Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Agriculture must make water use go further: expertsIn a world where water risks running short for many, the especially thirsty agricultural industry must learn how to manage the vital resource better, experts said Tuesday.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Arizona death brings calls for more autonomous vehicle rulesThe deadly collision between an Uber autonomous vehicle and a pedestrian near Phoenix is bringing calls for tougher self-driving regulations. But advocates for a hands-off approach say big changes aren't needed.
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NYT > Science

N.Y.C. Nature: The Croaky Sounds of SpringThe rasping call of the wood frog, who amazingly emerges from being mostly frozen during the winter, is filling city woodlands right now.
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NYT > Science

Trilobites: ‘These Eagles Are More Than Just a Symbol’Avid bird-watchers come out annually for the counting program in the San Bernardino National Forest and California state parks, where conservation of eagles has largely been a success.
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The Atlantic

Failure, A Modern Success StoryFilmmaker Ryan Booth was idly scrolling through his Instagram feed when he saw something that stopped him in his tracks. It was a picture of his friend, Michael Stevenson, in the ICU. “I was completely shocked,” Booth told The Atlantic . “Like most of Mike’s friends and acquaintances, I had no clue that he had been sick.” Booth then contacted Stevenson to check in. “Thanks for letting me chase yo
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Scientific American Content: Global

The World Bids Farewell to the Last Male Northern White RhinoThe beloved rhino bull Sudan died Monday, leaving behind only two females of its kind -- Read more on ScientificAmerican.com
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The Scientist RSS

Worlds Last Male Northern White Rhino DiesOnly two members of the subspecies are now left alive.
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Live Science

China's First Space Station Is Going to Fall Out of Space Very SoonA Chinese space station is going to fall out of space, and now trackers know when. Kind of.
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BBC News - Science & Environment

Brexit: Ministers suffer nuclear defeat in LordsPeers vote for the UK to remain in Euratom until a post-Brexit replacement deal is in place.
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Popular Science

The math behind the perfect free throwScience From a mathematical viewpoint, basketball is a game of trajectories. Math offers a unique perspective. It speeds up the amount of time it takes to see the patterns behind the best shots. For the most part, we discovered things that the…
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Cambridge Analytica: We designed Trump campaign strategyThe chief executive of data mining firm Cambridge Analytica told a reporter posing as a potential client that his company played a big role in getting Donald Trump elected, a British news program revealed Tuesday.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

EU lawmakers, UK regulator press Facebook on data breachEuropean lawmakers demanded answers from Facebook on Tuesday over a major data breach, as Britain's information watchdog sought a warrant to search the London offices of the analysis firm involved.
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Science : NPR

The Puzzle Of Quantum RealityDespite the incredibly accurate predictions of quantum theory, there's a lot of disagreement over what it says about reality — or even whether it says anything at all about it, says guest Adam Becker. (Image credit: Pasieka/Getty Images/Science Photo Library RF)
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News

First population-scale sequencing project explores platypus historyThe platypus is the ultimate evolutionary mashup of birds, reptiles and mammals. The iconic, egg-laying, venom producing, duck-billed platypus first had its genome sequenced in 2008, revealing its unique genetic makeup and its divergence from the rest of the mammals around 160 million years ago. Now, a greater effort to understand its ecological and population history has been made possible by the
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

China's Tencent to take stake in Ubisoft games makerChinese internet giant Tencent has entered into a strategic partnership with Ubisoft that includes it taking a five percent stake, the French videogame publisher said Tuesday.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Airbus to name new CEO at end of year: companyEuropean aviation giant Airbus said Tuesday it will name a successor to departing CEO Tom Enders at the end of 2018.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Test reveals why female lion in Oklahoma zoo sprouted a maneLab results have revealed the answer to a mystery at an Oklahoma zoo: Just what caused a female lion to sprout a mane.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Germany returns 3,000-year-old wooden Olmec busts to MexicoMexico says German authorities have returned two rare, wooden Olmec sculptures over 3,000 years old.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

UK firm in Facebook row suspends CEO amid fresh revelationsCambridge Analytica, the British firm at the centre of a major scandal rocking Facebook, suspended its chief executive Alexander Nix Tuesday, as he became embroiled in fresh controversy and lawmakers on both sides of the Atlantic demanded answers over the data breach.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Google boosts efforts to help news organizations, with $300 mnGoogle News SubscriptionsGoogle on Tuesday launched a new initiative, committing $300 million to help news publishers get more paid subscribers while stemming the flow of misinformation.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Breaking up with Facebook? It's harder than it looksFacebook Data Cambridge AnalyticaFacebook's latest privacy scandal, involving Trump campaign consultants who allegedly stole data on tens of millions of users in order to influence elections, has some people reconsidering their relationship status with the social network.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Marine researchers say recent sea star wasting disease epidemic defies predictionBeginning in 2013, a mysterious disease crippled sea star populations up and down the U.S. west coast. Over a matter of months, many sea star species died in record-breaking numbers, though Pisaster ochraceus—a keystone species known as the ochre sea star—was among the hardest hit. Now, researchers at UC Santa Cruz have analyzed just how much the populations of this species have declined, but they
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Researchers improve fabrication process of nano-structures for electronic devicesResearchers at RIT have found a more efficient fabricating process to produce semiconductors used in today's electronic devices. They also confirmed that materials other than silicon can be used successfully in the development process that could increase performance of electronic devices. This fabrication process—the I-MacEtch, or inverse metal-assisted chemical etching method—can help meet the gr
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NYT > Science

Trilobites: In a Cockroach Genome, ‘Little Mighty’ SecretsThe American cockroach has the second largest insect genome ever sequenced. The variety of genes may help it survive in a multitude of environments.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

What plants can teach us about oil spill clean-up and microfluidicsFor years, scientists have been inspired by nature to innovate solutions to tricky problems, even oil spills—manmade disasters with devastating environmental and economic consequences. A new USC study takes a cue from leaf structure to fabricate material that can separate oil and water, which could lead to safer and more efficient oil spill clean-up methods.
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Live Science

A Mysterious Infection Killed This Man. Here's How Doctors Finally Found the CauseThe man had a mysterious infection in his brain, but tests for dozens of viruses and bacterial infections came back negative.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

Medicine that slows balding may turn stiff vessels supple, helping vital organsA medicine that slows balding and stimulates hair growth also may make stiff vessels more stretchy and improve blood flow to vital organs like the brain, according to an experimental model study.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

First population-scale sequencing project explores platypus historyThe platypus is the ultimate evolutionary mashup of birds, reptiles and mammals. The iconic, egg-laying, venom producing, duck-billed platypus first had its genome sequenced in 2008, revealing its unique genetic makeup and its divergence from the rest of the mammals around 160 million years ago.
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Science : NPR

Classroom Skeleton: Whose Bones Are These?Remember that skeleton hanging in the front of your classroom? In some schools, those were actual human remains. We used science to figure out the story behind one of them. (Image credit: Skunk Bear/Skunk Bear)
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The Scientist RSS

Kathy Matthews, Drosophila Geneticist, DiesFor decades, Matthews led two important repositories for fruit fly research: the Bloomington Drosophila Stock Center and FlyBase.
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The Atlantic

A Mideast Nuclear Deal Trump Might Actually LikeSaudi Crown Prince Mohammed bin Salman is showing off the new face of Saudi Arabia in the U.S. He has emphasized women’s rights in his country, long known for enforcing strict gender rules; made much of his plan to diversify the Saudi economy away from oil, on which it is heavily reliant; and is pitching the kingdom as an investment destination to CEOs in Silicon Valley. But in Washington, where
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The Atlantic

Trump's Bizarre Response to Putin's ReelectionDonald Trump V. PutinThe White House again offered a puzzling response to foreign policy regarding Russia on Tuesday, refusing to criticize the voting that reelected Vladimir Putin by a landslide on Sunday. Asked whether the White House deemed the election “free and fair,” Press Secretary Sarah Sanders offered this deflection: In terms of the election, there we’re focused on our elections. We don’t get to dictate how
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New on MIT Technology Review

Cambridge Analytica nixes its CEO, Alexander Nix
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Cambridge Analytica CEO Alexander Nix Suspended Amid ScandalsAlexander Nix has been suspended until further notice and replaced by Cambridge's head of data, Alexander Tayler.
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News

RIT researchers improve fabrication process of nano-structures for electronic devicesResearchers at RIT have found a more efficient fabricating process to produce semiconductors used in today's electronic devices. They also confirmed that materials other than silicon can be used successfully in the development process that could increase performance of electronic devices.
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Ideal heart health less likely among lesbian, gay and bisexual adultsLesbian, gay and bisexual (LGB) adults were less likely than heterosexuals to have ideal cardiovascular health, according to preliminary research. LGB adults were 36 percent less likely to have ideal cardiovascular health, based on seven leading risk factors, including smoking, body-mass index, physical activity, diet, blood cholesterol, blood pressure and blood sugar. These preliminary findings u
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TED Talks Daily (SD video)

A rite of passage for late life | Bob SteinWe use rituals to mark the early stages of our lives, like birthdays and graduations -- but what about our later years? In this meditative talk about looking both backward and forward, Bob Stein proposes a new tradition of giving away your things (and sharing the stories behind them) as you get older, to reflect on your life so far and open the door to whatever comes next.
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Big Think

Reducing the US prison population is but a small stepLast month, the United States Federal Bureau of Prisons released more than 6,000 prisoners early. The Sentencing Commission reduced their sentences retroactively. And the Senate is considering a bipartisan bill to lower mandatory minimums. These developments show that, after extraordinary growth in ... Read More
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Popular Science

Can AI solve the internet's fake news problem? A fact-checker investigates.Technology We're in our misinformation predicament partly because of algorithms. Can they also get us out of it? We're in our fake news predicament partly because of algorithms. Can they also get us out of it?
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Big Think

Are religious people really less smart, on average, than atheists?Various studies have found that, on average, belief in God is associated with lower scores on IQ tests. Read More
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Live Science

Stephen Hawking's Last Paper (Probably) Doesn't Prove We Live in a MultiverseStephen Hawking's last paper has been touted to provide a way to finally test for the existence of a multiverse, but it's unlikely to do that, several experts said.
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News

BU: Children of centenarians feel stronger purpose in lifeA sense of meaning and direction in life is associated with living longer and experiencing less disease, disability, and cognitive impairment.Now, a new study co-authored by Boston University School of Public Health (BUSPH) researchers has found that the children of centenarians, who tend to have similar healthy aging patterns and long lives like their parents, are also much more likely than the g
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Live Science

Can You 'Speed Up' Your Metabolism?Metabolism refers to the calories the body uses at rest.
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The Atlantic

The Cambridge Analytica Scandal, in 3 Paragraphs(If you want to skip the preamble, see below for the three indented paragraphs. I promise they’re here.) The Cambridge Analytica scandal is suddenly a major problem for Facebook. On Tuesday, the Federal Trade Commission opened an investigation into how Cambridge Analytica, ostensibly a voter-profiling company, accessed data about 50 million Facebook users, according to The Wall Street Journal . I
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Science : NPR

Why Are Iguanas' Skulls Being Crushed In The Name Of Science?A scientific project for killing invasive green iguanas in Florida has become the center of national attention. Anthropologist Barbara J. King looks at wildlife management and methods. (Image credit: Joe Raedle/Getty Images)
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Latest Headlines | Science News

5 things we’ve learned about Saturn since Cassini diedThe Cassini spacecraft plunged to its death into Saturn six months ago, but the discoveries keep coming.
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Science : NPR

Robots Are Trying To Pick Strawberries. So Far, They're Not Very Good At ItStrawberry growers are so worried about the farmworker shortage that they're testing a strawberry-picking robot. But while picking strawberries is easy for humans, machines struggle with the task. (Image credit: Dan Charles/NPR)
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Massey scientists identify genes that could inform novel therapies for EBV-related cancersVCU Massey Cancer Center researchers have identified two genes that are responsible for governing the replication of the Epstein-Barr virus, an infection that drives the growth of several types of cancer. The discovery could lead to the development of novel therapies for virus-associated diseases including stomach cancer and lymphomas.
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Praise may motivate young adults with autism to exercise moreSimple statements of praise may have a big effect on the amount of exercise young adults with autism complete, according to preliminary research from the UNC Frank Porter Graham Child Development Institute (FPG). Technology may play a key role in delivering that praise.
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Medicine that slows balding may turn stiff vessels supple, helping vital organsA medicine that slows balding and stimulates hair growth also may make stiff vessels more stretchy and improve blood flow to vital organs like the brain, according to an experimental model study.
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Big Think

26% of Americans are almost always online, according to new researchIf you check your phone in the middle of the night, it says something about you. Read More
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At Y Combinator's Demo Day, Companies Are No Longer the Next Airbnb, Uber or WhatsAppFounders are no longer declaring their companies the "Uber of X." Instead, they're charming investors by having fun.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

Role of specific gene in 16p11.2 deletion autismNew findings in mice suggest that the lack of a copy of the gene MVP may contribute to the symptoms of 16p11.2 deletion syndrome because it is needed for brain circuits to incorporate changes driven by experience.
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cognitive science

Cognitive dysfunctions predict course of depression after first-episode. New research suggests patients suffering from depression should also receive cognitive testingsubmitted by /u/thedabarry [link] [comments]
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Scientific American Content: Global

Scott Pruitt Will Restrict the EPA's Use of Legitimate ScienceThe administrator's “transparency” proposal is a fundamentally flawed Trojan horse -- Read more on ScientificAmerican.com
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

Excitations: First steps of photosynthesisPhotosynthesis has driven life on this planet for more than 3 billion years -- first in bacteria, then in plants -- but we don't know exactly how it works.
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Big Think

10 female heads of state and how they changed the worldThe history of women being elected to offices of supreme power is short. Here are 10 women who have made the most of that time. Read More
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Live Science

Psychologists Have a Plan to Fix the Broken Science of PsychologyPsychologists have known that something was wrong with their field since at least 2011. Now, there's a real plan to fix things, and it seems to be working.
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Popular Science

With Operation Popeye, the U.S. government made weather an instrument of warMilitary As geo-engineering projects soar, the declassified project is newly relevant. Operation Popeye was a secret Vietnam War-era effort to conduct covert cloud seeding over Vietnam, Cambodia, and Laos, extend the monsoon season, and give the United…
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The Atlantic

Where Is Mark Zuckerberg?Some time, about 10 days ago, Facebook was notified that there were major stories planned in The Guardian, The New York Times, and on British television about Cambridge Analytica. These stories would allege that the company built its initial models of American voters with data ferried out of Facebook by an app built by a Cambridge psychology researcher. And that when informed that this data exist
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Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences current issue

Defaunation shadow on mutualistic interactions [Biological Sciences]Tregidgo et al. (1) show that size-selective overfishing has drastically depleted and downsized populations of tambaqui (Colossoma macropomum) along the Purus River, Amazonia. Because fishers have historically targeted the largest individuals, tambaqui ∼1,000 km upriver are twofold larger than those near the Manaus rainforest metropolis (1). Here, we demonstrate that...
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Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences current issue

Noninvasive detection of macrophage activation with single-cell resolution through machine learning [Biophysics and Computational Biology]We present a method enabling the noninvasive study of minute cellular changes in response to stimuli, based on the acquisition of multiple parameters through label-free microscopy. The retrieved parameters are related to different attributes of the cell. Morphological variables are extracted from quantitative phase microscopy and autofluorescence images, while molecular...
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Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences current issue

Matching material and cellular timescales maximizes cell spreading on viscoelastic substrates [Biophysics and Computational Biology]Recent evidence has shown that, in addition to rigidity, the viscous response of the extracellular matrix (ECM) significantly affects the behavior and function of cells. However, the mechanism behind such mechanosensitivity toward viscoelasticity remains unclear. In this study, we systematically examined the dynamics of motor clutches (i.e., focal adhesions) formed...
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Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences current issue

Structurally modulated codelivery of siRNA and Argonaute 2 for enhanced RNA interference [Engineering]Small interfering RNA (siRNA) represents a promising class of inhibitors in both fundamental research and the clinic. Numerous delivery vehicles have been developed to facilitate siRNA delivery. Nevertheless, achieving highly potent RNA interference (RNAi) toward clinical translation requires efficient formation of RNA-induced gene-silencing complex (RISC) in the cytoplasm. Here we...
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Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences current issue

Structural basis for the role of serine-rich repeat proteins from Lactobacillus reuteri in gut microbe-host interactions [Biochemistry]Lactobacillus reuteri, a Gram-positive bacterial species inhabiting the gastrointestinal tract of vertebrates, displays remarkable host adaptation. Previous mutational analyses of rodent strain L. reuteri 100-23C identified a gene encoding a predicted surface-exposed serine-rich repeat protein (SRRP100-23) that was vital for L. reuteri biofilm formation in mice. SRRPs have emerged as...
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Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences current issue

N-terminal arginylation generates a bimodal degron that modulates autophagic proteolysis [Biochemistry]The conjugation of amino acids to the protein N termini is universally observed in eukaryotes and prokaryotes, yet its functions remain poorly understood. In eukaryotes, the amino acid l-arginine (l-Arg) is conjugated to N-terminal Asp (Nt-Asp), Glu, Gln, Asn, and Cys, directly or associated with posttranslational modifications. Following Nt-arginylation, the...
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Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences current issue

Liver X receptor {beta} regulates the development of the dentate gyrus and autistic-like behavior in the mouse [Biochemistry]The dentate gyrus (DG) of the hippocampus is a laminated brain region in which neurogenesis begins during early embryonic development and continues until adulthood. Recent studies have implicated that defects in the neurogenesis of the DG seem to be involved in the genesis of autism spectrum disorders (ASD)-like behaviors. Liver...
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Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences current issue

dCas9-targeted locus-specific protein isolation method identifies histone gene regulators [Biochemistry]Eukaryotic gene regulation is a complex process, often coordinated by the action of tens to hundreds of proteins. Although previous biochemical studies have identified many components of the basal machinery and various ancillary factors involved in gene regulation, numerous gene-specific regulators remain undiscovered. To comprehensively survey the proteome directing gene...
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Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences current issue

Conformational transitions of the sodium-dependent sugar transporter, vSGLT [Biophysics and Computational Biology]Sodium-dependent transporters couple the flow of Na+ ions down their electrochemical potential gradient to the uphill transport of various ligands. Many of these transporters share a common core structure composed of a five-helix inverted repeat and deliver their cargo utilizing an alternating-access mechanism. A detailed characterization of inward-facing conformations of...
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Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences current issue

BRICHOS domain of Bri2 inhibits islet amyloid polypeptide (IAPP) fibril formation and toxicity in human beta cells [Cell Biology]Aggregation of islet amyloid polypeptide (IAPP) into amyloid fibrils in islets of Langerhans is associated with type 2 diabetes, and formation of toxic IAPP species is believed to contribute to the loss of insulin-producing beta cells. The BRICHOS domain of integral membrane protein 2B (Bri2), a transmembrane protein expressed in...
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Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences current issue

Transmembrane E3 ligase RNF183 mediates ER stress-induced apoptosis by degrading Bcl-xL [Cell Biology]The accumulation of misfolded proteins in the endoplasmic reticulum (ER) causes ER stress and triggers the unfolded protein response (UPR). Failure to resolve ER stress leads to apoptotic cell death via a yet unclear mechanism. Here, we show that RNF183, a membrane-spanning RING finger protein, localizes to the ER and...
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Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences current issue

MAPK signaling couples SCF-mediated degradation of translational regulators to oocyte meiotic progression [Developmental Biology]RNA-binding proteins (RBPs) are important regulators of gene expression programs, especially during gametogenesis. How the abundance of particular RBPs is restricted to defined stages of meiosis remains largely elusive. Here, we report a molecular pathway that subjects two nonrelated but broadly evolutionarily conserved translational regulators (CPB-3/CPEB and GLD-1/STAR) to proteosomal...
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Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences current issue

Modeling environmentally mediated rotavirus transmission: The role of temperature and hydrologic factors [Environmental Sciences]Rotavirus is considered a directly transmitted disease due to its high infectivity. Environmental pathways have, therefore, largely been ignored. Rotavirus, however, persists in water sources, and both its surface water concentrations and infection incidence vary with temperature. Here, we examine the potential for waterborne rotavirus transmission. We use a mechanistic...
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Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences current issue

Metabolic shift from glycogen to trehalose promotes lifespan and healthspan in Caenorhabditis elegans [Genetics]As Western diets continue to include an ever-increasing amount of sugar, there has been a rise in obesity and type 2 diabetes. To avoid metabolic diseases, the body must maintain proper metabolism, even on a high-sugar diet. In both humans and Caenorhabditis elegans, excess sugar (glucose) is stored as glycogen....
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Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences current issue

Myeloid ERK5 deficiency suppresses tumor growth by blocking protumor macrophage polarization via STAT3 inhibition [Medical Sciences]Owing to the prevalence of tumor-associated macrophages (TAMs) in cancer and their unique influence upon disease progression and malignancy, macrophage-targeted interventions have attracted notable attention in cancer immunotherapy. However, tractable targets to reduce TAM activities remain very few and far between because the signaling mechanisms underpinning protumor macrophage phenotypes are...
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Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences current issue

Peptides of pHLIP family for targeted intracellular and extracellular delivery of cargo molecules to tumors [Medical Sciences]The pH (low) insertion peptides (pHLIPs) target acidity at the surfaces of cancer cells and show utility in a wide range of applications, including tumor imaging and intracellular delivery of therapeutic agents. Here we report pHLIP constructs that significantly improve the targeted delivery of agents into tumor cells. The investigated...
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Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences current issue

Structure-based discovery of glycomimetic FmlH ligands as inhibitors of bacterial adhesion during urinary tract infection [Microbiology]Treatment of bacterial infections is becoming a serious clinical challenge due to the global dissemination of multidrug antibiotic resistance, necessitating the search for alternative treatments to disarm the virulence mechanisms underlying these infections. Uropathogenic Escherichia coli (UPEC) employs multiple chaperone–usher pathway pili tipped with adhesins with diverse receptor specificities
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Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences current issue

Communicating the nutritional value of sugar in Drosophila [Neuroscience]Sweet-insensitive Drosophila mutants are unable to readily identify sugar. In presence of wild-type (WT) flies, however, these mutant flies demonstrated a marked increase in their preference for nutritive sugar. Real-time recordings of starved WT flies revealed that these flies discharge a drop from their gut end after consuming nutritive sugars,...
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Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences current issue

BEST1 gene therapy corrects a diffuse retina-wide microdetachment modulated by light exposure [Neuroscience]Mutations in the BEST1 gene cause detachment of the retina and degeneration of photoreceptor (PR) cells due to a primary channelopathy in the neighboring retinal pigment epithelium (RPE) cells. The pathophysiology of the interaction between RPE and PR cells preceding the formation of retinal detachment remains not well-understood. Our studies...
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Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences current issue

Murine knockin model for progranulin-deficient frontotemporal dementia with nonsense-mediated mRNA decay [Neuroscience]Frontotemporal dementia (FTD) is the most common neurodegenerative disorder in individuals under age 60 and has no treatment or cure. Because many cases of FTD result from GRN nonsense mutations, an animal model for this type of mutation is highly desirable for understanding pathogenesis and testing therapies. Here, we generated...
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Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences current issue

hnRNP R and its main interactor, the noncoding RNA 7SK, coregulate the axonal transcriptome of motoneurons [Neuroscience]Disturbed RNA processing and subcellular transport contribute to the pathomechanisms of motoneuron diseases such as amyotrophic lateral sclerosis and spinal muscular atrophy. RNA-binding proteins are involved in these processes, but the mechanisms by which they regulate the subcellular diversity of transcriptomes, particularly in axons, are not understood. Heterogeneous nuclear ribonucleoprotein..
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Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences current issue

Simultaneous imaging and functional studies reveal a tight correlation between calcium and actin networks [Plant Biology]Tip-growing cells elongate in a highly polarized manner via focused secretion of flexible cell-wall material. Calcium has been implicated as a vital factor in regulating the deposition of cell-wall material. However, deciphering the molecular and mechanistic calcium targets in vivo has remained challenging. Here, we investigated intracellular calcium dynamics in...
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Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences current issue

Integration of speed and time for estimating time to contact [Psychological and Cognitive Sciences]To coordinate movements with events in a dynamic environment the brain has to anticipate when those events occur. A classic example is the estimation of time to contact (TTC), that is, when an object reaches a target. It is thought that TTC is estimated from kinematic variables. For example, a...
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Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences current issue

Nongenetic origins of cell-to-cell variability in B lymphocyte proliferation [Systems Biology]Rapid antibody production in response to invading pathogens requires the dramatic expansion of pathogen-derived antigen-specific B lymphocyte populations. Whether B cell population dynamics are based on stochastic competition between competing cell fates, as in the development of competence by the bacterium Bacillus subtilis, or on deterministic cell fate decisions that...
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Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences current issue

Correction for Lange et al., A mitochondrial ferredoxin is essential for biogenesis of cellular iron-sulfur proteins [Correction]BIOCHEMISTRY Correction for “A mitochondrial ferredoxin is essential for biogenesis of cellular iron-sulfur proteins,” by Heike Lange, Anita Kaut, Gyula Kispal, and Roland Lill, which was first published February 1, 2000; 10.1073/pnas.97.3.1050 (Proc Natl Acad Sci USA 97:1050–1055). The authors wish to note the following: “Recently when we reanalyzed Fig....
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Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences current issue

Correction for Kudalkar et al., From in silico hit to long-acting late-stage preclinical candidate to combat HIV-1 infection [Correction]PHARMACOLOGY Correction for “From in silico hit to long-acting late-stage preclinical candidate to combat HIV-1 infection,” by Shalley N. Kudalkar, Jagadish Beloor, Elias Quijano, Krasimir A. Spasov, Won-Gil Lee, José A. Cisneros, W. Mark Saltzman, Priti Kumar, William L. Jorgensen, and Karen S. Anderson, which was first published December 26,...
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Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences current issue

Retraction for Skau et al., Inverted formin 2 in focal adhesions promotes dorsal stress fiber and fibrillar adhesion formation to drive extracellular matrix assembly [Retraction]CELL BIOLOGY Retraction for “Inverted formin 2 in focal adhesions promotes dorsal stress fiber and fibrillar adhesion formation to drive extracellular matrix assembly,” by Colleen T. Skau, Sergey V. Plotnikov, Andrew D. Doyle, and Clare M. Waterman, which was first published April 27, 2015; 10.1073/pnas.1505035112 (Proc Natl Acad Sci USA...
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Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences current issue

Retraction for Maisonneuve et al., Bacterial persistence by RNA endonucleases [Retraction]GENETICS Retraction for “Bacterial persistence by RNA endonucleases,” by Etienne Maisonneuve, Lana J. Shakespeare, Mikkel Girke Jørgensen, and Kenn Gerdes, which was first published July 25, 2011; 10.1073/pnas.1100186108 (Proc Natl Acad Sci USA 108:13206–13211). The authors wish to note the following: “In this article, we reported that successive deletion of...
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Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences current issue

In This Issue [This Week in PNAS]Marine animal movement patterns might shape conservation outcomes Southern sea lion mother and pup on the Falkland Islands. Animal movement patterns are thought to be dictated by environmental as well as intrinsic factors, such as body length and mass, metabolism, and speed. To determine the influence of intrinsic versus extrinsic...
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Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences current issue

Anthropogenic enrichment of mercury greater than that of vanadium [Physical Sciences]Schlesinger et al. (1), in quantifying the global biogeochemical cycle of vanadium (V), argue that the human perturbation of V atmospheric cycling may exceed that of mercury (Hg). However, best available knowledge suggests that the human impact of Hg far exceeds that of V. For Hg, Schlesinger et al. (1)...
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Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences current issue

Reply to Selin: Human impacts on the atmospheric burden of trace metals [Physical Sciences]We thank Selin (1) for pointing out that in our recent paper (2) on the global biogeochemical cycle of vanadium (V), we misinterpret her calculation of the flux of mercury (Hg) to the atmosphere. In table 1 of our paper (2), the correct value for the natural volatilization of Hg...
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Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences current issue

Hydrologic regulation of plant rooting depth: Breakthrough or observational conundrum? [Physical Sciences]In PNAS, Fan et al. (1) propose that landscape-scale hydrologic convergence along topography is the main driver of rooting depth. Fan et al. (1) base their assessment on a compilation of published reports and the development of an inverse modeling applied at the global scale. One of the central hypotheses...
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Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences current issue

Reply to Pierret and Lacombe: Global controls on maximum rooting depths remain important [Physical Sciences]We appreciate the comments by Pierret and Lacombe (1), highlighting the enormous complexity and observational challenges in root–environment relations. This challenge is evident in the scatter presented in figure 3 of our paper (2). Regarding water table depths in particular, Pierret and Lacombe (1) correctly point out that there are...
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Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences current issue

Assembling the mitochondrial ATP synthase [Biochemistry]Mitochondria are known as the powerhouses of the cell. The F1Fo-ATP synthase of the mitochondrial inner membrane produces the bulk of cellular ATP. The respiratory chain complexes pump protons across the inner membrane into the intermembrane space and thereby generate a proton-motive force that drives the ATP synthase. In a...
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Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences current issue

Experimental evolution heals the scars of genome-scale recoding [Evolution]Much of the dramatic plot of Mary Shelley’s Frankenstein resulted from the apparent scars and imperfections of the creature her hero brought to life. Similarly, organisms highly modified by synthetic biologists suffer from scars and imperfect functioning that their creators had not intended. However, as presented in PNAS by Wannier...
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Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences current issue

{beta}-Arrestin1 mediates hMENA expression and ovarian cancer metastasis [Medical Sciences]Ubiquitously expressed β-arrestin1 (β-arr1) and β-arrestin2 (β-arr2) proteins were originally identified and characterized based on their function to desensitize activated G protein-coupled receptors (GPCRs) with respect to heterotrimeric G protein signaling, and to mediate GPCR endocytosis. Work over the past decade has shown that β-arrestins also function as molecular scaffolds...
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Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences current issue

Breeding plant broad-spectrum resistance without yield penalties [Plant Biology]A central goal of crop improvement is to breed varieties with broad-spectrum resistance (BSR) to pathogens, but most of the major resistance (R) genes identified to date confer race-specific resistance to their adapted pathogens. Although these R genes are effective for a specific pathogen, their durability in the field is...
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Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences current issue

Human aging and disease: Lessons from age-related macular degeneration [Biochemistry]Aging is the most significant risk factor associated with chronic disease in humans. The accumulation of genetic damage throughout life leads to a variety of biological aberrations, including disrupted protein homeostasis, metabolic dysfunction, and altered cellular signaling. Such changes ultimately result in cellular senescence, death, or transformation to uncontrolled proliferation,...
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Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences current issue

Toward engineering E. coli with an autoregulatory system for lignin valorization [Applied Biological Sciences]Efficient lignin valorization could add more than 10-fold the value gained from burning it for energy and is critical for economic viability of future biorefineries. However, lignin-derived aromatics from biomass pretreatment are known to be potent fermentation inhibitors in microbial production of fuels and other value-added chemicals. In addition, isopropyl-β-d-1-thiogalactopyranoside...
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Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences current issue

Strain-induced high-temperature perovskite ferromagnetic insulator [Applied Physical Sciences]Ferromagnetic insulators are required for many new magnetic devices, such as dissipationless quantum-spintronic devices, magnetic tunneling junctions, etc. Ferromagnetic insulators with a high Curie temperature and a high-symmetry structure are critical integration with common single-crystalline oxide films or substrates. So far, the commonly used ferromagnetic insulators mostly possess low-symmet
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Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences current issue

Manipulating thermal emission with spatially static fluctuating fields in arbitrarily shaped epsilon-near-zero bodies [Applied Physical Sciences]The control and manipulation of thermal fields is a key scientific and technological challenge, usually addressed with nanophotonic structures with a carefully designed geometry. Here, we theoretically investigate a different strategy based on epsilon-near-zero (ENZ) media. We demonstrate that thermal emission from ENZ bodies is characterized by the excitation of...
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Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences current issue

Bifurcation-enhanced ultrahigh sensitivity of a buckled cantilever [Applied Physical Sciences]Buckling, first introduced by Euler in 1744 [Euler L (1744) Opera Omnia I 24:231], a sudden mechanical sideways deflection of a structural member under compressive stress, represents a bifurcation in the solution to the equations of static equilibrium. Although it has been investigated in diverse research areas, such a common...
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Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences current issue

Assembly of the membrane domain of ATP synthase in human mitochondria [Biochemistry]The ATP synthase in human mitochondria is a membrane-bound assembly of 29 proteins of 18 kinds. All but two membrane components are encoded in nuclear genes, synthesized on cytoplasmic ribosomes, and imported into the matrix of the organelle, where they are assembled into the complex with ATP6 and ATP8, the...
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Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences current issue

ATP-dependent substrate reduction at an [Fe8S9] double-cubane cluster [Biochemistry]Chemically demanding reductive conversions in biology, such as the reduction of dinitrogen to ammonia or the Birch-type reduction of aromatic compounds, depend on Fe/S-cluster–containing ATPases. These reductions are typically catalyzed by two-component systems, in which an Fe/S-cluster–containing ATPase energizes an electron to reduce a metal site on the acceptor protein...
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Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences current issue

Modulation of intestinal sulfur assimilation metabolism regulates iron homeostasis [Biochemistry]Sulfur assimilation is an evolutionarily conserved pathway that plays an essential role in cellular and metabolic processes, including sulfation, amino acid biosynthesis, and organismal development. We report that loss of a key enzymatic component of the pathway, bisphosphate 3′-nucleotidase (Bpnt1), in mice, both whole animal and intestine-specific, leads to iron-deficiency...
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Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences current issue

Exploring modular allostery via interchangeable regulatory domains [Biochemistry]Most proteins comprise two or more domains from a limited suite of protein families. These domains are often rearranged in various combinations through gene fusion events to evolve new protein functions, including the acquisition of protein allostery through the incorporation of regulatory domains. The enzyme 3-deoxy-d-arabino-heptulosonate 7-phosphate synthase (DAH7PS) is...
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Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences current issue

Molecular mechanism of ATP versus GTP selectivity of adenylate kinase [Biochemistry]Enzymatic substrate selectivity is critical for the precise control of metabolic pathways. In cases where chemically related substrates are present inside cells, robust mechanisms of substrate selectivity are required. Here, we report the mechanism utilized for catalytic ATP versus GTP selectivity during adenylate kinase (Adk) -mediated phosphorylation of AMP. Using...
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Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences current issue

Deciphering the reading of the genetic code by near-cognate tRNA [Biochemistry]Some codons of the genetic code can be read not only by cognate, but also by near-cognate tRNAs. This flexibility is thought to be conferred mainly by a mismatch between the third base of the codon and the first of the anticodon (the so-called “wobble” position). However, this simplistic explanation...
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Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences current issue

Conserved in situ arrangement of complex I and III2 in mitochondrial respiratory chain supercomplexes of mammals, yeast, and plants [Biochemistry]We used electron cryo-tomography and subtomogram averaging to investigate the structure of complex I and its supramolecular assemblies in the inner mitochondrial membrane of mammals, fungi, and plants. Tomographic volumes containing complex I were averaged at ∼4 nm resolution. Principal component analysis indicated that ∼60% of complex I formed a...
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Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences current issue

Enzymatic reconstitution of ribosomal peptide backbone thioamidation [Biochemistry]Methyl-coenzyme M reductase (MCR) is an essential enzyme found strictly in methanogenic and methanotrophic archaea. MCR catalyzes a reversible reaction involved in the production and consumption of the potent greenhouse gas methane. The α-subunit of this enzyme (McrA) contains several unusual posttranslational modifications, including the only known naturally occurring example...
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Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences current issue

Allostery revealed within lipid binding events to membrane proteins [Biophysics and Computational Biology]Membrane proteins interact with a myriad of lipid species in the biological membrane, leading to a bewildering number of possible protein−lipid assemblies. Despite this inherent complexity, the identification of specific protein−lipid interactions and the crucial role of lipids in the folding, structure, and function of membrane proteins is emerging from...
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Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences current issue

Crystal structure of bacterial succinate:quinone oxidoreductase flavoprotein SdhA in complex with its assembly factor SdhE [Biophysics and Computational Biology]Succinate:quinone oxidoreductase (SQR) functions in energy metabolism, coupling the tricarboxylic acid cycle and electron transport chain in bacteria and mitochondria. The biogenesis of flavinylated SdhA, the catalytic subunit of SQR, is assisted by a highly conserved assembly factor termed SdhE in bacteria via an unknown mechanism. By using X-ray crystallography,...
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Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences current issue

Structural basis for the alternating access mechanism of the cation diffusion facilitator YiiP [Biophysics and Computational Biology]YiiP is a dimeric antiporter from the cation diffusion facilitator family that uses the proton motive force to transport Zn2+ across bacterial membranes. Previous work defined the atomic structure of an outward-facing conformation, the location of several Zn2+ binding sites, and hydrophobic residues that appear to control access to the...
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Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences current issue

Solution NMR structure of yeast Rcf1, a protein involved in respiratory supercomplex formation [Biophysics and Computational Biology]The Saccharomyces cerevisiae respiratory supercomplex factor 1 (Rcf1) protein is located in the mitochondrial inner membrane where it is involved in formation of supercomplexes composed of respiratory complexes III and IV. We report the solution structure of Rcf1, which forms a dimer in dodecylphosphocholine (DPC) micelles, where each monomer consists...
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Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences current issue

Protein homology model refinement by large-scale energy optimization [Biophysics and Computational Biology]Proteins fold to their lowest free-energy structures, and hence the most straightforward way to increase the accuracy of a partially incorrect protein structure model is to search for the lowest-energy nearby structure. This direct approach has met with little success for two reasons: first, energy function inaccuracies can lead to...
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Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences current issue

Guanidinium export is the primal function of SMR family transporters [Biophysics and Computational Biology]The small multidrug resistance (SMR) family of membrane proteins is prominent because of its rare dual topology architecture, simplicity, and small size. Its best studied member, EmrE, is an important model system in several fields related to membrane protein biology, from evolution to mechanism. But despite decades of work on...
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Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences current issue

Single-molecule analysis of phospholipid scrambling by TMEM16F [Biophysics and Computational Biology]Transmembrane protein 16F (TMEM16F) is a Ca2+-dependent phospholipid scramblase that translocates phospholipids bidirectionally between the leaflets of the plasma membrane. Phospholipid scrambling of TMEM16F causes exposure of phosphatidylserine in activated platelets to induce blood clotting and in differentiated osteoblasts to promote bone mineralization. Despite the importance of TMEM16F-mediat
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Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences current issue

Dynamic patterns of cortical expansion during folding of the preterm human brain [Biophysics and Computational Biology]During the third trimester of human brain development, the cerebral cortex undergoes dramatic surface expansion and folding. Physical models suggest that relatively rapid growth of the cortical gray matter helps drive this folding, and structural data suggest that growth may vary in both space (by region on the cortical surface)...
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Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences current issue

Surface chemical heterogeneity modulates silica surface hydration [Chemistry]An in-depth knowledge of the interaction of water with amorphous silica is critical to fundamental studies of interfacial hydration water, as well as to industrial processes such as catalysis, nanofabrication, and chromatography. Silica has a tunable surface comprising hydrophilic silanol groups and moderately hydrophobic siloxane groups that can be interchanged...
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Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences current issue

Chirality-controlled spontaneous twisting of crystals due to thermal topochemical reaction [Chemistry]Crystals that show mechanical response against various stimuli are of great interest. These stimuli induce polymorphic transitions, isomerizations, or chemical reactions in the crystal and the strain generated between the daughter and parent domains is transcribed into mechanical response. We observed that the crystals of modified dipeptide LL (N3-l-Ala-l-Val-NHCH2C≡CH) undergo...
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Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences current issue

Stable iridium dinuclear heterogeneous catalysts supported on metal-oxide substrate for solar water oxidation [Chemistry]Atomically dispersed catalysts refer to substrate-supported heterogeneous catalysts featuring one or a few active metal atoms that are separated from one another. They represent an important class of materials ranging from single-atom catalysts (SACs) and nanoparticles (NPs). While SACs and NPs have been extensively reported, catalysts featuring a few atoms...
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Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences current issue

Mechanism of the G-protein mimetic nanobody binding to a muscarinic G-protein-coupled receptor [Chemistry]Protein–protein binding is key in cellular signaling processes. Molecular dynamics (MD) simulations of protein–protein binding, however, are challenging due to limited timescales. In particular, binding of the medically important G-protein-coupled receptors (GPCRs) with intracellular signaling proteins has not been simulated with MD to date. Here, we report a successful simulation...
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Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences current issue

Susceptibility of brain atrophy to TRIB3 in Alzheimer’s disease, evidence from functional prioritization in imaging genetics [Computer Sciences]The joint modeling of brain imaging information and genetic data is a promising research avenue to highlight the functional role of genes in determining the pathophysiological mechanisms of Alzheimer’s disease (AD). However, since genome-wide association (GWA) studies are essentially limited to the exploration of statistical correlations between genetic variants and...
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Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences current issue

Discovery of a hexagonal ultradense hydrous phase in (Fe,Al)OOH [Earth, Atmospheric, and Planetary Sciences]A deep lower-mantle (DLM) water reservoir depends on availability of hydrous minerals which can store and transport water into the DLM without dehydration. Recent discoveries found hydrous phases AlOOH (Z = 2) with a CaCl2-type structure and FeOOH (Z = 4) with a cubic pyrite-type structure stable under the high-pressure–temperature...
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Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences current issue

Long-term urban carbon dioxide observations reveal spatial and temporal dynamics related to urban characteristics and growth [Earth, Atmospheric, and Planetary Sciences]Cities are concentrated areas of CO2 emissions and have become the foci of policies for mitigation actions. However, atmospheric measurement networks suitable for evaluating urban emissions over time are scarce. Here we present a unique long-term (decadal) record of CO2 mole fractions from five sites across Utah’s metropolitan Salt Lake...
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Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences current issue

Uranium isotope evidence for two episodes of deoxygenation during Oceanic Anoxic Event 2 [Earth, Atmospheric, and Planetary Sciences]Oceanic Anoxic Event 2 (OAE 2), occurring ∼94 million years ago, was one of the most extreme carbon cycle and climatic perturbations of the Phanerozoic Eon. It was typified by a rapid rise in atmospheric CO2, global warming, and marine anoxia, leading to the widespread devastation of marine ecosystems. However,...
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Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences current issue

Biomass smoke from southern Africa can significantly enhance the brightness of stratocumulus over the southeastern Atlantic Ocean [Earth, Atmospheric, and Planetary Sciences]Marine stratocumulus clouds cover nearly one-quarter of the ocean surface and thus play an extremely important role in determining the global radiative balance. The semipermanent marine stratocumulus deck over the southeastern Atlantic Ocean is of particular interest, because of its interactions with seasonal biomass burning aerosols that are emitted in...
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Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences current issue

Acceleration of tropical cyclogenesis by self-aggregation feedbacks [Earth, Atmospheric, and Planetary Sciences]Idealized simulations of tropical moist convection have revealed that clouds can spontaneously clump together in a process called self-aggregation. This results in a state where a moist cloudy region with intense deep convection is surrounded by extremely dry subsiding air devoid of deep convection. Because of the idealized settings of...
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Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences current issue

Convergence of marine megafauna movement patterns in coastal and open oceans [Ecology]The extent of increasing anthropogenic impacts on large marine vertebrates partly depends on the animals’ movement patterns. Effective conservation requires identification of the key drivers of movement including intrinsic properties and extrinsic constraints associated with the dynamic nature of the environments the animals inhabit. However, the relative importance of intrinsic...
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Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences current issue

The seasonality of nonpolio enteroviruses in the United States: Patterns and drivers [Ecology]Nonpolio enteroviruses are diverse and common viruses that can circulate year-round but tend to peak in summer. Although most infections are asymptomatic, they can result in a wide range of neurological and other diseases. Many serotypes circulate every year, and different serotypes predominate in different years, but the drivers of...
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Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences current issue

Biogeographical disparity in the functional diversity and redundancy of corals [Ecology]Corals are major contributors to a range of key ecosystem functions on tropical reefs, including calcification, photosynthesis, nutrient cycling, and the provision of habitat structure. The abundance of corals is declining at multiple scales, and the species composition of assemblages is responding to escalating human pressures, including anthropogenic global warming....
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Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences current issue

Brief history of US debt limits before 1939 [Economic Sciences]Between 1776 and 1920, the US Congress designed more than 200 distinct securities and stated the maximum amount of each that the Treasury could sell. Between 1917 and 1939, Congress gradually delegated all decisions about designing US debt instruments to the Treasury. In 1939, Congress began imposing a limit on...
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Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences current issue

Layered dynamic regulation for improving metabolic pathway productivity in Escherichia coli [Engineering]Microbial production of value-added chemicals from biomass is a sustainable alternative to chemical synthesis. To improve product titer, yield, and selectivity, the pathways engineered into microbes must be optimized. One strategy for optimization is dynamic pathway regulation, which modulates expression of pathway-relevant enzymes over the course of fermentation. Metabolic engineers...
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Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences current issue

Adaptive evolution of genomically recoded Escherichia coli [Evolution]Efforts are underway to construct several recoded genomes anticipated to exhibit multivirus resistance, enhanced nonstandard amino acid (nsAA) incorporation, and capability for synthetic biocontainment. Although our laboratory pioneered the first genomically recoded organism (Escherichia coli strain C321.∆A), its fitness is far lower than that of its nonrecoded ancestor, particularly in...
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Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences current issue

Genetic signatures of microbial altruism and cheating in social amoebas in the wild [Evolution]Many microbes engage in social interactions. Some of these have come to play an important role in the study of cooperation and conflict, largely because, unlike most animals, they can be genetically manipulated and experimentally evolved. However, whereas animal social behavior can be observed and assessed in natural environments, microbes...
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Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences current issue

Vaccination can drive an increase in frequencies of antibiotic resistance among nonvaccine serotypes of Streptococcus pneumoniae [Evolution]The bacterial pathogen Streptococcus pneumoniae is a major public health concern, being responsible for more than 1.5 million deaths annually through pneumonia, meningitis, and septicemia. Available vaccines target only a subset of serotypes, so vaccination is often accompanied by a rise in the frequency of nonvaccine serotypes. Epidemiological studies suggest...
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Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences current issue

RNAi is a critical determinant of centromere evolution in closely related fungi [Genetics]The centromere DNA locus on a eukaryotic chromosome facilitates faithful chromosome segregation. Despite performing such a conserved function, centromere DNA sequence as well as the organization of sequence elements is rapidly evolving in all forms of eukaryotes. The driving force that facilitates centromere evolution remains an enigma. Here, we studied...
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Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences current issue

Intermediate filament accumulation can stabilize microtubules in Caenorhabditis elegans motor neurons [Genetics]Neural circuits utilize a coordinated cellular machinery to form and eliminate synaptic connections, with the neuronal cytoskeleton playing a prominent role. During larval development of Caenorhabditis elegans, synapses of motor neurons are stereotypically rewired through a process facilitated by dynamic microtubules (MTs). Through a genetic suppressor screen on mutant animals...
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Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences current issue

Foxp1 controls mature B cell survival and the development of follicular and B-1 B cells [Immunology and Inflammation]The transcription factor Foxp1 is critical for early B cell development. Despite frequent deregulation of Foxp1 in B cell lymphoma, the physiological functions of Foxp1 in mature B cells remain unknown. Here, we used conditional gene targeting in the B cell lineage and report that Foxp1 disruption in developing and...
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Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences current issue

B7-H1 maintains the polyclonal T cell response by protecting dendritic cells from cytotoxic T lymphocyte destruction [Immunology and Inflammation]Induced B7-H1 expression in the tumor microenvironment initiates adaptive resistance, which impairs immune functions and leads to tumor escape from immune destruction. Antibody blockade of the B7-H1/PD-1 interaction overcomes adaptive resistance, leading to regression of advanced human cancers and survival benefits in a significant fraction of patients. In addition to...
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Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences current issue

hMENA is a key regulator in endothelin-1/{beta}-arrestin1-induced invadopodial function and metastatic process [Medical Sciences]Aberrant activation of endothelin-1 receptors (ET-1R) elicits pleiotropic effects relevant for tumor progression. The network activated by this receptor might be finely, spatially, and temporarily orchestrated by β-arrestin1 (β-arr1)–driven interactome. Here, we identify hMENA, a member of the actin-regulatory protein ENA/VASP family, as an interacting partner of β-arr1, necessary for...
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Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences current issue

High salt intake causes leptin resistance and obesity in mice by stimulating endogenous fructose production and metabolism [Medical Sciences]Dietary guidelines for obesity typically focus on three food groups (carbohydrates, fat, and protein) and caloric restriction. Intake of noncaloric nutrients, such as salt, are rarely discussed. However, recently high salt intake has been reported to predict the development of obesity and insulin resistance. The mechanism for this effect is...
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Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences current issue

MERS coronaviruses from camels in Africa exhibit region-dependent genetic diversity [Microbiology]Middle East respiratory syndrome coronavirus (MERS-CoV) causes a zoonotic respiratory disease of global public health concern, and dromedary camels are the only proven source of zoonotic infection. Although MERS-CoV infection is ubiquitous in dromedaries across Africa as well as in the Arabian Peninsula, zoonotic disease appears confined to the Arabian...
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Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences current issue

Conserved mechanism of cell-wall synthase regulation revealed by the identification of a new PBP activator in Pseudomonas aeruginosa [Microbiology]Penicillin-binding proteins (PBPs) are synthases required to build the essential peptidoglycan (PG) cell wall surrounding most bacterial cells. The mechanisms regulating the activity of these enzymes to control PG synthesis remain surprisingly poorly defined given their status as key antibiotic targets. Several years ago, the outer-membrane lipoprotein EcLpoB was identified...
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Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences current issue

Rare variants in axonogenesis genes connect three families with sound-color synesthesia [Neuroscience]Synesthesia is a rare nonpathological phenomenon where stimulation of one sense automatically provokes a secondary perception in another. Hypothesized to result from differences in cortical wiring during development, synesthetes show atypical structural and functional neural connectivity, but the underlying molecular mechanisms are unknown. The trait also appears to be more...
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Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences current issue

Physical and geometric constraints shape the labyrinth-like nasal cavity [Physiology]The nasal cavity is a vital component of the respiratory system that heats and humidifies inhaled air in all vertebrates. Despite this common function, the shapes of nasal cavities vary widely across animals. To understand this variability, we here connect nasal geometry to its function by theoretically studying the airflow...
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Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences current issue

Loss of function of a rice TPR-domain RNA-binding protein confers broad-spectrum disease resistance [Plant Biology]Crops carrying broad-spectrum resistance loci provide an effective strategy for controlling infectious disease because these loci typically confer resistance to diverse races of a pathogen or even multiple species of pathogens. Despite their importance, only a few crop broad-spectrum resistance loci have been reported. Here, we report the identification and...
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Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences current issue

Solution of the multistep pathway for assembly of corynanthean, strychnos, iboga, and aspidosperma monoterpenoid indole alkaloids from 19E-geissoschizine [Plant Biology]Monoterpenoid indole alkaloids (MIAs) possess a diversity of alkaloid skeletons whose biosynthesis is poorly understood. A bioinformatic search of candidate genes, combined with their virus-induced gene silencing, targeted MIA profiling and in vitro/in vivo pathway reconstitution identified and functionally characterized six genes as well as a seventh enzyme reaction required...
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Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences current issue

How cognitive and reactive fear circuits optimize escape decisions in humans [Psychological and Cognitive Sciences]Flight initiation distance (FID), the distance at which an organism flees from an approaching threat, is an ecological metric of cost–benefit functions of escape decisions. We adapted the FID paradigm to investigate how fast- or slow-attacking “virtual predators” constrain escape decisions. We show that rapid escape decisions rely on “reactive...
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Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences current issue

Opinion: How to tackle the childcare-conference conundrum [Social Sciences]Conferences are vital forums for academic researchers. At these meetings, scientists communicate new discoveries, form research collaborations, make contacts with funding agencies, and attract new members to our labs and programs. Even with new technological advances that allow remote communication, resource sharing, and networking, face-to-face interactions are a crucial component...
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Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences current issue

Low agreement among reviewers evaluating the same NIH grant applications [Social Sciences]Obtaining grant funding from the National Institutes of Health (NIH) is increasingly competitive, as funding success rates have declined over the past decade. To allocate relatively scarce funds, scientific peer reviewers must differentiate the very best applications from comparatively weaker ones. Despite the importance of this determination, little research has...
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Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences current issue

Measuring the potential for sustainable intensification of aquaculture in Bangladesh using life cycle assessment [Sustainability Science]Food production is a major driver of global environmental change and the overshoot of planetary sustainability boundaries. Greater affluence in developing nations and human population growth are also increasing demand for all foods, and for animal proteins in particular. Consequently, a growing body of literature calls for the sustainable intensification...
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Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences current issue

Citywide cluster randomized trial to restore blighted vacant land and its effects on violence, crime, and fear [Sustainability Science]Vacant and blighted urban land is a widespread and potentially risky environmental condition encountered by millions of people on a daily basis. About 15% of the land in US cities is deemed vacant or abandoned, an area roughly the size of Switzerland. In a citywide cluster randomized controlled trial, we...
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News

What plants can teach us about oil spill clean-up, microfluidicsFor years, scientists have been inspired by nature to innovate solutions to tricky problems, even oil spills -- manmade disasters with devastating environmental and economic consequences. A new USC study takes a cue from leaf structure to fabricate material that can separate oil and water, which could lead to safer and more efficient oil spill clean-up methods.
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Medicare claims show long-term prostate cancer prevention benefits of finasterideMen who take the medication finasteride get a prostate cancer prevention benefit that can last 16 years -- twice as long as previously recorded, according to SWOG clinical trial analysis that made innovative use of Medicare data.
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Marine researchers say recent sea star wasting disease epidemic defies predictionBeginning in 2013, a mysterious disease crippled sea star populations up and down the U.S. west coast. Over a matter of months, many sea star species died in record-breaking numbers, though the ochre sea star was among the hardest hit. Now, researchers at UC Santa Cruz have analyzed just how much the populations of this species have declined, but they have not yet determined what factors might be
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News

How obesity dulls the sense of tastePrevious studies have indicated that weight gain can reduce one's sensitivity to the taste of food. Now a study publishing March 20 in the open-access journal PLOS Biology by Andrew Kaufman, Robin Dando, and colleagues at Cornell University shows that inflammation, driven by obesity, actually reduces the number of taste buds on the tongues of mice.
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News

State-by-state causes of infant mortality in the USSudden unexpected death of infants (SUDI) was the most common cause of infant mortality among children born full term in the US according to estimates from a state-by-state study published this week in PLOS Medicine.
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The Atlantic

The Last Male Northern White Rhino Is DeadWith wide three-toed hooves and no thumbs, Sudan could neither swipe right nor swipe left. But last April, he joined Tinder anyway , making him the only northern white rhino on the dating network. He was, indeed, the only male northern white rhino on the entire planet, and anyone who swiped right on his profile was asked to donate to research into artificially breeding rhinos. “I don’t mean to be
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

'Missing mutation' found in severe infant epilepsyResearchers have discovered a 'missing mutation' in severe infant epilepsy -- long-suspected genetic changes that might trigger overactive, brain-damaging electrical signaling leading to seizures. They also found early indications that specific anti-seizure medications might prevent disabling brain injury by controlling epilepsy during a crucial period shortly after birth.
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Science | The Guardian

Obesity dulls sense of taste, study suggestsScientists say the findings could help devise new approaches to losing weight, with a greater focus on taste perception Obesity dulls the sense of taste, according to research that offers new insights into why some people enter a persistent cycle of weight gain. Researchers found that within eight weeks of becoming obese, mice lost 25% of their taste buds. The findings suggest that weight gain no
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NYT > Science

Trilobites: Something’s Brewing in the Lab: Beer Without HopsGrowing the small, green flowers is resource-intensive, and farmers can’t keep up. So scientists engineered yeast to produce the bitter, citrusy, flavor in beer.
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Latest Headlines | Science News

How obesity makes it harder to tasteMice that gained excessive weight on a high-fat diet also lost a quarter of their taste buds.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

Taming chaos: Calculating probability in complex systemsWeather patterns, brain activity and heartbeats each generate lines of complex data. To analyze this data, researchers must first divide up this continuous data into discrete pieces -- a task difficult to perform simply and accurately. Researchers have devised a method to transform data from complex systems, reducing the amount of important information lost, while still using less computing power
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

Hydrogel may help heal diabetic ulcersA hydrogel that is adept at helping the body heal may also be particularly good at treating wounds related to diabetes.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

Parenting and personality work together to affect baby's weight gainThe more mothers use food to soothe their babies, the more weight certain babies gained, according to researchers. The effect was only seen in babies with a surgent temperament -- characterized by being more outgoing, active and drawn to new things and people, putting these children at a risk for obesity later on.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

Wind, sea ice patterns point to climate change in western ArcticA major shift in western Arctic wind patterns occurred throughout the winter of 2017 and the resulting changes in sea ice movement are possible indicators of a changing climate, says a researcher.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

Living abroad leads to a clearer sense of selfLiving abroad can clarify your sense of self, according to new research by a team of social scientists. They found living abroad increases 'self-concept clarity,' the extent to which individuals' beliefs about themselves are clearly and confidently defined and consistent and stable over time.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

Low-tech, affordable solutions to improve water qualityClever, fundamental engineering could go a long way toward preventing waterborne illness and exposure to carcinogenic substances in water.
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Science : NPR

Taste Buds Dull As People Gain Weight. Now Scientists Think They Know WhyDoctors have known that as people pack on the pounds, their sense of taste diminishes. New research in mice helps explain what's going on: Inflammation brought on by obesity may be killing taste buds. (Image credit: Omikron Omikron/Getty Images/Science Source)
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New on MIT Technology Review

The Netherlands is building the world’s first subsidy-free offshore wind farms
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Scientific American Content: Global

'Oumuamua, First-Known Interstellar Visitor, Likely Born from 2 StarsThe mysterious object may have formed in a binary star system, new research suggests -- Read more on ScientificAmerican.com
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Foxconn selects general contractor, engineering consultantsFoxconn Technology Group has selected some key companies to begin building its massive flat screen manufacturing complex in Racine County, the Taiwanese company announced Tuesday.
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News

TRAPPIST-1 planets provide clues to the nature of habitable worldsTo determine the composition of the TRAPPIST-1 planets, the team used a unique software package, developed by Unterborn and Lorenzo, that uses state-of-the-art mineral physics calculators. The software, called ExoPlex, allowed the team to combine all of the available information about the TRAPPIST-1 system, including the chemical makeup of the star, rather than being limited to just the mass and r
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Vitamin D might be key to syndrome affecting half of women aged 50 or plusResearch with postmenopausal women, found a 57.8 percent rate of metabolic syndrome (MetS) among women presenting vitamin D insufficiency or deficiency. MetS affects half of United States' female population above the age of 50 and increases the risks of heart diseases and diabetes.
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News

A method for predicting the impact of global warming on diseaseScientists have devised a new method that can be used to better understand the likely impact of global warming on diseases mediated by parasites, such as malaria. The method uses the metabolic theory of ecology to understand how temperature affects the host-parasite relationship, and has been proofed using a model system.
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Scientists discern new antibiotics resistance mechanism to peptide antibioticsIn a recent study, a group of scientists from the Hong Kong University of Science and Technology reveals both the widespread distribution and broad-spectrum resistance potential of D-stereospecific peptidases, providing a potential early indicator of antibiotic resistance to non-ribosomal peptide antibiotics.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

A method for predicting the impact of global warming on diseaseScientists have devised a method for predicting how rising global temperatures are likely to affect the severity of diseases mediated by parasites. Their method can be applied widely to different host-pathogen combinations and warming scenarios, and should help to identify which infectious diseases will have worsened or diminished effects with rising temperatures.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Google buys NYC's Chelsea Market building for $2.4 bnGoogle on Tuesday bought up New York's Chelsea Market for $2.4 billion, finalizing its acquisition of the emblematic retail and food hall that stands opposite the internet giant's current headquarters in the city.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Data scandal threatens Zuckerberg vision for FacebookFacebook Mark ZuckerbergFirst it was "move fast and break things." Then it was "connecting the world" and "building a global community."
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New Scientist - News

Huge Australian bushfire was caused by unseasonal freak weatherA fire in New South Wales has destroyed 69 homes, even though Australia’s fire season is over – climate change may be a factor
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BBC News - Science & Environment

Stephen Hawking's ashes to be interred near Sir Isaac Newton's graveThe scientist's remains will be also be interred close to Charles Darwin's grave at Westminster Abbey.
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Big Think

Massive search for this woman in photograph from 1971 turns up fascinating detailsThe Internet solves another mystery. Read More
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Amygdala neurons increase as children become adults -- except in autismResearchers at the UC Davis MIND Institute found that typically-developing children gain more neurons in a region of the brain that governs social and emotional behavior, the amygdala, as they become adults. This phenomenon does not happen in people with autism spectrum disorder (ASD). Instead, children with ASD have too many neurons early on and then appear to lose those neurons as they become ad
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Brewing hoppy beer without the hopsSynthetic biology has created microbes that produce drugs, flavors, aromas and fuels. Now UC Berkeley scientists have used the same tricks, with the help of CRISPR-Cas9, to get yeast to produce the flavor of hops. They added genes from mint and basil and used the yeast to brew a beer that tasters said had notes of 'fruit-loops' and 'orange blossom,' with no off flavors. The yeast helps brewers avo
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

Ultrasound to enhance cancer drug deliveryMedical researchers are testing the use of pulsed sound waves to direct and focus cancer drug therapies.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

Vegetable compound could have a key role in 'beeting' Alzheimer's diseaseA compound in beets that gives the vegetable its distinctive red color could help slow the accumulation of misfolded proteins in the brain, a process associated with Alzheimer's disease. Scientists say this could lead to the development of drugs that could alleviate some of the long-term effects of the disease, the world's leading cause of dementia.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

Making fragrances last longerFrom floral perfume to fruity body wash and shampoos, scents heavily influence consumer purchases. But for most, the smell doesn't last long after showering. Scientists have now developed a way to get those fragrances to stick to the skin longer instead of washing down the drain immediately after being applied.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

Smoked foods are tastier, less harmful with a tip from the auto industryInfusing foods with smoke can impart delicious nuanced flavors, but could also come with an unwelcome side of carcinogens. To reduce the carcinogen content of smoked foods, researchers took a lesson from the automobile industry, running the smoke through a zeolite filter to remove harmful compounds. It worked, and with a happy bonus: superior smoke flavor.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

'Candy cane' polymer weave could power future functional fabrics and devicesIf scientists are going to deliver on the promise of implantable artificial organs or clothing that dries itself, they'll first need to solve the problem of inflexible batteries that run out of juice too quickly. Today, researchers report that they've developed a new material by weaving two polymers together in a way that increases charge storage capacity.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

Wildfire intensity impacts water quality and its treatment in forested watershedsThe recent Thomas Fire was the largest wildfire in in California's modern history. Now, researchers report that wildfires in forested watersheds can have a variable but predictable impact on the substances that are released from soils and flow into drinking water sources. The research provides important insights for water utilities evaluating treatment options after severe wildfires.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

Continuously killing bacteria on coated stainless steel -- add bleach to rechargeStainless steel is the gold standard for kitchen appliances and cookware, but bacteria can grow on these surfaces, contaminating food. Current coatings available on the market are pricey and potentially harmful, so scientists have now developed an affordable specialized polymer coating for such surfaces that they can recharge with bleach treatments.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

Tiny gels sop up intestinal toxinsBacterial infections that target the intestine can cause conditions that range from uncomfortable to deadly. While it's easy to blame the bacteria, it's actually the toxins the bacteria produce that trigger inflammation, diarrhea, fever and cramps. Researchers now report the development of a microgel scavenger that targets toxins instead of bacteria.
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The Atlantic

The Controversial ‘Humanity Star’ Is Coming Back to Earth EarlyUpdated on March 20 at 5:53 p.m. ET Humanity will come crashing down earlier than expected. The Humanity Star, a satellite launched into space in January, will reenter Earth’s atmosphere and disintegrate sometime this week, according to websites that track the movement of objects in orbit around the planet. The satellite was always going to come back down. But it was supposed to remain in orbit f
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The Atlantic

Not Even Cambridge Analytica Believed Its HypeOne can be forgiven for not being quite sure what to think about Channel 4’s expose on Cambridge Analytica , the political-consulting firm linked to Donald Trump and others. On Monday, the British news channel released a story based on hidden-camera videos they took during meetings with CA higher-ups, in which the officials discuss a range of skullduggery, including bribes and sexual entrapment.
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The Atlantic

Writing a Feminist Novel With a Man's Point of ViewBy Heart is a series in which authors share and discuss their all-time favorite passages in literature. See entries from Colum McCann, George Saunders, Emma Donoghue, Michael Chabon, and more. Doug McLean An American Marriage , Tayari Jones’s bestselling new novel, was almost never published. Though the plot hinges upon the wrongful imprisonment of Roy, a black man sent to prison for a rape he di
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New on MIT Technology Review

The US has banned transactions that use Venezuela’s crypto token
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

EU to greenlight Bayer-Monsanto takeover: sourceThe EU is set to greenlight the proposed blockbuster buyout of US agri-giant Monsanto by German chemical firm Bayer after securing concessions in order to win approval, sources close to the matter said on Tuesday.
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Big Think

Sudan, world’s last male northern white rhino, dies at Kenyan conservancySudan leaves behind only two other northern white rhinos, but artificial reproductive technologies could provide a future for the subspecies. Read More
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

Study of climate change could lead to understanding future of infectious diseaseOver the past 34 years, rainfall in Uganda has decreased by about 12 percent even though many of the global climate models predict an increase in rainfall for the area, according to an international team of researchers. Rainfall levels in Uganda impact agriculture, food security, wildlife habitats and regional economics as well as the prevalence of certain diseases.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

3-D-printed models improve medical student trainingA relatively inexpensive 3-D-printed model of a patient's blood vessels is as effective as current commercially available models for training medical students in interventional radiology vascular access, according to a new study.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

High consumption of red and processed meat linked to non-alcoholic fatty liver disease and insulin resistanceWorld meat consumption has increased during the last decades, and evidence is mounting that high consumption of red and mainly processed meat is unhealthy to humans and is related to chronic diseases such as cancer, type 2 diabetes, and cardiovascular disease. A new study adds non-alcoholic fatty liver disease (NAFLD) to the list.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

Effective parenting strategies to reduce disruptive behavior in childrenMost parenting programs aim to teach parents how to reduce their children's disruptive behavior. New research looked at more than 150 studies of these programs, finding differences in what works best according to whether or not children already showed behavior problems.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

Researchers create new low-cost, sustainable material for reducing air and water pollutionA new class of hybrid materials shows promise as an affordable and sustainable product for reducing particulate matter in air and organic pollutants in wastewater. The material, produced inexpensively from an industrial waste by-product and naturally abundant polymers, performed more efficiently than activated carbon, the current gold standard.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

Tamoxifen and raloxifene slow down the progression of muscular dystrophySteroids are currently the only available treatment to reduce the repetitive cycles of inflammation and disease progression associated with functional deterioration in patients with muscular dystrophy (MD). A study has shown that a new treatment approach using the selective estrogen receptor modulators (SERMs) tamoxifen and raloxifene significantly improved cardiac, respiratory, and skeletal muscl
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

Young at wrong end of deprivation gap, finds studyThe under-thirties have endured most the marked increase in relative deprivation of any age group in England, according to a 11-year study of data from the Office of National Statistics (ONS). Data scientists reviewed the analysis from 2004-2015 and also found that over the same period, deprivation fell for the over-60s, who are also less likely to live in deprived neighborhoods.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

You're the product: Facebook's business model explainedFacebook Data AccountDo you prefer organic food? Did you study in Mexico? Do you like red shoes? Such bits of information about Facebook users may seem insignificant in isolation but, once harvested on a grand scale, make the internet giant billions. Here's how:
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New Scientist - News

Craft beer may get cheaper thanks to GM yeast with hoppy flavourA genetically engineered yeast makes beer that tastes of hops, without using any hops – and it could make beer cheaper and more environmentally friendly
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Hydrogel may help heal diabetic ulcersA hydrogel invented at Rice University that is adept at helping the body heal may also be particularly good at treating wounds related to diabetes.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

NASA finds Tropical Cyclone Eliakim's clouds warmingNASA's Aqua satellite analyzed Tropical Cyclone Eliakim in infrared light and found warmer cloud top temperatures as wind shear continued to pummel the storm. Wind shear has elongated Eliakim and pushed precipitation south of the storm's center.
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Decision-making is shaped by individual differences in the functional brain connectomeEach day brings with it a host of decisions to be made, and each person approaches those decisions differently. A new study by University of Illinois researchers found that these individual differences are associated with variation in specific brain networks -- particularly those related to executive, social and perceptual processes.
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News

TGen-ASU study identifies molecular response of muscle to different types of exerciseExercise in the future could be customized for individuals based on genomics, according to a study by Arizona State University (ASU) and the Translational Genomics Research Institute (TGen), an affiliate of City of Hope. For years, scientists have studied the effects of different types of exercise on the human body, but never before at this level of molecular precision, according to the TGen-ASU s
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News

NASA finds Tropical Cyclone Eliakim's clouds warmingNASA's Aqua satellite analyzed Tropical Cyclone Eliakim in infrared light and found warmer cloud top temperatures as wind shear continued to pummel the storm. Wind shear has elongated Eliakim and pushed precipitation south of the storm's center.
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News

NASA infrared imagery shows a powerful Tropical Cyclone MarcusTropical Cyclone Marcus continues to strengthen as it moves further away from Western Australia. NASA's Aqua satellite analyzed the system in infrared light to find the strongest part of the hurricane.
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Mass. Eye and Ear performs first FDA-approved gene therapy procedure for inherited diseaseMassachusetts Eye and Ear made medical history on Tuesday by performing the first post-FDA approval gene therapy for patients with a form of inherited blindness. The occasion marks the beginning of a new era in medicine, as it is the first time any FDA-approved gene therapy has been given to a patient for any inherited disease.
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Hydrogel may help heal diabetic ulcersA hydrogel invented at Rice University that is adept at helping the body heal may also be particularly good at treating wounds related to diabetes.
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The Atlantic

The Press at War, From Vietnam to IraqThe Iraq War, launched 15 years ago today, always brings another war immediately to mind for me, and did so even when it first began. It’s not that Iraq itself did not loom large. I was an editor at The Atlantic when the war started, and the magazine’s coverage of issues relating to it was intensive and prolonged. Michael Kelly, who for four years was The Atlantic ’s editor-in-chief, had covered
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Paris to study pollution-busting free transportParis Mayor Anne Hidalgo is commissioning a study into making public transport free in the French capital to bring down grim levels of air pollution.
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Science : NPR

A Chinese Space Lab Will Soon Fall From The Sky. Where It Lands, No One KnowsMost of the Chinese space lab, the size of a city bus, will burn up in the atmosphere, but some debris may survive re-entry. (Image credit: Kin Cheung/AP)
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

Natural enemies reduce pesticide useCrop variety in agriculture has a positive impact on the natural enemies of aphids. Farmers can use this insight to keep aphids at bay and cut down on pesticides.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

Filling lithium-ion cells fasterDevelopers are using neutrons to analyze the filling of lithium ion batteries for hybrid cars with electrolytes. Their experiments show that electrodes are wetted twice as fast in a vacuum as under normal pressure.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

We start caring about our reputations as early as kindergartenKindergarteners don't use social media, but they do care about their public image. By the time kids go to elementary school, they're thinking critically about their reputation. Psychologists consider how our fascination with social status begins around age five, when kids begin to consider how they are viewed by others and behave in ways that cultivate positive reputations.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

The search for dark matter widensInvestigators report the discovery of a new material that may be able to directly detect dark matter. The material, known as a scintillator, should be sensitive to dark matter that is lighter than a proton. This will allow the search for dark matter to enter a largely unexplored mass range, below that of the proton.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

Researchers create microlaser that flies along hollow optical fiberFor the first time, researchers have optically trapped and propelled a particle-based laser for centimeters inside an optical fiber.
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Blog » Languages » English

Narwhal vs. Unicorn vs. PegasusIt’s time for a battle of epic proportions! We’ve got 3 majestic and magical creatures for you to choose from. How will you manage to pick just one?? It’ll be a tough decision but you must choose a side. Pick your favorite and let the battle begin! The competition starts at 11 AM EDT on 3/22 and goes for 24 hours! Narwhal The Narwhal, sometimes also called the “Narwhale” is a unique creature that
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Live Science

The Weirdest Things That Fell From The SkyUmbrellas and galoshes will shield you from the rain, snow and hail — but what about the showers of spiders, satellites, and raw mystery meat?
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Science | The Guardian

Stephen Hawking's ashes to be buried near Newton at Westminster AbbeyPhysicist’s remains to be interred in thanksgiving service near memorials to other famous scientists Stephen Hawking ’s ashes will be interred at Westminster Abbey near the grave of Sir Isaac Newton during a thanksgiving service later this year, a spokesman for the abbey has said. The dean of Westminster, the Very Rev Dr John Hall, said: “It is entirely fitting that the remains of Prof Stephen Ha
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Brewing hoppy beer without the hopsHoppy beer is all the rage among craft brewers and beer lovers, and now UC Berkeley biologists have come up with a way to create these unique flavors and aromas without using hops.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Church of England ushers in contactless donationsThe Church of England rolled out contactless payment terminals in its churches and cathedrals on Tuesday, bringing the way it collects donations into the digital age.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

NASA infrared imagery shows a powerful Tropical Cyclone MarcusTropical Cyclone Marcus continues to strengthen as it moves further away from Western Australia. NASA's Aqua satellite analyzed the system in infrared light to find the strongest part of the hurricane.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

UK parliament asks Zuckerberg to testify in data misuse caseA British parliamentary committee on Tuesday summoned Facebook CEO Mark Zuckerberg to answer questions on fake news as authorities step up efforts to determine whether data has been improperly used to influence elections.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Orbitz says legacy travel site likely hacked, affecting 880KOrbitz says one of its older websites may have been hacked, potentially exposing the personal information of people who made purchases online between Jan. 1, 2016 and Dec. 22, 2017.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Egyptian court rules Uber, Careem illegal; appeal expectedAn Egyptian court on Tuesday ordered authorities to revoke the operating licenses of the Uber and Careem ride-hailing services and block their mobile apps and software.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Hawking's remains to be buried at Abbey near Newton, Darwin (Update)Stephen Hawking's ashes will be buried near the graves of fellow British scientists Isaac Newton and Charles Darwin at Westminster Abbey, it was announced Tuesday.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Taming chaos: Calculating probability in complex systemsDaily weather patterns, brain activity on an EEG (electroencephalogram) and heartbeats on an EKG (electrocardiogram) each generate lines of complex data. To analyze this data, perhaps to predict a storm, seizure or heart attack, researchers must first divide up this continuous data into discrete pieces—a task that is difficult to perform simply and accurately.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Fins up! Georgia Aquarium to create shark habitat in AtlantaThe Georgia Aquarium has announced it's adding a new shark exhibit featuring a viewing gallery to give visitors a close-up view of the animals. It's set to open in 2020, and the aquarium says it wants to showcase the important role sharks serve in oceans.
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Live Science

In Images: Cut Marks from Samurai Swords and MachetesSlashing pigs with swords doesn't sound like science. But that's exactly what scientists had volunteers do — hack away at a pig carcass with a Japanese samurai sword called a katana.
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Live Science

Why Scientists Are Stabbing Pig Carcasses with Samurai SwordsPay no attention to the person wielding a samurai sword and hacking away at a pig carcass — he's doing it for science.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

Antibiotics could be key to relieving chronic bladder painAntibiotics can successfully help rid a patient of chronic urinary tract infection symptoms, according to a new clinical study. The research highlights the growing concern of many practitioners that the tests they rely on to diagnose urinary tract infections are inadequate.
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Scientific American Content: Global

"Grand Unified Theory of Math" Nets Abel PrizeRobert Langlands’ ideas unearthed connections within mathematics that have helped to solve centuries-old problems and aided researchers in disparate fields -- Read more on ScientificAmerican.com
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

It's givin' me excitations: Study uncovers first steps of photosynthesisPhotosynthesis has driven life on this planet for more than 3 billion years—first in bacteria, then in plants—but we don't know exactly how it works.
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Pain management in low-resource settings -- anesthesiologists advocate for increased accessIncreasing the availability of effective pain management in low- to middle-income countries will be an essential part of ongoing efforts to expand global access to safe surgery and anesthesia, according to a special article in the April issue of Anesthesia & Analgesia.
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Taming chaos: Calculating probability in complex systemsWeather patterns, brain activity and heartbeats each generate lines of complex data. To analyze this data, researchers must first divide up this continuous data into discrete pieces -- a task difficult to perform simply and accurately. Researchers have devised a method to transform data from complex systems, reducing the amount of important information lost, while still using less computing power
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Filling lithium-ion cells fasterDevelopers from Bosch and scientists at the Technical University of Munich (TUM) are using neutrons to analyze the filling of lithium ion batteries for hybrid cars with electrolytes. Their experiments show that electrodes are wetted twice as fast in a vacuum as under normal pressure.
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The Atlantic

Photos: Looking Back at the War in Iraq, 15 Years After the U.S. InvadedFifteen years ago, the bombs started falling on Baghdad. U.S. war planners had hoped a campaign of “shock and awe” would expedite the conflict, demoralize the Iraqi forces, and speed up their surrender. While the initial overthrow of Saddam Hussein was relatively quick, the Iraq War itself was anything but. For nearly nine years, occupying coalition troops tried to work with Iraqis to secure and
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New on MIT Technology Review

NASA has developed a way to 3-D-print its rocket nozzles
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Scientific American Content: Global

RIP Sudan, the Last Male Northern White RhinoThe most famous rhino in the world has died, leaving behind two aging females and a hole in our world -- Read more on ScientificAmerican.com
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Ingeniøren

Kæmpeprinter skal udskrive et hus på under et døgnMed en pris på kun 4.000 dollars er det 3D-printede hus møntet på verdens fattigste befolkning.
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Natural enemies reduce pesticide useCrop variety in agriculture has a positive impact on the natural enemies of aphids. Farmers can use this insight to keep aphids at bay and cut down on pesticides.
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News

We start caring about our reputations as early as kindergartenKindergarteners don't use social media, but they do care about their public image. By the time kids go to elementary school, they're thinking critically about their reputation. In a Review published on March 20 in the journal Trends in Cognitive Sciences, psychologists consider how our fascination with social status begins around age five, when kids begin to consider how they are viewed by others
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Scientific American Content: Global

When Towns Lose Their Newspapers, Disease Detectives Are Left Flying BlindReports from local communities have helped identify outbreaks -- Read more on ScientificAmerican.com
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New Scientist - News

Self-driving Uber death should halt tech’s race to the bottomA pedestrian has become the first to die after being hit by a self-driving car. The autonomous vehicle regulatory free-for-all must end, says Mark Harris
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Inside Science

Engineering Yeast to Make Hoppy BeerEngineering Yeast to Make Hoppy Beer Genetically modified yeast with basil and mint genes added gives beer a hoppy flavor without the need to add the actual flowers. BeerBrewing_topNteaser.jpg Image credits: Allagash Brewing via flickr Rights information: CC BY 2.0 Culture Tuesday, March 20, 2018 - 12:00 Jason Socrates Bardi, Editor (Inside Science) -- The bad news for environmentally conscious b
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Science | The Guardian

Cockroaches' DNA reveals why they thrive in filthy placesBy identifying which genes are key to the bugs’ survival, scientists hope to find ways to better control them The secrets of the cockroach’s ability to thrive in some of the most disgusting places on Earth have been discovered in its DNA. The American cockroach spread around the world after it was introduced to the US from Africa in the early 16th century. Its population exploded as the insects m
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Ingeniøren

Den jyske vestkyst kan blive knudepunkt for internettet i NordenNye søkabler til Holland og USA vil i de kommende år gå i land på kysten nord for Esbjerg. Hvis der bliver etableret netværksneutrale datacentre, kan Esbjerg overhale både Hamborg og København som trafikknudepunkt for internettet i Norden. Sådan lyder forudsigelsen fradet største europæiske netvæ...
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

Even flies like a familiar songThe process that allows sounds experienced during infancy to shape language is poorly understood. Researchers have found that courtship behavior in Drosophila melanogaster can be shaped by earlier auditory experiences. Their findings allowed them to develop a novel and simple neurological model to study how experiences of sound can shape complex modes of communication in animals.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

Why do some people 'hear' silent flashes?Up to one in five people may show signs of a synesthesia-like phenomenon in which they 'hear' silent flashes or movement, according to a new study.
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New on MIT Technology Review

IBM will help any firm build its own voice assistant
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News

It's givin' me excitations: U-M study uncovers first steps of photosynthesisPhotosynthesis has driven life on this planet for more than 3 billion years -- first in bacteria, then in plants -- but we don't know exactly how it works.
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Can acupuncture help alleviate menopausal symptoms?An umbrella review from Duke Clinical Research Institute that was a comprehensive assessment of previous systematic reviews and randomized controlled trials has found that women who received acupuncture had less frequent and less severe vasomotor symptoms associated with menopause than women who did not have acupuncture.
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News

'Missing mutation' found in severe infant epilepsyResearchers have discovered a 'missing mutation' in severe infant epilepsy -- long-suspected genetic changes that might trigger overactive, brain-damaging electrical signaling leading to seizures. They also found early indications that specific anti-seizure medications might prevent disabling brain injury by controlling epilepsy during a crucial period shortly after birth.
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Scientific American Content: Global

Privacy and Counterfeit CoinsDo fake coins really need a lawyer’s protection in the courtroom? -- Read more on ScientificAmerican.com
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New Scientist - News

There’s no point reviving the northern white rhino – yetWith Sudan, the last male northern white rhino, dead it is natural to ask if we can bring these animals back with biotechnology - but there is nowhere for them to live
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Ingeniøren

Facebooksag: Et flertal af brugerne kan også – uvidende – have fået deres data høstetTirsdag får Facebooks ansatte mulighed for at spørge løs om Cambridge Analytica.
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News

How GDP affects success in eSportsPer capita GDP can make a difference in a country's performance in competitive computer gaming, according to a study conducted by researchers at the Higher School of Economics (HSE University, Perm).
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Metformin lowers risk of late miscarriage, preterm birth in pregnant women with PCOSThe oral diabetes medication metformin seems to reduce the chance of a late miscarriage and premature birth among women with polycystic ovary syndrome (PCOS) but does not affect their rate of developing gestational diabetes, a multicenter study finds. The results were presented Tuesday at ENDO 2018, the Endocrine Society's 100th annual meeting in Chicago, Ill.
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Providing free supplies to low-income families improves type 1 diabetesProviding free supplies of insulin and blood glucose test trips to families with type 1 diabetes in low- and lower-middle income families can result in improved blood-sugar control and diabetes-related knowledge, a new study of families in India suggests. The research results will be presented Tuesday, March 20, at ENDO 2018, the 100th annual meeting of the Endocrine Society in Chicago, Ill.
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The Guardian's Science Weekly

A Neuroscientist Explains: psychology's replication crisis – podcast trailerIn episode three of the second season of A Neuroscientist Explains, Daniel Glaser revisits a weekly column that saw him roped into what is now being called a crisis for psychology and further afield
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Investigation of metal deposition in organs after joint replacementThe hip replacement is considered to be one of the most successful orthopaedic interventions, with 75,000 performed each year by the NHS alone. However, the implants used to replace hips contain metals, such as chromium and cobalt, which are potentially toxic and which can be deposited into tissues around the implant site due to wear and corrosion. A team of researchers used X-ray absorption spect
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Pressing a button is more challenging than appears—new theory improves button designsPressing a button appears effortless and one easily dismisses how challenging it is. Researchers at Aalto University, Finland, and KAIST, South Korea, have created detailed simulations of button pressing with the goal of producing human-like presses.
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The Atlantic

What We Learn From 50 Years of Kids Drawing ScientistsBetween 1966 and 1977, the social scientist David Chambers asked 4,807 elementary-school children, mostly from Canada and the United States, to draw a scientist . Their illustrations regularly featured white coats, eyeglasses, lab equipment, and books. Often, the depicted scientists exclaimed things like “I made a discovery!” or simply “Wow!” In one memorable case, a third-grader drew a laborator
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Facebook Struggles to Respond to the Cambridge Analytica ScandalAs the Cambridge Analytica story broke over the weekend, Facebook has struggled to formulate a response.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Sentinels helping to map mineralsThe traditional way of mapping Earth's geology and mineral resources is a costly and time-consuming undertaking. While satellites cannot entirely replace the expert in the field, they can certainly help – as a recent effort in Africa shows.
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BBC News - Science & Environment

UK will lead European exoplanet missionA telescope to study planets beyond our Solar System is selected by the European Space Agency.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Facebook's 'rat-catching team' spies on employees: reportFacebook Data Cambridge AnalyticaSilicon Valley's tech giants are famously secretive—after all their proprietary products and services are worth billions—but a new report alleges that Facebook goes to Orwellian lengths to keep its workers from talking out of turn, even about their working conditions.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Beyond the WIMP: Unique crystals could expand the search for dark matterA new particle detector design proposed at the U.S. Department of Energy's Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory (Berkeley Lab) could greatly broaden the search for dark matter—which makes up 85 percent of the total mass of the universe yet we don't know what it's made of—into an unexplored realm.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Wind, sea ice changes suggest climate change in western ArcticA major shift in western Arctic wind patterns occurred throughout the winter of 2017 and the resulting changes in sea ice movement are possible indicators of a changing climate, says Kent Moore, a professor of physics at the University of Toronto Mississauga.
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Latest Headlines | Science News

Kids are starting to picture scientists as womenAn analysis of studies asking kids to draw a scientist finds that the number of females drawn has increased over the last 50 years.
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Scientific American Content: Global

Federal Government's Silence on Climate Could Stymie Disaster PlanningRefusal to acknowledge warming could also widen partisan divide -- Read more on ScientificAmerican.com
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Researchers create microlaser that flies along hollow optical fiberFor the first time, researchers have optically trapped and propelled a particle-based laser for centimeters inside an optical fiber. The new flying microlaser enables highly sensitive temperature measurements along the length of the fiber and could offer a novel way to precisely deliver light to remote and inaccessible locations.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Achieving healthy, climate-friendly, affordable diets in IndiaNew research led by IIASA researcher Narasimha Rao has shown how it might be possible to reduce micronutrient deficiencies in India in an affordable way whilst also reducing greenhouse gas emissions.
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Science | The Guardian

Pressure on National Portrait Gallery over £1m gift linked to drug crisisBritish institutions face questions over donations from Sackler family The National Portrait Gallery is facing scrutiny over a proposed £1m donation from the Sackler family following allegations that the American dynasty’s fortune is tainted by the US opioid crisis. The gallery is one of a number of British cultural and academic institutions in line for substantial donations from members of the S
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Low-tech, affordable solutions to improve water qualityClever, fundamental engineering could go a long way toward preventing waterborne illness and exposure to carcinogenic substances in water.
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The search for dark matter widensIn this week's issue of Journal of Applied Physics, investigators report the discovery of a new material that may be able to directly detect dark matter. The material, known as a scintillator, should be sensitive to dark matter that is lighter than a proton. This will allow the search for dark matter to enter a largely unexplored mass range, below that of the proton.
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Beyond the WIMP: Unique crystals could expand the search for dark matterA new particle detector design proposed at the US Department of Energy's Berkeley Lab could greatly broaden the search for dark matter -- which makes up 85 percent of the total mass of the universe yet we don't know what it's made of -- into an unexplored realm.
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In some elderly patients, levothyroxine may be linked with increased mortalityTreating some elderly people with levothyroxine may put them at increased risk of death, new research from Israel reports. The results will be presented on Tuesday, March 20, at ENDO 2018, the 100th annual meeting of the Endocrine Society in Chicago, Ill.
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Limiting shifts for medical trainees affects satisfaction, but not educational outcomesLimiting first-year medical residents to 16-hour work shifts, compared to 'flexing' them to allow for some longer shifts, generally makes residents more satisfied with their training and work-life balance, but their training directors more dissatisfied with curtailed educational opportunities. That's one conclusion of a new study published online March 20 in the New England Journal of Medicine.
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Limiting medical trainees' hours affects satisfaction, but not educational outcomesLimiting first-year medical residents to 16-hour work shifts, compared to 'flexing' them to allow for some longer shifts, generally makes residents more satisfied with their training and work-life balance, but their training directors more dissatisfied with curtailed educational opportunities. That's one conclusion of a new study published online March 20 in the New England Journal of Medicine.
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Research study encourages hospitals to reduce number of paper documents createdAfter collecting nearly 600 kilograms of papers from recycling bins at five Toronto hospitals, researchers at St. Michael's Hospital found 2,687 documents containing personal health or other information that should instead have been shredded.
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Are hospitals improperly disposing of personal health information?A substantial amount of personal information, most of it personal health information, was found in the recycling at five hospitals in Toronto, Canada, despite policies in place for protection of personal information.
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US Preventive Services Task Force recommendation statement on behavioral counseling to prevent skin cancerThe US Preventive Services Task Force (USPSTF) recommends behavioral counseling to help reduce the risk of skin cancer from ultraviolet (UV) radiation in persons ages 6 months to 24 years with fair skin types.
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The Atlantic

Atlanta's Perfect Satire of the Music Industry in 2018Arcade Fire’s new music video opens with the band visiting the offices of the fictional Everything Now corporation, makers of such products as cars, soft drinks, and a cereal advertised with the slogan “Make it painless!” An executive played by Toni Collette informs the musicians that their band is broke, but that Everything Now is going to bail them out. “We’ll have exclusive rights over your en
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The Atlantic

Can You Sue a Robocar?Uber Arizona VehiclesOn Sunday night, a self-driving car operated by Uber struck and killed a pedestrian, 49-year-old Elaine Herzberg, on North Mill Avenue in Tempe, Arizona. It appears to be the first time an automobile driven by a computer has killed a human being by force of impact. The car was traveling at 38 miles per hour. An initial investigation by Tempe police indicated that the pedestrian might have been at
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Study: Living abroad leads to a clearer sense of selfLiving abroad can clarify your sense of self, according to new research by a team of social scientists at Rice University, Columbia University and the University of North Carolina.
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Popular Science

The failed Florida overpass was supposed to be a shining example of accelerated bridge constructionTechnology But catastrophic events like these are rarely as simple as the ABCs. On March 15, just five days after the bridge was erected, 950 tons of concrete gave way, killing six motorists. Could the technology behind the pedestrian overpass be to…
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Scientific American Content: Global

Kids Draw Female Scientists More Often Than They Did Decades AgoA new study documents a significant change, but stereotypes about what a "typical" scientist looks like remain -- Read more on ScientificAmerican.com
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Dana Foundation

Exploring the Personal Side of ScienceA collegiate swim team, uncontrollable diarrhea, an uncle’s drum solo, green Jell-O, and getting lost in the streets of Bogotá, Colombia, may seem like unlikely elements at a Brain Awareness Week event. But not at the annual “Studying the Brain: A Storytelling Event hosted by The Friedman Brain Institute ,” which highlights personal stories from Mount Sinai students, fellows, and professors. Five
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Extreme winter weather, such as 'Beast from the East', can be linked to solar cyclePeriods of extreme cold winter weather and perilous snowfall, similar to those that gripped the UK in a deep freeze with the arrival of the 'Beast from the East', could be linked to the solar cycle, pioneering new research has shown.
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Aerial Views of Mexico's Dystopian Housing DevelopmentsThe Mexican government spent billions trying to provide affordable housing to its citizens. This is the result.
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Researchers map San Antonio's music sceneInnovative music research is underway at The University of Texas at San Antonio (UTSA). The university's music marketing coordinator and his undergraduate students are using geographic information system (GIS) technology to map the scale and scope of the live music scene in San Antonio.
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NYT > Science

Sudan, the Last Male Northern White Rhino, Dies in KenyaJust two members of the charismatic subspecies remain, both female. But scientists still hope to prevent the extinction of the animals.
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Researchers create microlaser that flies along hollow optical fiberFor the first time, researchers have optically trapped and propelled a particle-based laser for centimeters inside an optical fiber.
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Study: Living abroad leads to a clearer sense of selfLiving abroad can clarify your sense of self, according to new research by a team of social scientists at Rice University, Columbia University and the University of North Carolina. They found living abroad increases 'self-concept clarity,' the extent to which individuals' beliefs about themselves are clearly and confidently defined and consistent and stable over time.
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Achieving healthy, climate-friendly, affordable diets in IndiaNew research led by IIASA researcher Narasimha Rao has shown how it might be possible to reduce micronutrient deficiencies in India in an affordable way whilst also reducing greenhouse gas emissions.
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Dermatology scale validates quality of lifeCan having a skin condition impact the quality of your life? Absolutely, claim Boston University School of Medicine researchers who have set out to find the best tool to measure the impact on patients.
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Danger ahead?A major shift in western Arctic wind patterns occurred throughout the winter of 2017 and the resulting changes in sea ice movement are possible indicators of a changing climate, says Kent Moore, a professor of physics at the University of Toronto Mississauga.
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Some patients on levothyroxine have continued symptomsPeople who take replacement thyroid hormone may have more comorbidities and lower quality of life than those who don't take the hormone, a large population-based study from the University of Groningen in the Netherlands reports. The study results will be presented Tuesday, March 20, at ENDO 2018, the 100th annual meeting of the Endocrine Society in Chicago, Ill.
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The Atlantic

What Is Donald Trump Hiding?Donald Trump has little regard for the privacy of the masses. During the 2016 campaign, he bought access to psychological profiles of millions of voters created by scraping and studying their Facebook accounts without most of them having granted permission. He signed a bill repealing FCC rules that limited the ability of Internet service providers to sell data on our browsing habits. Like his pre
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The Atlantic

The Atlantic Expands with New Section on the American FamilyWashington, D.C. (March 20, 2018)— The Atlantic today introduces a new Family section at TheAtlantic.com—the centerpiece of an expansive, multi-platform reporting initiative on the cultural, political, and economic forces shaping America’s families. Along with a growing reporting team dedicated to this ambitious digital coverage, The Atlantic ’s focus on family will include stories in the magazin
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

Chronic fatigue syndrome possibly explained by lower levels of key thyroid hormonesA new study reveals that chronic fatigue syndrome, a debilitating condition with unknown causes, can be explained by lower thyroid levels -- but may be distinct from thyroidal disease. This can be seen as a first step to finding a treatment for a common illness for which diagnosis is hard to come by.
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TED Talks Daily (SD video)

What if gentrification was about healing communities instead of displacing them? | Liz OgbuLiz Ogbu is an architect who works on spatial justice: the idea that justice has a geography and that the equitable distribution of resources and services is a human right. In San Francisco, she's questioning the all too familiar story of gentrification: that poor people will be pushed out by development and progress. "Why is it that we treat culture erasure and economic displacement as inevitable
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Big Think

Stephen Hawking’s final paper is an astounding farewellTen days before he died, Stephen Hawking published a final paper with a way to prove or disprove the multiverse. Read More
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Dagens Medicin

Prisfald på astma-KOL medicin bidrager til lavere medicinudgifterKombination af patentudløb og egentlige prisfald på medicin gav fem pct. lavere priser på apotekernes medicin i 2017, sammenlignet med 2016. Prisfald på astma-KOL medicin bidrager betydeligt til det generelle prisfald, viser analyse fra Apotekerforeningen.
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Live Science

Facts About RhinosTheir horns are made of the same stuff as human fingernails!
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Alphabet's 'Outline' Homebrew VPN Software Offers Open-Source, Easy Set-Up Privacy You ControlAlphabet tech incubator Jigsaw wants to make it easy to run your own, more private virtual private network.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Study of climate change could lead to understanding future of infectious diseaseOver the past 34 years, rainfall in Uganda has decreased by about 12 percent even though many of the global climate models predict an increase in rainfall for the area, according to an international team of researchers. Rainfall levels in Uganda impact agriculture, food security, wildlife habitats and regional economics as well as the prevalence of certain diseases.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

Social media use at age 10 could reduce wellbeing of adolescent girlsSocial media use may have different effects on wellbeing in adolescent boys and girls, according to new research. Researchers found an association between increased time spent on social media in early adolescence (age 10) and reduced well-being in later adolescence (age 10-15) -- but only among girls.
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Making intricate images with bacterial communitiesA technique for growing sticky films of bacteria into elaborate microscopic images could reveal how potentially dangerous biofilms grow and transmit antibiotic resistance, and could lead to novel biomaterials or synthetic microbial communities.
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Even flies like a familiar song—how auditory learning shapes fly behaviorThe ability to learn and speak language depends heavily on the sounds and language we experience during early infancy. While this may sound self-evident, we still do not understand exactly what happens neurologically as a developing infant learns how to speak. In a study published in eLife, researchers at Nagoya University devised a new neurological model in fruit flies that may illuminate this pr
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Malaria's most wanted: Identifying the deadliest strains to design a childhood vaccineResearchers have identified a 'genetic fingerprint' associated with the most deadly strains of malaria parasites, making these unique DNA regions potential targets for vaccine development.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Closing the 69 million teacher gap needs to be top priority for world's education leadersAddressing the global teacher gap of 69 million should be the number one priority for education policymakers the world over, a new international study has warned.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Dogs with noise sensitivity should be routinely assessed for pain by vetsDogs which show fear or anxiety when faced with loud or sudden noises should be routinely assessed for pain by veterinarians, a new study has found.
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Physicists made crystal lattice from polaritonsAn international research team produced an analog of a solid-body crystal lattice from hybrid photon-electron quasiparticles -- polaritons. In the resulting polariton lattice, certain particles' energy does not depend on their speed. At the same time, the lattice's geometry, particle concentration and polarization properties can still be modified. This opens up new perspectives for study of quantu
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Parenting and personality work together to affect baby's weight gainThe more mothers use food to soothe their babies, the more weight certain babies gained, according to researchers. The effect was only seen in babies with a surgent temperament -- characterized by being more outgoing, active and drawn to new things and people, putting these children at a risk for obesity later on.
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A star disturbed the comets of the solar system in prehistoryAbout 70,000 years ago, when the human species was already on Earth, a small reddish star approached our solar system and gravitationally disturbed comets and asteroids. Astronomers from the Complutense University of Madrid and the University of Cambridge have verified that the movement of some of these objects is still marked by that stellar encounter.
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Study of climate change could lead to understanding future of infectious diseaseOver the past 34 years, rainfall in Uganda has decreased by about 12 percent even though many of the global climate models predict an increase in rainfall for the area, according to an international team of researchers. Rainfall levels in Uganda impact agriculture, food security, wildlife habitats and regional economics as well as the prevalence of certain diseases.
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Study: Men more likely to be readmitted to hospital after sustaining a firearm injuryMen have a substantially greater hospital readmission risk during the first three months following a firearm injury hospitalization compared to women. While this overall risk was no longer observed at six months after the initial hospitalization, the risk of renal failure and cardiovascular readmissions among males was more than three times greater than females at six months.
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UTSA researcher maps San Antonio's music sceneThe University of Texas at San Antonio's music marketing coordinator and his undergraduate students are using geographic information system (GIS) technology to map the scale and scope of the live music scene in San Antonio. Stan Renard, in the UTSA Department of Music, has developed an app to capture, store, analyze, manage and present music-centric geographic data for San Antonio.
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The Atlantic

There Used to Be Consensus on How to Raise KidsThis article is part of Parenting in an Uncertain Age, a series about the experience of raising children in a time of great change. As I think of today’s parents, who fear they aren’t doing a good enough job, I sometimes imagine the arrival of a new Dr. Benjamin Spock, a calming presence to rein in the tumult of parental angst. After the devastation of war, in the period from the late 1940s throu
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The Atlantic

The Immense Pressure on Children to Behave as Tiny AdultsThis article is part of Parenting in an Uncertain Age , a series about the experience of raising children in a time of great change. So much of raising children is unimaginable until it happens, an abstract future materialized awkwardly into an actual child covered in dirt. Amid constant unpredictability, one small unsung comfort for parents is the chance to revisit books from childhood, to share
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New on MIT Technology Review

Climate change will cause huge internal migration around the world
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Ingeniøren

Infosecurity Denmark: Bliv klogere på cybersikkerhedAlvorlige it-sikkerhedsangreb på danske virksomheder, digitale teknologier og ny lovgivning har øget behovet for viden og debat om cybersikkerhed. Version2’s it-sikkerhedsmesse Infosecurity 2.-3. maj bidrager med faglig viden på højt niveau.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

How well do solar cells really work in the Nordic climate?In recent years the price of solar cells has fallen so dramatically that more and more people are now looking to invest in solar panels. These can be installed either as free-standing structures on roofs, or as integrated components of construction modules such as roof slates or facade panels.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Eager to dye your hair with 'nontoxic' graphene nanoparticles? Not so fast!Graphene is something of a celebrity in the world of nanoscale materials. Isolated in 2004 by Nobel Prize winners Andre Geim and Konstantin Novoselov, these ultrathin sheets of carbon atoms are already finding novel uses in areas like electronics, high-efficiency heating systems, water purification technologies and even golf balls. According to recent research published in the journal Chem, hair d
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Dagens Medicin

Lov om passiv dødshjælp vedtagetEt enigt folketing har i dag vedtaget ny lov, der skal give syge patienter bedre muligheder for at vælge livet fra.
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Dagens Medicin

Svendborg-sagen for Højesteret onsdag: Rudkjøbing forventer frifindelseSagen om den unge Svendborg-læge, der i Landsretten blev dømt for forsømmelser og skødeløshed, kommer for Højesteret onsdag.
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Study IDs important role for specific gene in 16p11.2 deletion autismNew findings in mice suggest that the lack of a copy of the gene MVP may contribute to the symptoms of 16p11.2 deletion syndrome because it is needed for brain circuits to incorporate changes driven by experience.
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Extreme winter weather, such as 'Beast from the East', can be linked to solar cyclePeriods of extreme cold winter weather and perilous snowfall, similar to those that gripped the UK in a deep freeze with the arrival of the 'Beast from the East,' could be linked to the solar cycle, pioneering new research has shown.
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Closing the 69 million teacher gap needs to be top priority for world's education leadersAddressing the global teacher gap of 69 million should be the number one priority for education policymakers the world over, a new international study has warned.
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Why it doesn't pay to be just nice -- you also need to be intelligentNew research has revealed how people's intelligence, rather than their personality traits, leads to success.
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The Atlantic

Republicans Don't Want a Primary Challenge to TrumpLast Friday in New Hampshire, Jeff Flake—the outgoing Republican senator from Arizona who has denounced President Donald Trump as a threat to American democracy—got a standing ovation in Manchester, New Hampshire. John Kasich, another potential challenger to Trump in the 2020 GOP primary, will visit the Granite State next month. “The unusual flurry of activity,” noted The Washington Post , “is st
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The Atlantic

The Heavy Burden of Teaching My Son About American RacismThis article is part of Parenting in an Uncertain Age, a series about the experience of raising children in a time of great change. When I saw the sign for the Emmett Till Museum, I knew I had to take the next exit. As a Ph.D. student in American history studying the civil-rights movement, it felt almost like an obligation. My only hesitation was that my 7-year-old son was in the car too. Was he
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The Atlantic

Introducing The Atlantic's Family SectionWhen The Atlantic ’s founders created this magazine 161 years ago, the American family was not top of mind. The Atlantic , they wrote, would be devoted to literature, art, and politics. Early on, its foremost concerns included the abolition of slavery and the then-parlous future of America as a united nation. Soon enough, though, the editors came to understand that the well-being of a nation, its
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The Atlantic

Marriage Has Become a TrophyThe decline of marriage is upon us. Or, at least, that’s what the zeitgeist would have us believe. In 2010, when Time magazine and the Pew Research Center famously asked Americans whether they thought marriage was becoming obsolete, 39 percent said yes. That was up from 28 percent when Time asked the question in 1978. Also, since 2010, the Census Bureau has reported that married couples have made
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Silver nanoparticles in clothing wash out—and may threaten human health and the environmentHumans have known since ancient times that silver kills or stops the growth of many microorganisms. Hippocrates, the father of medicine, is said to have used silver preparations for treating ulcers and healing wounds. Until the introduction of antibiotics in the 1940s, colloidal silver (tiny particles suspended in a liquid) was a mainstay for treating burns, infected wounds and ulcers. Silver is s
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Ingeniøren

DEBAT: Hvor sikre skal selvkørende biler være?Er det teknologiens skyld, når en selvkørende bil søndag aften ramte en fodgænger, der sprang ud af mørket og krydsede vejen? Lektor i kunstig intelligens mener, det er på tide at diskutere sikkerheden om selvkørende biler.
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New on MIT Technology Review

The race is on to probe Facebook’s massive data scandal
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Optical computers light up the horizonSince their invention, computers have become faster and faster, as a result of our ability to increase the number of transistors on a processor chip.
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Live Science

Self-Driving Car Kills Pedestrian in Arizona. Human Drivers Will Kill 6,000 This Year.Will self-driving cars ultimately be safer than human-piloted vehicles? So far, the numbers say yes.
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DowDuPont Signs a Deal to Surveil Farms With SatellitesPhotos from a network of 200 satellites will go into agricultural analytics tools, which could give farmers new insight.
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Specific gene region in hypertension revealedThe renin-angiotensin system plays an essential role in blood pressure homeostasis. To address the molecular mechanisms controlling hypertension-responsive mouse renin (mRen) gene regulation, University of Tsukuba researchers deleted specific regions of the endogenous mRen gene and placed the animals in a hypertensive environment. The mRen gene bearing the 5? deletion lost hypertension responsiven
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Two genes cooperate to trigger leukemia developmentAn international group of researchers led by Professor Jan Cools of the VIB-KU Leuven Center for Cancer Biology have made a breakthrough in understanding the development of acute lymphoblastic leukemia, an aggressive cancer of the blood. While scientists were already familiar with many cancer-causing genes and their separate functions, the VIB team has now illustrated how two of these cancer genes
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Months-long real-time generation of a time scale based on an optical clockThe National Institute of Information and Communications Technology (NICT) generated a real-time signal of an accurate time scale by combining an optical lattice clock and a hydrogen maser. The signal generated in this optical-microwave hybrid system continued for half a year without interruption. The resultant 'one second' deviated by 0.8 ns in half a year relative to TT(BIPM). This demonstration
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Malaria's most wanted: Identifying the deadliest strains to design a childhood vaccineResearchers have identified a 'genetic fingerprint' associated with the most deadly strains of malaria parasites, making these unique DNA regions potential targets for vaccine development.
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Pro-environmental programs should take the factors that motivate each gender into considerationA piece of research carried out by lecturers at the UPV/EHU's Faculty of Economics and Business has explored, from the gender perspective, the pro-environmental behavior of university students on the UPV/EHU's Bizkaia campus. The results suggest that the set of variables affecting pro-environmental behavior differs according to gender, but that the degree of intensity that each factor exerts on th
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Why do some people 'hear' silent flashes?Up to one in five people may show signs of a synesthesia-like phenomenon in which they 'hear' silent flashes or movement, according to a new study from City, University of London.
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Dogs with noise sensitivity should be routinely assessed for pain by vetsDogs which show fear or anxiety when faced with loud or sudden noises should be routinely assessed for pain by veterinarians, according to new research from the UK and Brazil. Researchers believe that pain, which could be undiagnosed, could be exacerbated when a noise makes the dogs tense up or 'start,' putting extra stress on muscles or joints which are already inflamed leading to an associated w
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Antibiotics could be key to relieving chronic bladder painAntibiotics can successfully help rid a patient of chronic urinary tract infection symptoms. This is the finding of a new clinical study led by Sheela Swamy of University College London in the UK. The study in the International Urogynecology Journal, which is published by Springer, highlights the growing concern of many practitioners that the tests they rely on to diagnose urinary tract infections
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New Scientist - News

Exclusive: Other countries could have made ‘Russian’ nerve agentWeapons experts have told New Scientist that a number of countries legally created small amounts of Novichok after it was revealed in 1992 and a production method was later published
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

The impact of families on social mobilityYoung people whose families support them financially are not only more likely to remain dependent on their parents, but also become less ambitious new research has shown.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

US, EU hardwood imports fuel Amazon destruction: GreenpeaceAmazon Sale USScores of US and European companies selling the hardwood ipe for things like decks and garden furniture are fueling an illegal trade devastating the Amazon rainforest, Greenpeace said Tuesday.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

UK MPs ask Facebook's Zuckerberg to testify on data rowA British parliamentary committee on Tuesday asked Facebook chief Mark Zuckerberg to appear before it to explain in person claims that millions of users' data was harvested for political campaigns.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Bird populations in French countryside 'collapsing'Bird populations across an eerily quiet French countryside have collapsed, on average, by a third over the last decade-and-a-half, alarmed researchers reported on Tuesday.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

German prosecutors raid VW over carbon dioxide emissionsGerman authorities said Thursday they had again raided the headquarters of the world's largest carmaker Volkswagen in a probe over financial market manipulation related to excessive exhaust emissions from its vehicles.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Five new species of frogs identified in museum collectionsResearchers from Yale-NUS College and the North Carolina Museum of Natural Sciences have discovered five new species of Southeast Asian frogs from a group of museum specimens that had long been considered to only contain two species. This research by lead author Yale-NUS College Assistant Professor of Science (Environmental Studies) Jennifer Sheridan and her co-author Dr Bryan Stuart, Research Cur
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

Rain or snow? Humidity, location can make all the difference, new map showsResearchers have created a map of the Northern Hemisphere showing how location and humidity can affect precipitation, illustrating wide variability in how and why different areas receive snow or rain.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

Discovered mode of drinking in mosquitoes carries biomedical implicationsMosquitoes may have a reputation for being one of the world's most intractable pests, but they're actually quite tiny and fragile. So when an international team of scientists wanted to observe the underlying mechanisms of how the insects feed, they had to get creative.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

Trial shows safety of drugs for irregular heartbeat patients undergoing treatmentA trial has found that two types of blood thinning drugs are safe to use in patients with an irregular heartbeat when they are undergoing surgery aimed at stopping the condition.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

Switch discovered to convert blood vessels to blood stem cells in embryonic developmentA switch has been discovered that instructs blood vessel cells to become blood stem cells during embryonic development in mice. The findings could aid research into creating new blood cells for transplants and for understanding cancer metastasis.
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Popular Science

How to watch live TV on your computerDIY Turn your laptop into a mobile television set. You probably use your computer to consume on-demand TV shows. But what about sports games and news broadcasts? Here's how to watch live channels on your laptop.
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Even flies like a familiar songThe process that allows sounds experienced during infancy to shape language is poorly understood. Researchers at Nagoya University found that courtship behavior in Drosophila melanogaster can be shaped by earlier auditory experiences. Their findings allowed them to develop a novel and simple neurological model to study how experiences of sound can shape complex modes of communication in animals.
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Pressing a button is more challenging than appearsPressing a button appears easy, but the brain needs a probabilistic internal model to control a press. A new theory exposes significant improvements to button design that help gamers and musicians.
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Illusory motion reproduced by deep neural networks trained for predictiona research team led by associate professor Eiji Watanabe of the National Institute for Basic Biology successfully reproduced illusory motion by deep neural networks trained for prediction.
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Good motor skills may enhance reading skills in obese childrenExcess body weight has been linked to poor academic performance in children in several previous studies. A new Finnish study now shows that a high body fat percentage is associated with poor reading skills in 6- to 8-year-old boys. However, these associations are largely explained by poor motor skills.
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Type 2 Diabetes research held back by animal modelsUsing animal models for researching type 2 diabetes mellitus (T2DM) impedes scientific breakthroughs about the disease origins and treatment options. Researchers recently proposed a human-centered research framework to study the biology of sugar metabolism in humans from molecules to population studies by utilizing novel human-based research technologies such as organ-on-chips and computer simulat
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Transcription factor helps tumors grow in low oxygen, resist anticancer therapiesAn international team of researchers led by Keiji Tanimoto found how cancer cells respond to DNA damage signaling when in low oxygen, or hypoxia. Through comprehensive gene expression analyses, the team determined how one family of genes controls DNA damage response, as well as how they weaken the effectiveness of anticancer therapies.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Fukushima seven years later—case closed?On March 11, 2011, a nuclear disaster struck Japan. The 9.0 magnitude Tohoku earthquake triggered a 15-meter tidal wave, which hit the Fukushima Daiichi Nuclear Power Plant approximately 45 minutes later. The plant's power was knocked out and the backup generators crippled. After the emergency batteries were exhausted, three of the plant's six reactors soon overheated, and at least two of the core
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Why the face of Western war gives us a false idea of conflictThe US-led global coalition fighting Islamic State has, with success, robbed the terrorist movement of its territorial safe havens. But when it comes to facing war's brutal nature, the West fumbles the football. It habitually reports (close to) zero civilian casualties from its actions, which is questionable. It should be a cause of reflection on why Western societies believe war can be painless.
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Inside Science

Studying How Germs Spread on a PlaneStudying How Germs Spread on a Plane Just how dangerous is flying to your health? sick-on-plane_cropped.jpg Image credits: leungchopan via Shutterstock Human Tuesday, March 20, 2018 - 08:30 Joel Shurkin, Contributor (Inside Science) -- It’s flu season and the passenger four rows behind you is coughing. How likely is that you or other people on the plane will catch the flu? The answer is: not very
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

New coral bleaching outbreak in Northern Territory a worrying sign of our warming oceansAn outbreak of coral bleaching has been reported over the summer in Gang Gurak Barlu National Park on the Cobourg Peninsula, 60km northeast of Darwin, homeland of several clans of the Iwaidja-speaking Aboriginal people of Western Arnhem Land.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

Pipe-crawling robot will help decommission DOE nuclear facilityA pair of autonomous robots will soon be driving through miles of pipes at the US Department of Energy's former uranium enrichment plant in Piketon, Ohio, to identify uranium deposits on pipe walls.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

Sound new technique tunes into the shifting shapes of biologyScientists have come up with a novel way of quantifying cell shapes -- with a lot of mathematics and a little musical inspiration.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

New deep reef ocean zone, the rariphotic, teeming with new fish speciesDiving down below the range of scuba in the Curasub, Smithsonian deep reef explorers discovered a new world where roughly half of the fish had no names. They are calling it the rariphotic.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

Natural sniper kills hospital bacteriumBacteria produce proteins to take out specific competitors. One of these proteins can kill the hospital bacterium Pseudomonas aeruginosa. Microbial geneticists have unraveled how this protein launches its attack and ensures that the bacteria die very quickly. In the long term, these proteins hold potential for new antibiotic cocktails.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

Newly discovered antibodies 'nip' malaria in the budScientists have discovered a new class of antibodies that potently block malaria parasites in the initial phase of the infection thus, conferring a sterilizing immunity. These antibodies bind to the surface of the sporozoites, the infectious form of the malaria parasite which is injected into the blood by the mosquito.
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Why You Should Be Wary of Financial Robo-AdvisorsWIRED Columnist Felix Salmon on how companies like Wealthfront are drifting away from low-fee passive investing—and why customers should be skeptical.
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Scientific American Content: Global

Tiny Creatures, Part Plant and Part Animal, May Control the Fate of the PlanetMixotrophs, tiny sea creatures that hunt like animals but grow like plants, can change everything from fish populations to rates of global warming -- Read more on ScientificAmerican.com
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The Scientist RSS

BPA Exposure Alters Behavior and Brain Development in Mice: StudyThe effects occurred after rodents consumed the chemical in levels 10- or 20-fold below the recommended daily dose for humans.
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Live Science

An Icelandic Epic Predicted a Fiery End for Pagan Gods, and Then This Volcano EruptedA series of Earth-shattering volcanic eruptions in Iceland during the Middle Ages may have spurred the people living there to turn away from their pagan gods and convert to Christianity.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

California's misguided attempt to force urban densityLast week, Conor Dougherty and Brad Plumer filed an illuminating piece in the New York Times titled "A Bold, Divisive Plan to Wean Californians From Cars." According to these reporters, the policy is:
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Natural sniper kills hospital bacteriumBacteria produce proteins to take out specific competitors. One of these proteins can kill the hospital bacterium pseudomonas aeruginosa. Microbial geneticists at KU Leuven, Belgium, have unraveled how this protein launches its attack and ensures that the bacteria die very quickly. In the long term, these proteins hold potential for new antibiotic cocktails.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

New evidence for plume beneath Yellowstone National ParkA pair of researchers from the University of Texas has found what they claim is evidence of a plume beneath Yellowstone National Park. In their paper published in the journal Nature Geoscience, Stephen Grand and Peter Nelson further propose that the plume is part of a zone that runs to the park all the way from Mexico.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Climate migrants will soon shift populations of many countries, says World BankA new World Bank report projects that tens to hundreds of millions of people fleeing the gradual effects of climate change will shift centers of population within many countries in Latin America, South Asia and sub-Saharan Africa. If emissions of greenhouse gases remain high, as many as 143 million "internal migrants" might move within their own countries, comprising as much as 3.5 percent of the
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Sea ice coverage at the poles remains at record- and near-record lowsThough La Nina is starting to wane, the ocean-cooling phenomenon continues to lower global temperatures.
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Brain SPECT imaging predicts outcomes in depressed patientsNew research from the Amen Clinics shows that brain SPECT (single photon emission computed tomography) imaging, a study that measures blood flow and activity patterns, identifies who is likely to get better from depression and who is not. The study is published in the Journal of Alzheimer's Disease, because depression is a highly treatable risk for cognitive decline and Alzheimer's disease.
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News

20 percent of Americans responsible for almost half of US food-related greenhouse gas emissionsOn any given day, 20 percent of Americans account for nearly half of US diet-related greenhouse gas emissions, and high levels of beef consumption are largely responsible, according to a new study from researchers at the University of Michigan and Tulane University.
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Sustained bacterial outbreak in mosquitoes limits spread of life-threatening diseasesCertain strains of the Wolbachia bacterium inhibit the transmission of disease-inducing pathogens to humans. Unfortunately, it is not naturally found in mosquitoes that are the primary transmitters of mosquito-borne illnesses. In an article publishing next week in the SIAM Journal on Applied Mathematics, Zhuolin Qu, Ling Xue, and James Mac Hyman use a mathematical model to calculate the most effec
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Five new species of frogs identified in museum collectionsResearchers from Yale-NUS College and the North Carolina Museum of Natural Sciences have discovered five new species of Southeast Asian frogs from a group of museum specimens that was believed to only contain two species. To distinguish the five new species from the original two, they examined almost 400 frogs from 11 natural history museum collections and sequenced five genes from close to 350 in
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Dagens Medicin

Steno Diabetes Center Aarhus har ansat afdelingsledelsenLiselotte Fisker bliver ledende overlæge og Mette Qvortrup Holsting bliver oversygeplejerske på det nye Steno Diabetes Center Aarhus.
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Dagens Medicin

Hver femte hjertepatient bliver ikke udredt til tidenRegionerne overholder ikke udredningsretten for hver femte hjertepatient. Det er slet ikke godt nok, mener sundhedsminister Ellen Trane Nørby (V).
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Scientific American Content: Global

Are Nor'easters and Bomb Cyclones the New Normal?More data are supporting a once-controversial theory that the warming Arctic is making winter weather more extreme -- Read more on ScientificAmerican.com
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Turning up the heat on remote research plots without electricitySeeing how ecosystems respond to rising temperatures often requires heating a research plot. Working in the Arctic and other remote areas, scientists often build structures that rely on passive warming from the sun. This approach only warms the research plot by about 1.5 degrees Celsius. Scientists developed an alternative approach that uses modulating venting. The system requires no electrical po
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How the Jaegers in *Pacific Rim Uprising* Violate PhysicsSometimes real science isn't nearly as exciting as pretend science.
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The FCC Should Use Blockchain to Manage Wireless SpectrumOpinion: The FCC's Jessica Rosenworcel argues that using blockchain technology to distribute wireless spectrum would be efficient and economical.
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Ingeniøren

Stor matematikpris til uventet forbindelse mellem harmonisk analyse og talteoriRobert Langlands er årets modtager af Abelprisen 2018 i matematik. De seks millioner norske kroner, der følger med prisen, vil han give videre til velgørenhed.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

More sting jet storms likely due to global warmingThe UK could be hit by more than double the number of storms with exceptional windspeeds, like the one that caused mayhem across south east England in October 1987, if global warming continues, scientists have warned.
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Viden

Sikkerhedsekspert: Millioner af danskere er også gået i Facebook-fældeMange danskere har fået høstet private oplysninger via apps, lige som det er sket i USA.
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Scientific American Content: Global

Big Blue Marble: The Arctic, Mixotrophs and Other News about Our Ocean Planet-- Read more on ScientificAmerican.com
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Scientific American Content: Global

Video Looks Most Natural Horizontally, but We Hold Our Phones VerticallyWe see horizontally but tend to hold our phones vertically -- Read more on ScientificAmerican.com
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Artificial intelligence gets its day in courtLast september, the ACLU filed an amicus brief in a California case that brings to a head a controversy over the use of algorithms and artificial intelligence in criminal law.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Sustained bacterial outbreak in mosquitoes limits spread of life-threatening diseasesMedical practitioners, such as those at the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, frequently utilize mathematical models when determining how to best control the spread of mosquito-borne illnesses. Diseases such as chikungunya, dengue fever, malaria, and Zika virus can be life-threatening, and no effective vaccine currently exists. While most mitigation strategies aim to eliminate popular mo
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

20 percent of Americans responsible for almost half of US food-related greenhouse gas emissionsOn any given day, 20 percent of Americans account for nearly half of U.S. diet-related greenhouse gas emissions, and high levels of beef consumption are largely responsible, according to a new study from researchers at the University of Michigan and Tulane University.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Addressing climate migration within borders helps countries plan, mitigate effectsMigration in response to climate change is a big topic in the media. But the focus is all too often on either international cross-boundary movements or short-term population displacement from major floods or droughts. While these forms of population movement are important, they are by no means the whole story. A new report by World Bank, CIESIN, CUNY, and PIK, Groundswell: Preparing for Internal C
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

US children now draw female scientists more than everWhen drawing scientists, US children now depict female scientists more often than ever, according to new research, which analyzed five decades of 'Draw-A-Scientist' studies conducted since the 1960s. This change suggests that children's stereotypes linking science with men have weakened over time, said the researchers, consistent with more women becoming scientists and children's media depicting m
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Engineering yeast tolerance to a promising biomass deconstruction solventTo convert plant matter to fuel and other sustainable bioproducts, it must first be broken into digestible sugars for microbes. Gamma-valerolactone (GVL) is a promising chemical solvent for biomass degradation. However, it is toxic to fermentative microbes. Scientists discovered the mechanisms of GVL toxicity to fermentative microbes. They identified gene deletions that created sensitivity or tole
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Superprostheses and realityAssistive devices may soon allow people to perform virtually superhuman feats. According to Robert Riener, however, there are more pressing goals than developing superhumans.
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Science | The Guardian

Richard Dawkins to give away copies of The God Delusion in Islamic countriesAuthor and the Centre for Inquiry planning free ebook versions of his books in Arabic, Urdu, Farsi and Indonesian following a ‘stirring towards atheism’ in some Islamic countries Richard Dawkins is responding to what he called the “stirring towards atheism” in some Islamic countries with a programme to make free downloads of his books available in Arabic, Urdu, Farsi and Indonesian. The scientist
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The Scientist RSS

Image of the Day: Nuclear Pore ComplexThe structure has a stress-resilient architecture reminiscent of suspension bridges.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Trappist-1 exoplanets may have too much water to support lifeA team of researchers from Arizona State University and Vanderbilt University has found evidence that suggests the exoplanets surrounding the star Trappist-1 may be too wet to support life. In their paper published in the journal Nature Astronomy, the group describes using data from prior efforts that focused on determining the mass and diameter of the stars' planets to calculate densities, and fr
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Cybersecurity experts say device makers have 'duty to keep users safe' from hackingWell-connected smart devices at home and in healthcare are currently vulnerable to hacking, warn two new reports.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Scaling plant traits stymied by uncertainty in measured global photosynthesisThere are many ways to calculate how plants take up carbon. The challenge, in part, is scaling these approaches to global levels. Why? Because of the hypotheses behind each approach. Often, the hypothesis relies on data at such a small scale (molecules) that it is hard to scale up. To see how the different ways of determining carbon uptake affect global models, the team compared hypotheses for the
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Certain species of trees retain stored water, limit root growth to survive three months without waterWhy do some tropical trees survive extensive droughts and others do not? Scientists took up this question in a three-month study of various tropical saplings. Their results suggest that species that avoid dehydration have traits that favor water storage, allowing them to retain a water reservoir during the drought. Further, the trees reduce their root surface area, suggesting a role for root absci
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

A study proves there is a link between depth and longevity of marine species like corals and gorgoniansDeep marine ecosystems from 100 to 1,000 meters deep are dominated by long-lived species that live from 100 to 1000 years, while other waters are inhabited by those species that live up to about 10 years.
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Scientific American Content: Global

Is Trump's Opioid Strategy a "War on Drugs" Relapse?The White House says it will boost treatment and strengthen law enforcement -- Read more on ScientificAmerican.com
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Study reveals new insights into how hybrid perovskite solar cells workScientists have gained new insights into a fundamental mystery about hybrid perovskites, low-cost materials that could enhance or even replace conventional solar cells made of silicon.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Helping street sex workers break the cycle of homelessnessA pioneering project has proven successful in helping women sex workers escape a downward spiral – and in one case was a life-saver.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Priorities for managing protected areas are crucial for Bornean elephantsDegraded forests play a crucial role in the future survival of Bornean elephants. A new study, published in the journal Biological Conservation, finds that forests of surprisingly short stature are ideal for elephants.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Why aren't humans 'knuckle-walkers?'Our closest biological relatives, the African apes, are the only animals that walk on their knuckles; CWRU researchers discovered why
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Turning plants into medicine factoriesThe potential to produce cheaper medicines within edible plants including lettuce and canola has taken a significant step forward.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Experiments underway to turn light into matterIn laser facilities in the UK, Imperial physicists are testing an 84-year-old theory which was once thought impossible to prove.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

China to build 'world's fastest' wind tunnelChina has announced it is building the world's fastest wind tunnel to develop a new generation of super-fast airplanes, but it could also be used for hypersonic missile technology.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Can a city ever be truly carbon neutral?Upon becoming Greater Manchester's first elected mayor, Andy Burnham announced his ambition to make the city-region one of the greenest in Europe. In his Mayor's manifesto, the former MP and Labour leadership candidate, committed to "a new, accelerated ambition for Greater Manchester on the green economy and carbon neutrality". If achieved, Manchester would be transformed from one-time poster city
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Sound new technique tunes into the shifting shapes of biologyScientists at the John Innes Centre have come up with a novel way of quantifying cell shapes -- with a lot of mathematics and a little musical inspiration.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Smallest ever sieve separates atomsResearchers at The University of Manchester have discovered that the naturally occurring gaps between individual layers of two-dimensional materials can be used as a sieve to separate different atoms.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Telegram must give FSB encryption keys: Russian courtRussia's Supreme Court on Tuesday ruled the popular Telegram messenger app must provide the country's security services with encryption keys to read users' messaging data, agencies reported.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

UK investigating Cambridge Analytica, FacebookBritain's information commissioner says she is using all her legal powers to investigate the handling of millions of people's personal Facebook data by the social media giant and by political campaign consultants Cambridge Analytica.
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Popular Science

Planes might not be disgusting germ factories after allHealth Surely you can't be serious. Planes make us reckon with the fact that humans are gross, virus-carrying, disease-burdened flesh sacs. You can’t escape inhaling the same air as the man in 14B who…
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BBC News - Science & Environment

Japanese basket pattern inspires new materialResearchers produce a metal with exotic electrical properties by mimicking a pattern from Japanese basket-weaving.
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Feed: All Latest

'#WarGames' Is a Unique, Interactive Revival of the '80s MovieThe "interactive television" experience harkens back to a weird, stitched-together, decades-old videogame genre.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Sound new technique tunes into the shifting shapes of biologyIt's one of the major challenges of biology: how to accurately quantify the mass of swarming, shifting shapes that make up the matter of life.
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The Atlantic

The Iraq War and the Inevitability of IgnoranceThere’s a specific reason it is so hard to be president—in normal circumstances—and why most incumbents look decades older when they leave the job than when they began. The reason is that the only choices normal presidents get to make are the impossible ones—decisions that are not simply very close calls on the merits, but that are guaranteed to lead to tragedy and bitterness whichever way they g
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New Scientist - News

Five billion people face water shortages by 2050, warns UNBillions more will go thirsty unless we increase use of forests and soils to capture and recycle water
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BBC News - Science & Environment

Meet the dogs being trained to sniff out looted ancient treasuresDogs are being trained to detect ancient treasures in an attempt to tackle cultural heritage trafficking.
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BBC News - Science & Environment

Last male northern white rhino dies in KenyaSudan Rhino KenyaSudan died in a Kenyan conservancy at the age of 45, after months of ill health.
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Science | The Guardian

Abel Prize 2018: Robert Langlands wins for 'unified theory of maths'Canadian-American wins ‘maths Nobel’ for the Langlands program, which predicts unexpected connections between different fields Some mathematicians are immortalised by a theorem. Others by a conjecture. But of the great mathematicians only Robert P Langlands is immortalised by a program. Continue reading...
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Science | The Guardian

Spring equinox 2018: it's official, winter is over – despite the snowIt may not feel like spring has arrived, but the days are getting longer and the sun has crossed the celestial equator With patches of snow still covering the ground in parts of Britain, it may not seem like the first day of spring. But as of 4.15am Tuesday morning, winter was officially over for another year. The spring, or vernal, equinox marks the point in space and time when the sun moves acr
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The Scientist RSS

Many Non-Antibiotic Drugs Affect Gut BacteriaA new study finds that more than 200 human-targeted, non-antibiotic drugs inhibit the growth of bacterial species that make up part of the human microbiome.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Who is to blame when driverless cars have an accident?Uber Vehicles CarsThe news that an Uber self-driving vehicle has killed a pedestrian in the US has made headlines around the world.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Researchers show role for cyanide in origins of lifeIt sounds odd, but cyanide may have been a key ingredient in the origins of life.
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The Atlantic

Self-Driving Cars Still Don't Know How to SeeUber Arizona VehiclesOn Sunday, the inevitable happened: An autonomous vehicle struck and killed someone. In Arizona, a woman police identified as Elaine Herzberg was crossing the street with her bicycle when a self-driving Uber SUV smashed into her. Tempe police reported in their preliminary investigation that the vehicle was traveling at 40 miles per hour. Uber has suspended its self-driving car program in response
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Why it doesn't pay to be just nice – you also need to be intelligentNew research has revealed how people's intelligence, rather than their personality traits, leads to success.
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New Scientist - News

Green tea extract may prevent Down’s syndrome face traitsA compound in green tea seems to change the facial features of Down’s syndrome, but researchers warn people not to try it until a safe dosage has been found
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

ESA testing detection of floating plastic litter from orbitThe millions of tonnes of plastic ending up in the oceans every year are a global challenge. ESA is responding by looking at the detection of marine plastic litter from space, potentially charting its highest concentrations and understanding the gigantic scale of the problem.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Team reports diamond ring architecture of a protein complexNuA4/Tip60, a complex with diamond ring architecture, is required for regulatory and repairing processes. Prof. CAI Gang and Prof. Jacques Côté's team reports the 4.7 Å structure of the yeast NuA4/TIP60 complex, which elucidates the detailed architecture and molecular interactions between NuA4 subunits. Related study is published online in Nature Communications on March 19th.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Three genes essential for cells to tell timeOne family of genes allows cells to adapt to daily changes in environmental conditions by adjusting the circadian clock responsible for regular sleep-wake cycles. The new discovery by University of Tokyo scientists reveals for the first time that circadian regulation may be directly connected to cellular stress.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Shedding light on the mystery of the superconducting domeUniversity of Groningen physicists, and colleagues from Nijmegen and Hong Kong, have induced superconductivity in a monolayer of tungsten disulfide. By using an increasing electric field, they were able to show how the material turns from an insulator into a superconductor and then back into a re-entrant insulator again. Their results show the typical dome-shaped superconducting phase, and finally
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Live Science

Did Prehistoric 'Astronomers' Build Stonehenge?Ever since humans could look up to see the sky, we have been amazed by its beauty and untold mysteries. Naturally then, astronomy is often described as the oldest of the sciences, inspiring people for thousands of years.
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Sociologists Examine Hackathons and See ExploitationA study finds that hackathon sponsors take advantage of free labor to create "fictional expectations of innovation that benefits all."
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Feed: All Latest

Medicare Now Covers Genetic Cancer TestingPrecision medicine has finally broken into the mainstream.
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Science | The Guardian

Empty half the Earth of its humans. It's the only way to save the planet | Kim Stanley RobinsonThere are now twice as many people as 50 years ago. But, as EO Wilson has argued, they can all survive – in cities Discussing cities is like talking about the knots in a net: they’re crucial, but they’re only one part of the larger story of the net and what it’s supposed to do. It makes little sense to talk about knots in isolation when it’s the net that matters. Related: The 100 million city: is
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NYT > Science

Robert P. Langlands Is Awarded the Abel Prize, a Top Math HonorThe honor, regarded by some as a Nobel Prize of mathematics, recognizes work on a “grand unified theory” to connect different areas of mathematics.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Swarming drones could help fight Europe's megafiresSwarms of firefighting drones could one day be deployed to tackle hugely destructive megafires that are becoming increasingly frequent in the Mediterranean region because of climate change, arson and poor landscape management.
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Live Science

Sudan, the Last Male Northern White Rhino, Has DiedOver the last 24 hours, Sudan's health declined to the point where he was suffering a great deal and unable to walk.
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New on MIT Technology Review

How to manipulate Facebook and Twitter instead of letting them manipulate youTwitter and Facebook have vast control over our online lives. Here are six ways to take it back.
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Quanta Magazine

Robert Langlands, Mathematical Visionary, Wins the Abel PrizeRobert Langlands, who developed one of the most original insights of 20th-century mathematics, was named the winner of the 2018 Abel Prize at a ceremony in Norway this morning. The prize, which is modeled on the Nobel, is one of the highest honors in mathematics. Langlands , 81, an emeritus professor at the Institute for Advanced Study in Princeton, New Jersey, is the progenitor of the “Langlands
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Scientific American Content: Global

"Elderly Woman" Is Not a Synonym for "Clueless Person"Yet somehow that's often who we're asked to imagine we're aiming at when trying to simplify complex ideas -- Read more on ScientificAmerican.com
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Ingeniøren

Facebooks sikkerhedschef siger op: Vil have mere gennemsigtighedEfter en række problematiske sager, hvor Facebook har været brugt på uhensigtsmæssige måder, har topsikkerhedschefen nu sagt op, da han ikke vil stå på mål for det sociale medies rolle.
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Ingeniøren

Vestager åbner sag om tysk blokade af dansk vindmøllestrømTysklands største netoperatør, TenneT, mistænkes for at have begrænset adgangen for dansk strøm i strid mod konkurrencereglerne. Et problem, som blandt andet brancheorganisationen Dansk Energi længe har peget på.
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Ingeniøren

GALLERI: Hoppende gæster stiller særlige krav til ny K.B.-halRejsegilde for den legendariske K.B.-hal på Frederiksberg, hvor Beatles spillede. Den nye hal ligner den gamle i moderne klæder.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Amazon deforestation is close to tipping pointAmazon Sale USDeforestation of the Amazon is about to reach a threshold beyond which the region's tropical rainforest may undergo irreversible changes that transform the landscape into degraded savanna with sparse, shrubby plant cover and low biodiversity. This warning derives from an editorial published in the journal Science Advances co-authored by Thomas Lovejoy, a professor at George Mason University in the
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Thawing permafrost produces more methane than expectedMethane (CH4) is a potent greenhouse gas that is roughly 30 times more harmful to the climate than carbon dioxide (CO2). Both gases are produced in thawing permafrost as dead animal and plant remains are decomposed. However, methane is only formed if no oxygen is available. Until now, it was assumed that larger amounts of greenhouse gases are formed when the ground was dry and well aerated—when ox
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Ocean acidification: Herring could benefit from an altered food chainJuvenile fish must immediately learn to catch prey and to escape enemies. Additionally, at this stage of their lives, they are highly sensitive to environmental factors such as temperature, oxygen and the pH of the water. These factors are currently changing on a global scale—temperature is rising, the oxygen content of the ocean is decreasing and more carbon dioxide (CO2) from the atmosphere is d
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Scientists synthesize a new substance with antitumoral propertiesScientists from Far Eastern Federal University have developed a new synthetic derivative of fascaplysin—a biologically active substance with antitumoral properties obtained from sea sponges. Biological tests have shown that the compound is two to three times more active than fascaplysin. The results of the study were published in the well-known scientific journal Tetrahedron Letters.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Glacier mass loss passes the point of no return, researchers reportResearchers from the Universities of Bremen and Innsbruck have shown in a recent study that the further melting of glaciers cannot be prevented in the current century—even if all emissions were curtailed. However, due to the slow reaction of glaciers to climate change, human activity will have a massive impact beyond the 21st century. In the long run, 500 meters by car with a mid-range vehicle wil
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Studying the visual recognition abilities of rodentsThe visual process that allows humans to recognize the gender or emotional state of another person is very sophisticated. Until recently, only primates were believed able to perform such complex operations as object recognition. A new study published in the journal Current Biology shows that rodents also use advanced and diversified object recognition strategies. These results confirm the validity
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Quantum bits in two dimensionsTwo novel materials, each composed of a single atomic layer and the tip of a scanning tunneling microscope, are the ingredients for a novel kind of quantum dot. These extremely small nanostructures allow delicate control of individual electrons by fine-tuning their energy levels directly. Such devices are key for modern quantum technologies.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Deeper insight into viral infectionsAn infection with cytomegalovirus is usually harmless for adults. However, during pregnancy, the virus can be transmitted to the unborn baby and cause malformations. Once the viruses have invaded a human cell, they start to produce large amounts of viral proteins. This includes more than 500 proteins and peptides, including 200 previously unknown to science.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Peter Thiel-founded floating-island plan sunk by the government of paradise?It seems the "Next New World" may not be coming to Tahiti after all—the government of French Polynesia has thrown a wrench into plans for a libertarian utopia on floating islands there—as proposed by a group founded by Peter Thiel and a former Google engineer.
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Live Science

Astronomers Have Found Their Paradise, and It's the Coldest and Most Remote Point in AntarcticaAntarctica. The name evokes images of bitter extremes, an environment unkind to humans. Stories of polar explorers battling with the weather and perishing on their way back to safety. Why would astronomers choose to go there?
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Futurity.org

Magnetic field lets tiny ball robots swim ‘breaststroke’Scientists have discovered what may be the simplest form of locomotion in the travels of micron-scale particles linked and driven by a magnetic field. Researchers placed magnetized spheres of different sizes into a solution. When subjected to an “eccentric magnetic field,” the spheres self-assembled and the smaller spheres, attached by virtual hinges, traced rough orbits to one side of their larg
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Isle Royale likely to get 20-30 wolves over a 3-year spanThe National Park Service on Friday formally moved forward with its proposal to put 20 to 30 wolves on Isle Royale in Lake Superior over three years to bolster the nearly extinct population on the island and cull the growing herd of moose.
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Smithsonian researchers name new ocean zone: The rariphoticDiving down below the range of scuba in the Curasub, Smithsonian deep reef explorers discovered a new world where roughly half of the fish had no names. They are calling it the rariphotic.
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News

New study brings us one step closer to understanding how tidal clocks tickA comprehensive study on the rhythmicity of limpets -- mobile intertidal molluscs -- employing field and laboratory observations, as well assembling a clock oriented transcriptome -- shows that in the same way that these animals behave with a tidal rhythm, so too are a majority of their genes expressed in a tidal (and not circadian) rhythm, including some genes which were thought to play an import
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News

USTC reports diamond ring architecture of a protein complexProfessor CAI Gang from USTC and Professor Jacques Côté's team reports the 4.7 Å structure of the yeast NuA4/TIP60 complex, which elucidates the detailed architecture and molecular interactions between NuA4 subunits. A related study is published online in Nature Communications on March 19.
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Discovered mode of drinking in mosquitoes carries biomedical implications'Mosquitoes are not just a nuisance, but also a health threat,' said Virginia Tech's Mark Stremler, a study co-author. 'The more we can understand about their robustness and how they survive, the better chance we have of figuring out ways to control them.'
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Rain or snow? Humidity, location can make all the difference, new map showsUniversity of Colorado Boulder researchers have created a map of the Northern Hemisphere showing how location and humidity can affect precipitation, illustrating wide variability in how and why different areas receive snow or rain.
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Chronic fatigue syndrome possibly explained by lower levels of key thyroid hormonesA new study reveals that chronic fatigue syndrome, a debilitating condition with unknown causes, can be explained by lower thyroid levels -- but may be distinct from thyroidal disease. This can be seen as a first step to finding a treatment for a common illness for which diagnosis is hard to come by.
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Natural sniper kills hospital bacteriumBacteria produce proteins to take out specific competitors. One of these proteins can kill the hospital bacterium Pseudomonas aeruginosa. Microbial geneticists at KU Leuven, Belgium, have unravelled how this protein launches its attack and ensures that the bacteria die very quickly. In the long term, these proteins hold potential for new antibiotic cocktails.
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Researchers create new low-cost, sustainable material for reducing air and water pollutionA new class of hybrid materials shows promise as an affordable and sustainable product for reducing particulate matter in air and organic pollutants in wastewater. The material, produced inexpensively from an industrial waste by-product and naturally abundant polymers, performed more efficiently than activated carbon, the current gold standard.
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The Atlantic

One Morning in BaghdadOne morning in October 2003, I was shaken out of bed by an explosion. I was in Baghdad, leading a platoon of Army Rangers as part of a special operations task force that was hunting down the famous “deck of cards”—the last of the Ba’ath Regime loyalists, and Saddam himself. Because we did all of our work at night, I had only been sleeping for a few hours. When I first felt the explosion, I rolled
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The Atlantic

YouTube Removes the 'Hail, Trump' Video From SearchLess than two weeks after the 2016 election, a prominent alt-right leader addressed more than 200 people gathered at the Ronald Reagan Building in Washington, D.C. Millions of people would come to know what happened next. “Hail Trump, hail our people, hail victory!” said the leader, Richard B. Spencer. Attendees in the room replied with shouts, applause, and Nazi salutes. The speech closed the an
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The Atlantic

A Battle Over Abortion and Free SpeechUpdated at 2:43 p.m. ET Anyone who wants to understand National Institute of Family Life Advocates v. Becerra , which the Supreme Court will hear Tuesday, would do well to start with a viewing of Jackson , Maisie Crow’s 2016 documentary about the abortion battle in Mississippi. In one memorable scene in the film, Barbara Beavers, director of the pro-life Center for Pregnancy Choices , asks donors
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The Atlantic

What's the Difference Between a Frat and a Gang?When I thought about locking up with a crew in 1996, I wanted to see a full initiation first, not parts I stumbled upon over the years. My friend Cliff and I arrived at a park not close from my home in Jamaica, Queens. Leaves danced with the wind around our feet, wafting an eerie feeling in my 14-year-old black body. The grounds of the initiation beckoned: a high-rise chain link fence, enclosing
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The Atlantic

When Guilt Is GoodA few years ago, researchers in Germany set out to plumb the moral consciences of small children. They invited a series of 2- and 3-year-olds to play with a marble track in a lab. Close to the track—inauspiciously close—was a block tower that one of the adult experimenters claimed to have painstakingly constructed. Just before turning her back, she asked them not to damage it. Needless to say, th
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The Atlantic

Can a Simple Test Match You With Your Perfect Dog?Chaz is a free spirit. Iris is a good girl looking for love. Dylan is a foodie who isn’t sure how he feels about kids. Luke likes long walks—really long walks. All of them are ready for a long-term relationship. In fact, they’d like to move in right away. All of them are dogs. Taking a cue from dating websites, a number of programs have begun using personality tests to pair pets with owners. For
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Science : NPR

Why Some Men Have A Harder Time Confiding In OthersMany of us find our circle of friends gets smaller as we get older. Researchers say it is especially true for men and that social isolation can have grave effects on their physical and mental health.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Facebook apologizes for offensive autocomplete search resultsFacebook search was not safe for work or home on Thursday night.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Researchers name new ocean zone: The rariphoticBased on the unique fish fauna observed from a manned submersible on a southern Caribbean reef system in Curaçao, Smithsonian explorers defined a new ocean-life zone, the rariphotic, between 130 and 309 meters (about 400 to 1,000 feet) below the surface. The rariphotic occurs just below a previously defined reef zone, the mesophotic, which extends from about 40 to as deep as 150 meters (about 120-
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Researchers create new low-cost, sustainable material for reducing air and water pollutionA new class of low-cost and sustainable hybrid materials could possibly displace activated carbon as the preferred choice for reducing wastewater and air pollution. The material, described in Frontiers in Chemistry, is synthesized inexpensively from solid wastes and a naturally abundant polymer—and can cut down pollutants in air and wastewater with more success than activated carbon, the current g
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

New study brings us one step closer to understanding how tidal clocks tickAlmost all organisms have an internal biological clock that synchronizes their behavior with the environment in which they live. Endogenous biological clocks follow the major cyclical rhythms: the solar-influenced 24-hour transition of day and night, the tidal 12.4 hour rising and falling of the tides that is governed by the lunar cycle, and the annual seasonal changes.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Discovered mode of drinking in mosquitoes carries biomedical implicationsMosquitoes may have a reputation for being one of the world's most intractable pests, but they're actually quite tiny and fragile. So when an international team of scientists, including several at Virginia Tech, wanted to observe the underlying mechanisms of how the insects feed, they had to get creative.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Google Doodle honors philanthropist George PeabodyGoogle is paying tribute Friday to "the father of modern philanthropy."
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Rain or snow? Humidity, location can make all the difference, new map showsUniversity of Colorado Boulder researchers have created a map of the Northern Hemisphere showing how location and humidity can affect precipitation, illustrating wide variability in how and why different areas receive snow or rain.
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Ingeniøren

Første offer for selvkørende bil: Krydsede vejen 100 meter fra fodgængerovergangSøndag aften blev en kvinde påkørt af en af Ubers selvkørende biler i en forstad til Phoenix, USA.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Team creates the world's first formic acid-based fuel cellClean energy costs will be equal or less than fossil fuels by 2020, while renewable energy sources will meet 40 percent of global energy demand by 2040. But because renewable energy depends on the sun and wind, it is still largely unreliable. Therefore, the challenge is to develop new methods for storing renewable energy surplus in a way that allows it to be used when needed.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Cosmologists create record-breaking simulation of galaxy formationBy understanding the stars and their origins, we learn more about where we come from. However, the vastness of the galaxy—let alone the entire universe—means experiments to understand its origins are expensive, difficult and time consuming. In fact, experiments are impossible for studying certain aspects of astrophysics, meaning that in order to gain greater insight into how galaxies formed, resea
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Fish accounted for surprisingly large part of the Stone Age dietNew research at Lund University in Sweden can now show what Stone Age people actually ate in southern Scandinavia 10,000 years ago. The importance of fish in the diet has proven to be greater than expected. So, if you want to follow a Paleo diet, you could quite simply eat a lot of fish.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Amazon sellers seek more clout with new 'merchants guild'Amazon Sale USThe millions of merchants who sell products on Amazon.com Inc. have long craved more leverage over their powerful benefactor. Now some are creating a trade association in the hopes that a unified voice will force Amazon to take them more seriously.
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Ingeniøren

USA: Google udleverede data om alle brugere i et område til politietNår sagen er alvorlig nok, så er det ikke kun det danske politi, der benytter omfattende overvågning i jagten på gerningsmanden.
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NYT > Science

Canada’s Outdoor Rinks Are Melting. So Is a Way of Life.Canada loves its ice, and outdoor hockey is part of the nation's cultural identity. So what happens when winters get too warm for backyard rinks?
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Can Facebook be trusted with your personal info? Voter harvesting scheme shows perils for usersFacebook Data Cambridge AnalyticaCan Facebook be trusted with your personal information?
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Ingeniøren

Energimastodonter: Sæt fokus på energibesparelser frem for VEDanfoss, Grundfos, Velux og Rockwool etablerer ny interesseorganisation, der vil dreje fokus væk fra grøn energi og mere over mod energieffektivitet.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Apple takes a very un-tech approach to solving fake news: human editorsWe all agree there's too much disinformation on the Web.
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Viden

Gener, manipulation og hyper-velsmagende mad gør os tykkeEvolution og genetik er delvist skyld i, at vi bliver federe. Men vi skal også lære at sige nej til svigermors kage og supermarkedernes tilbud på billigt slik.
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Tiny gels sop up intestinal toxinsBacterial infections that target the intestine can cause conditions that range from uncomfortable to deadly. While it's easy to blame the bacteria, it's actually the toxins the bacteria produce that trigger inflammation, diarrhea, fever and cramps. Researchers now report the development of a microgel scavenger that targets toxins instead of bacteria. They will present their results today at the 25
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Continuously killing bacteria on coated stainless steel -- add bleach to rechargeStainless steel is the gold standard for kitchen appliances and cookware, but bacteria can grow on these surfaces, contaminating food. Current coatings available on the market are pricey and potentially harmful, so scientists have now developed an affordable specialized polymer coating for such surfaces that they can recharge with bleach treatments. The researchers are presenting their results tod
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Wildfire intensity impacts water quality and its treatment in forested watershedsThe recent Thomas Fire was the largest wildfire in in California's modern history. Now, researchers report that wildfires in forested watersheds can have a variable but predictable impact on the substances that are released from soils and flow into drinking water sources. The research provides important insights for water utilities evaluating treatment options after severe wildfires. The scientist
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News

'Candy cane' polymer weave could power future functional fabrics and devicesIf scientists are going to deliver on the promise of implantable artificial organs or clothing that dries itself, they'll first need to solve the problem of inflexible batteries that run out of juice too quickly. Today, researchers report that they've developed a new material by weaving two polymers together in a way that increases charge storage capacity. The researchers are presenting their resu
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Smoked foods are tastier, less harmful with a tip from the auto industryInfusing foods with smoke can impart delicious nuanced flavors, but could also come with an unwelcome side of carcinogens. To reduce the carcinogen content of smoked foods, researchers took a lesson from the automobile industry, running the smoke through a zeolite filter to remove harmful compounds. It worked, and with a happy bonus: superior smoke flavor. The researchers will present their result
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Making fragrances last longerFrom floral perfume to fruity body wash and shampoos, scents heavily influence consumer purchases. But for most, the smell doesn't last long after showering. Scientists have now developed a way to get those fragrances to stick to the skin longer instead of washing down the drain immediately after being applied. The researchers are presenting their results today at the 255th National Meeting & Expo
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Vegetable compound could have a key role in 'beeting' Alzheimer's diseaseA compound in beets that gives the vegetable its distinctive red color could help slow the accumulation of misfolded proteins in the brain, a process associated with Alzheimer's disease. Scientists say this could lead to the development of drugs that could alleviate some of the long-term effects of the disease, the world's leading cause of dementia. The researchers will present their results today
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Facebook is testing ways to compensate video creators so it can cut into YouTube's dominanceIf you're a die-hard fan of a Facebook video creator, the social network may soon give you a way to pay for exclusive content and award you with a digital badge to declare your fandom.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

DNA in the water could help reveal where endangered manatees liveAs big as they are, Florida manatees aren't always so easy to find.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Salk scientists adapt powerful gene-editing system to correct dementia in labThe revolutionary CRISPR/Cas9 gene editing system made it possible to rapidly and precisely alter DNA, the essential molecule of life. But DNA doesn't work by itself, it relies on the messenger molecule RNA to carry out its instructions.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Au revoir, baguette! France goes burger-madBaguette lovers may be horrified to learn that in 2017, for the first time ever, hamburger sales were higher in France than the classic jambon-beurre sandwich.
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Science | The Guardian

Shoestring expedition returns with wild photos of SumatraA shoestring expedition to one of the remotest places in Sumatra has returned with stunning photos of tigers, tapirs, clouded leopards among other rare species, large and small. Will they find orangutans next? Last year a motley crew of conservationists, adventurers and locals trekked into one of the last unexplored regions of Sumatra. They did so with a mission: check camera traps and see what t
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Science : NPR

Shingles Is Nasty, And The New Vaccine Works Well. Why Do Adults Avoid Shots?Beyond annual flu shots, older adults need protection against shingles, pneumonia, tetanus, diphtheria and pertussis, federal health officials say. But many aren't getting vaccinated. (Image credit: Andrew Brookes/Getty Images/Cultura RF)
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

'Candy cane' polymer weave could power future functional fabrics and devicesIf scientists are ever going to deliver on the promise of implantable artificial organs or clothing that dries itself, they'll first need to solve the problem of inflexible batteries that run out of juice too quickly. They're getting closer, and today researchers report that they've developed a new material by weaving two polymers together in a way that vastly increases charge storage capacity.
1d

Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Continuously killing bacteria on coated stainless steel—add bleach to rechargeStainless steel is the gold standard for kitchen appliances and cookware, described as modern and sleek. But bacteria can grow on stainless steel surfaces, contaminating food. Current coatings available on the market are pricey and potentially harmful, so scientists have now developed an affordable specialized polymer coating for such surfaces that they can recharge with bleach treatments.
1d

Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Wildfire intensity impacts water quality and its treatment in forested watershedsThe recent Thomas Fire in California was the largest wildfire in the state's modern history. It scorched nearly 282,000 acres between December 2017 and January 2018, and serves as a reminder of how devastating such events can be. Now, researchers report that wildfires in forested watersheds can have a variable but predictable impact on the substances that are released from soils and flow into drin
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Making fragrances last longerFrom floral perfume to fruity body wash and shampoos, scents heavily influence consumer purchases. But for most, the smell doesn't last long after showering before it fades away. Scientists have now developed a way to get those fragrances to stick to the skin longer instead of washing down the drain immediately after being applied.
1d

Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Smoked foods are tastier, less harmful with a tip from the auto industryInfusing foods with smoke can impart delicious nuanced flavors, but could also come with an unwelcome side of carcinogens. To reduce the carcinogen content of smoked foods, researchers took a lesson from the automobile industry, running the smoke through a zeolite filter to remove harmful compounds. It worked, and with a happy bonus: superior smoke flavor.
1d

Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Vegetable compound could have a key role in 'beeting' Alzheimer's diseaseA compound in beets that gives the vegetable its distinctive red color could eventually help slow the accumulation of misfolded proteins in the brain, a process that is associated with Alzheimer's disease. Scientists say this discovery could lead to the development of drugs that could alleviate some of the long-term effects of the disease, the world's leading cause of dementia.
1d

Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Tiny gels sop up intestinal toxinsBacterial infections that target the intestine can cause conditions that range from uncomfortable to deadly. While it's easy to blame the bacteria, it's actually the toxins the bacteria produce that trigger inflammation, diarrhea, fever and cramps. Treatment strategies typically include indiscriminate antibiotics that slaughter health-promoting gut bacteria along with disease-causing microbes. Res
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BBC News - Science & Environment

Children drawing more women in scienceA US study shows that more children draw women scientists than they did in the 1960s and 1970s.
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Nyheder - Forskning - Videnskab

Dansk oldtidsforsker modtager ’den lille nobelpris’Assyriolog Mogens Trolle Larsen fra Københavns Universitet modtager 20. marts Det Svenske Akademis...
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Switch discovered to convert blood vessels to blood stem cells in embryonic developmentA switch has been discovered that instructs blood vessel cells to become blood stem cells during embryonic development in mice. Reported in eLife, the findings from researchers from the Wellcome Sanger Institute in Cambridge and the European Molecular Biology Laboratory in Rome could aid research into creating new blood cells for transplants and for understanding cancer metastasis.
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