Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

A half degree more global warming could flood out 5 million more peopleThe 2015 Paris climate agreement sought to stabilize global temperatures by limiting warming to "well below 2.0 degrees Celsius above pre-industrial levels," but a recent literature review found the 2 degree limitation "inadequate" and concluded that limiting global warming to no more than 1.5 degrees would "come with several advantages."
7h
Ingeniøren

Leder: Lønkampen i det offentlige savner enhver nuance
15h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News

A highly sensitive and multi-analytical system for hereditary kidney diseaseAlport syndrome (AS) is a hereditary kidney disease caused by protein (collagen) abnormalities. Unfortunately, treatment through the correction of collagen functionality has not yet been developed. Now, Japanese researchers have established a method to assess collagen complex integrity in AS, making it possible to develop therapeutic drugs. This detection system reduces labor and time costs compar
15h
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Big Think

Friday essay: Joan of Arc, our one true superheroShe made the world be the change that she wanted to see in herself. She thought local and acted global. Read More
3min
Latest Headlines | Science News

What we do and don’t know about how to prevent gun violenceBackground checks work to prevent gun violence; concealed carry and stand-your-ground laws don’t. But lack of data makes it hard to make other links.
17min
Popular Science

Our stupid brains love spreading lies all over the internetNews Twitter StoriesScience A new study from MIT suggests "fake news" often trumps the truth. That’s not at all surprising, from a psychological standpoint. By their very design, these falsehoods prey upon one of humanity’s greatest cognitive weaknesses.
18min
EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Blood stored longer may be less safe for patients with massive blood loss and shockIn a collaborative study using a mouse model, researchers have found mechanistic links between older stored red blood cell transfusions and subsequent bacterial pneumonia. This may reveal new approaches to improve safety of stored red blood cell transfusions. The key player is free heme, a breakdown product from degraded red blood cells
27min
EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Could living at high altitude increase suicide risk? Evidence suggests possible treatments, reports Harvard Review of PsychiatryHigh-altitude areas -- particularly the US intermountain states -- have increased rates of suicide and depression, suggests a review of research evidence in the Harvard Review of Psychiatry. The journal is published by Wolters Kluwer.
27min
Live Science

A Power Company Just Gave MIT $30 Million to Build the World's Strongest ElectromagnetWhat are they going to do with it? Why, solve the energy crisis, of course.
29min
Live Science

Antarctic Penguins Find Research Camera, Proceed to Take Most Adorable SelfiesAn adorable pair of emperor penguins recently captured the cutest of all animal selfies when they encountered a camera left behind in their rookery.
38min
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

California bullet train costs soar to $77B; opening delayedThe projected cost of California's bullet train between San Francisco and Los Angeles has jumped to $77 billion and the opening date has been pushed back four years to 2033, according to a business plan released Friday.
39min
NYT > Science

The E.P.A Chief Wanted a Climate Science Debate. Trump’s Chief of Staff Stopped Him.Donald Trump GameThe idea for a military-style exercise to question climate science encountered widespread resistance within the administration, officials said.
46min
NYT > Science

Trilobites: Watch the High-Flying Physics of a Plant’s Exploding FruitsThree undergradute physics majors and their professor worked out how the hairyflower wild petunia shoots tiny seeds more than 20 feet through the air.
46min
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Flat gallium joins roster of new 2-D materialsScientists at Rice University and the Indian Institute of Science, Bangalore, have discovered a method to make atomically flat gallium that shows promise for nanoscale electronics.
46min
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Startup scales up carbon nanotube membranes to make carbon-zero fuels for less than fossil fuelsMattershift, an NYC-based startup with alumni from MIT and Yale has achieved a breakthrough in making carbon nanotube (CNT) membranes at large scale. The startup is developing the technology's ability to combine and separate individual molecules to make gasoline, diesel, and jet fuel from CO2 removed from the air.
46min
Feed: All Latest

How WhatsApp Could Worsen Brazil’s Yellow Fever OutbreakAs Brazil's health authorities scramble to contain the worst yellow fever outbreak in decades, WhatsApp’s misinformation trade threatens to go from destabilizing to deadly.
49min
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

New conductive coating may unlock biometric and wearable technology of the futureA team of researchers from the College of Engineering at Texas A&M University have developed a mechanically robust conductive coating that can maintain performance under heavy stretching and bending.
52min
EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Flat gallium joins roster of new 2-D materialsScientists at Rice University and the Indian Institute of Science, Bangalore, have discovered a method to make atomically flat gallium that shows promise for nanoscale electronics.
1h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News

New conductive coating may unlock biometric and wearable technology of the futureA team of researchers from the College of Engineering at Texas A&M University have developed a mechanically robust conductive coating that can maintain performance under heavy stretching and bending.
1h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Unique diamond impurities indicate water deep in Earth's mantleUNLV scientists discovered the first direct evidence that fluid water pockets may exist as far as 500 miles deep into the Earth's mantle..
1h
Live Science

Brilliant Fireball Lights Up the Sky Over WashingtonA space rock slammed into Earth's atmosphere over the Pacific Northwest on Wednesday night (March 7), putting on a brief but brilliant sky show, according to media reports.
1h
Live Science

Can (and Should) the Northern White Rhino Be Saved?With the last northern white rhino named Sudan standing on his last leg, conservationists are debating whether his subspecies has a chance at survival.
1h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Blood donors' leftover immune cells reveal secrets of antibody affinityResearchers at Iowa State University, partnering with the LifeServe Blood Center, have gained crucial insights into how natural killer cells circulating in the human body differ from those typically studied in the lab. The results of this research are published in the March 9 issue of the Journal of Biological Chemistry.
1h
Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

Metal-organic compounds produces new class of glassLightning and volcanos both produce glass, and humans have been making glass from silicon dioxide since prehistory. Industrialization brought us boron-based glasses, polymer glasses and metallic glasses, but now an international team of researchers has developed a new family of glass based on metals and organic compounds that stacks up to the original silica in glass-forming ability.
1h
Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

Antigen study supports new approach to vaccine for respiratory syncytial virusMedical researchers have been trying to develop a vaccine for respiratory syncytial virus (RSV) for more than 50 years, without success. New findings however, point to a promising route for designing an effective vaccine.
1h
Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

Blood donors' leftover immune cells reveal secrets of antibody affinityResearchers have gained crucial insights into how natural killer cells circulating in the human body differ from those typically studied in the lab.
1h
The Atlantic

America 'Blew the Opportunity' to Denuclearize North KoreaAs South Korea’s national-security adviser told it on Thursday, Donald Trump will meet with Kim Jong Un this spring for one purpose only: to achieve the “permanent denuclearization” of North Korea. But according to one of the U.S. officials who came closest to striking that kind of deal, the president better lower his expectations. By a lot. Kim seems willing to talk because his nuclear-weapons p
1h
Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

Breakthrough in circuit design makes electronics more resistant to damage and defectsA new article details an innovation that provides robust protection against circuitry damage that affects signal transmission.
1h
Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

Insight into metastability and avalanche dynamics in strongly correlated gases with long-range interactionsThe phenomenon of metastability -- when a system is in a state that is stable but not the one of least energy -- is widely observed in nature and technology. Yet, many aspects underlying the mechanisms governing the behavior and dynamics of such systems remain unexplored. Physicists have now demonstrated a promising platform for studying metastability on a fundamental level, using an exquisitely w
1h
Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

A model for autoignition in turbulent jetsJets are rapid streams of liquids or gases that forcefully shoot into a surrounding medium. When ignitable substances are involved, combustion -- rapid chemical reactions that result in heat and light -- can occur. Autoignition ensues when this spontaneous combustion results in a visible flame. In a newly-published paper, authors provide a mathematical model for autoignition in free round turbulen
1h
Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

Report identifies options for lowering risk of failure of undersea bolts on offshore oil rigsA new report identifies strategies for improving the reliability of bolts used in offshore oil and gas drilling rigs, thereby reducing the risk that a bolt failure could cause a spill of oil, drilling fluids, or natural gas into the environment.
1h
Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

Eyelash-sized plants reveal climate change -- and citizen scientists help identify themA motley band of citizen scientists -- including a high school student and a retired businesswoman -- teamed up with a botanist to build a tool that lets the public participate in a research project about eyelash-sized plants that reveal climate change.
1h
Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

Understanding 'disease mechanisms' of ALSResearchers are making strides in understanding the disease mechanism of amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS), also known as Lou Gehrig's disease.
1h
Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

Gastrointestinal hormone measurably improved symptoms of non-alcoholic fatty liver diseaseThrough a randomized, double-blind, placebo-controlled phase II clinical trial, researchers report that small doses of NGM282, a non-tumorigenic variant of an endocrine gastrointestinal hormone, can significantly and rapidly decrease liver fat content in patients with non-alcoholic fatty liver disease (NAFLD) and nonalcoholic steatohepatitis (NASH). The findings represent an important proof-of-con
1h
Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

Menopausal hormone therapy linked to having a healthier heartWomen who use menopausal hormone therapy appear to have a heart structure and function that is linked to a lower risk of heart failure, according to a new study.
1h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Startup scales up CNT membranes to make carbon-zero fuels for less than fossil fuelsMattershift, an NYC startup with alumni from MIT and Yale has achieved a breakthrough in making carbon nanotube (CNT) membranes at large scale. Tests confirming that Mattershift's large-scale CNT membranes match the characteristics and performance of small prototype CNT membranes previously reported in the scientific literature were published today in Science Advances. The startup is developing th
1h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Metal-organic compounds produces new class of glassLightning and volcanos both produce glass, and humans have been making glass from silicon dioxide since prehistory. Industrialization brought us boron-based glasses, polymer glasses and metallic glasses, but now an international team of researchers has developed a new family of glass based on metals and organic compounds that stacks up to the original silica in glass-forming ability.
1h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Antigen study supports new approach to vaccine for respiratory syncytial virusMedical researchers have been trying to develop a vaccine for respiratory syncytial virus (RSV) for more than 50 years, without success. New findings by researchers at UC Santa Cruz, however, point to a promising route for designing an effective vaccine.
1h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News

ZooKeys special: Proceedings of the 17th International Congress of Myriapodology, ThailandFor the third consecutive time, a special issue in the open access zoological journal ZooKeys is hosting a collection of the research findings presented at the International Congress of Myriapodology. The contemporary myriapod research presented at the 17th International Congress of Myriapodology, held in July 2017 in Krabi, Thailand, contains 13 novel research papers by 35 authors from across the
1h
The Atlantic

Photos of the Week: Oscar Night, Iraqi Bear Release, Paralympics in PyeongchangA powerful nor'easter rocks New England, International Women's Day observed worldwide, a pony in Norway, flooding in Australia, sunbathing in Saint Petersburg, Sydney’s Gay and Lesbian Mardi Gras Parade, dogs at play in the snow, and much more.
1h
Live Science

8 Reasons Why We Love TardigradesWhether you know them as water bears or moss piglets, tardigrades are microscopic bundles of awesomeness.
1h
Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

Why the world looks stable while we moveNeuroscientists investigate the interaction of visual perception and head movements with functional magnetic resonance imaging.
1h
Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

Plant-derived volatiles may serve as future antifungalsA research team has developed a novel screening method to identify antimicrobial properties of volatile substances. With this assay, they tested the vapour-phase-mediated activity of 175 essential oils (EOs) and 37 EO components. Approximately half of them proved active against the most drug-resistant type of Candida.
1h
Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

Emotional support is key for stroke patients, research suggestsDoctors caring for severe stroke patients need to take account of their psychological needs and help prepare families for the possibility that they may not recover, a study suggests.
1h
Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

Meal times may be key to managing malaria, parasite study showsMalaria infections might be brought under control by managing the meal times of infected people or animals, a study suggests.
1h
Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

Social stress leads to changes in gut bacteriaExposure to psychological stress in the form of social conflict alters gut bacteria in Syrian hamsters, according to a new study.
1h
Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

Fluoroquinolones linked to increased risk of acute aortic diseaseNew research lends additional support to a link between treatment with fluoroquinolone antibiotics and an increased risk of acute aortic disease.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

Formation of bacterial sporesBacterial spores store information about the individual growth history of their progenitor cells, thus retaining a "memory" that links the different stages of the bacterial life cycle. The spore memory could give rise to various adaptive behaviors in microbes.
1h
New Scientist - News

Eco-friendly nanowood is a super strong and recyclable StyrofoamNanowood is a strong yet lightweight material made by chemically stripping wood to its skeletal fibres. It’s eco-friendly and insulates better than Styrofoam
1h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Mastering metastable matterThe phenomenon of metastability -- when a system is in a state that is stable but not the one of least energy -- is widely observed in nature and technology. Yet, many aspects underlying the mechanisms governing the behaviour and dynamics of such systems remain unexplored. Physicists at ETH Zurich have now demonstrated a promising platform for studying metastability on a fundamental level, using a
2h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Metal-organic compounds produces new class of glassLightning and volcanos both produce glass, and humans have been making glass from silicon dioxide since prehistory. Industrialization brought us boron-based glasses, polymer glasses and metallic glasses, but now an international team of researchers has developed a new family of glass based on metals and organic compounds that stacks up to the original silica in glass-forming ability.
2h
The Atlantic

My Family Is a Theme Park“I went to the amusement park in search of a story,” Bernhard Wenger, director of Keeping Balance , told The Atlantic . “When I saw Denise on the Tagada [carousel], I was thrilled. I asked her how she could do her moves. Her first answer was, ‘I've been doing this almost every day for six years.’” In Wenger’s poignant short documentary, 20-year-old Denise describes how a history of abuse and negl
2h
BBC News - Science & Environment

Alien atmospheres recreated on EarthResearch shows that planets orbiting distant stars may be surprisingly colourful.
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Blog » Languages » English

Victory to Team Windows!Whaddya know! As far as Eyewire’s concerned, it appears that windows beat apples. We are glad to have solved this cosmic rivalry after so much time. Congratulations to both teams on a duel well played! Artwork by Minjeong Kim
2h
Popular Science

Five rad and random products I found this weekGadgets The end-of-week dispatch from PopSci's commerce editor. Vol. 41. Throughout the week I spend hours scouring the web for things that are ingenious or clever or ridiculously cheap.
2h
Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

Majority of mining-related injuries and illness in Illinois go unreportedIllnesses and injuries associated with working in Illinois mines are substantially underreported to the federal agency tasked with tracking these events, according to a new study.
2h
Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

Fast-acting antidote in sight for cholera epidemicsGroundbreaking discoveries regarding the onset of cholera are paving the way for a future, fast-acting antidote for cholera epidemics.
2h
Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

Mandatory flu vaccines for healthcare workers reduce absenteeismA multi-institutional study shows that mandatory flu vaccines for healthcare workers improve vaccination rates by as much as 30 percent and reduce absenteeism during critical periods by about six percent. Further, vaccinated healthcare workers had a 30 percent reduction in absenteeism compared to non-vaccinated healthcare workers overall.
2h
Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

Trauma and dementia patients given hope by 'flashbulb memory' breakthroughScientists have made a telling breakthrough in detailing the formation of 'flashbulb memories', which can help a snail find a sugary treat but also mean a war survivor repeatedly relives their trauma.
2h
Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

Novel technology for anticancer drug delivery on demandWith the goal of minimizing the side effects of chemotherapy on healthy tissues, scientists have developed novel nanocontainers able to deliver anticancer drugs at precise timing and location. They combines uniquely designed molecules and light-dependent drug release, which may provide a new platform to enhance the effect of anticancer therapeutics.
2h
Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

Heat shock system helps bug come back to life after drying upThe larva of the sleeping chironomid, Polypedilum vanderplanki -- a mosquito-like insect that inhabits semi-arid areas of Africa -- is well known for being able to come back to life after being nearly completely desiccated, losing up to 97 percent of its body's water content. Now, researchers have discovered that a gene called heat shock factor -- which is present in some form in nearly all living
2h
Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

Melding of concepts from different scientific fieldsResearchers have investigated how seemingly separate concepts in scientific fields fuse to become universal approaches by by developing a new methodology to analyze citations in papers that use similar concepts, and tracked the changes over time. The researcher used ABM -- agent based modeling -- and IBM -- individual based modeling as examples.
2h
Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

Modulation of Fgf21 gene in early-life ameliorates adulthood diet-induced obesityThe importance of good nutrition in the early development of children has been recognized for many decades. Nutritional experiences in early life can have profound and long-lasting effects on body weight in later life. For instance, malnutrition in early life as a result of poor nutrition during pregnancy and/or the lactation period may be stored on the offspring genome as epigenetic memory and pe
2h
The Guardian's Science Weekly

Is it possible to enhance and rewire the adult brain? – Science Weekly podcastNicola Davis asks: can we increase the window of brain plasticity in the later stages of life? And what do we know about the implications of doing so?
2h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Report says radioactive monitors failed at nuclear plantA new report says mistakes and mismanagement are to blame for the exposure of workers to radioactive particles at the Hanford Nuclear Reservation in Washington state.
2h
Viden

Ikke alt er elendighed: 3 områder, hvor vi er blevet sundereGladere ældre og mindre druk. Der er faktisk forbedringer i danskernes sundhed, selvom ugen har budt på masser af negative nyheder om danskernes sundhed.
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Science | The Guardian

Is it possible to enhance and rewire the adult brain? – Science Weekly podcastNicola Davis asks: can we increase the window of brain plasticity in the later stages of life? And what do we know about the implications of doing so? Subscribe and review on Apple Podcasts , Soundcloud , Audioboom , Mixcloud and Acast , and join the discussion on Facebook and Twitter In early development, the brain is hard at work making new connections between neurons, based on the new experien
2h
The Atlantic

The Politics of Trade WarsOne inconvenient feature of the global trading system is that efforts to protect the jobs of voting workers in one country risk affecting jobs, and perhaps votes, in another. Thus President Donald Trump’s proposed tariffs on imported aluminum and steel, offered with the rationale that American metalworkers had been losing jobs to foreign competition, alarmed Europe—the continent has its own metal
2h
The Atlantic

A Wrinkle in Time: See It With a Kid, or as a KidBefore Disney’s big-budget, live-action adaptation of Madeleine L’Engle’s classic 1962 novel A Wrinkle in Time begins, its director, Ava DuVernay, appears on the screen. (At least this is what happened at the showing I attended; I can’t be sure it will be true of all of them.) DuVernay describes the film as about finding “the light in yourself,” before advising, “Embrace the inner child in you …
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

A model for autoignition in turbulent jetsJets are rapid streams of liquids or gases that forcefully shoot into a surrounding medium. When ignitable substances are involved, combustion—rapid chemical reactions that result in heat and light—can occur. Combustion in jets has many industrial and technological applications, and is thus of great interest to scientists and engineers.
2h
Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

Carbon could be locked in forestsArgonne researchers have found that in the next 100 years, already existing reforestation in the country could help topsoil absorb an additional 2 billion tons of carbon.
2h
Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

Experiment sheds new light on prehistoric ocean conditionsAn international research team modeled the prehistoric ocean to study the reduction of iron. The team's findings may reinterpret the conditions under which iron-rich sedimentary rock was formed.
2h
Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

Newfound clock in blood brain barrier of fruit flies regulates daily permeabilityResearchers found that the fruit fly blood brain barrier has a molecular clock that makes it more or less penetrable during over 24 hours. Giving mutant flies a drug for treating seizures at night was more effective.
2h
Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

Evading in-flight lightning strikesA new study shows that electrically charging airplanes may reduce their risk of being struck by lightning.
2h
Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

Genetic timeline of early Pacific settlersResearchers have helped put together the most comprehensive study ever conducted into the origins of people in Vanuatu -- regarded as a geographic gateway from Asia to the Remote Pacific.
2h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Bill addresses Facebook, Google 'duopoly' over online ad revenueFacebook MLB GamesThe news industry, which has been pushing for the right to bargain collectively against tech giants that are eating up ad revenue, is cheering a new bill introduced this week.
2h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News

A model for autoignition in turbulent jetsJets are rapid streams of liquids or gases that forcefully shoot into a surrounding medium. When ignitable substances are involved, combustion--rapid chemical reactions that result in heat and light--can occur. Autoignition ensues when this spontaneous combustion results in a visible flame. In a newly-published paper, authors provide a mathematical model for autoignition in free round turbulent je
2h
Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

Making a splash in search for interstellar waterWater is crucial for life, but how do you make water? Cooking up some H2O takes more than mixing hydrogen and oxygen. It requires the special conditions found deep within frigid molecular clouds, where dust shields against destructive ultraviolet light and aids chemical reactions. NASA's James Webb Space Telescope will peer into these cosmic reservoirs to gain new insights into the origin and evol
2h
Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

Can't sleep? Could be down to geneticsResearchers have identified specific genes that may trigger the development of sleep problems, and have also demonstrated a genetic link between insomnia and psychiatric disorders such as depression, or physical conditions such as type 2 diabetes.
2h
Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

Moist snuff: Blood samples can soon reveal your lifestylePeople who use moist snuff 'snus' have significantly higher levels of the protein cornulin in their blood than non-snusers. This previously unknown relationship was found in a new study. Whether higher levels per se increase the risk of disease has, however, not yet been clarified.
2h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Reefs are dying. Scientists hope lab-bred 'super corals' can help revive themAt a shiny new lab atop the new Frost Museum of Science, nine aquariums hold colonies of staghorn corals stressed to the edge of death.
2h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Jack Dorsey pledges Twitter will improve blue check mark verification systemA better version of the verification system is coming soon to Twitter, according to CEO Jack Dorsey.
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Live Science

Here's a Lion Getting a CAT ScanA big cat just got a CAT scan.
2h
The Atlantic

What Trump Means When He Calls Gary Cohn a 'Globalist'The term “globalist” is a bit like the term “thug.” It’s an epithet that is disproportionately directed at a particular minority group. Just as “thug” is often used to invoke the stereotype that African Americans are violent, “globalist” can play on the stereotype that Jews are disloyal. Used that way, it becomes a modern-day vessel for an ancient slur: that Jews—whether loyal to international Ju
2h
New Scientist - News

How to keep foreign pests away from the UK’s natural treasuresBrexit has got the UK rethinking its border controls. Improved biosecurity to protect cherished flora should be part of that, says Gerard Clover
2h
Science : NPR

Penguins Mug For Camera, Take A Pretty Great 'Selfie'You probably didn't know that emperor penguins are reasonably good at framing a video shot. At a research station in Antarctica, the curious animals provided a bird's-eye view. (Image credit: Australian Antarctic Division/Screenshot by NPR)
2h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Facebook moves ahead on music with last major label dealFacebook MLB MusicFacebook on Friday announced a licensing deal with Warner Music, the last of the major label groups to sign with the social media behemoth which is promising more personalized music.
2h
Popular Science

Most teens still visit pediatricians—but they deserve doctors trained to treat themHealth An adolescent health specialist explains what it means to understand teens. Teenagers make up 13 percent of the U.S., and most see pediatricians for their health needs. But experts say teens need doctors trained to work with adolescents.
3h
Feed: All Latest

Waymo Is Testing Self-Driving Trucks in GeorgiaWaymo Google TrucksAutonomous big rigs could make trucking safer, and make Google's sister company some money too.
3h
Big Think

Elon Musk tweets Trump on U.S.–China trade rules: It’s like racing with “lead shoes”Tesla CEO Elon Musk appealed to President Trump on Twitter last week following tough talk on trade with China. Read More
3h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Google's autonomous vehicle unit to test semis in AtlantaJust days after ride-hailing service Uber announced it was testing tractor-trailers that drive themselves, Google's autonomous vehicle operation announced similar testing in Georgia.
3h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

John Sulston, who decoded the human genome, dies at 75John Sulston, a Nobel Prize-winning British scientist who helped decode the human genome, has died. He was 75.
3h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Facebook to stream 25 MLB games in exclusive dealFacebook MLB MusicFacebook is getting deeper into the professional sports streaming game, partnering with Major League Baseball to air 25 weekday afternoon games in an exclusive deal.
3h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

NASA sees Tropical Cyclone Hola drenching Vanuatu, New CaledoniaTropical Cyclone Hola was dropping heavy rainfall on Vanuatu and New Caledonia when the Global Precipitation Measurement mission or GPM core satellite passed overhead.
3h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Breakthrough in circuit design makes electronics more resistant to damage and defectsPeople are growing increasingly dependent on their mobile phones, tablets and other portable devices that help them navigate daily life. But these gadgets are prone to failure, often caused by small defects in their complex electronics, which can result from regular use. Now, a paper in today's Nature Electronics details an innovation from researchers at the Advanced Science Research Center (ASRC)
3h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Experiment sheds new light on prehistoric ocean conditionsA new experiment by Iowa State University's Elizabeth Swanner that evaluates the reduction of iron in prehistoric oceans may reinterpret the conditions under which iron-rich sedimentary rock is formed.
3h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Majority of mining-related injuries and illness in Illinois go unreportedIllnesses and injuries associated with working in Illinois mines are substantially underreported to the federal agency tasked with tracking these events, according to a new study published in the American Journal of Industrial Medicine.
3h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Evading in-flight lightning strikesA new MIT study shows that electrically charging airplanes may reduce their risk of being struck by lightning.
3h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Locked in a forestArgonne researchers have found that in the next 100 years, already existing reforestation in the country could help topsoil absorb an additional 2 billion tons of carbon. Their work is detailed in a recent study in the Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences.
3h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Newfound clock in blood brain barrier of fruit flies regulates daily permeabilityThe blood brain barrier (BBB), like a bouncer outside an exclusive night club, stands guard between the brain and the rest of the body. The barrier consists of tight junctions between cells lining blood vessels to keep harmful toxins and germs out of the brain. But this can also bar entry to many medications used to treat brain illnesses.
3h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Report identifies options for lowering risk of failure of undersea bolts on offshore oil rigsA new report from the National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine identifies strategies for improving the reliability of bolts used in offshore oil and gas drilling rigs, thereby reducing the risk that a bolt failure could cause a spill of oil, drilling fluids, or natural gas into the environment. Although the oil and gas industry has made important advances in improving the reliabil
3h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Webb Telescope to make a splash in search for interstellar waterWater is crucial for life, but how do you make water? Cooking up some H2O takes more than mixing hydrogen and oxygen. It requires the special conditions found deep within frigid molecular clouds, where dust shields against destructive ultraviolet light and aids chemical reactions. NASA's James Webb Space Telescope will peer into these cosmic reservoirs to gain new insights into the origin and evol
3h
Science : NPR

The Great Norwegian Porridge Debate, Or Tradition Vs. 'Science'In 1864, a male scientist tried to "porridge-splain" how to make proper gruel to Norwegian women who had been making it for centuries. It caused quite a stir and didn't work out so well for him. (Image credit: Kjerstin Gjengedal/Getty Images)
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Three NASA satellites recreate solar eruption in 3-DThe more solar observatories, the merrier: Scientists have developed new models to see how shocks associated with coronal mass ejections, or CMEs, propagate from the Sun—an effort made possible only by combining data from three NASA satellites to produce a much more robust mapping of a CME than any one could do alone.
3h
Latest Headlines | Science News

Museum mummies sport world’s oldest tattoo drawingsA wild bull and symbolic designs were imprinted on the bodies of two Egyptians at least 5,000 years ago.
3h
New on MIT Technology Review

What regular Joes think about the one-armed robot baristas invading San FranciscoSpeedy caffeine delivery is Café X’s X factor, and the coffee’s decent, too.
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New on MIT Technology Review

A plan to make the web load faster will cause more controversy than you’d think
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Big Think

Small, ultra-powerful fusion energy? MIT is closer to it than ever.MIT is working on something that will change how we use energy in dramatic ways. Read More
3h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Experiment sheds new light on prehistoric ocean conditionsAn international research team modeled the prehistoric ocean to study the reduction of iron. The team's findings may reinterpret the conditions under which iron-rich sedimentary rock was formed.
3h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Newfound clock in blood brain barrier of fruit flies regulates daily permeabilityResearchers found that the fruit fly blood brain barrier has a molecular clock that makes it more or less penetrable during over 24 hours. Giving mutant flies a drug for treating seizures at night was more effective.
3h
The Atlantic

David Byrne Is Back With a Surreal Wakeup CallWhen TED Talks and travel guides advise the virtues of “seeing with new eyes,” they’re reducing a bigger and stranger idea from Marcel Proust. Every artist is “the native of an unknown country, which he himself has forgotten,” he wrote in Remembrance of Things Past . “The only true voyage of discovery, the only fountain of Eternal Youth, would be not to visit strange lands but to possess other ey
3h
Big Think

The dark history of women, witches, and beerThe history of women in brewing goes back millennia where it was a respected profession. How did it help give rise to our modern image of witches? Read More
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Feed: All Latest

Reddit Still Hosts Links to Russian Propaganda SitesReddit has deleted hundreds of Russian troll accounts, but the links they shared remain, forming a digital trail of the Internet Research Agency's actions on the platform.
3h
The Atlantic

Why It’s Okay to Call It ‘Fake News’This week, more than a dozen high-profile social scientists and legal scholars charged their profession to help fix democracy by studying the crisis of fake news. Their call to action, published in Science , was notable for listing all that researchers still do not know about the phenomenon. How common is fake news, how does it work, and what can online platforms do to defang it? “There are surpr
4h
Science : NPR

Getting Climate Change Right: In Light Of The StarsWhen it comes to facing global warming, dealing with climate change and making informed choices for our cherished "project of civilization," we've been asking the wrong question, says Adam Frank. (Image credit: Getty Images/WIN-Initiative RM)
4h
Live Science

Man's 'Missing' Brain Was Actually a Large Air Pocket Inside His HeadA scan of the 84-year-old's brain revealed something quite unexpected.
4h
New Scientist - News

Young babies disapprove when they see adults acting immorallyEven four-month-old infants expect adults to go comfort another baby that is crying – a finding that suggests we may be born with a foundation of morality
4h
Big Think

Taste color and see sounds? Synesthesia may have a genetic basis.Learning about synesthesia can help us better understand how our brain works, particularly in terms of perception. Read More
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Scientific American Content: Global

Nerve Agents: What Are They and How Do They Work?The first nerve agents were invented by accident in the 1930s when German researchers were trying to make cheaper and better alternatives to nicotine as insecticides -- Read more on ScientificAmerican.com
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Burn specialists report a dramatic increase in burn injury survival over the past 30 yearsFor many years, people who sustained severe burn injuries often died. But great strides in burn care over the last 30 years have dramatically increased their chances of survival, according to new study findings published as an 'article in press' on the Journal of the American College of Surgeons website ahead of print publication.
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Breakthrough in circuit design makes electronics more resistant to damage and defectsA paper in today's Nature Electronics details an innovation from researchers at the Advanced Science Research Center (ASRC) at The Graduate Center of The City University of New York that provides robust protection against circuitry damage that affects signal transmission.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

Across the metal-molecule interface: Observing fluctuations on the single-molecule scaleScientists have developed a technique for analyzing structural and electronic fluctuations on the single-molecule scale across the metal-molecule interface in an organic electronic device. This technique provides information that cannot be obtained using the conventional method, and it has important implications for devices such as organic solar cells.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

Defect in cells' antenna linked to deformed organs in zebrafishA protein at the base of the 'antenna' of many of the body's cells is vital to a crucial type of cell signal and to whether organs like the heart develop correctly, a test with zebrafish shows.
4h
Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

Study predicts wildlife of Africa's Albertine Rift will be threatened by climate changeA new study predicts that the effects of climate change will severely impact the Albertine Rift, one of Africa's most biodiverse regions and a place not normally associated with global warming.
4h
New on MIT Technology Review

Waymo’s self-driving trucks are carrying cargo for ... GoogleWaymo Google Trucks
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Blog » Languages » English

Join a Live Science Chat with AshwinSave the date! Seung Lab postdoc, electron microscope expert, and zebrafish researcher Ashwin Vishwanathan will be hosting a live science chat in Eyewire as well as delivering a presentation about zebrafish neurons on video on Thursday, March 15 at 2 pm US ET on eyewire.org as a part of Brain Awareness Week. Other Eyewire HQ team members will also be online and ready to chat and answer questions
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The Dot Power Platform Could Transform Farming TechnologyThe multitalented Dot Power Platform could raise crop yields 70 percent by 2050.
5h
Popular Science

You probably shouldn't blame touchscreens for your kid's terrible handwritingHealth In fact, they might even do some good. Parents the world over are concerned that touchscreen and tablet technology is negatively impacting children’s handwriting. But is this the case?
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Mandatory flu vaccines for health care workers improve rates, reduce absenteeismMandatory flu vaccines for health care workers improve participation by as much as 30 percent and reduce absenteeism during critical periods of patient surges by about 6 percent, findings from a multi-institutional study show.
5h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Report identifies options for lowering risk of failure of undersea bolts on offshore oil rigsA new report from the National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine identifies strategies for improving the reliability of bolts used in offshore oil and gas drilling rigs, thereby reducing the risk that a bolt failure could cause a spill of oil, drilling fluids, or natural gas into the environment.
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News

NASA sees Tropical Cyclone Hola drenching Vanuatu, New CaledoniaTropical Cyclone Hola was dropping heavy rainfall on Vanuatu and New Caledonia when the Global Precipitation Measurement mission or GPM core satellite passed overhead.
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Dupilumab for neurodermatitis: Indication of an added benefit in adultsThe first neurodermatitis drug undergoing the AMNOG procedure provides better symptom relief and has clear advantages particularly in the quality of life.
5h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News

NASA's Webb Telescope to make a splash in search for interstellar waterWater is crucial for life, but how do you make water? Cooking up some H2O takes more than mixing hydrogen and oxygen. It requires the special conditions found deep within frigid molecular clouds, where dust shields against destructive ultraviolet light and aids chemical reactions. NASA's James Webb Space Telescope will peer into these cosmic reservoirs to gain new insights into the origin and evol
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Intravenous arginine benefits children after acute metabolic strokesChildren with mitochondrial diseases who suffered acute metabolic strokes benefited from rapid intravenous treatment with the amino acid arginine, experiencing no side effects from the treatment. The diseases were caused by a range of different genetic disorders. In half of the stroke episodes, patients showed clinical improvements in symptoms such as seizures and partial paralysis.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

For nanomedicine, cell sex matmonoclonal antibodies crucial to fighting emerging infectious diseasesMonoclonal antibodies (mAbs) -- preparations of a type of antibody designed to bind to a single target -- have shown promise in the fight against cancer and autoimmune diseases. They also may play a role in future battles against emerging infectious disease outbreaks. A new article outlines the potential uses for mAbs as treatments for infectious diseases, as prevention for protecting at-risk indi
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

Third-hand smoke found to increase lung cancer risk in miceResearchers have identified third-hand smoke, the toxic residues that linger on indoor surfaces and in dust long after a cigarette has been extinguished, as a health hazard nearly 10 years ago. Now a new study has found that it also increases lung cancer risk in mice.
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The Atlantic

How to Lose Your Job From Sexual Harassment in 33 Easy Steps1. Land a job. At a new online magazine for approximately the same salary you earned in 1992, but whatever. You have bills to pay, MRIs to undergo, kids to feed, you are doing this solo, and at this point you have no idea that the company’s offer of $34,000 a year is a fraction of the $200,000 a man in your same position later tells you he was making. 2. Have your first story out of the gate, abo
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New Scientist - News

Ancient black holes may have made the first stars look coolThe signature of cold gas around the first stars is far stronger than expected. Some suggest dark matter is to blame, but black holes may be the culprit
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News

NIH experts call for transformative research approach to end tuberculosisA more intensive biomedical research approach is necessary to control and ultimately eliminate tuberculosis (TB), according to a perspective published in The American Journal of Tropical Medicine and Hygiene. In the article, authors Anthony S. Fauci, M.D., director of the National Institute of Allergy and Infectious Diseases, and Robert W. Eisinger, Ph.D., special assistant for scientific projects
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Three NASA satellites recreate solar eruption in 3-DScientists have developed a model that simulates how shocks following coronal mass ejections, or CMEs, propagate from the sun -- an effort made possible only by combining data from three different NASA satellites.
5h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Defect in cells' antenna linked to deformed organs in zebrafishA protein at the base of the 'antenna' of many of the body's cells is vital to a crucial type of cell signal and to whether organs like the heart develop correctly, a test with zebrafish shows. The test is part of a new study conducted by researchers from the University of Copenhagen and the University of Southern Denmark.
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Ingeniøren

IDA før historisk lockout: Sophie Løhde vil skyde gråspurve med kanonerTvinges de 11.000 offentligt ansatte IDA-medlemmer ud i en lockout, skrives der historie i Ingeniørforeningen, som aldrig tidligere har haft behov for at åbne for strejkekassen.
5h
Scientific American Content: Global

Meet the Satellites That Can Pinpoint Methane and Carbon Dioxide LeaksEuropean and Canadian orbiters can work together to catch wayward emissions -- Read more on ScientificAmerican.com
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The Atlantic

A Provision Hidden in the Banking Bill Could Hurt Black HomeownersImagine two families in Mobile, Alabama, trying to buy a home. The households are similar in many ways. They have roughly the same income and employment history. They are seeking to buy similar three-bedroom ranches in comparable, quiet neighborhoods. They both want a loan from the same local bank, and both want to put down a similar, standard down payment. The only difference is that one family
5h
The Atlantic

The Biggest Danger of North Korea TalksIn August of last year, days before he was forced out of the White House, Steve Bannon gave an unusual interview to Robert Kuttner, a journalist at The American Prospect . The article made headlines because Bannon tore into his rivals, especially Gary Cohn, and in a progressive magazine no less. But Kuttner’s piece also contained an astonishing detail about North Korea. He wrote that Bannon said
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Science | The Guardian

Sir John Sulston, pioneering genome scientist, dies aged 75Sulston won the Nobel prize for medicine in 2002 for his work on genome sequencing The pioneering geneticist Sir John Sulston has died, it has been confirmed. The scientist led the UK side of the landmark Human Genome Project and founded and directed the Wellcome Sanger Institute near Cambridge, one of the country’s leading biomedical institutions. Continue reading...
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Viden

Energiforsker: El-selskaberne kan ikke garantere dig vindstrømElselskaberne lover mere, end elnettet kan levere, når de lokker med 100 procent vindenergi i stikkontakten - men derfor er de grønne elprodukter stadig en god idé for klimaet.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

NHL takes esports on ice with gaming tournamentThe National Hockey League is making its first foray into the world of esports.
5h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Increasing tree mortality in a warming worldA mix of factors is contributing to an increasing mortality rate of trees in the moist tropics, where trees in some areas are dying at about twice the rate that they were 35 years ago, according to a far-reaching study examining tree health in the tropical zone that spans South America to Africa to Southeast Asia.
5h
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Router-Hacking "Slingshot" Spy Operation Compromised More Than 100 TargetsA sophisticated hacking campaign used routers as a stepping stone to plant spyware deep in target machines across the Middle East and Africa.
5h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Agricultural sustainability project reached 20.9 million smallholder farmers across ChinaSmallholder farmers who cultivate perhaps only a few hectares of land dominate the agricultural landscape in places like China, India, and sub-Saharan Africa. Increasing their efficiency while reducing their environmental impact are critical steps to ensuring a sustainable food source for the world's growing population.
5h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Meal times may be key to managing malariaMalaria infections might be brought under control by managing the eating habits of infected people or animals, according to a new study.
5h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Sustainable embedded wireless systems reduce environmental impact of ICTRenowned international scientists have presented first-level research results on the intersection of embedded systems and wireless networks at the EWSN 2018 conference. The international event covered a wide range of topics going from energy constrained applications, security, emerging networking paradigms and protocols to distributed computing and cyber physical systems. Special emphasis was put
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Telemonitoring in cardiac disorders: Benefit still unclearThe data showed no relevant differences for some outcome criteria, and data were missing for others -- also because some studies remain incompletely published.
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News

New method increases life span of donated brain tissueResearchers at Lund University in Sweden have developed a method that enables them to use donated brain tissue from people with epilepsy for 48 hours. Previously, the researchers only had 12 hours to test new treatments before the structure of the cells started to break down. The research has now been published in the journal Scientific Reports.
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News

ZMapp antibody delivered by viral vector protects against Ebola infectionA new study comparing the effectiveness of individual ZMapp antibodies versus a cocktail of antibodies, administered to mice using recombinant adeno-associated virus (rAAV) delivery vectors, showed the ability to achieve 100% protection against infection by Ebola virus.
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Latest Headlines | Science News

Discussing what matters when facts are not enoughEditor in Chief Nancy Shute reflects on finding common ground with science and policy.
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Latest Headlines | Science News

Readers muse about memory, magnetic monopoles and moreReaders had questions about the physical trace of memory, magnetic monopoles, blowflies and more.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Imaging a galaxy's molecular outflowA merger between galaxies can trigger can intense radiation from bursts star formation and from the accretion of gas onto the two supermassive black holes at their centers. Astronomers have observed a strong statistical correlation between the masses of these black holes and other properties of the galaxies like their velocity structure or luminosity, and have concluded that there must be a connec
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Image: Italy and the MediterraneanThe Copernicus Sentinel-3A satellite carries a suite of state-of-the art sensors that deliver a wealth of information to monitor our changing world, but this image was captured with its ocean and land camera. With a swath-width of 1270 km, this instrument delivers images that can span several countries, as we see here.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

To stop fake news, researchers call for internet platforms to choose quality over quantityFacebook MLB Games"Fake news" has made headlines and dominated social media chatter since the 2016 presidential election. It appears to be everywhere, and researchers are still determining the scale of the problem, said David Lazer, Distinguished Professor of Political Science and Computer and Information Sciences at Northeastern.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

More vulnerable male adults are victims of forced marriage than previously thoughtA higher number of men with learning disabilities are victims of forced marriage than previously thought, suggesting that better education and training is needed to recognise those at risk.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Research reveals origins of Middle Ages altarpiecesIt was previously believed that altarpieces from the late Middle Ages were made in Germany. New research shows that several of them were made in Norway.
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BBC News - Science & Environment

Sir John Sulston human genome pioneer diesSir John Sulston, a key figure in the race to decode the human genome, has died at the age of 75.
5h
New on MIT Technology Review

MIT researchers say nuclear fusion will feed the grid “in 15 years”
5h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

A compass in the darkA research team headed by scientists of Helmholtz Zentrum München and the Technical University of Munich (TUM) has published a new model in Nature Communications which allows studying magnetoreception. Analyzing zebrafish and medaka fish allowed the researchers to measure brain activity during magnetic stimulation and to show that the sense also works in darkness.
5h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

BepiColombo gets green light for launch siteThe mission passed a major review yesterday, meaning that the three BepiColombo spacecraft, along with ground equipment and mission experts, are confirmed to start the move from ESA's centre in the Netherlands to Europe's Spaceport in Kourou, French Guiana at the end of next month. The launch window is open from 5 October until 29 November.
5h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Plant-derived volatiles may serve as future antifungalsA research team at the VIB-KU Leuven Center for Microbiology has developed a novel screening method to identify antimicrobial properties of volatile substances. With this assay, they tested the vapour-phase-mediated activity of 175 essential oils (EOs) and 37 EO components. Approximately half of them proved active against the most drug-resistant type of Candida. In a context of fungi showing incre
6h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

How beneficial gut bacteria optimise host colonisation and biofilm formationScientists on the Norwich Research Park have discovered a key mechanism by which gut bacteria colonise and adhere to their specific hosts.
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Dagens Medicin

Hovedstaden spørger lægerne om problemer med Sundhedsplatformen28.000 brugere af den udskældte Sundhedsplatform i Region Hovedstaden inviteres til at deltage i brugerundersøgelse. Regionsrådsformand erkender, at alle problemer med platformen ikke bliver løst med opdatering til november, og at processen omkring platformen ikke har været perfekt.
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Dagens Medicin

Midtjylland skal spare næste 300 mio. kr.Nye beregninger viser, at Region Midtjylland skal spare 295 mio. kr. på næste års budget.
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Dagens Medicin

Overlæger bekymrede over nordjysk hospitalsfusionFormanden for Overlægerådet på Aalborg Universitetshospital er bekymret for de konsekvenser som en sammenlægning af Aalborg Universitetshospital og hospitalet i Thisted kan få for Aalborg Universitetshospitals egne lægeressourcer.
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News

New blood pressure app and hardware rivals arm cuff accuracyA team of Michigan State University scientists has created a new app and hardware for smartphones to measure blood pressure with accuracy that may rival arm-cuff devices. The technology, published in the current issue of Science Translational Medicine, also includes a discovery of a more convenient measurement point.
6h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News

A compass in the darkA research team headed by scientists of Helmholtz Zentrum München and the Technical University of Munich (TUM) has published a new model in Nature Communications which allows studying magnetoreception. Analyzing zebrafish and medaka fish allowed the researchers to measure brain activity during magnetic stimulation and to show that the sense also works in darkness.
6h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Understanding the evolution of parasitic worms by studying their spermatozoaDo you know about "comparative spermatology?" It's the science of describing spermatozoa. A first international congress was devoted to it in 1970. In 1976, more than 1,000 animal species had their spermatozoa described by electron microscopy; and today it's probably closer to 10,000.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

100 years later, the madness of daylight saving time enduresOne hundred years after Congress passed the first daylight saving legislation, lawmakers in Florida this week passed the "Sunshine Protection Act," which will make daylight saving a year-round reality in the Sunshine State.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Topological superconductor phase may solve decoherence problem in quantum computersA team of researchers from Japan, the U.S. and China, has identified a topological superconducting phase for possible use in an iron-based material in quantum computers. In their paper published in the journal Science, the team outlines their study of the phase, which, they claim, shows promise as a means for solving the decoherence problem in quantum computers.
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Big Think

The Vatican is hosting a hackathon right now. But why?When in Rome... do as the Romans do? Read More
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Futurity.org

High-fiber foods may boost gut bacteria to control diabetesA high-fiber diet may boost a group of gut bacteria that can benefit people with type 2 diabetes, according to a new study. In the study, which appears in the journal Science , researchers found that promotion of a select group of gut bacteria by a diet high in diverse fibers led to better blood glucose control, greater weight loss, and better lipid levels in people with type 2 diabetes. . “…fibe
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Popular Science

How to make caramel at home without losing your mindDIY The real sweet science. You don’t have to buy caramels from a candy store. You make them in your own kitchen—and there's some fascinating science behind the sweetness.
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Tokyo Tech's six-legged robots get closer to natureA study led by researchers at Tokyo Institute of Technology (Tokyo Tech) has uncovered new ways of driving multi-legged robots by means of a two-level controller. The proposed controller uses a network of so-called non-linear oscillators that enables the generation of diverse gaits and postures, which are specified by only a few high-level parameters. The study inspires new research into how multi
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News

An itch you can't scratch: Researchers find 'itch receptors' in the throats of miceWorking with mice, Johns Hopkins researchers report they have found previously known skin itch receptors in the airways that appear to contribute to bronchoconstriction and airway hypersensitivity, hallmarks of asthma and other respiratory disorders. The investigators' experiments in mice suggest that the receptors' activation directly aggravates airway constriction and--if the same process is act
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Meal times may be key to managing malaria, parasite study showsMalaria infections might be brought under control by managing the meal times of infected people or animals, a study suggests.
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Academic study finds women wearing heavy makeup less likely to be perceived as leadersWomen wearing heavy makeup are less likely to be thought of as good leaders, new research from Abertay University has found.
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Emotional support is key for stroke patients, research suggestsDoctors caring for severe stroke patients need to take account of their psychological needs and help prepare families for the possibility that they may not recover, a study suggests.
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Modulation of Fgf21 gene in early-life ameliorates adulthood diet-induced obesityThe nutritional environment in early life can lead to epigenetic changes in the genome that influence the risk of obesity in later life. In a new study, Tokyo Medical and Dental University (TMDU) researchers showed that the Fgf21gene undergoes PPARα-dependent DNA demethylation in the liver during the postnatal period and its status may persist into adulthood. Fgf21 methylation represents a form of
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News

When sciences come togetherKyoto University investigates how seemingly separate concepts in scientific fields fuse to become universal approaches by by developing a new methodology to analyze citations in papers that use similar concepts, and tracked the changes over time. The researcher used ABM -- agent based modeling -- and IBM -- individual based modeling as examples.
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Increasing tree mortality in a warming worldA mix of factors is contributing to an increasing mortality rate of trees in the moist tropics, where trees in some areas are dying at about twice the rate that they were 35 years ago.
6h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Older adults with small social networks less likely to get cataract surgeryA new study by University of Michigan Kellogg Ey Center links familial relationships to the likelihood older adults will get needed cataract surgery -- a procedure with broad implications for health.
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The Atlantic

Thoroughbreds Isn't Quite a New Teen ClassicThe world of Thoroughbreds consists of anonymous suburban mansions in Connecticut: spacious, immaculately designed, eerily empty, surrounded on all sides by acres of well-manicured grounds. Cory Finley’s debut film, a stylish, gripping yarn about two teenage girls who hatch a murder plot, wants the viewer to consider the environment around them. For all the fancy trimmings, it’s an entirely lovel
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The Atlantic

Hiring John Bolton Would Be a Betrayal of Donald Trump's BaseLast year, National Review published an article by John Bolton, the perennial war hawk who last served in government during the George W. Bush administration, fittingly titled “ How to Get Out of the Iran Nuclear Deal .” At the beginning of this year, The National Interest favorably reported on the idea that President Trump may replace his national security advisor, H.R. McMaster, with Bolton. Ea
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Viden

Klimakampen udkæmpes i din stue og i dit badLune boliger og lange brusebade skæpper i CO2-regnskabet. 40 procent af vores energiforbrug går til boliger.
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NYT > Science

Ask Your Doctor. Until Then, Here’s a Word From Our Sitcom.Two decades ago, the F.D.A. paved the way for an explosion of prescription drug commercials. An episode of “black-ish” offered a worrying example.
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Dagens Medicin

OK18: Rathcke udelukker forlig kun for lægerCamilla Rathcke, formand for Yngre Læger, håber stadig på forhandlinger i Forligsinstitutionen. Hvis det ikke lykkes, er hun sikker på, at musketer-eden mellem de falige organisationerne holder.
6h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Plant-derived volatiles may serve as future antifungalsA research team at the VIB-KU Leuven Center for Microbiology has developed a novel screening method to identify antimicrobial properties of volatile substances. With this assay, they tested the vapour-phase-mediated activity of 175 essential oils (EOs) and 37 EO components. Approximately half of them proved active against the most drug-resistant type of Candida.
6h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Heat shock system helps bug come back to life after drying upThe larva of the sleeping chironomid, Polypedilum vanderplanki -- a mosquito-like insect that inhabits semi-arid areas of Africa -- is well known for being able to come back to life after being nearly completely desiccated, losing up to 97 percent of its body's water content. Now, researchers have discovered that a gene called heat shock factor -- which is present in some form in nearly all living
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Spotlight on quantum computing at SXSW 2018South by Southwest 2018 hosts a panel on March 10th called Quantum Computing: Science Fiction to Science Fact. Experts on quantum computing make up the panel, including Antia Lamas-Linares of the Texas Advanced Computing Center at UT Austin. Lamas-Linares co-authored a study in the Proceedings of the SPIE (February, 2018). The study, 'Secure Quantum Clock Synchronization,' proposed a protocol to v
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Novel technology for anticancer drug delivery on demandWith the goal of minimizing the side effects of chemotherapy on healthy tissues, IBS scientists have developed novel nanocontainers able to deliver anticancer drugs at precise timing and location. They combines uniquely designed molecules and light-dependent drug release, which may provide a new platform to enhance the effect of anticancer therapeutics.
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Agricultural sustainability project reached 20.9 million smallholder farmers across ChinaAn effort to improve crop yields and reduce fertilizer use applied top-down and bottom-up approaches to reach 20 million smallholder farmers across China.
6h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News

ANU research reveals genetic timeline of early Pacific settlersResearchers from The Australian National University have helped put together the most comprehensive study ever conducted into the origins of people in Vanuatu -- regarded as a geographic gateway from Asia to the Remote Pacific.
6h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Most patients comfortable with sexual orientation and gender identity questionsNew Mayo Clinic research suggests up to 97 percent of patients are comfortable with their health care provider asking sexual orientation and gender identity questions. Before this research, it was unclear if the questions - which researchers say are important to reduce health disparities among LGBTI patients -- would offend patients. The findings were published today in Health Services Research.
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Study finds mandatory flu vaccines for healthcare workers reduce absenteeismA multi-institutional study, as reported in the journal Infection Control and Hospital Epidemiology, shows that mandatory flu vaccines for healthcare workers improve vaccination rates by as much as 30 percent and reduce absenteeism during critical periods by about six percent. Further, vaccinated healthcare workers had a 30 percent reduction in absenteeism compared to non-vaccinated healthcare wor
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The Atlantic

A Puzzling Opioid-Linked Killing Points to a Dangerous TrendBAKERSFIELD, Calif.—The police report is all David Cole Lang’s family has to describe his last moments on Earth. Fifty pages of officer narratives and witness interviews filled with grisly detail, it lacks any explanation for his death. Many months later, Lang’s widow, Monique, says she still has no clue as to why the 33-year-old combat veteran and father who struggled with opioid addiction ended
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Live Science

Russian Gov't Says Not to Worry About These 54 Severed Human Hands Found in SiberiaA bag of 54 dismembered hands found in the snow was probably 'not criminal' in origin, officials say.
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Science : NPR

Kang Lee: Can Technology Detect Our Hidden Emotions?Developmental researcher Kang Lee says scientists can detect emotions by reading subtle physiological signals beneath the surface of our skin. (Image credit: Bret Hartman / TED)
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Science : NPR

Lisa Feldman Barrett: Can We Really Tell How Other People Are Feeling?Identifying basic emotions in others — like fear, sadness or anger — seems instinctive, but psychologist Lisa Feldman Barrett says we're doing more guesswork than we think. (Image credit: Russell Edwards / TED)
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Diamond inclusions suggest free flowing water at boundary between upper and lower mantleA team of researchers from the U.S., China and Canada has found evidence in diamonds of free-flowing water in the boundary between Earth's upper and lower mantle. In their paper published in the journal Science, the group describes analyzing inclusions in diamonds spewed from volcanoes and what they found.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Research reveals genetic timeline of early Pacific settlersResearchers from The Australian National University (ANU) have helped put together the most comprehensive study ever conducted into the origins of people in Vanuatu—regarded as a geographic gateway from Asia to the Remote Pacific.
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Ingeniøren

Solcelleejere truer energiminister med stævning i målersagSolcelleejere kræver kompensation, fordi forkerte elmålere har pålagt dem forhøjede afgifter og tariffer.
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Feed: All Latest

Want Animoji, but Not the iPhone X? Try These Apps InsteadOK, so you can't afford the iPhone X or the Galaxy S9. That shouldn't mean you miss out on all the animated emoji fun.
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Feed: All Latest

Uber's Robo-Truck, McLaren's Senna Supercar, and More Cars News This WeekSelf-driving trucks make news in Arizona and Florida, plus highlights from the supercar-happy Geneva Motor Show.
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Gut microbes influence severity of intestinal parasitic infectionsA new study indicates that the kinds of microbes living in the gut influence the severity and recurrence of parasitic worm infections in developing countries. The findings, by researchers at Washington University School of Medicine in St. Louis, suggest that manipulating the gut's microbial communities may protect against intestinal parasites, which affect more than 1 billion people worldwide.
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Can't sleep? Could be down to geneticsResearchers have identified specific genes that may trigger the development of sleep problems, and have also demonstrated a genetic link between insomnia and psychiatric disorders such as depression, or physical conditions such as type 2 diabetes. The study in the journal Molecular Psychiatry, which is published by Springer Nature, was led by Murray Stein of the University of California San Diego
7h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News

2016 Brexit/Trump election results driven by fear and loathingIn 2016 voters in the US and the UK defied expert predictions with the Vote Leave campaign winning for the UK to leave the European Union (Brexit) and the election of President Donald Trump. A world-first QUT-led study reveals why and how fear may now be driving the global political landscape.
7h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News

New study finds less research being published by female radiologistsA new study has found that although radiology research by women has increased significantly over the past five decades, the rate of this increase has leveled off since 2000.
7h
Scientific American Content: Global

We Should Embrace Scavengers and PredatorsThey’re being lost at an unprecedented rate, and that’s not good for human health and well-being -- Read more on ScientificAmerican.com
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Scientific American Content: Global

Hayflick on His Limit; Malaria Failure; Cholera SuccessInnovation and discovery as chronicled in Scientific American -- Read more on ScientificAmerican.com
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Scientific American Content: Global

You Are Here: Earth Shines in Image from Kepler SpacecraftLast December, the planet-hunting mission viewed our planet from 94 million miles away -- Read more on ScientificAmerican.com
7h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Synthetic channel with a strong preference for potassium ions offers rapid transport through artificial membraneArtificial ion channels developed by A*STAR researchers could pave the way for new kinds of antibacterial agents and biomedical sensors.
7h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Abright idea for on-demand nanopatternsFocused electron beams can simultaneously synthesize optically active nanocrystals and pattern them into intricate surface arrays
7h
New Scientist - News

Ancient birds couldn’t sit on their eggs without smashing themThe first birds to evolve had hip bones that forced them to lay small, weak eggs that could not support the adult bird’s weight
7h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Why increasing shale gas production won't reduce greenhouse gas emissionsThe boom in hydraulic fracturing (fracking) has led to an increase in the production of natural gas in the United States by about one-third since 2006. Production of has remained strong even when oil prices were low following the significant price drop in 2014. In light of the recent recovery of oil and gas prices, a 2017 report by the International Energy Agency (IEA) predicts the shale revolutio
7h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Novel technology for anticancer drug delivery on demandWith the goal of minimizing the side effects of chemotherapy on healthy tissues, a team of researchers at the Center for Self-assembly and Complexity, within the Institute for Basic Science (IBS) have developed novel nanocontainers able to deliver anticancer drugs at precise timing and location. Published in Angewandte Chemie International Edition, the study combines uniquely designed molecules an
7h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Fossil fuel subsidies need to go – but what about the poorer people who rely on cheap energy?Almost all governments in the world joined the Paris agreement in 2015 in an effort to tackle climate change. In the same year, many of the same governments paid about US$400 billion in direct and indirect subsidies to help people buy fossil fuels.
7h
Futurity.org

‘Stress eating’ can hit kids as young as 4Children as young as 4 who experience stress eat more in the absence of hunger, beginning a cycle that could possibly mean extra pounds down the road. “We know from previous studies that people who have extremely adverse life experiences and stress in childhood have a tendency toward overweight and obesity,” says Alison Miller, associate professor of health behavior and health education at the Un
7h
The Scientist RSS

Image of the Day: Glowing LarvaResearchers identified a gene in mosquitoes that moderates their susceptibility to malaria parasite infection.
7h
The Scientist RSS

High-Fiber Diet Shifts Gut Microbes, Lowering Blood Sugar in DiabeticsNew findings suggest that promoting the growth of fiber-loving bacteria may help manage type 2 diabetes.
7h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Could shallow biospheres exist beneath the icy ceilings of ocean moons?Alien life could potentially exist on the undersides of the icy shells of Jupiter's moon Europa and other frozen worlds thanks to the intersection of chemical energy rising up from hydrothermal vents on the ocean floor and oxidants diffusing down from the surface.
7h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

International ocean drilling expedition obtains unique record of plate tectonic rifting and changing climate in GreeceCore samples taken during an international ocean drilling expedition are yielding the most high-resolution, extended record of continental rifting ever obtained.
7h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

The quantum states on the surface of conducting materials can strongly interact with lightAn exotic state of matter that is dazzling scientists with its electrical properties, can also exhibit unusual optical properties, as shown in a theoretical study by researchers at A*STAR.
7h
Live Science

Spacecraft Could Nuke Dangerous Asteroid to Defend EarthThe next time a hazardous asteroid lines Earth up in its crosshairs, we may be ready for the threat.
7h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Flower-shaped gold nanocrystals as photothermal agents against tumor cellsGold nanoflowers grown in starfruit juice are promising agents for photothermal cancer therapy. When injected into a tumor and irradiated with near-infrared laser light, the nanoflowers heat up and kill the cancer cells around them.
7h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Eyelash-sized plants reveal climate change -- and citizen scientists help identify themA motley band of citizen scientists -- including a high school student and a retired businesswoman -- teamed up with a botanist to build a tool that lets the public participate in a research project about eyelash-sized plants that reveal climate change.
7h
Science | The Guardian

Is vitamin D really a cure-all – and how should we get our fix?Evidence is growing that the ‘sunshine vitamin’ helps protect against a wide range of conditions including cancers Vitamin D is having quite a moment. In the past few months, evidence has been growing that the “sunshine vitamin” not only has an important role in bone and muscle health, but might also help prevent a range of cancers , reduce the chance of developing rheumatoid arthritis , protect
7h
The Atlantic

Commander v. ChiefA t a White House stag dinner in February 1954, President Dwight Eisenhower shocked the new chief justice of the United States. Earl Warren was Eisenhower’s first appointment to the Supreme Court and had been sworn in just four months earlier. Only two months into his tenure, Warren had presided over oral arguments in the blockbuster school-segregation case Brown v. Board of Education . As of the
7h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

A wireless patch for monitoring emergency-room patientsA small, wireless patch developed by EPFL spin-off Smartcardia can measure emergency-room patients' vital signs with the same reliability as existing systems involving cumbersome cables. After extensive testing at several hospitals, the device recently obtained the European Union's CE marking for medical devices and will be launched on the market in the coming days.
7h
Popular Science

Whatever the latest infectious disease outbreak is, explained. (This time, it's mumps.)Health A tale as old as time. Since cases like these are so common in 2018, we’ve put together a template for writing about whatever infectious disease risk is trending on Google News.
7h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Eyelash-sized plants reveal climate change—and citizen scientists help identify themA botanist, a retired businesswoman, and a high school student walk into a bar. Or, maybe not a bar, what with the high school student. A museum. They and their team have a common problem—too many plant photos to analyze—and they find a solution: creating an online tool that lets regular, non-scientist people help do that analysis.
7h
Feed: All Latest

San Francsico Mayor Wants a Safety Test for Self-Driving CarsWaymo Trucks GoogleAnd he won't be the last to try to exert control over this sweeping technological change.
8h
Feed: All Latest

The Quest to Make a Robotic Cat Walk With Artificial NeuronsWant to create machines that move more naturally? Maybe start by replicating the spinal cord.
8h
Science : NPR

In The Recycling World, Why Are Some Cartons Such A Problem?Because of layers of material that can be difficult to separate, many containers for juices and broths have traditionally been destined for landfills. But recycling them is getting easier. (Image credit: KidStock/Getty Images )
8h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

How to spark a chemical chain reactionTailor-made protein drugs in the fight against cancer and other diseases are a step close, with the Centre for NanoScale Science and Technology at Flinders playing a part in one of the latest chemistry discoveries in effectively modifying therapeutic proteins.
8h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Research team creates hydrogel adhesives to seal woundsA Band-Aid adhesive bandage is an effective way to stop bleeding from skin wounds, but an equally viable option for internal bleeding does not yet exist. Surgical glues are often used inside the body instead of traditional wound-closure techniques such as stitches, staples, and clips, because the glues reduce the patient's time in the hospital and lower the risk of secondary injury or damage at th
8h
Futurity.org

Scientists call for action in fight against ‘fake news’Legal scholars, social scientists, and researchers are joining forces in a global call to action in the fight against “fake news.” The indictment of 13 Russians in the operation of a “troll farm” that spread false information related to the 2016 US presidential election has renewed the spotlight on the power of “fake news” to influence public opinion. “It’s such a complex problem that it must be
8h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Birdsong loss would echo silence in the forestsSouth-East Queensland is in danger of losing one of the last remaining populations of the Eastern bristlebird, one of Australia's most melodic songbirds, a study has shown.
8h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

From foe to friend—how carnivores could help farmersAcross the globe, the numbers of carnivore species such as leopards, dingoes, and spectacled bears are rapidly declining. The areas they occupy are also getting smaller each year. This is a problem, because carnivores are incredibly important to ecosystems as they may provide services such as biodiversity enhancement, disease regulation, and improving carbon storage. And that, in turn, is importan
8h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Video: Tour a Mars robot test labNASA's InSight lander looks a bit like an oversized crane game: when it lands on Mars this November, its robotic arm will be used to grasp and move objects on another planet for the first time.
8h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Scaling silicon quantum photonic technologyAn international team of quantum scientists and engineers led by the University of Bristol and involving groups from China, Denmark, Spain, Germany and Poland, have realised an advanced large-scale silicon quantum photonic device that can entangle photons to incredible levels of precision.
8h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Scientists gain new visibility into quantum information transferWhen we talk about "information technology," we generally mean the technology part, like computers, networks, and software. But information itself, and its behavior in quantum systems, is a central focus for MIT's interdisciplinary Quantum Engineering Group (QEG) as it seeks to develop quantum computing and other applications of quantum technology.
8h
Live Science

These 2 Photographers Never Met, But They Took the Exact Same PhotoTwo photographers captured photographs so much like one another that a stranger thought one of them was stolen.
8h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

The science of preserving Henry VIII's 1200+ cannonballsIn a ground-breaking partnership between The Mary Rose, UCL and Diamond Light Source, the Mary Rose's Head of Conservation, Dr. Eleanor Schofield and her colleagues are working at the cutting edge of conservation science to protect and preserve the huge haul of cannonballs found on Henry VIII's flagship. But in a contradictory twist, the only way to uncover how to preserve them is to sacrifice som
8h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

A highly sensitive and multi-analytical system for hereditary kidney diseaseAlport syndrome (AS) is a hereditary kidney disease caused by a genetic mutation leading to type IV collagen (Col4) abnormalities. Unfortunately, treatment through the correction of Col4 functionality has not yet been developed. Now, researchers from Kumamoto University in Japan have established a highly sensitive technology to assess Col4 functionality, paving the way to therapeutic drugs. This d
8h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Nanostructures made of previously impossible materialMaterials scientists often seek to change the physical properties of a material by adding a certain proportion of an additional element; however, it isn't always possible to incorporate the desired quantity into the crystal structure of the material. At TU Wien, a new method has been developed to produce previously unattainable mixtures of germanium and other atoms. This results in new materials w
8h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Simulation and experiment help researchers study next-generation semiconductorsSemiconductors, a class of materials that can function as both electrical conductor and insulator depending on the circumstances, are fundamental to modern electronics. Silicon is the most widely used semiconductor, but in recent years, researchers have studied a greater range of materials, including molecules that can be tailored to serve specific electronic needs.
8h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Once degraded, Brazilian savanna does not regenerate naturallySome of Brazil's most important rivers, including the Xingu, Tocantins, Araguaia, São Francisco, Parnaíba, Gurupi, Jequitinhonha, Paraná and Paraguay, rise in the Cerrado, the only savanna in the world with perennial rivers. This biome is at risk owing to rapid conversion to pasture and cropland, in conjunction with inadequate management of preserved areas, despite its tremendous importance as a n
8h
Ingeniøren

USA levetidsforlænger gamle Super HornetsMens leveringen af det nye F-35 trækker ud, er det amerikanske søværn begyndt at opgradere sine mere end 500 Super Hornets.
8h
Feed: All Latest

AI Has a Hallucination Problem That's Proving Tough to FixMachine learning systems, like those used in self-driving cars, can be tricked into seeing objects that don't exist. Defenses proposed by Google, Amazon, and others are vulnerable too.
8h
Feed: All Latest

How Fast Can Gravitational Wave Detection Get?With machine learning and other algorithmic approaches, researchers are increasing the speed at which they detect the undulations of spacetime.
8h
Feed: All Latest

These Women Could Lose Their Right to Work in the USThe Obama administration allowed the spouses of foreign H-1B visa holders to work. The Trump administration wants to reverse that.
8h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

New star described in a model combining relativity and quantum mechanicsA new kind of star is reported in a study by SISSA postdoctoral researcher Raúl Carballo-Rubio. In a paper recently published in Physical Review Letters, Carballo-Rubio describes a novel mathematical model combining general relativity with the repulsive effect of quantum vacuum polarization. The result is a description of an ultra-compact configuration of stars that scientists previously believed
9h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

New ultrafast measurement technique shows how lasers start from chaosLasers that emit ultrashort pulses of light are critical components of technologies, including communications and industrial processing, and have been central to fundamental Nobel Prize-winning research in physics. Although first invented in the 1960s, the exact mechanism whereby lasers actually produce such bright flashes of light has remained elusive. It has not been previously possible to look
9h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Study shows electrically charging planes have reduced risk of being struck by lightningNews Twitter StoriesAviation experts estimate that every commercial airplane in the world is struck by lightning at least once per year. Around 90 percent of these strikes are likely triggered by the aircraft itself: In thunderstorm environments, a plane's electrically conductive exterior can act as a lightning rod, sparking a strike that could potentially damage the plane's outer structures and compromise its onboar
9h
TED Talks Daily (SD video)

The best way to help is often just to listen | Sophie AndrewsA 24-hour helpline in the UK known as Samaritans helped Sophie Andrews become a survivor of abuse rather than a victim. Now she's paying the favor back as the founder of The Silver Line, a helpline that supports lonely and isolated older people. In a powerful, personal talk, she shares why the simple act of listening (instead of giving advice) is often the best way to help someone in need.
9h
Dagens Medicin

Jacob Bundsgaard er ny formand i KLKommunernes Landsforening har fået ny bestyrelse, hvor formand og næstformand har byttet plads. Derudover er der ny formand for sundhedsudvalget.
9h
Science-Based Medicine

A Miscellany of Medical Malarkey Episode 3: The RevengeningA setback for bogus marketing claims for fancy athletic tape. E-cigarettes aren't a good Christmans stocking stuffer for your kids. An update on the European measles outbreak. That's right, it's time for another miscellany of medical malarkey!
9h
New Scientist - News

Brain zap can make people re-experience old dreams while awakeWhile déjà-vu is a false feeling of familiarity, déjà-rêvé is a rare experience of suddenly recalling a dream – and it can be sparked by zapping the brain
9h
Scientific American Content: Global

Clearing the Radioactive Rubble Heap That Was Fukushima Daiichi, 7 Years OnThe water is tainted, the wreckage is dangerous, and disposing of it will be a prolonged, complex and costly process -- Read more on ScientificAmerican.com
9h
Viden

Ny forskning: Folk spreder fake news meget hurtigere end sandhederFalske nyheder bliver spredt op til 100.000 gange hurtigere på sociale medier end de sande, viser forskning baseret på millioner af tweets.
9h
The Atlantic

How the Supreme Court is Expanding the Immigrant Detention SystemA quarter-century ago, in 1994, the Immigration and Naturalization Service, on any given day, was holding somewhere around 5,500 immigrants in “immigration detention.” For fiscal year 2017, Immigration and Customs Enforcement budget documents projected an average daily population in detention of roughly 31,000. That increase—nearly six-fold in 25 years—made the Enforcement and Removal Operations
9h
Ingeniøren

Frankrig stejler over Facebook og Googles absolutte reklame-herredømmeGoogle og Facebook kan måske se frem til endnu et dataindsamlings-slagsmål med EU.
10h
Ingeniøren

Trump går ind i debat om vold i computerspilTrump mødtes torsdag med spil-industrien efter at have givet vold i computerspil en del af skylden for det meget omtalte skoleskyderi i Parkland, Florida.
10h
Ingeniøren

Hør ugens podcast om kvantecomputere og nye kryptovalutaerIngeniørens ugentlige podcast, Transformator, handler denne gang om verdens kraftigste kvantecomputer, som Google præsenterede forleden, med hele 72 kvantebit eller qubit. Kryptovalutaen bitcoin er på vej ud som betalingsmiddel til lyssky transaktioner på Internettet. De nye hedder monero, zcash ...
10h
Ingeniøren

Sverige mangler ubådeFor 30 år siden rådede det svenske søværn over tolv ubåde. Sverige har i dag behov for seks eller syv ubåde, men kun to af landets fire ubåde er operationelle, advarer flådechef.
10h
Big Think

How to have a good reputation (because having a perfect one is impossible)"Nice and in control: the twin peaks of a good reputation...But since we are riddled with contradiction, this is not a simple story." Read More
10h
NYT > Science

At the Hayden Planetarium, a Joyride Across the CosmosThe planetarium has a multimillion dollar project that uses computers and satellite images to simulate a flight to distant galaxies.
10h
Ingeniøren

ANALYSE: Lobby-giganter strides om bygningers rolle i nyt energiforligMagtfulde Dansk Industri slår nu et slag for en noget mere ambitiøs energispareindsats end den anden store organisation, Dansk Energi, som ikke vil prioritere besparelser i bygninger. Hvem lytter politikerne mon til?
10h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Trauma and dementia patients given hope by 'flashbulb memory' breakthroughUniversity of Sussex scientists have made a telling breakthrough in detailing the formation of 'flashbulb memories', which can help a snail find a sugary treat but also mean a war survivor repeatedly relives their trauma.
10h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Liver study offers insights into hard-to-treat diseasesA key cell process that could cause damage to bile ducts and help explain some liver diseases has been identified by scientists.
10h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News

When the doctor's awayHeart-attack sufferers who receive treatment during periods when interventional cardiologists are away at academic conferences are more likely to survive in the month after their heart attack than patients receiving treatment during nonmeeting days.
10h
Science | The Guardian

There’s hope for our blue planet, despite what you see on the news | Fiona GellAfter the mass die-off of starfish, it’s easy to despair. But conservation success stories show what ordinary people can do I recently helped to organise an environmental meeting and found myself checking our video link by calling home. Beamed on to the screen was my four-year-old son, hair sticking out and school jumper on back to front. As we checked the sound, I asked him what message he would
11h
Science : NPR

Invisibilia: When Death Rocks Your World, Maybe You Jump Out Of A PlaneThe first episode of this season's Invisibilia podcast explores how people cope when something happens that fundamentally shifts how they view themselves. The author's mother decided to try skydiving. (Image credit: Sara Wong for NPR)
11h
Ingeniøren

‘Abeleg’ på sjette år om lossepladser og giftgrundeOveralt i landet ligger forurening fra omkring 3.000 lossepladser ubehandlet hen. Fortidens synder siver ud, men oprensningen er forhalet i et årelangt politisk spil og udskudt til efter 2019.
11h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Entangled LED first to operate in the telecom windowResearchers have demonstrated the first quantum light-emitting diode (LED) that emits single photons and entangled photon pairs with a wavelength of around 1550 nm, which lies within the standard telecommunications window. A single-photon source that operates at this wavelength is expected to serve as a key component in future quantum networks, long-distance quantum communication systems, quantum
11h
The Atlantic

How Skin Care Became an At-Home Science ExperimentIn the skin-care aisle at the CVS pharmacy closest to my office, there are 106 different products for acne. I lurked in the store for an hour last week tallying anything with the words “acne,” “blemish,” or “blackhead” on the packaging. I did not include products labeled “pore refining,” because that seems fake. There are 101 antiaging products on the shelves. This includes anything that claims t
11h
Ingeniøren

Ugens job: Denne uges IT-liste indeholder 39 nye jobmulighederPå dagens liste finder du job fra 3Shape A/S, Forsvarets Koncern IT og Forsikring & Pension. Find det rette job for dig.
11h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Warmer, saltier polar water could change global ocean currentsMelting ice shelves are changing the ocean's chemistry at the South Pole and the result could be a change in global currents and increased glacial melt, according to scientists who are creating maps to feed into climate change models.
12h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Two better than one: Chemists advance sustainable battery technologyUtah State University chemists' efforts to develop alternative battery technology solutions are advancing and recent findings are highlighted in a renowned, international chemistry journal.
12h
Ingeniøren

Mystik om afsender af OL-malwareMalware rettet mod De Olympiske Vinterlege er konstrueret langt ned i koden, så bestemt hackergruppe skal se ud til at stå bag, mener russisk anti-virus virksomhed.
12h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Krill could prove secret weapon in ocean plastics battleThey might be at the bottom of the food chain, but krill could prove to be a secret weapon in the fight against the growing threat of plastic pollution in the world's oceans.
12h
Science | The Guardian

Stress does not cause cancer. But when I’m unhappy, I get ill | Christina PattersonWe should listen to experts such as Cancer Research, but I’m the expert on my heart – and its connection with my health What starts with an “o”, has an “s” in the middle, and ends with death? If you like crosswords and puzzles, you’ll love the posters that have been springing up around the country in the last few days. They’re like the billboards in Three Billboards Outside Ebbing, Missouri . But
13h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Chinese drones slink into North Korean arsenalWang Dewen's daughter-in-law says the Chinese businessman could be dead. His wife claims he is travelling. But they are sure of one thing: he is definitely not working in North Korea.
13h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Judge to Trump: Muting, not blocking followers, may end suitA judge recommended Thursday that President Donald Trump mute rather than block some of his critics from following him on Twitter to resolve a First Amendment lawsuit.
13h
Ingeniøren

Videnskabeligt faktum: Fake news spreder sig hurtigere end sande nyhederFake News scorer højt på deres nyhedsværdi og spreder sig derfor hurtigere og længere ud end sande nyheder, forklarer forskere fra Massachusetts Institute of Technology, der har gennemført en omfattende undersøgelse af spredningen af nyheder via Twitter.
13h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Watchdog: Western tech used for hacking in Turkey, SyriaA Canadian company's hardware is being used to hack internet users along Turkey's border with Syria, researchers said Friday, adding that there were signs that Kurdish forces aligned with the United States might have been targeted.
13h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Smuggled tiger undergoes emergency surgery in CaliforniaA Bengal tiger cub that was being smuggled into California from Mexico has undergone emergency surgery to fix internal problems he probably had before being rescued.
13h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Ex-Tennessee governor's Senate campaign fears it was hackedFormer Tennessee Gov. Phil Bredesen's campaign for U.S. Senate told the FBI on Thursday that it fears it has been hacked, amid growing concern that candidates in the 2018 election could be targets of cyberattacks.
13h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

California salmon will have places to chill with dam removalA $100 million project removing dams and helping fish route around others is returning a badly endangered salmon to spring-fed waters in northernmost California, giving cold-loving native fish a life-saving place to chill as scientists say climate change, drought and human diversions warm the waters.
13h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Study predicts wildlife of Africa's Albertine Rift will be threatened by climate changeA new study by scientists from WCS (Wildlife Conservation Society) and other groups predicts that the effects of climate change will severely impact the Albertine Rift, one of Africa's most biodiverse regions and a place not normally associated with global warming.
13h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Researchers develop a new class of two-dimensional materialsA research team led by UCLA scientists and engineers has developed a method to make new kinds of artificial "superlattices"—materials comprised of alternating layers of ultra-thin "two-dimensional" sheets, which are only one or a few atoms thick. Unlike current state-of-the art superlattices, in which alternating layers have similar atomic structures, and thus similar electronic properties, these
13h
Ingeniøren

Kriminelle søger tilflugt i anonyme kryptovalutaerPolitiet har fået værktøjer til at følge lysky bitcoin-transaktioner, men de kriminelle er allerede på vej videre.
14h
Science | The Guardian

Scientists unsure where Chinese space station will crash to EarthDefunct module expected to scatter debris over thousands of kilometres in fiery descent It launched as a potent symbol of Chinese ambitions in space, but in the coming weeks the nation’s first orbital outpost will come crashing down to Earth in a fireball that could scatter debris over thousands of kilometres. The Chinese space agency lost control of its Tiangong-1, or Heavenly Palace, spacecraft
14h
Science | The Guardian

Scientists seek public's help to map plastic on UK beachesProject hopes to get more than 250,000 drone images tagged to record type and extent of plastic pollution Food wrappers, fishing nets, bottles, straws and carrier bags are among the top 10 plastic items littering British beaches, according to new research. Related: Is there life after plastic? The new inventions promising a cleaner world Continue reading...
15h
Dagens Medicin

Center for partikelterapi klar til at modtage patienter fra hele landetAarhus Universitetshospital har stort set alle samarbejdsaftaler om partikelterapi på plads. Dansk Center for Partikelterapi er dermed klar til at tilbyde behandling til efteråret.
15h
Dagens Medicin

Ny immunterapi viser effekt på hjernekræftDanskudviklet immunterapi kan stoppe tumorvækst hos nogle patienter med glioblastom.
15h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Blood samples can soon reveal your lifestylePeople who use moist snuff 'snus' have significantly higher levels of the protein cornulin in their blood than non-snusers. This previously unknown relationship was found in a new study from Umeå University, Sweden. Whether higher levels per se increase the risk of disease has, however, not yet been clarified.
15h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Are those who help the bad good or bad? The answer depends on adaptive architecturesAre those who help the bad good or bad? Game theoreticians reveal that the answer depends on whether the society adopts 'individualism' or 'dividualism.'
15h
BBC News - Science & Environment

Five ways to break up with plasticFrom boar hair toothbrushes to beeswax food wrap, here's how you can dump the disposable plastics.
15h
Science | The Guardian

Nuclear fusion on brink of being realised, say MIT scientistsCarbon-free fusion power could be ‘on the grid in 15 years’ The dream of nuclear fusion is on the brink of being realised, according to a major new US initiative that says it will put fusion power on the grid within 15 years. The project, a collaboration between scientists at MIT and a private company, will take a radically different approach to other efforts to transform fusion from an expensive
16h
Dagens Medicin

Det går o.k., men pulsen er højDet er en broget butik, som Stephanie Lose arver 22. marts, hvor hun bliver formand for Danske Regioner. Vi har bedt fire erfarne observatører – to læger og to økonomer – om at vurdere 14 udvalgte dele af sundhedsvæsenet. De tegner et billede af gode præstationer, når det gælder produktivitet, det faglige niveau, akutområdet og kræftindsatsen. Derimod halter forebyggelse, sammenhæng og især psyki
16h
Dagens Medicin

Sådan har har eksperterne vurderet sundhedsvæsenets helbredstilstand
16h
Dagens Medicin

Lad os sende et signal til generalforsamlingenVil du være med til at give politikerne en opfordring til at tage fat dér, hvor det kniber mest
16h
Ingeniøren

Danmark har over 1.000 forurenede grunde, og ingen rydder opGrindsteds giftdepoter er kun toppen af isbjerget: Lossepladser, blandingspladser for pesticider og depoter med farlig kemi fra industrien truer vandløb og grundvand. Men der sker kun lidt for at fjerne forureningen.
17h
Dagens Medicin

Kardiologer forebygger blodpropper ved at lukke huller i hjertetAflukning af en åbning i skillevæggen mellem hjertets forkamre har stor forebyggende effekt på risikoen for nye blodpropper i hjernen hos yngre personer, der tidligere har haft en blodprop i hjernen. Tre nye store kliniske undersøgelser viser, at indgrebet kan reducere patienternes risiko for nye blodpropper med 50-80 pct. På afdeling for hjertesygdomme på Aarhus Universitetshospital udføres lukn
17h
Dagens Medicin

120.000 blodprøver skal sikre hjertepatienter bedre behandlingEt stort genetisk studie af blodprøver fra 120.000 hjerte-kar-patienter skal bidrage med viden om sygdomsmekanismer, patienternes risikoprofiler og prognose. Håbet er, at studiet vil styrke udredningen og behandlingen af den enkelte patients sygdom samt forhindre overbehandling.
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Dagens Medicin

Hjertets sammentrækning afslører risiko for hjertedødMeget tidlige tegn på en dyssynkron sammentrækning af hjertets muskulatur kan bruges til at finde personer, som er i øget risiko for at dø af en hjertesygdom. Det viser et nyt studie, som ved hjælp af avancerede ultralydsmålinger har set på risikomarkører for hjertedød i normalbefolkningen.
17h
Live Science

German Culture: Facts, Customs and TraditionsGermans place a high value on hard work, precision and order, and have made tremendous contributions to engineering, classical music and beer. Here is an overview of German customs, traditions and values.
17h
Dagens Medicin

Ung forsker-komet hiver endnu en pris hjemNår hjertekongressen American College of Cardiology om få dage løber af stablen, henter læge og ph.d. Tor Biering-Sørensen endnu en pris hjem til samlingen. Prisen får han for at vise, at et nyt præparat forbedrer hjertefunktionen hos hjertesvigtspatienter uden nedsat pumpefunktion.
17h
Dagens Medicin

Har vi tabt noget i kampen for evidens?Lægekunst kan ikke nødvendigvis evidensbaseres, men de personlige relationer mellem læge og patient kan ikke overvurderes.
17h
Science : NPR

Study Questions Science Behind Hunting Management PlansResearchers say governments' hunting policies often don't demonstrate they've made wildlife decisions using the best available science.
17h
BBC News - Science & Environment

Ministers question 'latte levy' on cupsThe government says it is better for coffee shops to offer discounts to those who bring their own cups.
17h
NeuWrite West

A Novel Neural Circuit Saps Pleasure in Model of DepressionGrief is a normal response to some of life’s most powerful stressors – like the death of a loved one, a natural disaster, or a serious break-up. However, this grief may not go away for those suffering from depression. Feelings of helplessness, guilt, and lack of self-worth may stick around for extended periods of time, and a stressor isn’t required to trigger a depressive episode. This descriptio
18h
BBC News - Science & Environment

X-ray probe to save Mary Rose cannonballsResearchers are using powerful X-rays to look inside cannonballs found on the famous Tudor ship, the Mary Rose.
18h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Across the metal-molecule interface: Observing fluctuations on the single-molecule scaleScientists at Tokyo Institute of Technology (Tokyo Tech) have developed a technique for analyzing structural and electronic fluctuations on the single-molecule scale across the metal-molecule interface in an organic electronic device. This technique provides information that cannot be obtained using the conventional method, and it has important implications for devices such as organic solar cells.
18h
Feed: All Latest

A New Star Wars TV Show Is on the Way. Worried? You Shouldn't BeThreading the needle might be tough, but the newly announced project is well within Lucasfilm's powers.
18h
The Atlantic

What's There to Talk About With North Korea?On Thursday evening South Korean National-Security Adviser Chung Eui Yong, fresh off meeting North Korea’s reclusive leader in Pyongyang, stood before cameras at the White House and delivered an extraordinary message. Donald Trump had agreed to meet with Kim Jong Un—and soon, by May—to “achieve permanent denuclearization” on the Korean peninsula. The man who once threatened North Korea and its “L
19h
Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

How common is food insecurity among older adults?Food insecurity occurs when people lack access to food or go hungry due to poverty or other challenges. It remains a serious problem for many older adults. Recently, a research team from the Institute for Health Research, Kaiser Permanente, Colorado, designed a study to learn more about food insecurity and older adults. Their study was published in the Journal of the American Geriatrics Society.
19h
Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

Early-killed rye shows promise in edamameWith the rise of herbicide-resistant weeds in most grain and vegetable crops, farmers are looking for alternatives to herbicides to control weeds. Cover crops offer one potential weed management tool. Their use in specialty crops is limited, and no testing has been done so far in edamame. However, a new study reports that early-killed cereal rye shows promise for edamame growers.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

Regional levels of fear associated with Trump and Brexit votes, psychology study showsRegions where voters have more neurotic personality traits were more likely to vote for Donald Trump in the United States or for the Brexit campaign in the United Kingdom, revealing a new trend that could help explain the rise of fearmongering populist political campaigns across the world, according to new research.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

Once degraded, Brazilian savanna does not regenerate naturallyAccording to study, after being converted to pastures, areas of the so-called 'Cerrado' become closed forest with poor biodiversity if not appropriately managed. This biome works as the source for much of Brazil's main river basins, and boasts biodiversity levels higher than tropical forests at the microscale.
19h
Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

Scientists discover a key function of ALS-linked proteinThe protein FUS, whose mutation or disruption causes many cases of amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS) and frontotemporal dementia (FTD), works as a central component of one of the most important regulatory systems in cells, according to a new study.
19h
Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

'Bat detectives' train new algorithms to discern bat calls in noisy recordingsUsing data collected by citizen scientists, researchers have developed new, open-source algorithms to automatically detect bat echolocation calls in audio recordings.
20h
Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

Nanostructures made of previously impossible materialOne could think that mixing different materials is easy -- why not just melt them and pour them together? But if the goal is to create well-ordered crystals, things are more complicated. Scientists have now found a way to add large amounts of metal to semiconductor crystals, which changes their properties dramatically.
20h
Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

Engineered cartilage template to heal broken bonesResearchers have designed a novel, hybrid hydrogel system to help address some of the challenges in repairing bone in the event of injury.
20h
Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

New 3-D measurements improve understanding of geomagnetic storm hazardsMeasurements of the three-dimensional structure of Earth, as opposed to the one-dimensional models typically used, can help scientists more accurately determine which areas of the United States are most vulnerable to blackouts during hazardous geomagnetic storms.
20h
Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

Having children can make women's telomeres seem 11 years olderResearchers found that women who have given birth have shorter telomeres than those who haven't. Telomeres are the end caps of DNA on our chromosomes, which help in DNA replication and get shorter over time. The length of telomeres has been associated with morbidity and mortality previously, but this is the first study to examine links with having children.
20h
Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

MicroRNA predicts and protects against severe lung disease in extremely premature infantsResearchers report discovery of a strong predictive biomarker for bronchopulmonary dysplasia, and they show a role for the biomarker in the pathogenesis of this neonatal lung disease. These results open the path to possible future therapies to prevent or lessen BPD, which is marked by inflammation and impaired lung development, and mortality or morbidity.
20h
The Atlantic

Why Was George Nader Allowed Into the White House?Updated at 8:26 p.m. on March 8, 2018 A political operative who frequented the White House in the early days of President Trump’s administration, George Nader, was indicted in 1985 on charges of importing to the United States obscene material, including photos of nude boys “engaged in a variety of sexual acts,” according to publicly available court records. Nader pleaded not guilty, and the charg
20h
Futurity.org

Simulating ‘haze’ may narrow search for alien lifeAnalyzing the murky haziness of simulated atmospheres whipped up in a lab is an important step toward using the James Webb Space Telescope to look for signs of life on planets far from our own, report researchers. The simulations will help establish models of atmospheres that might exist on distant worlds orbiting stars in other solar systems, says Sarah Hörst, assistant professor of earth and pl
20h
Feed: All Latest

Apple's Swift Programming Language Is Now Top TierA new report ranking developers' favorite languages shows big gains for Apple's Swift and Google-endorsed Kotlin.
20h
Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

Mesothelioma: Why asbestos is so dangerousLong, pointed asbestos fibers induce chronic inflammation, which can lead to cancer. Researchers have found underlying mechanisms for this and hope their results will help prevent damage.
20h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Physician education and guidelines lead to drop in opioids prescribed after hand surgeryAn educational session on opioid abuse and new prescription guidelines led to a 45 percent decrease in opioids prescribed after hand surgery, according to a study at Hospital for Special Surgery (HSS). The educational session was mandatory for all HSS staff involved in prescribing controlled substances. The hospital also conducted extensive research to develop guidelines for opioid prescription.
20h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Prosthetic limbs represented like hands in brainThe human brain can take advantage of brain resources originally devoted to the hand to represent a prosthetic limb, a new UCL-led study concludes.
20h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Survivors of childhood cancer are at great risk of heart problems in adulthoodA study of nearly 1,000 survivors of childhood cancer has found that they are at increased risk of suffering prematurely from cardiovascular disease in adulthood. Childhood cancer survivors had a nearly two-fold increased risk of cardiovascular diseases such as congestive heart failure and venous thromboembolism, and were at increased risk of having high blood pressure and dyslipidaemia. The study
20h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Poor rural population had best diet and health in mid-Victorian yearsPoor, rural societies retaining a more traditional lifestyle where high-quality foods were obtained locally enjoyed the best diet and health in mid-Victorian Britain. A new study, published in JRSM Open, examined the impact of regional diets on the health of the poor during mid-19th century Britain and compared it with mortality data over the same period.
20h
Futurity.org

Why manufacturing jobs aren’t likely to returnNew research strongly suggests the days of high manufacturing employment in the United States, and just about every other country, are over. During the 2016 presidential election, Donald Trump repeatedly vowed to return to the United States—after decades of steep losses—the manufacturing jobs he often blamed China for “stealing.” As president, he has recently proposed tariffs and praised trade wa
20h
Science | The Guardian

Antihistamines linked to fertility problems in menAnimal studies suggest the anti-allergy drugs may affect the production of male sexual hormones Common allergy drugs have been linked to fertility problems in men. Antihistamines are often used to relieve symptoms of allergies such as hay fever, hives, conjunctivitis and reactions to insect bites or stings and are available either over-the-counter or on prescription. Continue reading...
20h
Live Science

In Photos: Ancient Home and Barracks of Roman Military OfficerPhotos reveal a recently discovered 1,900-year-old home that would have belonged to a Roman military commander.
21h
Live Science

Roman Military Commander's Sprawling Home Found Beneath Subway SystemThe home includes 14 rooms with elaborate mosaic floors, fountains and pools.
21h
cognitive science

Last few days left to enrol in the FREE Understanding Dementia MOOC - The No.1 Online Health Course in the world.submitted by /u/WickingCentreUTAS [link] [comments]
21h
Futurity.org

Mice without this protein resist multiple sclerosisThe brains of patients with multiple sclerosis (MS) have an extremely high content of the protein calnexin compared to those without the disease, a study of donated brain tissue shows. When researchers tested the susceptibility of mice lacking calnexin to a mouse model of human MS (experimental autoimmune encephalomyelitis), they were astonished to find that the mice were completely resistant to
21h
Futurity.org

Sugar cubes solve big problem with lithium metal batteriesSugar cubes are a key component of a new substrate that can prevent dendrites from degrading and ultimately destroying lithium metal batteries. Lithium, a soft metal, has the ability to store far more energy than current electrodes used in lithium-ion batteries. It could allow electric cars to run longer on a single charge and facilitate backup energy supplies for solar power grids. But pure lith
21h
Futurity.org

No new babies for North Atlantic right whales?North Atlantic right whales face a serious danger of extinction—a danger made all the more apparent this breeding season as scientists see no sign of newborns. As waters warm and food supplies dwindle, the right whales are migrating further north into places like the Gulf of Saint Lawrence where they face dangerous new threats, from boats and fishing gear, report researchers. Last summer, 17 righ
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Futurity.org

These spiders moved to Hawaii and just kept evolvingNew research examines how stick spiders living on Hawaiian islands are an example of “adaptive radiation” and sheds light on how evolution happens. About 2 to 3 million years ago, a group of spiders from parts unknown let out long silk threads into the wind and set sail, so to speak, across the Pacific Ocean to Hawaii. The spiders were parasites of other spiders, invading their webs and snipping
21h
Live Science

What to Know Before Taking 23andMe's Breast Cancer TestPeople can buy all kinds of take-home medical tests these days, but the latest test to get government approval - one that looks for a certain type of breast cancer risk - is problematic, a bioethicist told Live Science.
21h
Popular Science

Alexa should laugh more, not less, because people prefer social robotsTechnology Services like Alexa and Siri work best when they emulate humans. Alexa, Amazon’s virtual assistant, has been laughing at the wrong times. But it's good that it's trying.
21h
The Atlantic

The Atlantic Daily: Where They're Coming FromWhat We’re Following Updated at 8:29 p.m. North Korea News: Following conversations with President Trump and North Korean leader Kim Jong Un, South Korea’s national security adviser announced three surprising developments: First, that Kim had pledged to stop conducting missile tests and commit to denuclearization; second, that Kim had extended an invitation to Trump to meet with him; and finally,
21h
The Atlantic

How Well Does Trump Understand NASA?At the end of a meeting at the White House on Thursday, President Donald Trump, flanked by members of his Cabinet, gestured to the table in front of them. “Before me are some rocket ships,” the president said . “You haven’t seen that for this country in a long time.” On the table stood model replicas of three rocket-launch systems, two of which are in use today and one that is still in developmen
21h
Popular Science

Now's your chance to send your name hurtling into the Sun's atmosphereSpace Meanwhile in space: dusty donuts, 50 launches, and pizza storms on Jupiter. You’re probably not going to go to space any time soon. But your name could.
22h
Inside Science

BRIEF: Can We Engineer Our Way Out of Global Warming?BRIEF: Can We Engineer Our Way Out of Global Warming? Scientists discuss the risks and feasibility of using solar geoengineering to cool us off. CloudyEarth_topNteaser.jpg Image credits: NASA Earth Observatory Rights information: CC BY 2.0 Earth Thursday, March 8, 2018 - 17:30 Yuen Yiu, Staff Writer (Inside Science) -- In the 1999 movie The Matrix, humans darkened the sky to try to starve off the
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