Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

World's last male northern white rhino, Sudan, diesThe world's last male northern white rhino, Sudan, has died after "age-related complications," researchers announced Tuesday, saying he "stole the heart of many with his dignity and strength."
57min
Science : NPR

Sudan, World's Last Male Northern White Rhino, DiesSudan lived most of his life in a zoo in the Czech Republic, but was brought to a conservancy in Kenya in 2009 as part of a last-ditch effort to save his species. He died at the conservancy at age 45. (Image credit: STR/AP)
1h
Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

Discovery of sophisticated 115,000-year-old bone tools in ChinaAn analysis of 115,000-year-old bone tools discovered in China suggests that the toolmaking techniques mastered by prehistoric humans there were more sophisticated than previously thought.
5h

LATEST

Science | The Guardian

Breffu: a slave, a rebel, a fighter – and a woman almost invisible to historyThe role of women in conflict is often lost to the archaeological record – but Breffu’s story illustrates how sometimes we catch a glimpse of them Early one November morning in 1733 on St Jan, a small island in the Danish West Indies, two slaves waited outside a small stone house belonging to a family of plantation owners, the Krøyers. The slaves, Breffu and Christian, were listening for the soun
4min
NYT > Science

‘We’re Losing the Fight’: Tuberculosis Batters a Venezuela in CrisisVenezuelan US D. TrumpThe disease, which until recently seemed to be under control in Venezuela, is making an aggressive comeback in the nation, overwhelming its broken health care system.
3min
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

New Gulf of Maine study investigates return of kelpBigelow Laboratory for Ocean Sciences has been awarded funding from Maine Sea Grant for a new study of kelp forests in the Gulf of Maine. Senior Research Scientist Douglas Rasher will lead the project with support from University of Maine scientist Robert Steneck, continuing a long-standing partnership between Bigelow Laboratory and the University of Maine's Darling Marine Center. The researchers
9min
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Pipe-crawling robot will help decommission DOE nuclear facilityA pair of autonomous robots developed by Carnegie Mellon University's Robotics Institute will soon be driving through miles of pipes at the U.S. Department of Energy's former uranium enrichment plant in Piketon, Ohio, to identify uranium deposits on pipe walls.
9min
EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Trial shows safety of drugs for irregular heartbeat patients undergoing treatmentA trial has found that two types of blood thinning drugs are safe to use in patients with an irregular heartbeat when they are undergoing surgery aimed at stopping the condition.
27min
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

US Air Force to begin fighter-mounted laser testing this summerThe US Air Force will this summer begin testing a laser that will be mounted on an F-15 warplane, an official said Monday.
51min
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Crash marks first death involving fully autonomous vehicleUber Vehicle TempeA fatal pedestrian crash involving a self-driving Uber SUV in a Phoenix suburb could have far-reaching consequences for the new technology as automakers and other companies race to be the first with cars that operate on their own.
51min
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

US State Dept has deal with under-fire UK data-minerCambridge Analytica FacebookThe US State Department has a $500,000 contract with the British analysis firm facing allegations it misused Facebook user data and offered to dig dirt on its international clients' election opponents.
57min
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Aramco eyes local IPO, may spike overseas listing: reportSaudi Arabia plans to sell shares of Saudi Aramco on a local exchange and may scuttle entirely an earlier plan for an overseas listing, The Wall Street Journal reported Monday.
57min
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Sea level fears as more of giant Antarctic glacier floating than thoughtMore of a giant France-sized glacier in Antarctica is floating on the ocean than previously thought, scientists said Tuesday, raising fears it could melt faster as the climate warms and have a dramatic impact on rising sea-levels.
57min
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Belgium says investigating 'significant' meat fraudBelgium on Monday said at least three nations had received falsely labelled meat products from an abattoir in the south of the country in what it called a "significant" food fraud operation.
57min
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Facebook security chief changes role to focus on election fraudFacebook's chief of security said late Monday his role has shifted to focusing on emerging risks and election security at the global social network, which is under fire for letting its platform be used to spread bogus news and manipulate voters.
57min
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Sweet science: Putting corn syrup to work on Earth's originsHow has the Earth evolved, and what's in store for the future? It's a sticky question that has graduate student Loes van Dam covered in corn syrup by the end of a day in the lab.
1h
Science-Based Medicine

The Ethics of CAM: More Harm than Good?A new book examines the ethics of Complementary and Alternative Medicine (CAM. Ernst and Smith demonstrate that CAM is inherently unethical and does more harm than good.
1h
BBC News - Science & Environment

Rhino dies: Sudan was the last male northern whiteSudan's death at the age of 45 leaves only two females of his subspecies alive in the world.
1h
NYT > Science

Profiles in Science: David Reich Unearths Human History Etched in BoneThe geneticist at Harvard Medical School has retrieved DNA from more than 900 ancient people. His findings trace the prehistoric migrations of our species.
1h
NYT > Science

ScienceTake: The Amazing Metabolism of HummingbirdsHummingbirds have several tricks to survive with a super-high metabolism on a diet of nectar.
1h
NYT > Science

How Hummingbirds Cheat DeathA hovering hummingbird burns energy faster than any other bird or mammal — and it often lives just hours from starvation.
1h
Ingeniøren

Statens Serum Institut har syltet kontrol med behandlere af persondata i tre årEfter adskillige artikler fra Version2, erkender Statens Serum Institut i en redegørelse til Sundhedsministeriet, at der ikke var styr på databehandleraftaler.
1h
Science | The Guardian

Does testosterone make you mean?The ‘risk-taking’ male hormone is blamed for everything from sexual violence to the financial crisis, but some researchers are starting to question the supposed links Charles Ryan has a clinic in San Francisco at which he regularly relieves men of their testosterone. This “chemical castration”, as it is sometimes known, is not a punishment, but a common treatment for prostate cancer. Testosterone
1h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News

High consumption of red and processed meat linked to non-alcoholic fatty liver disease and insulin resistanceWorld meat consumption has increased during the last decades, and evidence is mounting that high consumption of red and mainly processed meat is unhealthy to humans and is related to chronic diseases such as cancer, type 2 diabetes, and cardiovascular disease. A new study published in the Journal of Hepatology adds non-alcoholic fatty liver disease (NAFLD) to the list.
2h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Pipe-crawling robot will help decommission DOE nuclear facilityA pair of autonomous robots developed by Carnegie Mellon University's Robotics Institute will soon be driving through miles of pipes at the US Department of Energy's former uranium enrichment plant in Piketon, Ohio, to identify uranium deposits on pipe walls.
3h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Weight loss after stomach-narrowing surgery eases chronic knee painA new report finds that extremely obese people who have a band surgically strapped around their stomachs to restrict food intake not only lose weight but also suffer less from arthritic knee pain.
3h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Music therapy aids healing of military personnelA new paper published in Music Therapy Perspectives examines the importance of music therapy in military healthcare. There has been an increase in music therapy to treat combat-related injuries in recent years. With this growth in the use of the therapy, the researchers involved believe it's important for practitioners to publish more program evaluations and patient outcomes data.
3h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Potential cognitive effects of targeted drugs in children may be reversible with therapyYoung mice that received molecularly targeted therapies used to treat brain cancer in human patients sustained cognitive and behavioral deficits, but the deficits were largely reversible through environmental stimulation and physical exercise. The study suggests that pediatric brain cancer patients may experience similar side effects of molecularly targeted therapies, and may benefit from efforts
3h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Tamoxifen and raloxifene slow down the progression of muscular dystrophySteroids are currently the only available treatment to reduce the repetitive cycles of inflammation and disease progression associated with functional deterioration in patients with muscular dystrophy (MD). A study reported in The American Journal of Pathology showed that a new treatment approach using the selective estrogen receptor modulators (SERMs) tamoxifen and raloxifene significantly improv
3h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Study identifies effective parenting strategies to reduce disruptive behavior in childrenMost parenting programs aim to teach parents how to reduce their children's disruptive behavior. New research looked at more than 150 studies of these programs, finding differences in what works best according to whether or not children already showed behavior problems.
3h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News

In drawing tests, US children draw female scientists more today than in previous decadesThe participation of women in science has risen significantly in the United States since the 1960s. A new meta-analysis reviewed five decades of 'Draw a Scientist' tests to determine whether children's drawings have mirrored that change. The study found that US children and adolescents today draw female scientists more often than in earlier decades, but overall, female scientists are still depicte
3h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News

3-D-printed models improve medical student trainingA relatively inexpensive 3-D-printed model of a patient's blood vessels is as effective as current commercially available models for training medical students in interventional radiology vascular access, according to a study presented at the Society of Interventional Radiology's 2018 Annual Scientific Meeting.
3h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News

US children now draw female scientists more than everWhen drawing scientists, US children now depict female scientists more often than ever, according to new Northwestern University research, which analyzed five decades of 'Draw-A-Scientist' studies conducted since the 1960s. This change suggests that children's stereotypes linking science with men have weakened over time, said the researchers, consistent with more women becoming scientists and chil
3h
Ingeniøren

Generalprøven på fremtidens tog: Kun én ud af tre leverandører bød på DSB's lokomotiverTo ud af de tre leverandører, som DSB inviterede til at komme med et bud på danskernes nye lokomotiver, endte med at trække sig, så Siemens var alene om at byde. Intet problem, så længe buddet er godt, mener DSB.
4h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

US children now draw female scientists more than everWhen drawing scientists, U.S. children now depict female scientists more often than ever, according to new Northwestern University research, which analyzed five decades of "Draw-A-Scientist" studies conducted since the 1960s.
4h
Feed: All Latest

The Noisy Fallacies of Psychographic TargetingFacebook Cambridge Analytica DataWIRED columnist Antonio Garcia Martinez on why Cambridge Analytica’s targeting efforts probably didn’t even work—and why Facebook should be embarrassed anyway.
4h
Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

Climate change threatens world's largest seagrass carbon storesIn the summer of 2010-2011 Western Australia experienced an unprecedented marine heat wave that elevated water temperatures 2-4°C above average for more than 2 months. The heat wave resulted in defoliation of the dominant Amphibolis antarctica seagrass species across the iconic Shark Bay World Heritage Site. Researchers alert us of the major carbon dioxide (CO2) emissions resulting from this loss
4h
Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

Termite queen, king recognition pheromone identifiedForget the bows and curtsies. Worker termites shake in the presence of their queens and kings. New research explains how these workers smell a royal presence.
4h
Live Science

Skeletal System: Facts, Function & DiseasesThe human skeleton has 206 bones and performs several vital functions.
4h
Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

Shedding light on the mystery of the superconducting domePhysicists have induced superconductivity in a monolayer of tungsten disulfide. By using an increasing electric field, they were able to show how the material turns from an insulator into a superconductor and then back into a 're-entrant' insulator again. Their results show the typical 'dome-shaped' superconducting phase, and finally provide an explanation for this phenomenon.
5h
Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

Pregnant women and new moms still hesitant to introduce peanut productsIn January 2017 guidelines were released urging parents to begin early introduction of peanut-containing foods to reduce the risk of peanut allergy. A new study shows those who are aware of the guidelines are still hesitant to put them into place and not everyone has heard of them.
5h
Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

So close, yet so far: Making climate impacts feel nearby may not inspire actionAn expert says it is possible to make faraway climate impacts feel closer. But that doesn't automatically inspire the American public to express greater support for policies that address it.
5h
Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

What happens to a dying cell's corpse? New findings illuminate an old problemScientists have discovered a curious way for cells to die. In studying it, they are learning about how remnants of diseased cells are normally chewed up and removed.
5h
Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

Detection, deterrent system will help eagles, wind turbines coexist betterResearchers have taken a key step toward helping wildlife coexist more safely with wind power generation by demonstrating the success of an impact detection system that uses vibration sensors mounted to turbine blades.
5h
Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

Geoengineering polar glaciers to slow sea-level riseTargeted geoengineering to preserve continental ice sheets deserves serious research and investment, argues an international team of researchers. Without intervention, by 2100 most large coastal cities will face sea levels that are more than three feet higher than they are currently.
5h
Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

Designing diamonds for medical imaging technologiesResearchers have optimized the design of laboratory-grown, synthetic diamonds. This brings the new technology one step closer to enhancing biosensing applications, such as magnetic brain imaging.
5h
Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

What is the cost of interrupting a radiologist?A first of its kind study shows typical interruptions experienced by on-call radiologists do not reduce diagnostic accuracy but do change what they look at and increase the amount of time spent on a case.
5h
Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

Quintupling inhaler medication may not prevent asthma attacks in childrenChildren with mild to moderate asthma do not benefit from a common practice of increasing their inhaled steroids at the first signs of an asthma exacerbation, according to clinical trial results. Researchers found short-term increases in inhaled steroids did not prevent attacks in children aged 5 to 11, and may even slow a child's growth.
5h
Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

Diabetes medicine reduces liver fat in nonalcoholic fatty liver diseaseIn people with type 2 diabetes, nonalcoholic fatty liver disease (NAFLD) is common and can progress to a severe liver disease known as nonalcoholic steatohepatitis (NASH). Now a study has found that empagliflozin, a newer treatment for type 2 diabetes, reduces liver fat in patients with NAFLD and diabetes.
5h
Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

New model, new drugs, and a 'remarkable' response in adrenal cancerTwo new studies use new models to identify genetic targets and test promising treatments in adrenal cancer. One patient was treated with the immunotherapy pembrolizumab and now more than a year after starting treatment remains on the drug with 77 percent tumor reduction and no new metastases.
5h
Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

Molecular doorstop could be key to new tuberculosis drugsIn discovering how an antibiotic kills the bacteria that cause tuberculosis, scientists open the door to new treatments for the disease -- and possibly others, as well.
5h
Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

Newly described human antibody prevents malaria in miceScientists have discovered a human antibody that protected mice from infection with the deadliest malaria parasite, Plasmodium falciparum. The research findings provide the basis for future testing in humans to determine if the antibody can provide short-term protection against malaria, and also may aid in vaccine design. Currently, there is no highly effective, long-lasting vaccine to prevent mal
5h
Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

Three genes essential for cells to tell timeOne family of genes allows cells to adapt to daily changes in environmental conditions by adjusting their internal 'body clock,' the circadian clock responsible for regular sleep-wake cycles. The new discovery reveals for the first time that circadian regulation may be directly connected to cellular stress.
5h
Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

Better understanding of ALS by looking at how cells changeEight years in the making, a discovery by neuroscientists highlights the value of long-term, fundamental research and provides important information for future drug targets.
5h
Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

Environmentally friendly cattle production (really)When cattle congregate, they're often cast as the poster animals for overgrazing, water pollution and an unsustainable industry. While some of the criticism is warranted, cattle production -- even allowing herds to roam through grasslands and orchards -- can be beneficial to the environment as well as sustainable.
5h
New on MIT Technology Review

The Cambridge Analytica affair reveals Facebook’s “Transparency Paradox”Facebook Cambridge Analytica DataSinan Aral, a professor at MIT, fears the fallout from the scandal could limit researchers’ access to social networks’ data.
7h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Young at wrong end of deprivation gap, finds studyThe under thirties have endured most the marked increase in relative deprivation of any age group in England, according to a 11-year study of data from the Office of National Statistics (ONS).Led by University of Manchester data scientists, the analysis from 2004-2015 also found that over the same period, deprivation fell for the over-60s, who are also less likely to live in deprived neighborhoods
7h
Science | The Guardian

Female-dominated Wellcome book prize shortlist spans Victorian surgery and modern NigeriaTitles vying for £30,000 award for books on health and medicine include Ayọ̀bámi Adébáyọ̀’s novel Stay With Me and Sigrid Rausing’s memoir Mayhem A reflection on death from a palliative care consultant sits alongside a Nigerian novel tackling the heartbreak of infertility on the female-dominated Wellcome book prize shortlist. Chair of judges Edmund de Waal praised the six contenders for the £30,0
7h
Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

Helium plays a 'nanny' role in forming chemical compounds under pressureHelium, a noble gas, was long believed to be 'too aloof' to react with the other elements on the periodic table. Now, however, scientists have provided a theoretical explanation of how helium may be capable of forming stable compounds.
8h
Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

Tiny implants for cells are functional in vivoFor the first time, an interdisciplinary team has succeeded in integrating artificial organelles into the cells of living zebrafish embryos. This innovative approach using artificial organelles as cellular implants offers new potential in treating a range of diseases.
8h
Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

Deeper insight into viral infectionsResearchers have developed a new analysis technique that sheds more light on viral infections. They used the new method to demonstrate that virus-infected cells produce far more infection-related proteins and peptides than previously thought.
8h
Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

Interstellar asteroid, 'Oumuamua, likely came from a binary star systemNew research finds that 'Oumuamua, the rocky object identified as the first confirmed interstellar asteroid, very likely came from a binary star system.
8h
Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

New research into letter-spacing could help improve children's readingIncreased letter spacing helps individuals read faster, but not due to visual processing, according to new research.
8h
Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

Scientists have a new way to gauge the growth of nanowiresResearchers have observed the formation of two kinds of defects in individual nanowires, which are smaller in diameter than a human hair.
8h
Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

Fasting diets reduce important risk factor for cardiovascular diseaseIntermittent energy restriction diets, such as the 5:2 diet, clears fat from the blood quicker after eating meals than daily calorie restriction diets – reducing an important risk factor for cardiovascular disease, a new study reports.
8h
Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

Preventing hurricanes using air bubblesMany people have tried to find ways of preventing hurricanes before they make landfall, resulting in the loss of human lives. Researchers believe that the answer lies in cold bubbles.
8h
Futurity.org

Arthritis treatment may soon ditch trial and errorScientists are bringing precision medicine to rheumatoid arthritis for the first time by using genetic profiling of joint tissue to see which drugs will work for which patients, a new study shows. Treatment for rheumatoid arthritis is now trial and error, but in the near future, it’s possible that patients will no longer have to waste time and be disappointed with months of ineffective therapy, s
8h
Futurity.org

Students tend to drink more when they think parents don’t mindCollege students who think their parents are more accepting of drinking tend to drink more, a new study shows. “One part of this can be… not reinforcing or making jokes about college being a crazy time when everyone takes risks without consequences.” Researchers asked students about their drinking habits and how much they believed their parents were accepting of them drinking during their first f
8h
Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

Wives of many prostate cancer sufferers made ill or feel undermined by the diseaseMany wives of advanced prostate cancer sufferers feel that their lives are being undermined by their husband’s illness, with nearly half reporting that their own health suffered. In addition a focus subgroup has revealed that many feel isolated and fearful, and worry about the role change in their lives as their husband’s cancer advances. This study, developed with the wives of men with metastatic
8h
Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

Heart can terminate atrial fibrillation itself after local gene therapyThe heart is capable of terminating arrhythmias itself after local gene therapy, potentially avoiding the need for patients to undergo painful electric shocks, according to a proof-of-concept study.
8h
Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

Siblings of cot death victims have four-fold cot death riskResearchers say steps to avoid sibling deaths could be identified through autopsies and family screening.
8h
Futurity.org

Listen: Program fights food insecurity for families of sick kidsWhile taking care of a sick child in the hospital can be a nightmare for any parent or caregiver, many families must also contend with being hungry while caring for their child. Stacy Lindau leads a program to help combat hunger called Feed1st. With six food pantries located throughout the University of Chicago’s Comer Children’s Hospital, it offers a solution in the fight against “food insecurit
8h
Futurity.org

How black holes feed on star stuff (and spit some out)Researchers have discovered how black holes not only consume stars, but how these gravitational powerhouses discard part of what they take in. The findings offer new insights into distant celestial phenomena, researchers say. “These findings enhance our understanding of how black holes’ energy is produced, and, with it, a more advanced sense of the galaxy evolves,” says Sjoert van Velzen, a New Y
8h
Futurity.org

Did enormous volcanoes lead to oceans on Mars?A new theory of how oceans on Mars came and went over the last 4 billion years suggests they formed several hundred million years earlier and were not as deep as once thought. The proposal links the existence of oceans early in Mars’ history to the rise of the solar system’s largest volcanic system, Tharsis, and highlights global warming’s key role in allowing liquid water to exist on the red pla
9h
New on MIT Technology Review

What Uber’s fatal accident could mean for the autonomous-car industryUber Vehicle TempeThe first pedestrian death leads some to ask whether the industry is moving too fast to deploy the technology.
9h
Popular Science

A warmer Arctic caused icy traffic jams in seas down southEnvironment Hazardous sea ice is going farther, faster. Off the northeastern coast of Newfoundland, Canada, sea ice is a normal sight between January and May. The icy coating usually disappears in the warmer months, letting…
9h
Feed: All Latest

GDC 2018: Who Is This Event For Anymore?Like the gaming world itself, the annual developer conference stands at a crossroads.
9h
Futurity.org

Well-child visits flag these risks in new momsWell-child visits keep babies healthy, but they also give doctors the perfect opportunity to offer new moms who are between pregnancies basic screenings and health care interventions, a new study shows. Developed by the IMPLICIT Network (Interventions to Minimize Preterm and Low birth weight Infants through Continuous Improvement Techniques), the IMPLICIT interconception care (ICC) method uses re
9h
Futurity.org

Nope, hormones aren’t to blame for teen social behaviorReproductive hormones that develop during puberty are not responsible for changes in social behavior that may occur during adolescence, research shows. “Changes in social behavior during adolescence appear to be independent of pubertal hormones. They are not triggered by puberty, so we can’t blame the hormones,” says Matthew Paul, an assistant professor in the psychology department at the Univers
9h
The Atlantic

The Atlantic Daily: Investigating the NuancesWhat We’re Following Firing Fallout: President Trump is reportedly enjoying a burst of self-confidence that has lowered his inhibitions. Over the weekend, he rejoiced over the firing of the former FBI Deputy Director Andrew McCabe, whom he’s attacked multiple times on Twitter. Although McCabe’s dismissal was technically carried out by Attorney General Jeff Sessions, those past attacks call the Ju
9h
The Atlantic

Mike Isabella, Top Chef, and the Capitalism of Bad Behavior“There’s no way—no offense—but a girl shouldn’t be at the same level that I am.” That was Mike Isabella, celebrity chef and successful restaurateur, making his debut on the show that would make him famous. Bravo’s Top Chef , to kick off its Las Vegas–set Season 6, had pitted its new group of contestants against each other in a mise-en-place relay race; Isabella, shucking clams, had looked over an
9h
Latest Headlines | Science News

First pedestrian death from a self-driving car fuels safety debateA self-driving Uber kills woman in Arizona in the first fatal pedestrian strike by an autonomous car.
9h
Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

'New life form' answers question about evolution of cellsBacteria and Archaea must have evolved from the putative Last Universal Common Ancestor (LUCA). One hypothesis is that this happened because the cell membrane in LUCA was an unstable mixture of lipids. Now, scientists have created such a life form with a mixed membrane and discovered it is in fact stable, refuting this hypothesis.
9h
Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

Don't blame adolescent social behavior on hormonesReproductive hormones that develop during puberty are not responsible for changes in social behavior that occur during adolescence, according to the results of a newly published study.
9h
Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

Modified biomaterials self-assemble on temperature cuesBiomedical engineers have demonstrated a new approach to making self-assembled biomaterials that relies on protein modifications and temperature. The hybrid approach allows researchers to control self-assembly more precisely, which may prove useful for a variety of biomedical applications, from drug delivery to wound-healing.
9h
Feed: All Latest

Facebook Owes You More Than ThisFacebook Data Cambridge AnalyticaYou give Facebook all of your data in exchange for using their service—an exchange that seems increasingly out of whack.
9h
cognitive science

During the hours of sleep the memory performs a cleaning shift. A study reveals that when we sleep, the neural connections that collect important information are strengthened and those created from irrelevant data are weakened until they get lost.submitted by /u/SophiaDevetzi [link] [comments]
10h
Latest Headlines | Science News

Some TRAPPIST-1 planets may be water worldsTwo of TRAPPIST-1’s planets are half water and ice, which could hamper the search for life.
10h
Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

Americans prefer economic inequality to playing Robin Hood, study findsGiven the chance to play Robin Hood, most Americans show little interest in taking from the rich and giving to the poor. A new study may explain why it's so hard for voters in modern democracies to erase the economic inequalities that separate most citizens from the nation's super-wealthy elites.
10h
Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

Severe war injuries and PTSD can impact hypertension riskUS service members severely injured in the Iraq or Afghanistan wars or diagnosed with PTSD (posttraumatic stress disorder) face a greater risk of high blood pressure. Injury severity and PTSD were each independently associated with an increased risk of high blood pressure.
10h
Live Science

Live Bee Sting 'Acupuncture' Triggers Lethal Allergic ReactionAn "acupuncture" session using live bees had a lethal ending.
10h
Feed: All Latest

Cambridge Analytica Is Finally Under Fire Because of WhistleblowersIt was no secret that Cambridge Analytica was manipulating people with big data. But it took a former employee’s reckoning to provoke outrage.
10h
Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

New osteoarthritis genes discoveredIn the largest study of its kind, nine novel genes for osteoarthritis have been discovered. Results could open the door to new targeted therapies for this debilitating disease in the future.
10h
Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

LSD blurs boundaries between the experience of self and otherLSD reduces the borders between the experience of our own self and others, and thereby affects social interactions. Researchers have now found that the serotonin 2A receptor in the human brain is critically involved in these intertwined psychological mechanisms. This knowledge could help develop new therapies for psychiatric disorders such as schizophrenia or depression.
10h
Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

Intensification of agriculture and social hierarchies evolve together, study findsResearchers analyzed the evolution of 155 Island South East Asian and Pacific societies to determine that, rather than intensification of agriculture leading to social stratification, the two evolve together. The study illustrates the way social and material factors combine to drive human cultural evolution.
10h
Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

Palm trees are spreading northward. How far will they go?What does it take for palm trees, the unofficial trademark of tropical landscapes, to expand into northern parts of the world that have long been too cold for palm trees to survive? A new study attempts to answer this question. Researchers analyzed a broad dataset to determine global palm tree distribution in relation to temperature.
10h
Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

Suicide risk for youth sharply higher in the months after self-harmA recent study revealed that young Americans had a sharply higher risk of suicide in the months after surviving a deliberate self-harm attempt. The authors say the findings underscore the need to direct clinical interventions toward youth who survive such attempts during this critical period.
10h
The Atlantic

The Atlantic Politics & Policy Daily: Miranda WarningToday in 5 Lines During a speech in New Hampshire, President Trump unveiled his plan to combat the national opioid crisis , which includes a proposal to impose the death penalty on some drug dealers. “If we don’t get tough on the drug dealers, we are wasting our time,” Trump said. The Supreme Court denied a request from Republican state legislators to block the implementation of a revised map of
10h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

How Facebook likes could profile voters for manipulationFacebook Cambridge Analytica DataFacebook likes can tell a lot about a person. Maybe even enough to fuel a voter-manipulation effort like the one a Trump-affiliated data-mining firm stands accused of—and which Facebook may have enabled.
10h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Making intricate images with bacterial communitiesWorking with light and genetically engineered bacteria, researchers from Stanford University are able to shape the growth of bacterial communities. From polka dots to stripes to circuits, they can render intricate designs overnight. The technique, described in the Mar. 19 in Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences, can achieve biofilms grown at a resolution of 25 micrometers, which is abou
10h
Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

Research signals arrival of a complete human genomeResearch have just published attempts to close huge gaps remain in our genomic reference map. The research uses nanopore long-read sequencing to generate the first complete and accurate linear map of a human Y chromosome centromere. This milestone in human genetics and genomics signals that scientists are finally entering a technological phase when completing the human genome will be a reality.
10h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Making intricate images with bacterial communitiesA technique for growing sticky films of bacteria into elaborate microscopic images could reveal how potentially dangerous biofilms grow and transmit antibiotic resistance, and could lead to novel biomaterials or synthetic microbial communities.
10h
Popular Science

A self-driving Uber hit and killed a pedestrian in ArizonaUber Vehicle TempeTechnology It's the first fatal incident of its kind. A self-driving car in Uber's test fleet got into a fatal accident with a pedestrian last night.
11h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News

TGen tests ultrasound as way to enhance cancer drug deliveryA Norwegian biotech company called Phoenix Solutions AS is working with the Translational Genomics Research Institute (TGen), a Phoenix, Arizona-based biomedical research facility, to test the use of these pulsed sound waves to direct and focus cancer drug therapies.
11h
Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

Historians to climate researchers: Let's talkOurs is not the first society to be confronted by massive environmental change. Over the course of history, some societies have been destroyed by natural disasters, like Pompeii, while others have learned how to accommodate floods, droughts, volcanic eruptions and other natural hazards. The key is how a society plans for and interacts with the stress from nature.
11h
Live Science

Male Birth Control Pill Blocks 'Sperm Hormones,' But Will It Work?Scientists say they're getting closer to developing a birth control pill for men.
11h
Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

Agriculture initiated by indigenous peoples, not Fertile Crescent migrationSmall scale agricultural farming was first initiated by indigenous communities living on Turkey's Anatolian plateau, and not introduced by migrant farmers as previously thought, according to new research.
11h
Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

First evidence of live-traded dogs for Maya ceremoniesEarliest evidence that Mayas raised and traded dogs and other animals -- probably for ceremonies -- from Ceibal, Guatemala.
11h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Scientists discover new causes of cellular decline in prematurely aging kidsSaint Louis University researchers have uncovered new answers about why cells rapidly age in children with a rare and fatal disease.
11h
New on MIT Technology Review

A massive genome-sequencing effort is coming to India
11h
Feed: All Latest

Uber's Self-Driving Car Just Killed Somebody in Arizona. Now What?Uber Vehicle TempeThe first deadly crash raises questions about how quickly autonomous driving technology is progressing—and who's in charge of keeping everybody safe.
11h
Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

At first blush, you look happy -- or sad, or angryOur faces broadcast our feelings in living color -- even when we don't move a muscle. That's the conclusion of a groundbreaking study into human expressions of emotion, which found that people are able to correctly identify other people's feelings up to 75 percent of the time -- based solely on subtle shifts in blood flow color around the nose, eyebrows, cheeks or chin.
11h
Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

Arctic sea ice becoming a spring hazard for North Atlantic shipsMore Arctic sea ice is entering the North Atlantic Ocean than before, making it increasingly dangerous for ships to navigate those waters in late spring, according to new research.
11h
BBC News - Science & Environment

Breaking mould in male-dominated industryThree pioneers who are shattering stereotypes surrounding the world of science and engineering.
11h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Fast-acting antidote in sight for cholera epidemicsGroundbreaking discoveries regarding the onset of cholera are paving the way for a future, fast-acting antidote for cholera epidemics, according to research published in the journals PLOS Pathogens and ACS Infectious Disease.
11h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News

New biomarkers for neuroblastoma, a type of cancer in childrenTwo new biomarkers for a type of cancer in children called neuroblastoma have been identified in a study published in the journal Cancer Cell. The findings are expected to have immediate significance for disease prognosis, and eventually also for treatment.
11h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

So close, yet so far: Making climate impacts feel nearby may not inspire actionAlthough scientists warn that urgent action is needed to stop climate change, public engagement continues to lag. Many social scientists say people are hesitant to act on climate change because, especially in Western industrialized countries like the U.S., it feels like such a distant threat.
11h
TED Talks Daily (SD video)

How I use art to bridge misunderstanding | Adong JudithDirector and playwright Adong Judith creates provocative art that sparks dialogue on issues from LGBTQ rights to war crimes. In this quick but powerful talk, the TED Fellow details her work -- including the play "Silent Voices," which brought victims of the Northern Ugandan war against Joseph Kony's rebel group together with political, religious and cultural leaders for transformative talks. "List
12h
Feed: All Latest

Cambridge Analytica Execs Caught Discussing Extortion and Fake NewsCambridge Analytica FacebookIn undercover videos filmed by Britain’s Channel 4 news, Cambridge Analytica executives appear to offer up various unsavory tactics to influence campaigns.
12h
Big Think

Facebook’s stock drops 7% after whistleblower speaks on Cambridge Analytica scandalFacebook Cambridge Analytica DataA former employee of Cambridge Analytica has revealed new information on the harvesting of Facebook users’ data prior to the 2016 presidential election. Read More
12h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Cancer comes back all jacked up on stem cellsThree tumor samples collected over time from a single patient shows how cancer evolves in response to treatment: A higher percentage of cancer stem cells in the final sample make a more aggressive disease.
12h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News

So close, yet so far: Making climate impacts feel nearby may not inspire actionJonathon Schuldt, assistant professor of communication at Cornell University, says it is possible to make faraway climate impacts feel closer. But that doesn't automatically inspire the American public to express greater support for policies that address it. The paper appeared in the Journal of Environmental Psychology.
12h
Feed: All Latest

HTC Vive Gets $100 Price Cut, Vive Pro Launches For $799Vive Pro HTCThe HTC Vive VR system is finally getting affordable as the new Vive Pro goes up for preorder.
12h
Big Think

What men would do to fix the workplace equality gapIt is still true that far more men than women have leading roles in many organisations. Read More
12h
Big Think

Over 40% of the world's dog breeds come from these 3 countriesIsn't the world of dogs about more than (British) bulldogs and (French) poodles? Read More
12h
Popular Science

Stephen Hawking’s long life with ALS reminds us how little we know about the diseaseHealth The condition often kills patients within a few years. Stephen Hawking lived for 55 years following his diagnosis with ALS, a condition that often kills patients within a few short years. The research isn't entirely clear on…
12h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Neutrons help demystify multiferroic materialsMaterials used in electronic devices are typically chosen because they possess either special magnetic or special electrical properties. However, an international team of researchers using neutron scattering recently identified a rare material that has both.
12h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

VW to invest $340 mn more in Tennessee plantVolkswagen I.D. Pikes PeakVolkswagen will invest another $340 million to build SUVs at its US factory, a sign of confidence despite rising friction on international trade, the company announced Monday.
12h
Live Science

Big Cats and 'Ritual' Dogs Lived in Maya CaptivityThe ancient Maya were trading dogs and holding cats in captivity as early as 400 B.C.
12h
The Atlantic

The Lesson Hollywood Should Learn From Love, SimonThere was a strange bit of Hollywood ephemera in this weekend’s box-office numbers. The big story, of course, was the continued success of Black Panther , which remains the No. 1 movie in America after five weeks (the last movie to have such an extended streak was Avatar , the highest-grossing film in history). One reason for the Marvel movie’s impressive gross has been a combination of word-of-m
12h
The Atlantic

Trump's Confidence GameIt was a fun weekend for Donald Trump. Late on Friday, Attorney General Jeff Sessions fired Andrew McCabe, the outgoing FBI deputy director whom Trump had long targeted, and the president spent the rest of the weekend taking victory laps: cheering McCabe’s departure, taking shots at his former boss and mentor James Comey, and renewing his barrage against Special Counsel Robert Mueller. Trump’s mo
12h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Facebook launches audit of data leaked to Trump consultantFacebook Cambridge Analytica DataFacebook announced Monday it has hired a digital forensics firm to investigate the handling of data on millions of Americans leaked to a consulting firm working on Donald Trump's 2016 presidential campaign.
12h
Science | The Guardian

Happy or sad, the colour of your face reveals how you feelPeople able to identify others’ feelings from changes in facial blood flow alone up to 75% of the time, study says Subtle shifts in blood flow colour around the face provide key insights into a person’s emotions that fellow humans are able to interpret, a study suggests. Continue reading...
12h
Dana Foundation

#Brainweek: Our Sensational BrainBrain props at the AMNH for a fun photo opportunity and to get in the spirit of celebrating the brain during Neuroscience Night: Our Sensational Brain . The American Museum of Natural History (AMNH) in New York City presented “Neuroscience Night: Our Sensational Brain” last Thursday night in celebration of Brain Awareness Week . Using interactive activities, the event showcased the astounding cap
12h
New on MIT Technology Review

The US military wants AI to dream up weird new helicoptersA DARPA project aims to see if machine learning can change the way complex engineering systems are designed.
12h
Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

Cutting carbon emissions sooner could save 153 million livesAs many as 153 million premature deaths linked to air pollution could be avoided worldwide this century if governments speed up their timetable for reducing fossil fuel emissions, a new study finds.
12h
New Scientist - News

The universe may end in a collision with a bubble of nothingnessThe most precise calculation of the lifetime of our universe finds that a bubble of vacuum energy made by the Higgs boson could envelop us all in 10139 years
12h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News

HRD-positive breast cancer patients fare better with adjuvant AC chemotherapyPeople with tough-to-treat triple negative breast cancer, whose tumors also don't allow for double-strand DNA repair, fare better when treated with a common adjuvant breast cancer chemotherapy combination, according to results from a SWOG clinical trial.
12h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Immune cell target that may prevent or delay heart failure after pressure overloadResearchers have identified a therapeutic target to prevent or delay heart failure from pressure overload of the heart, and a potential biomarker for the same. They say their animal studies carry clinical and translational potential. Mouse-model experiments showed that preventing the early infiltration of CCR2+ macrophages into the heart, after experimental pressure overload, significantly lessene
12h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Pregnant women and new moms still hesitant to introduce peanut productsIn January 2017 guidelines were released urging parents to begin early introduction of peanut-containing foods to reduce the risk of peanut allergy. A new study shows those who are aware of the guidelines are still hesitant to put them into place and not everyone has heard of them.
12h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Shedding light on the mystery of the superconducting domeUniversity of Groningen physicists, and colleagues from Nijmegen and Hong Kong, have induced superconductivity in a monolayer of tungsten disulfide. By using an increasing electric field, they were able to show how the material turns from an insulator into a superconductor and then back into a 're-entrant' insulator again. Their results show the typical 'dome-shaped' superconducting phase, and fin
12h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Agriculture initiated by indigenous peoples, not Fertile Crescent migrationSmall scale agricultural farming was first initiated by indigenous communities living on Turkey's Anatolian plateau, and not introduced by migrant farmers as previously thought, according to new research by the University of Liverpool.
12h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Study of COPD patients has created a 'looking glass' into genome of pathogenDecades of work on chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) at the University at Buffalo and the Veterans Administration WNY Healthcare System have yielded extraordinary information about the pathogen that does the most harm to patients. The results, published this week in Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences, provide the first insights into how this pathogen lives and adapts to its
12h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Three genes essential for cells to tell timeOne family of genes allows cells to adapt to daily changes in environmental conditions by adjusting their internal 'body clock,' the circadian clock responsible for regular sleep-wake cycles. The new discovery by University of Tokyo scientists reveals for the first time that circadian regulation may be directly connected to cellular stress.
12h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News

New pheromone insight may help predict mountain pine beetle outbreaksResearchers at the University of British Columbia have shed new light on how mountain pine beetles produce an important pheromone called trans-verbenol, which could aid in efforts to better predict outbreaks.
12h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News

At first blush, you look happy -- or sad, or angryOur faces broadcast our feelings in living color -- even when we don't move a muscle. That's the conclusion of a groundbreaking study into human expressions of emotion, which found that people are able to correctly identify other people's feelings up to 75 percent of the time -- based solely on subtle shifts in blood flow color around the nose, eyebrows, cheeks or chin.
12h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Termite queen, king recognition pheromone identifiedForget the bows and curtsies. Worker termites shake in the presence of their queens and kings. New research explains how these workers smell a royal presence.
12h
The Atlantic

It’s Disturbingly Easy to Buy Iraq’s Archeological TreasuresShe can’t remember the exact date of her kidnapping. But it was springtime when the blur of bodies burst into her home, breaking first the silence, then the stone and glass. Someone rushed at her with outstretched hands, grabbed her head, and pulled. She was whisked outside—brief breeze of warm spring air!—then stuffed into a car. A man carried her to the back of a farm and buried her. It was mon
12h
Feed: All Latest

To Stay Healthy On Your Next Flight, Avoid Aisles and Stay PutJust grab a window seat and don't move.
13h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Termite queen, king recognition pheromone identifiedResearchers at North Carolina State University have for the first time identified a specific chemical used by the higher termite castes—the queens and the kings—to communicate their royal status with worker termites. The findings could advance knowledge of termite evolution, behavior and control.
13h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

New pheromone insight may help predict mountain pine beetle outbreaksResearchers at the University of British Columbia have shed new light on how mountain pine beetles produce an important pheromone called trans-verbenol, which could aid in efforts to better predict outbreaks.
13h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Americans prefer economic inequality to playing Robin Hood, study findsVoters in modern democracies, such as the United States and Germany, have long held the power to take from the rich, give to the poor and erase the huge economic inequalities that separate the vast majority of a nation's citizens from its super-wealthy elites.
13h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Agriculture initiated by indigenous peoples, not Fertile Crescent migrationSmall scale agricultural farming was first initiated by indigenous communities living on Turkey's Anatolian plateau, and not introduced by migrant farmers as previously thought, according to new research by the University of Liverpool.
13h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Intensification of agriculture and social hierarchies evolve together, study findsA long-standing debate in the field of cultural evolution has revolved around the question of how and why human societies become more hierarchical. Some theorize that material changes to a society's resources or subsistence strategies lead it to become more hierarchical; others believe that hierarchy is the cause rather than the result of these changes. Many see the answer as being somewhere on th
13h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Team reports first evidence of live-traded dogs for Maya ceremoniesPolice detectives analyze isotopes in human hair to find out where a murder victim was born and grew up. Ashley Sharpe, an archaeologist at the Smithsonian Tropical Research Institute in Panama, and colleagues combined clues from carbon, nitrogen, oxygen and strontium isotope analysis discovering the earliest evidence that the Maya raised and traded dogs and other animals, probably for ceremonial
13h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Physicists bring order to liquid droplets, offering promise for pharmaceutical developmentA team of physicists has developed a method to generate and self-organize liquids into well-defined patterns, a breakthrough that offers potential new pathways for the development of more sophisticated pharmaceuticals and other consumer products.
13h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

New life form answers question about evolution of cellsBacteria and Archaea are two of the three domains of life. Both must have evolved from the putative last universal common ancestor (LUCA). One hypothesis is that this happened because the cell membrane in LUCA was an unstable mixture of lipids. Now, scientists from the University of Groningen and Wageningen University have created such a life form with a mixed membrane and discovered it is, in fac
13h
Live Science

No, One Sick Passenger Won't Infect Everyone on the PlaneFinally, some good news about airplane travel.
13h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Don't blame adolescent social behavior on hormonesReproductive hormones that develop during puberty are not responsible for changes in social behavior that occur during adolescence, according to the results of a newly published study by a University at Buffalo researcher.'Changes in social behavior during adolescence appear to be independent of pubertal hormones. They are not triggered by puberty, so we can't blame the hormones,' says Matthew Pau
13h
The Atlantic

America's Most Widely Misread Literary WorkRobert Frost’s poem “The Road Not Taken” is often interpreted as an anthem of individualism and nonconformity, seemingly encouraging readers to take the road less traveled. This interpretation has long been propagated through countless song lyrics, newspaper columns, and graduation speeches. But as Frost liked to warn his listeners , “You have to be careful of that one; it’s a tricky poem—very tr
13h
Science | The Guardian

Virus risk on planes is lower than you might think, study saysUnless, that is, you’re directly next to an infected person, or a steward is contagious Flyers who live in fear of catching bugs on every flight, take heart: the risk of picking up respiratory infections while cruising at 35,000 feet may be slimmer than you think. Scientists used a computer model to crunch information on how people moved around aircraft on flights lasting three-and-a-half to five
13h
Popular Science

Last week in tech: Bad news for Facebook users, but good news for flying taxisTechnology Facebook faces data security issues, while Catch up on all the tech news you missed while you were crafting the perfect NCAA bracket.
13h
New Scientist - News

An Uber self-driving car has killed a pedestrian in ArizonaAn Uber self-driving car has crashed into a 49-year-old woman in Arizona. This is the first time a car in autonomous mode has killed a pedestrian
13h
Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

In children with obesity, impulsivity may be linked with greater weight loss when treatedChildren with obesity may be more impulsive than those with normal weight, but during family-based behavioral treatment (FBT), the more impulsive of children with obesity may lose more weight, a new study suggests.
13h
Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

New method manages and stores data from millions of nerve cells -- in real timeRecent developments in neuroscience set high requirements for sophisticated data management, not least when implantable Brain Machine Interfaces are used to establish electronic communication between the brain's nerve cells and computers. A new method makes it possible to recode neural signals into a format that computer processors can use instantly.
13h
Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

Cosmologists create largest simulation of galaxy formation, break their own recordCosmology researchers are releasing initial findings from IllustrisTNG, their follow-up to the 2015 record-breaking Illustris simulation -- the largest-ever hydrological simulation of galaxy formation.
13h
Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

Scientists create microscopic 'swimmers' controlled by a magnetic fieldMicroscopic, magnetic 'swimmers' may someday be used to carry cargoes in fluids, such as drugs that need precise placement to treat disease.
13h
Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

Visual recognition: Seeing the world through the eyes of rodentsMan or woman, happy or sad. The visual process that allows us to recognize someone's gender or emotional state is very sophisticated. Until recently, only primates were deemed able to perform such complex operations as object recognition. A new study shows that rodents also use advanced and diversified recognition strategies, confirming the validity of this animal model for studying object vision
13h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Facebook rocked by data breach scandal as investigations loom (Update)Facebook Data Cambridge AnalyticaFacebook shares plunged Monday as the social media giant was pounded by criticism at home and abroad over revelations that a firm working for Donald Trump's presidential campaign harvested and misused data on 50 million members.
13h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News

What is the cost of interrupting a radiologist?A first of its kind study shows typical interruptions experienced by on-call radiologists do not reduce diagnostic accuracy but do change what they look at and increase the amount of time spent on a case.
13h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Quintupling inhaler medication may not prevent asthma attacks in childrenChildren with mild to moderate asthma do not benefit from a common practice of increasing their inhaled steroids at the first signs of an asthma exacerbation, according to clinical trial results published in The New England Journal of Medicine. Researchers found short-term increases in inhaled steroids did not prevent attacks in children aged 5 to 11, and may even slow a child's growth.
13h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

World water forum opens after dire UN warningThe world must race to avert disastrous loss of water supplies, Brazil's President Michel Temer told a conference Monday, after the UN said some 5.7 billion people may run short of drinking water by 2050.
13h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Cambridge Analytica: firm at the heart of Facebook scandalCambridge Analytica FacebookAt the centre of a scandal over alleged misuse of Facebook users' personal data, Cambridge Analytica is a communications firm hired by those behind Donald Trump's successful US presidential bid.
13h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Warming climate to displace millions in coming decades: World BankThe wave of refugees fleeing crop failures, droughts and rising sea levels will grow drastically over the next three decades if world governments do not intervene, the World Bank warned Monday.
13h
Big Think

Stay-at-home moms work the equivalent of 2.5 full-time jobs, survey findsThis is no surprise to moms everywhere. Raise glass of wine for all of the caregivers out there! Cheers. Read More
13h
Science | The Guardian

Interstellar visitor ’Oumuamua probably came from a two-star systemAstronomers studying the interstellar asteroid ’Oumuamua find that it probably formed around a binary star The mysterious, cigar-shaped object now called ’Oumuamua was found crossing the solar system last October by robotic telescopes on Hawaii. The trajectory showed it had come from another star system and was already on its way back into interstellar space. This sparked a race against time. Ast
13h
Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

Drinking alcohol makes your heart raceThe more alcohol you drink, the higher your heart rate gets, according to new research.
13h
Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

Rheumatoid arthritis meets precision medicineScientists are bringing precision medicine to rheumatoid arthritis for the first time by using genetic profiling of joint tissue to see which drugs will work for which patients, reports a new multi-site study. In the near future, patients won't have to waste time and be disappointed with months of ineffective therapy, scientists said. Currently $2.5 billion a year is wasted on therapy that doesn't
13h
Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

Fighting illegal fishingResearchers explore an alternative pathway to fast-tracking the global recovery of fisheries.
13h
Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

New genetic test detects manatees' recent presence in fresh or saltwaterScientists have developed the first laboratory test that picks up traces of manatees' genetic material in waterways. The environmental DNA test shows whether one or more of the elusive marine mammals has been in the area in the past month.
13h
Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

High omega-6 levels can protect against premature deathCould omega-6 fatty acids protect you against premature death? The answer is yes, according to a new study. While protecting against death, omega-6 fatty acids also keep cardiovascular diseases at bay. “Linoleic acid is the most common polyunsaturated omega-6 fatty acid. We discovered that the higher the blood linoleic acid level, the smaller the risk of premature death,” says one of the researche
13h
Big Think

The evolution of justice, from Socrates to todayPeople have debated what justice is exactly for the last 3,000 years. How have our ideas changed in that time? Read More
13h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

VIIRS satellite instrument gets 2 views of Tropical Cyclone MarcusTropical Cyclone Marcus was moving along the northern coast of Australia when the VIIRS instrument that flies aboard two different satellites captured true-color images of the storm over two days.
13h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

NASA analyzes Tropical Cyclone Eliakim's rainfall, wind shear now affecting stormTropical Cyclone Eliakim soaked the eastern coast of Madagascar as it moved in a southerly path. NASA analyzed that rainfall using data from the Global Precipitation Measurement mission or GPM core satellite. Another NASA satellite provided a current look at the storm that revealed wind shear was taking a toll on the storm.
13h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Few young patients with severe obesity undergo weight loss surgeryAmong U.S. teenagers and young adults with severe obesity, a new study finds that only a small percentage undergo weight loss surgery, even though it is broadly considered the most effective long-term weight loss therapy. The study results, from high-volume surgical centers across five states, will be presented Monday at ENDO 2018, the Endocrine Society's 100th annual meeting in Chicago, Ill.
13h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Tooth health may indicate diabetes riskPoor dental health may be linked with increased risk for diabetes, a new study suggests. The results will be presented in a poster Monday, March 19, at ENDO 2018, the 100th annual meeting of the Endocrine Society in Chicago, Ill.
13h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Study finds association between mother's larger waist size, child's autism riskA new study finds children born to mothers who had a larger waist size before pregnancy may be more likely to have autism than those whose mothers had a smaller pre-pregnancy waist. The research results will be presented Monday, March 19, at ENDO 2018, the 100th annual meeting of the Endocrine Society in Chicago, Ill.
13h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Premature hearts less able to cope with exerciseThe hearts of people born prematurely are less able to cope with the pressures of exercise in adulthood, according to a new study published in the Journal of the American College of Cardiology and part-funded by the British Heart Foundation.
13h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Self-driving vehicle strikes and kills pedestrian in Arizona (Update)Uber Vehicle TempeA self-driving Uber SUV struck and killed a pedestrian in suburban Phoenix in the first death involving a fully autonomous test vehicle—a crash that could have far-reaching consequences for the new technology.
13h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Research signals arrival of a complete human genomeIt's been nearly two decades since a UC Santa Cruz research team announced that they had assembled and posted the first human genome sequence on the internet. Despite the passage of time, enormous gaps remain in our genomic reference map. These gaps span each human centromere.
13h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

What happens to a dying cell's corpse? New findings illuminate an old problemDeath is certain for all living things, including the body's cells. The act of dying is in fact as sophisticated as any process a cell might perform during its lifetime—and when glitches in cell death occur, they can lead to disease or developmental defects.
13h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Scientists examine reproducibility of research issues and remediesReproducibility of scientific findings has long been an important indicator of the validity of data gleaned from research, a process deemed even more critical in this age of ever-changing technologies and methods.
13h
The Scientist RSS

Opinion: No, FDA Didnt Really Approve 23andMes BRCA TestRather, the breast cancer mutation screen was classified as a type of medical device with obligations for the company to reduce risks to customers.
14h
The Scientist RSS

AIDS Researcher Emerges as Top Candidate to Head CDCRobert Redfield would replace Brenda Fitzgerald, who resigned in January over unresolved conflicts of interest.
14h
The Scientist RSS

Zebrafish and Medaka Can Sense Magnetic FieldsUnlike in some animals, their sense of magnetoreception appears to be independent of blue light.
14h
The Scientist RSS

First Direct-to-Consumer BRCA Test Authorized by FDAThe agency gave personal genomics company 23andMe the green light to screen samples for breast cancer-related genetic mutations.
14h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Eliminating injustice imposed by the death penaltyIn "Black Lives Matter and the Call for Death Penalty Abolition," published in Ethics, Michael Cholbi and Alex Madva defend the central arguments of the Black Lives Matter movement's abolitionist stance on capital punishment. The Black Lives Matter movement, in recent years, has advocated for numerous reforms to address "the war against Black people." Based on the argument that capital punishment
14h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Muslims face high rates of discrimination in CanadaOne in five Muslim Canadians say they have experienced discrimination due to their religion, ethnicity or culture at least once in the past five years.
14h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Geoengineering polar glaciers to slow sea-level riseTargeted geoengineering to preserve continental ice sheets deserves serious research and investment, argues an international team of researchers in a Comment published March 14 in the journal Nature. Without intervention, by 2100 most large coastal cities will face sea levels that are more than three feet higher than they are currently.
14h
Live Science

Scientists Made a Startling Discovery After Dosing People with LSDScientists in Switzerland dosed test subjects with LSD to investigate how patients with severe mental disorders lose track of where they end and other people begin.
14h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Historians to climate researchers: Let's talkHistory can tell us a lot about environmental upheaval, say Princeton University historians John Haldon and Lee Mordechai. What is missing in today's debate about climate change is using what we know about how past societies handled environmental stresses to help inform our own situation.
14h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Researchers explore an alternative pathway to fast-tracking the global recovery of fisheriesShort-term pain for long-term gain. When applied to the reform of global fisheries, this strategy could yield enormous benefits.
14h
Science | The Guardian

LSD blurs line between ourselves and others, study findsDrugs targeting similar brain networks as LSD could help with a variety of mental disorders Apart from the wide-eyed bike ride home from the lab, his neighbour turning into a witch, the threatening behaviour of his furniture and the futile battle to save his ego from collapse, Dr Albert Hofmann appeared to enjoy his first trip on LSD. Now, 75 years after the Swiss chemist witnessed the full effec
14h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Oral micronized progesterone may decrease perimenopausal hot flashes, night sweatsOral micronized progesterone (OMP) may diminish hot flashes and night sweats in perimenopausal women, new research from Canada reports. The results will be presented on Monday, March 19 at ENDO 2018, the 100th annual meeting of the Endocrine Society in Chicago, Ill.
14h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Environmentally friendly cattle production (really)Three hundred years ago, enormous herds of bison, antelope and elk roamed North America, and the land was pristine and the water clean.
14h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Palm trees are spreading northward. How far will they go?What does it take for palm trees, the unofficial trademark of tropical landscapes, to expand into northern parts of the world that have long been too cold for palm trees to survive? A new study, led by Lamont-Doherty Earth Observatory researcher Tammo Reichgelt, attempts to answer this question. He and his colleagues analyzed a broad dataset to determine global palm tree distribution in relation t
14h
Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

Scientists caution that a rare childhood liver cancer can spread to the brainA new report details three cases of secondary brain tumors in people with fibrolamellar hepatocellular carcinoma. The researchers say imaging tests could improve treatment for patients whose cancer spreads to the brain from the liver.
14h
Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

Stem cells treat macular degenerationResearchers have developed a specially engineered retinal patch to treat people with sudden, severe sight loss.
14h
Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

Programming DNA to deliver cancer drugsA research team has developed technology to program strands of DNA into switches that turn proteins on and off. This technology could lead to the development of new cancer therapies and other drugs.
14h
Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

Amazon deforestation is close to tipping pointAmazon Prime GamingScientists considered climate change and indiscriminate use of fire to calculate that deforestation rates ranging from 20 percent to 25 percent could turn Amazon's hydrological cycle unable to support its ecosystem.
14h
Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

Genetic analysis uncovers the evolutionary origin of vertebrate limbsFish, mice and likely all modern-day vertebrates share genetic elements first used to develop the unpaired dorsal fin in ancient fish. They later copied these elements to produce paired appendages, like pelvic and pectoral fins, arms and legs.
14h
Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

Molecular cuisine for gut bacteriaScientific recipes have been developed to successfully grow and study gut bacteria in the lab Researchers report on the nutritional preferences and growth characteristics of 96 diverse gut bacterial strains. Their results will help scientists worldwide advance our understanding of the gut microbiome.
14h
Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

Progress toward a new flu treatment, thanks to a small tweakThis year's aggressive flu season reminds everyone that although the flu vaccine can reduce the number of people who contract the virus, it is still not 100 percent effective. A tweak to a small-molecule drug shows promise for future production of new antiviral therapies that could help patients, regardless of the strain with which they are infected.
14h
Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

Identifying 'designer' drugs taken by overdose patientsMedical professionals are scrambling to meet growing demand for emergency room treatment of drug overdoses, but they're hampered by the lack of a quick and easy test to screen patients for synthetic 'designer' drugs. Chemists are developing such a test with the hope that hospitals could eventually use it to choose the appropriate treatment.
14h
Blog » Languages » English

New Feature: Scythe FreezeAttention all Scythes! The day is finally here. That’s right, you can now freeze those pesky, misbehaving, mergery, no good, very bad branches. CB carpet? Get rid of it faster than you can say “you are tearing me apart, Eyewire!” How does Scythe Freeze work? Scythe freeze is pretty similar to admin freeze, but with some slight differences. Let’s explore those similarities and differences. Toolbox
14h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Programming DNA to deliver cancer drugsDNA has an important job—it tells your cells which proteins to make. Now, a research team at the University of Delaware has developed technology to program strands of DNA into switches that turn proteins on and off.
14h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Scientists have a new way to gauge the growth of nanowiresIn a new study, researchers from the U.S. Department of Energy's (DOE) Argonne and Brookhaven National Laboratories observed the formation of two kinds of defects in individual nanowires, which are smaller in diameter than a human hair.
14h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

New optical modules could improve thyroid cancer screeningEarly diagnosis in thyroid cancer can improve a patient's likelihood of recovery, but current screening methods use instruments with poor sensitivity and can yield inaccurate results. Consequently, doctors often have to rely on incomplete information to make diagnostic decisions and recommend treatments, and this can lead to patients receiving unnecessary surgeries or experiencing a reduced qualit
14h
Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

Human influence on climate change will fuel more extreme heat waves in USHuman-caused climate change will drive more extreme summer heat waves in the western US, including in California and the Southwest as early as 2020, new research shows.
14h
Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

A new kind of quantum bits in two dimensionsTwo novel materials, each composed of a single atomic layer and the tip of a scanning tunneling microscope - these are the ingredients to create a novel kind of a so-called 'quantum dot'. These extremely small nanostructures allow delicate control of individual electrons by fine-tuning their energy levels directly. Such devices are key for modern quantum technologies.
14h
Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

A future colorfully lit by mystifying physics of paint-on semiconductorsIt defies conventional wisdom about semiconductors. It's baffling that it even works. It eludes physics models that try to explain it. This newly tested class of light-emitting semiconductors is so easy to produce from solution that it could be painted onto surfaces to light up our future in myriad colors shining from affordable lasers, LEDs, and even window glass.
14h
Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

From landfill to lipstick: Grape waste as a cosmetic and food ingredientThe world drinks a lot of wine, and that means a lot of grapes are consumed. But not every part of the grape ends up in the bottle. Seeds, stalks and skins end up in landfills. Now, researchers say they have found useful commercial applications, such as prolonging the shelf life of fatty foods, for these wine leftovers.
14h
Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

Implantable sensor relays real-time personal health data to a cell phonePersonalized medicine is one step closer thanks to tiny, implantable sensors that can send data to a computer or cell phone to give early warning of a person's developing health problems. Future versions of these devices could indicate the most effective type of exercise for an individual athlete, or help in the triage of wounded soldiers.
14h
Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

Living sensor can potentially prevent environmental disasters from fuel spillsBy the time a Colonial Pipeline leak was detected last fall during a routine inspection, vapors from the quarter-million gallons of released gasoline were so strong they prevented pipeline repair for days. Now, scientists report technology that would alert pipeline managers about leaks much earlier, avoiding the environmental disasters and fuel distribution disruptions resulting from pipeline leak
14h
Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

The Swiss army knife of smoke screensThe military uses smoke grenades to provide cover for people and tanks on the move. But the smoke arms race is on. Increasingly, sensors can now go beyond the visible range into the infrared (IR) region of the spectrum. So, researchers report developing a new kind of smoke that obscures both visible and IR detection.
14h
Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

Experimental obesity drug prevents development of kidney stonesScientists have found that a drug connected with fat regulation prevents the formation of kidney stones in mice. This early work opens the possibility of developing drugs which may help prevent kidney stones in at-risk individuals.
14h
The Atlantic

A Loving Portrait of Arthur MillerRebecca Miller, the filmmaker and writer, has as good a sense as anyone of the events associated with the playwright Arthur Miller: his meteoric rise in the theater, his tangles with the House Un-American Activities Committee, and his five-year marriage to Marilyn Monroe. But the common perception of Arthur Miller didn’t square with how Rebecca knew him, as his daughter. “Early on,” she narrates
14h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Detection, deterrent system will help eagles, wind turbines coexist betterResearchers have taken a key step toward helping wildlife coexist more safely with wind power generation by demonstrating the success of an impact detection system that uses vibration sensors mounted to turbine blades.
14h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

A future colorfully lit by mystifying physics of paint-on semiconductorsSome novel materials that sound too good to be true turn out to be true and good. An emergent class of semiconductors, which could affordably light up our future with nuanced colors emanating from lasers, lamps, and even window glass, could be the latest example.
14h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Designing diamonds for medical imaging technologiesJapanese researchers have optimized the design of laboratory-grown, synthetic diamonds. This brings the new technology one step closer to enhancing biosensing applications, such as magnetic brain imaging. The advantages of this layered, sandwichlike, diamond structure are described in a recent issue of Applied Physics Letters.
14h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Modified biomaterials self-assemble on temperature cuesBiomedical engineers from Duke University have demonstrated a new approach to making self-assembled biomaterials that relies on protein modifications and temperature. The hybrid approach allows researchers to control self-assembly more precisely, which may prove useful for a variety of biomedical applications from drug delivery to wound healing.
14h
Science | The Guardian

Doctors hope for blindness cure after restoring patients' sightTreatment for common cause of blindness could be available within five years, scientists say A treatment for the commonest cause of blindness could be available within five years, scientists believe, after revealing the first two patients given a revolutionary stem cell therapy have regained enough vision to be able to read. The two patients have advanced AMD – age-related macular degeneration –
14h
Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

Decoding the chemistry of fearA new team charts the pathway for fear in worms to reveal more about human anxiety.
14h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Designing diamonds for medical imaging technologiesJapanese researchers have optimized the design of laboratory-grown, synthetic diamonds. This brings the new technology one step closer to enhancing biosensing applications, such as magnetic brain imaging. The advantages of this layered, sandwichlike, diamond structure are described in a recent issue of Applied Physics Letters.
14h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Certain antidepressants more effective in treating youth anxiety disorder, analysis showsA meta-analysis study by University of Cincinnati researchers shows for the first time that SSRIs may be the more effective antidepressant treatment for youth anxiety disorder.
14h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Wolovick: Geoengineering polar glaciers to slow sea-level riseTargeted geoengineering to preserve continental ice sheets deserves serious research and investment, argues an international team of researchers in a Comment published March 14 in the journal Nature. Without intervention, by 2100 most large coastal cities will face sea levels that are more than three feet higher than they are currently.
14h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Modified biomaterials self-assemble on temperature cuesBiomedical engineers from Duke University have demonstrated a new approach to making self-assembled biomaterials that relies on protein modifications and temperature. The hybrid approach allows researchers to control self-assembly more precisely, which may prove useful for a variety of biomedical applications, from drug delivery to wound-healing.
14h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Detection, deterrent system will help eagles, wind turbines coexist betterResearchers have taken a key step toward helping wildlife coexist more safely with wind power generation by demonstrating the success of an impact detection system that uses vibration sensors mounted to turbine blades.
14h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Robocalls improve diabetes eye screening among low-income minoritiesAutomated reminder calls may be an effective tool to improve screening for diabetic eye disease among low-income minority patients, especially African Americans, a new study finds. The study results will be presented Monday at ENDO 2018, the Endocrine Society's 100th annual meeting in Chicago, Ill.
14h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News

LSD blurs boundaries between the experience of self and otherLSD reduces the borders between the experience of our own self and others, and thereby affects social interactions. Researchers at the University of Zurich have now found that the serotonin 2A receptor in the human brain is critically involved in these intertwined psychological mechanisms. This knowledge could help develop new therapies for psychiatric disorders such as schizophrenia or depression
14h
New on MIT Technology Review

A self-driving Uber has killed a pedestrian in ArizonaUber Vehicle Tempe
14h
BBC News - Science & Environment

Macular degeneration: 'I've been given my sight back'Two patients have had pioneering stem cell therapy to restore their vision.
15h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News

What happens to a dying cell's corpse? New findings illuminate an old problemScientists have discovered a curious way for cells to die. In studying it, they are learning about how remnants of diseased cells are normally chewed up and removed.
15h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Historians to climate researchers: Let's talkOurs is not the first society to be confronted by massive environmental change. Over the course of history, some societies have been destroyed by natural disasters, like Pompeii, while others have learned how to accommodate floods, droughts, volcanic eruptions and other natural hazards. The key is how a society plans for and interacts with the stress from nature, say Princeton University historian
15h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News

NASA analyzes Tropical Cyclone Eliakim's rainfall, wind shear now affecting stormTropical Cyclone Eliakim soaked the eastern coast of Madagascar as it moved in a southerly path. NASA analyzed that rainfall using data from the Global Precipitation Measurement mission or GPM core satellite. Another NASA satellite provided a current look at the storm that revealed wind shear was taking a toll on the storm.
15h
Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

Glacier mass loss: Past the point of no returnResearchers show in a recent study that the further melting of glaciers cannot be prevented in the current century -- even if all emissions were stopped now. However, due to the slow reaction of glaciers to climate change, our behavior has a massive impact beyond the 21st century: In the long run, five hundred meters by car with a mid-range vehicle will cost one kilogram of glacier ice.
15h
Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

Mars' oceans formed early, possibly aided by massive volcanic eruptionsA new theory about how oceans and volcanoes interacted during the early history of Mars supports the idea that liquid water was once abundant and may still exist underground. Geophysicists propose that the oceans originated several hundred million years earlier than thought, as the volcanic province Tharsis formed, and that greenhouse gases enabled the oceans. The theory predicts smaller oceans, m
15h
New on MIT Technology Review

A stem-cell treatment shows promise fighting multiple sclerosis
15h
Science | The Guardian

‘Steve’: the mystery purple aurora that rivals the northern lightsThe phenomenon of ‘Steve’ - a glowing arc seen in Alberta, Canada by amateur scientists – has now been named by Nasa A group of citizen scientists in Alberta, Canada, weren’t sure what the glowing purple (sometimes green) arc in the night sky they had been photographing was. Nor were the scientists Elizabeth MacDonald, a space physicist at Nasa, and Eric Donovan, an associate professor of physics
15h
Popular Science

Look to large bodies to understand long life spansAnimals Larger animals live longer, but tiny dogs outlive big ones. What's the deal? How does body size relate to longevity? We know larger species (usually) live longer, though smaller animals within those species live longest. Uncovering the secrets…
15h
Live Science

12 Extremely Strange Animal FeetWhether they're used as digging tools, grasping suckers or killing machines, animal feet can be downright bizarre.
15h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News

UC Santa Cruz research signals arrival of a complete human genomeResearch from a UC Santa Cruz Genomics Institute-affiliated team just published in the journal Nature Biotechnology attempts to close huge gaps remain in our genomic reference map. The research uses nanopore long-read sequencing to generate the first complete and accurate linear map of a human Y chromosome centromere. This milestone in human genetics and genomics signals that scientists are finall
15h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Fighting illegal fishingResearchers explore an alternative pathway to fast-tracking the global recovery of fisheries
15h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Amazon deforestation is close to tipping pointScientists considered climate change and indiscriminate use of fire to calculate that deforestation rates ranging from 20 percent to 25 percent could turn Amazon's hydrological cycle unable to support its ecosystem.
15h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Programming DNA to deliver cancer drugsA research team at the University of Delaware has developed technology to program strands of DNA into switches that turn proteins on and off. This technology could lead to the development of new cancer therapies and other drugs.
15h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Diabetes medicine reduces liver fat in nonalcoholic fatty liver diseaseIn people with type 2 diabetes, nonalcoholic fatty liver disease (NAFLD) is common and can progress to a severe liver disease known as nonalcoholic steatohepatitis (NASH). Now a study has found that empagliflozin, a newer treatment for type 2 diabetes, reduces liver fat in patients with NAFLD and diabetes. Results of the randomized controlled study, called the E-LIFT Trial, will be presented Monda
15h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News

ENDO 18: New model, new drugs, and a 'remarkable' response in adrenal cancerTwo University of Colorado Cancer Center studies presented at ENDO 2018 use new models to identify genetic targets and test promising treatments in adrenal cancer. One patient was treated with the immunotherapy pembrolizumab and now more than a year after starting treatment remains on the drug with 77 percent tumor reduction and no new metastases.
15h
The Atlantic

Michigan State University Is Botching Its Reputation-RehabEast Lansing, Mich.—The chairman of Michigan State University’s Board of Trustees said he had to get something off his chest. It was the board’s first regularly scheduled meeting following the criminal-sentencing hearings of the former sports-medicine doctor Larry Nassar. And Brian Breslin, facing an overwhelming vote of no confidence from the university’s faculty, had already indicated he would
15h
Science | The Guardian

Wide range of drugs affect growth of gut microbes, study saysIt’s not just antibiotics that affect our microbes – a quarter of drugs designed to act on human cells do so too A wide range of drugs from cancer therapies to antipsychotics affect the growth of microbes that are found in our gut, researchers say, highlighting that it is not only antibiotics that can have an impact on our internal flora. These microbes, whose genes taken together are known as th
15h
Scientific American Content: Global

Arizona Regulators Want Renewables, Not More Natural GasSurprise decision could speed transition to greener forms of energy -- Read more on ScientificAmerican.com
15h
Big Think

Relationships really do lead to weight gain, study findsEven though couples tend to live healthier lifestyles, they put on extra weight. A new study offers potential clues why. Read More
15h
Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

Fish accounted for surprisingly large part of the Stone Age dietNew research can now show what Stone Age people actually ate in southern Scandinavia 10 000 years ago. The importance of fish in the diet has proven to be greater than expected. So, if you want to follow a Paleo diet -- you should quite simply eat a lot of fish.
15h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News

VIIRS satellite instrument gets 2 views of Tropical Cyclone MarcusTropical Cyclone Marcus was moving along the northern coast of Australia when the VIIRS instrument that flies aboard two different satellites captured true-color images of the storm over two days.
15h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Stem cells treat macular degenerationUCSB researchers helped develop a specially engineered retinal patch to treat people with sudden, severe sight loss.
15h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Primary care physicians report feeling unprepared for role in prenatal oral healthA new study from the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill suggests that primary care physicians may feel underequipped to provide adequate oral health counseling to pregnant women. Poor maternal oral health can have significant impacts on a woman's overall health and the health of her children.
15h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News

A future colorfully lit by mystifying physics of paint-on semiconductorsIt defies conventional wisdom about semiconductors. It's baffling that it even works. It eludes physics models that try to explain it. This newly tested class of light-emitting semiconductors is so easy to produce from solution that it could be painted onto surfaces to light up our future in myriad colors shining from affordable lasers, LEDs, and even window glass.
15h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Scientists caution that a rare childhood liver cancer can spread to the brainA new report details three cases of secondary brain tumors in people with fibrolamellar hepatocellular carcinoma. The researchers say imaging tests could improve treatment for patients whose cancer spreads to the brain from the liver.
15h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Eliminating injustice imposed by the death penaltyThe Black Lives Matter movement has called for the abolition of capital punishment in response to what it calls 'the war against Black people' and 'Black communities.' This article defends the two central contentions in the movement's abolitionist stance: first, that US capital punishment practices represent a wrong to black communities, and second, that the most defensible remedy for this wrong i
15h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Palm trees are spreading northward -- how far will they go?What does it take for palm trees, the unofficial trademark of tropical landscapes, to expand into northern parts of the world that have long been too cold for palm trees to survive? A new study, led by Lamont-Doherty Earth Observatory researcher Tammo Reichgelt, attempts to answer this question. He and his colleagues analyzed a broad dataset to determine global palm tree distribution in relation t
15h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Rheumatoid arthritis meets precision medicineScientists are bringing precision medicine to rheumatoid arthritis for the first time by using genetic profiling of joint tissue to see which drugs will work for which patients, reports a new multi-site study. In the near future, patients won't have to waste time and be disappointed with months of ineffective therapy, scientists said. Currently $2.5 billion a year is wasted on therapy that doesn't
15h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News

New antibody and unique binding site offer possible paths to malaria preventionScientists have discovered a human antibody that, when tested in mice, prevented malaria infection by binding a specific portion of a surface protein found in almost all strains of the malaria parasite worldwide.
15h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News

A new kind of quantum bits in two dimensionsTwo novel materials, each composed of a single atomic layer and the tip of a scanning tunneling microscope - these are the ingredients to create a novel kind of a so-called 'quantum dot'. These extremely small nanostructures allow delicate control of individual electrons by fine-tuning their energy levels directly. Such devices are key for modern quantum technologies.
15h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Ocean acidification: Herring could benefit from an altered food chainMany studies have shown that larvae of various fish species can be negatively affected by ocean acidification. Acidification is caused by large amounts of carbon dioxide (CO2) entering the seawater from the atmosphere. But CO2 can also influence the food supply for the fish larvae. Researchers from the GEOMAR Helmholtz Centre for Ocean Research Kiel investigated how the combination of these effect
15h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Climate change threatens world's largest seagrass carbon storesShark Bay seagrass carbon storage hotspot suffers alarming losses after a devastating marine heat wave, according to a study led by ICTA-Universitat Autònoma de Barcelona researchers. The loss of seagrass would have released up to nine million metric tons of carbon dioxide (CO2) into the atmosphere.
15h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Glacier mass loss: Past the point of no returnResearchers from the Universities of Bremen and Innsbruck show in a recent study that the further melting of glaciers cannot be prevented in the current century -- even if all emissions were stopped now. However, due to the slow reaction of glaciers to climate change, our behavior has a massive impact beyond the 21st century: In the long run, five hundred meters by car with a mid-range vehicle wil
15h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Thawing permafrost produces more methane than expectedIn a seven-year laboratory study, Dr. Christian Knoblauch from Universität Hamburg's Center for Earth System Research and Sustainability (CEN) and an international team have shown, for the first time, that significantly more methane is produced by thawing permafrost than previously thought. The findings, published in Nature Climate Change, make it possible to better predict how much greenhouse gas
15h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Human influence on climate change will fuel more extreme heat waves in USHuman-caused climate change will drive more extreme summer heat waves in the western US, including in California and the Southwest as early as 2020, new research shows.
15h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News

A third of young adults have ridden with an impaired driver, NIH analysis suggestsRoughly a third of recent high school graduates have ridden in a motor vehicle with a substance-impaired driver, according to a study by researchers at the National Institutes of Health and other institutions.
15h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Cutting carbon emissions sooner could save 153 million livesUp to 153 million premature deaths linked to air pollution could be avoided this century if governments accelerate efforts to reduce fossil fuel emissions, a Duke-led study finds. Deaths would drop on every inhabited continent, but the greatest drops would occur in Asia and Africa. The study projects the number of lives that could be saved in 154 cities worldwide if emissions are reduced and globa
15h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Newly described human antibody prevents malaria in miceScientists have discovered a human antibody that protected mice from infection with the deadliest malaria parasite, Plasmodium falciparum. The research findings provide the basis for future testing in humans to determine if the antibody can provide short-term protection against malaria, and also may aid in vaccine design. NIAID investigators led the research with colleagues at the Fred Hutchinson
15h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Physicists discover new quantum electronic materialMIT, Harvard, and LBNL physicists have discovered a new quantum electronic material, the 'kagome metal,' whose atomic structure resembles a Japanese basketweaving pattern and exhibits exotic, quantum behavior.
15h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Mars' oceans formed early, possibly aided by massive volcanic eruptionsA new theory about how oceans and volcanoes interacted during the early history of Mars supports the idea that liquid water was once abundant and may still exist underground. UC Berkeley geophysicists propose that the oceans originated several hundred million years earlier than thought, as the volcanic province Tharsis formed, and that greenhouse gases enabled the oceans. The theory predicts small
15h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News

New osteoarthritis genes discoveredIn the largest study of its kind, nine novel genes for osteoarthritis have been discovered by scientists from the Wellcome Sanger Institute and their collaborators. Results of the study, published today in Nature Genetics, could open the door to new targeted therapies for this debilitating disease in the future.
15h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Paraplegic rats walk again after therapy, now we know whyParaplegic rats walk again in response to neuroprosthetic rehabilitation that allows the brain to elaborate new routes so that motor commands about walking, swimming and even climbing staircases reach spinal cord execution centers below the injury.
15h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News

New osteoarthritis genes discovered, paving way for new therapiesIn the largest study of its kind, nine novel genes for osteoarthritis have been discovered by scientists from the University of Sheffield and their collaborators.
15h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News

A reference catalog for the rumen microbiomeIn Nature Biotechnology, an international team including scientists at the US Department of Energy (DOE) Joint Genome Institute (JGI), a DOE Office of Science User Facility, present a reference catalog of rumen microbial genomes and isolates cultivated and sequenced from the Hungate1000 collection. One of the largest targeted cultivation and sequencing projects to date, the collection was produced
15h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Commonly used drugs affect our gut bacteriaOne in four drugs with human targets inhibit the growth of bacteria in the human gut. These drugs cause antibiotic-like side-effects and may promote antibiotic resistance, EMBL researchers report in Nature on March 19.
15h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News

How allergens trigger asthma attacksA team of Inserm and CNRS researchers from the Institute of Pharmacology and Structural Biology -- or IPBS -- have identified a protein that acts like a sensor detecting various allergens in the respiratory tract responsible for asthma attacks. Their study, codirected by Corinne Cayrol and Jean-Philippe Girard, is published in Nature Immunology on March 19, 2018. These scientists' work offers hope
15h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Climate change threatens world's largest seagrass carbon storesShark Bay seagrass carbon storage hotspot suffer alarming losses after a devastating marine heat wave, according to a study involving KAUST researchers.
15h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Measuring neutrophil motility could lead to accurate sepsis diagnosisMicrofluidic device developed by Massachusetts General Hospital investigators may help solve a significant and persistent challenge in medicine -- diagnosing the life-threatening complication of sepsis.
15h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Genetic analysis uncovers the evolutionary origin of vertebrate limbsFish, mice and likely all modern-day vertebrates share genetic elements first used to develop the unpaired dorsal fin in ancient fish. They later copied these elements to produce paired appendages, like pelvic and pectoral fins, arms and legs.
15h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Molecular cuisine for gut bacteriaScientific recipes to successfully grow and study gut bacteria in the lab: that's what EMBL scientists are publishing in Nature Microbiology on March 19. They report on the nutritional preferences and growth characteristics of 96 diverse gut bacterial strains. Their results will help scientists worldwide advance our understanding of the gut microbiome.
15h
New Scientist - News

Stem cell therapy reverses sight loss and lets people read againHuman embryonic stem cells have been used to replenish damaged eye tissue resulting from age-related macular degeneration
15h
New Scientist - News

US and Russia will soon face mega-heatwaves from climate changeIn the coming decades Russia will experience worse heatwaves than the 2010 event, which killed 55,000 people, while the US will bake in the West and Great Lakes regions
15h
New on MIT Technology Review

FedEx is embracing more robots, but that doesn’t mean people are getting fired (yet)
16h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Molecular doorstop could be key to new tuberculosis drugsIn discovering how an antibiotic kills the bacteria that cause tuberculosis, scientists open the door to new treatments for the disease -- and possibly others, as well.
16h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News

A breakthrough in our understanding of how red blood cells developFor the first time, cellular machines called ribosomes -- which create proteins in every cell of the body -- have been linked to blood stem cell differentiation. The findings, published today in Cell, have revealed a potential new therapeutic pathway to treat Diamond-Blackfan anemia.
16h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Arctic sea ice becoming a spring hazard for North Atlantic shipsMore Arctic sea ice is entering the North Atlantic Ocean than before, making it increasingly dangerous for ships to navigate those waters in late spring, according to new research.
16h
New on MIT Technology Review

Accelerating the shift from fossil fuels could save 150 million lives
16h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

'Kagome metal': Physicists discover new quantum electronic materialA motif of Japanese basketweaving known as the kagome pattern has preoccupied physicists for decades. Kagome baskets are typically made from strips of bamboo woven into a highly symmetrical pattern of interlaced, corner-sharing triangles.
16h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Mars' oceans formed early, possibly aided by massive volcanic eruptionsA new scenario seeking to explain how Mars' putative oceans came and went over the last 4 billion years implies that the oceans formed several hundred million years earlier and were not as deep as once thought.
16h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Molecular cuisine for gut bacteriaEMBL scientists report in Nature Microbiology on the nutritional preferences and growth characteristics of 96 diverse gut bacterial strains. Their results will help scientists worldwide advance the understanding of the gut microbiome.
16h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Human influence on climate change will fuel more extreme heat waves in USHuman-caused climate change will drive more extreme summer heat waves in the western U.S., including in California and the Southwest as early as 2020, new research shows.
16h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Climate change threatens world's largest seagrass carbon storesIn the summer of 2010-2011, Western Australia experienced an unprecedented marine heat wave that elevated water temperatures two to four degrees Celsius above average for more than two months. Researchers from the Institute for Environmental Science and Technology at the Universitat Autònoma de Barcelona (ICTA-UAB) in collaboration with scientists from Australia, Spain, Malaysia, the United States
16h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Cutting carbon emissions sooner could save 153 million livesAs many as 153 million premature deaths linked to air pollution could be avoided worldwide this century if governments speed up their timetable for reducing fossil fuel emissions, a new Duke University-led study finds.
16h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

A reference catalog for the rumen microbiomeThe digestive tracts of ruminant (cud-chewing) animals such as cattle, sheep, and goats convert lignocellulosic plant matter to short-chain fatty acids used for nourishment with unparalleled efficiency, thanks to the activity of symbiotic microbes in the rumen. Rumen microbes play a vital role in allowing ruminant livestock to break down the food they eat, and produce milk, meat and wool which hel
16h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Genetic analysis uncovers the evolutionary origin of vertebrate limbsAs you picture the first fish to crawl out of primordial waters onto land, it's easy to imagine how its paired fins eventually evolved into the arms and legs of modern-day vertebrates, including humans. But a new study by researchers from the University of Chicago and the Andalusian Center for Development Biology in Spain shows how these creatures used an even more primitive genetic blueprint to d
16h
Quanta Magazine

In Search of God’s Perfect ProofsPaul Erdős, the famously eccentric, peripatetic and prolific 20th-century mathematician, was fond of the idea that God has a celestial volume containing the perfect proof of every mathematical theorem. “This one is from The Book,” he would declare when he wanted to bestow his highest praise on a beautiful proof. Never mind that Erdős doubted God’s very existence. “You don’t have to believe in God
16h
Ingeniøren

Energidebat: Hvor meget skal vi spare på energien?Som led i Ingeniørens optakt til forhandlingerne om et nyt energiforlig, har vi stillet to centrale aktører og de politiske partier spørgsmålet: Hvor meget skal vi spare på energien frem mod 2030?
16h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Scientists synthesized a new substance with considerable antitumoral propertiesScientists from Far Eastern Federal University developed a new synthetic derivative of fascaplysin -- a biologically active substance with antitumoral properties obtained from sea sponges. Biological tests have shown that the compound is 2-3 times more active than fascaplysin. The results of the study were published in the well-known scientific journal Tetrahedron Letters.
16h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Scientists have a new way to gauge the growth of nanowiresIn a new study, researchers from the US Department of Energy's Argonne and Brookhaven National Laboratories observed the formation of two kinds of defects in individual nanowires, which are smaller in diameter than a human hair.
16h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Scientists detect radio echoes of a black hole feeding on a starAn MIT scientist has detected radio echoes of a black hole feeding on a star, suggesting black hole emits a jet of energy proportional to the stellar material it gobbles up.
16h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Muslims face high rates of discrimination in CanadaOne in five Muslim Canadians say they have experienced discrimination due to their religion, ethnicity or culture at least once in the past five years.
16h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Environmentally friendly cattle production (really)When cattle congregate, they're often cast as the poster animals for overgrazing, water pollution and an unsustainable industry. While some of the criticism is warranted, cattle production -- even allowing herds to roam through grasslands and orchards -- can be beneficial to the environment as well as sustainable.
16h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News

New research into letter-spacing could help improve children's readingIncreased letter spacing helps individuals read faster, but not due to visual processing, according to new research from Binghamton University, State University of New York.
16h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News

IU Bloomington scientists examine reproducibility of research issues and remediesReproducibility of scientific findings has long been an important indicator of the validity of data gleaned from research, a process deemed even more critical in this age of ever-changing technologies and methods. IU Bloomington scientists invited discussion on the main topics of defining reproducibility in various research contexts and providing remedies that contribute to greater reproducibility
16h
Big Think

Your stress likely changes the brains of those around youA new study published in Nature Neuroscience shows that stress changes the structure of mouse brains—in partners who did not experience stress. Read More
16h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News

'Oumuamua likely came from a binary star systemNew research finds that 'Oumuamua, the rocky object identified as the first confirmed interstellar asteroid, very likely came from a binary star system.
16h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Deeper insight into viral infectionsWürzburg researchers have developed a new analysis technique that sheds more light on viral infections. They used the new method to demonstrate that virus-infected cells produce far more infection-related proteins and peptides than previously thought.
16h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Visual recognition: Seeing the world through the eyes of rodentsMan or woman, happy or sad. The visual process that allows us to recognize someone's gender or emotional state is very sophisticated. Until recently, only primates were deemed able to perform such complex operations as object recognition. A SISSA study shows that rodents also use advanced and diversified recognition strategies, confirming the validity of this animal model for studying object visio
16h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Insulin pump known to be effective in adolescents, adults also benefits childrenThe MiniMed™ 670G insulin pump system (Medtronic, Northridge, California) can improve glycemic outcomes in children with type 1 diabetes as young as 7 years of age, according to an industry-funded study. The results will be presented in a poster on Saturday, March 17 at ENDO 2018, the 100th annual meeting of the Endocrine Society in Chicago, Ill.
16h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Wearable heart rate monitor could signal low blood sugar in type 1 diabetesA wearable medical patch measuring the beat-to-beat variation in heart rate is a promising device for the early detection of hypoglycemia, or low blood sugar, in type 1 diabetes, according to the researchers who tested the new monitor. Results of their preliminary study will be presented Saturday at ENDO 2018, the Endocrine Society's 100th annual meeting in Chicago.
16h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Beta cell-seeded implant restores insulin production in type 1 diabetes mouse modelResearchers have successfully created a novel biomaterial that can be seeded with insulin-producing beta cells. Implantation of the beta cell-seeded biomaterial reversed diabetes in a mouse model by effectively normalizing glucose levels and significantly increasing survival. The research results will be presented Monday, March 19, at ENDO 2018, the annual 100th meeting of the Endocrine Society in
16h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Single steroid-bronchodilator treatment for control and rescue improves persistent asthmaWhen it comes to treating teens and adults with persistent asthma, using a single corticosteroid and long-acting bronchodilator treatment for both daily asthma control and for rescue relief during sudden asthma attacks is more effective than taking separate medications for daily control and rescue, according to an analysis led by University of Connecticut researchers.
16h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Treating postmenopausal vulvovaginal symptoms in womenA prescribed vaginal estradiol hormone tablet and over-the-counter vaginal moisturizer didn't provide more benefit than a placebo vaginal tablet and gel to reduce postmenopausal vulvovaginal symptoms in women.
16h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Are traumatic brain injuries in kids associated with later ADHD?Severe traumatic brain injury in children was associated with increased risk for later onset of attention-deficit/hyperactivity up to about seven years after injury.
16h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Vaginal estrogen tablets, moisturizers and placebo gel all can improve vaginal discomfortA clinical trial comparing two treatments for postmenopausal vaginal discomfort -- low-dose vaginal estrogen and a vaginal moisturizer -- to placebo treatments found that both produced symptom improvements similar to those associated with the placebos.
16h
Popular Science

Why we still haven’t figured out what Stonehenge was forScience What do we actually know about ancient astronomy? What do we actually know about how people of the past understood the sky and developed a cosmology? When it comes to studying ancient astronomy, we must be careful not…
16h
Dagens Medicin

Lægeforeningens formænd bliver ramt af lockoutDe tre formænd for Lægeforeningen, Overlægeforeningen og Yngre Læger kan se frem til blive sendt hjem uden løn ligesom deres kolleger.
16h
Ingeniøren

Milliondyr flytning skal redde vikingeskibeneLige meget om Vikingeskibsmuseet skal renoveres eller nedrives, skal de 1.000 år gamle Skuldelevskibe flyttes ud af den nuværende bygning. Flytningen vil koste omkring 31 millioner kroner.
17h
TED Talks Daily (SD video)

Can I have your brain? The quest for truth on concussions and CTE | Chris NowinskiSomething strange and deadly is happening inside the brains of top athletes -- a degenerative condition, possibly linked to concussions, that causes dementia, psychosis and far-too-early death. It's called chronic traumatic encephalopathy, or CTE, and it's the medical mystery that Chris Nowinski wants to solve by analyzing brains after death. It's also why, when Nowinski meets a pro athlete, his f
17h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Why are women at high breast cancer risk not having supplemental MRI screening?Women at high lifetime breast cancer risk might benefit from breast MRI screening in addition to routine mammography, but a new study shows that breast MRI is greatly underutilized even though access is widely available.
17h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News

New optical modules could improve thyroid cancer screeningA team of international researchers developed a point of care device that could enable consistent and cost-effective screening for thyroid nodules.
17h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Women with food insecurity less likely to breastfeed: U of T studyResearchers from the University of Toronto have shown that women who struggle to afford food are less able to sustain breastfeeding than those who are food-secure -- even though women in both groups start the practice at about the same rate.
17h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Study suggests helium plays a 'nanny' role in forming chemical compounds under pressureHelium, a noble gas, was long believed to be 'too aloof' to react with the other elements on the periodic table. Now, however, scientists have provided a theoretical explanation of how helium may be capable of forming stable compounds.
17h
Futurity.org

A.I. may spot heart failure signs earlyA new method that uses deep learning to analyze vast amounts of personal health record data could identify early signs of heart failure, researchers say. A paper, which appears in the Journal of the American Medical Informatics Association (JAMIA) , describes how the method addresses temporality in the data—something previously ignored by conventional machine learning models in health care applic
17h
New on MIT Technology Review

Lawmakers want to probe Facebook’s huge new data scandalFacebook Cambridge Analytica Data
17h
Dagens Medicin

Nyt initiativ skal minimere medicinfejlDer er for mange fejlmedicineringer i det danske sundhedsvæsen. En række danske myndigheder og organisationer står bag et nyt initiativ, som skal sætte en stopper for de mange medicinfejl.
17h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Prostate MRI reveals more treatable cancers, reduces overdiagnosis than standard biopsyA large international study has shown that an MRI scan can reduce the number of invasive prostate biopsies by up to 28 percent. The PRECISION trial shows that using MRI to target prostate biopsies leads to more of the harmful prostate cancers, and fewer harmless cancers being diagnosed. The authors believe that this work could change clinical practice. The results are presented at the European Ass
17h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Epidural stimulation shown to normalize blood pressure following spinal cord injuryWorking with human research participants, researchers at the Kentucky Spinal Cord injury Research Center (KSCIRC) have found that spinal cord epidural stimulation can safely and effectively elevate blood pressure in individuals with SCI along with chronic hypotension.
17h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Rice University scientists create microscopic 'swimmers' controlled by a magnetic fieldMicroscopic, magnetic 'swimmers' may someday be used to carry cargoes in fluids, such as drugs that need precise placement to treat disease.
17h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Scientists invented method of catching bacteria with 'photonic hook'An international research team discovered a new type of curved light beams, dubbed a "photonic hook". Photonic hooks are unique, as their radius of curvature is two times smaller than their wavelength. This is the smallest curvature radius of electromagnetic waves ever recorded. Photonic hook can improve the resolution of optical systems and control the movement of nanoparticles, individual cells,
17h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Tiny implants for cells are functional in vivoFor the first time, an interdisciplinary team from the University of Basel has succeeded in integrating artificial organelles into the cells of living zebrafish embryos. This innovative approach using artificial organelles as cellular implants offers new potential in treating a range of diseases, as the authors report in an article published in Nature Communications.
17h
Latest Headlines | Science News

Tree rings tell tale of drought in Mongolia over the last 2,000 yearsSemifossilized trees preserved in Mongolia contain a 2,000-year climate record that could help predict future droughts.
17h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Tiny implants for cells are functional in vivoFor the first time, an interdisciplinary team from the University of Basel has succeeded in integrating artificial organelles into the cells of living zebrafish embryos. This innovative approach using artificial organelles as cellular implants offers new potential in treating a range of diseases, as the authors report in an article published in Nature Communications.
17h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Cosmologists create largest simulation of galaxy formation, break their own recordAn international consortium of cosmology researchers are releasing initial findings from IllustrisTNG, their follow-up to the 2015 record-breaking Illustris simulation -- the largest-ever hydrological simulation of galaxy formation.
17h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News

The use of immunotherapy to treat metastatic breast cancerThe Authors review immunotherapy attempts to treat metastatic breast cancer. They include a) the addition of cytokines to endocrine therapy, b) monoclonal antibodies associated to chemotherapy and c) vaccination.
17h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Study finds changes in intestines leads to reversal of diabetes after weight-loss surgeryA new study helps explain changes in the intestines that may be responsible for the reversal of diabetes in people who undergo a type of bariatric surgery known as Roux-en-Y gastric bypass surgery (RYGB). The research will be presented Sunday, March 18, at ENDO 2018, the Endocrine Society's 100th annual meeting in Chicago, Ill.
17h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News

In children with obesity, impulsivity may be linked with greater weight loss when treatedChildren with obesity may be more impulsive than those with normal weight, but during family-based behavioral treatment (FBT), the more impulsive of children with obesity may lose more weight, a new study suggests. The results of the study will be presented in a poster on Sunday, March 18, at ENDO 2018, the 100th annual meeting of the Endocrine Society in Chicago, Ill.
17h
The Atlantic

The Trauma of Having a Newborn in the NICUWhen Kelli Kelley awoke from her C-section 17 years ago, having delivered her son after just 24 weeks of pregnancy, her husband gave her a Polaroid of their baby. He was tiny, underdeveloped, eyes still fused shut, with translucent skin covered in fine hair, and lying in a sea of medical equipment and lines. To Kelley, he looked like a baby bird. Cut to her first visit to the neonatal intensive-c
17h
The Atlantic

Facebook Vigilantism Is a Scary ThingIn early December, a shocking video recorded in the lobby of an apartment building on the outskirts of Beirut surfaced on the internet. The video, posted to an unusual Facebook page called Weynieh el Dawleh— or “Where is the state?”—showed two young men grabbing another man and leading him away at gunpoint. A caption claimed that the men were involved in a drug-related dispute and requested the p
17h
Dagens Medicin

Danske psykiatere har fået ny formandDansk Psykiatrisk Selskab har valgt overlæge Gitte Ahle som selskabets nye formand.
17h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

UK software firm Micro Focus suffers share price collapseThe share price of British software maker Micro Focus collapsed Monday by more than half on the back of a poorly-received trading update and the departure of its chief executive.
17h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

'Oumuamua likely came from a binary star systemNew research finds that 'Oumuamua, the rocky object identified as the first confirmed interstellar asteroid, very likely came from a binary star system.
17h
NYT > Science

She Was the Only Woman in a Photo of 38 Scientists, and Now She’s Been IdentifiedAt a whale biology conference in 1971, one attendee was photographed but not named. Internet sleuths tracked her down.
18h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Amazon Go execs share insights into shopper behaviorA key executive behind Amazon Go, the online leader's much heralded cashier-less grocery store, says she was surprised at how many customers were hesitant to just walk out the store.
18h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News

New method manages and stores data from millions of nerve cells -- in real timeRecent developments in neuroscience set high requirements for sophisticated data management, not least when implantable Brain Machine Interfaces are used to establish electronic communication between the brain's nerve cells and computers. A new method developed by researchers at Lund University in Sweden makes it possible to recode neural signals into a format that computer processors can use inst
18h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Wives of many prostate cancer sufferers made ill or feel undermined by the diseaseMany wives of advanced prostate cancer sufferers feel that their lives are being undermined by their husband's illness, with nearly half reporting that their own health suffered. In addition a focus subgroup has revealed that many feel isolated and fearful, and worry about the role change in their lives as their husband's cancer advances. This study, is amongst the first carried out on how prostat
18h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Interest rate hikes 'pose mental health threat to people in debt'Interest rate hikes by central banks can impact on the mental health of people in debt, a new study led by University of Stirling experts has found.
18h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News

More people miss NHS appointments when clocks go forwardThe numbers of missed hospital outpatient appointments increases following the clock change in the spring, researchers have shown.
18h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Fasting diets reduce important risk factor for cardiovascular diseaseIntermittent energy restriction diets such as the 5:2 diet clears fat from the blood quicker after eating meals compared with daily calorie restriction diets, reducing an important risk factor for cardiovascular disease, a new study in the British Journal of Nutrition reports.
18h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Fish accounted for surprisingly large part of the Stone Age dietNew research at Lund University in Sweden can now show what Stone Age people actually ate in southern Scandinavia 10 000 years ago. The importance of fish in the diet has proven to be greater than expected. So, if you want to follow a Paleo diet -- you should quite simply eat a lot of fish.
18h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Poorer socioeconomic status predicts lower survival in patients with anal cancerIf you are from a lower income area, your chances of surviving anal cancer are significantly reduced, according to a new study led by investigators at NYU Langone Health's Perlmutter Cancer Center.
18h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Suicide risk for youth sharply higher in the months after self-harmA study led by Columbia University Irving Medical Center (CUIMC) revealed that young Americans had a sharply higher risk of suicide in the months after surviving a deliberate self-harm attempt. The authors say the findings, published online today in Pediatrics, underscore the need to direct clinical interventions toward youth who survive such attempts during this critical period.
18h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

New genetic test detects manatees' recent presence in fresh or saltwaterU.S. Geological Survey scientists have developed the first laboratory test that can pick up traces of manatees' genetic material in the waterways where they live. Using a water sample collected in the field, the innovative environmental DNA test can reveal whether one or more of the elusive marine mammals has been in the area within the past month.
18h
Scientific American Content: Global

Was Giordano Bruno Burned at the Stake for Believing in Exoplanets?Most historians say no, but new evidence suggests otherwise -- Read more on ScientificAmerican.com
18h
Popular Science

Seven creatures with skills that easily beat humansScience What scientists learn about animal cognition helps unravel the mysteries of intelligence. What scientists learn about animal cognition helps unravel the mysteries of intelligence.
18h
Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

Volcanic eruption influenced Iceland's conversion to ChristianityMemories of the largest lava flood in the history of Iceland, recorded in an apocalyptic medieval poem, were used to drive the island's conversion to Christianity, new research suggests.
18h
New Scientist - News

A fifth of people hear sounds when watching silent GIFs. Do you?Ever felt like you’ve heard a video even though the sound was turned off? As many as 20 per cent of us may “hear” silent GIFs and other moving objects
18h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Measuring white dwarf masses with gravitational lensingMeasuring the mass of a celestial body is one of the most challenging tasks in observational astronomy. The most successful method uses binary systems because the orbital parameters of the system depend on the two masses. In the case of black holes, neutron stars, and white dwarfs, the end states of stellar evolution, many are isolated objects, and most of them are also very faint. As a result, as
18h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Scientists create microscopic 'swimmers' controlled by a magnetic fieldRice University scientists have discovered what may be the simplest form of locomotion in the travels of micron-scale particles linked and driven by a magnetic field.
18h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Listening for micro-earthquakes, hearing mega-whales in the ArcticHow does the sound of a tiny Earth tremor differ from the sound of a huge passing whale? That is one of the things that scientists had to figure out while listening for the sound of methane release from the sea floor.
18h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Scientists invented method of catching bacteria with 'photonic hook'An international research team has discovered a new type of curved light beam called a "photonic hook." Photonic hooks are unique, as their radius of curvature is two times smaller than their wavelength. This is the smallest curvature radius of electromagnetic waves ever recorded. Photonic hooks can improve the resolution of optical systems and control the movement of nanoparticles, individual cel
18h
Ingeniøren

Laser lærer soldater at ramme i kampøvelserMed Forsvarets LDS-system kan danske soldater øve sig i at ramme – også uden for skydebanen. Ingeniøren tog med på øvelse.
18h
Dagens Medicin

Giftlinjen advarer mod at bagatellisere MDMAFørende misbrugsekspert mener ikke, at stoffet MDMA er farligt, hvis det indtages kontrolleret. Det skaber hovedrysten hos lægerne bag Giftlinjen.
18h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News

High omega-6 levels can protect against premature deathCould omega-6 fatty acids protect you against premature death? The answer is yes, according to a new University of Eastern Finland study. While protecting against death, omega-6 fatty acids also keep cardiovascular diseases at bay.
18h
Live Science

Russian Scientists Tested Their Asteroid-Nuking Plan with Powerful LasersRussian scientists have a plan to deal with the asteroid threat straight out of the movie "Armageddon."
18h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Rubbery carbon aerogels greatly expand applicationsResearchers have designed carbon aerogels that can be reversibly stretched to more than three times their original length, displaying elasticity similar to that of a rubber band. By adding reversible stretchability to aerogels' existing properties (which already include an ultralow density, light weight, high porosity, and high conductivity), the results may lead to a host of new applications of c
18h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Why the rich in Jakarta have better access to water than the poor – it's not the piped networkIn Jakarta, the rich have much better access to clean water than the poor. Residents in the city's business districts or in rich neighbourhoods have much more reliable access to water than those living in poor neighbourhoods.
18h
Futurity.org

Tree removal workers need better trainingAs climate change increases the risk to trees from severe storms, insects, diseases, drought, and fire, a new study highlights the need for improved safety in tree-care operations. According to the findings reported in the American Journal of Industrial Medicine , workers employed by tree care experts and licensed arborists are more likely to receive health and safety training and to use personal
18h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News

New genetic test detects manatees' recent presence in fresh or saltwaterUS Geological Survey scientists have developed the first laboratory test that picks up traces of manatees' genetic material in waterways. The environmental DNA test shows whether one or more of the elusive marine mammals has been in the area in the past month.
18h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Revolutionary new filter can improve drinking water qualityUNSW Sydney scientists have developed a world-first, graphene-based, laboratory-scale filter that can remove more than 99 percent of the natural organic matter left behind during conventional treatment of drinking water. The filter is being scaled up for possible use in conventional plants.
18h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Columbia scientists locate nerve cells that enable fruit flies to escape dangerResearchers have identified the nerve cells that initiate a fly's escape response: that complex series of movements in which an animal senses, and quickly maneuvers away from, something harmful such as high heat. These results provide a window into a survival mechanism so important that it has persisted across evolutionary time, and today exists in virtually all animals -- including in people.
18h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News

UCalgary researchers develop portable brain imaging system to shed light on concussionsIt's one of the most talked about injuries in sport today, concussion. Yet, there is no accepted way to image a concussion. University of Calgary scientist Jeff Dunn, Ph.D., hopes to change that. He and his team have developed a portable brain imaging system that uses light to detect and monitor damage in the brain from concussion.
18h
Futurity.org

Mats made of active proteins soak up pollutionScientists have figured out a way to keep certain proteins active outside the cell, which could lead to materials with functions usually only found in living systems. The researchers used the technology to create mats that can soak up and trap chemical pollution. Despite years of effort to stabilize proteins outside of their native environments, scientists have made limited progress in combining
18h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Two sub-Jovian exoplanets orbiting bright stars discoveredUsing NASA's prolonged Kepler mission, known as K2, astronomers have identified two new gas giant exoplanets. The newly found alien worlds, designated HD 89345 b and HD 286123 b, are warm, low-density sub-Jovian planets circling bright stars. The finding is detailed in a paper published March 9 on arXiv.org.
18h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Tropical dry forests 'canary in the coal mine' on climate changeTropical dry forests are being increasingly recognized as conclusive indicators of climate change, thanks in part thanks to a monitoring system recognized as one of the world's best climate research projects.
19h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Arctic sea ice becoming a spring hazard for North Atlantic shipsMore Arctic sea ice is entering the North Atlantic Ocean than before, making it increasingly dangerous for ships to navigate those waters in late spring, according to new research led by the University of Manitoba.
19h
Scientific American Content: Global

The Turtle Extinction CrisisNearly half of all freshwater turtles and tortoises are at risk of disappearing forever, a new report warns -- Read more on ScientificAmerican.com
19h
The Scientist RSS

Louise Slaughter, Scientist and Congresswoman, DiesTrained in microbiology, Slaughter championed science, women's health, and consumer protections as a member of the US House of Representatives.
19h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

The first SpaceX BFR should make orbital launches by 2020Elon Musk has a reputation for pushing the envelop and making bold declarations. In 2002, he founded SpaceX with the intention of making spaceflight affordable through entirely reusable rockets. In April of 2014, his company achieved success with the first successful recovery of a Falcon 9 first stage. And in February of this year, his company successfully launched its Falcon Heavy and managed to
19h
Viden

Det er evolutionens skyld, at du har dellerNår du kæmper mod de ekstra kilo, kæmper du i virkeligheden en indædt kamp mod din indre hulemand, der vil holde på fedtet for at forberede sig på hårdere tider.
19h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Working to safeguard the public against viruses and antibiotic resistant bacteriaScientists working to reduce risk the risks to the public from exposure to viruses and antibiotic resistant bacteria in the water environment shared their research and discussed next steps at a recent meeting at the Royal Geographic Society, London (14.3.18).
19h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Raising transparency in the online advertising ecosystemThe online advertising business, led by companies like Google or Facebook, generated over $200 billion revenue in 2017, with an interanual growth over 15 percent. This online advertising explosion is raising serious data privacy concerns.
19h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

How tree bonds can help preserve the urban forestGreat cities need trees to be great places, but urban changes put pressure on the existing trees as cities develop. As a result, our rapidly growing cities are losing trees at a worrying rate. So how can we grow our cities and save our city trees?
19h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Fossilized brains of ancient sea creatures found in northern GreenlandA team of researchers from Korea, the U.K. and Denmark has found fossilized brains of sea creatures that lived during the Cambrian explosion. In their paper published in the journal Nature Communications, the group describes features of the brains and why they believe their findings may overturn a commonly held belief about the ancestry of panarthropods and invertebrate panarthropods and also vert
19h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Floods don't occur randomly, so why do we still plan as if they do?Most major floods in South East Queensland arrive in five-year bursts, once every 40 years or so, according to our new research.
19h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Looking beyond genes to explain blood cells' fatesScientists often talk about cell fate and commitment in terms of mechanisms that control gene expression (transcription factors, chromatin remodeling, etc.). But by studying Diamond-Blackfan anemia (DBA), rare genetic blood disorder, a team led by researchers from the Broad Institute of MIT and Harvard and the Dana-Farber/Boston Children's Cancer and Blood Disorders Center (DF/BC) have found a sur
19h
Futurity.org

Boosting 1 protein lets plants thrive on much less waterIt may be possible to grow crops using less water by altering a gene involved in regulating photosynthesis, according to new research. Krishna Niyogi, chair of the plant and microbial biology department at the University of California, Berkeley, discovered that a protein called PsbS is involved in regulating photosynthetic light harvesting. He and his team thought that increasing the amount of th
19h
BBC News - Science & Environment

Rare poisonSergei and Yulia Skripal were poisoned by Novichok nerve agents, the PM says. So what are they?
19h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Sex, man flu and the water fleaDr. Matt Hall is interested in the differences between males and females. Why are some males of a species larger and stronger, while females are more hardy and long-lived? Why do they experience illness differently?
19h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

What is differential privacy and how can it protect your data?It's no secret that big tech companies like Facebook, Google, Apple and Amazon are increasingly infiltrating our personal and social interactions to collect vast amounts of data on us every day. At the same time, privacy violations in cyberspace regularly make front page news.
19h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Taking MRI technology down to micrometer scalesMillions of magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) scans are performed each year to diagnose health conditions and perform biomedical research. The different tissues in our bodies react to magnetic fields in varied ways, allowing images of our anatomy to be generated. But there are limits to the resolution of these images—generally, doctors can see details of organs as small as a half millimeter in size
19h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Sweep wood ash from fireplace to gardenAs you clean the fireplace, do your plants a favor and sprinkle the ashes in the garden instead of throwing them in the garbage.
19h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Computers may help K-8 math teachers understand students' thought processesCornell CIS researchers are working on computer software that may help K-8 math teachers with grading math assignments. Researchers will present their research at the Conference on Human Factors in Computing Systems, April 21-26 in Montreal.
19h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Social determinants of health linked to HIV mortality ratesPeople who are living with HIV in Ontario have access to good health care and medications, yet they are still dying younger and at substantially higher rates than the rest of the population, according to a new study published today.
19h
The Atlantic

The Art of Vanishing Is a Marriage Memoir With Hidden DepthsI read this unusual book twice, and it only got better. First I rushed through it to find out whether Laura Smith had solved the mystery of Barbara Newhall Follett, whose prodigious early life and haunting end I’ve written about myself. Encouraged by her father, a Knopf editor and her idol, Follett published a novel at the age of 12, in 1927. Jazz Age readers were enchanted by her tale of a girl
19h
Popular Science

Platypus milk might save us from bacterial infections, and that’s not even the best thing about themAnimals These weird lil’ guys defy everything about how we try to categorize animals. You may have heard that platypuses are going to save us from antibiotic resistance. This may or may not be true. But here’s what we do know: they’re definitely weird…
19h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Study suggests helium plays a 'nanny' role in forming stable chemical compounds under high pressureHelium, the second lightest element in the universe, has a variety of uses, from keeping balloons afloat to cooling superconducting magnets.
19h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

New model reveals forgotten influencers and 'sleeping beauties' of scienceFor centuries, scientists and scholars have measured the influence of individuals and discoveries through citations, a crude statistic subject to biases, politics and other distortions. A new paper led by the Knowledge Lab at the University of Chicago describes a different way to keep score in science—a more direct measure of how influential ideas ripple out across scholarship and culture.
19h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Image: Rose-colored JupiterThis image captures a close-up view of a storm with bright cloud tops in the northern hemisphere of Jupiter.
19h


Vil du være med til at finde de mest interessante nyheder? Send email herom til BioNyt

Se nyheder fra en tidligere dato

Tegn abonnement på

BioNyt Videnskabens Verden (www.bionyt.dk) er Danmarks ældste populærvidenskabelige tidsskrift for naturvidenskab. Det er det eneste blad af sin art i Danmark, som er helliget international forskning inden for livsvidenskaberne.

Bladet bringer aktuelle, spændende forskningsnyheder inden for biologi, medicin og andre naturvidenskabelige områder som f.eks. klimaændringer, nanoteknologi, partikelfysik, astronomi, seksualitet, biologiske våben, ecstasy, evolutionsbiologi, kloning, fedme, søvnforskning, muligheden for liv på mars, influenzaepidemier, livets opståen osv.

Artiklerne roses for at gøre vanskeligt stof forståeligt, uden at den videnskabelige holdbarhed tabes.