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Roskilde først med elektriske busser på alle ruter20 nye elbusser skal betjene alle interne busruter i Roskilde Kommune fra næste år. Dermed bliver det første danske kommune til at tage hele springet, og løsningen er stort set ikke dyrere, end den nuværende drift af dieselbusserne.
12h
The Atlantic

Britain Accuses Russia of Poisoning—Trump Won't AgreeHere’s what would normally happen after an outrage like the attempted murder of a Russian defector and his daughter with a nerve agent, in an attack that also poisoned a British police officer and exposed as many as 500 people to neurological risk. The United States would instantly offer Britain any technical assistance it might require: forensic chemical analysis, other kinds of information coll
46min
EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Life in the fast flow: Tadpoles of new species rely on 'suction cups' to keep upThe young of two new species and a genus of frog found to inhabit Sumatra's rainforests have developed a unique ability to latch onto rocks in the fast-flowing rivers, using bellies crafted by evolution into 'suction cups.' The herpetologists, who described the species in the open-access journal Zoosystematics and Evolution, use their remarkable discovery to highlight the unique biodiversity of th
16h
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The Atlantic

An 'Unlawful Use of Force'Russian operations in the West—or rather, alleged Russian operations in the West—are designed in part for deniability. From election meddling in the United States to mysterious poisonings in the United Kingdom, the Russian connection has been visible through hints, happenstance, digital trails, or clear motives, but always hard to prove. Which leaves Western governments in the position of decidin
5min
New Scientist - News

We’ve just spotted the brightest mystery radio burst from spaceFast radio bursts are some of the weirdest, most elusive phenomena in the cosmos. We just found three new ones, one of which is the brightest we’ve ever seen
9min
EurekAlert! - Breaking News

How the color-changing hogfish 'sees' with its skinThe hogfish can go from white to reddish in milliseconds as it adjusts to shifting conditions in the ocean. Scientists have long suspected that animals with quick-changing colors don't just rely on their eyes to tune their appearance to their surroundings -- they also sense light with their skin. But exactly how remains a mystery. A study reveals that hogfish skin senses light differently from eye
11min
EurekAlert! - Breaking News

A new cross-coupling simplifies the synthesis of drug-like moleculesResearchers at The Scripps Research Institute (TSRI) have designed a new molecule-building method that uses sulfones as partners for cross-coupling reactions, or the joining of two distinct chemical entities in a programmed fashion aided by a catalyst.
11min
EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Rochester researchers use 'flying focus' to better control lasers over long distancesFor the first time, researchers at the University of Rochester's Laboratory for Laser Energetics (LLE) have found a way to use a concept called 'flying focus' to better control the intensity of lasers over longer distances. Their technique includes capturing some of the fastest movies ever recorded and has the potential to help researchers design the next generation of high-power lasers or produce
11min
EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Extracellular vesicles could be personalized drug delivery vehiclesCreating enough nanovesicles to inexpensively serve as a drug delivery system may be as simple as putting the cells through a sieve, according to an international team of researchers who used mouse autologous -- their own -- immune cells to create large amounts of fillable nanovesicles to deliver drugs to tumors in mice.
11min
EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Female researchers publish childcare recommendations for conference organizersMany women in science are raising concerns over the fact that parents with young children are often excluded from fully participating in academic conference activities.
11min
BBC News - Science & Environment

Microplastics are 'littering' riverbedsThe BBC's Victoria Gill looks under the microscope to discover the microplastics lurking in our waters.
12min
Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

First-annual sea-level report cardsResearchers are launching new web-based 'report cards' to monitor and forecast changes in sea level at 32 localities along the US coastline from Maine to Alaska. They plan to update the report cards in January of each year, with projections out to the year 2050.
13min
Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

Polymer nanoparticle shows ability to locate and treat breast tumorsOne major problem in treating cancer is identifying the location of small tumors and treating them before they metastasize.
13min
Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

Chemical topology of silica can influence the effectiveness of many chemical processes that use itBetter known as glass, silica is a versatile material used in myriad industrial processes, from catalysis and filtration, to chromatography and nanofabrication. Yet despite its ubiquity in labs and cleanrooms, surprisingly little is known about silica's surface interactions with water at a molecular level.
13min
Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

Plants faring worse than monkeys in increasingly patchy forests of Costa RicaA new study shows that cattle ranching, agriculture and other human activities breaking up Costa Rican forests into isolated patchy fragments, are causing more problems for native plant populations than for monkey species sharing the same habitat.
13min
Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

Mutating Ebola's key protein may stop replicationResearchers were able to mutate Viral Protein 40 (VP40) in a way that changed the residues of the protein, blocking the budding and replication of Ebola virus in a model system.
13min
New on MIT Technology Review

India reiterates lofty solar goals that may be out of reach
22min
EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Mutating Ebola's key protein may stop replicationResearchers were able to mutate Viral Protein 40 (VP40) in a way that changed the residues of the protein, blocking the budding and replication of Ebola virus in a model system.
32min
EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Crisis or self-correction: Rethinking how the media cover scienceOne of the recurring media narratives about the nature of science today is that it is 'broken' or 'in crisis.' But an analysis of how the media cover science news argues that generalizations about a crisis in science aren't justified by the available evidence. The essay proposes that those who communicate science, including journalists, scholars and scientists themselves, should more accurately co
32min
EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Plants faring worse than monkeys in increasingly patchy forests of Costa RicaA University of Toronto-led study shows that cattle ranching, agriculture and other human activities breaking up Costa Rican forests into isolated patchy fragments, are causing more problems for native plant populations than for monkey species sharing the same habitat.
32min
EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Response of new cotton variety (rassafa) to nitrogen fertilizerThe Rassafa cotton cultivar is a relatively new variety grown in the dry areas of the Eastern Mediterranean region. Farmers have targeted the higher seed cotton yield and they assume the greater yields would need augmented N fertilizer and water quantity. So, water and nitrogen fertilizer requirements of this new cultivar need to be quantified and optimized.
46min
EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Glass mattersBetter known as glass, silica is a versatile material used in myriad industrial processes, from catalysis and filtration, to chromatography and nanofabrication. Yet despite its ubiquity in labs and cleanrooms, surprisingly little is known about silica's surface interactions with water at a molecular level.
46min
Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

Two behaviors linked to high school dropout ratesThe factors that may lead to a student's decision to leave school are complex, but a new study sheds light on how two behaviors -- aggression and weak study skills -- contribute to the problem.
48min
Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

It's mostly luck, not pluck, that determines lifetime reproductive successCan one seedling, or one female bird, be so superior to the rest that it will inevitably become the 'lucky' one to grow to the sky, or help perpetuate the species? The short answer: No.
48min
Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

Babies fed soy-based formula have changes in reproductive system tissuesInfants who consumed soy-based formula as newborns had differences in some reproductive-system cells and tissues, compared to those who used cow-milk formula or were breastfed, according to a new study. The researchers say the differences, measured in the months after birth, were subtle and not a cause for alarm, but reflect a need to further investigate the long-term effects of exposure to estrog
48min
Popular Science

How about this disease-infested rat weather we're having?Animals It's a beautiful day for bacteria. Rats are more likely to pick up disease-causing bacteria like C. difficile during some kinds of weather than others.
51min
Live Science

Burger-Flipping Robot 'Flippy' On Leave After Doing Its Job Too WellBeing a fry cook isn't as easy as it looks, as a burger-flipping robot named "Flippy" recently discovered.
51min
NYT > Science

Robert Lightfoot, NASA’s Acting Administrator, to Retire as Trump’s Nominee Is StalledMr. Lightfoot has filled in since the end of the Obama administration, and the agency has never gone this long without a leader confirmed by the Senate.
1h
The Atlantic

The Siege of Eastern Ghouta and Seven Years of War in SyriaSyrian Ghouta RussianMore than a thousand people are believed to have been killed in recent weeks as Syrian government forces laid siege to the rebel-controlled region of eastern Ghouta outside the capital of Damascus. The United Nations estimates that 400,000 people still live in the villages and towns in the besieged region, trapped by several rebel groups who won’t let them leave and by Syrian government blockades
1h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News

National Academies review of the draft Fourth National Climate AssessmentThe US Global Change Research Program (USGCRP) asked the National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine to review the draft Fourth National Climate Assessment (NCA4) -- a congressionally mandated report that evaluates the state of climate science and the broad range of impacts of climate change in the United States every four years - and the draft Second State of the Carbon Cycle Report
1h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Polymer nanoparticle shows ability to locate and treat breast tumorsOne major problem in treating cancer is identifying the location of small tumors and treating them before they metastasize.
1h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Researchers issue first-annual sea-level report cardsResearchers are launching new web-based 'report cards' to monitor and forecast changes in sea level at 32 localities along the US coastline from Maine to Alaska. They plan to update the report cards in January of each year, with projections out to the year 2050.
1h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Water troughs are key to E. coli contamination in cattleA major study led by Cornell University College of Veterinary Medicine researchers reveals for the first time that water troughs on farms are a conduit for the spread of toxic E. coli in cattle, which can then spread the pathogen to people through bacteria in feces.
1h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Kansas State University researchers make breakthrough in glyphosate resistance in pigweedsKansas State University researchers have discovered the mechanism by which pigweed develops resistance to glyphosate, a popular herbicide.
1h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News

The Great Recession took a toll on public health, study findsThe Great Recession, spanning 2008 to 2010, was associated with heightened cardiovascular risk factors, including increased blood pressure and glucose levels, according to a new UCLA-led study. The connections were especially pronounced among older homeowners and people still in the work force, two groups that may have been especially vulnerable to the stresses the Recession brought about.
1h
New Scientist - News

Psychopaths pay less attention to what other people are thinkingPsychopaths in films and TV are often masters of manipulation, but in real life they’re not so good at subconsciously registering other people’s perspectives
1h
Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

Water troughs are key to E. coli contamination in cattleA major study reveals for the first time that water troughs on farms are a conduit for the spread of toxic E. coli in cattle, which can then spread the pathogen to people through bacteria in feces.
1h
Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

Elephant declines imperil Africa's forestsPoaching and habitat loss have reduced forest elephant populations in Central Africa by 63 percent since 2001. This poses consequences not only for elephants but also for the region's forests, a new study finds. Without intervention to stop poaching, as much as 96 percent of Central Africa's forests will undergo major changes in tree-species composition and structure as local populations of elepha
1h
Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

Arrested development: Hubble finds relic galaxy close to homeAstronomers have put NASA's Hubble Space Telescope on an Indiana Jones-type quest to uncover an ancient 'relic galaxy' in our own cosmic backyard.
1h
Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

Four kinds of algal toxins found in San Francisco Bay shellfishResearchers monitoring San Francisco Bay for algal toxins have found a surprising array of different toxins in the water and in mussels collected from the bay. Four different classes of toxins, including one produced in freshwater environments, occur regularly throughout the bay, according to a new study.
1h
Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

The Alps are home to more than 3,000 lichensWidely used as biomonitors of air quality, forest health and climate change, lichens play a vital role. However, no overview of their diversity across the emblematic Alps had been provided up until recently, when an international team of lichenologists concluded their 15-year study. Their annotated checklist includes more than 3,000 lichens and presents a long-missed benchmark for scientists study
1h
Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

Patients living longer with Duchenne muscular dystrophy pose new challenge for caregiversDiagnostic and treatment advances are helping patients with Duchenne muscular dystrophy live into their 30s and beyond, raising challenges in such areas as education, vocation, levels of independence, personal relationships, emotional health, and intimacy. To address these shifting circumstances, as well as reflect promising new treatment options, new guidelines aimed at physicians who care for DM
1h
Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

Great Recession still plagues workers with lower lifetime wagesFor displaced workers in Washington state during the Great Recession, earnings dropped suddenly and had still not fully recovered five years later, according to a new article.
1h
Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

Method to grow large single-crystal graphene could advance scalable 2-D materialsA new method to produce large, monolayer single-crystal-like graphene films more than a foot long relies on harnessing a 'survival of the fittest' competition among crystals. The novel technique may open new opportunities for growing the high-quality two-dimensional materials necessary for long-awaited practical applications.
1h
The Atlantic

How Psychopaths See the WorldIt’s a rare person who goes out of their way to spend time with psychopaths, and a rarer one still who repeatedly calls a prison to do so. But after more than a year of meetings and negotiation, Arielle Baskin-Sommers from Yale University finally persuaded a maximum-security prison in Connecticut to let her work with their inmates, and to study those with psychopathic tendencies. Psychopaths, by
1h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News

News from Molecular & Cellular ProteomicsThese are research highlights from Molecular & Cellular Proteomics: proteostasis and cancer in a collagen-deficient skin disease; chemical tools for probing protein glycosylation in T-cell activation
1h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Babies fed soy-based formula have changes in reproductive system tissuesInfants who consumed soy-based formula as newborns had differences in some reproductive-system cells and tissues, compared to those who used cow-milk formula or were breastfed, according to a new study. The researchers say the differences, measured in the months after birth, were subtle and not a cause for alarm, but reflect a need to further investigate the long-term effects of exposure to estrog
1h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News

It's mostly luck, not pluck, that determines lifetime reproductive successCan one seedling, or one female bird, be so superior to the rest that it will inevitably become the 'lucky' one to grow to the sky, or help perpetuate the species? The short answer: No.
1h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Researchers make breakthrough in glyphosate resistance in pigweedsKansas State University researchers have discovered how weeds develop resistance to the popular herbicide glyphosate, a finding that could have broad future implications in agriculture and many other industries.
1h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Forty years of data quantifies benefits of Bt corn adoption across multiple crops for the first timeUniversity of Maryland researchers have pulled together forty years of data to quantify the effects of Bt field corn, a highly marketed and successful genetically engineered technology, in a novel and large-scale collaborative study. Other studies have demonstrated the benefits of Bt corn or cotton adoption on pest management for pests like the European corn borer or cotton bollworm in corn or cot
1h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Genetic prehistory of Iberia differs from central and northern EuropeIn a multidisciplinary study published in PNAS, an international team of researchers combined archaeological, genetic and stable isotope data to encapsulate 4000 years of Iberian biomolecular prehistory.
1h
Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

How to build a better railway -- in (almost) every cell in your bodyNew research shows how a microscopic 'railway' system in our cells can optimize its structure to better suit our bodies' needs.
1h
Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

Would you pay for an Ebola vaccine? Most say yes.Researchers conducted a study during the height of the 2014-2016 Ebola epidemic and found that a majority of participants (59.7 percent) would pay at least $1 for a vaccine.
1h
Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

Mexico's 2017 earthquake emerged from a growing risk zoneUnder Mexico, where the Cocos Plate from the Pacific Ocean slides under the North American Plate, a bending line of hills, created when the seafloor first formed, sits atop a flattened area of subduction. That newly recognized combination, scientists report, has created a fault that likely explains last September's Puebla earthquake, scientists report.
1h
Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

Critical limb ischemia treatment shows no improvement at three monthsPatients with foot ulcers or gangrene who received the experimental drug JVS-100 did not show evidence of faster wound healing, compared with those receiving a placebo.
1h
Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

A revolutionary technique allows to image all the cells in a region of the brainPhysicists and biologists working on research into brain cells have come up with a new, revolutionary microscopy technique which for the first time allows images to be obtained of all the cells within a specified area of living brain tissue.
1h
Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

Riding the (quantum magnetic) waveScientists have shown that an organic-based magnet can carry waves of quantum mechanical magnetization, called magnons, and convert those waves to electrical signals. It's a breakthrough for the field of magnonics (electronic systems that use magnons instead of electrons) because magnons had previously been sent through inorganic materials that are more difficult to handle.
1h
Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

Unlimited capacity in wireless networks with massive MIMOMassive MIMO is an antenna technology that is considered the most promising for future superfast 5G networks, although researchers have until now believed that there is an upper limit for how much data can be transferred. New research has shown that there is no such limit.
1h
Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

Low-dose 'triple pill' lowers blood pressure more than usual careA pill combining low doses of three blood pressure-lowering medications significantly increased the number of patients reaching blood pressure targets compared with usual care, researchers reported.
1h
Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

Trial for gout drug meets primary endpoint, raises safetyFebuxostat, a gout drug that has been in use for nearly a decade, was found to significantly increase the risk of death, even though it did not raise the risk of the trial's primary endpoint, a combined rate of fatal and nonfatal adverse cardiovascular events, according to new research.
1h
Popular Science

The best weather for hitting a home run, according to scientistsScience Factors like temperature and humidity have a real impact on your ability to hit a homer. Did you know that warm weather makes for better baseball? A ball’s trajectory is affected by other conditions, too, including humidity, altitude, and wind speed.
1h
NYT > Science

Trilobites: Here’s a Newly Discovered Difference Between Alligators and CrocodilesMany differences between the two reptiles center on their heads and mouths, but researchers in Japan have found features in their limbs that set them apart.
1h
Big Think

Self-obsession is creating a neurotic culture. Can we fix this?In his latest book, Selfie, Will Storr explores the history of self-obsession, and wonders how we can fix it. Read More
1h
Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

Researchers discover structure of protein associated with inflammation, Parkinson'sNew findings open the door to developing new treatments for a wide range of illnesses, from heart disease, diabetes and cancer to neurodegenerative disorders, including Parkinson's disease.
1h
Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

Genetic heart diseases cause fewer SIDS deaths than previously thought, study findsGenetic mutations linked to heart disease have been considered a leading cause of sudden infant death syndrome, but a new study finds they are to blame for far fewer SIDS deaths than previously thought. The findings are opening new lines of inquiry into possible causes of the syndrome and may help prevent unnecessary genetic testing of surviving family members.
1h
Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

CRISPR helps find new genetic suspects behind ALS/FTDResearchers used the gene editing tool CRISPR to rapidly identify genes in the human genome that might modify the severity of amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS) and frontotemporal dementia (FTD) caused by mutations in a gene called C9orf72. The results of the search uncovered a new set of genes that may hasten neuron death during the disease.
1h
Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

A milestone in petahertz electronicsIn a semiconductor, electrons can be excited by absorbing laser light. Advances during the past decade enabled measuring this fundamental physical mechanism on timescales below a femtosecond. Now physicists have resolved the response of electrons in gallium arsenide at the attosecond timescale, and gained unexpected insights for future ultrafast opto-electronic devices with operation frequencies i
1h
Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

Calcium testing in coronary arteries better way to predict heart attacks than stress testing aloneResearchers have found that incorporating underused, but available, imaging technologies more precisely predicts who's at risk for heart attacks and similar threats -- in time to prevent them.
1h
Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

Why babies need to move in the wombBiological signals that direct the development of bone and cartilage at specific skeletal locations are stimulated by movement in the womb. More work will also build knowledge around the exact movements that are needed, which may help diagnose problems earlier and suggest how clinicians may compensate for natural movements if required.
1h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Two behaviors linked to high school dropout ratesThe factors that may lead to a student's decision to leave school are complex, but a new study from the University of Georgia sheds light on how two behaviors -- aggression and weak study skills -- contribute to the problem.
1h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Elephant declines imperil Africa's forestsPoaching and habitat loss have reduced forest elephant populations in Central Africa by 63 percent since 2001. This poses consequences not only for elephants but also for the region's forests, a Duke University study finds. Without intervention to stop poaching, as much as 96 percent of Central Africa's forests will undergo major changes in tree-species composition and structure as local populatio
1h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News

NASA finds strongest storms in newly formed Tropical Cyclone 13PInfrared satellite data showed Tropical Cyclone 13P quickly developed powerful storms with very cold cloud top temperatures. NASA's Aqua satellite analyzed the system in infrared light to determine where its strongest storms were located.
1h
Feed: All Latest

VHacks: Inside the Vatican's First-Ever HackathonThis is the Holy See of the 21st century.
1h
Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

Key step in viral replicationResearchers showed how a common virus hijacks a host cell's protein to assemble new viruses.
1h
Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

A game changer: Metagenomic clustering powered by supercomputersResearchers took one of the most popular clustering approaches in modern biology -- Markov Clustering algorithm -- and modified it to run efficiently and at scale on supercomputers. Their algorithm achieved a previously impossible feat: clustering a 70 million node and 68 billion edge biological network in hours.
1h
Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

Humans behind majority of raptor deaths in Ontario, CanadaResearchers found that a majority of raptor deaths are due to trauma and starvation caused by urban expansion and other types of anthropogenic landscape alterations.
1h
Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

Study yields more than a million new cyclic compounds, some with pharmaceutical potentialResearchers say they can now produce a vast library of unique cyclic compounds, some with the capacity to interrupt specific protein-protein interactions that play a role in disease. The new compounds have cyclic structures that give them stability and enhance their ability to bind to their targets.
1h
Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

Holography approach improves heads up displays for planes and carsHeads-up displays are transparent devices used in airplanes and cars to provide information such as critical flight data or driving directions on the windshield. An innovative holography-based approach could soon make these heads-up displays much easier to see with a large eye box.
1h
Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

Study tackles neuroscience claims to have disproved 'free will'For several decades, some researchers have argued that neuroscience studies prove human actions are driven by external stimuli -- that the brain is reactive and free will is an illusion. But a new analysis of these studies shows that many contained methodological inconsistencies and conflicting results.
1h
Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

Painting a clear picture of how nitrogen oxides are formedFor decades, combustion researchers and engine companies have been seeking to understand how these gases are produced during combustion so that they can find ways to reduce them. Now researchers have synthesized more than a decade's worth of combustion studies to create a new overarching model of how nitrogen oxides are produced.
1h
Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

The occurrence of magnetism in the universeFlows of molten metal can generate magnetic fields. This so-called dynamo effect creates cosmic magnetic fields, like those found on planets, moons and even asteroids. Over the coming years, a globally unique Experiment is intended to demonstrate this effect.
1h
Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

Brown adipose tissue made transparentBrown adipose tissue has played a key role in prevention research since its presence was first documented in adults. However, there was no non-invasive method of measuring its heat generation. A team has now succeeded in making the activity of brown adipose tissue visible without injecting substances.
1h
Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

Using artificial intelligence to investigate illegal wildlife trade on social mediaIllegal wildlife trade is one of the biggest threats to biodiversity conservation and is currently expanding to social media. This is a worrisome trend, given the ease of access and popularity of social media. Efficient monitoring of illegal wildlife trade on social media is therefore crucial for conserving biodiversity.
1h
Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

Early warning system for deadly amphibian pathogenEnvironmental DNA is a new technology that detects telltale bits of genetic material that living creatures shed into their environment. Scientists demonstrate for the first time that it can be used to detect the presence of a deadly pathogen before it wipes out populations of amphibians.
1h
Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

Dengue fever linked to increased risk of strokeA new study has found that people with dengue fever have a higher risk of stroke, especially in the first 2 months following infection.
1h
Science | The Guardian

The Guardian view on nuclear fusion: a moment of truth | EditorialUntil recently the attractions and drawbacks of nuclear fusion reactors were largely theoretical. Within a decade this will not be the case One of the cliches of nuclear power research is that a commercial fusion reactor is only ever a few decades away – and always will be. So claims that the technology is on the “brink of being realised” by scientists at the Massachusetts Institute of Technology
2h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Arrested development: Hubble finds relic galaxy close to homeAstronomers have put NASA's Hubble Space Telescope on an Indiana Jones-type quest to uncover an ancient 'relic galaxy' in our own cosmic backyard.
2h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Genetic heart diseases cause fewer SIDS deaths than previously thought, study findsGenetic mutations linked to heart disease have been considered a leading cause of sudden infant death syndrome, but a new study by Mayo Clinic, British and Danish researchers finds they are to blame for far fewer SIDS deaths than previously thought. The findings are opening new lines of inquiry into possible causes of the syndrome and may help prevent unnecessary genetic testing of surviving famil
2h
New Scientist - News

Daft male spiders prefer females who are more likely to eat themFemale brown widow spiders become less fertile as they age, and more likely to kill and eat their mates – yet males still prefer them over younger females
2h
Popular Science

Last week in tech: Listen to our new podcastTechnology Check out some fancy new cars, Samsung's new TVs, and our experimental podcast. We're talking tech—literally.
2h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News

NASA-NOAA's Suomi NPP Satellite sees Tropical Cyclone Hola dissipatingWhen NASA-NOAA's Suomi NPP satellite passed over the South Pacific Ocean it captured a visible image of Tropical Cyclone Hola being torn apart by wind shear.
2h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News

How to build a better railway -- in (almost) every cell in your bodyNew work from the University of Warwick shows how a microscopic 'railway' system in our cells can optimise its structure to better suit bodies' needs.
2h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News

The changing voices of North Atlantic right whalesResearchers have found that right whale calls, much like human voices, change as individuals age. In a study recently published in Animal Behaviour, scientists examined 986 high-quality calls from 49 individual North Atlantic right whales of known ages spanning from 1 month to 37 years. Calls made by whales younger than 1 year were shorter and less structured than adult sounds. As the animals matu
2h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News

A milestone in petahertz electronicsIn a semiconductor, electrons can be excited by absorbing laser light. Advances during the past decade enabled measuring this fundamental physical mechanism on timescales below a femtosecond (10^-15 s). Now physicists at ETH Zurich for the first time resolved the response of electrons in gallium arsenide at the attosecond (10^-18 s) timescale, and gained unexpected insights for future ultrafast op
2h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News

SLU researchers discover structure of protein associated with inflammation, Parkinson'sThe findings open the door to developing new treatments for a wide range of illnesses, from heart disease, diabetes and cancer to neurodegenerative disorders, including Parkinson's disease.
2h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News

What if we could predict when an athlete was going to be injured?Athletic performance isn't the only casualty of sports injuries. These injuries pose economic burdens on athletes and their families and can have long-lasting effects on an athlete's quality of life. To help reduce the risk of injury, researchers at the University of Tennessee Chattanooga have developed a framework that measures an athlete's risk of injury using Internet of Things (IoT) technology
2h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Gerontologists tackle social isolation, increasingly a public health concernSocial connectivity and meaningful social engagement must be promoted as integral components of healthy aging, according to a new collection of articles in the latest issue of Public Policy & Aging Report (PP&AR) from The Gerontological Society of America (GSA). Several authors also detail a series of initiatives that, if replicated, hold promise for decreasing isolation among older adults.
2h
Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

Modern humans flourished through ancient supervolcano eruption 74,000 years agoEarly modern humans living in South Africa around 74,000 years ago prospered through the cataclysmic eruption of the Toba supervolcano in Sumatra. The Toba eruption was one of the Earth's most explosive volcanic events. The environmental effects of this event have been heavily debated, with some researchers having previously proposed that the eruption led to a worldwide volcanic winter that devast
2h
Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

Computers discover compounds that could reduce Listeria's virulenceResearchers have pinpointed new compounds that may be effective in containing the virulence -- or ability to produce disease -- of Listeria, a well-known bacterium that can cause severe food poisoning and even death.
2h
Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

Brain is less flexible than we thought when learningNobody really knows how the activity in your brain reorganizes as you learn new tasks, but new research reveals that the brain has various mechanisms and constraints by which it reorganizes its neural activity when learning over the course of a few hours. The new research finds that, when learning a new task, the brain is less flexible than previously thought.
2h
Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

Eliminating cost barriers helps heart patients comply with drug regimensDoctors often cite the high price of a prescription drug as a reason they don't prescribe it, while patients similarly say that cost is a main reason they quit taking a drug. Removing this financial barrier might increase the use of evidence-based therapies, improve patient adherence to those medications, and potentially save lives.
2h
Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

Worldwide study triples number of known genetic risk factors for strokeThe largest genetic study of stroke to date triples the number of known genetic risk factors for the disease and also should enable researchers to find novel treatments for dementia.
2h
Scientific American Content: Global

The Magic (and Math) of Skating on Thin Ice without Falling InCongelation ice, unlike “snow ice,” grows slowly downward from the surface of a calm lake in a vertical, column-like fashion with horizontal interlocking grains -- Read more on ScientificAmerican.com
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Serotonin Involved in a Slug Hosts Response to a ParasiteHost slugs given Prozac to increase their serotonin levels no longer avoid parasitic nematodes, the same behavior seen in infected slugs.
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Science | The Guardian

Rosalind Franklin plaque can inspire women scientists | Brief lettersSites of scientific discoveries | Alf Tupper | Pyrgic puzzles | Geological mnemonics | Paralympics I enjoyed Brian Cox’s lively tour of sites of scientific discoveries ( Travel , 10 March), but there was a glaring omission. The Eagle pub in Cambridge also has a plaque to Rosalind Franklin, a woman who played a significant part in the discovery of the structure of DNA. Young women scientists need t
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Viden

Elon Musk: Vores Mars-raket flyver allerede næste årSpaceXs enorme Mars-raket med tilnavnet "Big Fucking Rocket" er ifølge stifteren klar til testflyvning i 2019. Der er tale om en testmodel, vurderer DTU-forsker.
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New on MIT Technology Review

Delivery option: drone. Arrival estimate: sooner than you might think.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Google under fire over anti-Semitic search results in SwedenGoogle on Monday said it was taking measures to address criticism against the internet giant for allowing the spread of anti-Semitic propaganda through various search results, which had triggered outrage in Sweden.
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Science | The Guardian

Polls as accurate as they have ever been, study saysCrisis? What crisis? New analysis shows polling accuracy has been stable over the decades – and might even have improved It seemed to be a hat trick of polling catastrophes : Brexit, the 2016 US presidential election and the 2017 British general election. But researchers now say that despite popular perceptions, polls are as accurate as they have ever been. They say a new analysis of political po
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News

CRISPR helps find new genetic suspects behind ALS/FTDNIH-funded researchers used the gene editing tool CRISPR to rapidly identify genes in the human genome that might modify the severity of amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS) and frontotemporal dementia (FTD) caused by mutations in a gene called C9orf72. The results of the search uncovered a new set of genes that may hasten neuron death during the disease.
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Stroke research: 32 hitsResearchers have analyzed genetic data from half a million subjects in a search to identify the underlying causes of stroke, a complex vascular disease. Scientists at Ludwig-Maximilians-Universitaet (LMU) in Munich led the the huge collaborative Project.
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New on MIT Technology Review

A $4,000 3-D printed home still has some big barriers to overcome
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Researchers identify key step in viral replicationPitt and UPMC researchers showed how a common virus hijacks a host cell's protein to assemble new viruses.
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Worldwide study triples number of known genetic risk factors for strokeThe largest genetic study of stroke to date triples the number of known genetic risk factors for the disease and also should enable researchers to find novel treatments for dementia. The study team included Sudha Seshadri, M.D., of the Glenn Biggs Institute for Alzheimer's & Neurodegenerative Diseases at UT Health San Antonio.
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News

New link between obesity and body temperatureReduced ability to maintain body temperature in colder environments may contribute to the development of obesity in adulthood, suggests a new study in mice published in JNeurosci.
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Will run for methThe brain regions activated in anticipation of methamphetamine are identified in a noninvasive study of male mice published in eNeuro.
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Live Science

Quantum Physicists Doubled the Information Speed Limit of the UniverseA team of quantum physicists has busted the limit on how fast information can move through the universe.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Pre-election polls not becoming less reliable: studyPre-election polls are not becoming less reliable, said a study Monday addressing public distrust stemming from surprise results in Britain's 2015 general election and the 2016 US presidential vote.
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New Scientist - News

$10m prize to let you feel what a distant robot is feelingX Prize Foundation P. DiamandisThe latest XPrize competition wants to develop technology that lets anyone control a robot and carry out tasks from 100 kilometres away
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Researchers identify key step in viral replicationViruses are intracellular parasites that cause disease by infecting the cells in the body and, in a study published today in Nature Microbiology, researchers at Children's Hospital of Pittsburgh of UPMC and the University of Pittsburgh School of Medicine showed how a common virus hijacks a host cell's protein to help assemble new viruses before they are released. The findings increase our understa
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Broadcom speeds HQ move to US amid security reviewSingapore-based chipmaker Broadcom said Monday that it would complete moving its headquarters to the United States by April 3, ahead of a planned shareholder vote by takeover target Qualcomm.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Great Recession still plagues workers with lower lifetime wagesLosing a job often leads to lower earnings that stretch long beyond the time of unemployment. Yet it's hard to know exactly what causes these lower lifetime earnings.
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cognitive science

Good for the Heart, Good for the Brain: For Alzheimer's, Lifestyle Matters Too.submitted by /u/therealitywas [link] [comments]
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New Scientist - News

Found: more than 500 genes that are linked to intelligenceIntelligence is thought to be up to 80 per cent genetic, but it’s been hard to pin down the genes involved. Now the largest study of its kind has found hundreds
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Science | The Guardian

Did you solve it? The Pi Day party starts hereGather round for the solutions to today’s puzzles In my puzzle blog earlier today I set you three pi-flavoured puzzles. 1. Move one matchstick below to make the equation approximately correct Continue reading...
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Mexico's 2017 earthquake emerged from a growing risk zoneUnder Mexico, where the Cocos Plate from the Pacific Ocean slides under the North American Plate, a bending line of hills, created when the seafloor first formed, sits atop a flattened area of subduction.
3h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

James Webb Observatory prepares for additional testingEngineers removed the combined optics and science instruments of NASA's James Webb Space Telescope from their shipping container in a high bay at Northrop Grumman Aerospace Systems in Redondo Beach, California, on March 8, signaling the next step in the observatory's integration and testing.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

The Alps are home to more than 3,000 lichensHistorically, the Alps have always played an emblematic role, being one of the largest continuous natural areas in Europe. With its numerous habitats, the mountain system is easily one of the richest biodiversity hotspots in Europe.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Humans behind majority of raptor deaths in Ontario, study findsHuman encroachment is the leading cause of death among Ontario's at-risk birds of prey, according to a first-ever University of Guelph study.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Four kinds of algal toxins found in San Francisco Bay shellfishResearchers monitoring San Francisco Bay for algal toxins have found a surprising array of different toxins in the water and in mussels collected from the bay. Four different classes of toxins, including one produced in freshwater environments, occur regularly throughout the bay, according to a study led by UC Santa Cruz researchers and published March 10 in Harmful Algae.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Computers discover compounds that could reduce Listeria's virulenceIn a proof-of-concept study, researchers from North Carolina State University have pinpointed new compounds that may be effective in containing the virulence—or ability to produce disease - of Listeria, a well-known bacterium that can cause severe food poisoning and even death.
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Dana Foundation

2018 Brain Awareness Impact StoriesToday is the first day of Brain Awareness Week and we couldn’t be more thrilled with our partners’ commitment to educating the public about the importance of brain research in our daily lives. Earlier this year, we spotlighted three exceptional partners on our blog , and now the International Brain Research Organization (IBRO) is doing something similar. This week, they’ll feature “Brain Awarenes
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Large-scale genetic study provides new insight into the causes of strokeThe largest genetic study of stroke so far has identified 22 new genetic risk factors, tripling the number of gene regions known to affect stroke risk.
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Moderate Facebook use promotes happiness in adults with Autism spectrum disorderAmong adults with autism spectrum disorder (ASD), a new study has shown that those who use Facebook, in moderation, are happier than those who do not.
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Great Recession still plagues workers with lower lifetime wagesFor displaced workers in Washington state during the Great Recession, earnings dropped suddenly and had still not fully recovered five years later, according to a working paper by labor economists at Princeton University, Michigan State University and the W.E. Upjohn Institute for Employment Research.
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Scientific American Content: Global

Toxic Spill in the Navajo NationA new film highlights the efforts of a Diné hydrologist to protect sacred waters -- Read more on ScientificAmerican.com
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New Scientist - News

Start-up accused of launching mini satellites without permissionIn what seems to be the first unauthorised satellite launch, a start-up company may have sent four tiny - and potentially dangerous – satellites into space
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News

A game changer: Metagenomic clustering powered by supercomputersBerkeley Lab and Joint Genome Institute researchers took one of the most popular clustering approaches in modern biology -- Markov Clustering algorithm -- and modified it to run efficiently and at scale on supercomputers. Their algorithm achieved a previously impossible feat: clustering a 70 million node and 68 billion edge biological network in hours.
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Mexico well ahead of US in LGBT rightsCaroline Beer has spent her career researching comparative data between Latin American countries and the United States that often debunks false stereotypes. Her latest study showing Mexico as more progressive than the US when it comes to LGBT rights, especially in the recognition of same-sex relationships, is no exception.
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Children's Colorado experts find surgery promising option for severely obese adolescentsWhen a bariatric surgeon and an endocrinologist specializing in diabetes examined the effectiveness of medical versus surgical management of type 2 diabetes in adolescents, the results of the surgical intervention proved to be promising.
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Scientists find treasure trove of 110 genes linked to breast cancerScientists have linked 110 genes to an increased risk of breast cancer in the most comprehensive study ever to unpick the genetics of the disease.Their study used a pioneering genetic technique to analyse maps of DNA regions linked to an inherited risk of breast cancer and identify the actual genes involved in raising a woman's risk.Researchers also linked 32 of the new genes to the length of time
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News

NASA's James Webb Observatory prepares for additional testingEngineers removed the combined optics and science instruments of NASA's James Webb Space Telescope from their shipping container in a high bay at Northrop Grumman Aerospace Systems in Redondo Beach, California, on March 8, signaling the next step in the observatory's integration and testing.
3h
Scientific American Content: Global

EPA Youth Advisors Urge Agency to Act on Climate ChangeDraft report recommends ways to engage young people on climate and environmental justice -- Read more on ScientificAmerican.com
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Computers discover compounds that could reduce Listeria's virulenceResearchers from North Carolina State University have pinpointed new compounds that may be effective in containing the virulence -- or ability to produce disease -- of Listeria, a well-known bacterium that can cause severe food poisoning and even death.
4h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News

cfaed researchers of TU Dresden uncover doping in organic semiconductorsA group of physicists from the cfaed at TU Dresden, together with researchers from Japan, were able to demonstrate in a study how the doping of organic semiconductors can be simulated and experimentally verified. The study has now been published in Nature Materials.
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Four kinds of algal toxins found in San Francisco Bay shellfishResearchers monitoring San Francisco Bay for algal toxins have found a surprising array of different toxins in the water and in mussels collected from the bay. Four different classes of toxins, including one produced in freshwater environments, occur regularly throughout the bay, according to a study led by UC Santa Cruz researchers.
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News

New CMU and Pitt research finds the brain is less flexible than we thought when learningNobody really knows how the activity in your brain reorganizes as you learn new tasks, but new research from Carnegie Mellon University and the University of Pittsburgh reveals that the brain has various mechanisms and constraints by which it reorganizes its neural activity when learning over the course of a few hours. The new research finds that, when learning a new task, the brain is less flexib
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Modern humans flourished through ancient supervolcano eruption 74,000 years agoEarly modern humans living in South Africa around 74,000 years ago prospered through the cataclysmic eruption of the Toba supervolcano in Sumatra. The Toba eruption was one of the Earth's most explosive volcanic events. The environmental effects of this event have been heavily debated, with some researchers having previously proposed that the eruption led to a worldwide volcanic winter that devast
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Riding the (quantum magnetic) waveWorking together, Miller, Boehme, Vardeny and their colleagues have shown that an organic-based magnet can carry waves of quantum mechanical magnetization, called magnons, and convert those waves to electrical signals. It's a breakthrough for the field of magnonics (electronic systems that use magnons instead of electrons) because magnons had previously been sent through inorganic materials that a
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News

In the eye of the medulloblastomaCan genes normally expressed only in the eye be activated in brain tumors? Such a phenomenon, though surprising, has been observed in certain types of medulloblastoma, pediatric tumors of the cerebellum. Researchers from the CNRS, Institut Curie, Inserm and Université Paris-Sud, together with colleagues at St. Jude Children's Research Hospital, have pinpointed the role of these genes in the tumor
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Turning off autophagy helps chemotherapy stress cancer cells to deathA University of Colorado Cancer Center study published March 12 in the journal Developmental Cell suggests inhibiting molecule FOXO3a could increase effectiveness of autophagy-inhibitors, which have shown promise but little success in clinical practice.
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Study: Autism's social deficits are reversed by an anti-cancer drugNew research at the University at Buffalo reveals the first evidence that it may be possible to use a single compound to alleviate the behavioral symptoms of autism spectrum disorder by targeting sets of genes involved in the disease.
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Method to grow large single-crystal graphene could advance scalable 2-D materialsA new method to produce large, monolayer single-crystal-like graphene films more than a foot long relies on harnessing a 'survival of the fittest' competition among crystals. The novel technique, developed by a team led by the Department of Energy's Oak Ridge National Laboratory, may open new opportunities for growing the high-quality two-dimensional materials necessary for long-awaited practical
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Humans thrived in South Africa through the Toba super-volcanic eruption ~ 74,000 years agoNew research describes finding glass shards from a volcanic eruption at two archaeological sites in coastal South Africa, tracing those shards to Mount Toba in Indonesia through chemical fingerprinting and documenting a continuous human occupation across the volcanic event.
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News

New treatment for aggressive breast cancerApproximately 10-15 percent of breast cancer cases do not respond to treatment with hormone therapy, which means that they are more aggressive and often recur. An international research team led by researchers at Lund University in Sweden has uncovered a way to treat these aggressive tumors through manipulation of the connective tissue cells of the tumor. The researchers are now developing a new d
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Investigators identify neural circuit, genetic 'switch' that maintain memory precisionInvestigators from the Massachusetts General Hospital (MGH) Center for Regenerative Medicine and the Harvard Stem Cell Institute (HSCI) have identified a neural circuit mechanism involved in preserving the specificity of memories and a genetic 'switch' that can slow down memory generalization -- the loss of specific details over time that occurs in both age-related memory impairment and in post-tr
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Parenting stress associated with epigenetic differences in African American mothersParenting can be stressful - and this stress may be influencing the DNA methylation of African American mothers, finds a new study led by NYU Rory Meyers College of Nursing published in the Journal of Clinical and Translational Science.
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BBC News - Science & Environment

Microplastics are 'littering' riverbedsMicroplastic particles contaminate the riverbeds throughout the UK, research suggests.
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Inside Science

Biodiversity in the Oceans Exploded After Dinosaurs FellBiodiversity in the Oceans Exploded After Dinosaurs Fell New genetic analysis suggests that major groups of fish species arose in the 10 million years after dinosaurs disappeared. ReefFish_topNteaser.jpg Image credits: NOAA's National Ocean Service Rights information: Public Domain Creature Monday, March 12, 2018 - 12:00 Charles Q. Choi, Contributor (Inside Science) -- It has long been known that
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New Scientist - News

Election polling accuracy has not improved since the 1940sFailure to predict Brexit and Trump has created a crisis for the polling industry, but actually errors in election polls have stayed the same over the past 75 years
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New Scientist - News

Polar melt may shut down the Atlantic current that warms EuropeMelting Arctic ice flooding into the Atlantic could put the ocean circulation that warms Europe in danger, triggering dramatic sea-level rise and drought
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Science : NPR

Do Backyard Chickens Need More Rules?Drawn in by fresh eggs, or the possibility of feathered friends, people continue to flock toward backyard chickens. One researcher wonders if local laws are doing enough to keep people and birds safe. (Image credit: Emma Baker/Getty Images )
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New on MIT Technology Review

Peep this: The grabby robots keeping your Easter candy unsquished
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NYT > Science

Trilobites: After a Volcano’s Ancient Supereruption, Humanity May Have ThrivedSome said the Toba volcano’s explosion brought humanity to the brink of extinction 74,000 years ago, but archaeological evidence from South Africa challenges the idea.
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Latest Headlines | Science News

We probably won’t hear from aliens. But by the time we do, they’ll be dead.Astronomers build on the Drake Equation to probe the chance that humans will find existing aliens. The answer: Not likely.
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New on MIT Technology Review

Amazon wants to put Alexa in the workplace
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Quanta Magazine

Why the Tiny Weight of Empty Space Is Such a Huge MysteryThe controversial idea that our universe is just a random bubble in an endless, frothing multiverse arises logically from nature’s most innocuous-seeming feature: empty space. Specifically, the seed of the multiverse hypothesis is the inexplicably tiny amount of energy infused in empty space — energy known as the vacuum energy, dark energy or the cosmological constant. Each cubic meter of empty s
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Ingeniøren

Havisen i Arktis sætter ny bundrekordJanuar og februar har været præget af høj temperatur, mærkeligt vejrfænomen og tynd is.
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Ingeniøren

DTU-rektor: Vi lader os ikke diktereRegeringens uddannelsesudvalg vil skære ned på antallet af uddannelser på opfordring fra erhvervslivet. Uddannelsesministeren bakker op, men studerende og rektor på DTU påpeger, at specialiseringen i samfundet kalder på mange forskellige uddannelsesretninger.
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Mexico's 2017 earthquake emerged from a growing risk zoneUnder Mexico, where the Cocos Plate from the Pacific Ocean slides under the North American Plate, a bending line of hills, created when the seafloor first formed, sits atop a flattened area of subduction. That newly recognized combination, scientists report, has created a fault that likely explains last September's Puebla earthquake, scientists report.
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Humans behind majority of raptor deaths in Ontario, study findsUniversity of Guelph researchers found that a majority of raptor deaths are due to trauma and starvation caused by urban expansion and other types of anthropogenic landscape alterations.
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News

A revolutionary technique allows to image all the cells in a region of the brainAn interdisciplinary group of physicists and biologists working on research into brain cells have come up with a new, revolutionary microscopy technique which for the first time allows images to be obtained of all the cells within a specified area of living brain tissue.
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News

The Alps are home to more than 3,000 lichensWidely used as biomonitors of air quality, forest health and climate change, lichens play a vital role. However, no overview of their diversity across the emblematic Alps had been provided up until recently, when an international team of lichenologists concluded their 15-year study with a publication in the open access journal MycoKeys. Their annotated checklist includes more than 3,000 lichens an
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Patients living longer with Duchenne muscular dystrophy pose new challenge for caregiversDiagnostic and treatment advances are helping patients with Duchenne muscular dystrophy live into their 30s and beyond, raising challenges in such areas as education, vocation, levels of independence, personal relationships, emotional health, and intimacy. To address these shifting circumstances, as well as reflect promising new treatment options, new guidelines aimed at physicians who care for DM
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Researchers find bone density scans can also help identify cardiovascular diseaseResearchers from Hebrew SeniorLife's Institute for Aging Research, University of Western Australia, University of Sydney, and Edith Cowan University have discovered that bone density scans, typically used to determine fracture risk, could also be an aid in identifying cardiovascular disease. The study was recently published in the Journal of Bone and Mineral Research.
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Feed: All Latest

Maybe Election Poll Predictions Aren't Broken After AllAn analysis of polls from 32 countries since 1942 finds that they are no more—or less—accurate at predicting election winners than they used to be.
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The Atlantic

Supervolcano Goes Boom. Humans Go Meh?Around 74,000 years ago, the Toba supervolcano erupted on the Indonesian island of Sumatra. It was the biggest volcanic eruption of the last 2 million years, unleashing 2,800 cubic kilometers of magma. That’s enough to bury the entire United States in a foot-thick layer of ash and rock. In the 1990s, several scientists argued that Toba’s unprecedented outburst radically changed the world’s climat
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Method to grow large single-crystal graphene could advance scalable 2-D materialsA new method to produce large, monolayer single-crystal-like graphene films more than a foot long relies on harnessing a "survival of the fittest" competition among crystals. The novel technique, developed by a team led by the Department of Energy's Oak Ridge National Laboratory, may open new opportunities for growing the high-quality two-dimensional materials necessary for long-awaited practical
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Riding the (quantum magnetic) wave—Next-generation electronics one leap closer to realityIn 1991, University of Utah chemist Joel Miller developed the first magnet with carbon-based, or organic, components that was stable at room temperature. It was a great advance in magnetics, and he's been exploring the applications ever since.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Humans thrived in South Africa through the Toba super-volcanic eruption about 74,000 years agoImagine a year in Africa that summer never arrives. The sky takes on a gray hue during the day and glows red at night. Flowers do not bloom. Trees die in the winter. Large mammals like antelope become thin, starve and provide little fat to the predators (carnivores and human hunters) that depend on them. Then, this same disheartening cycle repeats itself, year after year. This is a picture of life
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New Scientist - News

Being in a relationship really does seem to make you fatterA massive study has found that couples tend to have healthier lifestyles than single people, but that doesn’t stop them from piling on the pounds
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NYT > Science

Why Studying Gun Violence MattersWhy do so many Americans kill one another, and how can the violence be stopped? The C.D.C. quit studying these and other questions over 20 years ago.
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Heart attack risk increases with six-month dual antiplatelet therapyThe combined rate of death from any cause, heart attack or stroke within 18 months was not significantly different in patients with acute coronary syndrome (ACS) who were randomly assigned to receive dual antiplatelet therapy (DAPT) for either six months or at least 12 months after receiving a drug-eluting stent.
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Trial bolsters evidence in favor of closing hole in heart after strokeAmong people with a type of hole in the heart, known as patent foramen ovale (PFO), those who received a medical device to close this opening after a stroke fared better after two years compared with those who received stroke-preventing medications alone.
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Critical limb ischemia treatment shows no improvement at three monthsPatients with foot ulcers or gangrene who received the experimental drug JVS-100 did not show evidence of faster wound healing, compared with those receiving a placebo, in a study presented at the American College of Cardiology's 67th Annual Scientific Session.
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Big Think

99% match: Forensic anthropologists may have solved the Amelia Earhart mysteryLooks like we finally know some answers that they didn't in 1940. Read More
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Shhh! How to stream March Madness when the boss isn't aroundMarch Madness begins Tuesday. And that may mean strategizing to sneak in some games when the boss isn't looking.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Painting a clear picture of how nitrogen oxides are formedNitrogen oxides (NOx) are some of the most significant pollutants in our atmosphere—they contribute to the formation of smog, acid rain and ground-level ozone. Because of this, combustion researchers and engine companies have been working since the 1980s to understand how these gases are produced during combustion so that they can find ways to reduce them.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Holography approach improves heads up displays for planes and carsHeads-up displays are transparent devices used in airplanes and cars to provide information such as critical flight data or driving directions on the windshield. An innovative holography-based approach could soon make these heads-up displays much easier to see with a large eye box.
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Big Think

Elon Musk at SXSW: SpaceX will 'do short trips’ to Mars by 2019Elon Musk MarsIn 2017, SpaceX announced plans to send a cargo mission to Mars by 2022. But Elon Musk said the company's BFR could be ready to make the journey sooner. Read More
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Would you pay for an Ebola vaccine? Most say yes.George Mason University researchers conducted a study during the height of the 2014-2016 Ebola epidemic and found that a majority of participants (59.7 percent) would pay at least $1 for a vaccine.
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Study identifies 76 quality indicators essential for emergency care systems in AfricaThe need for emergency care in low-income and middle-income countries has never been greater, but until now, measurable indicators for providing this care have been lacking. A new study fills this gap, identifying 76 quality indicators for emergency care for use in critical care facilities in Africa. The study findings are the first to formalize clinical quality indicators for emergency care in Af
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News

The occurrence of magnetism in the universeFlows of molten metal can generate magnetic fields. This so-called dynamo effect creates cosmic magnetic fields, like those found on planets, moons and even asteroids. Over the coming years, a globally unique Experiment is intended to demonstrate this effect. It will be carried out in the new DRESDYN facility at the Helmholtz-Zentrum Dresden-Rossendorf (HZDR), an independent German research labora
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Drug stops dangerous bleeding in patients taking factor Xa inhibitorsThe experimental drug andexanet was associated with control of serious bleeding in patients taking a common class of anticoagulants known as Factor Xa inhibitors, according to interim clinical trial results presented at the American College of Cardiology's 67th Annual Scientific Session. Millions of patients take Factor Xa inhibitors, which elevate the risk of serious bleeding.
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Painting a clear picture of how nitrogen oxides are formedFor decades, combustion researchers and engine companies have been seeking to understand how these gases are produced during combustion so that they can find ways to reduce them. Now Argonne researchers have synthesized more than a decade's worth of combustion studies to create a new overarching model of how nitrogen oxides are produced.
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Are adolescents with mental health conditions more likely to receive opioids?Adolescents with a wide range of preexisting mental health conditions and treatments were more likely to progress from an initial opioid prescription to long-term opioid therapy than adolescents without those conditions, although long-term opioid therapy was uncommon overall.
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Association of excessive daytime sleepiness in older adults and biomarker of Alzheimer's diseaseExcessive daytime sleepiness in a group of older adults without dementia was associated with increased accumulation of a brain protein that is an important biomarker for Alzheimer's disease.
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Science | The Guardian

Elon Musk: we must colonise Mars to preserve our species after a third world war – videoHumans must prioritise the colonisation of Mars so the species can survive in the event of a third world war, the SpaceX and Tesla founder, Elon Musk , said on Sunday. 'It’s important to get a self-sustaining base on Mars because it’s far enough away from Earth that [in the event of a war] it’s more likely to survive than a moon base,” Musk said on stage at SXSW. It came days after Donald Trump a
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Popular Science

The shape of your city could determine how hot it gets at nightNexus Media News New York City is a crystal, but Boston is a liquid. New research shows urban heat island varies according to city layout.
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The Atlantic

The Zombie Cheer of the Revived American IdolThis post contains spoilers for the premiere episode of American Idol . So much about ABC’s reboot of American Idol seems, from the outside, cynical. It was only two years ago that the one-time TV juggernaut delivered its supposedly final goodbye after 15 seasons on Fox. ABC bought the rights and promptly undug the show’s fresh grave, hiring Katy Perry as anchor judge for a reported $25 million,
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Scientific American Content: Global

New Tech Options are Helping Seniors Age in PlaceSystems that offer reminders and assistance are creating “monitored independence” -- Read more on ScientificAmerican.com
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New on MIT Technology Review

Farmland gene editors want cows without horns, pigs without tails, and business without regulationsThe lobbying effort to get the FDA out of the way of biotech animals is under way.
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Dagens Medicin

Udredningsretten halter i HovedstadenRegion Hovedstaden overskrider udredningsretten i mere end halvdelen af alle forløb inden for børne- og ungepsykiatri. Formanden for Psykiatriudvalget erkender, at tallene ikke er gode nok.
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New on MIT Technology Review

Intel may be considering a takeover of Broadcom
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The Atlantic

The Toothlessness of Saturday Night Live's Political HumorThe first appearance of Special Counsel Robert Mueller (as played by Kate McKinnon in heavy makeup) on Saturday Night Live came in the form of one very funny joke. McKinnon-as-Mueller had appeared as a guest on Weekend Update in January and chatted with host Colin Jost about the ongoing investigation into the 2016 election and the Trump campaign. “Obviously, I can’t discuss particulars of an ongo
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The Atlantic

Give Trump Credit for the North Korea OpeningNorth Korean D. TrumpThere are plenty of good reasons to worry about President Donald Trump meeting North Korea’s leader Kim Jong Un, and plenty of smart people are worrying. But there are some upsides to the business that don’t seem yet to be getting enough attention—and for which the American government and the Trump administration aren’t yet getting enough credit. It wasn’t a surprise. Peter Baker and Choe Sang-Hu
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Study yields more than a million new cyclic compounds, some with pharmaceutical potentialResearchers say they can now produce a vast library of unique cyclic compounds, some with the capacity to interrupt specific protein-protein interactions that play a role in disease. The new compounds have cyclic structures that give them stability and enhance their ability to bind to their targets.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Using artificial intelligence to investigate illegal wildlife trade on social mediaIllegal wildlife trade is one of the biggest threats to biodiversity conservation and is currently expanding to social media. This is a worrisome trend, given the ease of access and popularity of social media. Efficient monitoring of illegal wildlife trade on social media is therefore crucial for conserving biodiversity.
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Study tackles neuroscience claims to have disproved 'free will'For several decades, some researchers have argued that neuroscience studies prove human actions are driven by external stimuli -- that the brain is reactive and free will is an illusion. But a new analysis of these studies shows that many contained methodological inconsistencies and conflicting results.
5h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Study finds flatfoot reconstruction effective for older patientsWhen someone develops adult-acquired flatfoot deformity, they are offered either a reconstruction or foot fusion depending on the severity of the flatfoot and their age. Typically reconstructions are performed in younger patients, while older patients undergo fusions, even though it can limit mobility. A study at Hospital for Special Surgery found that flatfoot reconstruction is effective for olde
5h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Holography approach improves heads up displays for planes and carsHeads-up displays are transparent devices used in airplanes and cars to provide information such as critical flight data or driving directions on the windshield. An innovative holography-based approach could soon make these heads-up displays much easier to see with a large eye box.
5h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Marine exploration sensing with light and soundUnveiling new strategies to improve future wireless underwater sensing networks for marine research and communication.
5h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Blood thinner significantly reduces the risk of death after non-cardiac surgeryThe study enrolled 1,754 patients in 19 countries, 51 percent of whom were male, with an average age of 70 years. After an average follow-up of 16 months, 11 percent of patients treated with dabigatran experienced a MINS-related event, compared with 15 percent of patients who received a placebo. This translates to a 28 percent reduction in risk for patients receiving dabigatran.
5h
Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

Plants overcome hunger with the aid of autophagyResearchers have found that plants activate autophagy in their leaf cells to derive amino acids that are used for survival under energy-starved 'hunger' conditions. The findings show that amino acid utilization in plants can be controlled by the manipulation of autophagy.
5h
Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

Can pursuing happiness make you unhappy?Researchers have found that people who pursue happiness often feel like they do not have enough time in the day, and this paradoxically makes them feel unhappy.
5h
Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

Canakinumab reduces risk of cardiovascular events in populations with unmet clinical needTwo new analyses of data from more than 10,000 heart attack survivors worldwide were presented at a recent meeting. Scientists assessed whether the anti-inflammatory therapy canakinumab reduced rates of major adverse cardiovascular events and co-morbidities among high-risk atherosclerotic patients with chronic kidney disease (CKD) or those with pre-diabetes/diagnosed type 2 diabetes, respectively.
5h
Big Think

42 of the world's 50 deadliest cities are in one regionHere's why Latin American cities are the deadliest in the world. Read More
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Dagens Medicin

Disse hospitaler vil blive ramt af lockout17 hospitaler risikerer at blive omfattet af lockout, viser varsel fra Danske Regioner.
5h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Study yields more than a million new cyclic compounds, some with pharmaceutical potentialResearchers say they can now produce a vast library of unique cyclic compounds, some with the capacity to interrupt specific protein-protein interactions that play a role in disease. The new compounds have cyclic structures that give them stability and enhance their ability to bind to their targets.
5h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Precision oncology in advanced cancer patients improves overall survivalResource use intensity for patients in the targeted group was lower in both higher-cost, acute settings such as inpatient and ER as well in the lower acuity outpatient setting, compared to control patients.
5h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Preclinical characterization of therapeutic antibodiesThese findings led them to hypothesize that antibodies generated against the C-terminus Shh epitope can bind and neutralize full-length Shh found exclusively on the CSC population, while leaving the cleaved N-terminus Shh, important for physiologic Shh signaling, unperturbed.
5h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Low-dose 'triple pill' lowers blood pressure more than usual careA pill combining low doses of three blood pressure-lowering medications significantly increased the number of patients reaching blood pressure targets compared with usual care, researchers reported at the American College of Cardiology's 67th Annual Scientific Session. There was also no significant increase in adverse effects with the 'Triple Pill.'
5h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Managing blood pressure in barbershops yields substantial improvementsAfrican-American men who received medical intervention aimed at controlling their high blood pressure while at the barber saw a marked drop in blood pressure in just six months, according to research presented at the American College of Cardiology's 67th Annual Scientific Session.
5h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Why is it so hot at night in some cities?During the nighttime, it is hotter in the city than in nearby suburbs or the countryside. But just how much hotter differs between cities. Researchers from the
5h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News

More deaths, strokes seen with perioperative beta blocker one year after surgeryDuring the 12 months after undergoing noncardiac surgery, patients with or at risk for heart disease who were treated with the beta blocker metoprolol for 30 days were less likely than patients who received a placebo to have a heart attack, but more likely to die or have a stroke, according to research presented at the American College of Cardiology's 67th Annual Scientific Session.
5h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Near infrared chemical imaging can help maintain the safety of pharmaceutical tabletsThe final step in pharmaceutical production is often tableting. Near infrared chemical imaging can be used to monitor inconsistencies in the powder that will become the tablet, which have been introduced by mechanical processes in the tableting equipment and can lead to out of specification tablets.
5h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Trial for gout drug meets primary endpoint, raises safetyFebuxostat, a gout drug that has been in use for nearly a decade, was found to significantly increase the risk of death, even though it did not raise the risk of the trial's primary endpoint, a combined rate of fatal and nonfatal adverse cardiovascular events, according to research presented at the American College of Cardiology's 67th Annual Scientific Session.
5h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Using artificial intelligence to investigate illegal wildlife trade on social mediaIllegal wildlife trade is one of the biggest threats to biodiversity conservation and is currently expanding to social media. This is a worrisome trend, given the ease of access and popularity of social media. Efficient monitoring of illegal wildlife trade on social media is therefore crucial for conserving biodiversity.
5h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Canakinumab doesn't prevent prediabetes from progressing to diabetesThe anti-inflammatory drug canakinumab had no effect on rates of newly diagnosed diabetes in people who had prediabetes (elevated blood sugar levels at risk of developing into diabetes), according to research presented at the American College of Cardiology's 67th Annual Scientific Session.
5h
Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

Why some older people are rejecting digital technologiesFear of making mistakes and wider concerns about their social responsibility are among reasons why older people are rejecting digital technologies, a new study reveals.
5h
Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

Research could improve management of conflict between wildlife and farmers across the globeA new study highlights improvements in the way conflicts between wildlife conservation and farming are managed worldwide.
5h
Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

Citizen science birding data passes scientific musterBiologists report that eBird observations match trends in bird species populations measured by US government surveys to within 0.4 percent.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

Ratings rise over time because they feel easier to makeTasks often feel easier to perform as we gain experience with them, which can have unintended consequences when the task involves rating a series of items, according to new findings. The findings show that ratings given by individuals tend to become more positive over time, whether they're judging a televised dance competition, grading college coursework, or rating short stories.
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Ingeniøren

Magnon-transistorer kan være vejen til hurtigere elektroniske kredsløbTre forskergrupper har præsenteret en ny form for transistor til styring af såkaldte magnon-strømme, der er forbundet med elektroners spin.
5h
TED Talks Daily (SD video)

The radical beauty of Africa, in portraits | Iké UdéThroughout his colorful career and bodies of work, Iké Udé has found creative ways to reject the negative portrayal of Africans rampant in Western media. In this tour of his work, he shares evocative portraits that blend clothing, props and poses from many cultures at once into sharp takes on the varied, complex beauty of Africa.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

On Twitter, false news travels faster than true stories, study findsA new study has found that false news spreads more rapidly on the social network Twitter than real news does -- and by a substantial margin. Moreover, the spread of false information is essentially not due to bots that are programmed to disseminate inaccurate stories. Instead, false news speeds faster around Twitter due to people retweeting inaccurate news items.
6h
Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

Scientists discover fish scale-derived collagen effective for healing woundsScientists have established that collagen derived from fish scales could be effective for various biomedical applications such as wound healing.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

Childhood trauma link offers treatment hope for people with schizophreniaResearchers have shown that childhood sexual, physical and emotional abuse are associated with severe hallucinations in schizophrenia and other psychotic disorders.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

Barbershop-based healthcare study successfully lowers high blood pressure in African-American menAfrican-American men successfully lowered their high blood pressure to healthy levels when aided by a pharmacist and their local barber, according to a new study.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

University education makes students more agreeable, conscientiousnessA new study indicates that university education has a dramatically positive effect on the development of non-cognitive skills like conscientiousness, extraversion and agreeableness, in addition to the expected intellectual benefits. The paper also shows that the impact of education on these skills is even more dramatic for students from lower socioeconomic backgrounds.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

A new solution for chronic painNeuropathic pain is a chronic illness affecting 7-10 percent of the population in France and for which there is no effective treatment. Researchers have uncovered the mechanism behind the appearance and continuation of pain. Based on their discovery, an innovative treatment was developed which produces, in animal subjects, an immediate, robust and long-lasting therapeutic effect on pain symptoms.
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New on MIT Technology Review

The web’s creator says: let’s regulate Big Tech
6h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Plants overcome hunger with the aid of autophagyResearchers at Tohoku University have found that plants activate autophagy in their leaf cells to derive amino acids that are used for survival under energy-starved 'hunger' conditions. The findings show that amino acid utilization in plants can be controlled by the manipulation of autophagy.
6h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Heat shock system helps bug come back to life after drying upResearchers from an international collaboration including Oleg Gusev of the RIKEN Innovation Center and collaborators from NARO, Kazan Federal University (Russia) and Skoltech University (Russia) have discovered that a gene called heat shock factor -- which is present in some form in nearly all living organisms on Earth -- has been coopted by the species to survive desiccation.
6h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Brown adipose tissue made transparentBrown adipose tissue has played a key role in prevention research since its presence was first documented in adults. However, there was no non-invasive method of measuring its heat generation. A team at the Technical University Munich (TUM) and the Helmholtz Zentrum München has now succeeded in making the activity of brown adipose tissue visible without injecting substances.
6h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Why some older people are rejecting digital technologiesFollowing interviews with older adults, researchers from Lancaster University have discovered that resistance to using digital technologies is not primarily rooted in accessibility issues, as widely believed. Researchers found that personally held values to do with the desirability of technology, wider concerns regarding its impact on society, and fears of getting things wrong when using software
6h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Digging up the PrecambrianThe agronomic revolution, when animals started to burrow seafloor sediments and dramatically altered the marine ecosystem, began earlier than previously thought. Researchers identified multiple specimens of the trace fossil Arenicolites from the late Ediacaran (Precambrian) of Western Mongolia. These traces were likely made by worm-like bilaterians to escape predation. This important evolutionary
6h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Study identifies shortcomings young patients with type 2 diabetes transition to adult careYouth-onset type 2 diabetes is increasing globally as a result of pediatric obesity.
6h
Big Think

Does a ketogenic diet make you a better athlete?Seven people ate a ketogenic diet for three months straight. Here's what happened. Read More
6h
The Atlantic

YouTube Extremism and the Long TailZeynep Tufekci, the insightful scholar and observer of sociology in the internet era, argued over the weekend that YouTube is unwittingly radicalizing some of its viewers through the videos that it automatically recommends that they watch next. She was watching Donald Trump rallies while conducting research, sitting through clip after clip, when eventually she noticed “autoplay” videos “that feat
6h
Futurity.org

Listen: How Sputnik’s launch got more women into collegeThere’s a curious backstory to how more women ended up in college, and it starts with the Soviets’ launch of the satellite Sputnik in 1957. Today, women outnumber men on college campuses, but that wasn’t always the case. Before the 1960s, colleges routinely used gender quotas to suppress the number of women on campus. Some colleges excluded women entirely. When Sputnik launched, it was a big deal
6h
Science | The Guardian

A Neuroscientist Explains: the evolutionary origins of social behaviour – podcastWhat clues can our evolutionary past give us about human behaviour in the here and now? And, bearing in mind the likes of the recent #MeToo movement, does social conformity have a dark side? Subscribe and review on iTunes or Acast , and join the discussion on Facebook and Twitter A Neuroscientist Explains is back for its second season. In each episode, Dr Daniel Glaser and producer Max revisit a
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Feed: All Latest

The Physics of the Speeder Chase in 'Solo: A Star Wars Story'How do you pull off a banking turn if there's no road to bank off?
6h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Research could improve management of conflict between wildlife and farmers across the globeA new study led by the University of Stirling highlights improvements in the way conflicts between wildlife conservation and farming are managed worldwide.
6h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Keeping GPUs youngGraphics processing units (GPUs) are used for many computationally intensive tasks. Their aging process can be slowed by clever management, as TU Wien and University of California -- Irvine have now shown.
6h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Smoking heightens risk of psychosesSmoking at least 10 cigarettes a day is linked to a higher risk of psychoses compared to non-smoking young people. The risk is also raised if the smoking starts before the age of 13. This has been shown in a study led by Academy Research Fellow, Professor Jouko Miettunen. The results were recently published in the journal Acta Psychiatrica Scandinavica.
6h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Study links type of blood pressure medication to increased variability and higher risk of deathTwo types of blood pressure medications -- alpha blockers and alpha 2 agonist -- show increased variability in blood pressure measurements between doctor visits, which is associated with an increased risk of death, according to new research from the Intermountain Medical Center Heart Institute in Salt Lake City.
6h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Imaging sound movements of atomic units with an optical microscopeA research team in DGIST has newly developed imaging system that can analyze the movement of sound generated from 2-D structure with the thickness of an atomic unit. It is expected to be used in new material, solar cell, and catalyst development.
6h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Reduced device clotting, decreased strokes seen with novel heart pumpAt two years of follow-up, severely ill patients with advanced heart failure who received a novel heart pump fully implantable within the chest experienced no malfunctions requiring replacement or removal of the device for blood clotting. Further, their risk of a stroke was halved compared with patients who received the established version of the pump that requires an abdominal location for the im
6h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Popular heart medications can prevent herceptin-induced heart issues in some patientsBreast cancer patients who started taking one of two well-known heart medications at the same time they initiated trastuzumab -- a targeted cancer therapy that has been linked to heart damage -- received no benefit in terms of preventing declines in heart function, according to research presented at the American College of Cardiology's 67th Annual Scientific Session.
6h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Inhaled therapy ineffective in difficult-to-treat heart failureFour weeks of treatment with a novel inhaled medication failed to improve exercise capacity, daily activity levels, severity of symptoms or quality of life in patients with a type of heart failure for which no effective treatment options currently exist, according to research presented at the American College of Cardiology's 67th Annual Scientific Session.
6h
Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

Smoking heightens risk of psychosesSmoking at least ten cigarettes a day is linked to a higher risk of psychoses compared to non-smoking young people. The risk is also raised if the smoking starts before the age of 13.
6h
Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

Digging up the Precambrian: Fossil burrows show early origins of animal behaviorResearchers discover penetrative trace fossils from the late Ediacaran of western Mongolia, revealing earlier onset of the “agronomic revolution”.
6h
Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

Can we turn back time? Muscles' own protective systems could help reduce frailtyNew research published today helps explain why people experience muscle loss in old age, increasing the prospects of reversing the condition in the future.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

Caloric restriction in combination with low-fat diet helps protect aging mouse brainsNew research finds that a low-fat diet in combination with limited caloric consumption prevents aging-induced inflammatory activation of immune cells in the mouse brain - and that exercise is significantly less effective than caloric restriction in preventing these age-related changes. This indicates that the fat content of a diet, as well as caloric intake, are important parameters for the detrim
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

Scientists use nanotechnology to detect molecular biomarker for osteoarthritisFor the first time, scientists have been able to measure a specific molecule indicative of osteoarthritis and a number of other inflammatory diseases using a newly developed technology.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

Life in the fast flow: Tadpoles of new species rely on 'suction cups' to keep upThe young of two new species and a genus of frog found to inhabit Sumatra's rainforests have developed a unique ability to latch onto rocks in the fast-flowing rivers, using bellies crafted by evolution into 'suction cups'. Herpetologists use their remarkable discovery to highlight the unique biodiversity of the island, which is under imminent threat due to rampant habitat modification and defores
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

Sit, stay, heal: Study finds therapy dogs help stressed university studentsTherapy dog sessions for stressed-out students are an increasingly popular offering at North American universities. Now, new research confirms that some doggy one-on-one time really can do the trick of boosting student wellness.
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Ingeniøren

Sverige køber Patriot-missilerSverige har fået grønt lys til at indkøbe amerikanske luftforsvarsmissiler for næsten 20 milliarder kroner.
6h
Feed: All Latest

How Creative DDOS Attacks Still Slip Past DefensesWhile some major distributed-denial-of-service attacks have been thwarted this month, the threat remains as critical as ever.
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The Scientist RSS

Berkeley CRISPR Inventors Get Another Important European PatentThis is the second patent the European Patent Office has issued to the institutions of Jennifer Doudna, Emmanuelle Charpentier, and colleagues.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

French auto giant to set up assembly plant in NamibiaFrench car giant PSA announced Monday it would start assembling Peugeot and Opel brands in Namibia in the second half of 2018.
6h
BBC News - Science & Environment

Norfolk snowy owl attracts Harry Potter fans and birdwatchersA snowy owl, one of which stars in the Harry Potter films, brings in visitors to bird reserves.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

Genes play a role in empathyA new study suggests that how empathic we are is not just a result of our upbringing and experience but also partly a result of our genes.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

Children as young as 3 have brain network devoted to interpreting thoughts of other peopleAn new study finds the brain network that controls theory of mind has already formed in children as young as 3. The study is the first to use functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) to scan the brains of children that young as they perform a task requiring the ability to make inferences about someone else's state of mind.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

15 new planets confirmed around cool dwarf starsScientists report the existence of 15 new planets -- including one 'super-Earth' that could harbor liquid water -- orbiting small, cool stars near our solar system. These stars, known as red dwarfs, are of enormous interest for studies of planetary formation and evolution.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

A combination of personality traits might make you more addicted to social networksAs social networking companies feel the heat to create a more socially responsible and positive experience for their millions of users, new research explores how the interaction of personality traits can impact the likelihood of developing an addiction to social networking.
6h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

German automakers biggest spenders on electric cars: studyGermany's massive car industry is the biggest investor worldwide in electric vehicles, a study published Monday found, as it scrambles under increasing pressure to adopt low-emissions technology.
6h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Dropbox IPO aiming to raise $748 mnCloud data service Dropbox aims to raise as much as $748 million through its initial public offering and a private sale of stock, according to an updated securities registration filed Monday.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Accurately measuring embodied carbon in buildingsEmbodied carbon in the construction industry is a major factor of climate change, but it is rarely measured accurately. A reference text co-edited by an EPFL researcher calls for greater transparency surrounding embodied carbon, along with the introduction of international standards.
6h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News

A robust method to study cancer heterogeneity in liquid biopsyScientists reported the development of a robust procedure for whole-genome copy number profiling of circulating tumor cells (CTCs) from a blood test. In contrast to existing methods that are complex and costly, the single-tube, single-step protocol detect absolute copy number alterations (CNA) in single cells and maintain accuracy at a lower cost than conventional genomic analysis procedure, openi
6h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Can pursuing happiness make you unhappy?Researchers have found that people who pursue happiness often feel like they do not have enough time in the day, and this paradoxically makes them feel unhappy. Aekyoung Kim of Rutgers University in the US and Sam Maglio of the University of Toronto Scarborough in Canada have investigated this effect in a study in the journal Psychonomic Bulletin & Review, which is published by Springer and is an
6h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Stress of open-heart surgery significantly reduces vitamin D levels, but supplementation helpsThe stress of open-heart surgery significantly reduces patients' vitamin D levels, but aggressive supplementation with vitamin D3, just before and after surgery, can completely eliminate the observed drop in vitamin D, researchers have found.
6h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Calcium testing in coronary arteries better way to predict heart attacks than stress testing aloneResearchers at the Intermountain Medical Center Heart Institute in Salt Lake City have found that incorporating underused, but available, imaging technologies more precisely predicts who's at risk for heart attacks and similar threats -- in time to prevent them.
6h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Beta blocker shows mixed results in protecting against chemo-induced heart damageAfter six months of follow up, women newly diagnosed with breast cancer who were given the beta blocker carvedilol to prevent heart issues while undergoing chemotherapy showed no difference in declines in heart function compared with those taking a placebo. Patients who took carvedilol, however, were significantly less likely to have an elevated marker in the blood that signals injury to the heart
6h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Reducing co-payments improves patient, physician adherence to guideline-recommended treatment post-MIWhen patients who had a heart attack were given vouchers to cover their co-payments for medication to prevent a recurrence, physicians were more likely to prescribe a more effective, branded drug and patients were more likely to continue taking the medication for a full year as recommended in treatment guidelines, researchers reported at the American College of Cardiology's 67th Annual Scientific
6h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Dabigatran reduces major CV complications in patients with myocardial injury after noncardiac surgeryTreatment with the blood-thinning drug dabigatran significantly reduced the risk of death, heart attack, stroke and other heart or blood-vessel complications among patients who were at elevated risk for these events because of heart damage that occurred after major noncardiac surgery, according to research being presented at the American College of Cardiology's 67th Annual Scientific Session.
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Ticagrelor has comparable safety to clopidogrel after heart attackAmong people younger than 75 years who were given clot busters to treat a heart attack, taking the more potent blood thinner ticagrelor did not increase the risk of major bleeding (the primary endpoint) compared with the standard blood thinner clopidogrel, in a trial being presented at the American College of Cardiology's 67th Annual Scientific Session.
6h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News

3-D mapping babies' brainsResearch from a collaborative team at Washington University in St. Louis tested a 3-D method that could lead to new diagnostic tools that will precisely measure the third-trimester growth and folding patterns of a baby's brain. Their findings might help to sound an early alarm on developmental disorders in preemies that could affect them later in life.
6h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Early warning system for deadly amphibian pathogenNew technology being developed at Washington State University could help save amphibians around the world from a deadly fungal pathogen.
6h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Research could improve management of conflict between wildlife and farmers across the globeA new study led by the University of Stirling highlights improvements in the way conflicts between wildlife conservation and farming are managed worldwide.
7h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Surprising preference for simplicity found in common modelResearchers have discovered that input-output maps, which are widely used throughout science and engineering to model systems ranging from physics to finance, are strongly biased toward producing simple outputs. The results are surprising, as naïvely there is no reason to suspect that one output should be more likely than any other.
7h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Printing the 'soft' robots of the futureThree-dimensional printing offers unique advantages, but still faces many challenges, for fabricating small, flexible robots that can navigate through the human body and other confined spaces, according to a review in the journal Science and Technology of Advanced Materials.
7h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News

New research shows why babies need to move in the wombBiological signals that direct the development of bone and cartilage at specific skeletal locations are stimulated by movement in the womb. More work will also build knowledge around the exact movements that are needed, which may help diagnose problems earlier and suggest how clinicians may compensate for natural movements if required.
7h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Dengue fever linked to increased risk of strokeA new study has found that people with dengue fever have a higher risk of stroke, especially in the first 2 months following infection. The study is published in CMAJ (Canadian Medical Association Journal).
7h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Patients in primary care networks had fewer visits to ED, shorter staysPatients receiving care from physicians in primary care networks were less likely to visit emergency departments, according to a new study in CMAJ (Canadian Medical Association Journal).
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Early warning system for deadly amphibian pathogenEnvironmental DNA is a new technology that detects telltale bits of genetic material that living creatures shed into their environment. WSU scientists demonstrate for the first time that it can be used to detect the presence of a deadly pathogen before it wipes out populations of amphibians.
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Statins may bring benefits at time of treatment for heart attack, anginaGetting a large dose of a statin did not have an impact on major adverse cardiac events among a broad population of patients slated to undergo percutaneous coronary intervention (PCI), a procedure to clear blocked arteries, in a trial being presented at the American College of Cardiology's 67th Annual Scientific Session. However, statins did significantly reduce the rates of such events among the
7h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Personalized approach to selecting antiplatelet drugs improves outcomesPatients with acute coronary syndrome experienced a substantially lower rate of heart attack, stroke, death from cardiovascular causes and major bleeding at 12 months if genetic information was used to inform the selection of their antiplatelet medication in a study presented at the American College of Cardiology's 67th Annual Scientific Session.
7h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Self-applied chest patch catches common irregular heartbeat more quickly than usual careFor people at heightened risk for atrial fibrillation (AFib) -- a common heart rhythm disorder that also carries a high risk of stroke -- wearing a self-adhering chest patch that records heart patterns may better detect the condition and facilitate more timely treatment than relying on usual care, according to one-year data being presented at the American College of Cardiology's 67th Annual Scient
7h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Alirocumab reduces cardiovascular events after acute coronary syndromeAmong patients with persistently high cholesterol despite high-intensity statin therapy, the proprotein convertase subtilisin-kexin 9 (PCSK9) inhibitor alirocumab reduced rates of major adverse cardiovascular events (MACE) by 15 percent compared with placebo, in a study presented at the American College of Cardiology's 67th Annual Scientific Session.
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Wearable defibrillator cuts overall mortality, but not sudden deaths after heart attackWearing a lightweight vest equipped with a cardioverter defibrillator that detects abnormal heart rhythms in addition to taking recommended medications is associated with a reduction in the likelihood of dying during the first 90 days following a heart attack in people whose heart function was also impaired, according to a study presented at the American College of Cardiology's 67th Annual Scienti
7h
BBC News - Science & Environment

UK 'space drones' look to Proton rocket rideUK-headquartered start-up Effective Space aims to put up its first satellite servicing "drones" in 2020.
7h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

'Sweet spot' in sweet material for hydrogen storageRice University engineers have zeroed in on the optimal architecture for storing hydrogen in "white graphene" nanomaterials—a design like a Lilliputian skyscraper with "floors" of boron nitride sitting one atop another and held precisely 5.2 angstroms apart by boron nitride pillars.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Why is it so hot at night in some cities?During the nighttime, it is hotter in the city than in nearby suburbs or the countryside. But just how much hotter differs between cities. Researchers from the MSE2 (CNRS / MIT) international joint research laboratory and the Centre Interdisciplinaire des Nanosciences de Marseille (CNRS / Aix-Marseille University)1 have shown that the determining factor is how cities are structured: more organized
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Why some older people are rejecting digital technologiesFear of making mistakes and wider concerns about their social responsibility are among reasons why older people are rejecting digital technologies, a new study reveals.
7h
Futurity.org

3 reasons young people with psychosis delay getting helpStigmas, attitudes of self-reliance, and misattributing symptoms led a group of young adults experiencing their first episode of psychosis to delay seeking treatment, a new study shows. “These factors created a cloud of uncertainty in which individuals experiencing early psychosis and their family members struggled to make sense of what was happening, how and when to seek help, and what to expect
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Protecting tigers could be beneficial for their preyProtecting one of Asia's most formidable apex predators may not seem like the most obvious way to help another species that might be on its dinner menu, but that is precisely what Fauna & Flora International (FFI) is doing in Sumatra's Kerinci Seblat National Park, the second-largest national park in Southeast Asia.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Platform optimizes the design of new, tunable catalytic systemsIn the late 1700s, a Scottish chemist named Elizabeth Fulhame discovered that certain chemical reactions occurred only in the presence of water and that, at the end of those reactions, the amount of water was not depleted. Fulhame was the first scientist to demonstrate the power of a catalyst—a material that can speed up a chemical reaction without being consumed by it.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Digging up the precambrian—fossil burrows show early origins of animal behaviorIn the history of life on Earth, a dramatic and revolutionary change in the nature of the sea floor occurred in the early Cambrian (541–485 million years ago): the agronomic revolution. This phenomenon was coupled with the diversification of marine animals that could burrow into seafloor sediments. Previously, the sea floor was covered by hard microbial mats, and animals were limited to standing o
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Unravelling the mystery of ice ages using ancient moleculesResearchers from Cardiff University have revealed how sea ice has been contributing to the waxing and waning of ice sheets over the last million years.
7h
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Carbon Taxes Are Coming, and We Have Colleges to ThankIt turns out universities provide a fantastic model for how politicians should start thinking about this on a state or even national level.
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Star Wars News: Is 'Solo' in Even More Trouble?Want to know what's happening with the next Star Wars standalone movie—and everything else coming out of Lucasfilm? Click here.
7h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Building the machinery that makes proteinsAll of the proteins necessary for life are made by giant molecular machines called ribosomes. A ribosome, in turn, is built from proteins and ribosomal RNAs stitched together with immaculate precision.
7h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Metamaterials bend waves of all kindsAs the exciting new field of metamaterials advances, Duke has become one of the world's leading centers of this research. Founded in 2009, Duke's Center for Metamaterials and Integrated Plasmonics (CMIP) has grown to encompass dozens of researchers dedicated to exploring artificially structured materials.
7h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Astronomers discover two bright high-redshift quasarsUsing VST ATLAS and WISE surveys astronomers have identified two new bright high-redshift quasars. The newly found quasi-stellar objects, designated VST-ATLAS J158.6938-14.4211 and VST-ATLAS J332.8017-32.1036, could be helpful in improving our understanding of the evolution of the universe. The finding is reported March 4 in a paper published on arXiv.org.
7h
Live Science

Florida Scientists Are Running Around at Night Bashing in Iguanas' SkullsA team of scientists in Florida are on a three-month, $63,000 iguana-bashing spree.
7h
Live Science

The Guardian Is Reporting Astrologers' Ramblings about Quantum Physics for Some Reason"Sceptics will say that it is not science-based; practitioners will argue roots in astronomy and connections to quantum physics." What?
7h
Scientific American Content: Global

New Evidence Fuels Debate over the Origin of Modern LanguagesNomadic horse riders likely opened a “steppe bridge” between Europe and Asia, but recent genetic data raise more questions -- Read more on ScientificAmerican.com
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The Scientist RSS

Image of the Day: Soaring Manta RaysThe colossal fish bank like airplanes when turning.
7h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

You are not just you—you are a chimeraIn Greek mythology, the chimera was a fire-breathing monster—part goat, part snake and part lioness. Guess what? You are a bit like this—a patchwork of genes and foreign cells.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

A possible experiment to prove that gravity and quantum mechanics can be reconciledTwo teams of researchers working independently of one another have come up with an experiment designed to prove that gravity and quantum mechanics can be reconciled. The first team is a pairing of Chiara Marletto of the University of Oxford and Vlatko Vedral of National University of Singapore. The second is an international collaboration. In the papers, both published in Physical Review Letters,
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

A novel effect of epigenetic drugs on metabolic activityUsing the fruit fly Drosophila melanogaster as a model system in a novel technique, Ludwig Maximilian University of Munich researchers have uncovered a novel effect of epigenetic drugs on metabolic activity
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Futurity.org

Modified sugar molecules treat UTIs without antibioticsIn a new study with mice, researchers have discovered a new way to treat urinary tract infections (UTIs) without using antibiotics. Half of all women will experience the pain and burning of a urinary tract infection (UTI) at some point in their lives. Most such infections can be successfully treated with antibiotics, but antibiotic resistance—the ability of bacteria to withstand antibiotics—is a
7h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

MRI tags stick to molecules with chemical 'Velcro'Imagine attaching a beacon to a drug molecule and following its journey through our winding innards, tracking just where and how it interacts with the chemicals in our bodies to help treat illnesses.
7h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Computer analytics finds a way to astronaut's heartsKeeping an eye on your health is extra important if you're 54 million kilometres from a hospital.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Climate change and looters threaten the archaeology of MongoliaThe history and archaeology of Mongolia, most famously the sites associated with the largest land empire in the history of the world under Ghengis Khan, are of global importance. But they're facing unprecedented threats as climate change and looting impact ancient sites and collections.
7h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

How companies can make more money by allowing you to 'pay as you want'The last couple of years has seen the rise of restaurants, museums and other businesses allowing customers to pay as they want. There may be altruistic reasons for companies to adopt this pricing, but research shows that "pay what you want" pricing can sometimes lead to an increase in revenue.
7h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

The fight for education doesn't stop when working-class boys get into universityWhether it is high rates of suicide and mental health problems, a lack of appropriate role models, absent fathers, access to secure employment, drug and alcoholic dependency, men – when compared to their female counterparts – are often reported to be in trouble.
8h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Canakinumab reduces risk of cardiovascular events in populations with unmet clinical needTwo new analyses of data from more than 10,000 heart attack survivors worldwide were presented by investigators from Brigham and Women's Hospital at the 2018 American College of Cardiology meeting.
8h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Barbershop-based healthcare study successfully lowers high blood pressure in African-American menAfrican-American men successfully lowered their high blood pressure to healthy levels when aided by a pharmacist and their local barber, according to a new study from the Smidt Heart Institute.
8h
Popular Science

All the ways daylight saving time screws with youHealth When entire countries lose an hour of sleep simultaneously, bad things happen. Only a narrow band of people are really that affected by daylight saving. But gosh darn it, we will complain about it loudly every year.
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Dagens Medicin

Danskeres DNA opbevares ulovligt i udlandetAarhus Universitet har sendt 86.000 blodprøver til USA, uden at have ført tilsyn med, hvem der har adgang til dem.
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Science : NPR

This Is Why You Don't See People-Sized Salmon AnymoreHistorical photos show fishermen with chinooks almost as tall as they are. A century's worth of dam-building, overfishing, habitat loss and hatcheries has cut the size of the average fish in half. (Image credit: WikiMedia Commons )
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How to Build a 3-D Printed House in the Developing WorldA non-profit has successfully built the US's first 3-D printed home, and now plans to bring it to the world's poorest regions.
8h
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Elon Musk's and Donald Trump's China Twitter Tariff TiffReal talk: Imposing tariffs and fees on the import and export of cars is unlikely to make things better.
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The Atlantic

I Am a Survivor of Human Trafficking: Nena's StoryThis is one of three first-person accounts written by survivors of human trafficking. The others, as well as background about the project, can be found here . I come from a family of teachers: father, husband, sisters, and daughter. I taught for 32 years at an elementary school in the Philippines. Somehow, that added to the shame I felt for being a survivor of trafficking. I not only worried abou
8h
The Atlantic

I Am a Survivor of Human Trafficking: Judith's StoryThis is one of three first-person accounts written by survivors of human trafficking. The others, as well as background about the project, can be found here . I arrived in New York on September 15, 2005, at age 38, clutching a personal statement I had written for myself. It read, “I am going to America for the future of my kids. I am going to give them a good future. This is my purpose.” I never
8h
The Atlantic

I Am a Survivor of Human Trafficking: Natalicia's StoryThis is one of three first-person accounts written by survivors of human trafficking. The others, as well as background about the project, can be found here . My mother used to tell me, “I want you to go to school for me.” She herself had never had the chance. She came from a family of 10 children, and became a domestic worker, caring for another family’s children, by age 8. She stayed with them
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The Atlantic

Survivors of Human Trafficking, in Their Own WordsLast June, The Atlantic published “ My Family’s Slave ,” a harrowing reflection by the journalist Alex Tizon on his experience of being raised by Eudocia Tomas Pulido, or, as she was known to Tizon, “Lola.” Pulido wasn’t in chains, Tizon wrote, yet “no other word but slave encompassed the life she lived.” The story moved millions of readers. Today, as part of our special report about forced work,
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The Atlantic

‘We Can’t Make Our Elections About Being Against Trump’As Democrats position themselves for the 2020 presidential election, one name is mentioned again and again: Cory Booker. Before becoming New Jersey’s first black U.S. senator, in 2013, Booker was the mayor of Newark for a controversial six years. As mayor, he earned national attention for his crusading style and daring stunts—at one point he saved a woman from a burning building—but was criticize
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Technology and regulation must work in concert to combat hate speech onlineOnline bullying, hate and incitement are on the rise, and new approaches are needed to tackle them. As the Australian Senate conducts hearings for its Inquiry into cyberbullying, it should consider a two-pronged approach to combating the problem.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

No room for vegetables? Pot up your plantsMany vegetables grow well in containers located on a patio, porch, balcony or windowsill, so don't let lack of yard space keep you from gardening this spring and summer.
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Futurity.org

Roundworms shed light on how biological sex shapes behaviorNew research demonstrates how biological sex can modify communication between nerve cells and generate different responses to the same stimulus in males and females. The findings, which appear in the journal Current Biology , could shed new light on the genetic underpinnings of sex differences in neural development, behavior, and susceptibility to diseases. “While the nervous systems of males and
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Mastering the future power gridThe electric energy system is becoming increasingly diverse and distributed. This trend is bound to have an impact on how the system operators will control and optimize the future grid, blogs Gabriela Hug.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Sue thy neighbour—study reveals the dark side of the digital universePrivate individuals rather than public figures have emerged as the primary source of defamation in the digital age, a study by the Centre for Media Transition at the University of Technology Sydney shows.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Ancient clams preserve evidence of parasite increase in higher seasHow will sea-level rise influence the prevalence of infectious diseases? The best way to answer that question, says paleoecologist John Huntley of the University of Missouri, may be to look to the distant past.
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The Scientist RSS

John Sulston, Human Genome Project Leader, DiesThe biologist earned a Nobel Prize in 2002 for his work on C. elegans.
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The Atlantic

How Trump Is Remaking EvangelicalismThis fall, Christian students at Princeton dropped the word “evangelical” from the name of their fellowship. They felt the term is increasingly “confusing, or unknown, or misunderstood,” the director, William Boyce, told The Daily Princetonian. In the year since Donald Trump became president largely thanks to the support of white, self-identified evangelicals, this kind of quiet marketing shift h
8h
Scientific American Content: Global

A New Frontier: Data Visualization for Human RightsWhat I learned in a five-day workshop in Beirut -- Read more on ScientificAmerican.com
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Scrolls, Trolls, and Rickrolls: The Crisis of Online HarassmentWIRED columnist Virginia Heffernan on what the history of online harassment can tell us about today’s contrarian crisis.
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‘Wolverine: The Long Night’: In Marvel and Stitcher’s New Podcast, Sound Design Has Never Mattered MoreMarvel’s first foray into podcasts conveys mystery through meticulously placed voices and sounds.
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For News Publishers, Facebook Is a Less Reliable FriendFacebook News DataAs Facebook’s share of traffic to news sites has been falling sharply since early last year—and will only decline more—Google AMP has been on the rise.
9h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Tracking mechanisms of crystallization in real timeResearchers at the Interfacial Dynamics in Radioactive Environments and Materials (IDREAM) Energy Frontier Research Center quantified transient penta-coordinated Al3+ species during the crystallization of gibbsite from hydrous aluminum gels in solutions of concentrated sodium hydroxide. The research shows that concentrated electrolytes in solution affect hydrogen bonding, ion interactions, and coo
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

How social networks help perpetuate the cycle of segregationThink about the last time you looked for a new apartment or house.
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Latest Headlines | Science News

How biology breaks the ‘cerebral mystique’The Biological Mind rejects the idea of the brain as the lone organ that makes us who we are. Our body and environment also factor in, Alan Jasanoff says.
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Live Science

Europe's Clocks Are Losing Time and Here's WhyIt's the former Yugoslavia's fault.
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The Atlantic

Why a Classic German Children's Tale Is Ripe for RevisitingFrom an early age, many children learn that time is precious, before growing into adults who see it as a commodity to be managed at all costs. But literature for young readers often handles the concept with a greater sense of imagination and possibility. In Madeleine L’Engle’s beloved novel A Wrinkle in Time— whose long-awaited film adaptation hit theaters Friday—time can be bent (or tessered ) t
9h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Studies show urbanization impacts storms, rainfall despite surroundingsTwo Purdue University studies show that urbanization changes storm patterns and rainfall amounts, highlighting the need for urban planning and infrastructure design that considers how the landscape will affect the weather.
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Ingeniøren

Techtopia #43: Nørdtopmøde om dræberbakterier og gigantiske regnearkPodcast: Techtopia tager til IDAs topmøde for supernørder - også kendt som ph.d.-studerende og hører bl.a. om resistente dræberbakterier, regneark som programmeringsplatform og cellefabrikker til nye enzymer.
9h
Scientific American Content: Global

How France and India Can Unleash the Power of "Frugal Innovation"You can’t fix a fractured and conflict-ridden world with the competitive zero-sum mindset that has long dominated world affairs. -- Read more on ScientificAmerican.com
9h
Live Science

Yep, the Earth Is Still Round, Neil deGrasse Tyson Says"Cosmos" host and astrophysicist Neil deGrasse Tyson recently shot down the ideas of anyone out there who still thinks the Earth is flat.
9h
Live Science

Genes Can't Explain Why Men Are Less Empathetic Than WomenFor women who think that men just don't seem to understand, well, you're right.
9h
Ingeniøren

Svejserobot er blevet direktørens gør det selv-projektCheferne begynder selv at tage imod robotterne. Hos en containerfabrikant er det direktøren selv, der roder med virksomhedens første robot.
9h
New Scientist - News

We need to be mindful as we develop thought-reading techMass thought control may not be on the cards just yet, but mind-reading tech is developing fast. We need to be prepared
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Dagens Medicin

Læger og Google konkurrerer om at diagnosticere i tv-quizCharlotte Lysén Føhns er en af de læger, som er med i tv-quizzen ‘Er der en læge til stede’, hvor tre læger hver mandag dyster mod google for at få afgjort, hvem der er bedst til at diagnosticere. En grænseoverskridende oplevelse, siger lægen.
9h
Ingeniøren

Cyber-spionage: Malware har ligget gemt på routere i seks årCyber-spionage-malware er blevet fundet i over 100 computere, primært i Mellemøsten og Afrika. Programmerne har ligget skjult i op til seks år og har givet totalt indblik i de inficerede computere.
9h
Live Science

Famed Archaeologist 'Discovered' His Own Fakes at 9,000-Year-Old SettlementApparently, he ran a forger's workshop of sorts, where he created "ancient" murals and inscriptions.
9h
Scientific American Content: Global

Newer Horizons: Scientist Pitch Pluto Probe as a Unique Deep-Space TelescopeA once-in-a-lifetime opportunity for NASA’s trans-Pluto explorer to set its sights on distant galaxies, stars and exoplanets faces long odds -- Read more on ScientificAmerican.com
9h
Ingeniøren

Minister om fordoblet bredbåndstilskud: »Det er en kæmpe succes«Trods kritik fra flere sider vil regeringen fordoble og forlænge bredbåndspuljen: Den skal nu målrettes landområderne - og adresser med mobilt bredbånd skal udelukkes.
9h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Voyaging for the SentinelsTwo recent expeditions that took scientists 26 000 km across the Atlantic Ocean have returned critical information to make sure that the Copernicus Sentinel satellites are delivering accurate data about the state of our oceans.
10h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Sit, stay, heal: Study finds therapy dogs help stressed university studentsTherapy dog sessions for stressed-out students are an increasingly popular offering at North American universities. Now, new research from the University of British Columbia confirms that some doggy one-on-one time really can do the trick of boosting student wellness.
10h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Scientists use nanotechnology to detect molecular biomarker for osteoarthritisFor the first time, scientists at Wake Forest Baptist Medical Center have been able to measure a specific molecule indicative of osteoarthritis and a number of other inflammatory diseases using a newly developed technology.
10h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Study finds early signatures of the social brainAn MIT study finds the brain network that controls theory of mind has already formed in children as young as 3. The study is the first to use functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) to scan the brains of children that young as they perform a task requiring the ability to make inferences about someone else's state of mind.
10h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News

A new solution for chronic painNeuropathic pain is a chronic illness affecting 7-10 percent of the population in France and for which there is no effective treatment. Researchers at the Institute for Neurosciences of Montpellier (INSERM/Université de Montpellier) and the Laboratory for Therapeutic Innovation (CNRS/Université de Strasbourg) have uncovered the mechanism behind the appearance and continuation of pain. Based on the
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Ingeniøren

Politi drev narko-marked i 27 dage på det mørke netPolitiet i Holland overtog en narko-handelsplads på Tor og fik blandt andet narkosælgere til at uploade afslørende billeder.
10h
Science : NPR

Fishing Boats 'Going Dark' Raise Suspicion Of Illegal Catches, Report SaysA new report by the international conservation group Oceana highlights several incidents of fishing vessels switching off their Automatic Identification System beacons in no-take fishing areas. (Image credit: Marcel Mochet/AFP/Getty Images)
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Mastering metastable matterThe phenomenon of metastability, in which a system is in a state that is stable but not the one of least energy, is widely observed in nature and technology. Yet, many aspects underlying the mechanisms governing the behaviour and dynamics of such systems remain unexplored. Physicists at ETH Zurich have now demonstrated a promising platform for studying metastability on a fundamental level, using a
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

15 new planets confirmed around cool dwarf starsA research team led by Teruyuki Hirano of Tokyo Institute of Technology's Department of Earth and Planetary Sciences has validated 15 exoplanets orbiting red dwarf systems. One of the brightest red dwarfs, K2-155 that is around 200 light years away from Earth, has three transiting super-Earths. Of those three super-Earths, the outermost planet, K2-155d, with a radius 1.6 times that of Earth, could
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Defect in cellular sensory cilia linked to deformed organs in zebrafishA protein at the base of the 'antenna' of many of the body's cells is vital to a crucial type of cell signal and to whether organs like the heart develop correctly, a test with zebrafish shows. The test is part of a new study conducted by researchers from the University of Copenhagen and the University of Southern Denmark.
10h
NYT > Science

Four Years After Declaring War on Pollution, China Is WinningResearch gives estimates on the longer lives that are now possible in the country.
10h
NYT > Science

The New Health Care: Do Antidepressants Work?The most comprehensive study on them has recently been published, showing mostly modest effects.
10h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Research team explores the melding of concepts from different fieldsIn a new report in the Proceedings of the Royal Society B, Christian E Vincenot from Kyoto University's Department of Social Informatics investigates how seemingly separate concepts in scientific fields fuse to become universal approaches.
11h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Tokyo Tech's six-legged robots get closer to natureA study led by researchers at Tokyo Institute of Technology (Tokyo Tech) has uncovered new ways of driving multi-legged robots by means of a two-level controller. The proposed controller uses a network of so-called non-linear oscillators that enables the generation of diverse gaits and postures, which are specified by only a few high-level parameters. The study inspires new research into how multi
11h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Caloric restriction in combination with low-fat diet helps protect aging mouse brainsNew research finds that a low-fat diet in combination with limited caloric consumption prevents aging-induced inflammatory activation of immune cells in the mouse brain - and that exercise is significantly less effective than caloric restriction in preventing these age-related changes. This indicates that the fat content of a diet, as well as caloric intake, are important parameters for the detrim
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Science : NPR

Hearts Get 'Younger,' Even At Middle Age, With ExerciseAs early as your mid-40s, especially if you're sedentary, your heart muscle can show signs of aging, losing its youthful elasticity and power. But moderately strenuous exercise can change that. (Image credit: Maria Fabrizio for NPR)
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Dagens Medicin

Ledelse læres i praksis – det kræver god ledelseProjekt ‘Yngre Læger på Banen’ har aldrig haft som formål at udfordre hierarkiet, som det ellers fremgik af artikel i Dagens Medicin 9. marts. Tværtimod har et af de bærende principper i projekt et været: Ledelse læres i praksis. Det kræver god ledelse.
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BBC News - Science & Environment

Feed the birds, but be aware of risks, say wildlife expertsWild birds may catch and spread diseases as they gather to feed in gardens, say scientists.
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Science : NPR

Hearts Gets 'Younger,' Even At Middle Age, With ExerciseAs early as your mid-40s, especially if you're sedentary, your heart muscle can show signs of aging, losing its youthful elasticity and power. But moderately strenuous exercise can change that. (Image credit: Maria Fabrizio for NPR)
11h
The Atlantic

The Man Behind the North Korea NegotiationsKim Jong Un and Donald Trump are the volatile, captivating stars of North Korea’s nuclear drama—including the shocking twist last week in which Trump said he would accept Kim’s reported offer of a summit meeting. Given the outsized personalities at center stage, it’s easy to forget who is actually directing the plot: South Korean President Moon Jae In, who over the past eight months has been quie
11h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Revolutionizing computer memory—with magnetsWhen the energy efficiency of electronics poses a challenge, magnetic materials may have a solution.
11h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Putting people at the heart of big dataBig data has given scientists – and companies – a treasure trove of new information for analysing, understanding and predicting human behaviour, but it's also thrown up a raft of questions about privacy and ownership.
11h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Google, Facebook come down on the side of elephants, rhinos, tigersA week after the United States quietly lifted a ban on imports of sport-hunted elephants' ivory and lion parts from certain African countries, the World Wildlife Fund has announced that Google, Facebook and other major tech firms are joining an effort to halt the illegal trade of wildlife and wildlife parts.
12h
Dana Foundation

Happy Brain Awareness Week!Seyitgazi Middle School students celebrate Brain Awareness Week 2017, organized by Eskişehir Osmangazi University in Turkey. This week folks all over the world will be taking part in activities organized by people who share our love for the brain (thanks partners!). Brain Awareness Week is a chance for all of us to celebrate and learn more about the organ that is responsible for everything we do.
12h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Tall black men are perceived as more threatening than tall white men, study showsThe taller a guy is, the more attractive, intelligent, and successful he seems, right?
12h
Science-Based Medicine

The adverse health effects of the lunacy that is Daylight Saving TimeDaylight Saving Time has been around for over 100 years. Why does it still persist when there's little or no evidence that it does what it was intended to do (save energy) and growing evidence of adverse health effects related to the twice a year time change? That's a good question. It's time to get rid of this antiquated practice.
12h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

After EPA flip, a push to block 'harmful' pesticideA month after Scott Pruitt began leading the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency, the former Oklahoma attorney general rejected an Obama-era recommendation from agency scientists to ban a widely used pesticide from use on food crops.
12h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Texas guv confirms Amazon visit to Austin, DallasGov. Greg Abbott confirmed on Thursday that Amazon HQ2 scouts have been to Austin and Dallas as he accepted an annual award that recognizes the top performing states for business and job creation.
12h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

To combat iguana problem, researchers bash in reptiles' headsResearchers are on a critical mission in the heart of Broward County—bashing in the brains of iguanas in an attempt to eliminate the reptiles that have overtaken South Florida.
12h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

This is 'nanowood,' an invention that could reduce humanity's carbon footprintScientists have designed a heat-insulating material made from wood that is both light and strong and made entirely from tiny, stripped-down wood fibers.
12h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Pretty polly or pests? Dutch in a flap over parakeetsTo their detractors, they're dirty alien invaders whose incessant chatter ruins Sunday morning lie-ins. To their supporters, they're beautiful, cheerful reminders of warmer climes amid the winter chill.
13h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Space bases could preserve civilization in World War III: Elon MuskBases on the moon and Mars could help preserve human civilization and hasten its regeneration on earth in the event of a third world war, billionaire entrepreneur Elon Musk, said on Sunday.
13h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

VWs using more diesel, failing pollution tests after recalls: studyVolkswagen vehicles recalled and fixed after the worldwide "dieselgate" emissions cheating scandal are using more fuel and still failing pollution tests, according to a study by Australia's peak motoring body released Monday.
13h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Citizen science birding data passes scientific musterAs long as there have been birdwatchers, there have been lists. Birders keep detailed records of the species they've seen and compare these lists with each other as evidence of their accomplishments. Now those lists, submitted and aggregated to birding site eBird, can help scientists track bird populations and identify conservation issues before it's too late.
13h
NYT > Science

Hotter, Drier, Hungrier: How Global Warming Punishes the World’s PoorestA series of droughts with little recovery time in the intervals has pushed millions to the edge of survival in the Horn of Africa.
13h
Science | The Guardian

Can you solve it? The Pi Day party starts hereJoin the circle of friends of the friends of the circle UPDATE: Click here for the solutions Hi guzzlers, Wednesday is Pi Day, an annual date of celebration in the mathematical community because March 14, or 3/14, using the US convention for dates, looks like 3.14, which is pi to two decimal places. Continue reading...
13h
Science | The Guardian

Zombie Boy sculpture will greet visitors to Science MuseumMarc Quinn to create likeness of Rick Genest, who is covered with tattoos of the inside of his body Marc Quinn, the artist best known for freezing 10 pints of his own blood in a bust of his head , is to create a giant sculpture of a tattooed man known as Zombie Boy to permanently greet visitors to new galleries at the Science Museum in London. Zombie Boy is Rick Genest, a Canadian artist and mode
13h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Life in the fast flow: Tadpoles of new species rely on 'suction cups' to keep upIndonesia, a megadiverse country spanning over 17,000 islands located between Australia and mainland Asia, is home to more than 16% of the world's known amphibian and reptile species, with almost half of the amphibians found nowhere else in the world. Unsurprisingly, biodiversity scientists have been feverishly discovering and describing fascinating new animals from the exotic island in recent yea
13h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

University education makes students more agreeable, conscientiousnessA recent study published in Oxford Economic Papers indicates that university education has a dramatically positive effect on the development of non-cognitive skills like conscientiousness, extraversion and agreeableness, in addition to the expected intellectual benefits. The paper also shows that the impact of education on these skills is even more dramatic for students from lower socioeconomic ba
13h
Science | The Guardian

Not all he says is defensible, but Jordan Peterson deserves to be taken seriously | Gareth HutchensPeterson has found an enthusiastic audience in Australia, so it’s worth understanding how he has tapped into that The 1960s were a simpler time, where artists were valued for having something to say, rather than how much money they made. I heard that sentiment in a Bob Dylan documentary once. “Have you heard them play? Did they have anything to say ?” Continue reading...
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Science | The Guardian

Krill found to break down microplastics – but it won't save the oceansDigestion of plastic into much smaller fragments ‘doesn’t necessarily help pollution’, Australian researchers say A world-first study by Australian researchers has found that krill can digest certain forms of microplastic into smaller – but no less pervasive – fragments. The study, published in Nature Communications journal on Friday , found that Antarctic krill, Euphausia superba , can break dow
15h
Ingeniøren

Tænketank: Forudsigelser med persondata bør stoppe før individetData om personer kan være med til at udvikle samfundet. Men som det generelt er med forudsigelser, skal vi være meget varsomme med dem. Især når det drejer sig om at forudsige et menneskes udvikling og fremtidige beslutninger.
16h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Ratings rise over time because they feel easier to makeTasks often feel easier to perform as we gain experience with them, which can have unintended consequences when the task involves rating a series of items, according to findings published in Psychological Science, a journal of the Association for Psychological Science. The findings show that ratings given by individuals tend to become more positive over time, whether they're judging a televised da
16h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News

15 new planets confirmed around cool dwarf starsScientists report the existence of 15 new planets -- including one 'super-Earth' that could harbor liquid water -- orbiting small, cool stars near our solar system. These stars, known as red dwarfs, are of enormous interest for studies of planetary formation and evolution.
16h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News

A combination of personality traits might make you more addicted to social networksAs social networking companies feel the heat to create a more socially responsible and positive experience for their millions of users, new research out of Binghamton University, State University of New York explores how the interaction of personality traits can impact the likelihood of developing an addiction to social networking.
16h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Childhood trauma link offers treatment hope for people with schizophreniaResearchers from Orygen, the National Centre of Excellence for Youth Mental Health; the University of Melbourne; Port Phillip Prison and University Hospital of Gran Canaria Dr Negrin, Spain, have shown that childhood sexual, physical and emotional abuse are associated with severe hallucinations in schizophrenia and other psychotic disorders.
16h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News

University education makes students more agreeable, conscientiousnessA study published in Oxford Economic Papers indicates that university education has a dramatically positive effect on the development of non-cognitive skills like conscientiousness, extraversion and agreeableness, in addition to the expected intellectual benefits. The paper also shows that the impact of education on these skills is even more dramatic for students from lower socioeconomic backgroun
16h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Socioeconomic status may affect survival of patients with anal cancerIn a study of patients with anal cancer, living in low median household income areas was linked with an increased risk of early death.
16h
Ingeniøren

Miljøbrøler: Banedanmark tvunget til at fjerne 72.000 ton jordUnder anlæggelsen af en ny bane endte 72.000 ton jord fyldt med tegl, plast og byggeaffald på en mark.
16h
The Scientist RSS

Nitrogen Dioxide Linked to Thousands of Premature Deaths in GermanyThe findings of an official report come a month after a German court ruled in favor of banning diesel cars.
18h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Genes play a role in empathyA new study led by scientists from the University of Cambridge, the Institut Pasteur, Paris Diderot University, the CNRS and the genetics company 23andMe suggests that our empathy is not just a result of our education and experience but is also partly influenced by genetic variations. These results will be published in the journal Translational Psychiatry on March 12, 2018.
19h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Can we turn back time? Muscles' own protective systems could help reduce frailtyNew research published today helps explain why people experience muscle loss in old age, increasing the prospects of reversing the condition in the future.
20h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Study finds that genes play a role in empathyA new study published today suggests that how empathic we are is not just a result of our upbringing and experience but also partly a result of our genes.
20h
Futurity.org

Bacteria in your intestines can trigger autoimmune diseasesBacteria in the small intestines of mice and humans can travel to other organs and trigger an autoimmune response, according to a new study. The researchers also found that the autoimmune reaction can be suppressed with an antibiotic or vaccine designed to target the bacteria, they say. The findings, which appear in Science , suggest promising new approaches for treating chronic autoimmune condit
20h
Futurity.org

Workers at customer-facing companies tend to be happierPeople working in retail and other customer-facing companies tend to be happier than those who work in places further removed from interaction with customers, like manufacturing, new research suggests. But the research goes even further by showing that the phenomenon isn’t limited to individuals who work directly with customers. It affects everyone at the company—depending on whether the company
20h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News

One in 10 stroke survivors need more help with taking medication, study findsOver a half of stroke patients require a degree of help with taking medicine and a sizeable minority say they do not receive as much assistance as they need, according a study published today in the journal BMJ Open.
21h
Futurity.org

Support system trains teachers to better manage studentsA new system of training, coaching, and feedback designed to improve teacher use of evidence-based practices could offer a way to support students with behavioral challenges. Researchers say the system could have a strong positive effect on student behavior and academic achievements by giving teachers the training and support they need in the classroom. “Student behaviors don’t change until the a
21h
Futurity.org

Self-esteem sways benefits of expressive writingExpressive autobiographical writing—similar to journaling, but not necessarily a long-term endeavor—has well documented health benefits our psychological well-being, but new research suggests that it doesn’t work the same for everyone. “Whether this is beneficial or harmful, at least in the short term, seemed to depend on the level of self-esteem when people began writing,” says Melanie Green, an
21h
Futurity.org

Blood pressure app rivals arm cuff’s accuracyA new app measures blood pressure with accuracy that may rival arm cuff devices. The new technology, detailed in a paper in the journal Science Translational Medicine , also includes discovery of a more convenient measurement point. “We targeted a different artery, the transverse palmer arch artery at the fingertip, to give us better control of the measurement,” says lead author Anand Chandrasekh
21h
Big Think

CRISPR modified mosquitoes don't transmit malaria to humansBut there's a catch. Read More
21h
Science | The Guardian

Present Traces: Experiment 20 – videoExperiment 20 dramatises the stories of three women who took part in the psychologist Stanley Milgram's ‘Obedience to Authority’ experiments in 1962, and insisted on being heard. More than 800 people were recruited for what they were told was a study about learning and memory. The scenario they took part in urged them to inflict electric shocks on another person. This film by Kathryn Millard is t
22h
Big Think

Study: Even just a little light in your bedroom at night can heighten depressionPut down that cell phone before bed. Sleeping with even a little bit of light in your bedroom at night can heighten depression. Read More
22h
Science | The Guardian

Starwatch: find Mercury, with a little help from VenusMercury can be difficult to spot in the twilight sky, but this week Venus, the unmissable bright evening star, will be close by This week there is a treat for the early evening sky watcher. From 17 March onwards, the two inner planets of Mercury and Venus can be seen close together in the twilight sky. The sky will not be fully dark and viewers will need a clear western horizon to see the pair. B
22h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Citizen science birding data passes scientific musterJoshua Horns is an eBird user himself and a doctoral candidate in biology at the University of Utah. In a paper published today in Biological Conservation, Horns and colleagues report that eBird observations match trends in bird species populations measured by US government surveys to within 0.4 percent.
23h
Science | The Guardian

Elon Musk: we must colonise Mars to preserve our species in a third world warFounder of SpaceX, which is working on getting humans to the planet, speaks at SXSW amid rising nuclear tension Humans must prioritise the colonisation of Mars so the species can be conserved in the event of a third world war, SpaceX and Tesla founder Elon Musk said on Sunday. Related: Trump under pressure over chaotic approach to North Korea nuclear talks Continue reading...
23h
Big Think

Entering most black holes would kill you. This gives you an infinite number of futuresWhen the past and future are no longer connected, some pretty weird stuff happens. Read More
1d
Scientific American Content: Global

The Enigma of Leguatia, 6-Foot-Tall Mauritian Super-RailWe’re all familiar with the idea that weird animals have evolved on islands, and you’ve surely heard of many of them. But have you heard about the SIX-FOOT-TALL MAURITIAN SUPER-RAIL? -- Read more on ScientificAmerican.com
1d
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Hi-tech conservationists fight Indonesia wildlife crimeFrom cutting-edge DNA barcoding to smartphone apps that can identify illegal wildlife sales, conservationists are turning to hi-tech tools in their battle against Indonesia's animal traffickers.
1d
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

German energy giant EON to buy RWE subsidiary InnogyGerman energy giant EON plans to take over Innogy, the renewables subsidiary of competitor RWE, in a complex deal valued at around 20 billion euros ($25 billion), both companies said Sunday.
1d
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

'Citizen scientists' track radiation seven years after FukushimaBeneath the elegant curves of the roof on the Seirinji Buddhist temple in Japan's Fukushima region hangs an unlikely adornment: a Geiger counter collecting real-time radiation readings.
1d
Science | The Guardian

Geneticists know there’s more to life | LettersGenetic determinism is not a concept used by practising geneticists, write Brian Charlesworth and Deborah Charlesworth, and Anthony Gordon clears up some facts Martin Yuille and Jonathan Bard ( Letters , 9 March) assert that recent scientific developments have undermined genetic determinism, the idea (in Yuille’s words) that human traits “specify the characteristics – in their entirety – of the in
1d
Big Think

Were there ever any real Amazon warrior women?The myths and legends of the Amazons are fascinating and telling of the Greek culture they enthralled and through them, our own culture as well. Read More
1d
Scientific American Content: Global

The Techno-Signature ChallengeTaking SETI more seriously means thinking expansively, but how do we evaluate the options? -- Read more on ScientificAmerican.com
1d

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