wayJust 29 percent of all the translated books published in the United States between 2008 and 2017 were by women authors. Using the Translation Database , Chad Post, director of the University of Rochester’s nonprofit, literary translation press Open Letter , assembled the numbers. Publisher’s Weekly now supports and hosts the database, which Post founded. It offers 10 years of information on the t
8h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Radiation reaction when a light-speed electron beam collides with a high-intensity laserElectromagnetic radiation is pervasive. It comes in many forms, including radio waves, microwaves and high-energy X-rays and gamma rays. But what, precisely, is it?
8h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

More stringent conditions on democracy aid would enhance end resultsInternational aid, aimed at enhancing democracy in hybrid regimes, risks being wasted, due to the incentives of the recipient incumbents. Donors should be alert to this, and attach more elaborate conditions to their project contributions. These are conclusions drawn in a recent doctoral dissertation from the University of Gothenburg.
8h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Big steps toward control of production of tiny building blocksNanoparticles, superstrong and flexible structures such as carbon nanotubes that are measured in billionths of a meter—a diameter thousands of times thinner than a human hair—are used in everything from microchips to sporting goods to pharmaceutical products. But large-scale production of high-quality particles faces challenges ranging from improving the selectivity of the synthesis that creates t
8h
Futurity.org

Laser tech gives bird’s eye view of hidden Maya secretsAirborne laser mapping technology is allowing archaeologists to explore the history and spread of the settlement at the ancient Maya site of Ceibal in Guatemala on a larger scale than ever before . In a new paper appearing in PLOS ONE , researchers explain how they commissioned the use of LiDAR—light detection and ranging—technology to map a significantly larger area of Ceibal than ever before re
8h
New Scientist - News

Deep sea discovery suggests world’s oldest fossils misunderstoodStromatolites represent some of the oldest fossils on Earth but the assumption that they formed in sun-drenched seas has now been challenged
8h
Popular Science

Six ways to spend your free time making the internet a better placeDIY Put down Candy Crush and make yourself useful. Next time you're wandering around the internet with nothing to do, use your hours for good. Here are six ways to help others from the comfort of your home.
8h
Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

Got the message? Your brainwaves will tellA new technique will allow for a more accurate diagnosis of patients who cannot actively participate in a speech understanding test because they're too young, for instance, or because they're in a coma. In the longer term, the method also holds potential for the development of smart hearing devices.
8h
Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

Manure could heat your homeFarm manure could be a viable source of renewable energy to help reduce greenhouse gas emissions that cause global warming.
8h
Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

Algorithm shows differences between nurse, doctor careA multidisciplinary team of researchers has published the first quantitative study on the divergent scopes of practice for nurses and doctors. The study uniquely leveraged computer science technology to compare individual-level patient care provided by nurses and doctors using information routinely documented in the electronic health record.
8h
Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

Combating childhood obesity by preventing 'fatty liver' in fetusNew research indicates that an obese pregnant mother and exposure to a high fat, high sugar diet during pregnancy produces a 'fatty liver' in the fetus, potentially predisposing children to obesity, metabolic and cardiovascular disorders later in life.
8h
Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

More affordable way to make nanoparticlesA researcher is sharing his recipe for a new, more affordable way to make nanoparticles. This will empower any laboratory in the world to easily create similar nanoparticles and could lead to a whole new way of delivering biotherapeutic drugs and do it more quickly.
8h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

New study sheds some light on the low-viscosity layer in the Cascadia subduction zoneA team of researchers with the University of Ottawa has used teleseismic data from on- and off-shore sensors to learn more about the low-viscosity layer (LVL) present in a northern part of the Cascadia subduction zone. In their paper published on the open access site Science Advances, the team reports on what they learned.
8h
Feed: All Latest

Ad-Blocker Ghostery Just Went Open Source—And Has a New Business ModelGhostery, Edward Snowden’s preferred ad-blocker, details how a privacy tool can actually make money without being gross.
8h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Vitamin D may help prevent heart failure after heart attackNew research has shown how vitamin D may help protect heart tissue and prevent heart failure after a heart attack, potentially offering a low-cost addition to existing treatments for heart failure.
8h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Bullying based on stigma has especially damaging effectsIn a new study, two professors are looking at bullying based on stigma -- where one is treated unfairly or unjustly due to one's race, sexual orientation, gender, or other characteristic -- and examining the methods used to prevent this type of bullying and address it when it happens.
8h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News

How cellular structure orchestrates immunologic memoryWith every infection or vaccination, memory cells form that the body uses to remember the pathogen. This has been known for decades -- but the structure of this cellular immunologic memory has previously proven impossible to pin down. Researchers from the University of Basel and University Hospital Basel have now identified a microanatomical region in memory cells that enables them to work rapidly
8h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Serotonin promotes perseveranceIt was thought that the neurotransmitter serotonin most likely acted by inhibiting behavior. Now, scientists at the Champalimaud Centre for the Unknown have shown that general idea to be wrong.
8h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Supply bottleneck impairs nerve functionImpaired transport processes in neurons contribute to diseases such as amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (AML). Würzburg scientists have now identified key actors in these processes.
8h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Exercise may decrease heart drug's effectivenessHealth care experts are quick to remind us that a healthy lifestyle includes regular exercise. But what if certain, potentially life-saving medications don't perform as well during exercise?
8h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News

New butterfly species named for Field Museum's Emily GraslieIn recognition of the Field Museum's Chief Curiosity Correspondent Emily Graslie's outreach efforts, scientists have named a new species of butterfly in her honor: Wahydra graslieae.
8h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News

UC Davis researchers find new way to defeat HIV latencyResearchers at UC Davis Health, together with colleagues at UC San Francisco and the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill, have found a mechanism for making HIV come out of hiding and become susceptible to anti-HIV drugs. Their study is published in The Journal of Clinical Investigation.
8h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

A new portable system of water quality assessment in developing countriesPortable, easy-to-use water quality assessment systems are essential in developing countries where water access is limited and there is a risk of contamination. Researchers from Universidad Politécnica de Madrid (UPM) have designed a new system for assessing water for human consumption that is better than the systems currently available. The new system is three to five times cheaper, and is more s
8h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Energy harvester collects energy from sunlight and raindropsBy attaching a transparent nanogenerator to a silicon solar cell, researchers have designed a device that harvests solar energy in sunny conditions and the mechanical energy of falling raindrops in rainy conditions. The dual functionality may provide a way to harvest energy with greater consistency in the midst of constantly changing weather conditions.
8h
New on MIT Technology Review

To spot fire damage from space, point this AI at satellite imagery
8h
Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

Self-driving robots collect water samples to create snapshots of ocean microbesFor the first time, scientists will deploy a small fleet of long-range autonomous underwater vehicles (LRAUVs) that have the ability to collect and archive seawater samples automatically. These new robots will allow researchers to track and study ocean microbes in unprecedented detail.
8h
Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

Sexual harassment, gender stereotypes prevalent among youthYoung women enrolled in high schools and colleges told researchers that people routinely make sexual comments, both in-person and online, about them and their bodies.
8h
Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

Watching others makes people overconfident in their own abilitiesWatching YouTube videos, Instagram demos, and Facebook tutorials may make us feel as though we're acquiring all sorts of new skills but it probably won't make us experts, according to new research.
8h
Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

Wildlife conservation in North America may not be science-based after allA study has unveiled new findings that challenge the widespread assumption that wildlife management in North America is science-based.
8h
Viden

Smart-højtaler med grineflip skræmmer livet af sine ejereAmazons smarte digitale assistent, Alexa, er helt umotiveret begyndt at grine i flere brugeres hjem. Et fix er på vej, siger firmaet.
8h
Big Think

Jeff Bezos just slid past $100 billion in wealth. Good or bad for the world?Jeff Bezos is now worth a record $112 billion. Yes, billion with a "b". Read More
8h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Multiple optical measurements reveal the single cell activation without contrast agentNicolas Pavillon (Assistant Professor), Nicholas I. Smith (Associate Professor, Immunology Frontier Research Center, Osaka University) and collaborators developed a label-free multimodal microscopy platform that allows the non-invasive study of cellular preparations without the need of any additional chemicals or contrast agent. The parameters extracted from these measurements, coupled with machin
8h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Study shows decline of shark populations even in remote 'pristine' archipelagoA team of researchers with members from the U.S., France and the U.K. has found evidence showing reductions in shark populations in a part of the Indian ocean thought to be nearly pristine—the Chagos archipelago. In their paper published on the open access site Science Advances, the group describes their study of shark populations in the archipelago over time and what they found.
8h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Scientists spot pentagon pattern of cyclones —and unlock secrets of the planet's interiorWe all recognise Jupiter by its banded pattern of counter-rotating zones and belts – this can be seen even with small garden telescopes. These stunning structures are powered by fast jet streams that are visible in the planet's clouds. But what happens near its poles and below its cloud tops has long been a bit of a mystery.
8h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Why it's so important for kids to see diverse TV and movie charactersThe hype surrounding "Black Panther" has been as hyperbolic as any feat its characters might perform, with the film being praised for its layered story and what's been described as its "Afrofuturist" cast. And "Black Panther" will be joined by "A Wrinkle in Time," another film with blockbuster potential and an interracial cast.
8h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Why customer-facing companies have happier workersIt's possible the Keebler Elves aren't as happy at work as they seem.
8h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Why social media are more like chocolate than cigarettesTwitter CEO Jack Dorsey took to the social platform last week to announce a call-out for ideas about how to measure the health of online conversations. The initiative follows recent demands for government to regulate the negative consequences of social media.
8h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Amazing universe captured with the Subaru Telescope! 'HSC Viewer' released to the publicThe first dataset from the Hyper Suprime-Cam Subaru Strategic Plan (HSC-SSP) can be seen easily with the 'HSC Viewer' on your PC or tablet.
8h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News

JHU performs first laboratory simulation of exoplanet atmospheric chemistryScientists have conducted the first lab experiments on haze formation in simulated exoplanet atmospheres, an important step for understanding upcoming observations of planets outside the solar system with the James Webb Space Telescope.
8h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Multiple optical measurements reveal the single cell activation without contrast agentOsaka University researchers developed a label-free multimodal microscopy platform that allows the non-invasive study of cellular preparations without the need of any additional chemicals or contrast agent. The parameters extracted from these measurements, coupled with machine algorithms, enable the study of fine cellular processes such as macrophage cells activation upon exposure to lipopolysacch
8h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News

New way to fight sepsis: Rev up patients' immune systemsSepsis causes about 250,000 deaths annually in the United States. Standard treatment involves high doses of antibiotics. Even if people survive the initial onslaught , they can be left with severely damaged immune systems unable to fight lingering and secondary infections. But a small clinical trial, led by researchers at Washington University School of Medicine in St. Louis, has shown that a drug
8h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Exposure to air pollution during pregnancy linked to brain alterationsA new study published in Biological Psychiatry has linked exposure to residential air pollution during fetal life with brain abnormalities that may contribute to impaired cognitive function in school-age children. The study showed for the first time a relationship between air pollution exposure and a difficulty with inhibitory control -- the ability to regulate self-control over temptations and im
8h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Many adolescent and young adult cancer survivors have more social connections than peersSt. Jude Children's Research Hospital scientists have developed a new method to measure social networks of survivors of adolescent and young adult cancer in order to cultivate the health benefits of social connections
8h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Guidelines needed for use of therapy animals in mental health treatmentTherapy animals are used in the treatment of both mental and physical health issues, however this important form of therapy is not regulated, which leaves it open to misuse and misunderstanding by those who deliver it and the wider community.
8h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Retrofitting homes to improve energy ratings and reduce emissionsUniversity of Melbourne researchers have discovered how to retrofit homes to be more energy efficient, reducing greenhouse gas emissions and cutting electricity bills significantly.
8h
Ingeniøren

Amazon bremser umotiveret latter hos AlexaFlere brugere melder om tilfældige og umotiverede latterudbrud fra Amazons stemmestyrede assistent Alexa
8h
New Scientist - News

Record low Arctic ice linked to freak weather in US, EuropeThe unusually cold and snowy conditions hitting the US now, and experienced last week across Europe, may be a direct consequence of the Arctic's warmer winter
8h
BBC News - Science & Environment

Nerve agentsA nerve agent was used to poison a Russian former spy and his daughter. What are they and what do they do?
8h
Feed: All Latest

Season 2 of 'Jessica Jones' Proves She's Ahead of Her TimeThe world—and Netflix viewers—just needed to catch up.
9h
Dagens Medicin

Centrale aftaler skal lægge rammerne for nødberedskaber under lockoutDen varslede lockout på det regionale område betyder, at regionerne skal iværksætte nødberedskaber. Arbejdet med at afklare, hvem der skal arbejde under en konflikt, og hvem der ikke skal, er i fuld gang.
9h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Self-driving robots collect water samples to create snapshots of ocean microbesFor the first time, scientists from the University of Hawai'i at Mānoa (UH Mānoa) and the Monterey Bay Aquarium Research Institute (MBARI) will deploy a small fleet of long-range autonomous underwater vehicles (LRAUVs) that have the ability to collect and archive seawater samples automatically. These new robots will allow researchers to track and study ocean microbes in unprecedented detail.
9h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Scientists show how the brain may be wired for drinking fluidsScientists uncovered a high-resolution map of the wiring inside the mouse brain's thirst center. With these blueprints, they could trick mice into becoming light or heavy water drinkers. Moreover, they discovered a quenching circuit that knew when to tell the brain, 'Stop, the body has had enough.' Supported, in part, by the NIH's BRAIN® Initiative, the results may also provide a glimpse into the
9h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Teen gamers have as many friends as non-gamersYoung digital gamers do not have fewer friends at school than their non-gamer peers, two new research articles from Uppsala University indicate.
9h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Algorithm shows differences between nurse, doctor careA multidisciplinary team of researchers at the University of Illinois at Chicago has published the first quantitative study on the divergent scopes of practice for nurses and doctors. The study uniquely leveraged computer science technology to compare individual-level patient care provided by nurses and doctors using information routinely documented in the electronic health record.
9h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Studies point to smarter way to learn procedures, solve problemsEasy as 1, 2, 3! Such claims have touted the ease of use of a new gadget, although a closer look would reveal that it would take dozens of steps to make it work. Just ask School of Psychology Professor Richard Catrambone.
9h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Urban big cats cut rabies riskIt's a leopard eat dog world – and people are benefiting from it.
9h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Is there a glass ceiling in academic publishing?Five years ago, Nature—one of the most prestigious research journals in science—published an editorial pledging to improve on the low number of women editors and authors in its pages.
9h
Futurity.org

Measuring stickiness may guide designs for micro-machinesEngineers have devised a new method of measuring the stickiness of micro-scale surfaces. The technique, described in the Proceedings of the Royal Society A , could be useful in designing and building micro-electro-mechanical systems (MEMS), devices with microscopic moving parts. “If you have parts of your device sticking together that shouldn’t be, it’s not going to work…” At the scale of bridges
9h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

BMW posts record net profit of 8.7 bn euros for 2017German luxury carmaker BMW said Thursday its 2017 net profit soared 26 percent to a record 8.7 billion euros ($10.7 billion), driven by strong demand for electrified vehicles and a tax bump from the United States.
9h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

The Samsung S9 has a great camera—just like other phonesSamsung says its new Galaxy S9 phone features a "reimagined" camera, and it is indeed pretty darned good. But you might not want to shell out $720 or more for one just yet unless your current phone is already close to death.
9h
Ingeniøren

Spørg Scientariet: Kan man fjerne CO2 med kunstig fotosyntese?En læser vil gerne vide, om man kan efterligne planternes fotosyntese og bringe balance i naturen. Professor på KU giver et svar.
9h

Vil du være med til at finde de mest interessante nyheder? Send email herom til BioNyt

Se nyheder fra en tidligere dato

Tegn abonnement på

BioNyt Videnskabens Verden (www.bionyt.dk) er Danmarks ældste populærvidenskabelige tidsskrift for naturvidenskab. Det er det eneste blad af sin art i Danmark, som er helliget international forskning inden for livsvidenskaberne.

Bladet bringer aktuelle, spændende forskningsnyheder inden for biologi, medicin og andre naturvidenskabelige områder som f.eks. klimaændringer, nanoteknologi, partikelfysik, astronomi, seksualitet, biologiske våben, ecstasy, evolutionsbiologi, kloning, fedme, søvnforskning, muligheden for liv på mars, influenzaepidemier, livets opståen osv.

Artiklerne roses for at gøre vanskeligt stof forståeligt, uden at den videnskabelige holdbarhed tabes.