The Atlantic

The Last TemptationOne of the most extraordinary things about our current politics—really, one of the most extraordinary developments of recent political history—is the loyal adherence of religious conservatives to Donald Trump. The president won four-fifths of the votes of white evangelical Christians. This was a higher level of support than either Ronald Reagan or George W. Bush, an outspoken evangelical himself,
3h
Ingeniøren

Dansk ingeniør-kunst realiserer skulpturel bro i NorgeEt 90 graders vrid midt over en norsk elv var en af de store udfordringer, da Bladt Industries skulle gøre arkitektfirmaet BIG’s vision om en kunsthal til virkelighed.
2h
Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

Three NASA satellites recreate solar eruption in 3-DScientists have developed a model that simulates how shocks following coronal mass ejections, or CMEs, propagate from the sun -- an effort made possible only by combining data from three different NASA satellites.
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LATEST

Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

West Coast waters returning to normal but salmon catches laggingOcean conditions off most of the US West Coast are returning roughly to average, after an extreme marine heat wave from about 2014 to 2016 disrupted the California Current Ecosystem and shifted many species beyond their traditional range, according to a new report from NOAA Fisheries' two marine laboratories on the West Coast. Some warm waters remain off the Pacific Northwest, however.
7min
Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

Are those who help the bad good or bad? The answer depends on adaptive architectures.Are those who help the bad good or bad? Game theoreticians reveal that the answer depends on whether the society adopts 'individualism' or 'dividualism'.
7min
Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

Agricultural sustainability project reached 20.9 million smallholder farmers across ChinaAn effort to improve crop yields and reduce fertilizer use applied top-down and bottom-up approaches to reach 20 million smallholder farmers across China.
7min
Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

PET myocardial perfusion imaging more effective than SPECT scans in detecting coronary diseasePatients who receive cardiac positron emission testing (PET) imaging instead of single photon emission computed tomography (SPECT) scan experienced a significant increase in the detection of severe obstructive coronary artery disease.
21min
Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

Using pedometers in a short term walking program boosts long term activityExperts have found that people who use pedometers to count their steps as part of a 12-week walking programme, can have a healthier, more active lifestyle three to four years later.
21min
Science | The Guardian

Sir John Sulston obituaryPioneering biologist best known for his work on the human genome who was a fierce advocate of free access to scientific data In 1992 the biologist John Sulston, who has died of stomach cancer aged 75, shared a Nobel prize for physiology. He won it for elucidating the entire sequence in which the daughters of a single cell divide and sometimes disappear as an embryo grows into an adult in the tiny
24min
EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Study: Two drugs prevent heart problems in breast cancer patientsData presented from a Late-Breaking Clinical Trial at the American College of Cardiology's 67th Annual Scientific Session Data demonstrated the effectiveness of beta blockers or ACE inhibitors to reduce the risk of cardio toxicity for HER2-positive breast cancer patients undergoing chemotherapy
47min
EurekAlert! - Breaking News

New cardiac pump device improves long-term outcomes for heart failure patientsNew findings, presented today at the American College of Cardiology, provide long-term information about survival, stroke rates and durability of a novel centrifugal-flow pump compared with a commercial axial flow pump for heart-failure patients.
47min
Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

Could living at high altitude increase suicide risk? Evidence suggests possible treatments, reports Harvard Review of PsychiatryHigh-altitude areas -- particularly the US intermountain states -- have increased rates of suicide and depression, suggests a review of research evidence in the Harvard Review of Psychiatry. The journal is published by Wolters Kluwer.
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Viden

Fremtidens krop: Menneske og maskine bliver étMekaniske hænder, hjerne-implantater og elektroniske chips i øjet. Moderne teknologi letter livet for personer med handicap, og gør maskiner til en del af fremtidens menneske.
1h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Proteins associated with diabetic complications and increased heart disease identifiedProtein pathways that are closely linked to changes in both triglyceride and hemoglobin A1c levels in diabetic patients have been identified in new research by the Intermountain Medical Center Heart Institute in Salt Lake City.
1h
Scientific American Content: Global

Dinosaurs, in Living ColorAnalysis of a fossil bird reveals an unexpected facet of dinosaur life. -- Read more on ScientificAmerican.com
1h
The Atlantic

The Farrakhan ConundrumWhen I was 17, I was a scruffy-headed biracial black and Jewish teenager, and a furious Louis Farrakhan hater. In the mid-1990s, Farrakhan’s fame and influence was at its height; I had once been thrown out of a middle school gym class for calling the Nation of Islam leader a racist. His Million Man March, a massive collective act of solidarity and perhaps the most important black event of the dec
1h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Transcatheter aortic valve replacement dramatically improves heart patients' quality of lifePatients who undergo a transcatheter aortic valve replacement, or TAVR -- a minimally-invasive surgical procedure that repairs a damaged heart valve -- experienced a significant increase in their quality of life, according to a new study by researchers at the Intermountain Medical Center Heart Institute in Salt Lake City.
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Viden

Forladt kinesisk rumstation rammer snart JordenEksperter ved ikke hvor, at den gamle rumstation rammer Jorden. Men i Sydeuropa skal de måske begynde at kigge op.
2h
Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

Survival benefit seen for some patients when cardiologists are away at academic conferencesHeart-attack sufferers who receive treatment during periods when interventional cardiologists are away at academic conferences are more likely to survive in the month after their heart attack than patients receiving treatment during nonmeeting days.
2h
Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

Gut microbes influence severity of intestinal parasitic infectionsA new study indicates that the kinds of microbes living in the gut influence the severity and recurrence of parasitic worm infections in developing countries. The findings suggest that manipulating the gut's microbial communities may protect against intestinal parasites, which affect more than 1 billion people worldwide.
2h
Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

Academic study finds women wearing heavy makeup less likely to be perceived as leadersWomen wearing heavy makeup are less likely to be thought of as good leaders, new research has found.
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Feed: All Latest

Sam Nunberg's Media Tour Tops This Week's Internet News RoundupThe only way you *didn't* see former Trump aide Sam Nunberg last week was if you didn't turn on a TV or look at the internet.
2h
Live Science

9 Surprising Risk Factors for DementiaHere are nine recent studies that are changing the way we think about how to prevent dementia.
3h
Live Science

7 Years After Fukushima Disaster: Little Radioactive Material in US WatersNow that seven years have passed since the Fukushima disaster, how radioactive are the waters around the U.S.-Canadian West Coast?
3h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Eliminating cost barriers helps heart patients comply with drug regimensDoctors often cite the high price of a prescription drug as a reason they don't prescribe it, while patients similarly say that cost is a main reason they quit taking a drug. Removing this financial barrier might increase the use of evidence-based therapies, improve patient adherence to those medications, and potentially save lives.
3h
Science : NPR

North Korea's Nuclear Ambitions And AbilitiesNPR's Renee Montagne talks with Siegfried Hecker, a former director of the Los Alamos National Laboratory, about North Korea's nuclear program.
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Feed: All Latest

Russia Didn’t Abuse Facebook -- It Simply Used It As IntendedOpinion: When ISIS uses Twitter to recruit or a landlord uses Airbnb to discriminate, that’s not exploiting the platforms' glitches—that’s using their features.
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Feed: All Latest

Watch Nature Reclaim These Abandoned BuildingsJonk’s photographs in *Naturalia: Reclaimed by Nature* were taken in over 30 countries across four continents.
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Scientific American Content: Global

Influenza's Wild Origins in the Animals Around UsA century after the “Great Influenza” struck infectious disease specialists still fear the emergence of viral diseases they will not be able to control, including influenza -- Read more on ScientificAmerican.com
3h
Science | The Guardian

The Genius Within review – a smart look at boosting our brainsDavid Adam explores the history of intelligence and ways to improve his own, raising timely questions Which of us would not want to enhance our intelligence? Indeed, some ethicists, such as John Harris at Manchester University, argue that it is our duty to improve ourselves if we can, and in turn society and the quality of life for future generations. If we were more intelligent, perhaps we would
4h
Feed: All Latest

Can Machine Learning Find Meaning in a Mess of Genes?The computer scientist Barbara Engelhardt develops machine-learning models and methods to scour human genomes for the elusive causes and mechanisms of disease.
4h
Feed: All Latest

These New Lego Pieces Are Made of Sustainable PlasticsLego has introduced its first sustainable elements, but has along way to go before the other 98 percent of the line meets that goal.
4h
The Atlantic

The Persistent Crime of Nazi-Looted ArtT he discovery, when it was made, came entirely by chance. On September 22, 2010, a stooped, white-haired man in his late 70s taking an evening train from Zurich to Munich was asked by customs officers why he was crossing the Swiss border. The gentleman, Cornelius Gurlitt, responded with such nervousness that he triggered the officers’ suspicions. When they searched his person, they found an enve
4h
Ingeniøren

Ny kinesisk elbil skal være social platformI Kina skal biler være kørende digitale platforme for ejernes sociale liv, mener ny kinesisk bilproducent. Til gengæld betyder mærke og hestekræfter ikke meget.
4h
The Atlantic

'The Place Is Not a Frat House'It’s a congressional tradition that’s been around for decades and almost always cast in a glowing light: Dozens of lawmakers sleep in their offices while they’re in Washington to escape the exorbitant cost of rent and the corrupting culture of America’s most hated-upon company town. Their ranks include the most powerful men in Congress—House Speaker Paul Ryan and Majority Leader Kevin McCarthy. “
5h
Science : NPR

Rethinking How Students With Dyslexia Are Taught To ReadDyslexia is the most common learning disability in this country. But it is widely misunderstood, and schools often do a poor job of helping students learn to read. (Image credit: Trina Dalziel/Getty Images/Ikon Images)
5h
Science | The Guardian

Martie Haselton: ‘Hormones don’t make us crazy or irrational’The evolutionary scientist on her in-depth study on women’s hormones and their effects Your book is all about reproductive hormones, and their impact on our behaviour. It only focuses on female hormones. Why not look at men’s too? Two reasons. One is that the focus of research in my lab is to look at women’s hormones. The other is that I think there are problems with how people have viewed hormon
5h
The Atlantic

Let Trump and Kim MeetOn Thursday, Chung Eui Yong, South Korea’s national security advisor, told a stunned group of journalists at the White House that President Donald Trump had accepted an invitation to meet with Kim Jong Un, the leader of North Korea. Like so many other decisions in this White House, this one felt chaotic. Secretary of State Rex Tillerson, for example, seemed to learn of the decision to hold the me
6h
Ingeniøren

Video: Da Aarhus Å blev asfalteretDa trafikken i Aarhus blev tungere og tættere i 1930'erne, blev det besluttet at overdække åen og lave en ny vej. Se, hvordan det foregik og hør om, hvorfor asfalten blev fjernet igen. Vi er dykket ned i Ingeniørens arkiver.
6h
Latest Headlines | Science News

Depression among new mothers is finally getting some attentionScientists search new mothers’ minds for clues to postpartum depression.
6h
Science | The Guardian

We need to use gene editing wisely but also embrace its vast potential | Mary WarnockA new survey reveals Britons are keen to understand the possibilities offered by the groundbreaking science but also concerned it is properly regulated The Royal Society has recently published the results of an extensive survey of the attitudes of the general public to genetic modification . This sent my mind back to 1990, when the human fertilisation and embryology bill was going through parliam
9h
cognitive science

Brain Imaging Helps Redefine Intelligencesubmitted by /u/NaiveSkeptic [link] [comments]
12h
BBC News - Science & Environment

What happens when AI meets robotics?Researchers in Texas aim to create robots that can cope with our messy world.
14h
Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

Anthropologists show how migrant communities physically grow taller when they leave hardship behindA new study has shown that migrant populations moving to more affluent countries grow physically taller over relatively short periods of time.
16h
Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

Trends in pain medication useA new study reveals that acetaminophen use and over-dosing rise in cold/flu season in the United States, primarily due to increased use of over-the-counter combination medications treating upper respiratory symptoms. Another study reports that acetaminophen is the most commonly used analgesic in France, with more high-dose tablets being consumed in recent years.
16h
Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

Six-legged robots get closer to natureA study has uncovered new ways of driving multi-legged robots by means of a two-level controller. The proposed controller uses a network of so-called non-linear oscillators that enables the generation of diverse gaits and postures, which are specified by only a few high-level parameters. The study inspires new research into how multi-legged robots can be controlled, including in the future using b
17h
Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

A compass in the darkA research team has published a new model which allows studying magnetoreception. Analyzing zebrafish and medaka fish allowed the researchers to measure brain activity during magnetic stimulation and to show that the sense also works in darkness.
17h
Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

An itch you can't scratch: Researchers find 'itch receptors' in the throats of miceWorking with mice, researchers report they have found previously known skin itch receptors in the airways that appear to contribute to bronchoconstriction and airway hypersensitivity, hallmarks of asthma and other respiratory disorders. The investigators' experiments in mice suggest that the receptors' activation directly aggravates airway constriction and -- if the same process is active in peopl
17h
Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

Survivors of childhood cancer are at great risk of heart problems in adulthoodA study of nearly 1,000 survivors of childhood cancer has found that they are at increased risk of suffering prematurely from cardiovascular disease in adulthood. Childhood cancer survivors had a nearly two-fold increased risk of cardiovascular diseases such as congestive heart failure and venous thromboembolism, and were at increased risk of having high blood pressure and dyslipidaemia.
17h
Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

A new class of two-dimensional materialsScientists and engineers have developed a method to make new kinds of artificial "superlattices" -- materials composed of alternating layers of ultra-thin "two-dimensional" sheets, which are only one or a few atoms thick. Unlike current state-of-the art superlattices, in which alternating layers have similar atomic structures, and thus similar electronic properties, these alternating layers can ha
17h
Scientific American Content: Global

First Metro Projects in Vietnam Risk Bigger Problems Than DelaysUnderground line projects in Saigon and Hanoi are examples of the challenges of transport ventures that are not delayed by technical issues but by a lack of administrative planning, technical... -- Read more on ScientificAmerican.com
19h
Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

Increasing tree mortality in a warming worldA mix of factors is contributing to an increasing mortality rate of trees in the moist tropics, where trees in some areas are dying at about twice the rate that they were 35 years ago.
20h
Scientific American Content: Global

Saliva Protein Might Inhibit Intestinal AnarchyA protein found in spit prevents bad bugs from binding to intestinal cells in the lab, pointing to a possible way to lower the chances of dysentery. Christopher Intagliata reports. -- Read more on ScientificAmerican.com
20h
Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

New conductive coating may unlock biometric and wearable technology of the futureA team of researchers have developed a mechanically robust conductive coating that can maintain performance under heavy stretching and bending.
20h
Blog » Languages » English

Daylight Savings starts at HQAll righty, Eyewirers: spring hasn’t quite sprung for HQ, but the days are getting longer, and now they’re about to leap forward. Tomorrow, 3/11 , we will skip 2:00 AM Eastern Standard Time and move right along to 3:00 AM Eastern Daylight Time . If you are not in our own time zone, please be sure to reckon event times accordingly, and remember you can always check HQ local time by clicking the “?
20h
The Atlantic

Why Is Donald Trump So Hard to Caricature?I n October 2016 , Vanity Fair made a video of four of its cartoonists —Edward Sorel, Steve Brodner, Philip Burke, and Robert Risko—drawing Donald Trump. They were clearly enjoying themselves, exploring every aspect of his physique: his “girth,” the fact that “there’s so much of him” (Burke); the hair that is “essentially a beret that is flipped forward on his head” (Risko); the eyes that show “g
21h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Non-invasive technology is a money-saver for heart patients needing PCIDoctors evaluating patients for blockages in the heart are aided by having a good roadmap of the vascular terrain before they can insert stents to clear the impasse. Two technologies have been used with equal success, but now a study presented March 10 at the American College of Cardiology annual meeting by Duke cardiologists shows that the newer method carries a much lower cost, potentially savin
22h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Precision medicine: Access to real-time genetic testing data impacts prescriber behavior following minimally invasive stent procedureToday, in a late-breaking featured clinical research session at the American College of Cardiology Scientific Sessions 2018, researchers from Penn Medicine present first-of-its-kind data on the impact of real-time CYP2C19 genotype results when prescribing antiplatelet drugs in the clinic.
22h
Scientific American Content: Global

The Hidden Dogs of Dog CloningIt takes numerous dogs to clone one, raising animal welfare issues -- Read more on ScientificAmerican.com


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