EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Underwater volcano behavior captured by timely scientific expeditionResearchers got a rare opportunity to study an underwater volcano in the Caribbean when it erupted while they were surveying the area.
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Canada remains 7th in World Happiness Report rankingsCanada remains the seventh happiest country in the world, according to a new report co-edited by CIFAR Distinguished Fellow John Helliwell.
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Futurity.org

ADHD drugs hint at how good feelings workA new study shows that healthy people who take ADHD drugs experience a surge in the neurotransmitter glutamate in key parts of the brain. And that increase in glutamate is associated with subsequent changes in positive emotion. The findings, published in the journal Neuropsychopharmacology , not only provide clues about how these drugs affect healthy brains, but also hint at a previously undiscov
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Latest Headlines | Science News

Renowned physicist Stephen Hawking dies at 76Beyond his research contributions, Stephen Hawking popularized black holes and the deep questions of the cosmos.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Did Michelangelo include a hidden caricature of himself in one of his famous sketches?A new Clinical Anatomy article presents evidence that Michelangelo inserted his self-portrait into a sketch of his close friend, Vittoria Colonna, which is currently in the collection of the British Museum in London, England. This self-caricature of Michelangelo may serve as a tool for analysing the artist's probable bodily dimensions and even his state of health at the time.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

The power of studying combustion on the ISSIf you wanted to reduce the amount of pollution humans produce, where might you look?
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

How accurate is your AI?As AI's role in society continues to expand, J B Brown of the Graduate School of Medicine reports on a new evaluation method for the type of AI that predicts yes/positive/true or no/negative/false answers.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

Exceptionally large amount of winter snow in Northern Hemisphere this yearThe new Arctic Now product shows with one picture the extent of the area in the Northern Hemisphere currently covered by ice and snow. This kind of information, which shows the accurate state of the Arctic, becomes increasingly important due to climate change.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

60-year-old paleontological mystery of a 'phantom' dicynodontA new study has re-discovered fossil collections from a 19th century hermit that validate 'phantom' fossil footprints collected in the 1950s showing dicynodonts coexisting with dinosaurs.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Why virtual reality cannot match the real thingSuppose you were offered the opportunity to hook yourself up to a machine that would give you all the experiences you desire. Using this technology you could have the sensations of climbing Mt Everest, enjoying great sex with a good looking partner or visiting the Taj Mahal.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

The rise of cities in the battle against climate changeCities, home to over half of the global population and responsible for more than 70 percent of global greenhouse gas emissions, are particularly vulnerable to the impacts of climate change. The undeniable imperative to consider climate change in urban planning and policy has inspired a small but growing groundswell of support for local action around the world.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Two-toned light pattern creates steep quantum walls for atomsExotic physics can happen when quantum particles come together and talk to each other. Understanding such processes is challenging for scientists, because the particle interactions can be hard to glimpse and even harder to control. Moreover, modern computer simulations struggle to make sense of all the intricate dynamics going on in a large group of particles. Luckily, atoms cooled to near zero te
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Better biomass conversion for biofuels and bioproductsBehind the successful conversion of biomass to a better biofuel or a new green chemical, there is a carefully chosen solvent. The right solvent not only dissolves biomass but also drives the efficiency of the entire conversion process, resulting in higher yields and a lower bottom line.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Saudi Arabia turns to nuclear power to curb oil addictionSaudi Arabia is fast-tracking an atomic energy programme to reduce its dependence on oil, but concerns over nuclear proliferation in the Middle East could put a damper on its ambitious plans.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

PhenoCam network harnesses 'big data' to predict impact of warmer climate on ecosystem productivity and carbon cyclingA new paper by Northern Arizona University professor Andrew Richardson published in the journal Scientific Data describes a vast network of digital cameras designed to capture millions of images documenting seasonal changes of vegetation across North America. The network, dubbed PhenoCam, is the result of a 10-year collaboration between Richardson, who led the effort, and scientists from the Unive
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Drifting and bouncing particles can maintain stability in fusion plasmasA key challenge in fusion research is maintaining the stability of the hot, charged plasma that fuels fusion reactions inside doughnut-shaped facilities called "tokamaks." Physicists at the U.S. Department of Energy's (DOE) Princeton Plasma Physics Laboratory (PPPL), have recently found that drifting particles in the plasma, which consists of free electrons and atomic nuclei, can forestall instabi
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Graphene flakes for future transistorsTiny and very promising for possible applications in the field of nanoelectronics: they are the graphene nanoflakes studied by a SISSA's team and protagonists of a study recently published in the Nano Letters journal. These hexagonal shaped nanostructures would allow to exploit quantum effects to modulate the current flow. Thanks to their intrinsic magnetic properties, they could also represent a
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Daily dose of violent video games has no long-term effect on adult aggressionPlaying violent action adventure games for prolonged periods does not make adults more aggressive say researchers from the Max Planck Institute for Human Development and the University Clinic Hamburg-Eppendorf in Germany. A new study led by Simone Kühn looked at the influence long-term violent video game play has on aggression levels, and compared this with playing a life simulation game or not pl
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Boron can form a purely honeycomb, graphene-like 2-D structureBorophene is known to have triangular lattice with holes, while honeycomb lattice of boron was predicted to be energetically unstable. However, a research team led by Prof. K. H. Wu at Institute of Physics, Chinese Academy of Sciences successfully fabricated a purely honeycomb, graphene-like borophene, by using an Al(111) surface as the substrate and molecular beam epitaxy in ultrahigh vacuum, pro
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Did Michelangelo include a hidden caricature of himself in one of his famous sketches?A new Clinical Anatomy article presents evidence that Michelangelo inserted his self-portrait into a sketch of his close friend, Vittoria Colonna, which is currently in the collection of the British Museum in London, England.
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News

How accurate is your AI?Kyoto University researcher reports on a new evaluation method for the type of AI that predicts yes/positive/true or no/negative/false answers.
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The Atlantic

Conor Lamb Chips Away at Trump's CoalitionThe Republicans’ last sea wall against a Democratic wave in November visibly cracked, but did not entirely crumble, in Tuesday’s special election for a House seat in Pennsylvania. For all of the gains Democrats have posted in elections held since Donald Trump’s victory in 2016, until this week they had failed to demonstrate progress on one critical front: regaining ground with the white working-c
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

'Cold-blooded' pythons make for caring momsReptiles are usually thought of as cold-blooded (an outdated term), simple animals that certainly don't care for their young.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

China's Huawei says to keep investing in US despite setbackChinese telecoms giant Huawei says it will continue to invest in the United States despite recent setbacks in its efforts to boost sales there.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Tears at Hawking's college as Cambridge mourns (Update)Stephen Hawking BlackTears flowed at Stephen Hawking's Cambridge University college as former students, fellow academics and admirers came to pay tribute to the world-famous physicist who died on Wednesday.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Broadcom withdraws Qualcomm offer after Trump blocks bidSingapore-based Broadcom said Wednesday it was abandoning efforts to take over US smartphone chipmaker Qualcomm, two days after its bid was blocked by President Donald Trump over national security concerns.
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Popular Science

Stephen Hawking, a man synonymous with the mysteries of the cosmos, is dead at 76Stephen Hawking BlackSpace The famous physicist died at home early on Wednesday. Even if you weren’t a physicist, you knew him. His computerized voice enthralled us for decades, guiding us toward answers to some of the biggest questions.
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The Scientist RSS

Renowned Physicist Stephen Hawking DiesFamed for his work on black holes and cosmology, he also survived decades with amyotrophic lateral sclerosis.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Stephen Hawking: 'His laboratory was the universe'Stephen Hawking BlackEveryone knew of Stephen Hawking's cosmic brilliance, but few could comprehend it. Not even top-notch astronomers.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

While a candidate's voice pitch sways voters, it doesn't result in better leadersVoice pitch, the perceived "highness" or "lowness" of a voice, influences how people are judged on a variety of dimensions such as attractiveness, physical strength and social dominance. In fact, studies have shown that individuals with lower-pitched voices are more likely to win elected office because they are believed to be superior leaders with greater physical prowess and integrity.
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Ingeniøren

Miljøstyrelsen: Plastposer er mest miljøvenligeEt nyt studie slår fast, at indkøbsposer lavet af plast er mere miljøvenlige end alternativer af papir, bioplast og bomuld – selv hvis de kun bruges en enkelt gang. For at miljøregnskabet går i nul, skal en bomuldspose bruges 7.100 gange og en pose af bioplast 42 gange.
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Treatment for male anti-NMDA receptor encephalitis patientsTreatments for the anti-NMDA receptor encephalitis usually include steroids, intravenous immunoglobulin, plasma exchange, plasmapheresis, rituximab, cyclophosphamide and tumor resection. The researchers aimed to compare the efficacy of the treatments including intravenous immunoglobulin, plasma exchange, plasmapheresis, rituximab or cyclophosphamide for male anti-NMDA receptor encephalitis patient
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Digging deep: Harnessing the power of soil microbes for more sustainable farmingHow will the farms of the future feed a projected 9.8 billion people by 2050? Berkeley Lab's 'smart farm' project marries microbiology and machine learning in an effort to reduce the need for chemical fertilizers and enhance soil carbon uptake, thus improving the long-term viability of the land while increasing crop yields.
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News

'Cold-blooded' pythons make for caring momsThe female Southern African python is the first ever egg-laying snake species shown to care for their babies. This comes at great cost to themselves, as they never eat during the breeding period -- with many snakes starving -- and turn their color to black in order to attract more sun while basking to raise their body temperature.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Climate change is shrinking mountain hares' habitat in the AlpsA warming climate will shrink and fragment mountain hare habitat in the Swiss Alps. Populations are likely to decline as a result, concludes an international study led by the Swiss Federal Institute for Forest, Snow and Landscape Research (WSL) and the University of Bern.
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Popular Science

Five tips for blocking spam from your inboxDIY It shall not pass! Free yourself from junk emails! This five-point plan will banish spam to help you declutter your inbox.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

Artificial and biological cells work together as mini chemical factoriesResearchers have fused living and non-living cells for the first time in a way that allows them to work together, paving the way for new applications.
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BBC News - Science & Environment

The book that made him a starStephen Hawking BlackA short history of A Brief History of Time - Hawking's blockbuster.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Digging deep: Harnessing the power of soil microbes for more sustainable farmingThere's a farm in Arkansas growing soybeans, corn, and rice that is aiming to be the most scientifically advanced farm in the world. Soil samples are run through powerful machines to have their microbes genetically sequenced, drones are flying overhead taking hyperspectral images of the crops, and soon supercomputers will be crunching the massive volumes of data collected.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Scientists remind their peers: Female birds sing, tooWhen North American ornithologists hear a bird singing, they're likely to assume it's a male. But in many species, the females sing too—and a new commentary in The Auk: Ornithological Advances argues that a better understanding of these unappreciated female songs could lead to advances in many aspects of bird biology.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Interactive, downloadable and 3-D printable scans of newly discovered hermit crabs now availableToday, a study published in the open access, open data journal GigaScience provides three-dimensional visual data from hermit crabs using the latest 3D microCT (Micro computed tomography) scanning technology. By making this microCT data publicly available, taxonomists potentially have more time and cost-efficient options for examining and comparing specimens for taxonomic research. With a shortage
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Viden

Husker du? Forskere inviterer dig til stort hukommelses-projektDanske forskere vil afsløre hemmelighed bag superhukommelse, og du har muligheden for at stille din hjerne til rådighed og se hvor mange decimaler af tallet pi, du kan lagre.
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BBC News - Science & Environment

Stephen Hawking's cameos: 'I have been quite popular in my time'This video has been removed for rights reasons.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Small birds discern threat level of enemiesChickadees and titmice don't just see that another bird is dangerous. They can also differentiate species and tell just how much of a threat they are.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Cutting and leaving invasive western juniper may lead to increase in invasive grassesThe spread of western juniper and invasive grasses are major threats to the health of the sagebrush-steppe ecosystem.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Big data hype hasn't led to tan­gi­ble re­sults in the so­cial sci­ences, expert saysWe've already got used to the fact that our digital footprint is continuously recorded, stored somewhere and evaluated. This has revolutionized the advertising industry, and companies like Uber and Amazon are using our data to be even more efficient. Discussion of how digitization is affecting our lives, however, is often limited to speculations about what Google or Facebook might do with this dat
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Molecular brakemen keep transporter proteins in check until it's their turn to moveWithin both plant and animal cells, motor proteins act like the engines in a busy train system. They shuttle material in the cell from one location to another. And just as commuter trains travel a predictable route in a defined direction, their volume of transport is commensurate with need. At rush hour, more trains are in operation. At midnight, there's no point in running trains every 10 minutes
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Scientific American Content: Global

The Elusive Theory of EverythingPhysicists have long sought to find one final theory that would unify all of physics. Instead they may have to settle for several -- Read more on ScientificAmerican.com
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Jupiter's red spot getting taller as it shrinks, team findsThough once big enough to swallow three Earths with room to spare, Jupiter's Great Red Spot has been shrinking for a century and a half. Nobody is sure how long the storm will continue to contract or whether it will disappear altogether.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

The future of transportation systemsDaniel Sperling is a distinguished professor of civil engineering and environmental science and policy at the University of California at Davis, where he is also founding director of the school's Institute of Transportation Studies. Sperling, a member of the California Air Resources Board, recently gave a talk at MITEI detailing major technological and societal developments that have the potential
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

New ideas for humans to survive far from EarthHow can we build a habitat on an ice-covered planet? The Swiss Space Center (SSC) has entered a partnership with the European Space Agency (ESA) to prepare ESA_Lab@CH and is inviting students in Switzerland and elsewhere in Europe to share their ideas through a dedicated website.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

First tracking of yellow-eyed penguin juveniles to learn more about survival ratesA select group of this season's yellow-eyed penguin/hoiho chicks are having their first expeditions into the ocean remotely tracked, as University of Otago researchers investigate dramatically declining survival rates of the endangered species.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Efficient and high-throughput technique to study the structure of DNAIt may be the most famous structure in biology, but it wasn't until a few years ago that biophysicist Enzo di Fabrizio and his colleagues took the first direct images of the DNA double helix with an electron microscope.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Scientists find new way to produce chiral molecules which may bring safer and more affordable medicineA research team from the Hong Kong University of Science and Technology (HKUST) has discovered a more efficient and eco-friendly way to produce a family of chiral molecules, which would potentially bring down the cost of chiral medicine and make them more accessible to all.
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Pairing mobile phone reminders with incentives to help prevent diseasesIn a study conducted in rural India, Johns Hopkins Medicine researchers working in collaboration with Bal Umang Drishya Sanstha (BUDS), a nonprofit Indian organization focused on child health, have found that mobile phone reminders linked with incentives such as free talk time minutes work better than phone alerts alone to improve childhood immunization rates in poor communities.
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News

While a candidate's voice pitch sways voters, it doesn't result in better leadersStudies show that people with lower-pitched voices are more likely to win elected office because they are believed to be superior leaders with greater physical prowess and integrity. But is voice pitch a reliable signal of leadership quality? And is the bias in favor of selecting leaders with lower voices good or bad for democracy? Researchers from Florida Atlantic University and the University of
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News

American Federation for Aging Research experts featured in PBS special: Incredible AgingFourteen AFAR experts are among those featured in 'Incredible Aging: Adding Life to Your Years,' a new documentary program premiering on PBS stations nationwide in March 2018. The program, hosted by 14-time Emmy Award-winner Meredith Vieira, is based on the latest scientific research on healthy aging -- much of it funded by AFAR.
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Crabs in your computerA study published in GigaScience provides three-dimensional visual data from hermit crabs using 3-D microCT scanning technology. The authors not only describe the data, they also provide downloadable, interactive files of everything in this study, allowing everyone to use and manipulate the data. They even include interactive web-based viewers and 3-D printable file formats. Making this complex da
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Scientists remind their peers: Female birds sing, tooWhen North American ornithologists hear a bird singing, they're likely to assume it's a male. But in many species, the females sing too -- and a new commentary in The Auk: Ornithological Advances argues that a better understanding of these unappreciated female songs could lead to advances in many aspects of bird biology.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Companies that use conservative accounting principles less likely to face lawsuits, study findsFirms that use accounting practices that basically require more verification for good news than bad news can more easily avoid securities class-action lawsuits and improve the outcomes of litigation, according to a study that includes a University of Kansas accounting researcher.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Brachiopods resilient to past environmental changeA new study concludes that a seafloor dwelling marine invertebrate is more resilient to environmental change than expected. The paper, led by researchers at British Antarctic Survey, is published today in the journal Global Change Biology.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Boaty McBoatface returns from first mission under the iceThe yellow high-tech autonomous underwater vehicle (AUV), affectionately known as Boaty McBoatface, has successfully returned from an ambitious science expedition deep below half a kilometre of ice.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Eight new 'hot Jupiters' discovered by astronomersEuropean astronomers have detected eight new "hot Jupiter" exoplanets as part of the WASP-South transit survey. The newly discovered gas giants have short orbital periods and masses ranging from 0.42 to 5.2 Jupiter masses. The finding is detailed in a paper published March 6 on arXiv.org.
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NYT > Science

6 Memorable Cultural Moments Inspired by Stephen HawkingStephen Hawking BlackThe British theoretical physicist, who has died age 76, was the subject of films, made cameos on TV shows and featured in songs and works of opera.
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Live Science

Stephen Hawking's Most Intriguing Quotes on Aliens, Women and the Future of HumanityOne of the brightest minds, Stephen Hawking has died at age 76. As we mourn his death and celebrate his life, here's a look back at some of his most intriguing words.
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New on MIT Technology Review

AI assistants say dumb things, and we’re about to find out whyA new test could prove that when it comes to language, today’s best AI systems are fundamentally limited.
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News

NIH scientists search for the clocks behind aging brain disordersTo understand the link between aging and neurodegenerative disorders such as Alzheimer's disease, NIH scientists compared the genetic clocks that tick during the lives of normal and mutant flies. They found that altering the activity of a gene called Cdk5 appeared to make the clocks run faster than normal, and the flies older than their chronological age. This caused the flies to have problems wal
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News

One in four Americans suffer when exposed to common chemicalsUniversity of Melbourne research reveals that one in four Americans report chemical sensitivity, with nearly half this group medically diagnosed with Multiple Chemical Sensitivities (MCS), suffering health problems from exposure to common chemical product.
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BBC News - Science & Environment

Stephen Hawking: Colleagues reflect on scientist's brillianceColleagues of the visionary physicist Stephen Hawking say he left a unique legacy.
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Scientific American Content: Global

Osteoporosis: An Avoidable CrisisBone fractures are rife after age 50, so why aren’t we doing more to prevent them? -- Read more on ScientificAmerican.com
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Scientific American Content: Global

My Alarming, Inspiring Encounter with the Late Stephen HawkingAfter having a seizure in my arms at a meeting in Sweden, the paralyzed physicist lectured on how we live in a “superspace” with infinite dimensions -- Read more on ScientificAmerican.com
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Dagens Medicin

Bemanding af nødberedskabet bliver afgørende for praktiserende lægerPLO-formand afventer information om rammen for nødberedskabet i tilfælde af strejke og lockout. Bemandingens størrelse vil have stor betydning for trykket på almen praksis, vurderer Christian Freitag.
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BBC News - Science & Environment

The science that made him famousStephen Hawking BlackFrom black holes boiling themselves out of existence to equations describing the entire history of the Universe.
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New Scientist - News

A quarter of people have bad reactions to fragranced productsGrowing numbers of people say they get asthma, migraines or skin problems when they’re exposed to chemicals in products like deodorants and air fresheners
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Brightest fast radio burst yet recorded at Parkes in AustraliaA team of researchers at the Parkes Observatory in NSW Australia has reported recording the brightest fast radio burst (FRB) yet on March 9 of this year. They describe it as having a high signal-to-noise ratio with an "orientation not very favorable for a detection of any gamma ray transient with INTEGRAL all-sky detectors."
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The Scientist RSS

Image of the Day: Pterosaur FossilsPaleontologists find fossils from at least seven species of the flying reptiles in Morocco.
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Science | The Guardian

A life in science: Stephen HawkingThe physicist and author, who has died at home in Cambridge, made intuitive leaps that will keep scientists busy for decades Stephen Hawking dies aged 76 Stephen Hawking always had something to say. He shook up the world of cosmology with more than 150 papers, dozens of which became renowned. He was told he had only a brief time on Earth, but spent half a century captivating audiences in lecture
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Scientific American Content: Global

Scientists Mourn Stephen Hawking's DeathPhysicist and icon of science dies at age 76 -- Read more on ScientificAmerican.com
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Scientific American Content: Global

Why We Choose Ill-Matched Romantic Partners (And How to Stop)Why do we choose people who are so wrong for us? And more importantly, how can we stop? -- Read more on ScientificAmerican.com
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Futurity.org

More than one culprit is killing sea starsScientists are beginning to unravel the complicated connections among viruses, the environment, and wasting diseases among sea stars in the waters of the Pacific Northwest. As ocean temperatures rise and oceanic diseases proliferate, species like sea stars struggle to survive, and scientists are looking for underlying causes. To bring clarity to the sea star disease problem, the scientists propos
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Science | The Guardian

Stephen Hawking: a scientist who never forgot the value of the NHS | Jonathan FreedlandHawking’s fascination with the cosmos never stopped him speaking out on an everyday issue of vital importance In one of his last articles for the Guardian, Stephen Hawking confessed that, thanks to the celebrity he had gained – not many theoretical physicists could boast cameo roles in Star Trek and the Simpsons – and “the isolation imposed by my illness, I feel as though my ivory tower is getting
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Global warming found to be causing an increase in snow avalanches in Western HimalayasA team of researchers from across Europe has found that rising temperatures due to global warming have been causing more avalanches in the Western Himalayas than in the past. In their paper published in Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences, the group outlines their study and findings and suggest that their results indicate that new risk management policies need to be put in place.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

North Atlantic is getting less salty, but it's too soon to blame climate changeSalinity in the North Atlantic dropped dramatically over the last decade, according to a new study that used data from a floating network of sensors to get the most detailed picture yet of changing ocean conditions in the region.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Scientist develops hybrid nano-probe that can detect live cancer cellsFabien Pinaud's big vision for treating cancer homes in on the smallest of targets.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

How cash can promote tropical forest conservationPaying rural villagers to cut down fewer trees boosts conservation not only while the payments are being made but even after they're discontinued, according to a new CU Boulder study involving 1,200 tropical forest users in five developing countries.
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Removing heavy metals from waterEPFL chemists have developed a new material that can remove heavy metals from water and make it drinkable in seconds. The study is published in ACS Central Science.
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Nanospears deliver genetic material to cells with pinpoint accuracyIn a step toward accelerating the production of new gene therapies, scientists report in ACS Nano that they have developed remote-controlled, needle-like nanospears capable of piercing membrane walls and delivering DNA into selected cells. They say the new technique, which can ferry biological materials to cells with pinpoint accuracy, overcomes many of the existing barriers to effective gene modi
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Removing heavy metals from water with MOFsAn estimated 1 billion people do not have access to clean drinking water, a problem expected to worsen with climate change, according to the World Health Organization. In addition, higher energy needs and increased use of heavy metals in industrial processes have increased human exposure to these toxic materials from drinking water in recent decades. Researchers now report in ACS Central Science a
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Elevated lead in private wells could pose health risksSince the Flint Water Crisis in Michigan, concern in the US over lead in drinking water has increased. Information about water from private wells has been limited because such wells are exempt from the 1974 Safe Drinking Water Act, the 1986 Lead Ban and the 2011 Reduction of Lead in Drinking Water Act. Now, researchers report a case study in ACS' journal Environmental Science & Technology that she
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News

For nanomedicine, cell sex mattersA research team has demonstrated that cell sex considerably influenced cellular uptake of nanoparticles and found that cells from men and women responded differently to reprogramming techniques used to enhance the ability of the cells to differentiate into a greater variety of cell types.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Running a real-time simulation of go-no-go for Apollo 17Not everyone gets to become a part of history, but mathematician Billie Robertson is one of the lucky ones. In this image taken on Nov. 27, 1972, she was running a real-time simulation of Translunar Injection (TLI) Go-No-Go for the Apollo 17 lunar landing mission.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Revolutionary new filter can improve drinking water qualityA world-first graphene-based filter that can remove more than 99 percent of the natural organic matter in treated drinking water is being scaled up for possible use in conventional plants.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Research on bismuth ferrite could lead to new types of electrical devicesElectrical devices in use today use conductive materials to guide electrons where they are needed. These materials must be fastened in place and insulated in order to keep the electricity on the right path. New research from the University of Arkansas makes a significant step toward a new kind of electrical device, which would use the natural properties of materials like bismuth ferrite, along wit
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Popular Science

National data says substance abuse is on the decline. These charts tell a different story.Health National averages hide the counties that desperately need our help. Deaths from alcohol use disorders have dropped nationally by 8.1 percent since 1980. But in some counties, deaths have doubled in that same timeframe.
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Science-Based Medicine

Facilitated Communication Rears Its Ugly Head AgainFacilitated communication is pure pseudoscience that was debunked almost 30 years ago, but it keeps coming back, creating new victims.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Energy level alignment for molecular electronicsNUS physicists have found that complex electron-electron interactions change the energy levels at molecule-metal interfaces, affecting the performance of molecular electronic devices.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Physicists' algorithm predicts the optical properties of moleculesScientists of the Tomsk State University (Russia), with colleagues from Sweden and Finland, have created an algorithm for calculating the photophysical and luminescent characteristics of molecules. This algorithm makes it possible to calculate optical and luminescent properties (luminosity and quantum yield of fluorescence) of molecules and substances with high-precision methods of quantum chemist
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The Atlantic

Unplugging From the Internet Nearly Destroyed MeMost days, I am tethered to my phone. I walk around gorging myself on news from my mobile devices, constantly absorbing information, soaking in stories without satiation or satisfaction. I am bombarded by alerts and notifications, retweets and likes and faves. I’ve been on Twitter pretty much continuously for seven whole years, and the algorithm of virality and in-case-you-missed-its has all but
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The Atlantic

Why America's Teachers Haven't Been Getting RaisesLarry Cagle is angry. At 54 years of age, he makes $34,500 a year teaching critical-reading skills to public high-school students in Tulsa, Oklahoma. “I do construction and lawn maintenance in the summer” to make ends meet, he said. “I moved here from Florida five years ago, and in Florida I made $25,000 a year more.” He talked about the number of public-school teachers he knew working second job
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The Atlantic

Syphon FountainAn oddity of mountain land the earliest explorers found were springs that ebbed and flowed by turn. It was a true phenomenon, where water would gush out and then go slack and dry for no reason. Some speculated on the source but could propose no likely gloss. Then it was Thomas Jefferson who named an alternating run a “syphon fountain,” a cavity in rock that filled to capacity and reached the over
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Marine ecologists study the effects of giant kelp on groups of organisms in the underwater forest ecosystemWhen British naturalist Charles Darwin traveled to the Galapagos Islands in 1835, he took notice of the giant kelp forests ringing the islands. He believed that if those forests were destroyed, a significant number of species would be lost. These underwater ecosystems, Darwin believed, could be even more important than forests on land.
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Scientific American Content: Global

Why Are White Men Stockpiling Guns?Research suggests it's largely because they're anxious about their ability to protect their families, insecure about their place in the job market and beset by racial fears -- Read more on ScientificAmerican.com
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Feed: All Latest

Which Microsoft Surface Should I Buy? (2018)We round up your options to help you decide which Microsoft PC suits your needs.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

For nanomedicine, cell sex mattersImportant biological differences between men and women exist - right down to the cellular level. Investigators from Brigham and Women's Hospital and colleagues at Stanford University, McGill University and University of California, Berkeley wanted to determine if differences between male versus female cells may influence how well cells uptake nanoparticles - a key vehicle for imaging and targeted
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Removing heavy metals from water with MOFsAn estimated 1 billion people do not have access to clean drinking water, a problem expected to worsen with climate change, according to the World Health Organization. In addition, higher energy needs and increased use of heavy metals in industrial processes have increased human exposure to these toxic materials from drinking water in recent decades. Researchers now report in ACS Central Science a
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Elevated lead in private wells could pose health risksSince the Flint Water Crisis in Michigan, concern in the U.S. over lead in drinking water has increased. Information about water from private wells has been limited because such wells are exempt from the 1974 Safe Drinking Water Act, the 1986 Lead Ban and the 2011 Reduction of Lead in Drinking Water Act. Now, researchers report a case study in ACS' journal Environmental Science & Technology that s
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Nanospears deliver genetic material to cells with pinpoint accuracyIn a step toward accelerating the production of new gene therapies, scientists report in ACS Nano that they have developed remote-controlled, needle-like nanospears capable of piercing membrane walls and delivering DNA into selected cells. They say the new technique, which can ferry biological materials to cells with pinpoint accuracy, overcomes many of the existing barriers to effective gene modi
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Live Science

Woman Gives Birth in the Red Sea (But Here's Why You Shouldn't)A pregnant woman visiting Egypt certainly has a unique story to tell about her labor: She appears to have given birth in the Red Sea.
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Live Science

What Was the Most Pointless Battle in History?Some would argue that there are no winners in warfare. But in some battles, the losses are more embarrassing than others.
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The Atlantic

Obama's Legacy of Impunity for TortureMuch has been made of President Trump’s disregard for rules and norms—boundaries delineated by ethics and morality if not written laws themselves. But transgressing laws, rules, and norms isn’t the only way to destroy them. Another way is simply not to enforce them. In that regard, the 44th president, Barack Obama, bears a measure of responsibility for the recklessness of his successor, in partic
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The Atlantic

The Pointlessness and Promise of Art After DeathA recent article at New Zealand’s The Spinoff compared Mount Eerie’s 2017 album, A Crow Looked at Me, to, among other things, the Holocaust poetry of Primo Levi. The headline called Mount Eerie “the saddest musician in the world,” leading Phil Elverum, who records as Mount Eerie, to tweet: “I guess I’m the saddest in the world? Yeah maybe.” Elverum’s wife, the artist Geneviève Castrée, was diagno
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Asteroids and comets shower Mars with organicsAsteroids and comets appear to be a much more important supplier of organic molecules on Mars than expected. Until now, astronomers assumed that the organics on Mars mainly came from dust particles from space. Now, computer simulations by an international team of researchers led by Dutch astronomers indicate that one third of the material comes from asteroids and comets. The findings have been acc
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Ground-based spectrometer designed to identify Earth-sized planets in neighboring solar systemsA new, ground-based spectrometer designed and built at Yale represents the most powerful step yet in the effort to identify Earth-sized planets in neighboring solar systems.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Next NASA Mars rover reaches key manufacturing milestoneNASA's Mars 2020 mission has begun the assembly, test and launch operations (ATLO) phase of its development, on track for a July 2020 launch to Mars.
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Ingeniøren

It-vejledere: For meget fokus på kode i skolenDigital dannelse ligger bag dagens ideer om teknologiforståelse i folkeskolen.
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Live Science

10 Surprising Facts About PiFrom its ancient origins to the unanswered questions, here are some surprising facts about pi.
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Science | The Guardian

Share your tributes and memories of Stephen HawkingThe physicist and author of A Brief History of Time has died. Share your tributes here Stephen Hawking, the brightest star in the firmament of science , whose insights shaped modern cosmology and inspired global audiences in the millions, has died aged 76. Related: Stephen Hawking, cosmology's brightest star, dies aged 76 Continue reading...
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NYT > Science

Stephen Hawking, in His Own WordsStephen Hawking Brief“I’m not afraid of death, but I’m in no hurry to die. I have so much I want to do first.”
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

New Horizons chooses nickname for 'ultimate' flyby targetAs NASA's New Horizons mission continues exploring the unknown, the mission team has selected a highly appropriate nickname for its next flyby target in the outer reaches of the solar system.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

38-year-old code-writing tool released for general useOne of the world's early computer software editors, developed by the University of Adelaide and still in use today, is being released by the University for free use by developers around the world.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Warm summers could weaken ocean circulationDeep convection in the North Atlantic is one of the key components of large-scale ocean circulation. Based on long-term observations, scientists from the GEOMAR Helmholtz Centre for Ocean Research Kiel have now demonstrated the influence of increased surface freshening in summer on convection in the following winter. As the researchers write now in the journal Nature Climate Change, enhanced surfa
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Physicists blast model asteroids with a laserA large team of Russian researchers from Rosatom, joined by three MIPT physicists, has modeled the impact of a nuclear explosion on an Earth-threatening asteroid. They manufactured miniature asteroids and blasted them with a laser. The modeling technique developed in this study is a way of experimentally evaluating asteroid destruction criteria such as the explosion energy needed to eliminate a da
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Ingeniøren

Hver tiende boring indeholder for mange sprøjte-resterRester efter et roe-sprøjtemiddel, der blev brugt frem til 1990'erne, findes i grundvandet og i vandboringer over hele landet. I det værste tilfælde er der 110 gange over grænseværdien.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Hawking, the man whose brain transcended disabilityStephen Hawking BlackLiving with motor neurone disease for more than 50 years, Stephen Hawking transcended his disability to becoming one of science's brightest stars, harnessing technology to once again give voice to his ideas.
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Dagens Medicin

Sundhed skal være mere end blot modpol til sygdomDet går ned ad bakke for danskernes sundhed, lød konklusionerne fra Den Nationale Sundhedsprofil. Det gælder dog ikke for diabetesområdet. Ud over forbedret behandling, arbejdes der også med et nyt syn på, hvordan man får sundhedsfremme og det gode liv helt ud i hverdagen, der hvor borgerne bor, arbejder og færdes.
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Dagens Medicin

Praktiserende læger bruger ni dage om året på efteruddannelseNy opgørelse fra PLO viser, at de praktiserende læger i gennemsnit har brugt ni dage på efteruddannelse det seneste år. De unge foretrækker kursus og efteruddannelsesgrupper, mens de ældre bruger tid på kongresser og selvstudier.
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Dagens Medicin

Ny service til kronisk syge skal vende borgernes sygdomsforløb omRegion Sjælland og Odsherred Kommune samarbejder om en ny døgnbemandet service til borgere med kronisk sygdom, der skal forsøge at slå ring om borgeren, så denne ikke oplever at gå spidsrod mellem de forskellige tilbud.
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Ingeniøren

Årets værste hacker: Inficerede sig selv med malware, så sikkerhedsforskere kunne se altEn formodet cyberkriminel inficerede sig selv med malware, så sikkerhedsforskere kunne følge de kriminelle aktiviteter nøje.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

'The mind of God': top quotes from Stephen HawkingStephen Hawking BlackThe world-famous British theoretical physicist Stephen Hawking, who died on Wednesday at the age of 76, was known as much for his profound and witty comments as his scientific discoveries.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

These 6 new SUVs are worth the waitIf you're in the market for a new SUV, it's important to know not only what's available now but also what's coming. Here are six SUVs going on sale in the next several months that we at Edmunds think are worth waiting for.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

'Body on a chip' could improve drug evaluationMIT engineers have developed new technology that could be used to evaluate new drugs and detect possible side effects before the drugs are tested in humans. Using a microfluidic platform that connects engineered tissues from up to 10 organs, the researchers can accurately replicate human organ interactions for weeks at a time, allowing them to measure the effects of drugs on different parts of the
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Artificial and biological cells work together as mini chemical factoriesResearchers have fused living and non-living cells for the first time in a way that allows them to work together, paving the way for new applications.
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Ingeniøren

Fysikkens superstjerne er slukketStephen Hawking er død 76 år gammel.
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Feed: All Latest

Google's Quantum Computing Party Is as Fancy as Physics GetsPhysicists aren't known for their fancy shindigs—but quantum computer researchers break the mold.
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Feed: All Latest

Why Do Augmented-Reality Glasses Look So Bad?It's tough to pack in all the necessary tech and still make something people want to wear.
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Feed: All Latest

Blockchain's Brand New World Is Being Built By RefugeesCryptocurrency enthusiasts are harnessing blockchain's record-keeping potential to create a digital trail for people who've fallen off the grid
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Chain reaction of fast-draining lakes poses new risk for Greenland ice sheetA growing network of lakes on the Greenland ice sheet has been found to drain in a chain reaction that speeds up the flow of the ice sheet, threatening its stability.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

High numbers of elderly Japanese women will soon live in poverty, predicts new modelAround one in four elderly Japanese women will live below the poverty level in the near future—with the figure rising to 50% for never-married and divorced women. In contrast, only about 10% of Japanese men will become impoverished. This is the prediction of a new model of current Japanese pension system, published today in Frontiers in Physics, that investigates how and why elderly women in the c
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Ingeniøren

Regeringsudvalg: Universiteterne skal bruge mere teknologi i undervisningenRegeringens universitetsudvalg opfordrer til mere teknologi i undervisningen på universiteterne. DTU vil bruge teknologi, der monitorerer studerendes faglige kompetencer.
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Viden

Hawking til DR i 2016: Vores livsstil vil udrydde menneskehedenJorden kan blive som Venus. Kogende varm med svovlsyre som regn i stedet for vand.
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Scientific American Content: Global

What Is Pi, and How Did It Originate?Steven Bogart, a mathematics instructor at Georgia Perimeter College, answers -- Read more on ScientificAmerican.com
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Scientific American Content: Global

Pakistan Is Racing to Combat the World's First Extensively Drug-Resistant Typhoid OutbreakRumors about poisoned vaccines are making this bacterial infection hard to control -- Read more on ScientificAmerican.com
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Science | The Guardian

Startup wants to upload your brain to the cloud, but has to kill you to do itNectome offers to preserve grey matter through ‘vitrifixation’ process tested on rabbits – but doesn’t have a method for uploading brains yet A US startup is promising to upload customers’ brains to the cloud using a pioneering technique it has trialled on rabbits. The only catch, according to the company’s cofounder ? The process is “100% fatal”. Continue reading...
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Dagens Medicin

Kommunerne ønsker flere praktiserende lægerLæger er skævt fordelt i det danske sundhedsvæsen, og en for stor en del af behandlingen finder sted på sygehusene, mener Kommunernes Landsforening.
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Science | The Guardian

Why astrology is turning to millennialsA recent Observer article insisted millennials are embracing astrology. Like astrology itself, this claim is very questionable I once wrote a spoof horoscope column for a short-lived comedy publication under the pseudonym “Mystic Bob”. Spoofing horoscopes is a comedy staple, and my own take on it was that given how most horoscopes are largely just a jumble of vague generalisations and unspecific
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Futurity.org

Cities change how much it rains and where storms hitUrban development changes storm patterns and rainfall amounts, two new papers suggest. The research highlights the need for urban planning and infrastructure design that considers how the landscape will affect the weather. In two separate papers, teams led by Dev Niyogi, Indiana state climatologist and professor in the agronomy and earth, atmospheric, and planetary sciences departments at Purdue
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BBC News - Science & Environment

Stephen Hawking: Scientist in the public eyeFrom meeting presidents to popes, we look back at some of Professor Hawking's most notable public appearances.
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Viden

Hawking var verdensstjerne: Mødte Obama, paven og dronningenBILLEDER: Videnskabsmanden, der forskede i universets sorte huller, blev 76 år.
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BBC News - Science & Environment

Stephen Hawking: Tributes pour in for 'inspirational' physicistStephen Hawking BlackScientists, politicians and celebrities say the physicist's death leaves an "intellectual vacuum".
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Chain reaction of fast-draining lakes poses new risk for Greenland ice sheetA growing network of lakes on the Greenland ice sheet has been found to drain in a chain reaction that speeds up the flow of the ice sheet, threatening its stability.
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Artificial and biological cells work together as mini chemical factoriesResearchers have fused living and non-living cells for the first time in a way that allows them to work together, paving the way for new applications.
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News

'Body on a chip' could improve drug evaluationMIT engineers have developed new technology that could be used to evaluate new drugs and detect possible side effects before they are approved for human use. Using a microfluidic chip that connects tissue samples from up to 10 organs, the researchers can accurately replicate human organ interactions, allowing them to measure the effects of drugs on different parts of the body.
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News

High numbers of elderly Japanese women will soon live in poverty, predicts new modelRoughly one in four elderly Japanese women will live below the poverty level in the near future, predicts a model of the Japanese pension system. Never-married and divorced women will be the most affected, with around 50 percent of these women predicted to become impoverished in the next 50 years.
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The Atlantic

Hillary Clinton's Trickle-Down AmericaAfter a long, bruising career in public life, Hillary Clinton deserves a respite. Yet the erstwhile Democratic presidential nominee finds herself in the news again, having recently observed to an audience in Mumbai, India, that while she may have lost the 2016 election, she won, decisively, “the places that represent two-thirds of America’s gross domestic product.” In itself, this is hardly cause
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The Atlantic

Ten Questions Trump's CIA Director Nominee Should AnswerThere was a sharp intake of breath from those of us who litigated civil rights last year, when Gina Haspel, one of the key players in America’s post-9/11 torture drama, was made the CIA’s Deputy Director. Now she’s been tapped to lead the entire agency. In 2002 Haspel presided over a CIA black site in Thailand where a prisoner, Abu Zubaydah, was waterboarded 83 times in a month. Zubaydah’s tortur
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The Atlantic

Heidi Heitkamp Takes On Elizabeth Warren Over the Senate Banking BillDon’t expect Heidi Heitkamp and Elizabeth Warren to be campaigning together anytime soon. For the past week, Warren has been telling anyone who will listen that one-third of her fellow Democrats in the Senate are caving to Wall Street and bank lobbyists by joining Republicans in legislation to roll back a part of the 2010 Dodd-Frank financial regulatory overhaul. The bill’s supporters say it is a
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The Atlantic

The Origins of the 'Globalist' SlurAfter National Economic Council Director Gary Cohn announced his resignation last week, President Trump offered a back-handed compliment to his departing adviser: “He may be a globalist, but I still like him.” Mick Mulvaney, the director of the Office of Management and Budget, chimed in with his own statement: “I never expected that the co-worker I would work closest, and best, with at the White
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The Atlantic

Ancient DNA Is Rewriting Human (and Neanderthal) HistoryGeneticist David Reich used to study the living, but now he studies the dead. The precipitating event came in the form of 40,000-year-old Neanderthal bones found in a Croatian cave. So well-preserved were the bones that they yielded enough DNA for sequencing, and it became Reich’s job in 2007 to analyze the DNA for signs that Neanderthals interbred with humans—a idea he was “deeply suspicious” of
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New Scientist - News

Ten connected miniature organs are best human-on-a-chip yetTen miniature organs have been connected together to create the closest we’ve come yet to a human-on-a-chip – a system that may one day replace animal testing
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

A new twist to an old story of cellular signaling in the eye of a flyWhen light falls on the eye of a fly, ripples of messages flow through its cells. These messages are carried by molecular messengers forming an intricate information system that exists in most living cells.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Physicists quantum simulate topological materials with ultracold atomsSymmetry plays a fundamental role in understanding complex quantum matter, particularly in classifying topological quantum phases, which have attracted great interests in the recent decade. An outstanding example is the time-reversal invariant topological insulator, a relatively new class of material with peculiar electronic properties, that is well understood as a symmetry-protected topological (
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

The cause of low-level turbulence around Hong Kong International AirportWith more than 1000 flights per day, Hong Kong International Airport (HKIA) is one of the busiest airports in the world. Hence, the occurrence of low-level turbulence around HKIA, which can influence the landing and departure of aircraft and is closely related to aviation safety, is an important topic of study.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Technique combines light-based analytical methods with microfluidic sample processing for pathogen diagnosisScientists of the Leibniz-Institute of Photonic Technologies (Leibniz-IPHT), Center for Sepsis Control and Care at the University Hospital Jena and Friedrich Schiller University have developed a faster and cheaper alternative for pathogen diagnostics. Project manager Prof. Ute Neugebauer says, "We combine light-based analytical methods with microfluidic sample processing. With our Lab-on-a-Chip sy
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Flood, drought and disease tolerant—one gene to rule them allAn international collaboration between researchers at the University of Copenhagen, Nagoya University and the University of Western Australia has resulted in a plant biology breakthrough. Since 2014, the researchers have worked on identifying the genetic background for the improved flood tolerance observed in rice, wheat and several natural wetland plants. In New Phytologist, the researchers descr
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Stephen Hawking, a life in 10 datesHere are 10 key dates in the life of renowned British physicist Stephen Hawking, who died Wednesday at the age 76:
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Are palaeontologists naming too many species?A comprehensive new study looking at variations in Ichthyosaurus, a common British Jurassic ichthyosaur (sea-going reptile) also known as 'Sea Dragons', has provided important information into recognizing new fossil species.
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Ingeniøren

Energistyrelsen: Derfor skal ubeboede øer have lynhurtigt mobilnetI en redegørelse til Berlingske forklarer Energistyrelsen, hvorfor ubeboede øer som Flakfortet og Hesselø skal dækkes med høje hastigheder på op til 50 Mb/s.
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Nyheder - Forskning - Videnskab

Virtual Reality afslører vores fødevareadfærd og -ønskerNy forskning fra Future Consumer Lab på Københavns Universitet viser, at Virtual Reality...
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BBC News - Science & Environment

Stephen Hawking dies: Scientist's most memorable quotesStephen Hawking BlackRemembering some of the key theories and quotes of the world renowned physicist, who has died.
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BBC News - Science & Environment

Science mourns Stephen HawkingStephen Hawking BlackTributes highlight his breakthrough research as well as his personality and inspiration to millions.
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BBC News - Science & Environment

Stephen Hawking: A life in picturesStephen Hawking BlackThe physicist, who battled motor neurone disease for most of his life, has died at the age of 76.
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Are palaeontologists naming too many species?A comprehensive new study looking at variations in Ichthyosaurus, a common British Jurassic ichthyosaur (sea-going reptile) also known as 'Sea Dragons', has provided important information into recognizing new fossil species.
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Ingeniøren

Kunstige diamanter fra DTU skal skabe billige MR-scannereMed en brugt ‘diamant-maskine’ skaber DTU små, ædle krystaller, der har potentiale til at gøre magnetiske målinger meget billigere.
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The Atlantic

The New Secretary of State Is a North Korea HawkJust two days before he was named Rex Tillerson’s successor as secretary of state, CIA Director Mike Pompeo appeared on the Sunday morning shows and staked out exceedingly ambitious goals for Donald Trump’s upcoming summit with North Korean leader Kim Jong Un. Pompeo, an unsparing critic of the nuclear agreement with Iran, vowed to not repeat Barack Obama’s mistakes. What he promised was breathta
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Science | The Guardian

Why humans are optimised for endurance running, not speedOther animals have us beat over short distances, but in an interspecies Olympic ultramarathon, Homo sapiens would likely take all the medals Roger Bannister’s four-minute mile, while a remarkable human milestone, is noteworthy from a comparative physiology standpoint only for its mediocrity. A seminal paper by AV Hill on biomechanics illustrates the point with a table of maximum speeds across the
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

France warns Apple and Google of fines over 'abusive' practices (Update)The French government said Wednesday that it would take legal action against Google and Apple over "abusive business practices", threatening fines that could further strain transatlantic ties as a trade war looms.
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The Atlantic

Why a Study on Opioids Ignited a Twitter FirestormWith the opioid epidemic claiming more than 100 lives a day in the United States, every state now has some sort of law expanding access to naloxone, also known as Narcan. Naloxone is an opioid antagonist that makes someone who has overdosed start breathing again. Sometimes, its powers are said to bring an overdose victim “back to life.” That led two economists to wonder, does the prospect of not
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New Scientist - News

Stephen Hawking: Tributes pour in as physicist dies aged 76Stephen Hawking BlackWorld-famous theoretical physicist Stephen Hawking died on Wednesday morning, and tributes are flowing in
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Viden

Geni og favorit Simpson-karakter: Hele verden hylder Stephen HawkingNasa og Neil de Grasse var blandt de første, der hylder afdøde Stephen Hawking.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Stephen Hawking's death lights up the TwitterverseStephen Hawking BlackStephen Hawking's death on Wednesday left the universe a slightly dimmer place but lit up social media as academics, politicians and celebrities alike praised a scientist whose appeal crossed time, space and cultural boundaries.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

'Uncle Hawking' draws nearly half-billion clicks from mourning Chinese (Update)Stephen Hawking's death Wednesday generated nearly half a billion clicks in China, where fans mourned a "giant star" who was admired for rising above physical disability and for heartfelt messages to his Chinese social media followers.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

ALS: The disease that Stephen Hawking defied for decadesStephen Hawking BriefBritish physicist Stephen Hawking was one of the most famous sufferers of amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS), the fatal neurological disease that paralysed his body but did nothing to curb his contribution to science.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

In the US, small organic milk producers face turmoilWith supply exceeding demand, large farms taking center stage and plant-based alternatives luring consumers away, times are hard for small organic milk producers in the United States.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Greek innovation drive catches Tesla's attentionWhen a group of Greek students dreamt up the Pyrforos electric vehicle, they never imagined their futuristic, energy-efficient invention would inspire US automaker Tesla to invest in their crisis-hit country.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Stephen Hawking: a brief history of geniusStephen Hawking BlackStephen Hawking, who has died aged 76, was Britain's most famous modern day scientist, a genius who dedicated his life to unlocking the secrets of the Universe.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

First lady convening tech companies to tackle cyberbullyingFirst lady Melania Trump is bringing together tech giants to talk about ways to fight cyberbullying and promote internet safety, representatives of three companies said Tuesday.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Police use of social media to deliver news raises concernsIt opens with a warning: This video contains footage from real police body cameras. Viewer discretion is advised.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

New research solves the 60-year-old paleontological mystery of a 'phantom' dicynodontA new study has re-discovered fossil collections from a 19th century hermit that validate 'phantom' fossil footprints collected in the 1950s showing dicynodonts coexisting with dinosaurs.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Decreased oxygen levels could present hidden threat to marine speciesSpecies living in coastal regions could face a significant future threat from reduced levels of oxygen in the marine environment, according to research published in Nature Scientific Reports.
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Viden

Otte citater fra Stephen Hawking om rumvæsner, universet og livetHer er nogle af Stephen Hawkings bedste citater, som er død efter mange års alvorlig sygdom.
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Viden

Kretz om Stephen Hawking: Både hjernen og mennesket bjergtog folkStephen Hawking fik aldrig svar på sit store spørgsmål, fortæller DR's korrespondent.
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BBC News - Science & Environment

Obituary: Stephen HawkingStephen Hawking BlackDespite a crippling illness, Stephen Hawking became one of the most respected scientists of his age.
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BBC News - Science & Environment

War on plastic may do more harm than good, warns think tankA think tank warns of the risk of unintended consequences from the current concern over plastics.
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Science | The Guardian

Cosmology's brightest star Stephen Hawking dies aged 76 – videoStephen Hawking , the brightest star in the firmament of science, whose insights shaped modern cosmology and inspired global audiences in the millions, has died aged 76. Continue reading...
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Science | The Guardian

Dinosaurs in the Wild: a palaeontologist's viewA new experience transports you back 67 million years to view time-travelling scientists studying dinosaurs in the wild Where most efforts at “edutainment” fall down is on being overly bombastic, with too little actual science and far too much whizz-bang. But Dinosaurs in the Wild , a mixture of puppets, models and 3D films (all accompanied by live actors), merges the two brilliantly and is both
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Science | The Guardian

'Remember to look up at the stars': the best Stephen Hawking quotesThe British physicist and author had a way with words. Here are some of his greatest quotations Stephen Hawking, cosmology’s brightest star dies aged 76 Stephen Hawking, who has died aged 76 , combined a soaring intellect and a mischievous sense of humour that made him an icon of both academia and popular culture . Related: Stephen Hawking – obituary by Roger Penrose Continue reading...
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Stephen Hawking, best-known physicist of his time, has diedStephen Hawking BlackStephen Hawking, whose brilliant mind ranged across time and space though his body was paralyzed by disease, died early Wednesday, a University of Cambridge spokesman said. He was 76 years old.
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News

New research solves the 60-year-old paleontological mystery of a 'phantom' dicynodontA new study has re-discovered fossil collections from a 19th century hermit that validate 'phantom' fossil footprints collected in the 1950s showing dicynodonts coexisting with dinosaurs.
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New Scientist - News

A brief history of Stephen Hawking: A legacy of paradoxStephen Hawking BlackHe was an icon for many reasons, but as we remember Stephen Hawking, his remarkable contribution to science is undoubtedly his greatest legacy
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BBC News - Science & Environment

Stephen Hawking: Visionary physicist dies aged 76Stephen Hawking BlackThe British scientist who explained the Universe to millions died peacefully at home aged 76.
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Science | The Guardian

'I haven't achieved much recently': Albert Einstein's private fears revealed in sister's archiveThe celebrated scientist frets about fame and his brain ‘going off with age’ in candid, soon to be auctioned correspondence with his sister, Maja A glimpse at the “private, hidden face” of Albert Einstein, including the celebrated scientist’s thoughts on everything from his fears that his best work was behind him to his equivocal feelings about his fame, has been revealed in a cache of letters he
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Feed: All Latest

Stephen Hawking, a Physicist Transcending Space and Time, Dies at 76Stephen Hawking BlackStephen Hawking may have been the most famous physicist in the world—not only because he saw the face of the universe, but also because he could describe it to the rest of us.
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BBC News - Science & Environment

Professor Stephen Hawking's greatest wishThe physicist, who has died aged 76, had motor neurone disease.
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NYT > Science

The Expansive Life of Stephen HawkingStephen Hawking BriefDr. Hawking captured the public imagination and endeared himself to tens of millions of people around the world with his exploration of black holes and gravity.
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Science | The Guardian

'Rare genius': Stephen Hawking remembered across the worldPMs, astronauts, scientists and celebrities pay tribute to a ‘colossal mind and wonderful spirit’ Stephen Hawking dies aged 76 From astronauts to world leaders, tributes have poured in for Stephen Hawking, the British physicist and author who has died aged 76 . Theresa May praised his “brilliance” and contribution to our understanding of the universe during prime minister’s questions. Continue re
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New on MIT Technology Review

Stephen Hawking, 1942-2018Stephen Hawking Brief
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Smoke-damaged airway tissue restored on switching to gloStudies by British American Tobacco show that airway tissue damaged on exposure to smoke was restored when exposed to vapor from glo rather than smoke. These results add to evidence that glo has reduced risk potential compared to cigarettes. glo is a tobacco heating product designed to heat rather than burn tobacco. Tests show that glo heated tobacco vapor has around 90-95 percent less of certain
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The Atlantic

Remembering Stephen HawkingStephen Hawking BriefStephen Hawking, the iconic English theoretical physicist, has died. He was 76. Hawking died in the early hours of Wednesday morning at his home in Cambridge, England, his children—Lucy, Robert, and Tim—said in a statement, according to The Guardian . “He was a great scientist and an extraordinary man whose work and legacy will live on for many years. His courage and persistence with his brillian
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Ingeniøren

It-vejledere: For meget fokus på kode i diskussion om teknologifag i skolenDigital dannelse ligger bag dagens ideer om teknologiforståelse i folkeskolen.
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Science | The Guardian

From The Simpsons to Pink Floyd: Stephen Hawking in popular cultureThe scientist’s fame led to appearances on sitcoms, films about his life and music being written about him Stephen Hawking dies aged 76 ‘This Oscar,” declared Eddie Redmayne, delirious , “belongs to all of those people around the world battling ALS. It belongs to one exceptional family.” Related: A brief history of Stephen Hawking's A Brief History of Time Continue reading...
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Live Science

Stephen Hawking, Famed Physicist Who Defied ALS Odds, Dies at 76One of the brightest lights in the physics universe has passed away at the age of 76.
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The Scientist RSS

LabQuiz: Would You Bet on a Blot? Western Blot Data Integrity ChallengesHow confident are you in your Western blotting technique?
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Viden

Astrofysikeren Stephen Hawking er død 76 år gammelStephen Hawking, der grundet sygdommen ALS var kendt for at kommunikere med en computerstemme, er død.
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BBC News - Science & Environment

Professor Hawking 'transformed our view of the universe'Stephen Hawking BlackThis video has been removed for rights reasons.
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Decreased oxygen levels could present hidden threat to marine speciesIn research published in Scientific Reports, scientists from the University of Plymouth have shown that creatures which develop in hypoxic (low oxygen) conditions in the marine environment could experience previously unseen hindered development, and become compromised as adults.
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Large numbers of students skipping breakfastDespite widespread availability of morning meal programs, a large number of Canadian students are still skipping breakfast, according to a study from the University of Waterloo.
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Exploration of a new chemical synthesis process -- synergy of two catalysts in one flaskDevelopment of a general and simple reaction by an organocatalyst and a transition-metal catalyst in cooperation is highly desirable for various organic syntheses but remains a challenge. Herein, we report the one-step synthesis of a ketone from an aldehyde by the combination of thiazolium N-heterocyclic carbene and palladium/bisphosphine catalysts in one flask. The two catalysts function in a syn
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Study finds smokers at greater risk of hearing lossSmoking is associated with increased risk of hearing loss, according to a study of over 50,000 participants over eight years in Nicotine & Tobacco Research, published by Oxford University Press.
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News

New class of menopause drugs reduces number and severity of hot flushesA new class of experimental drugs reduces hot flushes in menopausal women by almost three-quarters in just three days.
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Preeclampsia screening method found superior to current testsNew research highlights a more accurate way to screen for preeclampsia in pregnant women than currently recommended methods.
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NYT > Science

Stephen Hawking Dies at 76; His Mind Roamed the CosmosStephen Hawking BlackA physicist and best-selling author, Dr. Hawking did not allow his physical limitations to hinder his quest to answer “the big question: Where did the universe come from?”
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Science | The Guardian

'Mind over matter': Stephen Hawking – obituary by Roger PenroseTheoretical physicist who made revolutionary contributions to our understanding of the nature of the universe Stephen Hawking dies aged 76 The image of Stephen Hawking – who has died aged 76 – in his motorised wheelchair, with head contorted slightly to one side and hands crossed over to work the controls, caught the public imagination, as a true symbol of the triumph of mind over matter. As with
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Science | The Guardian

The life of Stephen Hawking – in picturesThe world-renowned British physicist has died aged 76 . Here are images from his extraordinary life and times Continue reading...
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

How barbastelle bats trick moths that are able to hear their echolocation callsIn the evolutionary arms race between bats and their insect prey, some moths have developed ears to detect echolocating bats and avoid being caught. Conversely, barbastelle bats are known to counter moth hearing by using quiet, 'stealthy' calls to search for prey in the dark.
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This Pi Day, Calculate the Value of Pi for YourselfYou just have to add up all the rectangles.
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Ingeniøren

Den Røde Plads blev ikke rød – men dyrI laboratoriet kan man lave en rød plastbelægning. Men ikke udendørs på Nørrebro, hvor kommunen nu skal betale 11 millioner kroner for ny belægning efter seks års tovtrækkeri.
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New on MIT Technology Review

At this rate, it’s going to take nearly 400 years to transform the energy systemHere are the real reasons we’re not building clean energy anywhere near fast enough.
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Science : NPR

Stephen Hawking, Who Awed Both Scientists And The Public, DiesStephen Hawking BlackHawking was a theoretical physicist who changed how scientists think about gravity. He also wrote the best-selling book A Brief History of Time and lent his machine-aided voice to TV shows. He was 76. (Image credit: Sion Touhig/Getty Images)
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Science | The Guardian

A brief history of A Brief History of Time by Stephen HawkingThe late physicist’s editor, Peter Guzzardi, recalls his first meetings with Hawking and how his book became a bestseller Stephen Hawking dies aged 76 I first encountered Stephen Hawking on the cover of the New York Times magazine. Inside, its pages told a story we all know today, but at the time it was a revelation: a Cambridge astrophysicist sought to solve the great mysteries of the universe,
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Science | The Guardian

Stephen Hawking, science's brightest star, dies aged 76The physicist and author of A Brief History of Time has died at his home in Cambridge. His children said: ‘We will miss him for ever’ Stephen Hawking obituary by Roger Penrose Tributes poured in on Wednesday to Stephen Hawking , the brightest star in the firmament of science, whose insights shaped modern cosmology and inspired global audiences in the millions. He died at the age of 76 in the earl
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Science | The Guardian

Most Australian Indigenous languages came from just one place, research claimsBurketown, Queensland, named as origin of dominant Pama-Nyungan family of languages Most Indigenous languages in Australia likely originated from a remote spot in far north Queensland as recently as 4,000 years ago, before slowly spreading across the country, a new study has claimed. The paper, published in the journal Nature on Tuesday, mapped the origins of the Pama-Nyungan family of languages,
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

Feeding wildlife can influence migration, spread of diseaseAnimal migration patterns are changing as humans alter the landscape, according to new research. Those changes can affect wildlife interactions with parasites-with potential impacts on public health and on the phenomenon of migration itself.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

What do spacecraft, newborns and endangered shellfish have in common?Researchers have developed a microbial detection technique so sensitive that it allows them to detect as few as 50-100 bacterial cells present on a surface. What's more, they can test samples more efficiently -- up to hundreds of samples in a single day.
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Live Science

Solar Storm to Amp Up Earth's Northern Lights WednesdayA minor solar storm will reach Earth Wednesday (March 14) and could supercharge the planet's auroras, making them visible from the northernmost parts of the U.S., space weather officials say.
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What Keeps Egg-Freezing Operations From Failing?This week, cryogenic storage at two fertility clinics malfunctioned, putting their clients' family planning in jeopardy. Will it happen again?
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The Scientist RSS

Latest Reproducibility Project Study Fails to ReplicateResearchers did not observe the same link between a bacterium and human colon cancer that prior investigators had reported.
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The Scientist RSS

Humanity May Have Flourished After Supervolano EruptionA new study counters the popular theory that after Mount Toba blew its top 74,000 years ago, humans almost went extinct.
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The Atlantic

What Does Trump Mean By 'Space Force'?With a fighter jet positioned behind him, President Trump suggested on Tuesday that the United States create another military branch. “Space is a war-fighting domain just like the land, air, and sea,” Trump said , addressing an audience of Marines at the Miramar Marine Corps Air Station in San Diego, California. “We may even have a space force—develop another one—space force. We have the Air Forc
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News

It's not only size, but scales that matter in some male moth antennaeMale moths have evolved intricate scale arrangements on their antennae to enhance detection of female sex pheromones, which allows them to keep their antennae small enough to maximize flying, new research suggests.
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Climate change risk for half of plant and animal species in biodiversity hotspotsUp to half of plant and animal species in the world's most naturally rich areas, such as the Amazon and the Galapagos, could face local extinction by the turn of the century due to climate change if carbon emissions continue to rise unchecked. Even if the Paris Climate Agreement 2°C target is met, these places could lose 25 percent of their species. Researchers examined the impact of climate chang
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Astronomers discover galaxies spin like clockworkAstronomers have discovered that all galaxies rotate once every billion years, no matter how big they are.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Astronomers discover galaxies spin like clockworkAstronomers have discovered that all galaxies rotate once every billion years, no matter how big they are.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Climate change risk for half of plant and animal species in biodiversity hotspotsUp to half of plant and animal species in the world's most naturally rich areas, such as the Amazon and the Galapagos, could face local extinction by the turn of the century due to climate change if carbon emissions continue to rise unchecked.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

It's not only size, but scales that matter in some male moth antennaeMale moths have evolved intricate scale arrangements on their antennae to enhance detection of female sex pheromones, which allows them to keep their antennae small enough to maximise flying, new research suggests.
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Futurity.org

Infected ‘zombie ants’ shuffle through colony undetectedCarpenter ants don’t attack or isolate their nest mates infected with a specialized parasitic fungus, and instead continue to share the colony’s food resources until the infected ants leave the nest for the last time to die, according to a new study. The findings suggest that, although the fungus is deadly to infected individuals, it is only a chronic condition for the colony—one that does not in
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Science | The Guardian

Smokeless cigarettes not as harmless as claimed, study saysUsers of new iQOS ‘heat not burn’ devices speed up their ‘puff rate’ to inhale more nicotine, researchers find The new “heat not burn” smokeless cigarette devices are not as harmless as their manufacturer claims, according to a new study. iQOS – which stands for “I quit original smoking” – is made by Philip Morris International, best known as the manufacturer of Marlboro cigarettes. PMI, the bigg
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Futurity.org

Why the holographic principle is so excitingOne of the most cutting-edge theories in theoretical physics, the holographic principle, holds holds that the universe is 3D image projected off a 2D surface, much like a hologram emerges from a sheet of photographic film. “In my view, the discovery of holographic entanglement and its generalizations has been one of the most exciting developments in theoretical physics in this century so far,” sa
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Futurity.org

Congress didn’t always fight over the debt ceilingWhen the federal government ran up debt between 1776 and 1939, mainly to fund wars, Congress moved swiftly afterwards to repay the loans, a new paper shows. As a result of the costs of the War of 1812, the debt limit rose to roughly $190 million by 1820. Some 15 years later, the debt was almost entirely gone. By now, it’s a familiar pattern. America’s national debt rises and Congress increases th
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Futurity.org

Cell ‘railways’ adapt to be as useful as possibleA microscopic “railway” system in our cells can change its structure to best meet our bodies’ needs, new research shows. Almost every cell in our body contains this railway network, a system of tiny tracks called microtubules that link important destinations inside the cell. “Imagine if the tracks of a real railway were able to ask themselves, ‘am I useful?'” Researchers found that this system of
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NYT > Science

What Fertility Patients Should Know About Egg FreezingStorage failures at two respected clinics have raised concerns about safety and reliability. Here are some things to look out for and questions to ask.
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Futurity.org

Did tall skulls in ancient Bavaria belong to brides?The first genomic analysis of populations living in the former territory of the Roman Empire around 500 CE may explain artificial skull formation in the area. The peculiar phenomenon has sparked debate among scientists for more than 50 years. The palaeogenomic study, published in PNAS , investigates early human medieval genomic variation in southern Germany during the era known as the European Mi
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Futurity.org

10 ways health care team training benefits patientsHealth care team training can reduce patient mortality by 13 percent, according to a new review paper. The paper outlines existing evidence and theory on the science behind developing health care teams and how training improves patient outcomes. “When training is implemented correctly, the result is improved outcomes across the board, both for patients and employees,” says Eduardo Salas, chair of
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New on MIT Technology Review

Think Rex Tillerson was bad on climate change? His successor’s likely to be worse.
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The Atlantic

A Controversial Record of Torture, But Maybe Not a Deal-Breaker for DemocratsCIA Gina HaspelA key domino effect of Secretary of State Rex Tillerson’s dismissal on Tuesday was the nomination of Deputy CIA Director Gina Haspel—a career officer who has been sharply criticized for the role she played in the CIA’s now-banned torture programs and the tape recordings of which she helped to destroy . Haspel oversaw a CIA black site in Thailand where two terrorism suspects were tortured, and her
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The Atlantic

The Atlantic Daily: Rex Tillerson’s Ouster, Nazi-Looted Art, Stories of Modern-Day SlaveryWhat We’re Following Mixed Messages: This morning, President Trump unexpectedly announced the ouster of Secretary of State Rex Tillerson, who’s set to be replaced by CIA Director Mike Pompeo. The move resulted in a fair amount of confusion, as the White House’s and the State Department’s timelines and details of the firing differed. State Department officials claimed that Tillerson didn’t know th
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YouTube Will Link Directly to Wikipedia to Fight Conspiracy TheoriesAfter a series of scandals related to misinformation, YouTube CEO Susan Wojcicki announced the company would begin directing users to sources like Wikipedia.
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News

'Heat not burn' smokeless tobacco product may not be as harm free as claimediQOS, one of the first 'heat not burn' smokeless tobacco products marketed as a safer alternative to conventional cigarettes, may not be as harm free as its manufacturer claims, suggests research published online in the journal Tobacco Control.
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Larger families linked to heightened tooth loss risk for momsHaving a larger family is linked to a heightened tooth loss risk for moms, suggest the results of a large European study published online in the Journal of Epidemiology & Community Health.
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Futurity.org

How phosphorous can lead to global dead zonesHuman activity introduced ecosystem-threatening levels of phosphorus pollution to freshwater bodies around the world between 2002 and 2010, a new study indicates. Freshwater basins oversaturated with phosphorus covered nearly 40 percent of the world’s habitable land and supported almost 90 percent of the global population during that span, the study estimates. Though essential to plant growth and
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Live Science

This Futuristic Flying Car Requires Zero Piloting SkillsA "flying car" company funded by Google co-founder Larry Page seems to finally have a prototype that looks something like a personal aircraft people might actually use.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Seismic center: Caribbean undersea volcano may soon eruptA Caribbean seismic research center says an underwater volcano just north of Grenada may be about to erupt but does not pose a tsunami threat to the region.
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Popular Science

How to build your own spy kitTechnology Worried about secret cameras or roommates stealing your food? Go full James Bond. Find secret recording devices, listen from afar, and see through walls!
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Winklevoss twins pitch plan to regulate digital moneyTwins who made a fortune in cryptocurrency after settling a claim they came up the idea for Facebook on Tuesday pitched a plan to regulate the wild digital money market.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

University recovers stolen black rhino hornThe University of Vermont has recovered a black rhinoceros horn with a potential street value of more than $100,000 that was stolen from a locked storage room on campus last year, the school announced Tuesday.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Divisions over EU's focus on tech groups to stop 'fake news'Divisions emerged Tuesday after experts commissioned by the EU Commission called on tech groups and social media firms to sign up to a voluntary code of conduct for tackling "fake news".
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Reboot at Vice Media as co-founder Shane Smith steps downVice Media announced Tuesday that co-founder Shane Smith was giving up his position as chief executive, as the youth-oriented digital group sought to move past recent turbulence.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Behind the Broadcom deal block: Rising telecom tensionsBehind the U.S. move to block Singapore-based Broadcom's hostile bid for U.S. chip maker Qualcomm lies a new global struggle for influence over next-generation communications technology—and fears that whoever takes the lead could exploit that advantage for economic gain, theft and espionage.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

NASA sees Tropical Cyclone Linda lose an 'arm'Tropical Cyclone 13P has been renamed Tropical Cyclone Linda in the Southern Pacific Ocean. NASA's Aqua and Terra satellites found a powerful band of thunderstorms east of Linda's center that resembled an arm, fell apart in 9 hours.
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Popular Science

The Fitbit Versa is a $200 smart watch that does more than count stepsHealth Its 5-day battery life and lightweight design makes it easy to see as an everyday life tracker. Fitbit released a new product that might finally get at what people really need: A (relatively) low-cost, wear-it-forever smartwatch that does more than count steps.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Using whole genome analysis to home in on racing pigeon performanceBefore the Wi-fi and the Internet, the telephone and the telegraph, the original instant messaging services of society were homing pigeons. After becoming the first domesticated birds, for an estimated 2,000 years, these reliable messengers have brought news from battlefronts and between heads of state.
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The Atlantic

The Atlantic Politics & Policy Daily: Train RexToday in 5 Lines President Trump announced that Secretary of State Rex Tillerson would be replaced by CIA Director Mike Pompeo, and named Gina Haspel to head the intelligence agency. A State Department statement contradicted the White House's account of Tillerson's dismissal . The statement , attributed to Under Secretary for Public Diplomacy and Public Affairs Steve Goldstein, said Tillerson did
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Feeding wildlife can influence migration, spread of diseaseAnimal migration patterns are changing as humans alter the landscape, according to new research from the University of Georgia. Those changes can affect wildlife interactions with parasites-with potential impacts on public health and on the phenomenon of migration itself.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Individual education programs not being used as intended in special educationGone are the days when students with disabilities were placed in a separate classroom, or even in a completely different part of the school. These students often sit alongside their traditional student peers for at least part of the day, with the help of individualized education programs (IEPs).
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

New technique can reveal previously undetectable bacteria in places where they aren't wantedResearchers at University of California San Diego School of Medicine have developed a microbial detection technique so sensitive that it allows them to detect as few as 50-100 bacterial cells present on a surface. What's more, they can test samples more efficiently—up to hundreds of samples in a single day.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Die-off of fur seal pups attributed to mites, pneumonia and changing sea temperaturesMorris Animal Foundation-funded researchers uncovered several key factors contributing to a die-off of South American fur seal pups, including mites, pneumonia and sea surface temperature. The findings, published in the Journal of Wildlife Diseases, help scientists better understand the link between environmental factors and health.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

A starfish cold case reopens, climate change remains suspectCornell University scientists are beginning to unravel the complicated connections between viruses, the environment and wasting diseases among sea stars in the waters of the Pacific Northwest.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Team discovers that wind moves microinvertebrates across desertThe work of faculty and students from The University of Texas at El Paso (UTEP) has yielded the first evidence of how waterborne microinvertebrates move across vast expanses of arid desert.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

New guidelines on preventing and treating 'equine strep throat'Just as strep throat can run rampant in elementary schools, strangles, the "strep throat" of horses, caused by a different Streptococcus bacterium, Streptococcus equi sp equi, is highly contagious. Lymph nodes in the head and neck region become swollen and develop abscesses, resulting in nasal discharge and drainage from the throat. Though rarely fatal, strangles cases can range from mild to sever
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Multifunctional metalens unlocks with lightResearchers at the Harvard John A. Paulson School of Engineering and Applied Sciences (SEAS) have developed a flat optical component that is simultaneously a metalens, a microscope objective that can resolve details smaller than a wavelength of light, and an optical vortex and hologram generator. Each functionality is controlled by a different wavelength of light.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Road, rail, boat: Sandia transport triathlon puts spent nuclear fuel to the testSpent nuclear fuel needs to be safely transported from the power plants where it is generated to interim storage locations and eventually to a permanent geologic disposal site.
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Using whole genome analysis to home in on racing pigeon performanceA scientific team led by Malgorzata Anna Gazda and Miguel Carneiro, performed the first whole genome sequencing of 10 racing pigeons as well as data from 35 different breeds, and has now identified new clues in racing pigeons that may help enhance their performance. The study also including looking at gene expression differences (using RNA sequencing expression data) in the brains and muscle tissu
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Latest Headlines | Science News

Cosmic dust may create Mars’ wispy cloudsMagnesium left by passing comets seeds the clouds of Mars, a new study suggests.
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Live Science

Future Medical Implants May Be Blinged-Out in Tiny, Microwaved DiamondsGet a diamond-coated hip replacement for your health; keep it for the street cred.
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Die-off of fur seal pups attributed to mites, pneumonia and changing sea temperaturesMorris Animal Foundation-funded researchers uncovered several key factors contributing to a die-off of South American fur seal pups, including mites, pneumonia and sea surface temperature. The findings, published in the Journal of Wildlife Diseases, help scientists better understand the link between environmental factors and health.
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News

What do spacecraft, newborns and endangered shellfish have in common?Researchers at University of California San Diego School of Medicine have developed a microbial detection technique so sensitive that it allows them to detect as few as 50-100 bacterial cells present on a surface. What's more, they can test samples more efficiently -- up to hundreds of samples in a single day.
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Big Think

Social Psychology vs Cyber-MisogynyWomen who receive harassment online are often told to simply ignore it, and reminded that anyone can experience harassment on online. But feminist women seem to be particularly targeted. Read More
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The Atlantic

James Mattis Has Somehow Stayed on Trump's Good SidePresident Trump undermined Rex Tillerson before firing him on Tuesday. He has railed against Attorney General Jeff Sessions on Twitter; chided H.R. McMaster, the national-security adviser, also on Twitter; and pushed back against claims by John Kelly, the White House chief of staff, that the border wall would never be built. But there is one high-profile Cabinet official who has never publicly be
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

Individual education programs not being used as intended in special educationGone are the days when students with disabilities were placed in a separate classroom, or even in a completely different part of the school. These students often sit alongside their traditional student peers for at least part of the day, with the help of individualized education programs (IEPs).
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

Molecule that gives energy-burning brown fat its identity could lead to drugs for obesityA protein found in brown fat, but not typical white fat, is key to how the energy-burning brown fat cells function.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

A starfish cold case reopens, climate change remains suspectAs ocean temperatures rise and oceanic diseases proliferate, species like sea stars struggle to survive, and scientists are looking for underlying causes. To bring clarity to the sea star disease problem, the scientists propose a new, broad nomenclature.
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A Florida Bill Would Make Criminal Justice Data More Transparent Than EverA newly passed bill in the Florida Legislature would bring unprecedented levels of transparency to the criminal justice system.
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New on MIT Technology Review

Researchers say they’ve found serious security flaws in some AMD chips
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Fear of China Scuttles Broadcom Deal That Didn't Involve ChinaPresident Trump invoked national security in blocking Broadcom's proposed takeover of Qualcomm. His real concern may have been Qualcomm's research budget.
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The Atlantic

The 'First Woman CIA Director' Is a SmokescreenGina Haspel CIADonald Trump concluded his tweet firing of Rex Tillerson on a self-congratulatory note. In appointing CIA director Mike Pompeo to Tillerson’s soon-to-be-former job, he moved the career intelligence officer Gina Haspel into the top spot at the CIA. She was, he noted, “the first woman so chosen” to lead the spy agency, sounding another historic note on a day already destined to live in infamy or tr
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The Scientist RSS

Feathered Dino Archaeopteryx Probably Flew Like a PheasantHigh-tech imaging of the Jurassic creature's humerus and ulna bones reveals it flapped its wings to evade predators.
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Inside Science

Alzheimer's Drug Trials Keep Failing -- It May Be Because We Don't Understand the DiseaseAlzheimer's Drug Trials Keep Failing -- It May Be Because We Don't Understand the Disease The theory of what causes the disease and how it develops may be wrong. mouse-alzheimer%27s-top.jpg A memory-related brain region in a mouse model of Alzheimer's disease. The green parts are neurons, while the red parts are amyloid beta clusters. Image credits: National Center for Advancing Translational Med
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Thyroid gene variation may increase risk for Alzheimer's disease in African AmericansAfrican Americans with a common genetic variation are at increased risk for developing Alzheimer's disease, while European Americans with the same variation are not, according to a study led by researchers at Rush University Medical Center. They published the study results in the February 22 online issue of the Journal of Clinical Endocrinology and Metabolism.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

Toothpaste alone does not prevent dental erosion or hypersensitivityAn analysis of nine toothpastes found that none of them protects enamel or prevents erosive wear. Specialists stress that diet and treatment by a dentist are key to avoid the problems originated by dentin exposure.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

Helpful B cells lend a hand to developing neuronsNeuron myelination is critical to early mental development, and defects in myelination have been linked to neurodevelopmental disorders. Researchers found that B immune cells reside in the brains of developing mice, and play a key role in the myelination of neurons by oligodendrocytes. The findings suggest a new avenue of exploration for understanding the origin of disorders such as autism and sch
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Individual education programs not being used as intended in special educationGone are the days when students with disabilities were placed in a separate classroom, or even in a completely different part of the school. These students often sit alongside their traditional student peers for at least part of the day, with the help of individualized education programs (IEPs).
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Popular Science

Weird winter weather has scientists looking to the north poleEnvironment Temperatures in the Arctic could help drive extreme weather in the United States. New research connects variable temperatures at the north pole to extreme weather in the United States. But the idea isn't without controversy.
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Live Science

Would You Eat Human Meat Grown in a Lab?Richard Dawkins wants to know if lab-grown meat will open the door to a synthetic version of human cannibalism.
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Researchers Point to an AMD Backdoor—And Face Their Own BacklashAs an Israeli security firm outlines real flaws in AMD's chips, the security community questions its motivations.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

Team training can reduce patient mortality by 13 percentWhen implemented correctly, health care team training can reduce patient mortality by 13 percent, according to a new review paper.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

How much snow accumulates in North America each year? More than scientists thoughtScientists have revised an estimate of snow volume for the entire continent, and they've discovered that snow accumulation in a typical year is 50 percent higher than previously thought. Researchersplace the yearly estimate at about 1,200 cubic miles of snow. If spread evenly across the surface of the continent from Canada to Mexico, the snow would measure a little over 7.5 inches deep.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

Biophysicists discover how small populations of bacteria survive treatmentSmall populations of pathogenic bacteria may be harder to kill off than larger populations because they respond differently to antibiotics.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

Spectroscopic thermometer for nanomaterialsA scientific team has found a new way to take the local temperature of a material from an area about a billionth of a meter wide, or approximately 100,000 times thinner than a human hair. This discovery promises to improve the understanding of useful yet unusual physical and chemical behaviors that arise in materials and structures at the nanoscale.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

Warm summers could weaken ocean circulationDeep convection in the North Atlantic is one of the key components of the large-scale ocean circulation. Based on long-term observations, scientists have now demonstrated the influence of increased surface freshening in summer on convection in the following winter. Enhanced surface freshening and warmer winters have shortened the duration of ocean convection in the last decade.
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TED Talks Daily (SD video)

How to inspire every child to be a lifelong reader | Alvin IrbyAccording to the US Department of Education, more than 85 percent of black fourth-grade boys aren't proficient in reading. What kind of reading experiences should we be creating to ensure that all children read well? In a talk that will make you rethink how we teach, educator and author Alvin Irby explains the reading challenges that many black children face -- and tells us what culturally compete
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Scientific American Content: Global

Northern White Rhinos Are about to Die Out--Should We Save Them?Conservationists debate whether IVF efforts are the best use of limited resources -- Read more on ScientificAmerican.com
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Popular Science

Memory cards are loaded with jargon—here's how to choose the right oneGadgets Figuring out what kind of storage you need for your phone, drone, or camera can be tricky. Decode the jumble of letters and numbers on the face of all those memory cards.
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Dana Foundation

#Brainweek: BioBase 2018One of the newest buildings in Harlem’s historic neighborhood is now home to the Jerome L. Greene Science Center, part of Columbia University’s Zuckerman Mind Brain Behavior Institute . The idea behind the Science Center’s construction was to have a designated place to support human connection, intellectual excellence, and pioneering research that goes beyond traditional academic boundaries. So,
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The Atlantic

Full Text: Rex Tillerson Responds to His FiringOn Tuesday, President Donald Trump announced that Secretary of State Rex Tillerson would be replaced by CIA Director Mike Pompeo. The State Department shortly thereafter disagreed with the White House’s account of how Tillerson was informed of that decision. Tillerson addressed reporters at the State Department later in the day. Below, a full transcript of those remarks. I received a call today f
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Viden

Guide: Sådan undgår du at have hele verden med på løbeturenDin løbeapp sladrer om din løberute og dit løbetempo til hele verden. Men med en lille indsats kan du hægte sladrehanken af.
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The Scientist RSS

Pupil Response to an Optical Illusion Tied to Autistic TraitsPeople whose pupils change more dramatically during a visual perception task tend to score higher on a self-reported scale of autistic traits.
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Researchers bring the bling to improve implantsIn a world first, Australian researchers have harnessed the power of diamonds in a breakthrough that could lead to radical improvements in the way human bodies accept biomedical implants.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

Prevent antibiotic resistances from spreading: Rapid test helps administering the 'correct' drugMulti-resistant microbes are a growing danger. The often unnecessary and mass use of antibiotics causes the impassivity of pathogens against drugs. Infections that were easily curable up to now, may become life threatening. A new rapid test will give information on which available antibiotic is still effective. Faster diagnostics allow a personalized therapy and saves lives. A requirement for prev
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

Study IDs 'white graphene' architecture with unprecedented hydrogen storage capacityEngineers have zeroed in on the optimal architecture for storing hydrogen in 'white graphene' nanomaterials -- a design like a Lilliputian skyscraper with 'floors' of boron nitride sitting one atop another and held by boron nitride pillars.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

Scientists describe potential antibody treatment for multidrug-resistant K. pneumoniaeResearchers are developing a promising alternative to antibiotic treatment for infections caused by Klebsiella pneumoniae bacteria resistant to carbapenem antibiotics. The approach uses antibodies to target the K. pneumoniae protective capsule polysaccharide, allowing immune system cells called neutrophils to attack and kill the bacteria.
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New on MIT Technology Review

AI that describes how yeast works will help scientists model biology better
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Researchers bring the bling to improve implantsIn a world first, Australian researchers have harnessed the power of diamonds in a breakthrough that could lead to radical improvements in the way human bodies accept biomedical implants.
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News

New guidelines on preventing and treating 'equine strep throat'Ashley Boyle, an associate professor of medicine at the University of Pennsylvania's School of Veterinary Medicine, took the lead in writing a new consensus statement, issued by the American College of Veterinary Internal Medicine, on treating, controlling, and preventing strangles in horses.
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Toothpaste alone does not prevent dental erosion or hypersensitivityAn analysis of nine toothpastes found that none of them protects enamel or prevents erosive wear. Specialists stress that diet and treatment by a dentist are key to avoid the problems originated by dentin exposure.
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Core outcomes established for multimorbidity researchAccording to a panel of international experts, clinical trials of multimorbidity should measure and report, at minimum, quality of life, mortality, and mental health outcomes.
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Clinicians' skills in narrative can help chronically ill patients heal'What patients bring to their clinicians is their stories,' writes behavioral scientist Thomas Egnew. It is through these stories that clinicians try to understand and treat patients' health.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

Shaken, and stirred: Scaling up bioreactors' fluid dynamicsBioreactors are used to produce different therapeutics in the biopharmaceutical and regenerative medicine industries. Drug development relies on small multi-well plates shaken around an orbital diameter, while production-scale bioreactors are agitated by stirring. These different methods yield different fluid dynamics. Researchers in the U.K. are starting to bridge this gap by applying analytical
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

Mesenchymal stem cell therapy: Holding promise for feline inflammatory diseasesStem cell therapy is acknowledged as having great potential for the treatment of a variety of diseases in both people and animals. The use of bone marrow-derived stem cells is well established in the treatment of human cancer patients, and veterinary applications for bone marrow- and adipose-derived stem cells are being evaluated.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

Smartphone-assisted neuroendoscopyA variety of neurosurgical procedures are performed with the aid of smartphone-endoscope integration. The smartphone takes the place of a camera and video monitor. It is easy to use, more cost effective, and provides the surgeon with a more intuitive and fluid method of performing neuroendoscopy.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

Ultra-white coating modelled on beetle scalesResearchers have developed a super-thin, non-toxic, lightweight, edible ultra-white coating that could be used to make brighter paints and coatings, for use in the cosmetic, food or pharmaceutical industries.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

Toilet-to-tap: Gross to think about, but how does it taste?Researchers have asked 143 people to express a preference among recycled water, bottled water, and tap water. They hypothesized that all three would score similarly. In fact, tap water was the least popular among the tasters; recycled water and bottled water scored about the same.
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Team discovers that wind moves microinvertebrates across desertThe work of faculty and students from The University of Texas at El Paso (UTEP) has yielded the first evidence of how waterborne microinvertebrates move across vast expanses of arid desert. An article published March 13, 2018, in Limnology and Oceanography Letters, a publication of the Association for the Sciences of Limnology and Oceanography, details for the first time how high desert winds disp
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Physicians' work should focus on personalized care, not transactional tasksShifting physicians' roles from transactional tasks to personalized care would best serve patients, physicians and society.
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Health care reform and EHR design should be built around patients' goalsMeaningful reform of primary care should not only address the provision, documentation and payment of care; it should be based on patients' goals for their lives and health, with corresponding redesign of electronic health records.
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Electronic consultation system improves access to specialty careAn electronic consultation system designed to reduce excessive wait times for appointments with specialists experienced exponential growth during a recent five-year period.
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News

No increase in shared decision-making for PSA testing but discussions have broadenedAlthough health care organizations differ in their recommendations for use of prostate-specific antigen testing for prostate cancer screening, they agree that the decision to undergo PSA testing should be shared by patients and clinicians.
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Feeding wildlife can influence migration, spread of diseaseAnimal migration patterns are changing as humans alter the landscape, according to new research from the University of Georgia. Those changes can affect wildlife interactions with parasites-with potential impacts on public health and on the phenomenon of migration itself.
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Big Think

Uncontacted tribes: What do we know about the world's 100 hidden communities?As you live in our hyper-connected world, it may seem strange to realize that thousands of people still live in so-called uncontacted tribes, utterly cut off from modern civilization. Read More
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The Atlantic

Photos of the 2018 Winter ParalympicsAthletes have gathered in Pyeongchang, South Korea, one more time for the 2018 Paralympic Winter Games. More than 650 competitors from 40 countries have come to compete in 80 events in six sports over 10 days. Alpine skiing, cross-country skiing, and biathlon events all have three classifications, for sitting, standing, or visually impaired athletes. Para-snowboarding also has three classificatio
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The Atlantic

The Donald Trump Cabinet TrackerUpdated on March 13 at 2:23 p.m. ET President Trump’s Cabinet will undergo its third major shuffle in less than a year with the ouster of Rex Tillerson as secretary of state. The president announced Tuesday morning that he would replace Tillerson with CIA Director Mike Pompeo and elevate Pompeo’s deputy, Gina Haspel, to become the first woman to head the intelligence agency. The shift means that
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Oseltamivir does not increase risk of suicide in childrenA new study finds that use of oseltamivir, an antiviral drug used to treat influenza A and B, does not increase risk of suicide in children.
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Patients with multiple conditions receive higher level of care in affluent areasPatients with multimorbidity -- two or more long-term medical conditions -- have complex health care needs, often requiring higher levels of care than other patients. According to a new study, however, patients with multimorbidity in affluent areas receive longer doctor visits, greater perceived empathy, and more patient-centered care than comparable patients in socioeconomically deprived areas.
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Machines see the future for patients diagnosed with brain tumorsResearchers at Emory and Northwestern Universities have developed artificial intelligence (AI) software that can predict the survival of patients diagnosed with glioma by examining data from tissue biopsies. The approach is more accurate than the predictions of doctors who undergo years of highly-specialized training for the same purpose.
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News

A starfish cold case reopens, climate change remains suspectAs ocean temperatures rise and oceanic diseases proliferate, species like sea stars struggle to survive, and scientists are looking for underlying causes. To bring clarity to the sea star disease problem, the scientists propose a new, broad nomenclature in a study published in Frontiers in Marine Science.
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News

New analysis recommends against using digital rectal exam in primary careAlthough the digital rectal exam is widely used in primary care to screen for prostate cancer, a new study finds limited data to support its effectiveness.
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Asthma management tools improve asthma control and reduce hospital visitsA set of comprehensive asthma management tools helps decrease asthma-related visits to the emergency department, urgent care or hospital and improves patients' asthma control.
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News

World's largest cities depend on evaporated water from surrounding landsA study found that 19 of the 29 largest cities in the world depend on evaporation from surrounding lands for more than one-third of their water supplies.
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Pterosaurs went out with a bang, not a whimperFossils of six new species of pterosaurs -- giant flying reptiles that flew over the heads of the dinosaurs -- have been discovered by a research team led by the Milner Centre for Evolution at the University of Bath, revealing that this lineage was killed off in its prime. An analysis of the fossils, publishing March 13 in the open-access journal PLOS Biology shows that, contrary to previous studi
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Lopsided ear function can lead to lopsided brain developmentLeft-right differences in ear function have been found to lead to asymmetric brain development that affects the preferred direction of turning movement in mice. In a multi-national study publishing March 13 in the open-access journal PLOS Biology, Michelle Antoine, Jean Hébert, and their colleagues at the Albert Einstein College of Medicine investigated the potential link between increased inciden
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Big Think

Ancient women with "tower-shaped" skulls were high-ranking political brides, says new studyDNA testing of the remains of nine women with elongated skulls suggests a strange explanation for how they likely ended up hundreds of miles from their homeland. Read More
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Scientific American Content: Global

Quantum Physicists Double the "Bandwidth" of the UniverseNew research suggests a single quantum particle can be used for simultaneous two-way communication -- Read more on ScientificAmerican.com
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

Mowing the lawn less often improves bee habitatNew research suggests that homeowners can improve habitat for bees by mowing the lawn less often.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

Compassion helped Neanderthals to survive, new study revealsThey have an unwarranted image as brutish and uncaring, but new research has revealed just how knowledgeable and effective Neanderthal healthcare was.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

How would the brain process alien music?What might alien music sound like? Would it be structured hierarchically as our music is with verses and a chorus? Would we even be able to appreciate it? Researchers think the answer would be yes, assuming it was predicated on local and non-local dependencies.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

Physicists quantum simulate topological materials with ultracold atomsA team of physicists has reported the observation of an SPT phase for ultracold atoms using atomic quantum simulation. This work opens the way to expanding the scope of SPT physics with ultracold atoms and studying non-equilibrium quantum dynamics in these exotic systems.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

Predicting an insect community structure based on genomic variation in a tree speciesResearchers have discovered a rule to predict an arthropod community structure based on the genomic variation in a foundation tree species.
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Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences current issue

Phospholipase A activity of adenylate cyclase toxin? [Biological Sciences]González-Bullón et al. (1) detected a phospholipase A (PLA) activity in the preparations of adenylate cyclase (AC) toxin (ACT) purified from recombinant Escherichia coli. The authors conclude that the PLA activity is intrinsic to the toxin protein and facilitates translocation of its AC enzyme domain across the target cell membrane....
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Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences current issue

Reply to Masin et al: To be or not to be a phospholipase A [Biological Sciences]In their letter, Masin et al. (1) affirm that a “varying extent of contamination” of adenylate cyclase toxin (ACT) and ACT-S606A purified toxin preparations, by the phospholipase A (PLA) enzyme from the outer membrane (OMPLA) of the producing Escherichia coli cells, could easily account for our finding that ACT has...
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Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences current issue

How should we compare different genomic estimates of the strength of inbreeding depression? [Biological Sciences]Yengo et al. (1) evaluate the ability of genomic measures of inbreeding to quantify inbreeding depression. The authors conclude that a measure of inbreeding based on “runs of homozygosity” (FROH) had low power and upwardly biased estimates of the amount of inbreeding depression compared with FHOM (a measure of homozygosity...
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Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences current issue

Reply to Kardos et al.: Estimation of inbreeding depression from SNP data [Biological Sciences]We thank Kardos et al. (1) for their interest in our study (2), which is about the detection and quantification of inbreeding depression (ID) for complex traits from SNP data. Kardos et al. (1) make a number of points about the utility and interpretation of estimates of ID from runs...
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Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences current issue

Note on the quadratic penalties in elastic weight consolidation [Biological Sciences]Catastrophic forgetting is an undesired phenomenon which occurs when neural networks are trained on different tasks sequentially. Elastic weight consolidation (EWC; ref. 1), published in PNAS, is a novel algorithm designed to safeguard against this. Despite its satisfying simplicity, EWC is remarkably effective. Motivated by Bayesian inference, EWC adds quadratic...
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Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences current issue

Reply to Huszar: The elastic weight consolidation penalty is empirically valid [Biological Sciences]In our recent work on elastic weight consolidation (EWC) (1) we show that forgetting in neural networks can be alleviated by using a quadratic penalty whose derivation was inspired by Bayesian evidence accumulation. In his letter (2), Dr. Huszár provides an alternative form for this penalty by following the standard...
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Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences current issue

Interferometric mapping of material properties using thermal perturbation [Applied Physical Sciences]Optical phase changes induced by transient perturbations provide a sensitive measure of material properties. We demonstrate the high sensitivity and speed of such methods, using two interferometric techniques: quantitative phase imaging (QPI) in transmission and phase-resolved optical coherence tomography (OCT) in reflection. Shot-noise–limited QPI can resolve energy deposition of about...
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Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences current issue

Exploring functional pairing between surface glycoconjugates and human galectins using programmable glycodendrimersomes [Chemistry]Precise translation of glycan-encoded information into cellular activity depends critically on highly specific functional pairing between glycans and their human lectin counter receptors. Sulfoglycolipids, such as sulfatides, are important glycolipid components of the biological membranes found in the nervous and immune systems. The optimal molecular and spatial design aspects of...
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Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences current issue

Multiscale approach reveals that Cloudina aggregates are detritus and not in situ reef constructions [Earth, Atmospheric, and Planetary Sciences]The earliest metazoans capable of biomineralization appeared during the late Ediacaran Period (635–541 Ma) in strata associated with shallow water microbial reefs. It has been suggested that some Ediacaran microbial reefs were dominated (and possibly built) by an abundant and globally distributed tubular organism known as Cloudina. If true, this...
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Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences current issue

Brain-to-brain coupling during handholding is associated with pain reduction [Psychological and Cognitive Sciences]The mechanisms underlying analgesia related to social touch are not clear. While recent research highlights the role of the empathy of the observer to pain relief in the target, the contribution of social interaction to analgesia is unknown. The current study examines brain-to-brain coupling during pain with interpersonal touch and...
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Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences current issue

Structural basis of transcriptional stalling and bypass of abasic DNA lesion by RNA polymerase II [Biochemistry]Abasic sites are among the most abundant DNA lesions and interfere with DNA replication and transcription, but the mechanism of their action on transcription remains unknown. Here we applied a combined structural and biochemical approach for a comprehensive investigation of how RNA polymerase II (Pol II) processes an abasic site,...
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Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences current issue

Effects of maturation on the conformational free-energy landscape of SOD1 [Biophysics and Computational Biology]Amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS) is a devastating fatal syndrome characterized by very rapid degeneration of motor neurons. A leading hypothesis is that ALS is caused by toxic protein misfolding and aggregation, as also occurs in many other neurodegenerative disorders, such as prion, Alzheimer’s, Parkinson’s, and Huntington’s diseases. A prominent cause...
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Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences current issue

Bone degradation machinery of osteoclasts: An HIV-1 target that contributes to bone loss [Cell Biology]Bone deficits are frequent in HIV-1–infected patients. We report here that osteoclasts, the cells specialized in bone resorption, are infected by HIV-1 in vivo in humanized mice and ex vivo in human joint biopsies. In vitro, infection of human osteoclasts occurs at different stages of osteoclastogenesis via cell-free viruses and,...
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Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences current issue

A comprehensive genomic history of extinct and living elephants [Evolution]Elephantids are the world’s most iconic megafaunal family, yet there is no comprehensive genomic assessment of their relationships. We report a total of 14 genomes, including 2 from the American mastodon, which is an extinct elephantid relative, and 12 spanning all three extant and three extinct elephantid species including an...
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Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences current issue

Expanded cellular clones carrying replication-competent HIV-1 persist, wax, and wane [Immunology and Inflammation]The latent reservoir for HIV-1 in resting CD4+ T cells is a major barrier to cure. Several lines of evidence suggest that the latent reservoir is maintained through cellular proliferation. Analysis of this proliferative process is complicated by the fact that most infected cells carry defective proviruses. Additional complications are...
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Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences current issue

Treg cells limit IFN-{gamma} production to control macrophage accrual and phenotype during skeletal muscle regeneration [Immunology and Inflammation]Skeletal muscle regeneration is a highly orchestrated process that depends on multiple immune-system cell types, notably macrophages (MFs) and Foxp3+CD4+ regulatory T (Treg) cells. This study addressed how Treg cells rein in MFs during regeneration of murine muscle after acute injury with cardiotoxin. We first delineated and characterized two subsets...
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Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences current issue

Coamplification of miR-4728 protects HER2-amplified breast cancers from targeted therapy [Medical Sciences]HER2 (ERBB2) amplification is a driving oncogenic event in breast cancer. Clinical trials have consistently shown the benefit of HER2 inhibitors (HER2i) in treating patients with both local and advanced HER2+ breast cancer. Despite this benefit, their efficacy as single agents is limited, unlike the robust responses to other receptor...
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Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences current issue

Host biotin is required for liver stage development in malaria parasites [Microbiology]Acetyl-CoA carboxylase (ACC) is a biotin-dependent enzyme that is the target of several classes of herbicides. Malaria parasites contain a plant-like ACC, and this is the only protein predicted to be biotinylated in the parasite. We found that ACC is expressed in the apicoplast organelle in liver- and blood-stage malaria...
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Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences current issue

Role of a single noncoding nucleotide in the evolution of an epidemic African clade of Salmonella [Microbiology]Salmonella enterica serovar Typhimurium ST313 is a relatively newly emerged sequence type that is causing a devastating epidemic of bloodstream infections across sub-Saharan Africa. Analysis of hundreds of Salmonella genomes has revealed that ST313 is closely related to the ST19 group of S. Typhimurium that cause gastroenteritis across the world....
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Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences current issue

Karyopherin {alpha}-3 is a key protein in the pathogenesis of spinocerebellar ataxia type 3 controlling the nuclear localization of ataxin-3 [Neuroscience]Spinocerebellar ataxia type 3 (SCA3) is a neurodegenerative disorder caused by a CAG expansion in the ATXN3 gene leading to a polyglutamine expansion in the ataxin-3 protein. The nuclear presence and aggregation of expanded ataxin-3 are critical steps in disease pathogenesis. To identify novel therapeutic targets, we investigated the nucleocytoplasmic...
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Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences current issue

Identification of a highly neurotoxic {alpha}-synuclein species inducing mitochondrial damage and mitophagy in Parkinson’s disease [Neuroscience]Exposure of cultured primary neurons to preformed α-synuclein fibrils (PFFs) leads to the recruitment of endogenous α-synuclein and its templated conversion into fibrillar phosphorylated α-synuclein (pα-synF) aggregates resembling those involved in Parkinson’s disease (PD) pathogenesis. Pα-synF was described previously as inclusions morphologically similar to Lewy bodies and Lewy neurites in...
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Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences current issue

Target selectivity of septal cholinergic neurons in the medial and lateral entorhinal cortex [Neuroscience]The entorhinal cortex (EC) plays a pivotal role in processing and conveying spatial information to the hippocampus. It has long been known that EC neurons are modulated by cholinergic input from the medial septum. However, little is known as to how synaptic release of acetylcholine affects the different cell types...
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Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences current issue

Monitoring ligand-dependent assembly of receptor ternary complexes in live cells by BRETFect [Pharmacology]There is currently an unmet need for versatile techniques to monitor the assembly and dynamics of ternary complexes in live cells. Here we describe bioluminescence resonance energy transfer with fluorescence enhancement by combined transfer (BRETFect), a high-throughput technique that enables robust spectrometric detection of ternary protein complexes based on increased...
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Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences current issue

Forecasting the spatial transmission of influenza in the United States [Applied Mathematics]Recurrent outbreaks of seasonal and pandemic influenza create a need for forecasts of the geographic spread of this pathogen. Although it is well established that the spatial progression of infection is largely attributable to human mobility, difficulty obtaining real-time information on human movement has limited its incorporation into existing infectious...
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Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences current issue

RNA self-assembly contributes to stress granule formation and defining the stress granule transcriptome [Biochemistry]Stress granules are higher order assemblies of nontranslating mRNAs and proteins that form when translation initiation is inhibited. Stress granules are thought to form by protein–protein interactions of RNA-binding proteins. We demonstrate RNA homopolymers or purified cellular RNA forms assemblies in vitro analogous to stress granules. Remarkably, under conditions representative...
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Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences current issue

Human Ska complex and Ndc80 complex interact to form a load-bearing assembly that strengthens kinetochore-microtubule attachments [Biochemistry]Accurate segregation of chromosomes relies on the force-bearing capabilities of the kinetochore to robustly attach chromosomes to dynamic microtubule tips. The human Ska complex and Ndc80 complex are outer-kinetochore components that bind microtubules and are required to fully stabilize kinetochore–microtubule attachments in vivo. While purified Ska complex tracks with disassembling...
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Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences current issue

Inorganic phosphate, arsenate, and vanadate enhance exonuclease transcript cleavage by RNA polymerase by 2000-fold [Biochemistry]Inorganic Pi is involved in all major biochemical pathways. Here we describe a previously unreported activity of Pi. We show that Pi and its structural mimics, vanadate and arsenate, enhance nascent transcript cleavage by RNA polymerase (RNAP). They engage an Mg2+ ion in catalysis and activate an attacking water molecule....
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Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences current issue

Nrf2 activation attenuates genetic endoplasmic reticulum stress induced by a mutation in the phosphomannomutase 2 gene in zebrafish [Cell Biology]Nrf2 plays critical roles in animals’ defense against electrophiles and oxidative stress by orchestrating the induction of cytoprotective genes. We previously isolated the zebrafish mutant it768, which displays up-regulated expression of Nrf2 target genes in an uninduced state. In this paper, we determine that the gene responsible for it768 was...
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Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences current issue

Grip and slip of L1-CAM on adhesive substrates direct growth cone haptotaxis [Cell Biology]Chemical cues presented on the adhesive substrate direct cell migration, a process termed haptotaxis. To migrate, cells must generate traction forces upon the substrate. However, how cells probe substrate-bound cues and generate directional forces for migration remains unclear. Here, we show that the cell adhesion molecule (CAM) L1-CAM is involved...
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Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences current issue

OCT4/POU5F1 is required for NANOG expression in bovine blastocysts [Developmental Biology]Mammalian preimplantation development involves two lineage specifications: first, the CDX2-expressing trophectoderm (TE) and a pluripotent inner cell mass (ICM) are separated during blastocyst formation. Second, the pluripotent epiblast (EPI; expressing NANOG) and the differentiated primitive endoderm (PrE; expressing GATA6) diverge within the ICM. Studies in mice revealed that OCT4/POU5F1 is...
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Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences current issue

Natural diamond formation by self-redox of ferromagnesian carbonate [Earth, Atmospheric, and Planetary Sciences]Formation of natural diamonds requires the reduction of carbon to its bare elemental form, and pressures (P) greater than 5 GPa to cross the graphite–diamond transition boundary. In a study of shocked ferromagnesian carbonate at the Xiuyan impact crater, we found that the impact pressure–temperature (P-T) of 25–45 GPa and...
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Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences current issue

Decline and poleward shift in Indian summer monsoon synoptic activity in a warming climate [Earth, Atmospheric, and Planetary Sciences]Cyclonic atmospheric vortices of varying intensity, collectively known as low-pressure systems (LPS), travel northwest across central India and produce more than half of the precipitation received by that fertile region and its ∼600 million inhabitants. Yet, future changes in LPS activity are poorly understood, due in part to inadequate representation...
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Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences current issue

Strong control of Southern Ocean cloud reflectivity by ice-nucleating particles [Earth, Atmospheric, and Planetary Sciences]Large biases in climate model simulations of cloud radiative properties over the Southern Ocean cause large errors in modeled sea surface temperatures, atmospheric circulation, and climate sensitivity. Here, we combine cloud-resolving model simulations with estimates of the concentration of ice-nucleating particles in this region to show that our simulated Southern...
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Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences current issue

Transitory microbial habitat in the hyperarid Atacama Desert [Ecology]Traces of life are nearly ubiquitous on Earth. However, a central unresolved question is whether these traces always indicate an active microbial community or whether, in extreme environments, such as hyperarid deserts, they instead reflect just dormant or dead cells. Although microbial biomass and diversity decrease with increasing aridity in...
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Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences current issue

Reforestation can sequester two petagrams of carbon in US topsoils in a century [Ecology]Soils are Earth’s largest terrestrial carbon (C) pool, and their responsiveness to land use and management make them appealing targets for strategies to enhance C sequestration. Numerous studies have identified practices that increase soil C, but their inferences are often based on limited data extrapolated over large areas. Here, we...
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Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences current issue

Health effects of banning beehive coke ovens and implementation of the ban in China [Environmental Sciences]Environmental legislation and proper implementation are critical in environmental protection. In the past, beehive coke ovens (BCOs) were popular in China, resulting in enormous emissions of benzo[a]pyrene (BaP), a common indicator of carcinogenic polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons. BCOs were banned by the Coal Law in 1996. Although BCO numbers have declined...
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Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences current issue

Ants avoid superinfections by performing risk-adjusted sanitary care [Evolution]Being cared for when sick is a benefit of sociality that can reduce disease and improve survival of group members. However, individuals providing care risk contracting infectious diseases themselves. If they contract a low pathogen dose, they may develop low-level infections that do not cause disease but still affect host...
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Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences current issue

Editing out five Serpina1 paralogs to create a mouse model of genetic emphysema [Genetics]Chronic obstructive pulmonary disease affects 10% of the worldwide population, and the leading genetic cause is α-1 antitrypsin (AAT) deficiency. Due to the complexity of the murine locus, which includes up to six Serpina1 paralogs, no genetic animal model of the disease has been successfully generated until now. Here we...
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Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences current issue

Rapid regulatory evolution of a nonrecombining autosome linked to divergent behavioral phenotypes [Genetics]In the white-throated sparrow (Zonotrichia albicollis), the second chromosome bears a striking resemblance to sex chromosomes. First, within each breeding pair of birds, one bird is homozygous for the standard arrangement of the chromosome (ZAL2/ZAL2) and its mate is heterozygous for a different version (ZAL2/ZAL2m). Second, recombination is profoundly suppressed...
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Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences current issue

Double-stranded DNA break polarity skews repair pathway choice during intrachromosomal and interchromosomal recombination [Immunology and Inflammation]Activation-induced cytidine deaminase (AID) inflicts DNA damage at Ig genes to initiate class switch recombination (CSR) and chromosomal translocations. However, the DNA lesions formed during these processes retain an element of randomness, and thus knowledge of the relationship between specific DNA lesions and AID-mediated processes remains incomplete. To identify necessary...
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Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences current issue

MLH1-rheMac hereditary nonpolyposis colorectal cancer syndrome in rhesus macaques [Medical Sciences]Over the past two decades, 33 cases of colonic adenocarcinomas have been diagnosed in rhesus macaques (Macaca mulatta) at the nonhuman primate colony of the Keeling Center for Comparative Medicine and Research at The University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center. The distinctive feature in these cases, based on PET/computed...
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Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences current issue

Phosphorylation-dependent activation of the cell wall synthase PBP2a in Streptococcus pneumoniae by MacP [Microbiology]Most bacterial cells are surrounded by an essential cell wall composed of the net-like heteropolymer peptidoglycan (PG). Growth and division of bacteria are intimately linked to the expansion of the PG meshwork and the construction of a cell wall septum that separates the nascent daughter cells. Class A penicillin-binding proteins...
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Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences current issue

d-Sedoheptulose-7-phosphate is a common precursor for the heptoses of septacidin and hygromycin B [Microbiology]Seven-carbon-chain–containing sugars exist in several groups of important bacterial natural products. Septacidin represents a group of l-heptopyranoses containing nucleoside antibiotics with antitumor, antifungal, and pain-relief activities. Hygromycin B, an aminoglycoside anthelmintic agent used in swine and poultry farming, represents a group of d-heptopyranoses–containing antibiotics. To date,
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Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences current issue

Optimal multiguidance integration in insect navigation [Neuroscience]In the last decades, desert ants have become model organisms for the study of insect navigation. In finding their way, they use two major navigational routines: path integration using a celestial compass and landmark guidance based on sets of panoramic views of the terrestrial environment. It has been claimed that...
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Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences current issue

Direct observation of backbone planarization via side-chain alignment in single bulky-substituted polythiophenes [Physics]The backbone conformation of conjugated polymers affects, to a large extent, their optical and electronic properties. The usually flexible substituents provide solubility and influence the packing behavior of conjugated polymers in films or in bad solvents. However, the role of the side chains in determining and potentially controlling the backbone...
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Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences current issue

FLOWERING LOCUS T mRNA is synthesized in specialized companion cells in Arabidopsis and Maryland Mammoth tobacco leaf veins [Plant Biology]Flowering is triggered by the transmission of a mobile protein, FLOWERING LOCUS T (FT), from leaves to the shoot apex. FT originates in the phloem of leaf veins. However, the identity of the FT-synthesizing cells in the phloem is not known. As a result, it has not been possible to...
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Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences current issue

Infants expect ingroup support to override fairness when resources are limited [Psychological and Cognitive Sciences]Recent research suggests that the foundations of human moral cognition include abstract principles of fairness and ingroup support. We examined which principle 1.5-y-old infants and 2.5-y-old toddlers would prioritize when the two were pitted against each other. In violation-of-expectation tasks, a puppet distributor brought in either two (two-item condition) or...
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Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences current issue

For Black men, being tall increases threat stereotyping and police stops [Psychological and Cognitive Sciences]Height seems beneficial for men in terms of salaries and success; however, past research on height examines only White men. For Black men, height may be more costly than beneficial, primarily signaling threat rather than competence. Three studies reveal the downsides of height in Black men. Study 1 analyzes over...
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Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences current issue

The influence of a competition on noncompetitors [Psychological and Cognitive Sciences]We report a series of experimental studies that investigate the influence of a competition on noncompetitors who do not participate in it but are aware of it. Our work is highly relevant across many domains of social life where competitions are prevalent, as it is typical in a competition that...
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Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences current issue

Social norm enforcement in ethnically diverse communities [Social Sciences]Recent waves of immigration to Western nations have fueled a debate over the consequences of ethnic diversity for social cohesion. One prominent argument in this debate holds that diversity is detrimental to trust and cooperation because individuals in heterogeneous communities face difficulties in enforcing social norms across ethnic lines. We...
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Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences current issue

Group size in social-ecological systems [Sustainability Science]Cooperation becomes more difficult as a group becomes larger, but it is unclear where it will break down. Here, we study group size within well-functioning social-ecological systems. We consider centuries-old evidence from hundreds of communities in the Alps that harvested common property resources. Results show that the average group size...
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Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences current issue

Highly multiplexed and quantitative cell-surface protein profiling using genetically barcoded antibodies [Systems Biology]Human cells express thousands of different surface proteins that can be used for cell classification, or to distinguish healthy and disease conditions. A method capable of profiling a substantial fraction of the surface proteome simultaneously and inexpensively would enable more accurate and complete classification of cell states. We present a...
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Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences current issue

Correction for Haines et al., New twist on artificial muscles [Correction]PERSPECTIVE Correction for “New twist on artificial muscles,” by Carter S. Haines, Na Li, Geoffrey M. Spinks, Ali E. Aliev, Jiangtao Di, and Ray H. Baughman, which was first published September 26, 2016; 10.1073/pnas.1605273113 (Proc Natl Acad Sci USA 113:11709–11716). The authors note that on page 11714, left column, first...
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Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences current issue

Correction for D’Asaro et al., Ocean convergence and the dispersion of flotsam [Correction]EARTH, ATMOSPHERIC, AND PLANETARY SCIENCES Correction for “Ocean convergence and the dispersion of flotsam,” by Eric A. D’Asaro, Andrey Y. Shcherbina, Jody M. Klymak, Jeroen Molemaker, Guillaume Novelli, Cédric M. Guigand, Angelique C. Haza, Brian K. Haus, Edward H. Ryan, Gregg A. Jacobs, Helga S. Huntley, Nathan J. M. Laxague,...
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Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences current issue

Correction for Muretta et al., A posttranslational modification of the mitotic kinesin Eg5 that enhances its mechanochemical coupling and alters its mitotic function [Correction]BIOPHYSICS AND COMPUTATIONAL BIOLOGY Correction for “A posttranslational modification of the mitotic kinesin Eg5 that enhances its mechanochemical coupling and alters its mitotic function” by Joseph M. Muretta, Babu J. N. Reddy, Guido Scarabelli, Alex F. Thompson, Shashank Jariwala, Jennifer Major, Monica Venere, Jeremy N. Rich, Belinda Willard, David D....
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Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences current issue

In This Issue [This Week in PNAS]Promoting transparency in scientific authorship Transparency in scientific authorship. Image courtesy of iStock.com/exdez. Conventions for listing authors in scientific publications vary between disciplines, cultures, and research groups. As a result, determining the extent to which an author may have contributed to or is accountable for a given publication is challenging....
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Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences current issue

Following sugar patterns in search of galectin function [Chemistry]Through evolution, glycans have been selected as a class of biomolecules tasked with facilitating information exchange at the cellular boundary (1). Presented as attachments on membrane proteins or linked directly to lipids embedded in the plasma membrane of cells, glycans serve as recognition elements for glycan binding proteins, such as...
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Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences current issue

Deciphering how HIV-1 weakens and cracks the bone [Cell Biology]Globally, life expectancy for HIV-infected individuals is increasing and many are living into their old age, largely due to the success and increased use of combination antiretroviral therapy (cART) (1). Among the debilitating features of aging are the development of osteoporosis and loss of immune competence (2). Notably, both osteoporosis...
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Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences current issue

Reproducibility of research: Issues and proposed remedies [Introductions]Reproducibility has been one of the major tools science has used to help establish the validity and importance of scientific findings since Philosophical Transactions of the Royal Society was established in 1665 (1). Since that time the process of discovery has evolved to make use of new technologies and methods...
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Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences current issue

Transparency in authors’ contributions and responsibilities to promote integrity in scientific publication [Social Sciences]In keeping with the growing movement in scientific publishing toward transparency in data and methods, we propose changes to journal authorship policies and procedures to provide insight into which author is responsible for which contributions, better assurance that the list is complete, and clearly articulated standards to justify earning authorship...
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Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences current issue

Issues with data and analyses: Errors, underlying themes, and potential solutions [Colloquium Paper]Some aspects of science, taken at the broadest level, are universal in empirical research. These include collecting, analyzing, and reporting data. In each of these aspects, errors can and do occur. In this work, we first discuss the importance of focusing on statistical and data errors to continually improve the...
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Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences current issue

Core Concept: Mechanical metamaterials bend the rules of everyday physics [Applied Physical Sciences]Chiara Daraio played for Italy’s junior national basketball team in the 1990s. But when a Swiss running-shoe maker called her up in 2015, it wasn’t to talk about her athletic talents. Mechanical metamaterials, such as this Islamic-art–inspired metamaterial sheet, can pop into new configurations when stretched. Image courtesy of Ahmad...
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Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences current issue

Training replicable predictors in multiple studies [Colloquium Paper]This article considers replicability of the performance of predictors across studies. We suggest a general approach to investigating this issue, based on ensembles of prediction models trained on different studies. We quantify how the common practice of training on a single study accounts in part for the observed challenges in...
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Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences current issue

Strain-induced accelerated asymmetric spatial degradation of polymeric vascular scaffolds [Biophysics and Computational Biology]Polymer-based bioresorbable scaffolds (BRS) seek to eliminate long-term complications of metal stents. However, current BRS designs bear substantially higher incidence of clinical failures, especially thrombosis, compared with metal stents. Research strategies inherited from metal stents fail to consider polymer microstructures and dynamics––issues critical to BRS. Using Raman spectroscopy, we dem
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Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences current issue

Lamellipodium is a myosin-independent mechanosensor [Biophysics and Computational Biology]The ability of adherent cells to sense changes in the mechanical properties of their extracellular environments is critical to numerous aspects of their physiology. It has been well documented that cell attachment and spreading are sensitive to substrate stiffness. Here, we demonstrate that this behavior is actually biphasic, with a...
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Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences current issue

Multifrequency AFM reveals lipid membrane mechanical properties and the effect of cholesterol in modulating viscoelasticity [Biophysics and Computational Biology]The physical properties of lipid bilayers comprising the cell membrane occupy the current spotlight of membrane biology. Their traditional representation as a passive 2D fluid has gradually been abandoned in favor of a more complex picture: an anisotropic time-dependent viscoelastic biphasic material, capable of transmitting or attenuating mechanical forces that...
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Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences current issue

Inner Workings: Better sequencing tech may help keep planets clean [Earth, Atmospheric, and Planetary Sciences]In September 1956, more than a year before Sputnik would officially launch the space age, the International Astronautical Federation convened in Rome. Its agenda had little to do with mission logistics—attendees were actually there to discuss lunar and planetary contamination. Eleven years later, at the height of the Cold War,...
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Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences current issue

Direct observations of rock moisture, a hidden component of the hydrologic cycle [Ecology]Recent theory and field observations suggest that a systematically varying weathering zone, that can be tens of meters thick, commonly develops in the bedrock underlying hillslopes. Weathering turns otherwise poorly conductive bedrock into a dynamic water storage reservoir. Infiltrating precipitation typically will pass through unsaturated weathered bedrock before reaching groundwater...
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Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences current issue

Empirical confidence interval calibration for population-level effect estimation studies in observational healthcare data [Colloquium Paper]Observational healthcare data, such as electronic health records and administrative claims, offer potential to estimate effects of medical products at scale. Observational studies have often been found to be nonreproducible, however, generating conflicting results even when using the same database to answer the same question. One source of discrepancies is...
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Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences current issue

Standards for design and measurement would make clinical research reproducible and usable [Colloquium Paper]We find standards useful in everyday life and in science, although we do not always follow them. Adopting new standards can be expensive, so there may be a strong incentive to maintain the status quo rather than adopt new standards. The scientific community has many standards encompassing both doing clinical...
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Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences current issue

Enhancing primary reports of randomized controlled trials: Three most common challenges and suggested solutions [Colloquium Paper]Evidence from a well-designed randomized controlled trial (RCT) is generally considered to be the gold standard that can inform clinical practice and guide decision-making. However, several deficiencies in the reporting of RCTs have frequently been identified, including incomplete, selective, and biased or inconsistent reporting. Such suboptimal reporting may lead to...
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Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences current issue

Misrepresentation and distortion of research in biomedical literature [Colloquium Paper]Publication in peer-reviewed journals is an essential step in the scientific process. However, publication is not simply the reporting of facts arising from a straightforward analysis thereof. Authors have broad latitude when writing their reports and may be tempted to consciously or unconsciously “spin” their study findings. Spin has been...
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Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences current issue

Genetic manipulation of structural color in bacterial colonies [Microbiology]Naturally occurring photonic structures are responsible for the bright and vivid coloration in a large variety of living organisms. Despite efforts to understand their biological functions, development, and complex optical response, little is known of the underlying genes involved in the development of these nanostructures in any domain of life....
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Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences current issue

Opinion: Is science really facing a reproducibility crisis, and do we need it to? [Social Sciences]Efforts to improve the reproducibility and integrity of science are typically justified by a narrative of crisis, according to which most published results are unreliable due to growing problems with research and publication practices. This article provides an overview of recent evidence suggesting that this narrative is mistaken, and argues...
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Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences current issue

Scientific progress despite irreproducibility: A seeming paradox [Colloquium Paper]It appears paradoxical that science is producing outstanding new results and theories at a rapid rate at the same time that researchers are identifying serious problems in the practice of science that cause many reports to be irreproducible and invalid. Certainly, the practice of science needs to be improved, and...
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Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences current issue

The preregistration revolution [Colloquium Paper]Progress in science relies in part on generating hypotheses with existing observations and testing hypotheses with new observations. This distinction between postdiction and prediction is appreciated conceptually but is not respected in practice. Mistaking generation of postdictions with testing of predictions reduces the credibility of research findings. However, ordinary biases...
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Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences current issue

Metastudies for robust tests of theory [Colloquium Paper]We describe and demonstrate an empirical strategy useful for discovering and replicating empirical effects in psychological science. The method involves the design of a metastudy, in which many independent experimental variables—that may be moderators of an empirical effect—are indiscriminately randomized. Radical randomization yields rich datasets that can be used to...
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Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences current issue

An empirical analysis of journal policy effectiveness for computational reproducibility [Colloquium Paper]A key component of scientific communication is sufficient information for other researchers in the field to reproduce published findings. For computational and data-enabled research, this has often been interpreted to mean making available the raw data from which results were generated, the computer code that generated the findings, and any...
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Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences current issue

Crisis or self-correction: Rethinking media narratives about the well-being of science [Colloquium Paper]After documenting the existence and exploring some implications of three alternative news narratives about science and its challenges, this essay outlines ways in which those who communicate science can more accurately convey its investigatory process, self-correcting norms, and remedial actions, without in the process legitimizing an unwarranted “science is broken/in...
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New on MIT Technology Review

Sierra Leone’s “blockchain vote” sounds neat, but don’t get carried away
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Exploring the role of cognitive factors in a new instrument for elders' financial capacityAlthough the general public and mental health professionals seem to disregard incapacity regarding financial issues and relevant decision making in mild cognitive impairment (MCI), and focus only on severe dementia cases, a PhD study in Greece reveals that noticeable deficits do exist in the handling of financial issues in elders suffering from MCI.
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News

NASA sees Tropical Cyclone Linda lose an 'arm'Tropical Cyclone 13P has been renamed Tropical Cyclone Linda in the Southern Pacific Ocean. NASA's Aqua and Terra satellites found a powerful band of thunderstorms east of Linda's center that resembled an arm, fell apart in nine hours.
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Molecule that gives energy-burning brown fat its identity could lead to drugs for obesityA protein found in brown fat, but not typical white fat, is key to how the energy-burning brown fat cells function
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Multifunctional metalens unlocks with lightResearchers at the Harvard John A. Paulson School of Engineering and Applied Sciences (SEAS) have developed a flat optical component that is simultaneously a metalens, a microscope objective that can resolve details smaller than a wavelength of light, and an optical vortex and hologram generator. Each functionality is controlled by a different wavelength of light.
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Areas where homes, forests mix increased rapidly over two decadesFrom 1990 to 2010, the nation's wildland-urban interface grew rapidly, increasing from 30.8 to 43.4 million homes (41 percent growth) and expanding in area from 143,568,227 acres to 190,271,144 acres in area, or 33 percent. The vast majority of new WUI areas were caused by new housing (97 percent), not an increase in wildland vegetation.
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Feed: All Latest

'Into the Breach' Makes Defeat Feel Deeply SatisfyingThe latest from Subset Games, the company behind spaceflight-desperation simulator 'FTL,' is a game about going back in time to correct your mistakes.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

World's largest cities depend on evaporated water from surrounding landsUrbanization has taken billions of people from the rural countryside to urban centers, adding pressure to existing water resources. Many cities rely on renewable freshwater regularly refilled by precipitation, rather than groundwater or desalinated water.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Pterosaurs went out with a bang, not a whimperFossils of six new species of pterosaurs - giant flying reptiles that flew over the heads of the dinosaurs - have been discovered by a research team led by the Milner Centre for Evolution at the University of Bath, revealing that this lineage was killed off in its prime. An analysis of the fossils, publishing 13 March in the open access journal PLOS Biology shows that, contrary to previous studies
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

The early bird got to fly: Archaeopteryx was an active flyerThe question of whether the Late Jurassic dino-bird Archaeopteryx was an elaborately feathered ground dweller, a glider, or an active flyer has fascinated palaeontologists for decades. Valuable new information obtained with state-of-the-art synchrotron microtomography allowed an international team of scientists to answer this question.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

Study debunks fears of increased teen suicide risk from popular flu drugA new study suggests that the drug oseltamivir -- commonly known as Tamiflu -- does not cause an increased risk of suicide in pediatric patients.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Amazon maintains top brand reputation, Apple and Google reps dipAmazon remains the company with the best reputation, but several other tech brands including Apple and Google saw their reputations drop in the annual Harris Poll Reputation Quotient poll, out Tuesday.
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Live Science

Why Did These Medieval European Women Have Alien-Like Skulls?Genetic sleuthing has helped scientists crack the case of mysterious egg-shaped skulls unearthed from medieval Bavarian graves: The pointy skulls likely belonged to immigrant brides who traveled to Bavaria to get married.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

Bone marrow edema in lower spine is common in young athletesNew research indicates that young recreational and elite athletes commonly accumulate excess fluid in the bone marrow around the joint that connects the spine with the pelvis.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

Optometrist investigates changes in eye structure in astronautsAn optometrist studies the vision of returning International Space Station astronauts and demonstrates a structural change to their eyes.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

Men and women have opposite genetic alterations in depressionMen and women with major depressive disorder (MDD) have opposite changes in the expression of the same genes, according to a new postmortem brain study. The findings indicate distinct pathology, and suggest that men and women may need different types of treatment for depression.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

Infected 'zombie ants' face no discrimination from nest matesCarpenter ants infected with a specialized parasitic fungus are not subjected to aggression or isolation from their nest mates, and they continue to share in the colony's food resources until they leave the nest for the last time to die, according to a new study.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

Emotional suppression reduces memory of negative eventsBy peering at the brains of study subjects prompted to suppress negative emotions, scientists have gained new insights into how emotional regulation influences negative feelings and memories. The researchers hope the findings will lead to new methods to combat depression.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

Warm Arctic means colder, snowier winters in northeastern US, study saysScientists have linked the frequency of extreme winter weather in the United States to Arctic temperatures.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Mowing the lawn less often improves bee habitatWhen it comes to improving habitat for beleaguered native bee species, doing less may accomplish more. New research by the USDA Forest Service and partners funded by the National Science Foundation found that mowing the lawn less frequently can significantly improve pollinator habitat.
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Live Science

Get Used to Nor'easters — Arctic Warming May Mean More Severe Winters in the NortheastTemperature spikes in the Arctic coincide with severe winter weather in the northeastern U.S.
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BBC News - Science & Environment

Archaeopteryx flew like a pheasant, say scientistsThe famous winged dinosaur Archaeopteryx, once thought of as the first bird, could fly, research shows.
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The Atlantic

Read the State Department's Account of Tillerson's OustingOn Tuesday, President Donald Trump announced via Twitter that he would replace his secretary of state, Rex Tillerson, with CIA Director Mike Pompeo. Shortly thereafter, Under Secretary for Public Diplomacy and Public Affairs Steve Goldstein issued a statement in which he said Tillerson was “unaware of the reason” for his firing. (He also told reporters that Tillerson had learned of the firing fro
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New on MIT Technology Review

Real people are now hailing Waymo’s robotic taxis, without a driver in sight
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Mowing the lawn less often improves bee habitatNew research suggests that homeowners can improve habitat for bees by mowing the lawn less often.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

Hunger guides mountain lions' actions to enter residential areasIn a new study, researchers found that while big cats like mountain lions are generally fearful of and avoid humans, hunger can dampen that fear.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Amazon workers in Spain plan first ever strikeMore than 1,000 Amazon workers in Spain are planning to go on strike next week against a planned drop in allowances and overtime, a first in the country, a union said Tuesday.
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New Scientist - News

Malfunctioning fertility clinic tanks may put eggs at riskThousands of frozen eggs and embryos may have been damaged after temperatures rose in two malfunctioning tanks at fertility clinics in California and Ohio
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The Atlantic

The Ease of the Postal Service Makes It a Vector for ViolenceIf the postal service did not already exist, if its reach had not grown organically as the United States grew, then the idea of building one from scratch today might seem absurd. How preposterous it is that anyone can scrawl an address on an envelope and expect it to arrive days later at a specific address—be it inside a Manhattan high-rise or at the end of a dusty country road? How wonderful tha
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The Atlantic

Their Final Disagreement: How Trump Fired TillersonRex Tillerson Donald TrumpDonald Trump and Rex Tillerson disagreed on global trade, climate change, NATO , the nuclear deal with Iran, talks with North Korea, Qatar’s impasse with its neighbors, and, ultimately, even how the president fired his secretary of state. The White House said Tuesday that Tillerson was informed last Friday that he would be replaced as secretary of state. But the statement released Tuesday by Stev
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

China's bike-share app Ofo raises $850 mn to expand overseasChinese bike-sharing start-up Ofo announced Tuesday that it has raised around $850 million from investors including e-commerce giant Alibaba, to finance its overseas expansion while it battles rivals in China.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Google guru Page tests flying taxis in New Zealand (Update)Pilot-less flying taxis are being tested in New Zealand as part of a project backed by Google co-founder Larry Page that supporters say will revolutionise personal transport.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Infected 'zombie ants' face no discrimination from nest matesCarpenter ants infected with a specialized parasitic fungus are not subjected to aggression or isolation from their nest mates, and they continue to share in the colony's food resources until they leave the nest for the last time to die, according to a study led by Penn State researchers.
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Latest Headlines | Science News

Brain waves may focus attention and keep information flowingNot just by-products of busy nerve cells, brain waves may be key to how the brain operates.
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Quanta Magazine

Brainless Embryos Suggest Bioelectricity Guides GrowthThe tiny tadpole embryo looked like a bean. One day old, it didn’t even have a heart yet. The researcher in a white coat and gloves who hovered over it made a precise surgical incision where its head would form. Moments later, the brain was gone, but the embryo was still alive. The brief procedure took Celia Herrera-Rincon , a neuroscience postdoc at the Allen Discovery Center at Tufts University
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Compassion helped Neanderthals to survive, new study revealsThey have an unwarranted image as brutish and uncaring, but new research has revealed just how knowledgeable and effective Neanderthal healthcare was.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Hunger guides mountain lions' actions to enter residential areasIn late February, CBS News Denver reported that mountain lion sightings were on the rise in Colorado's high country. Lion attacks on people in the state and around the world are rare, but the story referenced an attack on a 5-year-old boy in 2016 by a mountain lion near Aspen.
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Emotional suppression reduces memory of negative eventsBy peering at the brains of study subjects prompted to suppress negative emotions, scientists have gained new insights into how emotional regulation influences negative feelings and memories. The researchers hope the findings will lead to new methods to combat depression.
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Scientific American Content: Global

How Much Math Do You Need to Win Your March Madness Pool?Somewhere between the opposing forces of “favorites” and “underdogs” lies a winning solution -- Read more on ScientificAmerican.com
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Scientific American Content: Global

Tree Farms Will Not Save Us from Global WarmingPlantations would have to be massive in scale, and their value is still unproven -- Read more on ScientificAmerican.com
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New Scientist - News

Weird crystals could grow on Titan and help alien life thriveThe surface of Saturn’s largest moon Titan might be covered, salt-like crystals that could be among the ingredients for nitrogen-based alien life
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The Atlantic

Donald Trump's Night With Rich Donors in Beverly HillsWould it be worth it for America to elect a president who lacked experience and moral character if he could also promise unusual independence from moneyed elites? Under Donald Trump, we won’t get an answer. During the 2016 campaign, Trump told voters that he was self-funding his campaign, in contrast to other politicians who’d be beholden to wealthy interests. “You know a lot of times you see the
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Big Think

The world's first blockchain-powered election just happened in a war-torn, poor countryThere's a new, highly secure way to vote and count ballots, and it's just been tested in a real-world election. Read More
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Google's AI program: Building better algorithms for detecting eye diseaseThe ability of artificial intelligence to help screen patients for a common diabetic eye disease gains momentum with a new study published online today in Ophthalmology, the journal of the American Academy of Ophthalmology. Lily Peng, M.D., Ph.D., and her colleagues at Google AI research group, show they could improve their disease-detecting software by using a small subset of images adjudicated b
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Popular Science

The people of Cape Town are running out of water—and they’re not aloneEnvironment The whole world is drying up. Cape Town could be the first major city to run out of water, and it might not be the only one.
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Big Think

Only 19% of European synagogues still stand, post-WWIIThis is the first-ever database of Europe's 3,318 remaining synagogues. Read More
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Infected 'zombie ants' face no discrimination from nest matesCarpenter ants infected with a specialized parasitic fungus are not subjected to aggression or isolation from their nest mates, and they continue to share in the colony's food resources until they leave the nest for the last time to die, according to a study led by Penn State researchers.
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Study shows bias in use of alcohol screening after traumatic brain injury'Has this patient been drinking?' It's a critical question for neurosurgical nurses and other professionals when evaluating patients with traumatic brain injury (TBI). But some groups of TBI patients are less likely to be screened for alcohol use, including women and younger patients, reports a study in the March issue of the Journal of Neuroscience Nursing, official journal of the American Associ
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Mindfulness meditation reduces incidence of major depressionAmong primary care patients with subthreshold depression, mindfulness meditation training reduces the incidence of major depression and improves depression symptoms.
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News

March/April 2018 Annals of Family Medicine tip sheetAnnals of Family Medicine is a peer-reviewed, indexed research journal that provides a cross-disciplinary forum for new, evidence-based information affecting the primary care disciplines.
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Pioneering research on mechanistic basis of disease in new journal Systems MedicineThe new peer-reviewed journal, Systems Medicine, has launched with a powerful mission to capture the leading research in the emerging field of medical systems biology.
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Men and women have opposite genetic alterations in depressionMen and women with major depressive disorder (MDD) have opposite changes in the expression of the same genes, according to a new postmortem brain study by researchers at the University of Pittsburgh and Centre for Addiction and Mental Health, Toronto, Canada. The findings, published in Biological Psychiatry, indicate distinct pathology, and suggest that men and women may need different types of tr
6d

EurekAlert! - Breaking News

UH optometrist investigates changes in eye structure in astronautsA University of Houston optometrist studies the vision of returning International Space Station astronauts and proves a structural change to their eyes.
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Bone marrow edema in lower spine is common in young athletesNew research indicates that young recreational and elite athletes commonly accumulate excess fluid in the bone marrow around the joint that connects the spine with the pelvis.
6d

EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Hunger guides mountain lions' actions to enter residential areasIn a new study, researchers found that while big cats like mountain lions are generally fearful of and avoid humans, hunger can dampen that fear.
6d

EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Study debunks fears of increased teen suicide risk from popular flu drugA new study published by researchers from the University of Illinois at Chicago suggests that the drug oseltamivir -- commonly known as Tamiflu -- does not cause an increased risk of suicide in pediatric patients.
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Surprising discovery provides insights into aggressive endometrial cancersNew research from Huntsman Cancer Institute (HCI) at the University of Utah (U of U) indicates steroid and hormone receptors are simultaneously active in many endometrial cancer tissues. The findings, published today in the journal Cell Reports, yield insights about factors that contribute to more aggressive endometrial tumors
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Warm Arctic means colder, snowier winters in northeastern US, study saysScientists from Rutgers University-New Brunswick and Atmospheric and Environmental Research (AER) have linked the frequency of extreme winter weather in the United States to Arctic temperatures.
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News

The early bird got to fly: Archaeopteryx was an active flyerThe question of whether the Late Jurassic dino-bird Archaeopteryx was an elaborately feathered ground dweller, a glider, or an active flyer has fascinated palaeontologists for decades. Valuable new information obtained with state-of-the-art synchrotron microtomography at the ESRF, the European Synchrotron (Grenoble, France), allowed an international team of scientists to answer this question in Na
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Mitochondria may metabolize ADP differently in aging muscle, despite exercise resistanceMost adults reach their peak levels of muscle mass in their late 30s or early 40s. Even for those who exercise regularly, strength and function then start to decline. Those who don't can experience dramatic drops. Now, a study published March 13 in the journal Cell Reports provides new clues about the cellular mechanisms of aging muscles, highlighting the importance of how mitochondria, the powerh
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Waymo’s Self-Driving Car Service Is Just About HereThe company that started off as Google's self-driving car project is now putting passengers in truly driverless cars in Phoenix—and will soon launch a commercial service.
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Ingeniøren

IDA om naturvidenskabsstrategi: Nu skal vi ud af starthullerneIDA-formand Thomas Damkjær Petersen er positiv over for den nationale naturvidenskabsstrategi, som regeringen offentliggjorde i dag, for jo hurtigere arbejdet kommer i gang, des bedre. Han efterlyser dog en mere anvendelsesorienteret tilgang.
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New Scientist - News

Dinobird Archaeopteryx only flew in short bursts like a pheasantThe bird-like dinosaur Archaeopteryx could flap its wings to fly, but only for short bursts – like a modern pheasant flapping to escape danger
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The Atlantic

Why Did Trump Fire Tillerson Now?The White House’s account of the Tillerson firing collapsed within minutes. Senior administration officials told outlets including The Washington Post and CNN that Tillerson had been told he would be dismissed on Friday, March 9. Within the hour, the State Department issued a statement insisting that Tillerson “had every intention of remaining” and “did not speak to the President this morning and
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Science | The Guardian

Archaeopteryx 'flew in bursts like a pheasant', scientists sayThe winged Late Jurassic creature would take to the air in frenetic, flapping bounds, fossil x-rays show Archaeopteryx , one of life on Earth’s first stabs at building a bird, evaded predators and cleared obstacles on the ground by bursting into flight like a startled pheasant, a new analysis suggests. High-resolution x-ray images of the creature’s skeleton reveal tell-tale similarities with the
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Latest Headlines | Science News

Dino-bird had wings made for flapping, not just glidingArchaeopteryx fossils suggest the dino-birds were capable of flapping their wings in flight.
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New on MIT Technology Review

Despite more tech, you will have to wait even longer for a Big Mac
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New on MIT Technology Review

A startup is pitching a mind-uploading service that is “100 percent fatal”Nectome will preserve your brain, but you have to be euthanized first.
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Ingeniøren

Myndighederne fik flere advarsler om graverende fejlanalyser af dansk vandmiljøAllerede i 2012 advarede Miljøstyrelsens egen laboratorierådgiver i en rapport mod at stole på en ny metode til at måle kvælstof i vandmiljøet. Men styrelsen tog det ikke som en advarsel, og laboratoriet, som udførte prøverne, fortsatte som hidtil.
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Compassion helped Neanderthals to survive, new study revealsThey have an unwarranted image as brutish and uncaring, but new research has revealed just how knowledgeable and effective Neanderthal healthcare was.
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Screening mammography for women 40-49 detects more cancers compared with older age groupsWhen compared to the screening population ages 50 and over, screening mammography in women ages 40-49 detects 19.3 percent additional cancers at the expense of an overall 1.5 percent increase in callbacks and 0.1 percent in increased biopsies, according to a study to be presented at the ARRS 2018 Annual Meeting, set for April 22-27 in Washington, DC.
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Field-data study finds no evidence of racial bias in predictive policingWhile predictive policing aims to improve the effectiveness of police patrols, there is concern that these algorithms may lead police to target minority communities and result in discriminatory arrests. A computer scientist in the School of Science at IUPUI conducted the first study to look at real-time field data from Los Angeles and found predictive policing did not result in biased arrests.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Warm Arctic means colder, snowier winters in northeastern US, study saysScientists from Rutgers University-New Brunswick and Atmospheric and Environmental Research (AER) have linked the frequency of extreme winter weather in the United States to Arctic temperatures.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

The early bird got to fly: Archaeopteryx was an active flyerThe question of whether the Late Jurassic dino-bird Archaeopteryx was an elaborately feathered ground dweller, a glider, or an active flyer has fascinated palaeontologists for decades. Valuable new information obtained with state-of-the-art synchrotron microtomography at the ESRF, the European Synchrotron (Grenoble, France), allowed an international team of scientists to answer this question in Na
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Amazon recalls portable chargers on reports of fires, burnsAmazon is recalling 260,000 AmazonBasics portable chargers after reports that they can overheat and cause fires or burns.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Blocking of Broadcom-Qualcomm tie-up highlights 5G security fearsThe unusual move by President Donald Trump blocking a proposed takeover of Qualcomm by Singapore-based chip rival Broadcom highlights growing concerns about the rise of Chinese competitors in the telecom sector and related national security issues.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Uber returns to Barcelona with licensed serviceUber said Tuesday it was back in Barcelona with 120 professional drivers after it was forced out three years ago over the suspension of its service that enables unregulated drivers to ferry passengers for money using their own cars.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Shaken, and stirred: Scaling up bioreactors' fluid dynamicsBioreactors are widely used to produce different therapeutics in the biopharmaceutical and regenerative medicine industries. Drug development relies on small multi-well plates shaken around an orbital diameter, while production-scale bioreactors are agitated by stirring. These different methods yield different fluid dynamics, making it difficult to scale lab findings to industry.
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Feed: All Latest

The Controversial Link Between Epic Storms and a Warming ArcticA controversial theory argues that weirdly enough, it’s a warming arctic that’s causing extreme winter weather in the eastern US.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

Lab surprised to find its drug-delivery system can help even without drugsA synthetic, injectable hydrogel developed to deliver drugs and encourage tissue growth turns out to have therapeutic properties all its own.
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New on MIT Technology Review

Facebook is being used to incite hatred in Myanmar, says the UN
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Scientific American Content: Global

Columbia's Dismissal of Prominent Neuroscientist Prompts Demand for Answers​An online petition calls for transparency about the removal of neuroscientist Thomas Jessell​ -- Read more on ScientificAmerican.com
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New Scientist - News

The sun’s mysteriously hot corona may be due to invisible plasmaThe surface of Saturn's largest moon Titan might be covered in salt-like crystals that could be among the ingredients for nitrogen-based microbes
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Science : NPR

An Ode To Insignificance: Buttons, Touchscreens, And Other Dangerous TechnologiesThe most successful technologies are so seductive, user-friendly, and so apparently innocuous that we hardly notice them entering our lives, says Jimena Canales. One such technology? The pushbutton. (Image credit: Jasmin Merdan/Getty Images)
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cognitive science

A new paper in JEP:General explores and extends the verbal overshadowing effect on eyewitness memory.submitted by /u/markmana [link] [comments]
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

Ash from dinosaur-era volcanoes linked with shale oil, gasNutrient-rich ash from an enormous flare-up of volcanic eruptions toward the end of the dinosaurs' reign kicked off a chain of events that led to the formation of shale gas and oil fields from Texas to Montana.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

Breeding trouble: Meta-analysis identifies fishy issues with captive stocksA meta-analysis has found patterns that may be jeopardizing the long-term success of worldwide animal breeding programs, which increasingly act as an insurance against extinction in conservation, and for food security. Captive-born animals had, on average, almost half the odds of reproductive success compared to their wild-born counterparts in captivity; in aquaculture, the effects were particular
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

Researchers computationally find the needle in a haystack to treat rare diseasesOne in 10 people in America is fighting a rare disease, or a disorder that affects fewer than 200,000 Americans. Researchers have developed a sophisticated and systematic way to identify existing drugs that can be repositioned to treat a rare disease or condition.
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Shaken, and stirred: Scaling up bioreactors' fluid dynamicsBioreactors are used to produce different therapeutics in the biopharmaceutical and regenerative medicine industries. Drug development relies on small multi-well plates shaken around an orbital diameter, while production-scale bioreactors are agitated by stirring. These different methods yield different fluid dynamics. Researchers in the U.K. are starting to bridge this gap by applying analytical
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Ingeniøren

VW’s NOx-fiks giver højere brændstofforbrugAustralsk test afslører op til 14 procent højere forbrug af brændstof, efter at VW havde fikset dieselbil med for høj NOx-udledning. Samtidig forurener bilen stadig over fire gange så meget med NOx, som laboratoriemålingerne viste.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Researchers develop spectroscopic thermometer for nanomaterialsA scientific team led by the Department of Energy's Oak Ridge National Laboratory has found a new way to take the local temperature of a material from an area about a billionth of a meter wide, or approximately 100,000 times thinner than a human hair.
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The Atlantic

A Cursed Appalachian Mining TownIn the late 1800s, traveling preacher Robert Sheffey cursed the town of Ivanhoe, Virginia, after witnessing what one female resident describes as “houses of ill repute, fighting, drunkenness, and a rejection of his ministry by the townspeople.” Legend has it that Sheffey condemned the sinful town to sink into the earth and be consumed by the pits of hell. “Whether you believe in it or not, after
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Video: The thousand-year-old eggCentury eggs, or pidan, are a preserved food made by fermenting duck eggs in alkali. The green and black color of these eggs is not very appealing at first blush, and the smell is even worse. However, this Ming dynasty innovation effectively extended the shelf life of eggs and has been adopted as a beloved comfort food in China and throughout the world.
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Science | The Guardian

Isabel Gal obituaryMy mother-in-law, Dr Isabel Gal, who has died aged 92, was working at Queen Mary’s hospital for children in Carshalton, Surrey, in the 1960s when her research suggested that a hormone-based pregnancy test drug called Primodos caused birth defects similar to those seen with thalidomide. Her findings were published in the journal Nature in 1967. In 1975 the Committee on Safety of Medicines issued a
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News

The thousand-year-old egg (video)Century eggs, or pidan, are a preserved food made by fermenting duck eggs in alkali. The green and black color of these eggs is not very appealing at first blush, and the smell is even worse. However, this Ming dynasty innovation effectively extended the shelf life of eggs and has been adopted as a beloved comfort food in China and throughout the world. Reactions explains the chemistry behind this
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Warm summers could weaken ocean circulationDeep convection in the North Atlantic is one of the key components of the large-scale ocean circulation. Based on long-term observations, scientists from the GEOMAR Helmholtz Centre for Ocean Research Kiel have now demonstrated the influence of increased surface freshening in summer on convection in the following winter. As the researchers write now in the journal Nature Climate Change, enhanced s
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Researchers develop spectroscopic thermometer for nanomaterialsA scientific team led by the Department of Energy's Oak Ridge National Laboratory has found a new way to take the local temperature of a material from an area about a billionth of a meter wide, or approximately 100,000 times thinner than a human hair. This discovery, published in Physical Review Letters, promises to improve the understanding of useful yet unusual physical and chemical behaviors th
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News

High prices are just one reason Americans spend more on healthcare than EuropeansHigh drug prices as well as the excessive use of imaging and surgical procedures, and excessive administrative burdens contribute the majority to America's health care overspending compared to Europe, argues policy expert Ezekiel J. Emanuel, MD, PhD, chair of the department of Medical Ethics and Health Policy at the Perelman School of Medicine at the University of Pennsylvania, in an editorial in
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Key drivers of high US healthcare spending identifiedThe major drivers of high healthcare costs in the US appear to be higher prices for nearly everything -- from physician and hospital services to diagnostic tests to pharmaceuticals -- and administrative complexity.
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Wide variation found among US counties for death from alcohol and drug use, suicide and interpersonal violenceDeaths from alcohol and drug use disorders, self-harm and interpersonal violence varied widely among U.S counties.
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News

US continues to spend much more on health care than other countries, driven by prices of physician and hospital services, pharmaceuticalsThe United States spent nearly twice as much as other high-income countries on medical care but did less well on many population health outcomes despite similar utilization. Spending differences were driven primarily by prices for labor and goods, including pharmaceuticals, devices and administrative costs.
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Popular Science

This 'acoustic lighthouse' could keep birds from killing themselves on wind turbinesNexus Media News Clean energy doesn't have to be deadly. Wind farms are good for the environment, but they pose a real risk for bird brains. An alarm system could stop birds from crashing into man-made structures.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

'Digistain' technology offers revolution in detailed cancer diagnosisNew cutting edge technology can be used to grade cancer tumors, eradicating human subjectivity and ensuring patients get the right treatment, researchers say.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

Off-the-shelf smart devices found easy to hackOff-the-shelf devices that include baby monitors, home security cameras, doorbells, and thermostats were easily co-opted by cyber researchers . As part of their ongoing research into detecting vulnerabilities of devices and networks expanding in the smart home and Internet of Things (IoT), the researchers disassembled and reverse engineered many common devices and quickly uncovered serious securit
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

Engineers create most efficient red light-activated optogenetic switch for mammalian cellsResearchers have developed a light-activated switch that can turn genes on and off in mammalian cells. This is the most efficient so-called 'optogenetic switch' activated by red and far-red light that has been successfully designed and tested in animal cells -- and it doesn't require the addition of sensing molecules from outside the cells.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

How to build a better railway, in (almost) every cell in your bodyResearch finds system of microtubule rails inside cells can adjust its own stability. New work shows how a microscopic 'railway' system in our cells can optimize its structure to better suit bodies' needs.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

Historical lead exposure may be linked to 256,000 premature deaths from cardiovascular disease in adults in United States each yearNew estimates suggest that 256,000 premature deaths from cardiovascular disease -- including 18,5000 deaths from ischemic heart disease -- in the United States may be linked to historical lead exposure in middle-aged and older adults (people currently aged 44 years or over), according to an observational study.
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TED Talks Daily (SD video)

What a world without prisons could look like | Deanna Van BurenDeanna Van Buren designs restorative justice centers that, instead of taking the punitive approach used by a system focused on mass incarceration, treat crime as a breach of relationships and justice as a process where all stakeholders come together to repair that breach. With help and ideas from incarcerated men and women, Van Buren is creating dynamic spaces that provide safe venues for dialogue
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

Autism's social deficits are reversed by an anti-cancer drugNew research reveals the first evidence that it may be possible to use a single compound to alleviate the behavioral symptoms of autism spectrum disorder by targeting sets of genes involved in the disease. The research demonstrated that brief treatment with a very low dose of romidepsin, an anti-cancer drug, restored social deficits in animal models of autism in a sustained fashion.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

Ag robot speeds data collection, analyses of crops as they growA new lightweight, low-cost agricultural robot could transform data collection and field scouting for agronomists, seed companies and farmers. The TerraSentia crop phenotyping robot measures the traits of individual plants using a variety of sensors, including cameras, transmitting the data in real time to the operator's phone or laptop computer.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

More homes built near wild lands leading to greater wildfire riskNew research o shows that a flurry of home-building near wild areas since 1990 has greatly increased the number of homes at risk from wildfires while increasing the costs associated with fighting those fires in increasingly dense developments.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

Movable silicon 'lenses' enable neutrons to see new range of details inside objectsAn innovative new way to focus beams of neutrons might allow scientists to probe the interiors of opaque objects at a size range they were blind to previously, allowing them to explore the innards of thick, opaque objects from meteorites to cutting-edge manufactured materials without damaging them.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

Genetic prehistory of Iberia differs from central and northern EuropeResearchers combined archaeological, genetic and stable isotope data to encapsulate 4000 years of Iberian biomolecular prehistory.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

Sound localization: Where did that noise come from?Humans can estimate distances to sound sources better when they move and exploit auditory motion parallax.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

Forty years of data quantifies benefits of Bt corn adoption across multiple crops for the first timeResearchers have pulled together forty years of data to quantify the effects of Bt field corn, a highly marketed and successful genetically engineered technology, in a novel and large-scale collaborative study. By tracking European corn borer populations, this study shows significant decreases in adult moth activity, recommended spraying regimens, and overall crop damage in vegetable crops such as
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

New link between obesity and body temperatureReduced ability to maintain body temperature in colder environments may contribute to the development of obesity in adulthood, suggests a new study.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Biophysicists discover how small populations of bacteria survive treatmentSmall populations of pathogenic bacteria may be harder to kill off than larger populations because they respond differently to antibiotics, a new study by Emory University finds.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Open dataset of human navigation strategies in foreign networked systemsNavigation within and across different types of information is an underlying process in performing many everyday tasks. Although human navigation is a natural part of life, the exploration of the underlying mechanisms is far from trivial. A structured scientific dataset has been offered by the computer scientist András Gulyás and his research team to investigate human navigation in foreign complex
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Feed: All Latest

Side-By-Side Photos of Paris and Its Chinese KnockoffIn “Paris Syndrome,” Francois Prost explores Tianducheng, a Paris-inspired housing development on the outskirts of Hangzhou, China.
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Concerns rise over transgender violence since the 2016 US presidential electionA national sample of transgender and gender non-conforming individuals reported high levels of concern about violence and discrimination related to the 2016 US Presidential election in a new study.
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News

NIH scientists describe potential antibody treatment for multidrug-resistant K. pneumoniaeResearchers are developing a promising alternative to antibiotic treatment for infections caused by Klebsiella pneumoniae bacteria resistant to carbapenem antibiotics. The approach uses antibodies to target the K. pneumoniae protective capsule polysaccharide, allowing immune system cells called neutrophils to attack and kill the bacteria. The early stage, in vitro research was conducted by scienti
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Biophysicists discover how small populations of bacteria survive treatmentSmall populations of pathogenic bacteria may be harder to kill off than larger populations because they respond differently to antibiotics.
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News

How much snow accumulates in North America each year? More than scientists thoughtScientists have revised an estimate of snow volume for the entire continent, and they've discovered that snow accumulation in a typical year is 50 percent higher than previously thought. Researchers at The Ohio State University place the yearly estimate at about 1,200 cubic miles of snow. If spread evenly across the surface of the continent from Canada to Mexico, the snow would measure a little ov
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Russian physicists make toy asteroids and blast them with a laserResearchers created small copies of asteroids in the laboratory, and then destroyed them with lasers. The nanosecond laser pulse served as an experimental substitute for a nuclear explosion. The experiments showed high efficiency of nuclear anti-asteroid defense. The study suggests the most effective asteroid destruction criteria, such as the explosion energy needed to eliminate a dangerous object
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Sprint may be rekindling merger plans, unconfirmed report saysSprint may be weighing merger moves again, according to an unconfirmed report of interest in cable company Charter Communications.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

The World Wide Web at 29: Tim Berners-Lee talks weaponization and big techIt's turning 29—what do you get the World Wide Web that has everything?
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The Atlantic

Love, Simon Is Groundbreakingly OrdinarySimon Spier (Nick Robinson) is a normal teenager living a normal life. It’s something he takes pains to remind the audience of in his voice-over narration for Love, Simon . Like the stars of so many coming-of-age rom-coms before him, he has an impossibly gorgeous family (his parents are played by Jennifer Garner and Josh Duhamel), a close-knit group of friends who carpool to their suburban high s
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Mesenchymal stem cell therapy: Holding promise for feline inflammatory diseasesStem cell therapy is acknowledged as having great potential for the treatment of a variety of diseases in both people and animals. The use of bone marrow-derived stem cells is well established in the treatment of human cancer patients, and veterinary applications for bone marrow- and adipose-derived stem cells are being evaluated
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Study IDs 'white graphene' architecture with unprecedented hydrogen storage capacityRice University engineers have zeroed in on the optimal architecture for storing hydrogen in 'white graphene' nanomaterials -- a design like a Lilliputian skyscraper with 'floors' of boron nitride sitting one atop another and held by boron nitride pillars.
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Prevent antibiotic resistances from spreading: Rapid test helps administering the 'correct' drugMulti-resistant microbes are a growing danger. The often unnecessary and mass use of antibiotics causes the impassivity of pathogens against drugs. Infections that were easily curable up to now, may become life threatening. A new rapid test will give information on which available antibiotic is still effective. Faster diagnostics allow a personalized therapy and saves lives. A requirement for prev
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Team training can reduce patient mortality by 13 percentWhen implemented correctly, health care team training can reduce patient mortality by 13 percent, according to a new review paper by a psychologist at Rice University.
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Flood, drought and disease tolerant -- one gene to rule them allA newly discovered gene in rice confers flood tolerance, drought tolerance and disease resistance, and the discovery of the gene is a major step forward on the quest to produce climate smart crops.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Get hit by internet crime? Good luck getting help from some local policeIn practically the blink of an eye, Maggie Irizarry lost about $1,300 to thieves. But the culprits weren't robbers who broke into her Miami home. They were hackers who connived their way onto her Lenovo laptop.
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Live Science

The Science Websites That We Read Every DayThere's a lot of junk on the internet, but the world wide web is still a wonderful place to share and discover knowledge. These are the sites we love to read.
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Live Science

A Surprising Use for Old iPhones: Brain Surgery!Actually, it seems to be working pretty well...
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Why economic growth does not necessarily contribute to human happinessEconomic growth in developed countries has a dual effect. On one hand, people's living standards and consumer spending are on the rise, but on the other hand, this does not necessarily make people happy and may in fact erode subjective wellbeing and lead to economic crises. A new study by an international team that included Francesco Sarracino, HSE LCSR Senior Associate Researcher, examines the re
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Futurity.org

Prone to guilt? It’ll drag you to workEmployees who are prone to feeling guilt about disappointing others tend to show up at the office regardless of their job satisfaction, new research suggests. Employees less prone to feeling that guilt, however, tend to show up at work when they feel happy at their job. “People who have guilt proneness show up even if they don’t like their job as much…” While it might seem like a safe assumption
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Scientific American Content: Global

When Do Favors Expire?Research suggests it’s never too early to ask for a favor in return -- Read more on ScientificAmerican.com
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Where language pionieer Paul Broca and alien music meetWhat might alien music sound like? Would it be structured hierarchically as our music is with verses and a chorus? Would we even be able to appreciate it? Vincent Cheung from Max Planck Institute for Human Cognitive and Brain Sciences, thinks the answer would be yes, assuming it was predicated on local and non-local dependencies. His research published this week in Scientific Reports explains what
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Rice U. lab surprised to find its drug-delivery system can help even without drugsA synthetic, injectable hydrogel developed at Rice University to deliver drugs and encourage tissue growth turns out to have therapeutic properties all its own.
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Ash from dinosaur-era volcanoes linked with shale oil, gasNutrient-rich ash from an enormous flare-up of volcanic eruptions toward the end of the dinosaurs' reign kicked off a chain of events that led to the formation of shale gas and oil fields from Texas to Montana.
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Why economic growth does not necessarily contribute to human happinessEconomic growth in developed countries has a dual effect. On one hand, people's living standards and consumer spending are on the rise, but on the other hand, this does not necessarily make people happy and may in fact erode subjective well-being and lead to economic crises. A new study by an international team that included Francesco Sarracino, HSE LCSR Senior Associate Researcher, examines the r
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Live Science

What This Optical Illusion Reveals About the Human BrainYou can interpret the image as either one of these animals or the other, but not both at the same time.
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The Atlantic

Exit, Rex TillersonRex Tillerson Donald TrumpRex Tillerson is out as secretary of state, President Trump announced in a tweet Tuesday, and will be replaced as America’s top diplomat by Mike Pompeo, currently the CIA director. Accounts differ, but a statement from the State Department suggested that Tillerson did not to know this was coming. That’s much the same way Trump got rid of James Comey, the FBI director, who was addressing the burea
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Elephant poachers arrested in MalaysiaFour heavily armed poachers who targeted wild elephants in Malaysia have been caught, officials said Tuesday, the second such arrest in less than two years.
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Futurity.org

Listen: How trees boost our health and happinessAdding trees to a city can have a significant impact on people’s health and happiness, according to environmental psychologist Marc Berman. Berman leads the Environmental Neuroscience Lab at the University of Chicago and his research shows that even just looking at pictures of nature or hearing nature sounds can have positive cognitive effects. “And the question is: Why?” says Berman, assistant p
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News

A new twist to an old story of cellular signaling in the eye of a flyRecent work from the National Centre for Biological Sciences (NCBS), Bangalore, has shown that the regeneration of a signaling molecule, phosphatidylinositol 4,5 bisphosphate (PIP2), is not as simple as it was thought to be. Experimental work from Raghu Padinjat's group and mathematical modelling by Sandeep Krishna's team from the Simons Centre for Living Machines at NCBS shows that the decades-ol
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News

IUPUI field-data study finds no evidence of racial bias in predictive policingWhile predictive policing aims to improve the effectiveness of police patrols, there is concern that these algorithms may lead police to target minority communities and result in discriminatory arrests. An IUPUI School of Science computer scientist conducted the first study to look at real-time field data from Los Angeles, CA and found predictive policing did not result in biased arrests.
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Long-term proton pump inhibitor use does not increase hip fracture risk among Alzheimer's patientsLong-term proton pump inhibitor (PPI) use does not increase the risk of hip fracture among persons with Alzheimer's disease, according to a new study from the University of Eastern Finland.
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Background radiation in UAE's agricultural topsoil found to be lower than global averageThe first civilian nuclear power plant in the Eastern Region of Arabian Desert, and specifically in the United Arab Emirates (UAE), will be operating four reactors between (2018- 2020). Before the construction of any regulated nuclear facility, it is essential to investigate the environmental background radiation level in the country. This study determines the primordial radionuclides concentratio
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Predicting an insect community structure based on genomic variation in a tree speciesResearchers have discovered a rule to predict an arthropod community structure based on the genomic variation in a foundation tree species.
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Scientific American Content: Global

Embroidering Electronics into the Next Generation of "Smart" FabricsUnlike today’s wearables, new fabrics promise to come with antennas and batteries that are flexible and washable -- Read more on ScientificAmerican.com
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Futurity.org

Meta-analysis lets scientists answer new questionsHow can researchers determine the best path forward when so many studies are coming out, each with new information? A new paper reveals that the power of meta-analysis in research synthesis over the past 40 years has transformed scientific thinking and research approaches. Meta-analysis has also become invaluable to making advances in many scientific fields, including medicine and ecology. “Meta-
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

Double or nothing: Astronomers rethink quasar environmentAstronomers have identified nearly 200 'protoclusters,' the progenitors of galaxy clusters, in the early Universe, about 12 billion years ago, about ten times more than previously known. They also found that quasars don't tend to reside in protoclusters; but if there is one quasar in a protocluster, there is likely a second nearby. This result raises doubts about the relation between protoclusters
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

New insights into the origin of elongated heads in early medieval GermanyA palaeogenomic study investigates early medieval migration in southern Germany and the peculiar phenomenon of artificial skull deformation.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

Lack of water is key stressor for urban treesA recent study finds that urban trees can survive increased heat and insect pests fairly well -- unless they are thirsty. Insufficient water not only harms trees, but allows other problems to have an outsized effect on trees in urban environments.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

Algorithm could streamline harvesting of hand-picked cropsA professor of industrial and enterprise systems engineering and mathematics has developed an algorithm that promises to give valuable information to farmers of crops picked by hand.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

Scientists find treasure trove of 110 genes linked to breast cancerScientists have linked 110 genes to an increased risk of breast cancer in the most comprehensive study ever to unpick the genetics of the disease. Their study used a pioneering genetic technique to analyse maps of DNA regions linked to an inherited risk of breast cancer and identify the actual genes involved in raising a woman's risk. Researchers also linked 32 of the new genes to the length of ti
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Image: Volcanic wormholeThe organic and intricate features of a volcanic cave come alive in great detail in this three-dimensional image of La Cueva de Los Verdes in Lanzarote, Spain. Some of the most innovative scanning technologies have produced the largest 3-D scan of a lava tube on Earth.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

How much snow accumulates in North America each year? More than scientists thoughtThere's a lot more snow piling up in the mountains of North America than anyone knew, according to a first-of-its-kind study.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Hydrogel heals without additivesSometimes when you're invested in a project you fail to notice things that turn out to be significant.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

What we know about Novichok, the 'newby' nerve agents linked to RussiaA Soviet-designed "Novichok" chemical is the nerve agent responsible for poisoning a former spy and his daughter, British Prime Minister Theresa May said today.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

'Sustainable' Lego—plastics from plants won't solve a pollution crisisLego is going to make start making toys from plant-based plastic. In an effort to become more sustainable, the Danish company announced plans to make tiny plastic trees and bushes for its playsets using ethanol extracted from Brazilian sugarcane. Yet while this looks like a forward thinking move, these toys represent just a tiny proportion of Lego's overall production. And, what's more, plastic ma
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Double or nothing—astronomers rethink quasar environmentUsing Hyper Suprime-Cam (HSC) mounted on the Subaru Telescope, astronomers have identified nearly 200 "protoclusters," the progenitors of galaxy clusters, in the early universe, about 12 billion years ago, about ten times more than previously known. They also found that quasars don't tend to reside in protoclusters; but if there is one quasar in a protocluster, there is likely a second nearby. Thi
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Scientists help solve mystery of why comets emit X-raysThe mystery of why comets travelling through Space give off X-ray emissions has been solved thanks to new research undertaken by a team that included science staff from STFC's Central Laser Facility (CLF) and RAL Space.
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Futurity.org

Ash from dinosaur-era volcanoes led to U.S. natural gasAsh from an enormous flare-up of volcanic eruptions toward the end of the dinosaurs’ reign kicked off a chain of events that led to the formation of shale gas and oil fields from Texas to Montana, a new study suggests. “One of the things about these shale deposits is they occur in certain periods in Earth’s history, and one of those is the Cretaceous time, which is around the time of the dinosaur
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Dagens Medicin

Læger kan komme til at trille tommelfingre under lockoutEn kommende strejke vil ramme alle anæstesi- og radiologiske afdelinger i landet, mens lockouten ikke vil omfatte alle hospitaler. Anders Kühnau kan ikke udelukke, at nogle læger vil komme til at trille tommelfingre under en lockout.
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Futurity.org

This protein may shield brains of tiniest babiesResearchers have identified a protein that, in embryonic mice, lessens the kind of brain hemorrhaging that affects many low-birth-weight babies born prematurely. One in five very low-birth-weight, premature infants suffers a life-threatening brain hemorrhage, often originating in a vital region known as the germinal matrix. The protein researchers identified in the new research, reported in Devel
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New on MIT Technology Review

Larry Page’s air taxis are already flying above New Zealand
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News

HKUST-PKU physicists quantum simulate topological materials with ultracold atomsA team of physicists from the Hong Kong University of Science and Technology and Peking University reported the observation of an SPT phase for ultracold atoms using atomic quantum simulation. This work opens the way to expanding the scope of SPT physics with ultracold atoms and studying non-equilibrium quantum dynamics in these exotic systems.
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Helpful B cells lend a hand to developing neuronsNeuron myelination is critical to early mental development, and defects in myelination have been linked to neurodevelopmental disorders. Researchers at Osaka University found that B immune cells reside in the brains of developing mice, and play a key role in the myelination of neurons by oligodendrocytes. The findings suggest a new avenue of exploration for understanding the origin of disorders su
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News

New insights into the origin of elongated heads in early medieval GermanyA palaeogenomic study investigates early medieval migration in southern Germany and the peculiar phenomenon of artificial skull deformation.
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Double or nothing: Astronomers rethink quasar environmentUsing Hyper Suprime-Cam (HSC) mounted on the Subaru Telescope, astronomers have identified nearly 200 'protoclusters,' the progenitors of galaxy clusters, in the early Universe, about 12 billion years ago, about ten times more than previously known. They also found that quasars don't tend to reside in protoclusters; but if there is one quasar in a protocluster, there is likely a second nearby. Thi
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Taking the jab (and the chill) out of vaccinationIn the April edition of the Journal of Clinical Investigation, a team led by Associate Professor John Miles from James Cook University and Cardiff University's Professor Andrew Sewell describe how they engineered a new vaccine production platform and built a fully synthetic flu vaccine.
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News

The cause of low-level turbulence around Hong Kong International AirportThe occurrence of low-level turbulence around Hong Kong International Airport, which can influence the landing and departure of aircraft and is closely related to aviation safety, is an important topic of study. By utilizing the Doppler Light Detection and Range (LIDAR) system at HKIA and radiosonde data at King's Park Meteorological Station, it was found that the possibility of turbulence occurre
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Popular Science

10 apps and gadgets to keep you warm during the finger-freezing days of winterDIY Fight the cold. Spring is tantalizingly close...but winter isn't over yet. Beat the weather with these apps and gadgets to help you get through cold conditions.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Why does a spinning egg stand up?If a hard-boiled egg is spun fast enough on a table, it will slowly stand upright as it continues to spin. Although the spinning egg rises due to the force of friction between the egg and the table, the full explanation involves a relatively complex set of equations. In an attempt to explain the concepts to a broader audience, physicist Rod Cross at the University of Sydney has sought a simpler ex
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Science | The Guardian

I have prostate cancer. But I am happy | George MonbiotThe principles that define a good life protect me from despair, despite this diagnosis and the grisly operation I now face It came, as these things often do, like a gunshot on a quiet street: shocking and disorienting. In early December, my urine turned brown. The following day I felt feverish and found it hard to pee. I soon realised I had a urinary tract infection. It was unpleasant, but seemed
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

People are stranded in 'transit deserts' in dozens of US citiesLess than two months after President Donald Trump pledged in his State of the Union Address to "rebuild our crumbling infrastructure," prospects look dim. The Trump administration is asking Congress for ideas about how to fund trillions of dollars in improvements that experts say are needed. Some Democrats want to reverse newly enacted tax cuts to fund repairs – an unlikely strategy as long as Rep
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

VW boss 'convinced of diesel renaissance'The chief executive of the world's largest carmaker Volkswagen said Tuesday he was convinced of a comeback for diesel motors, two-and-a-half years after the firm admitted to emissions cheating on a massive scale.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Philippines seizes hundreds of smuggled animalsAuthorities seized on Tuesday hundreds of exotic pets smuggled into the Philippines, which is a regional hub in the illicit animal trade.
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Sleep apnea study finds male-female differences in cerebral cortex thickness, symptomsResearchers from the UCLA School of Nursing examined clinical records and magnetic resonance imaging brain scans of patients who were recently diagnosed with sleep apnea, and discovered several apparent connections between thinning of the brain's cerebral cortex and apnea symptoms.
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Mending broken hearts with cardiomyocyte moldsWhether caused by an undetected birth defect or by a heart attack (myocardial infarction), when a heart sustains damage, it can be difficult to repair.
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The Scientist RSS

Bt Corn Associated with Higher Yields, Less Insecticide Use in Neighboring FieldsAn analysis of 40 years of data also finds declines in pest populations after the introduction of the GM crop.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Bali to shush social media for Day of SilenceBali's annual Day of Silence is so sacred that even reaching for a smartphone to send a tweet or upload a selfie to social media could cause offense. This year it will be nearly impossible to do that anyway.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Genetic study shows explosion of diversity in fish after end-Cretaceous mass extinctionA team of researchers from several institutions across the U.S. has found evidence suggesting that there was an explosion of diversity in fish after the end-Cretaceous mass extinction. In their paper published in the journal Nature Ecology and Evolution, the team describes their genetic study involving more than 1800 species of fish and what they found.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Predicting an insect community structure based on genomic variation in a tree speciesGenerally, spatial and temporal factors affect how communities of organisms are shaped in an ecosystem. Understanding the structure of associated communities is essential for ensuring biodiversity. However, predicting a community structure, or the combination of organisms forming the community, in the natural ecosystem has been difficult because it involves complex factors such as ever-changing me
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Feed: All Latest

You Can’t See 'Ready Player One' Yet, But With VR You Can Dance in ItTheWaveVR has spent the past year refining its live-performance nightclub mechanics. Now it's got a blockbuster new environment.
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Scientific American Content: Global

How Crocs Came to Rule the Water's EdgeAdrenaline-fueled studies of the bite forces of crocodiles and their relatives reveal secrets of the group’s evolutionary success -- Read more on ScientificAmerican.com
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Scientific American Content: Global

For E.T. Civilizations, Location Could Be EverythingTheir economies and their fate may depend on the abundance of gold and uranium, forged in relatively nearby neutron star mergers -- Read more on ScientificAmerican.com
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

New study suggests galactic bulge emissions not due to dark matterA team of researchers from the U.S., New Zealand, Australia and Germany has found evidence suggesting that a type of star formation near the center of the Milky Way is responsible for large gamma ray emissions, not dark matter. In their paper published in the journal Nature Astronomy, the group describes their study of the stars in the formation, what they found, and what it could mean for dark ma
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Dagens Medicin

Koncerndirektør affejer overlægers bekymringer om nordjysk hospitalsfusionDen mulige sammenlægning af Aalborg Universitetshospital og hospitalet i Thisted skaber bekymring blandt overlægerne på Aalborg Universitetshospital, men det er unødvendigt mener koncerndirektør i Region Nordjylland.
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Dagens Medicin

AUH vinder pris for bedste uddannelsesafdelingSundhedsstyrelsens pris for bedste uddannelsesafdeling går i år til Medicinsk Endokrinologisk Afdeling på Aarhus Universitetshospital.
6d

The Atlantic

A Democrat Declares Victory in Trump CountryConor Lamb R. SacconeDemocrat Conor Lamb has declared victory in the Pennsylvania special election. "It took a little longer than we thought, but we did it. You did it," Lamb told supporters at his election night party early Wednesday morning. With 100 percent of precincts in district 18 reporting, Lamb leads Republican Rick Saccone by only 579 votes—less than half a percentage point. Most media outlets have not yet
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

How gold rush prospectors made the original smart fridgeFirst came smartphones. Then smart watches. Now smart fridges. But how smart were the fridges of the gold rush?
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Futurity.org

Could revving up immune system fight sepsis?A drug that revs up the immune system may hold promise for treating sepsis, a small clinical trial shows. The approach goes against the grain of earlier strategies that have relied on antibiotics and inflammatory medications to tamp down the immune system. “Mortality rates from sepsis have remained essentially the same over the last 50 years,” says senior investigator Richard S. Hotchkiss, a prof
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Field-data study finds no evidence of racial bias in predictive policingWhile predictive policing aims to improve the effectiveness of police patrols, there is concern that these algorithms may lead police to target minority communities and result in discriminatory arrests. A computer scientist in the School of Science at IUPUI conducted the first study to look at real-time field data from Los Angeles and found predictive policing did not result in biased arrests.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Yes, kangaroos are endangered – but not the species you thinkDo you know what kind of animal the mala, nabarlek, or boodie is? What about the monjon, northern bettong, or Gilbert's potoroo?
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Why UNESCO's 'natural solutions' to water problems won't work in AfricaEach year UNESCO releases a World Water Assessment Report, a document that explores potential solutions to the globe's water problems. The 2018 report will focus on nature based solutions.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

The origins of Pama-Nyungan, Australia's largest family of Aboriginal languagesThe approximately 400 languages of Aboriginal Australia can be grouped into 27 different families. To put that diversity in context, Europe has just four language families, Indo-European, Basque, Finno-Ugric and Semitic, with Indo-European encompassing such languages as English, Spanish, Russian and Hindi.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Climate change may be hazardous to your healthDoctors around the country are already seeing evidence that climate change is affecting the health of their patients. In Florida, people are asking for more medication; as heat waves aggravate their medical conditions, such as asthma, they are using up their usual prescriptions faster. In Pennsylvania, some are contracting diseases, such as Lyme disease, that they never had to worry about before.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Making the tools to connect isiXhosa and isiZulu to the digital ageWe live in a world where around 7000 languages are spoken, and one where information and communication technologies are becoming increasingly ubiquitous. This puts increasing demands on more, and more advanced, Human Language Technologies (HLTs).
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Ingeniøren

Naturvidenskabelig dannelse skal på skoleskemaetRegeringen har netop fremlagt en strategi, som skal sikre fødekæden til de naturvidenskabelige uddannelser.
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Engineers create most efficient red light-activated optogenetic switch for mammalian cellsA team of researchers has developed a light-activated switch that can turn genes on and off in mammalian cells. This is the most efficient so-called 'optogenetic switch' activated by red and far-red light that has been successfully designed and tested in animal cells -- and it doesn't require the addition of sensing molecules from outside the cells.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

New research on the strength of children's bones could help in the design of safer car seatsResearchers at the University of Sheffield have successfully used computer simulated models and medical imaging to test the strength of young children's bones, producing results which could help car seat manufacturers design safer car seats for young children.
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Popular Science

Humans flourished through a supervolcano eruption 74,000 years ago (so you can make it through Tuesday)Science At least, some of them did... About 74,000 years ago, a large chunk of a Pacific island exploded. It sent ash and other debris around the world, including to the southern tip of Africa.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

'Quantum dot' lighting technology takes forward leap thanks to new superacid treatmentA "superacid" much stronger than automobile battery acid has enabled a key advance toward a new generation of LED lighting that's safer, less expensive and more user friendly.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Magnetism has the pull to transform our digital livesDigital memory and security could be transformed according to new research, which has for the first time showed that antiferromagnets can be easily controlled and read by switching the direction of ordinary electrical currents at super-fast speed.
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The Scientist RSS

Image of the Day: Aging Brain CellsScientists identified a gene involved in the age-related deterioration of mouse neural stem cells.
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The Scientist RSS

New Genetic Stroke-Risk Factors IdentifiedAnalysis of DNA samples from more than 520,000 people brings the number of known stroke-risk loci to 32.
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Ingeniøren

Politiet kan ikke gendanne slettede mails efter 30 dagePolitiets IT-systemer gemmer ifølge Rigspolitiet kun slettede mails i 30 dage. Herefter findes der ingen backup. Det skal ændres lyder det fra et flertal af partier på Christiansborg
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Feed: All Latest

'Westworld' at SXSW: The Perfect Allegory For Austin in MarchAn uneasy relationship between residents and visitors who think they have permission to do whatever they like? Sounds familiar.
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Feed: All Latest

Please Stop Building Houses Exactly Where Wildfires StartEvery fire scientist knows the place where houses meet the wild is dangerous. But people keep putting more houses there.
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Feed: All Latest

8 Features We Expect in the Best Android Phones of 20182018 is looking a wee bit notchy for smartphones. We explore all the Android and hardware trends coming to phones this year.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Engineers create most efficient red light-activated optogenetic switch for mammalian cellsA team of researchers has developed a light-activated switch that can turn genes on and off in mammalian cells. This is the most efficient so-called "optogenetic switch" activated by red and far-red light that has been successfully designed and tested in animal cells—and it doesn't require the addition of sensing molecules from outside the cells.
6d

Ingeniøren

Her er udvalget, der skal udforme Danmarks retningslinjer for dataetikErhvervsministeriet sætter navne på de 12 personer, der skal diskutere etisk anvendelse af data.
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Scientific American Content: Global

It's Time for More Physicians to Embrace AdvocacyIf young teenagers can embrace activism and say #Enough by engaging in the political conversation, doctors can, too -- Read more on ScientificAmerican.com
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New Scientist - News

Chemistry bots collude on Twitter to speed up their experimentsCommunicating on social media has allowed a pair of robots to conduct chemistry experiments together and get faster results
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Ash from dinosaur-era volcanoes linked with shale oil, gasNutrient-rich ash from an enormous flare-up of volcanic eruptions toward the end of the dinosaurs' reign kicked off a chain of events that led to the formation of shale gas and oil fields from Texas to Montana.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Tracking the spread of early hunter-gatherers through languageScientists have further evidence that an ancient family of languages spread across most of the Australian continent over the last 6000 years, rapidly replacing pre-existing languages.
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Ingeniøren

Her er Danmarks nye el-lokomotivSiemens Vectron skal fra 2021 trække pendlernes dobbeltdækkervogne rundt på Sjælland, efter at den hidtidige leverandør, Bombardier, opgav at byde på de nye, danske lokomotiver.
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Ingeniøren

It-sikkerheden i biler sejler: De kan stoppes, overtages, piftes og hackesModerne biler er rullende computere og det kan hackere udnytte alt for nemt, lyder det fra sikkerhedseksperter på Kaspersky Security Analyst Summit 2018.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Exposing the biggest computer chip vulnerability ever discoveredThe threat started making headlines around New Years. Publications around the globe warned of the biggest computer chip vulnerability ever discovered, a series of security flaws affecting any device with a microprocessor—from laptops to smartphones.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

New diagnostic method makes testing for infections in people and animals quick and easyResearchers in the University of Calgary Faculty of Veterinary Medicine (UCVM) have developed a fast, portable and inexpensive way to test humans and animals for different types of chronic and infectious diseases. This new "point of care" method tests for signals of infection, such as specific antibodies, in blood, milk or saliva samples.
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New Scientist - News

US climate report warns nation will lose out if it doesn’t actA draft of a US government report argues that the country could reap huge economic and health benefits by cutting greenhouse gas emissions
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Live Science

The Happiest US Communities: Full ListA new poll ranks nearly 186 U.S. communities based on the well being of their residents.
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Live Science

This Florida City Is Nation's Happiest for 3rd Year in a RowThe state may be declining in well-being, but this spot is a ray of sunshine.
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Ultra-white coating modelled on beetle scalesResearchers have developed a super-thin, non-toxic, lightweight, edible ultra-white coating that could be used to make brighter paints and coatings, for use in the cosmetic, food or pharmaceutical industries.
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Feed: All Latest

How the Government Can Future-Proof Our EconomyWIRED columnist Jason Pontin on how the government could tackle economic inequality and create jobs in our techno-turvy future.
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Feed: All Latest

Weighing Privacy vs. Security for the Internet's Address BookEuropean Union privacy rules may prompt removal of personal information from Whois lookups.
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Feed: All Latest

These Conservationists Are Desperate to Defrost Snake SpermFreezing and defrosting snake sperm could be a key to conserving endangered species—but artificial insemination isn't always easy.
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BBC News - Science & Environment

Humans 'thrived' after historic Mount Toba eruptionEarly humans may have flourished after the largest volcanic eruption in history, according to new research.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Ultra-white coating modelled on beetle scalesResearchers have developed a super-thin, non-toxic, lightweight, edible ultra-white coating that could be used to make brighter paints and coatings, for use in the cosmetic, food or pharmaceutical industries.
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Scientific American Content: Global

Unlock the Learning Power of Baby BabblingAt around six months, infants aren't making sense yet—but they're incredibly receptive to how parents respond to their vocalizations -- Read more on ScientificAmerican.com
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Live Science

Blasting This Old Book with X-Rays Could Reveal Greek Physician Galen's Ancient WordsResearchers have a great reason for firing high-powered x-rays into a very old book of not-very-interesting hymns.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Study shows market-based strategies for ecosystem conservation are surgingPrograms in which people pay landholders to support natural systems that provide benefits like flood protection, biodiversity and carbon storage, are expanding around the world, according to a new UCLA-led study.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Earth may be approaching a carbon dioxide threshold for melting ice in the ArcticIt may not rank among the all-time greatest dramas, but the history of ice on Greenland has been a source of scientific controversy for more than a decade.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

More of us are drinking recycled sewage water than most people realiseThe world is watching as Cape Town's water crisis approaches "Day Zero". Questions are being asked about which other cities could be at risk and what can they do to avoid running dry. In Perth, Australia's most water-stressed capital, it has been announced that the city is considering reusing all of its sewage as part of its future water supply.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Flash floods found to send massive amount of microplastics from rivers to the seaA trio of researchers at the University of Manchester has found that flash floods in the U.K. carried massive amounts of microplastics from rivers and streams to the ocean. In their paper published in the journal Nature Geoscience, Rachel Hurley, Jamie Woodward and James Rothwell describe their study of microplastic levels in U.K. waterways and what they believe their findings mean for the world's
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Modifications to non-fullerene small molecule acceptor in organic thin film for solar cells improve efficiencyScientists from the Imperial College London, Monash University, CSIRO, and King Abdullah University of Science and Technology have reported an organic thin film for solar cells with a non-fullerene small molecule acceptor that achieved a power conversion efficiency of just over 13 per cent.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Setting expectations for negative-emission systems in U.S. to protect climateNearly every major plan to limit the damage from climate change relies in part on combining bioenergy with carbon capture and storage, a technology in early development known as "BECCS." Feedstock plants would grow by absorbing carbon dioxide from the air, and the carbon-dioxide generated from burning the biomass to produce electricity would be captured and permanently stored underground. Producin
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Scientific American Content: Global

Like Ancient Snowball Earth, Frozen Planets May Still Be HabitableA new model suggests ice-locked worlds might contain oases of temperate land that could support life -- Read more on ScientificAmerican.com
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Unlimited capacity in wireless networks with massive MIMOMassive MIMO is an antenna technology that is considered the most promising for future superfast 5G networks, although researchers have until now believed that there is an upper limit for how much data can be transferred. Emil Björnson, associate professor at Linköping University, has together with colleagues, shown that there is no such limit.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

A milestone in petahertz electronicsIn a semiconductor, electrons can be excited by absorbing laser light. Advances in the past decade have enabled measuring this fundamental physical mechanism on timescales below a femtosecond (10-15 s). Now, physicists at ETH Zurich have resolved the response of electrons in gallium arsenide at the attosecond (10-18 s) timescale, and gained unexpected insights for future ultrafast opto-electronic
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Software solution controls water pressure in distribution networksSoftware used by Coca-Cola Femsa to reduce liquid waste from the soft drink bottling process has cut water waste due to leakage by 2 percent, equivalent to 2.5 million cubic meters per year.
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Futurity.org

Execs with accounting skills more likely to cook the booksExecutives with high accounting competence are more likely than their less-competent counterparts to make accounting misstatements when financial incentives encourage them to misreport, new research suggests. “…when both competence and financial incentives are present, this dark side of accounting competence emerges.” When analyzing financial statements, auditors must be aware of a variety of ris
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

The occurrence of magnetism in the universeFlows of molten metal can generate magnetic fields. This so-called dynamo effect creates cosmic magnetic fields, like those found on planets, moons and even asteroids. In the coming years, researchers are conducting a unique experiment in which a steel drum containing several tons of liquid sodium rotates around two axes in order to demonstrate this effect. It will be carried out in the new DRESDY
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Breeding trouble: Meta-analysis identifies fishy issues with captive stocksA meta-analysis has found patterns that may be jeopardising the long-term success of worldwide animal breeding programs, which increasingly act as an insurance against extinction in conservation, and for food security. Captive-born animals had, on average, almost half the odds of reproductive success compared to their wild-born counterparts in captivity; in aquaculture, the effects were particular
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Dagens Medicin

89 borgere har fået medicinsk cannabisDe første salgstal for den nye forsøgsordning med medicinsk cannabis viser, at der er udskrevet 116 recepter til 89 borgere.
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The Atlantic

When Republicans Attack States' Rights“Federalism was our Nation's own discovery,” Justice Anthony Kennedy wrote in 1995. “The Framers split the atom of sovereignty. It was the genius of their idea that our citizens would have two political capacities, one state and one federal, each protected from incursion by the other.” Splitting atoms is often a mistake; the Framers’ “genius” idea eventually shattered their antebellum Republic ov
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The Atlantic

Medicaid Expansion's Troubled FutureIn 2012, the Supreme Court’s decision in the NFIB v. Sebelius case sent shockwaves through the health-policy community, with Chief Justice John Roberts’s majority opinion causing much teeth-gnashing all around. Among many conservatives, the preservation of the Affordable Care Act’s individual mandate constituted “ one of the worst Supreme Court decisions in American history .” For supporters of t
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Marine exploration sensing with light and soundOceanic sensor networks that collect and transmit high-quality, real-time data could transform the understanding of marine ecology, improve pollution and disaster management, and inform multiple industries that draw on ocean resources. A KAUST research team is designing and optimizing underwater wireless sensor networks that could vastly improve existing ocean sensing equipment.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Plants overcome hunger with the aid of autophagyResearchers at Tohoku University have found that plants activate autophagy in their leaf cells to derive amino acids that are used for survival under energy-starved conditions. The findings show that amino acid utilization in plants can be controlled by the manipulation of autophagy.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Breeding trouble: Meta-analysis identifies fishy issues with captive stocksA group of researchers based at the University of Sydney has uncovered patterns that may be jeopardising the long-term success of worldwide animal breeding programs, which increasingly act as an insurance against extinction in conservation, and for food security.
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NYT > Science

Feature: Should Some Species Be Allowed to Die Out?As the list of endangered animals worldwide grows longer, society may soon be faced with an impossible decision: which ones to take off life support.
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NYT > Science

Near Noisy Oil Fields, Lovesick Birds Change Their Tunes“Hey, hey, sexy, hey, I’m Bob, a Savannah sparrow.” Birds near oil fields tweak their mating calls in complex ways that researchers are only starting to grasp.
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New Scientist - News

What are Novichok nerve agents and did Russia do it?The poison used to target ex-Russian spy Sergei Skripal and his daughter was a Novichok nerve agent, UK prime minister Theresa May revealed yesterday
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Ingeniøren

Kina sender ny generation af kampdroner på vingerneKina opruster voldsomt på dronefronten og tester i øjeblikket arvtageren til de store kampdroner Cai Hong 4.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Metabolic activity of brown adipose tissue easier to verify with new methodBrown adipose tissue has played a key role in prevention research since its presence was first documented in adults. However, there was no non-invasive method of measuring its heat generation. A team at the Technical University Munich (TUM) and the Helmholtz Zentrum München has now visualized the activity of brown adipose tissue without injecting substances.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Imaging sound movements of atomic units with an optical microscopeAn international team of researchers, led by Dr. Hyunmin Kim of Companion Diagnostics and Medical Technology Research Group at DGIST developed an imaging technique to monitor the sound movement of an atomically thin substance at high resolution. The technology could be used in the development of new materials, solar cells and catalysts.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Ancient giant shark tooth goes missing in AustraliaA giant fossilised tooth from a prehistoric shark has gone missing from a supposedly secret location at a remote Australian World Heritage site, and wildlife officials want it back.
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Researchers computationally find the needle in a haystack to treat rare diseasesOne in 10 people in America is fighting a rare disease, or a disorder that affects fewer than 200,000 Americans. Researchers have developed a sophisticated and systematic way to identify existing drugs that can be repositioned to treat a rare disease or condition.
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Patients do as well on generic antiplatelet drugs as more expensive brand-name productPatients who took the generic version of the anti-platelet drug clopidogrel after hospitalization for a heart attack or heart-related chest pain had roughly the same odds of death or recurrent heart attack than those who took the brand-name product Plavix®. This indicates that, in real-world use, patients do just as well with generic clopidogrel as with the far-costlier Plavix®.
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The Atlantic

How the Great Recession Hurt Americans' HealthA new paper confirms what many Americans likely suspected: A mass economic downturn—on the scale that occurred during the Great Recession—makes people physically sick. Past research has been surprisingly mixed on the effect of economic downturns on physical health. A review paper published in 2016 found that though alcohol use and traffic fatalities declined during the Great Recession, overall, p
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Researchers computationally find the needle in a haystack to treat rare diseasesOne in 10 people in America is fighting a rare disease, or a disorder that affects fewer than 200,000 Americans. Although there are more than 7,000 rare diseases that collectively affect more than 350 million people worldwide, it is not profitable for the pharmaceutical industry to develop new therapies to treat the small number of people suffering from each rare condition. Researchers at the LSU
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Dagens Medicin

Esbjerg-firma skal drive sin første udbudsklinik i DanmarkMedAssist bliver den tredje private aktør i almen praksis. Det sker med overtagelsen af lægeklinikken Danmarksgade 14 i Holstebro, hvor selskabet egenhændigt skal stå for driften.
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Ingeniøren

Banedanmark udelod vigtige detaljer om miljøbrøler i notat til FolketingetKommune måtte true Banedanmark til at fjerne 72.000 ton forurenet jord fra en mark. Det fik Folketinget bare ikke at vide, da Banedanmark skulle forklare sig om sagen.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Ice bridge in Argentine glacier collapses, no witnessesAn ice bridge that was part of a glacier at the tip of Argentina has collapsed in the dead of night, thwarting thousands of tourists who had hoped to watch the spectacle.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Malaysia's honey hunters defy angry bees to harvest treetop treasureOn a moonless night deep in the Malaysian rainforest, two men perched precariously on high branches use a smoking torch to draw thousands of bees from a treetop hive, braving the angry swarm to collect their prized honey.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Trump axes Obama-era rule on organic farmingThe US Department of Agriculture announced Monday it is withdrawing a much delayed Obama-era rule that would have imposed more regulations on producers of organically raised livestock and poultry.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

In Colombia, birders find their version of EdenDespite his small stature, 10-year-old Juan David Camacho has big dreams: pacing through Colombia's jungle with binoculars in tow, he aims to spot all the bird species his country offers.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

China 'winning' war on smog, helping life expectancy: studyChina appears to be "winning" its war on air pollution, making so much progress that life expectancy could rise by more than two years, according to a US university study.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

US scientists study impact of uranium in Grand Canyon regionU.S. scientists knew little about the impact of uranium mining in the Grand Canyon region before an Obama-era decision shut down new mining claims.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Trump blocks Broadcom takeover bid for QualcommPresident Donald Trump blocked Singapore chipmaker Broadcom from pursuing a hostile takeover of U.S. rival Qualcomm, ruling the proposed combination would imperil national security.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Hacked Japan crypto exchange refunds customersJapan-based virtual currency exchange Coincheck said Tuesday it had refunded more than $440 million to customers following the hack of its systems, which was one of the largest thefts of its kind.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

National Geographic acknowledges past racist coverageNational Geographic acknowledged on Monday that it covered the world through a racist lens for generations, with its magazine portrayals of bare-breasted women and naive brown-skinned tribesmen as savage, unsophisticated and unintelligent.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

$1.5B settlement in suit over Syngenta modified corn seedA $1.5 billion settlement was reached in a class-action lawsuit covering tens of thousands of farmers, grain-handling facilities and ethanol plants that sued Swiss agribusiness giant Syngenta over its introduction of a genetically engineered corn seed.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Algorithm could streamline harvesting of hand-picked cropsFarmers are the latest beneficiaries in a world of data analytics. Over the past few years, precision agriculture has been helping farmers make smarter decisions and producing a bigger yield. But most of the studies to date have been in row crops harvested by large machines, made possible by data collected by drones and other means. However, Richard Sowers, a professor of industrial and enterprise
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Science-Based Medicine

Coca’s Pulse Testing to Diagnose “Allergies”In the 1950s, Dr. Arthur F. Coca invented an elaborate method to diagnose a new kind of "allergy" by testing the pulse rate. He thought "allergies" were the underlying cause of most disease. His method has never been tested, but there is every reason to think it is bogus.
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Ingeniøren

Driller nettet? Så prøver nogen måske at lokke dig over på en usikker forbindelseTekniske drillerier kan bruges til at få folk til at glemme sikkerheden.
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Algorithm could streamline harvesting of hand-picked cropsRichard Sowers, a professor of industrial and enterprise systems engineering and mathematics at the University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign, and a team of students have developed an algorithm that promises to give valuable information to farmers of crops picked by hand.
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Off-the-shelf smart devices found easy to hack'It only took 30 minutes to find passwords for most of the devices and some of them were found only through a Google search of the brand,' says Omer Shwartz, a Ph.D. student and member of Dr. Oren's lab. 'Once hackers can access an IoT device, like a camera, they can create an entire network of these camera models controlled remotely.'
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Toilet-to-tap: Gross to think about, but how does it taste?Researchers at University of California, Riverside, asked 143 people to express a preference among recycled water, bottled water, and tap water. They hypothesized that all three would score similarly. In fact, tap water was the least popular among the tasters; recycled water and bottled water scored about the same.
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Moffitt researchers use single-cell imaging & math models to find effect drug propertiesDrug therapies that target a specific molecule have changed the way patients are treated for cancer and greatly improved survival rates. However, some patients do not respond to these therapies because the drug is not reaching the tumor cells effectively. In a new study published in Scientific Reports, Moffitt Cancer Center researchers combined single-cell imaging of cancer cells in mice with math
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News

'Digistain' technology offers revolution in detailed cancer diagnosisNew cutting edge technology can be used to grade cancer tumours, eradicating human subjectivity and ensuring patients get the right treatment.
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Technique developed to improve appendicitis care for pediatric patientsResearchers from Children's Minnesota and HealthPartners Institute have developed a new pediatric appendicitis risk calculator (pARC) to aid in the diagnosis of appendicitis. The calculator was developed as part of a $3.1 million, five-year grant from the National Institutes of Health.
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News

California mental health tax providing services to needy in L.A. County, study findsIn 2004 California voters created a special tax on people with high incomes to help pay for expanded mental health services. A new study finds that the tax has allowed Los Angeles County to reach the seriously mentally ill and those at risk for mental illness with services and prevention efforts.
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Smartphone-assisted neuroendoscopyA variety of neurosurgical procedures are performed with the aid of smartphone-endoscope integration. The smartphone takes the place of a camera and video monitor. It is easy to use, more cost effective, and provides the surgeon with a more intuitive and fluid method of performing neuroendoscopy.
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Lack of water is key stressor for urban treesA recent study finds that urban trees can survive increased heat and insect pests fairly well -- unless they are thirsty. Insufficient water not only harms trees, but allows other problems to have an outsized effect on trees in urban environments.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Lack of water is key stressor for urban treesA study out March 13 finds that urban trees can survive increased heat and insect pests fairly well - unless they are thirsty. Insufficient water not only harms trees, but allows other problems to have an outsized effect on trees in urban environments.
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Ingeniøren

Tung transport: Norske brintlastbiler på vej og Tesla ruller med godsEl fra 9.000 kvadratmeter norske solceller skal levere el til elektrolyse, så 30 brændselscellelastbiler kan fragte varer for dagligvaregrossisten Asko. I USA er Teslas kommende ellastbil nu blevet set med last ombord.
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Live Science

Facts About RhodiumProperties, sources and uses of the element rhodium.
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BBC News - Science & Environment

'Boaty McBoatface' sub survives ice missionThe nation's favourite yellow submarine returns safely after a dangerous dive in the Antarctic.
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Science : NPR

Daniel Kahneman On Misery, Memory, And Our Understanding Of The MindEconomic theory rests on a simple notion about humans: people are rational. But a half century ago, two psychologists shattered these assumptions. (Image credit: Eric Lee/NPR)
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Live Science

What Is Novichok, the Poison That Nearly Killed a Russian Ex-Spy?A Soviet-era poison called Novichok was used to poison a Russian ex-spy and his daughter last week in England, Prime Minister Theresa May told Parliament today (March 12).
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Raven food calls disclose their age and sexCommon ravens (Corvus corax) use food associated 'haa' calls to recruit other individuals of the same species (conspecifics) to food foraging sites which may be dangerous because of predators or territorial breeding pairs. These calls provide clues about the age and sex of the caller, according to a study published in the open access journal Frontiers in Zoology.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

Color-changing hogfish 'sees' with its skinThe hogfish can go from white to reddish in milliseconds as it adjusts to shifting conditions in the ocean. Scientists have long suspected that animals with quick-changing colors don't just rely on their eyes to tune their appearance to their surroundings -- they also sense light with their skin. But exactly how remains a mystery. A study reveals that hogfish skin senses light differently from eye
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BBC News - Science & Environment

Why sharks like it hot - but not too hotScientists have calculated the water temperature at which tiger sharks are most active and abundant.
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Scientific American Content: Global

Drones Could Help Biologists Tally BirdsCounting by drone not only saves time and effort, but yields better data on species numbers—a definite plus in terms of conservation. Karen Hopkin reports. -- Read more on ScientificAmerican.com
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New on MIT Technology Review

Trump blocked Broadcom’s bid for Qualcomm because of national security fears
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Futurity.org

Make your bracket: It’s March Madness for presidentsIt’s March Madness, but instead of basketball, one Duke University class is pitting US presidents from throughout the ages against each other. Who will be crowned the best president? Will it be Washington or Honest Abe? Maybe FDR? Or perhaps a dark horse will emerge. What criteria are the most important in determining what makes a great president? Honesty? Morality? How heavily should we weight r
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Futurity.org

Lots of irrigation may send rain elsewhereWidespread irrigation has resulted in a net moisture loss in Nebraska, research shows. The finding could have worldwide water conservation implications if additional research backs it up. Across Nebraska, runoff rates have generally dropped by a little more than a tenth of an inch per decade between 1979 and 2015, says Joe Szilagyi, a research hydrologist with the conservation and survey division
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The Atlantic

Who's Running NASA?There was only one witness at a congressional hearing about NASA ’s budget last week, and he wasn’t even supposed to be there. The witness, Robert Lightfoot, has worked at NASA for years. He arrived at the Marshall Spaceflight Center in 1989 as a test engineer. By 2009, he was running the whole place as director, and a few years later, he was number three at NASA headquarters. When President Obam
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The Atlantic

The Atlantic Daily: Quiet InfluenceWhat We’re Following Impending Talks: As a possible meeting between President Trump and the North Korean leader, Kim Jong Un, draws near, one person is left out of many of the discussions: South Korean President Moon Jae In, who has been central in orchestrating the diplomatic move. After decades of tension between the United States and North Korea, the meeting, which would be unprecedented, coul
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Feed: All Latest

How To Delete Your Facebook, Twitter, Instagram, and SnapchatActually deleting your social media accounts is more complicated than it looks.
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Futurity.org

Does cutting greenhouse gas emissions hurt economic growth?The Kyoto Protocol cut greenhouse gas emissions in nations that signed the agreement, but also may have slowed economic growth, new research suggests. Political wrangling over international agreements to curb climate change tends to be divisive. Just look at the reactions to the recent decision by President Donald Trump to withdraw from the Paris Agreement. On one side, the proponents of internat
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Internet overseers weigh website owner privacyThe group overseeing Internet addresses is scrambling to balance the privacy of website owners and the right to know who is behind online pages.
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Futurity.org

New metal-based glass bests the competitionResearchers have developed a new family of glass based on metals and organic compounds. Humans have been making glass from silicon dioxide since prehistory. Industrialization brought us boron-based glasses, polymer glasses, and metallic glasses. The new family of glass stacks up to the original silica in glass-forming ability. Glass-forming ability is the ability of a liquid to avoid crystallizat
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

State ponders lowest moose hunt numbers in modern eraThe Vermont Department of Fish and Wildlife is recommending the lowest number of moose hunting permits this year in the modern era as the herd continues to decline from infestations of ticks and brain worms believed to be caused by the warming climate.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Apple buys digital magazine subscription serviceApple announced Monday it is buying digital magazine subscription service Texture, adding to the side of its business aimed at making money from online content or services.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Central banks warned to weigh risks of virtual currenciesA global financial body warns central banks should carefully weigh the risks before introducing their own virtual currencies, saying such innovations could risk destabilizing banking systems and unleash disruption across borders.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

US could block Broadcom's takeover of Qualcomm, officials warnQualcomm Broadcom USUS officials are warning they could recommend against Singapore-based Broadcom's mega-acquisition of smartphone chipmaker Qualcomm on national security grounds.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

US scientists rescued in Antarctica by Argentina icebreakerA group of American scientists who were stranded in an ice-bound island off the northeastern tip of the Antarctic Peninsula were rescued Sunday by an Argentine icebreaker, U.S. and Argentine authorities said Monday.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

German utility EON to cut 5,000 jobs in RWE mega-dealGerman utility EON on Monday said it plans to cut up to 5,000 jobs as part of its takeover of the renewables unit Innogy from rival RWE, in a deal that will redraw the country's energy landscape.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Skulls show women moved across medieval Europe, not just menThe newcomers who arrived in the little farming villages of medieval Germany would have stood out: They had dark hair and tawny skin, spoke a strange language and had remarkably tall heads.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

More homes built near wild lands leading to greater wildfire riskMore than 10 million acres burned across the country during the 2017 U.S. wildfire season at a cost of more than $2 billion—the largest bill ever.
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Popular Science

Now’s your chance to discover a new planet (with Google’s help)Space The company's open source AI software is an armchair explorer's dream. What unknown worlds might be hiding behind nearby stars? We’ll never know until we take a look. Now Google is giving you a chance to take a peek.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Two behaviors linked to high school dropout ratesWhile the national high school dropout rate has declined, many school systems still struggle with a high number of students who do not finish high school.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

How the color-changing hogfish 'sees' with its skinSome animals are quick-change artists. Take the hogfish, a pointy-snouted reef fish that can go from pearly white to mottled brown to reddish in a matter of milliseconds as it adjusts to shifting conditions on the ocean floor.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Elephant declines imperil Africa's forestsPoaching and habitat loss have reduced forest elephant populations in Central Africa by 63 percent since 2001. This widespread killing poses dire consequences not only for the species itself but also for the region's forests, a new Duke University study finds.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Water troughs are key to E. coli contamination in cattleA major study led by Cornell University College of Veterinary Medicine researchers reveals for the first time that water troughs on farms are a conduit for the spread of toxic E. coli in cattle, which can then spread the pathogen to people through bacteria in feces. The study was recently published in the journal PLOS ONE.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Researchers issue first-annual sea-level report cardsResearchers at William & Mary's Virginia Institute of Marine Science are launching new web-based "report cards" to monitor and forecast changes in sea level at 32 localities along the U.S. coastline from Maine to Alaska. They plan to update the report cards in January of each year, with projections out to the year 2050.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Plants faring worse than monkeys in increasingly patchy forests of Costa RicaCattle ranching, agriculture and other human activities are breaking up Costa Rican forests into isolated patchy fragments, but causing more problems for native plant populations than for monkey species sharing the same habitat.
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The Atlantic

The Atlantic Politics & Policy Daily: Outlook: StormyToday in 5 Lines President Trump defended his administration’s new gun and school-safety proposals, which include arming school staffers. Adult-film actress Stormy Daniels, who says she had an affair with Trump, offered to return the payment she received from Trump’s lawyer in exchange for dissolving the hush agreement. A pair of exploding packages in Austin, Texas, appear to be connected to a th
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Science | The Guardian

Weatherwatch: Clean air over Southern Ocean alters cloud recipeClimate modelling does not take account of how ice crystals form in the region’s atmosphere, with ramifications for meteorologists What is the recipe for a cloud? This is like asking for the recipe for curry. There are many different types of curry, and the result depends upon which spices are used and how they are combined. For a long time, clouds over the Southern Ocean have puzzled meteorologi
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Mutating Ebola's key protein may stop replicationResearchers may be able to stop the replication of Ebola virus by mutating its most important protein, according to a paper published in the Journal of Biological Chemistry.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

The changing voices of North Atlantic right whalesResearchers have found that right whale calls, much like human voices, change as individuals age.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

It's mostly luck, not pluck, that determines lifetime reproductive successA tree will drop hundreds of seedlings over the course of its lifetime, but only a small fraction will ever get to grow into the forest canopy like their progenitor. And studies have shown that dominant female birds can produce up to 95 percent of the offspring within a group.
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The Scientist RSS

The Breeds of Guard Dogs that Best Protect Livestock: StudyPreliminary results from a USDA study reveal that imported guard dogs outperform those traditionally used in the U.S. to fend off wolves and coyotes.
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New on MIT Technology Review

Your next computer could improve with ageArtificial intelligence is sweeping industries like medicine and finance. What if the machine you’re reading this on could learn too?
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Female researchers publish childcare recommendations for conference organizersMany women in science are raising concerns over the fact that parents with young children are often excluded from fully participating in academic conference activities.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Suomi NPP Satellite sees Tropical Cyclone Hola dissipatingWhen NASA-NOAA's Suomi NPP satellite passed over the South Pacific Ocean it captured a visible image of Tropical Cyclone Hola being torn apart by wind shear.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

NASA finds strongest storms in newly formed Tropical Cyclone 13PInfrared satellite data showed Tropical Cyclone 13P quickly developed powerful storms with very cold cloud top temperatures. NASA's Aqua satellite analyzed the system in infrared light to determine where its strongest storms were located.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Crisis or self-correction: Rethinking how the media cover scienceOne of the recurring media narratives about the nature of science today is that it is "broken" or "in crisis." In the mainstream press, some stories about the failure to reproduce study results or the rising retraction rate or incidents of scientific fraud have been accompanied by assertions about a "systemic crisis" in areas of science - or in science itself.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Ag robot speeds data collection, analyses of crops as they growA new lightweight, low-cost agricultural robot could transform data collection and field scouting for agronomists, seed companies and farmers.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

What if we could predict when an athlete was going to be injured?Thousands of athletes showcased their abilities for the world in PyeongChang, South Korea, in pursuit of Olympic gold. But for every dazzling triple axel or stellar snowboarding run, athletes face the risk of career-ending injuries.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

How to build a better railway—in (almost) every cell in your bodyNew work from the University of Warwick shows how a microscopic 'railway' system in our cells can optimise its structure to better suit bodies' needs.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Arrested development: Hubble finds relic galaxy close to homeAstronomers have put NASA's Hubble Space Telescope on an Indiana Jones-type quest to uncover an ancient "relic galaxy" in our own cosmic backyard.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Chemical topology of silica can influence the effectiveness of many chemical processes that use itBetter known as glass, silica is a versatile material used in myriad industrial processes, from catalysis and filtration, to chromatography and nanofabrication. Yet despite its ubiquity in labs and cleanrooms, surprisingly little is known about silica's surface interactions with water at a molecular level.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Researchers use 'flying focus' to better control lasers over long distancesWhen you were a kid, you might have used a magnifying glass to focus the sun's light onto a spot on the sidewalk. The lens of the magnifying glass allowed you to concentrate the sun's energy by converging the light rays on a point.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

A new cross-coupling simplifies the synthesis of drug-like moleculesResearchers at The Scripps Research Institute (TSRI) have designed a new molecule-building method that uses sulfones as partners for cross-coupling reactions, or the joining of two distinct chemical entities in a programmed fashion aided by a catalyst. The technique, described recently in the journal Science, paves the way toward other new chemical reactions and facilitates the synthesis of pharma
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Movable silicon 'lenses' enable neutrons to see new range of details inside objectsYou can't see well without lenses that can focus, whether those lenses are in your eye or the microscope you peer through. An innovative new way to focus beams of neutrons might allow scientists to probe the interiors of opaque objects at a size range they were blind to previously, allowing them to explore the innards of objects from meteorites to cutting-edge manufactured materials without damagi
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Polymer nanoparticle shows ability to locate and treat breast tumorsOne major problem in treating cancer is identifying the location of small tumors and treating them before they metastasize.
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New on MIT Technology Review

When an AI finally kills someone, who will be responsible?Legal scholars are furiously debating which laws should apply to AI crime.
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Live Science

Scott Kelly Spent a Year in Space, and Now He Has Different DNA Than His Identical Twin BrotherIn space, no one can hear your DNA change.
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Science : NPR

Nerve Agent Found In U.K. Is Rare And Definitely RussianNovichok-class agents were developed in top-secret Russian labs at the end of the Cold War. Experts say only Russia is known to have made them. "They've been a deep, dark secret," says one expert. (Image credit: Chris J Ratcliffe/Getty Images)
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New on MIT Technology Review

What’s Driving Autonomous VehiclesSelf-driving cars are approaching fast in the rear-view mirror, poised to overtake conventional vehicles within the next decade. Automakers are joining the likes of Google, Uber, and a growing number of start-ups to harness the technological advances that will power next-generation autonomous vehicles.
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Popular Science

This car doesn’t need a steering wheel or pedalsTechnology When the GM Cruise AV says “self-driving,” it really means it. The 2019 GM Cruise AV is ready to drive you around.
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The Atlantic

Bitcoin Mining Turns Electricity Into MoneySince bitcoin emerged from the internet’s muddy bottom into a global asset class, there have been many attempts to understand what this computation-based currency might mean for the world. No claim about bitcoin, or “the blockchain,” as the general category of technology is known, is too big for advocates (“the most disruptive tech in decades”) or detractors (the “biggest bubble in human history”
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Live Science

Faced with Drowning, This Giant Tarantula Goes Out on a LimbA giant, hairy tarantula that was clinging for dear life to a branch with all eight of its legs is now in a much safer - and somewhat drier - spot, thanks to two spider lovers who rescued it from a flooded street in Queensland, Australia.
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Live Science

Declassified Military Video Shows 'UFO' Off East CoastOne former official said the government is turning away from its responsibilities.
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Movable silicon 'lenses' enable neutrons to see new range of details inside objectsAn innovative new way to focus beams of neutrons might allow scientists to probe the interiors of opaque objects at a size range they were blind to previously, allowing them to explore the innards of thick, opaque objects from meteorites to cutting-edge manufactured materials without damaging them.
7d

EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Gun laws stopped mass shootings in Australia: New researchThe odds of a 22-year absence of mass shootings in Australia since 1996 gun reforms being due to chance are one in 200,000, new research reveals.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

Crisis or self-correction: Rethinking how the media cover scienceOne of the recurring media narratives about the nature of science today is that it is 'broken' or 'in crisis.' But an analysis of how the media cover science news argues that generalizations about a crisis in science aren't justified by the available evidence. The essay proposes that those who communicate science, including journalists, scholars and scientists themselves, should more accurately co
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

Flatfoot reconstruction effective for older patients, study findsWhen someone develops adult-acquired flatfoot deformity, they are offered either a reconstruction or foot fusion depending on the severity of the flatfoot and their age. Typically reconstructions are performed in younger patients, while older patients undergo fusions, even though it can limit mobility. A new study has found that flatfoot reconstruction is effective for older patients.
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Big Think

Very few women oversee US companies. Here’s how to change thatWomen’s participation in the labor force has soared over the past 50 years, rising from 32 percent in 1948 to 56.7 percent as of January. Yet those gains have not translated into the U.S. corporate boardroom, where women held just 16.6 percent of seats in 2015, according to a Credit Suisse ... Read More
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New on MIT Technology Review

Walmart’s bot brigade is about to hit the 2,000-mile mark
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Live Science

These Personality Traits Could Put You At Risk for Social Media AddictionWhether it's scrolling through Instagram or constantly refreshing your Facebook feed, social media can eat up hours of your day.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

Extracellular vesicles could be personalized drug delivery vehiclesCreating enough nanovesicles to inexpensively serve as a drug delivery system may be as simple as putting the cells through a sieve, according to an international team of researchers who used mouse autologous -- their own -- immune cells to create large amounts of fillable nanovesicles to deliver drugs to tumors in mice.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

'Flying focus' used to better control lasers over long distancesFor the first time, researchers have found a way to use a concept called 'flying focus' to better control the intensity of lasers over longer distances. Their technique includes capturing some of the fastest movies ever recorded and has the potential to help researchers design the next generation of high-power lasers or produce light sources with novel wavelengths.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

A new cross-coupling simplifies the synthesis of drug-like moleculesResearchers have designed a new molecule-building method that uses sulfones as partners for cross-coupling reactions, or the joining of two distinct chemical entities in a programmed fashion aided by a catalyst.
7d

EurekAlert! - Breaking News

More homes built near wild lands leading to greater wildfire riskNew research out of the University of Wisconsin-Madison shows that a flurry of homebuilding near wild areas since 1990 has greatly increased the number of homes at risk from wildfires while increasing the costs associated with fighting those fires in increasingly dense developments.
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Ag robot speeds data collection, analyses of crops as they growA new lightweight, low-cost agricultural robot could transform data collection and field scouting for agronomists, seed companies and farmers.The TerraSentia crop phenotyping robot, developed by a team of scientists at the University of Illinois, will be featured at the 2018 Energy Innovation Summit Technology Showcase in National Harbor, Maryland. The robot measures the traits of individual plant
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