Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

New linguistic analysis finds Dravidian language family is approximately 4,500 years oldThe origin of the Dravidian language family, consisting of about 80 varieties spoken by 220 million people across southern and central India and surrounding countries, can be dated to about 4,500 years ago. This estimate is based on new linguistic analyses by an international team, including researchers from the Max Planck Institute for the Science of Human History, that used data collected first-
21h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Two genes likely play key role in extreme nausea and vomiting during pregnancyA new study has identified two genes associated with hyperemesis gravidarum, whose cause has not been determined in previous studies. The genes, known as GDF15 and IGFBP7, are both involved in the development of the placenta and play important roles in early pregnancy and appetite regulation.
11h
Ingeniøren

Forskere: Plastpose-konklusion var for kækDet førte til megen diskussion, da Miljøstyrelsen meldte ud, at plastposer var markant bedre for miljøet end muleposer. Senere er der dog kommet mere frem i sagen.
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The Atlantic

Kellyanne Conway Edges Toward Accepting the Job of Communications DirectorKellyanne Conway is moving closer to accepting President Donald Trump’s offer for her to succeed Hope Hicks as White House communications director, if only on an interim basis, according to multiple sources who have spoken with her. “It’s becoming increasingly difficult for her to say no,” said one senior White House official. The official said that First Lady Melania Trump and Vice President Mik
5min
New on MIT Technology Review

The scientist who gave Cambridge Analytica its Facebook data got lousy reviews online
6min
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Mat baits, hooks and destroys pollutants in waterA polymer mat developed at Rice University has the ability to fish biologically harmful contaminants from water through a strategy known as "bait, hook and destroy."
16min
The Atlantic

The Atlantic Politics & Policy Daily: Omnibust?Today in 5 Lines Congress is expected to unveil a $1.3 trillion spending bill to keep the government funded until September. Lawmakers have until Friday at midnight to pass the bill before the government shuts down, but President Trump is already threatening to veto it . The man suspected in a series of recent bombings in Austin, Texas, died after blowing himself up Wednesday morning. Authorities
20min
EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Surpassing critical blood pressure threshold could signal hypertension regardless of ageA new study supports updated blood pressure guidelines that redefine hypertension at a lower threshold.
28min
EurekAlert! - Breaking News

How often do medical problems lead to bankruptcy?A new MIT-led study has determined how often medical costs lead to personal bankruptcy.
28min
cognitive science

Babies Can Think Logically before They Learn to Talksubmitted by /u/burtzev [link] [comments]
39min
Scientific American Content: Global

U.S. Flu Spread Counts On Southern Cold SnapsA multifactorial analysis finds that the ignition of a flu epidemic stems from a blast of colder weather striking an otherwise warm, humid, urban environment, and driving people indoors into close... -- Read more on ScientificAmerican.com
41min
Live Science

How This Bulging Lump on a Man's Hand Revealed a Serious Heart InfectionIt started out as a red patch on a man's palm. But soon it turned into a raised, blue lump that pulsed with his heartbeat.
44min
EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Mat baits, hooks and destroys pollutants in waterA polymer mat developed at Rice University has the ability to fish biologically harmful contaminants from water through a strategy known as 'bait, hook and destroy.'
49min
EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Bioengineered tooth bud model functionalized with decellularized tooth bud ECMAt the 47th Annual Meeting of the American Association for Dental Research (AADR), held in conjunction with the 42nd Annual Meeting of the Canadian Association for Dental Research (CADR), Alen Blagajcevic, student at Tufts University School of Dental Medicine, Boston, Mass., presented an oral session titled 'Bioengineered Tooth Bud Model Functionalized With Decellularized Tooth Bud ECM.' The AADR/
49min
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Transforming oral health through science and evidence-based practiceThe 47th Annual Meeting of the American Association for Dental Research (AADR), held in conjunction with the 42nd Annual Meeting of the Canadian Association for Dental Research (CADR), featured a symposium sponsored by the American Dental Association (ADA) titled 'Transforming Oral Health Through Science and Evidence-based Practice.' The AADR/CADR Annual Meeting is in Fort Lauderdale, Fla., USA fr
49min
EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Three-dimensional printing and bioprinting for tissue engineeringThe 47th Annual Meeting of the American Association for Dental Research (AADR), held in conjunction with the 42nd Annual Meeting of the Canadian Association for Dental Research (CADR), featured a symposium titled 'Three-dimensional Printing and Bioprinting for Tissue Engineering.' The AADR/CADR Annual Meeting is in Fort Lauderdale, Fla., USA from March 21-24, 2018.
49min
New on MIT Technology Review

Genes of human “mutants” point to a new superpowerDNA search finds people resistant to liver disease. Can we mimic the effect with a drug?
49min
New on MIT Technology Review

Industrialization of ancient DNA search sets off a “bone rush”
49min
Scientific American Content: Global

Virologist Robert Redfield Named as Next CDC DirectorThe Maryland-based clinician will not require Senate confirmation -- Read more on ScientificAmerican.com
54min
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Travis Kalanick's Return and the 'Bad Boys' Who Always Come BackUber founder Travis Kalanick is a CEO again, after investing $150 million in a real-estate company that owns parking lots.
1h
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Mark Zuckerberg's Silence on Cambridge Analytica Has Done Irreversible DamageFacebook Mark ZuckerbergFacebook was forged in its founders image. So unlike traditional companies—say Google or Microsoft—Zuckerberg’s silence has already harmed his bottom line.
1h
Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

Middle-aged tooth loss linked to increased coronary heart disease riskLosing two or more teeth during middle age is associated with increased cardiovascular disease risk. Having fewer natural teeth by middle age is linked to higher cardiovascular disease risk.
1h
Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

Flight delays: Study finds out why some African birds stay home longerParents of millennials still living at home aren't the only ones with children that refuse to leave. Many animal species have adult offspring that are slow to take flight, but when and how they leave has been poorly understood by scientists. Now, new research on a desert-dwelling African bird is yielding some answers.
1h
Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

Mono-unsaturated fats from plants, not animals may reduce risk of death from heart disease and other causesDiets rich in mono-unsaturated fats from plants may lower the risk of death from heart disease and other causes. The largest reductions in the risk of death were found when healthy fats from plant sources replaced saturated fats, trans fats and refined carbohydrates.
1h
Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

Grilling and other high-temperature cooking may raise risk of high blood pressureAmong people who routinely eat meat, chicken and fish, those who grill, broil or roast these foods at high temperatures may be more likely to develop high blood pressure.
1h
Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

Connection between drug, alcohol use and infant abdominal malformationAlcohol use early in the pregnancy by the mother may be a risk factor for a condition in which an infant's intestines develop outside the abdomen, according to a study.
1h
Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

Online tech is changing the dynamics of gift-givingFacebook Data Cambridge AnalyticaOnline gift-giving is spreading in social networks and causing people to give more gifts -- online and in person -- according to a new study. About half of these gifts were unlikely to have occurred offline or via another online channel.
1h
Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

New brain scanner allows patients to move freely for the first timeA new generation of brain scanner, that can be worn like a helmet allowing patients to move naturally whilst being scanned, has been developed. It is part of a five-year Wellcome funded project which has the potential to revolutionize the world of human brain imaging.
1h
Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

New design produces true lithium-air batteryResearchers have designed a new lithium-air battery that works in a natural-air environment and still functioned after a record-breaking 750 charge/discharge cycles.
1h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Facebook's Zuckerberg admits mistakes—but no apology (Update)Breaking more than four days of silence, Facebook CEO Mark Zuckerberg admitted mistakes and outlined steps to protect user data in light of a privacy scandal involving a Trump-connected data-mining firm.
1h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Online tech is changing the dynamics of gift-givingFacebook Data Cambridge AnalyticaOnline gift-giving is spreading in social networks and causing people to give more gifts - online and in person - according to a new study led by René Kizilcec, Cornell University assistant professor of information science. About half of these gifts were unlikely to have occurred offline or via another online channel.
1h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Nanomaterials hold promise for producing hydrogen from waterHydrogen holds promise as an inexpensive form of clean energy, but finding an efficient and affordable way to produce the fuel from water—a technique known as water-splitting—remains a key scientific challenge.
1h
Popular Science

You don't have you delete Facebook, but you could definitely be using it betterTechnology Your Facebook account is spraying your personal info onto the internet like a hose. Here's how to stop it. You don't need to stop using Facebook, but you should stop using it so poorly.
1h
Latest Headlines | Science News

False alarms may be a necessary part of earthquake early warningsTo give enough time to take protective action, earthquake warning systems may have to issue alerts long before it’s clear how strong the quake will be.
1h
Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

Live 3-D printing of osteogenic scaffolds into bone defectsSevere traumatic injuries to the cranium have been challenging to heal due to the large missing bone volume. Typically, metal or plastic implants are used. But, these implants can take a long time to be customized for fit and often take a longer than desired time to support bone fixation. This can often lead to multiple revision surgeries if the defect is not properly healed. Moreover, the tissue
1h
Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

New artificial intelligence technique dramatically improves the quality of medical imagingResearchers have developed a new technique based on artificial intelligence and machine learning that should enable clinicians to acquire high-quality images from limited data.
1h
Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

Brief cardiac arrest? Tend to the heart, but don't neglect the brainPatients who survive a brief cardiac arrest and who appear neurologically intact should nonetheless receive a detailed neuropsychological assessment before being discharged, suggests a new study.
1h
Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

Drought-induced changes in forest composition amplify effects of climate changeThe face of American forests is changing, due to climate change-induced shifts in rainfall and temperature that are causing shifts in the abundance of numerous tree species, according to a new article. The result means some forests in the eastern U.S. are already starting to look different, but more important, it means the ability of those forests to soak up carbon is being altered as well, which
1h
The Atlantic

The Strange Tale of Trump's Phone Call to PutinDonald Trump V. Putin“DO NOT CONGRATULATE.” That was the instruction that President Donald Trump received on briefing materials before he called Russian President Vladimir Putin on Tuesday to discuss Putin’s victory in a reelection widely regarded as corrupt. But Trump did congratulate Putin, and he also declined to bring up the recent poisoning of an ex-Russian spy and his daughter in London, a crime that the Britis
1h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Study evaluates connection between drug, alcohol use and infant abdominal malformationAlcohol use early in the pregnancy by the mother may be a risk factor for a condition in which an infant's intestines develop outside the abdomen, according to a study published in the Journal of Maternal-Fetal and Neonatal Medicine.
1h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Online tech is changing the dynamics of gift-givingOnline gift-giving is spreading in social networks and causing people to give more gifts -- online and in person -- according to a new study led by René Kizilcec, Cornell University assistant professor of information science. About half of these gifts were unlikely to have occurred offline or via another online channel.
1h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Does menopausal hormone therapy maintain the brain?Taking menopausal hormone therapy soon after menopause to relieve symptoms may also benefit the brain, according to a study published in the March 21, 2018, online issue of Neurology®, the medical journal of the American Academy of Neurology.
1h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Drinking sugary drinks may be associated with greater risk of deathBeing among the highest vs. the lowest 25 percent of consumers of sugary beverages was associated with increased risk of death in people over 45 in an observational study which establishes a trend but does not prove cause and effect. There was no increased risk of death from consumption of sugar-sweetened foods.
1h
Live Science

Creator of 'Grand Unified Theory of Mathematics' Wins Prestigious Math PrizeRobert Langlands, a professor at the Institute for Advanced Studies at Princeton University, won one of mathematics' most prestigious prizes for a lifetime for groundbreaking work.
1h
The Scientist RSS

Tau Production Increased in Alzheimers PatientsThe findings suggest that faster synthesis, rather than decreased clearance, causes the protein to build up in neurons.
1h
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Mark Zuckerberg Speaks Out on Cambridge Analytica ScandalFacebook Mark ZuckerbergAfter a series of revelations of data misuse ballooned into a company crisis, Facebook's founder finally broke his silence.
1h
Big Think

Logic arrives before words for human babiesA new study reveals that babies as young as one year old can think logically. Read More
1h
Big Think

The first thing we do is nudge the lawyersIn early 1969, Ralph Nader placed an ad in the Harvard Crimson calling on law students to apply to work with him to investigate various federal agencies. The group of young lawyers would become known as ‘Nader’s Raiders’: an iconic posse aiming to shake up Washington in the name of ‘the public ... Read More
1h
NYT > Science

Stephen Hawking to Be Interred at Westminster AbbeyThe cosmologist’s ashes will be buried there later this year, near a few legendary scientists like Darwin and Newton.
2h
NYT > Science

Borrowing G.O.P. Playbook, Democratic States Sue the Government and Rack Up WinsDemocratic attorneys general are suing the Trump administration, just as their Republican counterparts sued the Obama administration. Each side has scored victories.
2h
NYT > Science

Trilobites: Robotic Fish to Keep a Fishy Eye on the Health of the OceansResearchers introduced SoFi, a soft robotic fish that can be operated underwater with a souped up Super Nintendo controller.
2h
Viden

Overblik: Sådan fik - og brugte - Cambridge Analytica 50 millioner profilerEn uskyldig app til personlighedstests høstede de data, som Cambridge Analytica selv mener, var afgørende for Donald Trumps valgsejr.
2h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

New Mexico regulators OK massive wind farms near TexasNew Mexico regulators on Wednesday approved a $1.6 billion plan that calls for building two massive wind farms along the Texas-New Mexico border.
2h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Crisis experts say Facebook has mishandled the data scandal (Update)Facebook Mark ZuckerbergThe crisis-management playbook is pretty simple: Get ahead of the story, update authorities and the public regularly, accept responsibility and take decisive action. Crisis-management experts say that until Wednesday, Facebook was 0-for-4.
2h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Washington state's electric vehicle sales tax break to endWashington state's sales tax exemption for electric vehicles is expected to end sometime this summer after efforts to extend it stalled during the recent legislative session.
2h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Drought-induced changes in forest composition amplify effects of climate changeThe face of American forests is changing, thanks to climate change-induced shifts in rainfall and temperature that are causing shifts in the abundance of numerous tree species, according to a new paper by University of Florida researchers.
2h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Drought-induced changes in forest composition amplify effects of climate changeThe face of American forests is changing, thanks to climate change-induced shifts in rainfall and temperature that are causing shifts in the abundance of numerous tree species, according to a new paper by University of Florida researchers.
2h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Automated notification system improves follow-up of actionable tests pending at dischargeA new study by researchers from Brigham and Women's Hospital demonstrates that the implementation of a simple automated notification system can improve tests pending at discharge (TPAD) follow-up.
2h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Live 3-D printing of osteogenic scaffolds into bone defectsAt the 47th Annual Meeting of the American Association for Dental Research (AADR), held in conjunction with the 42nd Annual Meeting of the Canadian Association for Dental Research (CADR), Venu G. Varanasi (University of Texas at Arlington College of Nursing and Health Innovation and Texas A&M University College of Dentistry, Dallas), presented an oral session titled 'Live 3-D Printing of Osteogeni
2h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Two Americans, one Russian blast off for ISSTwo astronauts, a cosmonaut and a ball set to be used in the forthcoming football World Cup in Russia blasted off Wednesday for a two-day flight to the International Space Station.
2h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Uber co-founder Kalanick shifts gears to real estate startupUber co-founder and ousted chief Travis Kalanick is shifting gears to take charge of a startup devoted to giving shops or parking lots new purpose as venues for internet-age businesses.
2h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Arsenic in groundwater? Virginia coal ash case before courtVirginia's largest electric utility asked a federal appeals court Wednesday to overturn a judge's ruling that the company is violating federal law by discharging arsenic through groundwater into surrounding waters from a coal ash storage site.
2h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

NASA finds major Tropical Cyclone Marcus getting strongerNow a Category 4 hurricane on the Saffir-Simpson Hurricane Wind Scale, Tropical Cyclone Marcus continues to strengthen as it moves south and keeps off-shore from Western Australia. NASA's Terra satellite looked at Marcus in infrared light and saw a well-organized hurricane with a wide eye.
2h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

New artificial intelligence technique dramatically improves the quality of medical imagingA radiologist's ability to make accurate diagnoses from high-quality diagnostic imaging studies directly impacts patient outcome. However, acquiring sufficient data to generate the best quality imaging comes at a cost - increased radiation dose for computed tomography (CT) and positron emission tomography (PET) or uncomfortably long scan times for magnetic resonance imaging (MRI). Now researchers
2h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Mathematicians invent tool to judge when voting maps have been unfairly drawnIn 1812, the governor of Massachusetts, Elbridge Gerry, approved a narrow and winding voting district for the state senate that curved from Marblehead around to Salisbury. It looked like a long-necked salamander, Federalist newspaper editors declared. They labeled the district "The Gerry-Mander," and the Salem-Gazette warned that it was a "monster brought forth to swallow and devour your Liberties
2h
The Atlantic

Trump Vents His Anger Over Border-Wall FundingPresident Donald Trump threatened to veto a massive government spending package over border wall funding measures, a senior White House official and two senior House Republican aides told The Atlantic . The president is also “upset” that the bill lacks a measure to defund sanctuary cities, both sources added. “He certainly wants the wall money,” the senior White House official said. “And he knows
2h
Popular Science

The perfect Rubik’s to challenge your brain—whether you're a beginner, expert, or in betweenTechnology These puzzles range from easy to pull-your-hair-out hard. These cuboid puzzles are designed to challenge your mind and your patience.
2h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Brief cardiac arrest? Tend to the heart, but don't neglect the brainPatients who survive a brief cardiac arrest and who appear neurologically intact should nonetheless receive a detailed neuropsychological assessment before being discharged, suggests a joint study by researchers at Baycrest's Rotman Research Institute (RRI) and Israel's Rambam Medical Center.
2h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Learning to seeResearchers with the Martinos Center for Biomedical Imaging at Massachusetts General Hospital have developed a new technique based on artificial intelligence and machine learning that should enable clinicians to acquire high-quality images from limited data.
2h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News

New brain scanner allows patients to move freely for the first timeA new generation of brain scanner, that can be worn like a helmet allowing patients to move naturally whilst being scanned, has been developed by researchers at the Sir Peter Mansfield Imaging Centre, University of Nottingham and the Wellcome Centre for Human Neuroimaging, UCL. It is part of a five-year Wellcome funded project which has the potential to revolutionize the world of human brain imagi
2h
Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

Parkinson's gene initiates disease outside of the brainThe most common gene mutation associated with Parkinson's alters cells circulating outside the brain, not within, offering a new understanding of what causes the disease.
2h
Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

Forgetting details, getting the gist may prompt false memories in older adultsOlder adults often complain about forgetting, but psychologists now suggest that another problem may be misremembering.
2h
Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

Neuroscientists develop potential tools for the study of brain functionA team of neuroscientists are inching closer to developing the tools needed to decipher the brain. Now, the team has demonstrated how these proteins can be used as tools to regulate the activity of individual neurons in the brain through changes in temperature. These tools will advance fundamental brain research and potentially lead to 'deep brain stimulation' treatments used for Alzheimer's and P
2h
Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

Conservation costs can be higher than bargained forSweeping policies that reward people in environmentally sensitive areas for returning their farmlands to nature have been lauded as ecological triumphs. But a new study shows that over time some participants may become conservation martyrs.
2h
Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

Gradual release of immunotherapy at site of tumor surgery prevents tumors from returningA new study by Dana-Farber Cancer Institute scientists suggests it may be possible to prevent tumors from recurring and to eradicate metastatic growths by implanting a gel containing immunotherapy during surgical removal of a tumor.
2h
Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

Seismologists introduce new measure of earthquake rupturesA team of seismologists has developed a new measurement of seismic energy release that can be applied to large earthquakes. It provides a measure of earthquake rupture complexity that better captures variations in the amount and duration of slip along the fault for events that may have similar magnitudes.
2h
Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

World's first continuous room-temperature solid-state maser built using diamondThe breakthrough means masers -- the microwave version of lasers -- could now be used more widely in a range of applications.
2h
Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

Potassium gives perovskite-based solar cells an efficiency boostA simple potassium solution could boost the efficiency of next-generation solar cells, by enabling them to convert more sunlight into electricity.
2h
The Atlantic

Building the World's Most Powerful TelescopeAssembling the world’s most powerful space telescope is a complicated process, and Chris Gunn has been there from nearly the beginning. Gunn, a NASA photographer, has spent almost a decade photographing the James Webb Space Telescope, the successor to the famed Hubble, capturing its transformation from a bare metal framework into a gleaming science observatory with 18 gold-plated mirrors. “For me
3h
New on MIT Technology Review

The latest on Facebook’s data scandal: Zuckerberg speaks, lawsuits, and ignored whistleblowers
3h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Parkinson's gene initiates disease outside of the brainThe most common gene mutation associated with Parkinson's alters cells circulating outside the brain, not within, offering a new understanding of what causes the disease.
3h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News

A new angle on gerrymandersA University of Vermont mathematician has developed a new tool to identify gerrymandered voting districts. The research shows Pennsylvania, Ohio and North Carolina strongly gerrymandered for Republicans, while Maryland's and California's voting districts have been strongly tipped in favor of Democrats. The new tool could be important in the wake of two Supreme Court cases now being considered that
3h
Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

US national parks increasingly important for bird conservation in face of climate changeUS national parks could become even more important for the conservation of bird species in the face of climate change, according to a new study.
3h
Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

Predators learn to identify prey from other speciesPredatory bats learn both from other members of their own species and from other predatory bat species.
3h
Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

Belly fat promotes diabetes under orders from liverResearchers found that obesity increases the liver's production of an enzyme that triggers inflammation in belly fat. Targeting the enzyme in the liver could present a new way to treat type 2 diabetes.
3h
Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

Despite high blood sugar, cavefish live long, healthy livesMexican cavefish have insulin resistance, a hallmark of many human metabolic disorders and a precursor to type 2 diabetes that can lead to an overworked pancreas, excess fat storage and chronically elevated blood sugar. Despite dysregulated blood sugar, the fish don't suffer the same health consequences people do. Study offers a fresh opportunity to understand how animals thrive with traits that s
3h
Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

Immune cells in the retina can spontaneously regenerateImmune cells called microglia can completely repopulate themselves in the retina after being nearly eliminated, according to a new study in mice. The findings point to potential therapies for controlling inflammation and slowing progression of rare retinal diseases such as retinitis pigmentosa (RP) and age-related macular degeneration (AMD).
3h
Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

Mumps resurgence likely due to waning vaccine-derived immunityA resurgence of mumps in the US among vaccinated young adults appears to be due to waning of vaccine-induced immunity, according to a recent analysis. Researchers found vaccine-derived immune protection against mumps lasts about 27 years after the last dose. The findings suggest that, in addition to the currently recommended two doses of mumps vaccine in childhood, a third dose at age 18 may help
3h
Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

First 'non-gene' mutations behind neurodevelopmental disorders discoveredIn the largest study of its kind, genetic changes causing neurodevelopmental disorders have been discovered. The study of almost 8,000 families found for the first time that mutations outside of genes can cause rare developmental disorders of the central nervous system. The study is a positive step towards providing an explanation for children with undiagnosed neurodevelopmental disorders.
3h
Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

Neglect common in English care homesThe largest-ever survey of care home staff in England has found that neglectful behaviors are widespread.
3h
Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

New anti-cancer protein discoveredAn international team of researchers has discovered a new anti-cancer protein. The protein, called LHPP, prevents the uncontrolled proliferation of cancer cells in the liver. The researchers report that LHPP can also serve as a biomarker for the diagnosis and prognosis of liver cancer.
3h
Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

Genomes of five late Neandertals provide insights into Neandertal population historyResearchers have sequenced the genomes of five Neandertals that lived between 39,000 and 47,000 years ago. These late Neandertals are all more closely related to the Neandertals that contributed DNA to modern human ancestors than an older Neandertal from the Altai Mountains that was previously sequenced. Their genomes also provide evidence for a turnover in the Neandertal population towards the en
3h
Live Science

Famous Mathematician Joseph Fourier Would Have Been 250 Today. Here's Why He MattersFourier's discoveries can still be felt in modern-day radiology, climate science and physics.
3h
Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

Brain stethoscope listens for silent seizuresBy converting brain waves into sound, even non-specialists can detect 'silent seizures' -- epileptic seizures without the convulsions most of us expect.
3h
Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

The curse of zombie fossilsNew research has revealed how the history of life can be distorted by the ways animals decompose and lose body parts as they decay -- and the ways in which decayed bodies ultimately become fossilized.
3h
Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

'Wiggling and jiggling': Study explains how organisms evolve to live at different temperaturesNew research explains how the 'wiggling and jiggling' of the atoms in enzymes -- the proteins that make biological reactions happen -- is 'choreographed' to make them work at a particular temperature. Enzyme catalysis is essential to life, and this research sheds light on how enzymes have evolved and adapted, enabling organisms to evolve to live at different temperatures.
3h
Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

Fixing soybean's need for nitrogenTo make protein, soybean plants need a lot of nitrogen. Beneficial bacteria in root nodules typically assist. A new study shows it's possible to increase the number of soybean root nodules--and the bacteria that live there--to further increase crop yields. This could remove the need to apply additional nitrogen fertilizers.
3h
Science : NPR

WATCH: Robotic Fish Moves Like The Real Thing — So It Can Observe The Real ThingFish MIT CSAIL RobotMIT researchers unveiled a Soft Robotic Fish prototype in hopes of boosting aquatic observation. It can wiggle like a fish, dive to 18 meters, work autonomously — and hopefully avoid getting eaten. (Image credit: MIT CSAIL)
3h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Neuroscientists develop potential tools for the study of brain functionA team of University of Missouri neuroscientists are inching closer to developing the tools needed to decipher the brain. Now, the team has published a new paper that demonstrates how these proteins can be used as tools to regulate the activity of individual neurons in the brain through changes in temperature. These tools will advance fundamental brain research and potentially lead to 'deep brain
3h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Forgetting details, getting the gist may prompt false memories in older adultsOlder adults often complain about forgetting, but Penn State psychologists suggest that another problem may be misremembering.
3h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News

NASA finds major Tropical Cyclone Marcus getting strongerNow a Category 4 hurricane on the Saffir-Simpson Hurricane Wind Scale, Tropical Cyclone Marcus continues to strengthen as it moves south and keeps off-shore from Western Australia. NASA's Terra satellite looked at Marcus in infrared light and saw a well-organized hurricane with a wide eye.
3h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News

New design produces true lithium-air batteryResearchers at the University of Illinois at Chicago and at Argonne National Laboratory have designed a new lithium-air battery that works in a natural-air environment and still functioned after a record-breaking 750 charge/discharge cycles. Their findings are reported in the journal Nature.
3h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Scientists use diamond in world's first continuous room-temperature solid-state maserThe breakthrough means masers -- the microwave version of lasers -- could now be used more widely in a range of applications.
3h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Potassium gives perovskite-based solar cells an efficiency boostA simple potassium solution could boost the efficiency of next-generation solar cells, by enabling them to convert more sunlight into electricity.
3h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News

New insights into the late history of NeandertalsResearchers at the Max Planck Institute for Evolutionary Anthropology in Leipzig, Germany, have sequenced the genomes of five Neandertals that lived between 39,000 and 47,000 years ago. These late Neandertals are all more closely related to the Neandertals that contributed DNA to modern human ancestors than an older Neandertal from the Altai Mountains that was previously sequenced. Their genomes a
3h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Neglect common in English care homesThe largest-ever survey of care home staff in England, led by UCL researchers, has found that neglectful behaviors are widespread.
3h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Researchers discover new anti-cancer proteinAn international team of researchers has discovered a new anti-cancer protein. The protein, called LHPP, prevents the uncontrolled proliferation of cancer cells in the liver. The researchers led by Professor Michael N. Hall from the Biozentrum, University of Basel, report in Nature that LHPP can also serve as a biomarker for the diagnosis and prognosis of liver cancer.
3h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News

First 'non-gene' mutations behind neurodevelopmental disorders discoveredIn the largest study of its kind, genetic changes causing neurodevelopmental disorders have been discovered by scientists at the Wellcome Sanger Institute and their collaborators. The study of almost 8,000 families, published today in Nature, found for the first time that mutations outside of genes can cause rare developmental disorders of the central nervous system. The study is a positive step t
3h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Mumps resurgence likely due to waning vaccine-derived immunityA resurgence of mumps in the US among vaccinated young adults appears to be due to waning of vaccine-induced immunity, according to a Harvard T.H. Chan School of Public Health analysis. Researchers found vaccine-derived immune protection against mumps lasts about 27 years after the last dose. The findings suggest that, in addition to the currently recommended two doses of mumps vaccine in childhoo
3h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Immune cells in the retina can spontaneously regenerateImmune cells called microglia can completely repopulate themselves in the retina after being nearly eliminated, according to a new study in mice from scientists at the National Eye Institute (NEI).
3h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Belly fat promotes diabetes under orders from liverResearchers at Columbia University Irving Medical Center found that obesity increases the liver's production of an enzyme that triggers inflammation in belly fat. Targeting the enzyme in the liver could present a new way to treat type 2 diabetes.
3h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Sweet surpriseMexican cavefish have insulin resistance, a hallmark of many human metabolic disorders and a precursor to type 2 diabetes that can lead to an overworked pancreas, excess fat storage and chronically elevated blood sugar.Despite dysregulated blood sugar, the fish don't suffer the same health consequences people do.Study offers a fresh opportunity to understand how animals thrive with traits that sic
3h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Why has mumps reemerged in the United States?A recent resurgence in mumps cases in the US may be due to weakening immune protection from the mumps vaccine, researchers report.
3h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Bats can learn from other species, in addition to their ownNot only are bats capable of auditory-based social learning to identify a new food source from individuals in their own species, but they can also learn about new food sources just as quickly from members of a different species, a new study finds. These results suggest that bats may learn from different species in nature and offer further insights into the adaptive strategies and evolution of bats
3h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Seismologists introduce new measure of earthquake rupturesA team of seismologists has developed a new measurement of seismic energy release that can be applied to large earthquakes. Called the Radiated Energy Enhancement Factor (REEF), it provides a measure of earthquake rupture complexity that better captures variations in the amount and duration of slip along the fault for events that may have similar magnitudes.
3h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Predators learn to identify prey from other speciesPredatory bats learn both from other members of their own species and from other predatory bat species.
3h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Conservation costs can be higher than bargained forSweeping policies that reward people in environmentally sensitive areas for returning their farmlands to nature have been lauded as ecological triumphs. But a new Michigan State University study shows that over time some participants may become conservation martyrs.
3h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Gradual release of immunotherapy at site of tumor surgery prevents tumors from returningA new study by Dana-Farber Cancer Institute scientists suggests it may be possible to prevent tumors from recurring and to eradicate metastatic growths by implanting a gel containing immunotherapy during surgical removal of a tumor.
3h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News

US national parks increasingly important for bird conservation in face of climate changeUS national parks could become even more important for the conservation of bird species in the face of climate change, according to a study published March 21, 2018, in the open-access journal PLOS ONE by Joanna Wu from the National Audubon Society, US, and colleagues.
3h
cognitive science

Powerful New Algorithm is a Big Step Towards Whole Brain Simulationsubmitted by /u/NaiveSkeptic [link] [comments]
3h
New Scientist - News

Watch this robotic fish flap its fins in Fiji’s Rainbow ReefSoFi Fish RobotUnderwater robots usually disrupt wildlife with their propellers, but a new mechanical fish gracefully swims through the water like a real one
3h
New Scientist - News

​Upgraded Pap test detects two extra cancers before ​they spreadWith a small adaption, a simple smear test for cervical cancer can also detect ovarian and endometrial cancers at the same time
3h
New Scientist - News

Immune-boosting gel prevents cancer relapse after surgeryA gel tested in mice prevented lingering cancer cells from growing or spreading around the body after surgeons remove tumours
3h
New Scientist - News

Wearable scanner can image your brain while you’re on the moveFor the first time, a portable MEG scanner can image brain activity while people move and behave normally. It could be useful for studying babies and infants
3h
Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

The quest for neuronal originsThe cerebral cortex consists of a large diversity of neurons, each displaying specific characteristics in terms of molecular, morphological and functional features. But where are these neurons born? How do they develop their distinct properties? Scientists have discovered a unique molecular factor allowing them to track, from birth to maturity, a homogeneous class of neurons called the neurogliafo
3h
Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

The problem of jaguars and space in western ParaguayA recent study shows how researchers used GPS technology and new analytical techniques to produce the first rigorous estimates of jaguar spatial needs and movements in the Gran Chaco and Pantanal ecosystems of Paraguay.
3h
Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

Cold can activate body's 'good' fat at a cellular level, study findsLower temperatures can activate the body's 'good' fat formation at a cellular level, a new study has found.
3h
Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

Evidence for a giant flood in the central Mediterranean SeaMarine scientists have uncovered evidence of one of the largest floods in Earth's history in the central Mediterranean seafloor. The flood, known as the Zanclean flood, is thought to have ended the Messinian Salinity Crisis (MSC), a period during which the Mediterranean Sea became partially dried up.
3h
Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

How trees coexist: Understanding biodiversityOne of the most fascinating topics in ecology is the exploration of interactions between plants, specifically in long-lived organisms, such as trees. In this context, it is generally assumed that tree-tree interactions are dominated by competition for resources such as light, water or nutrients.
3h
Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

Pacific influences European weatherSea surface temperature in the distant tropical Pacific can influence November weather in Europe.
3h
Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

Dravidian language family is approximately 4,500 years old, new linguistic analysis findsThe origin of the Dravidian language family, consisting of about 80 varieties spoken by 220 million people across South Asia, can be dated to about 4,500 years ago, based on new linguistic analyses. An international team used data collected first-hand from native speakers and analyzed these using cutting-edge computational methods. The findings shed light on the prehistory of these languages and t
3h
Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

Freezing hunger-signaling nerve may help ignite weight lossFreezing the nerve that carries hunger signals to the brain may help patients with mild-to-moderate obesity lose weight, according to a newly presented study. The treatment was determined safe and feasible in the initial pilot phase.
3h
Big Think

Maslow's other mistake, why self-acutalization is harder than it soundsSelf-actualization is a great goal, but how easy is it to actually reach? Read More
3h
Viden

E-cigaretter kan måske give fedtleverNikotin i e-cigaretter kan få fedt til at ophobe sig i leveren, viser museforsøg. Men drop ikke e-smøgen, hvis du bruger den som erstatning for cigaretterne, siger forsker.
3h
The Atlantic

The Y Chromosome's Still-Uncharted RegionsFifteen years ago this April, scientists announced that the human genome sequence was complete. I regret to inform you this is not true. If you have been misled, it is because many scientists themselves have long ignored the last unassembled regions of human DNA, which consist mostly of short, repeating sequences that do not look like genes. “These huge gaps still remain,” says Karen Miga , a gen
3h
The Atlantic

The Blind Fish That Should Have Diabetes, But Somehow Doesn'tMillions of years ago, a small, unremarkable fish called the Mexican tetra started swimming into the caves of eastern Mexico. In the all-encompassing darkness of these limestone caverns, the tetras’ eyes, which take a lot of energy to build and maintain , were useless luxuries. Over several generations, the cave fish lost them entirely. Today, they are born with small eyes that gradually waste aw
3h
Feed: All Latest

MIT Unleashes a Hypnotic Robot Fish to Help Save the OceansSoFi Fish RobotResearchers detail the evolution of the world’s strangest fish, and describe how it could be a potentially powerful tool for scientists to study ocean life.
3h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Predators learn to identify prey from other speciesWolves purportedly raised Romulus and Remus, who went on to rule Rome. Is there good scientific evidence for learning across species? Researchers at the Smithsonian Tropical Research Institute (STRI) in Panama wanted to know if predatory bats learn both from other members of their own species and from other predatory bat species.
3h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Seismologists introduce new measure of earthquake rupturesA team of seismologists has developed a new measurement of seismic energy release that can be applied to large earthquakes. Called the Radiated Energy Enhancement Factor (REEF), it provides a measure of earthquake rupture complexity that better captures variations in the amount and duration of slip along the fault for events that may have similar magnitudes.
3h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Blind cavefish evolved insulin resistance to keep from starvingResearchers trying to better understand and treat blood-sugar disorders such as type 2 diabetes can look for new clues in odd little fish that dwell in Mexican caves.
3h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Conservation costs can be higher than bargained forSweeping policies that reward people in environmentally sensitive areas for returning their farmlands to nature have been lauded as ecological triumphs. But a new Michigan State University study shows that over time some participants may become conservation martyrs=
3h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

US national parks increasingly important for bird conservation in face of climate changeU.S. National Parks could become even more important for the conservation of bird species in the face of climate change, according to a study published March 21, 2018 in the open-access journal PLOS ONE by Joanna Wu from the National Audubon Society, US, and colleagues.
3h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Scientists use diamond in world's first continuous room-temperature solid-state maserThe maser (microwave amplification by stimulated emission of radiation), the older microwave frequency sibling of the laser, was invented in 1954. However unlike lasers, which have become widespread, masers are much less widely used because in order to function they must be cooled to temperatures close to absolute zero (-273°C).
3h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

The genomes of five late Neandertals provide insights into Neandertal population historyResearchers at the Max Planck Institute for Evolutionary Anthropology in Leipzig, Germany, have sequenced the genomes of five Neandertals that lived between 39,000 and 47,000 years ago. These late Neandertals are all more closely related to the Neandertals that contributed DNA to modern human ancestors than an older Neandertal from the Altai Mountains that was previously sequenced. Their genomes a
3h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Potassium gives perovskite-based solar cells an efficiency boostA simple potassium solution could boost the efficiency of next-generation solar cells, by enabling them to convert more sunlight into electricity.
3h
Science | The Guardian

Helmet-shaped brain scanner allows wearers to move aroundScientists hope it will help children with neurological and mental disorders and reveal how brains handle social situations The world’s first brain scanner that can be worn as people move around has been invented, by a team who hope the contraption can help children with neurological and mental disorders and reveal how the brain handles social situations. The new scalp caps – made on 3D printers
3h
The Scientist RSS

Another Bird Telomere Study, Different ResultsTwo studies examining the effects of parents' ages on their offsprings' telomere lengths come to opposite conclusions.
3h
New Scientist - News

Weird Antarctic ice may explain how life endured on frozen EarthA strange discovery, made by polar explorer Robert Scott a century ago, might explain how complex life survived when the planet froze over into “Snowball Earth”
3h
Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

Global burden of low back painNew research highlights the extent to which low back pain is mistreated, often against best practice treatment guidelines.
4h
Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

New data confirm increased frequency of extreme weather eventsNew data show that extreme weather events have become more frequent over the past 36 years, with a significant uptick in floods and other hydrological events compared even with five years ago, according to a new publication.
4h
Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

Next-gen X-ray microscopy platform now operationalCOSMIC, a next-generation X-ray beamline now operating at Berkeley Lab, brings together a unique set of capabilities to measure the properties of materials at the nanoscale. It allows scientists to probe working batteries and other active chemical reactions, and to reveal new details about magnetism and correlated electronic materials.
4h
Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

A new way of thinking about tau kinetics, an essential component of Alzheimer's diseaseAlzheimer's disease is most often characterized by two different pathologies in the brain: plaque deposits of a protein called beta-amyloid and tangles of another protein called tau. A new article offers new insight: tau production and secretion from nerve cells appears to be an active process in the natural course of Alzheimer's disease, which may explain why experimental treatments targeting tau
4h
iBiology (uploads) on YouTube

David Drubin (UC Berkeley) 4: Actin assembly in budding yeastIn this series of videos, Dr. David Drubin describes the critical link between actin dynamics and endocytosis in both budding yeast and mammalian cells. https://www.ibiology.org/cell-biology/actin-dynamics-and-endocytosis Talk Overview: Actin forms many cellular structures and regulates a variety of critical biological processes. Dr. David Drubin’s lab focuses on studying actin in the context of
4h
iBiology (uploads) on YouTube

David Drubin (UC Berkeley) 3: Actin dynamics and endocytosis in mammalian cellsIn this series of videos, Dr. David Drubin describes the critical link between actin dynamics and endocytosis in both budding yeast and mammalian cells. https://www.ibiology.org/cell-biology/actin-dynamics-and-endocytosis Talk Overview: Actin forms many cellular structures and regulates a variety of critical biological processes. Dr. David Drubin’s lab focuses on studying actin in the context of
4h
iBiology (uploads) on YouTube

David Drubin (UC Berkeley) 2: Actin dynamics and endocytosis in yeastIn this series of videos, Dr. David Drubin describes the critical link between actin dynamics and endocytosis in both budding yeast and mammalian cells. https://www.ibiology.org/cell-biology/actin-dynamics-and-endocytosis Talk Overview: Actin forms many cellular structures and regulates a variety of critical biological processes. Dr. David Drubin’s lab focuses on studying actin in the context of
4h
iBiology (uploads) on YouTube

David Drubin (UC Berkeley) 1: Actin, endocytosis and the early days of yeast cell biologyIn this series of videos, Dr. David Drubin describes the critical link between actin dynamics and endocytosis in both budding yeast and mammalian cells. https://www.ibiology.org/cell-biology/actin-dynamics-and-endocytosis Talk Overview: Actin forms many cellular structures and regulates a variety of critical biological processes. Dr. David Drubin’s lab focuses on studying actin in the context of
4h
Live Science

Sorry, Toby — Winter Storms Don't Have Names (Except on Cable News)Only hurricanes get official names. Unless you're watching The Weather Channel.
4h
New on MIT Technology Review

Trump is reportedly preparing new ways to block China’s interest in American tech
4h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

COSMIC impact: Next-gen X-ray microscopy platform now operationalA next-generation X-ray beamline now operating at the Department of Energy's Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory (Berkeley Lab) brings together a unique set of capabilities to measure the properties of materials at the nanoscale.
4h
Science : NPR

Why An Imperfect HIV Vaccine Could Be Better Than None At AllPublic health interventions and antiviral drugs have put HIV on the ropes in the U.S. But it's unlikely that infections can be wiped out without a vaccine. (Image credit: Mujahid Safodien/AFP/Getty Images)
4h
Scientific American Content: Global

Uber Self-Driving Car Fatality Reveals the Technology's Blind SpotsThe ride-sharing company has halted its autonomous vehicle testing while it investigates the accident in Arizona -- Read more on ScientificAmerican.com
4h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News

COSMIC impact: Next-gen X-ray microscopy platform now operationalCOSMIC, a next-generation X-ray beamline now operating at Berkeley Lab, brings together a unique set of capabilities to measure the properties of materials at the nanoscale. It allows scientists to probe working batteries and other active chemical reactions, and to reveal new details about magnetism and correlated electronic materials.
4h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Briefing notes: New papers to be released on burden of low back painA new series of papers to be published in The Lancet highlights the extent to which low back pain is mistreated, often against best practice treatment guidelines.
4h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Global burden of low back pain -- a consequence of negligence and misinformationA series of groundbreaking papers from Australian and international researchers in The Lancet warns that low back pain is a major health burden globally -- across developed and developing nations -- and that the current use of X-rays and scans, opioids, injections and surgery to investigate and treat the condition is useless, unnecessary and harmful. The final paper in the series is a Worldwide Ur
4h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News

New data confirm increased frequency of extreme weather eventsNew data confirm increased frequency of extreme weather events, European national science academies urge further action on climate change adaptation. Man-made climate change has been proven to have increased recent extreme rainfall and associated floods; coastal flooding due to sea-level rise; heatwaves in Australia, China, and Europe; and increased risks of wildfires with implications for humans
4h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

World sees rapid upsurge in extreme weather: reportA world addled by climate change has seen a four-fold increase in major flooding events since 1980, and a doubling of significant storms, droughts and heat waves, Europe's national science academies jointly reported Wednesday.
4h
Ingeniøren

Norsk it-sikkerheds-razzia: Sniger sig ind i bygning og gemmer sig på wcTests af offentlige virksomheder i Norge afslørede alvorlige sårbarheder.
4h
Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

Targeting telomeres to overcome therapy resistance in advanced melanomaA study has demonstrated the efficacy of targeting aberrantly active telomerase to treat therapy-resistant melanoma.
4h
Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

Researchers link dietary supplement DHA to higher fat-free body mass in childrenResearchers have reported that pregnant women who consumed a supplement of DHA (docosahexaenoic acid), a nutrient added to U.S. infant formulas since 2002, tend to have children with higher fat-free body mass at 5 years old.
4h
Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

Cutting greenhouse gas emissions would help spare cities worldwide from rising seasCoastal cities worldwide would face a reduced threat from sea level rise if society reduced greenhouse gas emissions, with especially significant benefits for New York and other US East Coast cities, new research indicates.
4h
Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

Vital role of marine predators in supplying nutrients to coral reef ecologyIt's long been known that sharks help nourish coral reefs, but exactly to what extent has never been scientifically mapped out -- until now.
4h
Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

Potential drug target against large family of parasites is identifiedResearchers have identified a key enzyme for the synthesis of glycoconjugates (sugars linked to other molecules) in Plasmodium falciparum and other intracellular parasites belonging to the large phylum Apicomplexa. The study indicates that this enzyme could represent a selective therapeutic target against this broad group of parasites.
4h
Feed: All Latest

Facebook Privacy Settings: A Complete Guide to Making Your Account More SecureFacebook Data AccountDespite the repeated privacy lapses, Facebook offers a fairly robust set of tools to control who knows what about you.
4h
Science | The Guardian

Lower back pain being treated badly on a global scale, study saysVast numbers of people receive high-tech interventions that actually worsen the condition Vast numbers of people with lower back pain across the world are being harmed, not helped, by the surgery, injections and dangerous opioid drugs they are given, according to a major new report. More than 540 million people suffer low back pain, the commonest cause of disability in the world. But their condit
4h
Popular Science

A claim-by-claim analysis of a climate denial 'news' storyScience Anatomy of a fact check. Global warming alarmists claimed Arctic ice cap would be gone by now, but sea ice is 5 percent above 35 year average.
4h
Viden

Forskere: Vi behandler ondt i ryggen helt forkertOndt i lænden skal behandles med træning og fysioterapi frem for medicin og operation, viser stort forskningsprojekt.
4h
Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

New interactive map shows climate change everywhere in worldA geography professor has created a new interactive map that allows students or researchers to compare the climates of places anywhere in the world. The map draws on five decades of public meteorological data recorded from 50,000 international weather stations around the Earth. And it uses prediction models to display which parts of the globe will experience the most or least climate change in the
4h
Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

'We're sleepwalking into a mass extinction' say scientistsSpecies that live in symbiosis with others, which often occur in the most delicately balanced and threatened marine ecosystems such as coral reefs, are the slowest to recover their diversity if damaged, according to a team of scientists.
4h
Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

Insects could help us find new yeasts for big businessYeasts are tiny fungi -- but they play key roles in producing everything from beer and cheese to industrial chemicals and biofuels. And now scientists are proposing a new approach that could help these industries find new yeasts for use in their manufacturing processes.
4h
Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

The environment determines Caribbean hummingbirds' vulnerabilityHummingbirds' specialization and vulnerability are often predicted based on their physical traits. Scientists now found that this is not the case for hummingbirds on the Caribbean islands. Instead, the bird's environment is the determining factor.
4h
Popular Science

Scientists still don’t understand how freedivers can survive such crushing depthsScience They hang between life and death in a delicate balance. When you look at the stresses freediving places on our physiology, it initially looks almost impossible that anyone should be able to dive to such profound depths—and…
4h
Scientific American Content: Global

European Space Agency Picks Exoplanet-Studying Spacecraft for 2028 LaunchThe ARIEL mission will peer into the atmospheres of thousands of exoplanets to learn more about their formation and evolution -- Read more on ScientificAmerican.com
4h
New Scientist - News

Medicine for sick koalas turns out to actually kill themKoalas are often given antibiotics to treat a lethal strain of chlamydia, but the medicines often kill the koalas by wiping out friendly bacteria in their guts
4h
Live Science

How Much Do You Poop in Your Lifetime?Over time, a person's poop can really add up.
4h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Porsche workers snap up bonuses of nearly 10,000 eurosGerman luxury carmaker Porsche on Wednesday said it would pay workers a special bonus of up to 9,656 euros ($11,800) each to celebrate a record year, even as the industry grapples with a series of scandals.
5h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Bulgarians rush to save frozen storksWhat would you do if you came upon scores of distressed storks covered in ice lying in a snow-covered field? In Bulgaria, people have been taking them home.
5h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Machine learning predicts which patients benefit from prostate multiparametric MRIA newly developed machine learning model can accurately predict which patients are most likely to benefit from prostate multiparametric MRI (mpMRI), according to a study to be presented at the ARRS 2018 Annual Meeting, set for April 22-27 in Washington, DC.
5h
Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

Medical expansion has improved health -- with one exceptionWhile Americans debate the rising cost of health care, a new study of 30 countries over 27 years found that medical expansion has improved overall health -- with one major exception. Researchers found that increased spending on health care and increases in specialized care were both associated with longer life expectancy and less mortality in the countries studied. But pharmaceutical industry expa
5h
Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

Depth-sensing imaging system can peer through fogIn a study that holds promise for self-driving cars, researchers have developed a system that can image and gauge the distance of objects shrouded by fog so thick that human vision can't penetrate it.
5h
Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

Radar images show large swath of Texas oil patch is heaving and sinking at alarming ratesRadar satellite images show a large swath of Texas oil patch is heaving and sinking at alarming rates, according to a geophysical team. Analysis of the images with oil activity data from the Texas Railroad Commission suggests decades of oil activity have destabilized localities of the 4,000-square-mile area, which is populated by small towns, roadways and a vast network of oil and gas pipelines an
5h
Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

Intense exercise before taking anti-psychotic meds may prevent weight gain, diseasesResearchers found evidence that a single bout of exhaustive exercise protects against acute olanzapine-induced hyperglycemia.
5h
Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

Chronic opioids linked to increased complications after spinal fusion surgeryPatients who have been taking opioid pain relievers for several months before spinal fusion surgery are at increased risk of complications after their surgery, reports a new study.
5h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Opening arguments in AT&T antitrust trial postponedOpening arguments in the federal government's case to block AT&T's efforts to gobble up Time Warner have been postponed until Thursday.
5h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Tesla stockholders approve Elon Musk compensationShareholders of electric car and solar panel maker Tesla Inc. have approved an ambitious pay package for iconic CEO Elon Musk that could net him more than $50 billion if he meets lofty milestones over the next decade, according to a person briefed on the vote.
5h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Cutting greenhouse gas emissions would help spare cities worldwide from rising seasCoastal cities worldwide would face a reduced threat from sea level rise if society reduced greenhouse gas emissions, with especially significant benefits for New York and other U.S. East Coast cities, new research indicates.
5h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

'We're sleepwalking into a mass extinction' say scientistsSpecies that live in symbiosis with others, which often occur in the most delicately balanced and threatened marine ecosystems such as coral reefs, are the slowest to recover their diversity if damaged, according to a team of UK scientists.
5h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Researchers study the vital role of marine predators in supplying nutrients to coral reef ecologyIt's long been known that sharks help nourish coral reefs, but exactly to what extent has never been scientifically mapped out—until now.
5h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Insects could help us find new yeasts for big businessYeasts are tiny fungi - but they play key roles in producing everything from beer and cheese to industrial chemicals and biofuels. And now scientists are proposing a new approach that could help these industries find new yeasts for use in their manufacturing processes.
5h
Popular Science

The chemicals in your cosmetics aren't regulatedHealth It's up to us to stay educated and informed on the products that keep us looking good. Cosmetics aren’t really regulated for safety or efficacy—most consumers don’t know that as they slather beauty potions from their scalps down to their toenails.
5h
Live Science

WWII Shipwreck Where 5 Brothers Died 76 Years Ago Finally FoundDuring WWII, the sinking of the warship USS Juneau doomed five brothers who served on it.
5h
Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

New technologies and computing power to help strengthen population dataResearch is helping governments in low-income countries strengthen their capacity to build and use population maps, to plan for the future and respond to emergencies.
5h
Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

Seaweeds shelter calcifying marine life from acidifying oceansSeaweeds create a chemical microenvironment at their surface, providing refuge for calcifying organisms that are at risk from decreasing oceanic pH, shows new research.
5h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

New interactive map shows climate change everywhere in worldWhat does Salt Lake City have in common with Tehran?
5h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Targeting telomeres to overcome therapy resistance in advanced melanomaA study conducted at The Wistar Institute in collaboration with The University of Texas Southwestern Medical Center has demonstrated the efficacy of targeting aberrantly active telomerase to treat therapy-resistant melanoma.
5h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News

New ALS gene points to common role of cytoskeleton in diseaseAn international team of researchers led by John Landers, PhD, at UMass Medical School, has identified KIF5A as a new gene associated with the development of amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS). The discovery further implicates the role of cytoskeletal defects in the axon as a common factor in the disease. It points to the cytoskeleton as a potential target for new drug development.
5h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News

NIH-supported international team confirms new genetic mutation link to ALSKinesin family member 5A (KIF5A), a gene previously linked to two rare neurodegenerative disorders, has been definitively connected to amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS) by an NIH-supported international team from several of the world's top ALS research labs.
5h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Link between 2 key Alzheimer's proteins explainedAlzheimer's disease is characterized by clumps of two proteins -- amyloid beta and tau -- in the brain, but the link between the two has never been entirely clear. Now, researchers at Washington University School of Medicine in St. Louis have shown that people with more amyloid in the brain produce more tau, which could lead to new treatments for the disease based on targeting the production of ta
5h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News

A new way of thinking about tau kinetics, an essential component of Alzheimer's diseaseAlzheimer's disease is most often characterized by two different pathologies in the brain: plaque deposits of a protein called beta-amyloid and tangles of another protein called tau. A paper appearing March 21 in the journal Neuron offers new insight: tau production and secretion from nerve cells appears to be an active process in the natural course of Alzheimer's disease, which may explain why ex
5h
Ingeniøren

Replik: Det er godt at få dataetiske anbefalinger til erhvervslivet
5h
Scientific American Content: Global

Stephen Hawking to Be Interred in Westminster AbbeyThe late physicist’s ashes will share a final resting place with the remains of Newton, Darwin and other historic figures -- Read more on ScientificAmerican.com
5h
Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

Medical tests with less fearIt is a principle of modern architecture that less may be more. This principle does not apply to information as a basis of far-reaching decisions, it seems. But: Many people shy away from going to the doctor’s, because they are afraid of unpleasant truths, such as the diagnosis of a disease. Researchers have developed a method to overcome this fear.
5h
Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

Researchers observe the switching of Ras protein in detailRas proteins are molecular switches that decide if and when cells divide inside our bodies. An impairment of their function may result in the formation of a tumor. The process of switching the proteins on and off has now been observed in detail.
5h
Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

Flood protection is everyone's responsibilityScientists have studied the complex interplay between flooding events and economic decisions. Private businesses should not shoulder the responsibility for flood protection alone. In prosperous countries in particular, it makes sense for central government to establish the necessary infrastructure for flood protection.
5h
Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

Risk of maternal death doubled in pregnant women with anemiaPregnant women with anemia are twice as likely to die during or shortly after pregnancy compared to those without the condition, according to a major international study.
5h
Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

Risk of a second breast cancer can be better quantified in women carrying a BRCA mutationThe risk of a second breast cancer in patients with high-risk BRCA gene mutations can be more precisely predicted by testing for several other genetic variants, each of which are known to have a small impact on breast cancer risk.
5h
Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

Double mastectomy to prevent breast cancer reduces risk of dying from the disease in BRCA1 mutation carriers – but does not reduce further the already low risk in BRCA2 carriersHealthy women who carry a breast cancer-causing mutation in the BRCA1 gene, not only reduce their risk of developing the disease but also their chances of dying from it if they have both breasts removed.
5h
Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

Elephant and cow manure for making paper sustainablyIt's likely not the first thing you think of when you see elephant or cow dung, but this material turns out to be an excellent source of cellulose for paper manufacturing. Upcycling manure into paper products could be a cheap and environmentally sound method to get rid of this pervasive agricultural waste.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

Banana plant extract could be key to creamier, longer lasting ice creamScientists say they are closing in on a cool solution to a sticky problem. They've found that adding tiny cellulose fibers extracted from banana plant waste to ice cream could slow melting, increase shelf life and potentially replace fats used to make the tasty treat.
5h
Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

New 4-D printer could reshape the world we live inScientists report that they have developed a powerful new printer that could streamline the creation of self-assembling structures that can change shape after being exposed to heat and other stimuli. They say this unique technology could accelerate the use of 4-D printing in aerospace, medicine and other industries.
5h
The Atlantic

Can Electrically Stimulating Your Brain Make You Too Happy?It is a good question, but I was a little surprised to see it as the title of a research paper in a medical journal: “How Happy Is Too Happy?” Yet there it was in a publication from 2012. The article was grappling with the issue of how we should deal with the possibility of manipulating people’s moods and feelings of happiness through brain stimulation. If you have direct access to the reward sys
5h
Ingeniøren

Energidebat: Skal solceller have en langt større plads i energisystemet?Vi har, som led i optakten til forhandlingerne om et nyt energiforlig, stillet to centrale aktører og de politiske partier spørgsmålet: Bør forliget arbejde frem mod de 15-20 procent solcellestrøm i energiforsyningen, som forskere finder optimalt for energisystemet?
5h
Big Think

Here’s how to spot and remove the Facebook apps harvesting your dataOver the past week, former employees at Facebook and other companies have revealed how tens of millions of users' data has been harvested and passed along to outside parties. Read More
5h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News

The environment determines Caribbean hummingbirds' vulnerabilityHummingbirds' specialization and vulnerability are often predicted based on their physical traits. Scientists now found that this is not the case for hummingbirds on the Caribbean islands. Instead, the bird's environment is the determining factor. The new study was led by scientists from Center for Macroecology, Evolution and Climate, University of Copenhagen, and published today in the scientific
5h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Insects could help us find new yeasts for big businessYeasts are tiny fungi -- but they play key roles in producing everything from beer and cheese to industrial chemicals and biofuels. And now scientists are proposing a new approach that could help these industries find new yeasts for use in their manufacturing processes.
5h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News

New links between genetic abnormality and brain function in Huntington's diseaseWhile the gene mutation that causes Huntington's disease has been associated with changes in certain types of functional brain connectivity, a new study that examined connectivity across the whole brain has now identified alterations in functional connectivity in additional brain networks and has also shown significant associations between the extent of the degree of gene mutation and measures of
5h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News

New interactive map shows climate change everywhere in worldUniversity of Cincinnati geography professor Tomasz Stepinski created a new interactive map that allows students or researchers to compare the climates of places anywhere in the world. The map draws on five decades of public meteorological data recorded from 50,000 international weather stations around the Earth. And it uses prediction models to display which parts of the globe will experience the
5h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News

'We're sleepwalking into a mass extinction' say scientistsSpecies that live in symbiosis with others, which often occur in the most delicately balanced and threatened marine ecosystems such as coral reefs, are the slowest to recover their diversity if damaged, according to a team of UK scientists.
5h
Scientific American Content: Global

Chevron Will Stick to IPCC Findings in Landmark Climate Change TrialOil companies are not questioning climate science, even as they move to dismiss lawsuit -- Read more on ScientificAmerican.com
5h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News

A natural fertilizerIt's long been known that sharks help nourish coral reefs, but exactly to what extent has never been scientifically mapped out -- until now.
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Medical expansion has improved health -- with one exceptionWhile Americans debate the rising cost of health care, a new study of 30 countries over 27 years found that medical expansion has improved overall health -- with one major exception. Researchers found that increased spending on health care and increases in specialized care were both associated with longer life expectancy and less mortality in the countries studied. But pharmaceutical industry expa
6h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Cutting greenhouse gas emissions would help spare cities worldwide from rising seasCoastal cities worldwide would face a reduced threat from sea level rise if society reduced greenhouse gas emissions, with especially significant benefits for New York and other US East Coast cities, new research indicates.
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NYT > Science

Making Magic Out of Thin AirHow do married clowns make wordless wizardry with balloons, umbrellas, packing peanuts and fabric? Turn on those electric fans.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Psychometrics: How Facebook data helped Trump find his votersIt was one of hundreds of cute questionnaires that were shared widely on Facebook and other social media, like "Which Pokemon Are You?" and "What Are Your Most Used Words?"
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

Sitting and physical inactivity may increase risk of urinary tract symptomsProlonged sitting time and low physical activity levels were linked with the development of lower urinary tract symptoms (LUTS) in a new study of 69,795 middle-aged Korean men.
6h
Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

Systems approaches to optimizing deep brain stimulation therapies in Parkinson's diseaseSystems biologists, physicists, and engineers have intensively worked at computational tools to analyze, predict, and optimize the effects of deep brain stimulation (DBS) to treat chronic neurological diseases.
6h
Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

Seizures may be detected through soundA new Epilepsia study indicates that individuals without electroencephalogram (EEG) training can detect ongoing seizures in comatose patients through a novel method by which patients' brain waves are converted to sound.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

Do young children learn anything from YouTube videos?In a new study, children up to 2 years of age could be entertained and kept busy by their parents showing them YouTube clips on smartphones, but they did not learn anything from the videos.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

The perfect shot of espresso every time with chemistryThe average American drinks more than three cups of coffee a day, contributing to a $40 billion industry in the US alone, according to the National Coffee Association. But not all coffee is created equal; flavor profiles vary. Focusing on espresso, scientists say they have now unlocked the key to creating consistent cups of java.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

Make way for the mini flying machinesTiny floating robots could be useful in all kinds of ways, for example, to probe the human gut for disease or to search the environment for pollutants. In a step toward such devices, researchers describe a new marriage of materials, combining ultrathin 2-D electronics with miniature particles to create microscopic machines.
6h
Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

Long-term study reveals fluctuations in birds' nesting successUnderstanding the factors that affect a bird species' nesting success can be crucial for planning effective conservation efforts. However, many studies of nesting birds last only a few years -- and that means they can miss the effects of long-term variation and rare events. A new study demonstrates this with nearly four decades of data from Song Sparrows in British Columbia.
6h
Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

Can artificial intelligence be used to study gut microbes in patients?A new article proposes that artificial intelligence tools, such as machine learning algorithms, have the potential for building predictive models for the diagnosis and treatment of diseases linked to imbalances in gut microbial communities, or microbiota.
6h
Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

Dermatology scale validates quality of lifeCan having a skin condition impact the quality of your life? Absolutely, claim researchers who have set out to find the best tool to measure the impact on patients.
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Viden

Fakta-tjek: Er dadelkugler sundere end slik?Der kan være flere kalorier i sundt slik end i vingummi og lakrids, men også flere næringsstoffer.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

'Fat finger' sends Formosa Petrochemical shares plunging in TaiwanTaiwan's third largest stock tumbled almost 10 percent in minutes Wednesday and lost $3 billion of its market value due to errors made when placing orders, the stock exchange said.
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Science : NPR

Wrinkling Time To Heal A FamilyShowing science's enchanting side has the almost magical effect of opening new portals to what is possible, says astrophysicist Marcelo Gleiser. (Image credit: Mike Coppola/Getty Images)
6h
Live Science

Dream-Like Video Captures Minke Whale Gliding Beneath Antarctic IceIt looks like a stereotypical hallucination of a whale floating beneath puffy clouds.
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Science : NPR

Is Geoengineering A Solution To Climate Change?We got ourselves into this, and some researchers have a plan for getting ourselves out. (Image credit: Jonathan Wood/Getty Images)
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Racial disparities in HIV control persist despite equal access to careResearchers report that racial disparities in HIV control (viral load) exist even when patients have equal access to care, as shown in a study of black and white HIV-infected patients treated in the Veterans Administration (VA) health system.
6h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Researchers link dietary supplement DHA to higher fat-free body mass in childrenUniversity of Kansas researchers have reported that pregnant women who consumed a supplement of DHA (docosahexaenoic acid), a nutrient added to U.S. infant formulas since 2002, tend to have children with higher fat-free body mass at 5 years old.
6h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Analysis shows influential US prostate study not representative of real-world patientsAn analysis of 3 US cancer databases has shown that a major US study comparing surgery with observation in early prostate cancer patients, the PIVOT study, used patients which didn't properly reflect the average US patient. Researchers found that patients in the PIVOT trial were between 3 and 8 times more likely to die than real-world patients. This may call into question the conclusions of the st
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Pregnancy and motherhood during surgical training: Results of a nationwide surveyResearch reveals significant cultural challenges and infrastructure shortcomings that led respondents to seriously consider leaving residency and report they would advise against pursuing a career in surgery.
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Is there an association between number of patients doctor sees and online patient rating?Lower online patient ratings for urologists in California were associated with practices that saw more patients.
6h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Health-related quality of life for patients with vascular malformationsPatients with vascular malformations, which include blood vessel, artery and lymph vessel abnormalities, appear to have more pain and mental health distress than the general US population and that can contribute to poor health-related quality of life.
6h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Can a smartwatch detect irregular heartbeat?A smartwatch coupled with a machine learning algorithm was able to detect irregular heartbeat, or atrial fibrillation (AF), with high accuracy in a small group of patients undergoing treatment to restore normal heart rhythm but with lower accuracy in a larger group of people with a self-reported history of AF.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Key figures in Cambridge Analytica scandalThe university academic, the chief executive who boasted about dirty tricks and US political strategist Steve Bannon—here are the key figures involved in Cambridge Analytica, the British firm at the heart of a Facebook data scandal:
6h
The Atlantic

Democrats Bet on a Billionaire in IllinoisDemocrats have for more than a year gone to bat against a billionaire president and his Cabinet full of wealthy executives, railing against their conflicts of interest and accusing them of satisfying their lavish tastes on the taxpayers’ dime. But in their quest to reclaim the governorship of the nation’s third-largest blue state, Democrats in Illinois have turned to a billionaire of their own to
6h
The Atlantic

Raising My Kids to Be Unapologetic American MuslimsThis article is part of Parenting in an Uncertain Age , a series about the experience of raising children in a time of great change. Growing up in North Dakota in the 1980s and 1990s, there was nobody who shared my family’s last name. “Husain? Hoooooo-sayn? You’re not related to … ?” teachers would sometimes ask. No, I would explain, I wasn’t. My name was spelled differently from the then-dictato
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Dropbox raises price range ahead of stock debutCloud data service Dropbox defied recent volatility among technology shares and raised its expected stock price range ahead of this week's initial public offering, suggesting strong appetite among investors.
6h
Ingeniøren

3D-animation skal hjælpe soldater på øvelseBig data kan flettes sammen med 3D-animation og Forsvarets laser-våben, når soldater skal på øvelse. Det lader Forsvaret integrere flere våben og køretøjer og lave dybere dataanalyse af øvelserne.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Nordea 'pulls brake' on Facebook investments after data rowFacebook Data Cambridge AnalyticaThe Nordic region's largest bank Nordea said Wednesday it would not allow its investment funds to buy stocks in Facebook after the social media giant was ensnarled in a major data scandal.
6h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

China to become top patent filer within three years: UNChina is on its way to becoming the world leader in international patent filings, and should overtake the top spot from the United States within three years, the UN said Wednesday.
6h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Amazon workers in Spain deliver first strikeWorkers at Amazon's biggest logistics centre in Spain have gone on strike, a first in the country as they demand better pay and conditions, a union said Wednesday.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

EU greenlights controversial Bayer-Monsanto takeoverThe EU on Wednesday approved the proposed blockbuster buyout of US agri-giant Monsanto by German chemical firm Bayer after securing concessions in order to win approval.
6h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Tencent profits up on mobile gaming popularityChinese technology giant Tencent reported a profit boost Wednesday, helped by the continued popularity of its mobile games.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Pedestrian's death raises concerns over driverless carsSelf-driving cars were once the fixtures of futuristic cartoons and sci-fi films.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Psychographics—the behavioural analysis that helped Cambridge Analytica know voters' mindsThe dealings that have been revealed between Cambridge Analytica and Facebook have all the trappings of a Hollywood thriller: a Bond villain-style CEO, a reclusive billionaire, a naïve and conflicted whistle-blower, a hipster data scientist turned politico, an academic with seemingly questionable ethics, and of course a triumphant president and his influential family.
6h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Growing mistrust threatens Facebook after data mining scandal (Update)Facebook Data AccountAs Facebook reels from the scandal over hijacked personal data, a movement to quit the social network gathered momentum Wednesday, portending threats to one of the most powerful internet firms.
6h
New on MIT Technology Review

Apple Watches aren’t so great at detecting irregular heartbeats yet
6h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Chronic opioids linked to increased complications after spinal fusion surgeryPatients who have been taking opioid pain relievers for several months before spinal fusion surgery are at increased risk of complications after their surgery, reports a study in the journal Spine, published by Wolters Kluwer.
6h
Scientific American Content: Global

Ticks Have a Mouth Full of Hooks to Hang OnTheir barbs help them burrow in for a three-day feast of blood -- Read more on ScientificAmerican.com
6h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Starbucks commits $10M for greener coffee cupStarbucks is making a $10 million commitment to develop a greener coffee cup that is fully recyclable and compostable.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

The problem of jaguars and space in western ParaguayThe jaguar is the largest cat in the Americas and historically was found from southwestern USA to central Argentina. Today, jaguars are an endangered species throughout their natural habitat, and have almost been completely eliminated from the United States. The species has been lost from 50 percent of its original range, and outside of the Amazon it is present in only 20 percent of its original r
6h
Science : NPR

Have You Herd? Farmer Writes A Memoo Using Cows And Satellite ImageryA Kansas farmer is becoming somewhat of a celebrity for making agriculture-themed pop-music parodies and calling his cattle by playing Lorde's "Royals" on the trombone. Now, he's making space cow art. (Image credit: YouTube)
6h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Radar images show large swath of Texas oil patch is heaving and sinking at alarming ratesTwo giant sinkholes near Wink, Texas, may just be the tip of the iceberg, according to a new study that found alarming rates of new ground movement extending far beyond the infamous sinkholes.
7h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Promiscuity may have accelerated animal domesticationDomestication of wild animals may have accelerated as promiscuity increased among the high density populations drawn to life near humans, according to a new paper by University of Liverpool researchers.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Extent of cross-breeding between wild wolves and domestic dogs across Europe and AsiaMating between domesticated dogs and wild wolves over hundreds of years has left a genetic mark on the wolf gene pool, new research has shown.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Researchers observe the switching of Ras protein in detailRas proteins are molecular switches that decide if and when cells divide inside our bodies. An impairment of their function may result in the formation of a tumour. The process of switching the proteins on and off has been observed in detail by a research team headed by Prof Dr. Klaus Gerwert from the Department of Biophysics at Ruhr-Universität Bochum (RUB); using a combination of methods, the te
7h
TED Talks Daily (SD video)

For survivors of Ebola, the crisis isn't over | Soka MosesIn 2014, as a newly trained physician, Soka Moses took on one of the toughest jobs in the world: treating highly contagious patients at the height of Liberia's Ebola outbreak. In this intense, emotional talk, he details what he saw on the frontlines of the crisis -- and reveals the challenges and stigma that thousands of survivors still face.
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Science : NPR

Forum: How Discrimination Damages Health In LGBTQ CommunitiesHow do LGBTQ adults experience discrimination and how does it impact their health? Join us for a discussion with experts in a webcast from Harvard's Chan School of Public Health at noon ET Wednesday. (Image credit: Courtesy of Harvard T.H.Chan School of Public Health)
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Scientific American Content: Global

The Power of Flexible ThinkingThe cognitive style you need in times of change, explained by best-selling author Leonard Mlodinow -- Read more on ScientificAmerican.com
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

How trees coexist—new findings from biodiversity researchFor a decade, researchers explore how tree species diversity affects the coexistence of trees and their growth performance in the largest biodiversity experiment with trees worldwide, the so-called "BEF-China' experiment. One of the main interests of the BEF-China team is to explore the relationship between tree diversity and multiple ecosystem functions, specifically those benefitting society, su
7h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Medical tests with less fearIt is a principle of modern architecture that less may be more. This principle does not apply to information as a basis of far-reaching decisions, it seems. But: Many people shy away from going to the doctor's, because they are afraid of unpleasant truths, such as the diagnosis of a disease. Researchers of Karlsruhe Institute of Technology (KIT) and Tilburg University, Netherlands, have developed
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Facebook is killing democracy with its personality profiling dataWhat state should you move to based on your personality? What character on "Downton Abbey" would you be? What breed of dog is best for you? Some enormous percentage of Facebook's 2.13 billion users must have seen Facebook friends sharing results of various online quizzes. They are sometimes annoying, senseless and a total waste of time. But they are irresistible. Besides, you're only sharing the r
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

There is gold in big data, but there are not enough gold minersThe promise of big data has been on the horizon of the field of social sciences for years, but so far nobody has been able to deliver on this promise. In his inaugural lecture on 22 March, Professor and research methodologist Bernard Veldkamp explains why and offers solutions. His main point: we have to find different ways of dealing with this type of data. "The why-question should be replaced by
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

New technologies and computing power to help strengthen population data in low income countriesResearch led by the University of Southampton is helping governments in low-income countries strengthen their capacity to build and use population maps, to plan for the future and respond to emergencies.
7h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Indonesia's electricity subsidy reforms led to improved efficiencyIndonesia has been home to some of the world's largest subsidies for electricity use. Electricity prices have been set at low levels, with the government making transfers to Indonesia's electricity utility, Perusahaan Listrik Negara (PLN), to cover its losses. In 2012, electricity subsidies cost the government US$10 billion.
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Depth-sensing imaging system can peer through fogIn a study that holds promise for self-driving cars, MIT researchers have developed a system that can image and gauge the distance of objects shrouded by fog so thick that human vision can't penetrate it.
7h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Radar images show large swath of Texas oil patch is heaving and sinking at alarming ratesRadar satellite images show a large swath of Texas oil patch is heaving and sinking at alarming rates, according to a geophysical team from Southern Methodist University. Analysis of the images with oil activity data from the Texas Railroad Commission suggests decades of oil activity have destabilized localities of the 4,000-square-mile area, which is populated by small towns, roadways and a vast
7h
New on MIT Technology Review

Water scarcity could affect 5 billion people by 2050
7h
Big Think

How can teams objectively worse defeat teams who are objectively better?UMBC's upset over top-ranked Virginia last week was a perfect example of group flow. Read More
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Image: Satellite panel following reentry testingIdeally, no parts of a reentering satellite would survive their fiery return through the atmosphere, so testing is being used to understand how satellites break apart as they fall.
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Quanta Magazine

Complex Animals Led to More Oxygen, Says Maverick TheoryApproximately 540 million years ago, life rapidly diversified in an evolutionary burst — a biological “Big Bang” that witnessed the emergence of nearly every modern animal group. Scientists have long sought to determine what caused the Cambrian explosion, and to explain why animal life didn’t take this step at any point about a billion years earlier. The most popular narrative puts oxygen front a
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Futurity.org

There’s a surprising link between coffee and cannabisNew research shows coffee can affect our metabolism in dozens of ways—including our metabolism of steroids and the neurotransmitters typically linked to cannabis—beyond the caffeine boost we expect in the morning. “These are entirely new pathways by which coffee might affect health.” After drinking four to eight cups of coffee in a day, people’s neurotransmitters related to the endocannabinoid sy
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Scientific American Content: Global

Ralph Steadman's World of Endangered AnimalsThe legendary cartoonist highlights Earth’s most vulnerable species, using his lavish, eccentric style -- Read more on ScientificAmerican.com
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Dagens Medicin

Ny ledende overlæge i Ortopædkirurgien på Aalborg UniversitetshospitalBent Wulff Jakobsen er tiltrådt stillingen som ledende overlæge i Ortopædkirurgien, Aalborg Universitetshospital, Hjørring
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Dagens Medicin

Afdelingen for Hud- og kønssygdomme og Videncenter for Sårheling får ny ledende overlægeProfessor, dr.med. Simon Francis Thomsen er ansat som ny ledende overlæge på Bispebjerg og Frederiksberg Hospital.
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Dagens Medicin

Anklager i Højesteret: Svendborg-læge skal have skærpet sin strafSvendborg-lægens forsømmelser er af så grov karakter, at Højesteret bør skærpe landsrettens dom, mener anklageren. Lægen nægter sig fortsat skyldig.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

Could drugs used after an organ transplant protect against Alzheimer's?A new study in mice provides new clues about how a class of anti-rejection drugs used after organ transplants may also slow the progression of early-stage Alzheimer's disease.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

New valve technology promises cheaper, greener enginesNew technology reliably and affordably increases the efficiency of internal combustion engines by more than 10 per cent. The patented system for opening and closing valves could significantly reduce fuel consumption in everything from ocean-going ships to compact cars.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

Hunting squid slowed by rising carbon levelsScientists have found that high carbon dioxide levels cause squid to bungle attacks on their prey. Investigators said that the oceans absorb more than one-quarter of all the excess carbon dioxide (CO2) released into the atmosphere by humans and this uptake of additional CO2 causes seawater to become more acidic.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

Blue holes bring forgotten chemical element back on stageAbout a third of all Swiss exports result from fundamental discoveries in synthetic chemistry. Certain drugs and perfumes, as well as food and agricultural products -- and even Ferrari's famous red color -- are derived from new molecular structures invented by Swiss scientists. Chemists have just discovered that chemical bonds based on antimony yield powerful new catalysts that can be used to accu
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

Enzymetic activities based on nanocomplex sensors exploredResearchers compared the susceptibility of different triangle silver nanoprisms (TSNPRs) towards H2O2 and elucidated the influence of capping agents and structural size on the etching process, with the aim of optimizing TSNPRs for H2O2 etching-based biosensors, such as glucose and glucose oxidase.
7h
Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

New genetic research shows extent of cross-breeding between wild wolves and domestic dogsAn international study has shown that mating between domesticated dogs and wild wolves over hundreds of years has left a genetic mark on the wolf gene pool.
7h
Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

Dinosaur frills and horns did not evolve for species recognitionThe elaborate frills and horns of a group of dinosaurs including Triceratops and Styracosaurus did not evolve to help species recognise each other, according to researchers.
7h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Medicating for mental healthUniversity of Guelph researchers found evidence that a single bout of exhaustive exercise protects against acute olanzapine-induced hyperglycemia.
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News

The problem of jaguars and space in western ParaguayA recent study, published in the journal Mammalia, shows how researchers used GPS technology and new analytical techniques to produce the first rigorous estimates of jaguar spatial needs and movements in the Gran Chaco and Pantanal ecosystems of Paraguay.
7h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News

New technologies and computing power to help strengthen population dataResearch led by the University of Southampton is helping governments in low-income countries strengthen their capacity to build and use population maps, to plan for the future and respond to emergencies.
7h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News

How trees coexist. New findings from biodiversity research published in Nature CommunicationsOne of the most fascinating topics in ecology is the exploration of interactions between plants, specifically in long-lived organisms, such as trees. In this context, it is generally assumed that tree-tree interactions are dominated by competition for resources such as light, water or nutrients.
7h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Evidence for a giant flood in the central Mediterranean SeaMarine scientists have uncovered evidence of one of the largest floods in Earth's history in the central Mediterranean seafloor. The flood, known as the Zanclean flood, is thought to have ended the Messinian Salinity Crisis (MSC), a period during which the Mediterranean Sea became partially dried up.
7h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Islet transplantation improves QoL for people with hard-to-control type 1 diabetesQuality of life for people with type 1 diabetes who had frequent severe hypoglycemia -- a potentially fatal low blood glucose leve -- improved consistently and dramatically following transplantation of insulin-producing pancreatic islets, according to findings published online March 21 in Diabetes Care. The results come from a Phase 3 clinical trial funded by the National Institute of Allergy and
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Long-term study reveals fluctuations in birds' nesting successUnderstanding the factors that affect a bird species' nesting success can be crucial for planning effective conservation efforts. However, many studies of nesting birds last only a few years—and that means they can miss the effects of long-term variation and rare events. A new study from The Auk: Ornithological Advances demonstrates this with nearly four decades of data from Song Sparrows in Briti
7h
Viden

5 myter om fedme: Er du faldet for dem?Vi siger ikke, at din personlige træner lyver, men…
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Palaeontologists investigate the macabre science behind how animals decay and fossilizeNew research has revealed how the history of life can be distorted by the ways animals decompose and lose body parts as they decay—and the ways in which decayed bodies ultimately become fossilised.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Children benefit when taught social and emotional skills—but some methods are better than othersIt is understood that childrens' emotions in school are connected to their learning and academic achievement. The evolution of concepts such as emotional intelligence explain why the ability to recognise, use, express and manage one's emotions makes a huge difference to success in later life. As the American author and philosopher Walker Percy said, "You can get all As and still flunk life."
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The Atlantic

It’s Time to Regulate the InternetIt will be fantastically satisfying to see the boy genius flayed. All the politicians—ironically, in search of a viral moment—will lash Mark Zuckerberg from across the hearing room. They will corner Facebook’s founding bro, seeking to pin all manner of sin on him. This will make for scrumptious spectacle, but spectacle is a vacuous substitute for policy. As Facebook’s scandals have unfolded, the
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Feed: All Latest

Leica CL: Snap Candids in Style With This Discreet New CameraWhile potential photographic subjects would shy away from a DSLR-wielding tourist, barely a soul would notice a box as compact as Leica’s CL.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Researchers explore enzymetic activities based on nanocomplex sensorsA team of researchers from Ludong University compared the susceptibility of different triangle silver nanoprisms (TSNPRs) towards H2O2 and elucidated the influence of capping agents and structural size on the etching process, with the aim of optimizing TSNPRs for H2O2 etching-based biosensors, such as glucose and glucose oxidase. The result of their research was recently published in a paper in Na
7h
New on MIT Technology Review

The EU could make Big Tech pay tax on its turnover
7h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Proteins reveal new mechanisms in prostate cancerA study by the University of Tampere in Finland used protein profiling to find new prostate cancer mechanisms that are not shown by aberrations at the genomic level. Several new potential biomarkers of prostate cancer were also found.
7h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Cold can activate body's 'good' fat at a cellular level, study findsLower temperatures can activate the body's 'good' fat formation at a cellular level, a new study led by academics at The University of Nottingham has found.
7h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Study finds the emergency department can play a key role in identifying undiagnosed HIV cases in lowSouth Africa has the worst epidemic of HIV in the world. According to the Joint United Nations Programme on HIV/AIDS, 19 percent of the global number of people living with HIV are in South Africa. Many people in South Africa and around the globe do not even know they have HIV.
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News

The quest for neuronal originsThe cerebral cortex consists of a large diversity of neurons, each displaying specific characteristics in terms of molecular, morphological and functional features. But where are these neurons born? How do they develop their distinct properties? Scientists from the University of Geneva have discovered a unique molecular factor allowing them to track, from birth to maturity, a homogeneous class of
7h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News

A potential drug target against a large family of parasites is identifiedAn international research team identifies for the first time a key enzyme for the synthesis of glycoconjugates (sugars linked to other molecules) in Plasmodium falciparum and other intracellular parasites belonging to the large phylum Apicomplexa. The study, led by ISGlobal -- a centre supported by the 'la Caixa' Foundation -- and published in Scientific Reports, indicates that this enzyme could r
7h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Could drugs used after an organ transplant protect against Alzheimer's?A UT Southwestern study in mice provides new clues about how a class of anti-rejection drugs used after organ transplants may also slow the progression of early-stage Alzheimer's disease.
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Dagens Medicin

Ny ledende overlæge til Rygcenter SyddanmarkJakob Espesen tiltræder 1. april som ny ledende overlæge på Rygcenter Syddanmark i Middelfart.
7h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

'Wiggling and jiggling': Study explains how organisms evolve to live at different temperaturesThe brilliant physicist Richard Feynman famously said that, in principle, biology can be explained by understanding the wiggling and jiggling of atoms. For the first time, new research from the University of Bristol, UK and the University of Waikoto, New Zealand explains how this 'wiggling and jiggling' of the atoms in enzymes - the proteins that make biological reactions happen - is 'choreographe
7h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Understanding effects of climate change on California watershedsCalifornia relies on the Sierra Nevada snowpack for a significant portion of its water needs, yet scientists understand very little about how future changes in snowpack volume and timing will influence surface water and groundwater. Now researchers at the Department of Energy's Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory (Berkeley Lab) are developing an advanced hydrologic model to study how climate cha
7h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

We need laws on geoengineering, ASAPHumans have been accidentally altering the planet's climate for thousands of years. Soon, it may be possible alter it intentionally.
7h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Excess phosphorus in cat food damages the kidneyA new study carried out by LMU veterinarians shows that high phosphorus intake, comparable to the average level provided by prepared cat food, can be deleterious to kidney function in healthy cats.
7h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Come hither... how imitating mating males could cut cane toad numbersCane toads are a real Aussie success story – for themselves, at least. But research has produced a new kind of trap that may help stop their insidious march south.
8h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Consumers need critical thinking to fend off banks' bad behaviourThe irresponsible (if not predatory) lending and the selling of "junk" financial products highlighted by the Financial Services Royal Commission should raise concerns for regulators, educators and parents interested in financial literacy.
8h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

As humans change the world, predators seize the chance to succeedIf you have ever been to a nature reserve in Africa, you may have been lucky enough to see predators on a kill – maybe something spectacular like lions on a giraffe. The chances are you got to see that because the predators killed the prey right on the road, where you could get up close in your car or safari vehicle.
8h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Air-sea gas exchange impact measurements could improve climate predictionsTrace gases, ranging from carbon dioxide to water vapour, refer to any of the less common gases found in the Earth's atmosphere. Yet, many of these gases are responsible for the greenhouse effect. It's crucial to understand how their chemistry is affected by air-sea fluxes which involve the exchanges of heat, mass and momentum between the atmosphere and the ocean.
8h
Feed: All Latest

Turing Prize Winners Paved the Way to Smartphone ChipsStanford's John Hennessy, now chair of Google parent Alphabet, and Berkeley's David Patterson developed the Reduced Instruction Set Computer in the 1980s.
8h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Flood protection is everyone's responsibilityScientists in Vienna have studied the complex interplay between flooding events and economic decisions. Private businesses should not shoulder the responsibility for flood protection alone. In prosperous countries in particular, it makes sense for central government to establish the necessary infrastructure for flood protection.
8h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Researchers observe the switching of ras protein in detailRas proteins are molecular switches that decide if and when cells divide inside our bodies. An impairment of their function may result in the formation of a tumor. The process of switching the proteins on and off has been observed in detail by a research team headed by Prof Dr Klaus Gerwert from the Department of Biophysics at Ruhr-Universität Bochum (RUB);
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Sex workers need workplace regulations to improve safety: StudyCanada's sex workers, many of whom work indoors, are enterprising and vigilant when it comes to protecting themselves against exploitation, assault or robbery. They set a relaxing atmosphere, insist on a no-drugs rule, keep self-defence tools at the ready and maintain good relationships with landlords in order to avoid eviction.
8h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News

New genetic research shows extent of cross-breeding between wild wolves and domestic dogsAn international study led by the University of Lincoln has shown that mating between domesticated dogs and wild wolves over hundreds of years has left a genetic mark on the wolf gene pool.
8h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Cardiovascular health disparities between whites and minorities narrow, study showsThe nation's overall cardiovascular health worsened from 1988 to 2014, with disparities among racial and ethnic groups dropping slightly. But the reduction in disparities was due to worsening health among whites -- not improvements among African-Americans and Mexican-Americans.
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Futurity.org

How to brew hoppy beer, no hops requiredBiologists have come up with a way to create the unique flavors and aromas of hoppy beer without using hops. The researchers created strains of brewer’s yeast that not only ferment the beer but also provide two of the prominent flavor notes that hops provides. In double-blind taste tests, employees of Lagunitas Brewing Company in Petaluma, California, characterized beer made from the engineered s
8h
Popular Science

Travel safely with these electronics packing tipsDIY Don't break any gadgets. Get your trip off to a good start by making sure your gadgets are safe during transit.
8h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Native invaders—a chink in the armour of ecological policy?Invasive species are widely recognised as a major threat to the functioning of ecosystems and conservation of wildlife in the 21st century. But while most biological invasions are associated with the introduction of alien species into a new ecosystem – like the notorious cane toad in Australia– an important and often overlooked minority involve native species that begin to behave differently in re
8h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Exotic material exhibits an optical response in enormous disproportion to the stimulusNo earlier theory had envisioned that the responses would be so large! Scientists "poked" three crystals with pulses of light. Unexpectedly, the crystals exhibited the largest nonlinear optical response of any known crystal. The response was a huge amount of different colored light with twice the frequency of the pulse. These crystals are members of a new class of materials known as Weyl semimetal
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Ultrahigh-resolution insights into vegetation dynamics and terrestrial evaporationThe availability of high-resolution data collected by miniaturized satellites heralds a turning point in Earth and environmental sensing from space.
8h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Potential for a cleaner blend of fuelA technique modeling the combustion characteristics of gasoline blended with biofuels for cleaner and more efficient fuels.
8h
Big Think

A landmark report shows why Americans keep losing happinessThe 2018 World Happiness Index reveals some surprises and explains why the world's richest country is not one of its happiest. Read More
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Futurity.org

Older adults may be more prone to false memoriesResearchers have discovered that as people age, they may be more likely to rely on a type of memory—called schematic memory—that helps them remember the gist of an event, but not necessarily the details. This inability to remember details could lead to difficulty in distinguishing between a memory of something that really happened and something that a person thought happened, but did not—a false
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Ingeniøren

EU klar til at finansiere gratis wifi i 1.000 europæiske kommunerNu kan danske kommuner søge om midler til at etablere gratis wifi i form af internethotspots. EU står klar med knap 900 millioner kroner til etablering af nye gratis hotspots uden reklamer eller høst af personlige oplysninger.
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Futurity.org

Is soothing ‘surgent’ babies with food a bad idea?Making a habit of soothing a fussy child with food can result in unnecessary weight gain in babies with certain temperaments, new research suggests. “…in many ways, the baby’s behavior is influencing the parents’ behavior…” The researchers studied the babies’ temperaments and how their mothers soothed them when the babies were six months old. When the researchers followed up a year later, they fo
8h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Arctic sea-ice loss and winter temperatures in EurasiaA long debate of the role of the sea ice and the winter temperatures in Eurasia has got a new contribution. Probably no connection, a new study says.
8h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Cambridge Analytica scandal—legitimate researchers using Facebook data could be collateral damageThe scandal that has erupted around Cambridge Analytica's alleged harvesting of 50m Facebook profiles assembled from data provided by a UK-based academic and his company is a worrying development for legitimate researchers.
8h
Feed: All Latest

Google's Cloud Security Command Center Should Help Stop Data LeaksHuman error leads to countless leaky databases. But Google has some new protections in place to help cloud customers better help themselves.
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Dagens Medicin

Ny klinisk professor i godartede blodsygdomme på OUHOverlæge Henrik Frederiksen er ansat som ny klinisk professor på Hæmatologisk Afdeling på Odense Universitetshospital
8h
Feed: All Latest

It's Time for Facebook and Google to Ban Ads from Dark Money GroupsOpinion: Facebook and Google should stop accepting political advertising from groups whose funders and true agenda are unclear.
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Researchers explore enzymetic activities based on nanocomplex sensorsA team of researchers from Ludong University compared the susceptibility of different triangle silver nanoprisms (TSNPRs) towards H2O2 and elucidated the influence of capping agents and structural size on the etching process, with the aim of optimizing TSNPRs for H2O2 etching-based biosensors, such as glucose and glucose oxidase. The result of their research was recently published in a paper in Na
8h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Physicists reveal material for high-speed quantum internetResearchers from the Moscow Institute of Physics and Technology have 'rediscovered' a material that can lay the foundation for ultrahigh-speed quantum internet. Their paper published in npj Quantum Information shows how to increase the data transfer rate in unconditionally secure quantum communication lines to more than 1 gigabit per second, making quantum internet as fast as its classical counter
8h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Blue holes bring forgotten chemical element back on stageAbout a third of all Swiss exports result from fundamental discoveries in synthetic chemistry. Certain drugs and perfumes, as well as food and agricultural products -- and even Ferrari's famous red color -- are derived from new molecular structures invented by Swiss scientists. Chemists at the University of Geneva, Switzerland, have just discovered that chemical bonds based on antimony yield power
8h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Hunting squid slowed by rising carbon levelsPhD candidate Blake Spady from the ARC Centre of Excellence for Coral Reef Studies (Coral CoE) at James Cook University (JCU) led an investigation into how squid behave and perform under elevated CO2 levels.
8h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Long-term study reveals fluctuations in birds' nesting successUnderstanding the factors that affect a bird species' nesting success can be crucial for planning effective conservation efforts. However, many studies of nesting birds last only a few years -- and that means they can miss the effects of long-term variation and rare events. A new study from The Auk: Ornithological Advances demonstrates this with nearly four decades of data from Song Sparrows in Br
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Combining power of humans, computers key to watershed solutionsAn Oregon State University researcher is leading the charge for crowdsourced solutions to complex water management problems.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Leaving fossils behind for the future of transportOne of the key challenges we face as a species in the 21st century is how to co-exist with nature in a sustainable manner whilst maintaining our way of life and extending these benefits across the developing world. This basic tension affects every area of our modern way of life, but none more so than transport. We live in a time of unprecedented technological progress, with colossal investment in
8h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Op-ed says Clinton may have lost election due to 'systemic gender discrimination'Despite being described by former U.S. President Barack Obama as the most-qualified presidential nominee in U.S. history, former Secretary of State Hillary Clinton lost the 2016 campaign for the highest office in the land. That outcome may have been the result of systemic gender discrimination, according to psychologists at Rice University.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Weird superconductor leads double lifeUntil about 50 years ago, all known superconductors were metals. This made sense, because metals have the largest number of loosely bound "carrier" electrons that are free to pair up and flow as electrical current with no resistance and 100 percent efficiency – the hallmark of superconductivity.
8h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Radio nebula discovered around the pulsar PSR J0855–4644Using the Giant Metrewave Radio Telescope (GMRT) in India, an international team of astronomers has detected a diffuse radio emission forming a nebula around the pulsar PSR J0855–4644. The finding is reported March 9 in a paper published on the arXiv pre-print repository.
8h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Theory of non-orthogonalization and spatial localization for convection-allowing ensemble forecastThe method to generate initial perturbations is the core problem focalized by ensemble forecast system (EPS). Recently, a new convection-allowing ensemble prediction method based on the consideration of perturbations growth with non-orthogonalization and strong spatial localization has been proposed by researchers, which has been published on Science China Earth Sciences 2018.
8h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Western diet depletes artery-protecting immune cellsNew research from scientists at the La Jolla Institute shows how a diet high in fat and cholesterol depletes the ranks of artery-protecting immune cells, turning them into promoters of inflammation, which exacerbate atherosclerotic plaque buildup that occurs in cardiovascular disease. The team has also found that high density lipoproteins (HDL)--more commonly known as "good cholesterol"--counterac
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Futurity.org

Here’s whose germs can infect you on a planeA new study assesses rates and routes of possible infectious disease transmission during flights. An infectious passenger with influenza or other droplet-transmitted respiratory infection will most likely not transmit infection to passengers seated farther away than two seats laterally and one row in front or back on an aircraft, the new research indicates. Vicki Hertzberg, professor at Emory Uni
8h
Latest Headlines | Science News

Male birth control pill passes a safety testA prototype contraceptive for men safely reduced testosterone and other reproductive hormones during a month-long treatment.
8h
Dagens Medicin

Læger giver bud på økonomisk styring af det regionale sundhedsvæsenFaglig prioritering og kvalitet skal være styrende i det regionale sundhedsvæsen, lyder det fra Sygehussamarbejdet, som bl.a. består af Yngre Læger og Overlægeforeningen.
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Dagens Medicin

Millionpulje til nye lægehuse bliver overrendtKommuner og regioner ansøgt om knap 800 mio. kr. til nye lægehuse. Eksperter advarer mod at tro, at nye bygninger løser problemerne i det nære sundhedsvæsen.
8h
The Scientist RSS

Investigation Finds Signs of Misconduct in Swedish Researchers PapersEight papers by Suchitra Sumitran-Holgersson, a tissue engineer at the University of Gothenburg, have been flagged for image manipulation.
8h
The Scientist RSS

Image of the Day: Flock of AlgaeVolvox barberi actively organize themselves into large colonies that optimize space.
8h
Live Science

US Can't Stop Hypersonic Weapons, Air Force General SaysMissiles that spit out warheads traveling up to 20 times the speed of sound and with the ability to perform elusive acrobatics may be too much for the U.S. defenses to block, U.S. Stratcom chief says.
8h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Exploring the vast potential of non-edible seed oilsBiomass remains the primary source of energy for developing countries in the South-East Asian region. The share of biomass utilization for energy varies from as large as 50-75 percent in Laos, Myanmar, Cambodia and Vietnam to a much lower percentage (below 15 percent) in Indonesia, Philippines, Thailand and Malaysia. Previously, biomass was used only as primary energy source. However, the current
9h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

When communicating with color, balance can be a path to accuracyMore than just pleasing to the eye, color can be used to communicate messages quickly and effectively.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Depth-sensing imaging system can peer through fogMIT researchers have developed a system that can produce images of objects shrouded by fog so thick that human vision can't penetrate it. It can also gauge the objects' distance.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Nanocrystalline graphite enables new class of harsh environment electronicsResearchers from the Universities of Bristol and Southampton, in collaboration with Microsemi, have demonstrated reliable operation of microelectromechanical relays by coating the contacts with nanocrystalline layers of graphite, to enable ultra-low-power electronics for harsh environments.
9h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Novel adhesive and thermally stable epoxy resinsEpoxy resins or epoxies are organic compounds that can be hardened into adhesive materials with excellent thermal stability, mechanical strength, and chemical resistance. The hardening or 'curing' results from cross-linking either within the resin itself or between the resin and a co-reactant. Epoxies are produced by polymerization of epoxides—organic molecules with one or more three-atomic, trian
9h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

NASA marshall advances 3-D printed rocket engine nozzle technologyRocket engine nozzles operate in extreme temperatures and pressures from the combustion process and are complex and expensive to manufacture. That is why a team of engineers at NASA's Marshall Space Flight Center in Huntsville, Alabama, developed and proved out a new additive manufacturing technique for nozzle fabrication that can greatly reduce costs and development time.
9h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Extreme weather brings kelp rafts from the sub-Antarctic to New ZealandAn unusually large amount of storm activity in southern New Zealand over the past 12 months has provided new insights into how extreme weather events can impact marine biology.
9h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

New atmospheric results from the International Space StationWith ESA's help, the latest atmosphere monitor on the International Space Station is delivering results on our planet's ozone, aerosol and nitrogen trioxide levels. Installed last year on the orbital outpost, NASA's sensor tracks the sun and moon to probe the constituents of our atmosphere.
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Futurity.org

Hydrogel could totally change treatment of diabetic woundsA hydrogel that can help the body heal may also be particularly good at treating wounds related to diabetes, new research suggests. Tests on diabetic animal models show that the injectable hydrogel significantly accelerates wound healing compared with another hydrogel often used in clinics. …the typical treatment for a diabetic foot ulcer has not changed much over the last century. The multidomai
9h
Popular Science

One-fifth of Americans are responsible for half the country's food-based emissionsEnvironment And the emissions might not come from where you think. Until recently, we had no idea how right or wrong that hypothetical average human’s diet might be. We knew that American diets varied a lot, just not how much or in what…
9h
Ingeniøren

DMI-strejke kan lamme lufthavneneDe danske lufthavne er afhængige af vejrdata fra DMI, så når meteorologerne strejker, betyder det reelt, at der ikke kan flyves til eller fra danske lufthavne.
9h
Science-Based Medicine

Music for ADHD?In a recent "Ask Me Anything" on Reddit, the CEO of Brain.fm claimed his company's music can improve concentration and help with ADHD. At the very least I see such claims as highly implausible, and not something we can conclude from the existing basic science research. I have no problem with doing clinical research, and maybe we might learn something about how the brain regulates attention that ca
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Futurity.org

Scientists get a good look at electrons inside grapheneScientists have demonstrated how to view many-particle interactions in graphene using infrared light. Electrons in graphene—an atomically thin, flexible, and incredibly strong substance that has captured the imaginations of materials scientists and physicists—move at the speed of light, and behave as if they have no mass. Researchers conducted their work in a custom-built vessel cooled to a few d
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Science | The Guardian

UK's status as science superpower at risk after Brexit, say MPsCommittee calls on government to commit to next round of EU funding for science and clarify immigration policy Britain cannot take for granted that it will retain its world-leading position in science and innovation after Brexit, a committee of MPs has warned. The House of Commons science and technology select committee is concerned that the UK has not yet committed itself to the next round of EU
9h
cognitive science

A new paper in Psychological Science explores the sources of people's intuitions about what aspects of human behavior can be studied scientifically.submitted by /u/markmana [link] [comments]
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Futurity.org

Trump may galvanize black voters in 2018 and beyondAfrican-American voters who dislike and feel threatened by Donald Trump and his presidency are much more likely to vote and to engage with politics, according to new research. The findings, the researchers say, indicate sentiment against Trump and his policies creates an opportunity for African-American mobilization as the country heads toward the 2018 midterm elections. Black voters who strongly
9h
The Atlantic

Dear Therapist: I Google-Stalked My TherapistEditor’s Note: Every Wednesday, Lori Gottlieb answers questions from readers about their problems, big and small. Have a question? Email her at dear.therapist@theatlantic.com. Dear Therapist, My same-sex partner and I have been seeing the same therapist both individually and as a couple. Over the past year, we both feel that she has fundamentally changed our lives. While seeing her nearly weekly,
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The Atlantic

Martin Luther King Jr. Was Bailed Out by a MillionaireEditor’s Note: Read The Atlantic ’s special coverage of Martin Luther King Jr.’s legacy. Image above: Ralph Abernathy ( left ) and King pass through a corridor at the Birmingham, Alabama, city jail just after their release in 1963. I n the course of his life, Martin Luther King Jr. was arrested 30 times. Most famously, in April 1963, Eugene “Bull” Connor, the police commissioner of Birmingham, Al
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News

The curse of zombie fossilsPalaeontologists investigate the macabre science behind how animals decay and fossilize.
10h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Preventing hurricanes using air bubblesMany people have tried to find ways of preventing hurricanes before they make landfall, resulting in the loss of human lives. Norwegian researchers believe that the answer lies in cold bubbles.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

A new technique allows researchers to create real system cartographic maps at different scalesResearchers at the Institute of Complex Systems of the University of Barcelona (UBICS) have developed a method to represent network systems, such as postal services and the internet, at different scales, as if they were cartographic maps.
10h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

ESA's next science mission to focus on nature of exoplanetsThe nature of planets orbiting stars in other systems will be the focus for ESA's fourth medium-class science mission, to be launched in mid 2028.
10h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Radon research leads to new technique to improve global climate modelsAn investigation that set out to resolve some of the uncertainty in the sources and quantities of pollutants reaching Antarctica has produced a new experimental technique to identify and characterise recently terrestrially-influenced air reaching Antarctica.
10h
The Atlantic

Steven Soderbergh's Unsane Is a Paranoid NightmareThere’s a fun, emerging subgenre of horror that should feel particularly resonant for anyone who’s ever clicked “accept” on a long, incomprehensible set of terms and conditions, or signed a petition without really reading it. Let’s call it the “Don’t sign the contract!” film. Last year, there was A Cure for Wellness , where Dane DeHaan ended up taking a bath with some eels at a Swiss sanatorium a
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The Atlantic

The Return of the Iraq War ArgumentThe buzz about a summit this spring between Donald Trump and Kim Jong Un has tamped down talk of war with North Korea. But the bellicosity bubbles just below the surface, and could boil over if the diplomatic gamble fails. Recall how George W. Bush’s press secretary once justified the war in Iraq: “The United States exhausted every legitimate and credible opportunity to resolve this peacefully.”
10h
Live Science

Bizarre, Nessie-Like Creature Washes Ashore in Georgia, and Marine Experts Are MystifiedIs it a dead frilled shark? Or a decayed whale or an oarfish? Or even a hoax?
10h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Physicists reveal material for high-speed quantum internetResearchers from the Moscow Institute of Physics and Technology have rediscovered a material that could be the basis for ultra-high-speed quantum internet. Their paper published in npj Quantum Information shows how to increase the data transfer rate in unconditionally secure quantum communication lines to more than one gigabit per second, making quantum internet as fast as its classical counterpar
10h
Latest Headlines | Science News

Meet the giants among virusesFor decades, all viruses were thought to be small and simple. But the discovery of more and more giant viruses shows that’s not the case.
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Scientific American Content: Global

The Difficult Birth of the "Many Worlds" Interpretation of Quantum MechanicsHugh Everett, creator of this radical idea during a drunken debate more than 60 years ago, died before he could see his theory gain widespread popularity -- Read more on ScientificAmerican.com
10h
Ingeniøren

Fire lag asfaltpap kan afgøre Vikingeskibsmuseets fremtidUdgangen på en strid om tætheden af de fire lag asfaltpap, der udgør membranen under Vikingeskibsmuseet, kan blive afgørende for, om museet skal rives ned eller renoveres.
10h
Dagens Medicin

Plejehjemsejer: Læger har ukritisk tilgang til ældres medicinforbrugÆldres medicinforbrug vil kunne nedsættes ved mere opfølgning, siger plejehjemsejer. Formand for DSAM mener, at det er en svær opgave at løse, der kræver en mentalitetsændring hos lægerne.
10h
Dagens Medicin

Bred politisk aftale afblæser vagtlægekriseEt enstemmigt Folketing har besluttet at fritage den enkelte vagtlæge fra det omstridte vagtlægegebyr. Regningen lander i stedet hos regionerne. Det skriver JydskeVestkysten.
10h
New Scientist - News

Fed up with Facebook? Here’s how to fix your online privacyAllegations about Cambridge Analytica have led some to rethink their relationship with social media. Here are some tips to calm your data worries
10h
Live Science

These 2 Genes May Increase the Risk for Extreme Morning SicknessResearchers have identified two genes that may increase risk for hyperemesis gravidarum, a debilitating condition that causes extreme morning sickness during pregnancy.
10h
Live Science

Why Some People Can 'Hear' Silent ImagesHere's a riddle: If a tree falls in a silent GIF, does it make a sound?
11h
Ingeniøren

Røffel til Rejsekort fra Datatilsynet: Optog telefonsamtaler og nægtede udleveringOptagelser af telefonsamtaler skal udleveres på forlangende, slår Datatilsynet fast.
11h
Ingeniøren

USA mangler uranVedligehold af de amerikanske kernevåben kræver en konstant produktion af tritium, som foregår i reaktorer med lavt beriget uran, men USA mangler egne anlæg til at producere de nødvendige uranmængder.
11h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News

'Wiggling and jiggling': Study explains how organisms evolve to live at different temperaturesThe brilliant physicist Richard Feynman famously said that, in principle, biology can be explained by understanding the wiggling and jiggling of atoms. For the first time, new research from the University of Bristol, UK and the University of Waikoto, New Zealand explains how this 'wiggling and jiggling' of the atoms in enzymes -- the proteins that make biological reactions happen -- is 'choreograp
11h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

City-dwelling blackbirds have poorer measures of healthBlackbirds live longer in cities than in forests. But their telomeres, repetitive stretches of DNA at the ends of the chromosomes, show that these city birds have a much poorer health status than their rural cousins. These findings from a study in five European cities led by University of Groningen biologists were published in Biology Letters on 21 March.
11h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Filling lithium-ion cells fasterDevelopers from Bosch and scientists at the Technical University of Munich (TUM) are using neutrons to analyze the filling of lithium ion batteries for hybrid cars with electrolytes. Their experiments show that electrodes are wetted twice as fast in a vacuum as under normal pressure.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Natural aphid predators reduce pesticide useThe greater the diversity of crops grown in agricultural landscapes is, the better natural predators of aphids are able to control the pests on wheat fields. This is because a varied landscape provides better living conditions for aphids' natural predators than a never-ending series of monocultures.
11h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Scientists discern new bacterial resistance mechanism against peptide antibioticsNon-ribosomal peptide antibiotics, including polymyxin, vancomycin, and teixobactin, most of which contain D-amino acids, are highly effective against multidrug-resistant bacteria. However, overusing antibiotics while ignoring the risk of resistance arising has inexorably led to widespread emergence of resistant bacteria. Elucidating the little known mechanisms of resistance to peptide antibiotics
11h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

App developer says he is scapegoat in Facebook data rowThe academic behind the app which harvested data from 50 million Facebook users said Wednesday he was being used as a scapegoat in the row over online privacy.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Facebook fined in South Korea for limiting user accessFacebook Data Cambridge AnalyticaSouth Korea's telecoms regulator has fined Facebook for illegally limiting user access to its services from late 2016 to 2017.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Elephant and cow manure for making paper sustainablyIt's likely not the first thing you think of when you see elephant dung, but this material turns out to be an excellent source of cellulose for paper manufacturing in countries where trees are scarce, scientists report. And in regions with plenty of farm animals such as cows, upcycling manure into paper products could be a cheap and environmentally sound method to get rid of this pervasive agricul
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Protein nutrition for cells and organisms: Can we use it to treat diseases?In the April 2018 issue of SLAS Discovery, a review article by Prof. Stefan Broer, Ph.D. of the Australian National University highlights opportunities and challenges in using amino acid transporters as drug targets. Amino Acid Transporters as Disease Modifiers and Drug Targets provides an overview of methods used to identify new inhibitors for amino acid transporters and outlines cell and organ f
11h
New Scientist - News

Down’s syndrome has become the newest front in the abortion warsAbortions on the basis of disability are back in the spotlight thanks to a new test for Down's syndrome during pregnancy and law changes around the world
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

The perfect shot of espresso every time with chemistryThe average American drinks more than three cups of coffee a day, contributing to a $40 billion industry in the U.S. alone, according to the National Coffee Association. But not all coffee is created equal; flavor profiles vary. Focusing on espresso, scientists say they have now unlocked the key to creating consistent cups of java.
11h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Banana plant extract could be key to creamier, longer lasting ice creamNo doubt about it, ice cream is a great treat on a hot day. That is, until it drips down the sides of a cone or turns into soup in a bowl. Now scientists say they are closing in on a cool solution to this sticky problem. They've found that adding tiny cellulose fibers extracted from banana plant waste to ice cream could slow melting, increase shelf life and potentially replace fats used to make th
11h
Ingeniøren

Poul-Henning Kamp har ingen Facebook-profil: »Deres forretningsmodel er usympatisk«Margrethe Vestager kan højst give Facebook et rap over nallerne, vurderer han.
11h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Evidence that a star disturbed prehistory solar system cometsAbout 70,000 years ago, during human occupation of the planet, a small, reddish star approached our solar system and gravitationally disturbed comets and asteroids. Astronomers from the Complutense University of Madrid and the University of Cambridge have verified that the movement of some of these objects is still marked by that stellar encounter.
12h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Physicists made crystal lattice from polaritonsAn international research team produced an analog of a solid-body crystal lattice from polaritons, hybrid photon-electron quasiparticles. In the resulting polariton lattice, the energy of certain particles does not depend on their speed. At the same time, the lattice's geometry, particle concentration and polarization properties can still be modified. This opens up new perspectives for the study o
12h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Pro-environmental programs should take the factors that motivate each gender into considerationA piece of research carried out by lecturers at the UPV/EHU's Faculty of Economics and Business has explored the gender differences in pro-environmental behaviors of university students on the UPV/EHU's Bizkaia campus. The results suggest that the set of variables affecting pro-environmental behavior differs according to gender, but that the degree of intensity that each factor exerts on this beha
12h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Months-long, real-time generation of a time scale based on an optical clockThe National Institute of Information and Communications Technology (NICT) generated a real-time signal of an accurate time scale by combining an optical lattice clock and a hydrogen maser. The signal generated in this optical-microwave hybrid system continued for a half-year without interruption. The resultant one-second unit was more accurate than that of Coordinated Universal Time (UTC) on that
12h
NYT > Science

Where Do Birds Flock Together? Australians Are Mailing In Feathers to Help Find OutKate Brandis, an Australian researcher, has enlisted the public to help her track elusive waterfowl as the country’s wetlands disappear.
12h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Lymph node surgery could be avoided for some women with aggressive types of breast cancerSentinel lymph node biopsies, where lymph nodes are surgically removed to check for signs of breast cancer spread, could be safely avoided for some women, according to research presented at the 11th European Breast Cancer Conference.
12h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Protein nutrition for cells and organisms: Can we use it to treat diseases?A review article by Prof. Stefan Broer, Ph.D., highlights opportunities and challenges in using amino acid transporters as drug targets. Amino Acid Transporters as Disease Modifiers and Drug Targets provides an overview of methods used to identify new inhibitors for amino acid transporters and outlines cell and organ function where these can be used to modulate, prevent or to treat diseases.
12h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News

New 4-D printer could reshape the world we live inScientists report that they have developed a powerful new printer that could streamline the creation of self-assembling structures that can change shape after being exposed to heat and other stimuli. They say this unique technology could accelerate the use of 4-D printing in aerospace, medicine and other industries. The researchers will present their results today at the 255th National Meeting & E
12h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Make way for the mini flying machinesTiny floating robots could be useful in all kinds of ways, for example, to probe the human gut for disease or to search the environment for pollutants. In a step toward such devices, researchers describe a new marriage of materials, combining ultrathin 2-D electronics with miniature particles to create microscopic machines. The researchers will present their results today at the 255th National Mee
12h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Banana plant extract could be key to creamier, longer lasting ice creamScientists say they are closing in on a cool solution to a sticky problem. They've found that adding tiny cellulose fibers extracted from banana plant waste to ice cream could slow melting, increase shelf life and potentially replace fats used to make the tasty treat. The researchers will present their results today at the 255th National Meeting & Exposition of the American Chemical Society.
12h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News

The perfect shot of espresso every time with chemistryThe average American drinks more than three cups of coffee a day, contributing to a $40 billion industry in the US alone, according to the National Coffee Association. But not all coffee is created equal; flavor profiles vary. Focusing on espresso, scientists say they have now unlocked the key to creating consistent cups of java. The researchers are presenting their results today at the 255th Nati
12h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Elephant and cow manure for making paper sustainablyIt's likely not the first thing you think of when you see elephant or cow dung, but this material turns out to be an excellent source of cellulose for paper manufacturing. Upcycling manure into paper products could be a cheap and environmentally sound method to get rid of this pervasive agricultural waste. The researchers will present their results today at the 255th National Meeting & Exposition
12h
Science : NPR

Autism, Haircuts And A Nursery RhymeHaircuts can be traumatic for autistic children. It took two years for Australian barber Lisa Ann McKenzie to give Jordie Rowland a cut. The breakthrough was singing a favorite nursery rhyme.
12h
Ingeniøren

Omstridt trivselsmåling: Nu kan eleverne deltage anonymt og på papirSom en nødløsning kan eleverne udfylde besvarelsen anonymt via et papirskema.
12h
Ingeniøren

Sensorjakke skal gøre enhver til robotprogrammørTysk start-up har udviklet en jakke spækket med sensorer og aktuatorer, der kan vise en industriel robot, hvilke bevægelser den skal udføre. Teknologien skal nu testes af i praksis på Volkswagens demofabrik.
13h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Urgent care center growth in claim lines more than 7 times that of ER from 2007 to 2016To provide clarity in a rapidly changing healthcare environment, FAIR Health is introducing two new ways to derive insights from healthcare data: FH Healthcare Indicators™ and the FH Medical Price Index™. Drawing on the independent nonprofit's national database of billions of privately insured healthcare claims -- the largest in the country -- these two tools apply different approaches to illumina
13h
Nyheder - Forskning - Videnskab

Højst to øl - stramme regler for druk ser ud til at virkeUnge, hvis forældre satte stramme regler for alkohol i teenageårene, drikker sig sjældent...
13h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Monkeys use tools to crack nuts, shuck oystersWild macaque monkeys have learned to use tools to crack open nuts and even shuck oysters, researchers said Wednesday, identifying a rare skill-set long thought to be the exclusive party trick of humans and chimps.
13h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Australia to open more marine parks to commercial fishingAustralia recommended opening more of its marine parks, including near the Great Barrier Reef, to commercial fishing Wednesday in a decision slammed as the worst downgrading of a protected area in the world.
13h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

India's turtle warriors embrace mission to save threatened speciesSince he was a boy, Soumyaranjan Biswal has kept a night vigil at the beach near his coastal Indian village where tens of thousands of tiny olive ridley turtles gather to lay their eggs.
13h
Dagens Medicin

Aids-fondet: HPV-vaccine til drenge giver travlhed og ventelisterDen gratis HPV-vaccine til drenge fås kun hos Aids-fondet. Det har medført travlhed hos fondets sundhedspersonale, der ikke forstår, at PLO står uden for pilotprojektet
13h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Facebook: A community like no other. Should you leave it?Facebook Data Cambridge AnalyticaSure. Take that quiz about which hair-metal band is your spirit animal. Share a few snaps of your toddler at the beach and watch the likes pile up. Comment on that pointed political opinion from the classmate you haven't seen since the Reagan administration.
14h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

US FTC probing Facebook data scandal: mediaThe US Federal Trade Commission, a consumer and competition watchdog, is investigating Facebook after a major data scandal that affected 50 million users, US media reported on Tuesday.
14h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

EU to unveil digital tax targeting Facebook, GoogleThe EU will unveil proposals for a digital tax on US tech giants on Wednesday, bringing yet more turmoil to Facebook after revelations over misused data of 50 million users shocked the world.
14h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

AMD says patches on the way for flawed chipsAdvanced Micro Devices on Tuesday said patches are on the way for recently revealed flaws in some of its chips that could allow hackers to take over computers.
14h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Researcher captures striking Antarctic video of minke whaleMarine mammal expert Dr. Regina Eisert thought minke whales were a little boring until she captured some striking footage of one swimming underwater near Antarctica. Now she thinks they're beautiful.
14h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Judge holds climate change class in suits against big oilA federal judge presiding over lawsuits that accuse big oil companies of lying about global warming to protect their profits is turning his courtroom into a classroom in what could be the first hearing to study the science of climate change.
14h
Science | The Guardian

​It shouldn’t take a nerve agent attack before UK scientists are supportedA new £48m chemical weapons defence centre is welcome, but the scientists keeping us safe have faced years of funding cuts The city of Salisbury has been thrust into the international spotlight after the poisoning of Sergei Skripal and his daughter Yulia . The area is also home to one of the UK’s most important government defence agencies – the Defence Science and Technology Laboratory (Dstl). Th
14h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Fixing soybean's need for nitrogenSoybean is rich in protein, which is great for the humans and animals eating it. But this high protein content comes at a cost.
14h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Hunting squid slowed by rising carbon levelsJames Cook University (JCU) scientists in Australia have found high carbon dioxide levels cause squid to bungle attacks on their prey.
14h
Science | The Guardian

Donald Trump isn’t waging war on science. He just doesn’t careUnder Trump, US science policy is on autopilot and largely directionless. Here is how to tackle this lack of leadership The first time the word “science” appeared in a tweet by Donald Trump was on 13 September 2012, long before he became US president, when he wrote : “Wake Up America! See article: ‘Israeli Science: Obama Birth Certificate is a Fake’.” Since becoming president, Trump has not menti
14h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Hunting squid slowed by rising carbon levelsJames Cook University scientists in Australia have found high carbon dioxide levels cause squid to bungle attacks on their prey.
16h
Viden

Stephen Hawking skal begraves ved siden af Darwin og NewtonAstrofysikeren skal begraves side om side med videnskabsmændene i Westminster Abbey i London.
16h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News

New valve technology promises cheaper, greener enginesTechnology developed at the University of Waterloo reliably and affordably increases the efficiency of internal combustion engines by more than 10 per cent.
17h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Fixing soybean's need for nitrogenTo make protein, soybean plants need a lot of nitrogen.Beneficial bacteria in root nodules typically assist. A new study shows it's possible to increase the number of soybean root nodules--and the bacteria that live there--to further increase crop yields. This could remove the need to apply additional nitrogen fertilizers.
17h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Better educated nurses linked to better outcomes in surgical patients with dementiaA new study found that surgical patients with coexisting Alzheimer's disease and related dementias (ADRD) are more likely to die within 30 days of admission and to die following a complication compared with patients without ADRD.
17h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Brain stethoscope listens for silent seizuresBy converting brain waves into sound, even non-specialists can detect 'silent seizures' -- epileptic seizures without the convulsions most of us expect.
17h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Do young children learn anything from YouTube videos?In a new Acta Paediatrica study, children up to 2 years of age could be entertained and kept busy by their parents showing them YouTube clips on smartphones, but they did not learn anything from the videos.
17h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Can artificial intelligence be used to study gut microbes in patients?A new Journal of Internal Medicine article proposes that artificial intelligence tools, such as machine learning algorithms, have the potential for building predictive models for the diagnosis and treatment of diseases linked to imbalances in gut microbial communities, or microbiota.
17h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Seizures may be detected through soundA new Epilepsia study indicates that individuals without electroencephalogram (EEG) training can detect ongoing seizures in comatose patients through a novel method by which patients' brain waves are converted to sound.
17h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Systems approaches to optimizing deep brain stimulation therapies in Parkinson's diseaseSystems biologists, physicists, and engineers have intensively worked at computational tools to analyze, predict, and optimize the effects of deep brain stimulation (DBS) to treat chronic neurological diseases.
17h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Sitting and physical inactivity may increase risk of urinary tract symptomsProlonged sitting time and low physical activity levels were linked with the development of lower urinary tract symptoms (LUTS) in a BJU International study of 69,795 middle-aged Korean men.
17h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Order of surgical procedures may affect operating timeRecent reviews have suggested that the way in which surgeons prepare for operations can affect performance, with some preparation techniques resulting in shorter operating times.
17h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Certain pain medications linked to increased heart risksUse of nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs) was associated with an 18 percent increased risk of atrial fibrillation -- an irregular, often rapid heart rate -- in a study of middle-aged adults in Taiwan.
17h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Childhood measles linked to increased risk of later lung diseaseIn a new Respirology study, having measles -- a highly contagious respiratory infection -- during early childhood was linked with an increased risk of developing chronic obstructive pulmonary disease in middle age, but only in adults with asthma and a considerable history of smoking.
17h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Targeted immunotherapy treatment shows promise for treating advanced stage liver tumorsAdvanced stage liver tumors may be safely treated through image-guided injections of an immunotherapy approved for melanoma, according to a study presented today at the Society of Interventional Radiology's Annual Scientific Meeting.
17h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Freezing hunger-signaling nerve may help ignite weight lossFreezing the nerve that carries hunger signals to the brain may help patients with mild-to-moderate obesity lose weight, according to a study presented at the Society of Interventional Radiology's 2018 Annual Scientific Meeting. The treatment was determined safe and feasible in the initial pilot phase.
17h
Ingeniøren

Nu kan du snart køre uden om regnen med DMI’s nedbørsradarEn ny metode til radarfremskrivning gør DMI i stand til at vise, hvordan nedbør vil falde 1,5 time ud i fremtiden. Falske ekkoer og flygtige regnbyger kan dog stadig snyde radarfremskrivningen.
17h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Seaweeds shelter calcifying marine life from acidifying oceansSeaweeds create a chemical microenvironment at their surface, providing refuge for calcifying organisms that are at risk from decreasing oceanic pH, shows new research published in the journal Functional Ecology.
17h
New on MIT Technology Review

AI could alleviate China’s doctor shortageChinese doctors and tech companies are developing tools to automate routine medical tasks.
17h
Scientific American Content: Global

Louise Slaughter Was Congress's Food Safety ChampionUpstate New York Congresswoman Louise Slaughter, who worked for decades on issues such as overuse of antibiotics in agriculture and food safety in general, died March 16 at the age of 88. -- Read more on ScientificAmerican.com
19h
BBC News - Science & Environment

New plant list to help deter garden deerThe public is being asked to report damage to garden plants from visiting wild deer.
20h
BBC News - Science & Environment

Ocean plastic could treble in decadeBut there are opportunities to cash in on the "ocean economy", a major report for the UK government says.
20h
Science | The Guardian

It's beer, but not as we know it: scientists dispense with need for hopsScientists in the US used DNA-editing software to splice in genes from mint and basil plants Scientists in the US have created a more sustainable pint after discovering a way of getting the distinct hoppy taste into craft beer without the need for water-intensive hops. Related: Belgian bars put the boot into tourists who steal beer glasses Continue reading...
20h
Nyheder - Forskning - Videnskab

Alkoholvaner dannes i 15-års alderenMens halvdelen af danske unge har et moderat forbrug af alkohol gennem hele ungdomstiden, så drikker...
20h
Science | The Guardian

I'm following the footsteps of my Aboriginal ancestors, the first astronomers | IndigenousXMy mind was blown away when learning about Kamilaroi and Boorong astronomy I like to talk about astronomy a lot. No, scratch that, I love to talk about astronomy. All. The. Time. Thank goodness I do just that for a living. I’ve worked at Sydney Observatory for the past two years as an astronomy educator, which is essentially my glorified term for a tour guide. My favourite part about being an ast
21h
Feed: All Latest

Climate Change Will Not Make Us NicerA recent study found that people who grow up in places with mild weather are more agreeable and outgoing. What does that mean in a world of climate extremes?
21h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Flight delays: Study finds out why some African birds stay home longerParents of millennials still living at home aren't the only ones with children that refuse to leave. Many animal species have adult offspring that are slow to take flight, but when and how they leave has been poorly understood by scientists. Now, new UBC research on a desert-dwelling African bird is yielding some answers.
21h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Surgeon performance benefits from 'warm-up'Surgeons progressively 'warm-up' as they repeat a procedure on their operating list, akin to the way athletes' performance improves across a competition -- according to new research.
21h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Dinosaur frills and horns did not evolve for species recognitionThe elaborate frills and horns of a group of dinosaurs including Triceratops and Styracosaurus did not evolve to help species recognise each other, according to researchers at Queen Mary University of London.
21h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News

New linguistic analysis finds Dravidian language family is approximately 4,500 years oldThe origin of the Dravidian language family, consisting of about 80 varieties spoken by 220 million people across South Asia, can be dated to about 4,500 years ago, based on new linguistic analyses. An international team used data collected first-hand from native speakers and analyzed these using cutting-edge computational methods. The findings, published in Royal Society Open Science, shed light
21h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Blackbirds in the city: Bad health, longer lifeBlackbirds live longer in cities than in forests. But their telomeres, the repetitive stretches of DNA at the ends of the chromosomes, show that these city birds have a much poorer health status than their rural cousins. These findings from a study in five European cities led by University of Groningen biologists were published in Biology Letters on March 21.
21h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Children born to mothers with low vitamin D levels may develop autism-like behaviorsLow levels of vitamin D during pregnancy and breast feeding may be related to an unusual pattern of brain development that can lead to differences in social behaviour of children in later life, according to a study published in the Journal of Endocrinology. Rats with vitamin D deficiency during pregnancy and lactation produced offspring that displayed altered social behaviours in adulthood. These
21h
Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

Men more likely to be readmitted to hospital after sustaining a firearm injury, study findsMen have a substantially greater hospital readmission risk during the first three months following a firearm injury hospitalization compared to women. While this overall risk was no longer observed at six months after the initial hospitalization, the risk of renal failure and cardiovascular readmissions among males was more than three times greater than females at six months.
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Science | The Guardian

Fantastic beasts: everything you need to know about conservation studiesThe conservation sector requires postgrads with passion, curiosity and a commitment to science Giving a new tamarin monkey a health check or investigating why a gemsbok died are some of the more hands-on activities on the MSc in wild animal health at the Institute of Zoology, Zoological Society of London (ZSL). Wild animal care and conservation are fiercely competitive areas and a postgraduate co
21h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Flight delays: Study finds out why some African birds stay home longerParents of millennials still living at home aren't the only ones with children that refuse to leave. Many animal species have adult offspring that are slow to take flight, but when and how they leave has been poorly understood by scientists. Now, new UBC research on a desert-dwelling African bird is yielding some answers.
21h
BBC News - Science & Environment

Triceratops may have had horns to attract matesDinosaurs may have evolved horns and frills to attract a mate, according to a new study.
21h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Dinosaur frills and horns did not evolve for species recognitionThe elaborate frills and horns of a group of dinosaurs including Triceratops and Styracosaurus did not evolve to help species recognise each other, according to researchers at Queen Mary University of London.
21h
NYT > Science

Op-Ed Contributor: Bigger Is Not Better for Ocean ConservationNations are protecting vast expanses of open sea but their first priority should be their richly biodiverse coastal waters.
21h
Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

Molecular response of muscle to different types of exercise identifiedExercise in the future could be customized for individuals based on genomics, according to a new study. For years, scientists have studied the effects of different types of exercise on the human body, but never before at this level of molecular precision, according to researchers.
21h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Risk of maternal death doubled in pregnant women with anemiaPregnant women with anemia are twice as likely to die during or shortly after pregnancy compared to those without the condition, according to a major international study led by Queen Mary University of London of over 300,000 women across 29 countries.
22h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Women with DCIS at lowest risk of recurrence if they are post-menopausal or ER+Patients with an early form of breast cancer are less likely to suffer a recurrence if they are post-menopausal or if their tumour is oestrogen receptor positive, according to research presented at the 11th European Breast Cancer Conference.
22h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Risk of a second breast cancer can be better quantified in women carrying a BRCA mutationThe risk of a second breast cancer in patients with high-risk BRCA gene mutations can be more precisely predicted by testing for several other genetic variants, each of which are known to have a small impact on breast cancer risk.
22h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Double mastectomy to prevent cancer reduces risk of dying in BRCA1 mutation carriersHealthy women who carry a breast cancer-causing mutation in the BRCA1 gene, not only reduce their risk of developing the disease but also their chances of dying from it if they have both breasts removed, according to new research presented at the 11th European Breast Cancer Conference. However, the study also found that for women with a mutation in the BRCA2 gene, there was no difference in their
22h
Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

Improving fabrication process of nano-structures for electronic devicesResearchers have found a more efficient fabricating process to produce semiconductors used in today's electronic devices. They also confirmed that materials other than silicon can be used successfully in the development process that could increase performance of electronic devices.
22h
Feed: All Latest

How to Block Calls and Texts on iPhone in iOS 11Unwanted calls and messages arriving on your iPhone? Block 'em all with our guide.
22h
The Atlantic

The Atlantic Daily: ‘What Lessons Would They Learn?’What We’re Following Data Debacle: The Federal Trade Commission is now investigating how the political-consulting firm Cambridge Analytica gained access to the personal information of about 50 million Facebook users. That data was used to build “psychographic profiles” of potential voters. Although the profiles might not have actually worked, the scandal entangles not only Facebook (whose leaders
22h
Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

A star disturbed the comets of the solar system 70,000 years agoAbout 70,000 years ago, a small reddish star approached our solar system and gravitationally disturbed comets and asteroids. Astronomers have verified that the movement of some of these objects is still marked by that stellar encounter.
22h
New Scientist - News

Dark radiation may fix our broken understanding of the universeWe have two ways to measure the accelerating expansion of the universe, but they don’t line up. If dark matter gives off radiation, it could make them agree
22h
Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

How obesity dulls the sense of tastePrevious studies have indicated that weight gain can reduce one's sensitivity to the taste of food. Now a new study shows that inflammation, driven by obesity, actually reduces the number of taste buds on the tongues of mice.
23h
Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

Obtaining energy from marine currentsResearchers have developed procedures and designs to obtain energy from marine currents in areas of great depths optimizing the costs.
23h
Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

20 percent of Americans responsible for almost half of US food-related greenhouse gas emissionsOn any given day, 20 percent of Americans account for nearly half of US diet-related greenhouse gas emissions, and high levels of beef consumption are largely responsible, according to a new study.
23h
Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

Dogs with noise sensitivity should be routinely assessed for pain by vetsDogs which show fear or anxiety when faced with loud or sudden noises should be routinely assessed for pain by veterinarians, according to new research. Researchers believe that pain, which could be undiagnosed, could be exacerbated when a noise makes the dogs tense up or 'start', putting extra stress on muscles or joints which are already inflamed leading to and associated with a loud or startlin
23h
NYT > Science

N.I.H. to Investigate Outreach to Alcohol CompaniesAfter a report in The Times, the National Institutes of Health will examine whether health officials violated government policy by soliciting donations to fund a study of moderate drinking.
23h
Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

Scientists discern new antibiotics resistance mechanism to peptide antibioticsIn a recent study, a group of scientists reveals both the widespread distribution and broad-spectrum resistance potential of D-stereospecific peptidases, providing a potential early indicator of antibiotic resistance to non-ribosomal peptide antibiotics.
23h
Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

A method for predicting the impact of global warming on diseaseScientists have devised a new method that can be used to better understand the likely impact of global warming on diseases mediated by parasites, such as malaria. The method uses the metabolic theory of ecology to understand how temperature affects the host-parasite relationship, and has been proofed using a model system.
23h
Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

Vitamin D might be key to syndrome affecting half of women aged 50 or plusResearch with postmenopausal women, found a 57.8 percent rate of metabolic syndrome (MetS) among women presenting vitamin D insufficiency or deficiency. MetS affects half of United States' female population above the age of 50 and increases the risks of heart diseases and diabetes.
23h
Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

TRAPPIST-1 planets provide clues to the nature of habitable worldsTo determine the composition of the TRAPPIST-1 planets, the team used a unique software package that uses state-of-the-art mineral physics calculators. The software, called ExoPlex, allowed the team to combine all of the available information about the TRAPPIST-1 system, including the chemical makeup of the star, rather than being limited to just the mass and radius of individual planets.
23h
Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

Marine researchers say recent sea star wasting disease epidemic defies predictionBeginning in 2013, a mysterious disease crippled sea star populations up and down the U.S. west coast. Over a matter of months, many sea star species died in record-breaking numbers, though the ochre sea star was among the hardest hit. Now, researchers have analyzed just how much the populations of this species have declined, but they have not yet determined what factors might be contributing to t
23h
Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

What plants can teach us about oil spill clean-up, microfluidicsFor years, scientists have been inspired by nature to innovate solutions to tricky problems, even oil spills -- manmade disasters with devastating environmental and economic consequences. A new study takes a cue from leaf structure to fabricate material that can separate oil and water, which could lead to safer and more efficient oil spill clean-up methods.
23h
Live Science

New Stem Cell Treatment Reverses Vision Loss in 2 PatientsTwo people who were going blind can now see the word in much greater detail than before thanks to an experimental stem cell treatment for macular degeneration.
23h
Popular Science

The last male northern white rhino just died, but science could still make him a daddyAnimals Sudan's death is not the end of the northern white rhino's saga. The death of a 45-year-old rhino is rarely a tragedy; they seldom live much longer. But although Sudan’s passing was long expected, it still struck a blow to…
23h
Live Science

Stephen Hawking to Be Interred in Westminster Abbey Near Newton, DarwinStephen Hawking will spend eternity in the company of some other tremendously influential English scientists.
23h
Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

Praise may motivate young adults with autism to exercise moreSimple statements of praise may have a big effect on the amount of exercise young adults with autism complete, according to preliminary research. Technology may play a key role in delivering that praise.
23h
Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

Children of centenarians feel stronger purpose in lifeA sense of meaning and direction in life is associated with living longer and experiencing less disease, disability, and cognitive impairment. Now, a new study has found that the children of centenarians, who tend to have similar healthy aging patterns and long lives like their parents, are also much more likely than the general population to have a strong sense of purpose.
23h
Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

State-by-state causes of infant mortality in the USSudden unexpected death of infants (SUDI) was the most common cause of infant mortality among children born full term in the US according to estimates from a state-by-state study.
23h
Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

Decision-making is shaped by individual differences in the functional brain connectomeEach day brings with it a host of decisions to be made, and each person approaches those decisions differently. A new study found that these individual differences are associated with variation in specific brain networks -- particularly those related to executive, social and perceptual processes.
23h
Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

Amygdala neurons increase as children become adults -- except in autismResearchers have found that typically-developing children gain more neurons in a region of the brain that governs social and emotional behavior, the amygdala, as they become adults. This phenomenon does not happen in people with autism spectrum disorder (ASD). Instead, children with ASD have too many neurons early on and then appear to lose those neurons as they become adults.
23h
The Atlantic

The Atlantic Politics & Policy Daily: Secretary of Interior DesignToday in 5 Lines Karen McDougal, a former Playboy model, filed a lawsuit on Tuesday to be released from a 2016 agreement requiring her to stay quiet about her alleged affair with Donald Trump. And a New York court ruled that a defamation lawsuit filed against Trump by Summer Zervos, a former contestant on The Apprentice , may go forward . In a press conference, Majority Leader Mitch McConnell sai
23h

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