The Atlantic

The Kurds Keep Remaking the Middle EastKurds celebrated their traditional new year, Nowruz, this week, and to mark the occasion, Iraqi Prime Minister Haider al-Abadi gave them a peace offering of sorts. “I want to congratulate our Kurdish citizens in Kurdish,” he said Tuesday during his weekly news conference in Baghdad . “I don’t speak it, but it is meant to prove that Iraq is one and united.” That moment was believed to mark the fir
1d

Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

Two-billion-year-old salt rock reveals rise of oxygen in ancient atmosphereSalts left over from ancient seawater reveal new information about the oxygenation of the Earth's atmosphere more than 2 billion years ago.
1d

Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

Hubble solves cosmic 'whodunit' with interstellar forensicsOn the outskirts of our galaxy, a cosmic tug-of-war is unfolding-and only NASA's Hubble Space Telescope can see who's winning.
1d

Feed: All Latest

The Best Alternative For Every Facebook FeatureFacebook Data Cambridge AnalyticaIf you're ready to quit Facebook, here's how to replace everything you might miss.
1d

Big Think

Scientists detect radio echoes of a black hole feeding on a starScientists pick up signals from an explosion of electromagnetic energy that occurred when a black hole ripped apart a passing star. Read More
1d

EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Release of the cancer incidence and survival statistics for Northern Ireland 2012-2016The Queen's University N. Ireland Cancer Registry (NICR) today released the number of new cancer cases diagnosed (incidence) in Northern Ireland in 2016.
1d

EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Jaguars and well-managed logging concessions can coexist, say conservationistsLogging activities in biodiverse forests can have a huge negative impact on wildlife, particularly large species such as big cats, but a new study proves that the Western Hemisphere's largest cat species--the jaguar (Panthera onca)--can do well in logging concessions that are properly managed, according to conservationists from the San Diego Zoo Global and the Bronx Zoo-based WCS (Wildlife Conserv
1d

Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

Kids from wealthier families feel more control over their livesSociologists examined which measures of socioeconomic status -- parents' education, family income, race and parents' occupation -- have the greatest influence over a child's locus of control and why.
1d

Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

Three-in-one molecule shows promise in helping certain breast cancer patientsA newly designed three-part molecule could be the one answer patients with a certain form of breast cancer are looking for, scientists report. This chimera has the ability to simultaneously decrease the expression of three growth factors that are over-expressed in some cancers.
1d

cognitive science

The most commonly nightmares and the real-life stressors that could lead to themsubmitted by /u/SirButtChin [link] [comments]
1d

Science : NPR

For One Father And Son In Puerto Rico, A Storm Was Just The Latest TrialThe Martinez family has been waiting more than a year for a neurologist to diagnose the son's condition. He needs a diagnosis to be eligible for the health care he needs, but can't get an appointment. (Image credit: Sarah Varney/Kaiser Health News)
1d

Big Think

Profile of a social media addict: Do you fit the description?Social media addiction may be on the rise. Surprisingly, there’s been very little research on it. Read More
1d

TED Talks Daily (SD video)

The human stories behind mass incarceration | Eve AbramsThe United States locks up more people than any other country in the world, says documentarian Eve Abrams, and somewhere between one and four percent of those in prison are likely innocent. That's 87,000 brothers, sisters, mothers and fathers -- predominantly African American -- unnecessarily separated from their families, their lives and dreams put on hold. Using audio from her interviews with in
1d

EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Researchers use light to turn yeast into biochemical factoriesResearchers have used a combination of light and genetic engineering to controlling the metabolism, or basic chemical process, of a living cell. Building on techniques that already have transformed the field of neuroscience, the researchers used light to control genetically-modified yeast and increase its output of commercially valuable chemicals.
1d

EurekAlert! - Breaking News

For graphite pellets, just add elbow greaseRice University researchers crush and press functionalized graphene to make strong, light graphite pellets that hold promise for electronic and catalytic applications.
1d

EurekAlert! - Breaking News

The subgingival virome in periodontal health and diseaseAt the 47th Annual Meeting of the American Association for Dental Research (AADR), held in conjunction with the 42nd Annual Meeting of the Canadian Association for Dental Research (CADR), Abby Siefker, The Ohio State University, Columbus, presented an oral session titled 'The Subgingival Virome in Periodontal Health and Disease.' The AADR/CADR Annual Meeting is in Fort Lauderdale, Fla., USA from M
1d

EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Synergistic effects of smoking and obesity on the subgingival microbiomeAt the 47th Annual Meeting of the American Association for Dental Research (AADR), held in conjunction with the 42nd Annual Meeting of the Canadian Association for Dental Research (CADR), Najla Kasabreh, The Ohio State University, Columbus, presented an oral session titled 'Synergistic Effects of Smoking and Obesity on the Subgingival Microbiome.' The AADR/CADR Annual Meeting is in Fort Lauderdale
1d

Popular Science

Scientists have some pretty outlandish ideas for cooling the planet downNexus Media News Desperate times inspire desperate measures. If global warming is such a problem, why can't we just do something to set the climate back on track? Here are three particularly impractical ideas that show why cutting…
1d

Live Science

Could Cutting Calories Slow Down Aging?Cutting calories may reduce the risk of age-related diseases, and maybe even help you live longer, a new small study suggests.
1d

Live Science

1 in 10 Sober People Have Cocaine or Heroin on Their FingertipsThere are a lot of drugs in the world, and there's a chance you've got a tiny bit on your body right now — even if you've never knowingly touched the stuff.
1d

Feed: All Latest

The 'Pacific Rim Uprising' Cast Answers Kaiju TriviaThey know a fair bit about monsters. They also know if their movie passes the Bechdel Test or has a post-credits scene.
1d

The Atlantic

The Bike-Share Oversupply in China: Huge Piles of Abandoned and Broken BicyclesLast year, bike sharing took off in China, with dozens of bike-share companies quickly flooding city streets with millions of brightly colored rental bicycles. However, the rapid growth vastly outpaced immediate demand and overwhelmed Chinese cities, where infrastructure and regulations were not prepared to handle a sudden flood of millions of shared bicycles. Riders would park bikes anywhere, or
1d

Big Think

It's time to integrate psychedelics into therapyAs more research on psychedelics appears, we need to take their therapeutic potential seriously. Read More
1d

New on MIT Technology Review

The next generation of ICOs will actually have to follow the rulesThe SEC is cracking down on ICOs. But blockchain-based fund-raising won’t die—it will just evolve.
1d

EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Obesity surgery linked to positive outcomes in very obese teens with diabetesThis study is the first to compare glycemic control in two groups of very obese adolescents with type 2 diabetes. It included 30 teenagers treated with medication (TODAY) and 63 teenagers who underwent bariatric surgery (Teen-LABs).
1d

EurekAlert! - Breaking News

NASA eyes powerful Tropical Cyclone MarcusWhile a Category 4 hurricane on the Saffir-Simpson hurricane wind scale, NASA-NOAA's Suomi NPP satellite passed over Tropical Cyclone Marcus in the Southern Indian Ocean.
1d

EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Integrated program improves heart and stroke risk factors in those with diabetesOver a 10-year period, control of three key cardiovascular risk factors improved faster for Kaiser Permanente diabetes patients in Northern California than in the rest of the United States, according to research published today in the American Journal of Medicine.
1d

Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Telecom Italia board hangs up, dials battle for controlEight members of Telecom Italia's board of directors resigned on Thursday, triggering a re-election of the entire board as an activist investor fund has challenged the control over the company by France's Vivendi.
1d

Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Deep impact: Deep-sea wildlife more vulnerable to extinction than first thoughtWe have only known about the existence of the unusual yeti crabs (Kiwaidae)—a family of crab-like animals whose hairy claws and bodies are reminiscent of the abominable snowman—since 2005, but already their future survival could be at risk.
1d

Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

False stories claim NASA 'confessed' to spreading lithiumSome websites are falsely claiming that NASA has "confessed" to "dosing Americans" with lithium and other chemicals.
1d

Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Two-billion-year-old salt rock reveals rise of oxygen in ancient atmosphereA 2-billion-year-old chunk of sea salt provides new evidence for the transformation of Earth's atmosphere into an oxygenated environment capable of supporting life as we know it.
1d

Big Think

Study finds green tea may reduce Down syndrome facial traitsA questionable new study suggests green tea may be able to reduce the effect of Down syndrome on facial features. Read More
1d

Popular Science

China's new stealth fighter uses powerful materials with geometry not found in natureEastern Arsenal Metamaterials can make the J-20 an extra stealthy electromagnetic force. China's new fighter, the J-20, uses a combination of stealth, sensors, and datalinks to compete with the most modern aircraft in the world. Now, state media claims that…
1d

Latest Headlines | Science News

Atacama mummy’s deformities were unduly sensationalizedA malformed human mummy known as Ata has been sensationalized as alien. A DNA analysis helps overturn that misconception.
1d

Latest Headlines | Science News

How bees defend against some controversial insecticidesSome bees have enzymes that allow them to resist toxic compounds in some neonicotinoid pesticides.
1d

Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Bacteria eats greenhouse gas with a side of proteinWith the ability to leech heavy metals from the environment and digest a potent greenhouse gas, methanotrophic bacteria pull double duty when it comes to cleaning up the environment.
1d

Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Earwigs and the art of origamiETH Zurich researchers have developed multifunctional origami structures, which they then fabricated into 4-D printed objects. The design principle mimics the structure of an earwig's wing.
1d

The Atlantic

The NCAA Is Facing a CrossroadsOn Saturday, the Duke men’s basketball team walloped Rhode Island, 87–62, in the second round of the NCAA Tournament, earning the program’s 24th Sweet 16 berth in the past 33 years. The performance showed off many of the characteristics that make the second-seeded Blue Devils a national-championship contender: suffocating defense, balanced scoring, selfless passing. It was a satisfying win for on
1d

Inside Science

Consider the CockroachConsider the Cockroach Chinese researchers solve the complete DNA sequence of the pernicious pest, revealing some of its evolutionary secrets. Cockroach_topNteaser.jpg Image credits: Sheng Li Creature Thursday, March 22, 2018 - 14:15 Jason Socrates Bardi, Editor (Inside Science) -- On the fringes of urban life, some creatures thrive more than others. The brown rat, the coyote, the Canada goose, t
1d

EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Two-billion-year-old salt rock reveals rise of oxygen in ancient atmosphereSalts left over from ancient seawater reveal new information about the oxygenation of the Earth's atmosphere more than 2 billion years ago.
1d

EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Antimicrobial used in toiletries could become option against malariaNot only it inhibits enzymes essential to Plasmodium's survival in two key stages of its lifecycle in humans, but triclosan also performed well in tests against resistant parasites, an international study reveals. The efficiency of malaria treatment with mostly used drugs is undermined by resistant lineages and by the fact that patients present severe side effects in 10 percent of the cases.
1d

EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Measurement chip detects LegionellaIn an outbreak of Legionnaires' disease, finding the exact source as quickly as possible is essential to preventing further infections. To date, a standard analysis takes days. Researchers at the Technical University of Munich have now developed a rapid test that achieves the same result in about 35 minutes.
1d

EurekAlert! - Breaking News

AI tool promotes positive peer groups to tackle substance abuseWhen it comes to fighting substance abuse, research suggests the company you keep can make the difference between recovery and relapse. Researchers from the USC Center for Artificial Intelligence in Society have created an algorithm that sorts intervention program participants -- who are voluntarily working on recovery -- into smaller groups, or subgroups, in a way that maintains helpful social co
1d

EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Home genetic tests should be interpreted by expertsResults from at-home genetic tests are not always accurate. A new study in the journal Genetics in Medicine, published by Springer Nature, now shows that up to 40 percent of direct-to-consumer (DTC) genetic tests provide incorrect readings in the raw data. Stephany Leigh Tandy-Connor expressed concern about the fact that most DTC test results are interpreted by medical providers with limited genet
1d

EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Deep impact: Deep-sea wildlife more vulnerable to extinction than first thoughtThe existence of the unusual yeti crabs (Kiwaidae) -- a family of crab-like animals whose hairy claws and bodies are reminiscent of the abominable snowman -- since 2005, but already their future survival could be at risk.New Oxford University research suggests that past environmental changes may have profoundly impacted the geographic range and species diversity of this family. The findings indica
1d

EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Hubble solves cosmic 'whodunit' with interstellar forensicsOn the outskirts of our galaxy, a cosmic tug-of-war is unfolding-and only NASA's Hubble Space Telescope can see who's winning.
1d

Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Hubble solves cosmic 'whodunit' with interstellar forensicsOn the outskirts of our galaxy, a cosmic tug-of-war is unfolding—and only NASA's Hubble Space Telescope can see who's winning.
1d

The Scientist RSS

Mouse Moms Behavior Affects Pups Genome StructuresMice who get less attention from their mothers have more copies of a common retrotransposon in the genomes of their hippocampal neurons.
1d

EurekAlert! - Breaking News

The efficiency of nature-inspired metaheuristics in limited-budget expensive global optimizationGlobal optimization problems where evaluation of the objective function is an expensive operation arise frequently in engineering, machine learning, decision making, statistics, optimal control, etc.
1d

EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Bacteria eats greenhouse gas with a side of proteinWith the ability to leech heavy metals from the environment and digest a potent greenhouse gas, methanotrophic bacteria pull double duty when it comes to cleaning up the environment. But before researchers can explore potential conservation applications, they first must better understand the bacteria's basic physiological processes. Amy Rosenzweig's laboratory at Northwestern University has identi
1d

EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Earwigs and the art of origamiETH Zurich researchers have developed multifunctional origami structures, which they then fabricated into 4-D printed objects. The design principle mimics the structure of an earwig's wing.
1d

EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Gulf of Mexico dead zone not expected to shrink anytime soonAchieving water quality goals for the Gulf of Mexico may take decades, according to findings by researchers at the University of Waterloo.
1d

EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Researchers examine role of fluid flow in ovarian cancer progressionNew research from Virginia Tech is moving physicians closer to pinpointing a predictor of ovarian cancer, which could lead to earlier diagnosis of what is know as the 'silent killer.'
1d

EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Scientists identify potential drug target in blood-feeding hookwormsIn hookworms that infect and feed on the blood of mice, scientists have discovered a key step in blood digestion that can be targeted to disrupt the parasite's development and survival. These findings, published in PLOS Pathogens by Tiffany Bouchery of Malaghan Institute of Medical Research, New Zealand, and colleagues could help pave the way to new treatments against hookworms in humans.
1d

EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Wood pellets: Renewable, but not carbon neutralA return to firewood is bad for forests and the climate. So reports William Schlesinger, President Emeritus of the Cary Institute of Ecosystem Studies, in an Insights article published today in the journal Science.
1d

EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Stiffness of connection influences exchange of physical cues during coordinated movementsWhen two people coordinate their movements, such as by holding hands or moving furniture, they exchange physical cues through the objects that connect them. New research published in PLOS Computational Biology suggests that stiffer connections allow for better communication but require more effort to achieve coordination.
1d

EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Oldest evaporite deposit to date provides unique look into early Earth's atmosphereAn analysis of salt mineral sediments, or evaporites, from the oldest deposit of this type discovered to date provides a unique window on the atmospheric conditions of early Earth following the Great Oxidation Event 2.3 billion years ago.
1d

EurekAlert! - Breaking News

A mother's attention affects the genetic code of her youngIn mice, a new study reveals that pups that receive less maternal care have more repeated genetic sequences, called transposons, in neurons that reside in their hippocampus.
1d

EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Artificial wings reach new limits, thanks to inspiration from earwigsInspired by the wings of earwigs, scientists have designed artificial wings that exhibit extraordinary folding abilities. Whereas traditional origami folding techniques are limited by rigidity and number of folding patterns, the technique developed by Jakob A. Faber and colleagues overcomes these challenges.
1d

EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Because of agriculture, the Gulf of Mexico will suffocate for decades longerNitrogen runoff has created a massive oxygen-deprived 'dead zone' in the Gulf of Mexico, but even if the runoff was completely eliminated, it would still take at least 30 years for the area to recover, a new study estimates.
1d

EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Early life experiences influence DNA in the adult brainSalk scientists discover how maternal behavior changes brain cells in mice.
1d

EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Metastatic lymph nodes can be the source of distant metastases in mouse models of cancerA study by Massachusetts General Hospital investigators finds that, in mouse models, cancer cells from metastatic lymph nodes can escape into the circulation by invading nodal blood vessels, leading to the development of metastases in other parts of the body.
1d

EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Genetic cause of deadly skin condition afflicting bull terriers discoveredIn a new study published March 22, 2018 in PLOS Genetics, Anina Bauer of the University of Bern and a large international research team, report the discovery of a mutation that causes lethal acrodermatitis (LAD), a deadly condition that causes skin lesions on the paws and face of affected dogs.
1d

EurekAlert! - Breaking News

FASEB Journal: Study shows offspring response to maternal diet and male hormoneA novel study published online in The FASEB Journal identifies sex-specific responses to maternal diet and androgen (male hormone) excess among male and female animal offspring.
1d

Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

Mass treatment with azithromycin may decrease yaws cases in GhanaA single round of total-community treatment (TCT) with the antibiotic azithromycin applied to affected rural communities could significantly decrease yaws among the population one year later, according to a new study.
1d

Science | The Guardian

Gene editing: don’t bet the farm on this pig in a poke | LettersUsing genetic engineering to eradicate livestock diseases will have hidden costs for human and animal health, warns Dr Julia Wright It is very worrying not only to read about yet another blunder by the industrial farming sector ( Pigs in the pink: gene editing is set to revolutionise the farming industry , 17 March) but also that the article didn’t attempt to counterbalance with a different viewpo
1d

Latest Headlines | Science News

Earwigs take origami to extremes to fold their wingsStretchy joints let earwig wings flip quickly between folded and unfurled.
1d

Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Study: Kids from wealthier families feel more control over livesThe higher a child's family income, the more likely he or she is to feel control over their life, according to a new Portland State University study.
1d

Feed: All Latest

Key Takeaways From Mark Zuckerberg’s Facebook Media BlitzMark Zuckerberg made the rounds Wednesday, apologizing for Facebook's failure to protect your data. Here are the highlights.
1d

New Scientist - News

A very pregnant female ray had to fend off four courting malesGiant devil rays have been filmed courting for the first time, and it turns out the males do not even wait for the females to give birth
1d

The Atlantic

Trump Could Be Bumbling Into a Trade War With ChinaChinese US TradeIn an early morning tweet on March 2, President Donald Trump avowed that “trade wars are good, and easy to win.” We’re about to find out if he’s right. Trump may have just started one with China. Trump’s recently announced tariffs on steel and aluminum look trivial by comparison—especially if, as expected, he ends up granting exemptions to U.S. allies. Using an arcane statute of the Trade Act of
1d

Science current issue

The microbiome in cancer immunotherapy: Diagnostic tools and therapeutic strategiesThe fine line between human health and disease can be driven by the interplay between host and microbial factors. This "metagenome" regulates cancer initiation, progression, and response to therapies. Besides the capacity of distinct microbial species to modulate the pharmacodynamics of chemotherapeutic drugs, symbiosis between epithelial barriers and their microbial ecosystems has a major impact
1d

Science current issue

Building better early warning systems
1d

Science current issue

Keeping the channels open
1d

Science current issue

Metabolic syndrome, leaky guts, and infection
1d

Science current issue

Genomic plasticity during brain development
1d

Science current issue

Moving charges with radicals
1d

Science current issue

Local control of localized protein synthesis
1d

Science current issue

More than just simple folding
1d

Science current issue

For cancer, think globally, act locally
1d

Science current issue

An alternate route for metastatic cells
1d

Science current issue

Silicon clears a wet path to phosphines
1d

Science current issue

Using iron to generate a copper ligand
1d

Science current issue

Pinpointing amyloid's toxicity
1d

Science current issue

How green is burning wood?
1d

Science current issue

An emerging target for vascular diseases
1d

Science current issue

Human impact on African forests
1d

Science current issue

Natural variation in salt tolerance
1d

Science current issue

A circular solution for quantum simulation
1d

Science current issue

Faster, faster, faster
1d

Science current issue

The chill of a warming world
1d

Science current issue

Neurogenesis and the sleeping fly
1d

Science current issue

Cell geometry regulates differentiation
1d

Science current issue

Hyperglycemia drives intestinal barrier dysfunction and risk for enteric infectionObesity, diabetes, and related manifestations are associated with an enhanced, but poorly understood, risk for mucosal infection and systemic inflammation. Here, we show in mouse models of obesity and diabetes that hyperglycemia drives intestinal barrier permeability, through GLUT2-dependent transcriptional reprogramming of intestinal epithelial cells and alteration of tight and adherence junctio
1d

Science current issue

Phosphoric acid as a precursor to chemicals traditionally synthesized from white phosphorusWhite phosphorus, generated in the legacy thermal process for phosphate rock upgrading, has long been the key industrial intermediate for the synthesis of phosphorus-containing chemicals, including herbicides, flame-retardants, catalyst ligands, battery electrolytes, pharmaceuticals, and detergents. In contrast, phosphate fertilizers are made on a much larger scale from phosphoric acid, obtained
1d

Science current issue

Bioinspired spring origamiOrigami enables folding of objects into a variety of shapes in arts, engineering, and biological systems. In contrast to well-known paper-folded objects, the wing of the earwig has an exquisite natural folding system that cannot be sufficiently described by current origami models. Such an unusual biological system displays incompatible folding patterns, remains open by a bistable locking mechanis
1d

Science current issue

A nonconjugated radical polymer glass with high electrical conductivitySolid-state conducting polymers usually have highly conjugated macromolecular backbones and require intentional doping in order to achieve high electrical conductivities. Conversely, single-component, charge-neutral macromolecules could be synthetically simpler and have improved processibility and ambient stability. We show that poly(4-glycidyloxy-2,2,6,6-tetramethylpiperidine-1-oxyl), a nonconju
1d

Science current issue

Early life experience drives structural variation of neural genomes in miceThe brain is a genomic mosaic owing to somatic mutations that arise throughout development. Mobile genetic elements, including retrotransposons, are one source of somatic mosaicism in the brain. Retrotransposition may represent a form of plasticity in response to experience. Here, we use droplet digital polymerase chain reaction to show that natural variations in maternal care mediate the mobiliz
1d

Science current issue

A single fungal MAP kinase controls plant cell-to-cell invasion by the rice blast fungusBlast disease destroys up to 30% of the rice crop annually and threatens global food security. The blast fungus Magnaporthe oryzae invades plant tissue with hyphae that proliferate and grow from cell to cell, often through pit fields, where plasmodesmata cluster. We showed that chemical genetic inhibition of a single fungal mitogen-activated protein (MAP) kinase, Pmk1, prevents M. oryzae from inf
1d

Science current issue

Lymph node metastases can invade local blood vessels, exit the node, and colonize distant organs in miceLymph node metastases in cancer patients are associated with tumor aggressiveness, poorer prognoses, and the recommendation for systemic therapy. Whether cancer cells in lymph nodes can seed distant metastases has been a subject of considerable debate. We studied mice implanted with cancer cells (mammary carcinoma, squamous cell carcinoma, or melanoma) expressing the photoconvertible protein Dend
1d

Science current issue

Lymph node blood vessels provide exit routes for metastatic tumor cell dissemination in miceDuring metastasis, malignant cells escape the primary tumor, intravasate lymphatic vessels, and reach draining sentinel lymph nodes before they colonize distant organs via the blood circulation. Although lymph node metastasis in cancer patients correlates with poor prognosis, evidence is lacking as to whether and how tumor cells enter the bloodstream via lymph nodes. To investigate this question,
1d

Science current issue

The biosynthesis of methanobactinMetal homeostasis poses a major challenge to microbes, which must acquire scarce elements for core metabolic processes. Methanobactin, an extensively modified copper-chelating peptide, was one of the earliest natural products shown to enable microbial acquisition of a metal other than iron. We describe the core biosynthetic machinery responsible for the characteristic posttranslational modificati
1d

Science current issue

Locally translated mTOR controls axonal local translation in nerve injuryHow is protein synthesis initiated locally in neurons? We found that mTOR (mechanistic target of rapamycin) was activated and then up-regulated in injured axons, owing to local translation of mTOR messenger RNA (mRNA). This mRNA was transported into axons by the cell size–regulating RNA-binding protein nucleolin. Furthermore, mTOR controlled local translation in injured axons. This included regul
1d

Science current issue

New Products
1d

Science current issue

The freedom of choice
1d

Science current issue

Lumping and splitting
1d

Science current issue

News at a glance
1d

Science current issue

U.K. attack puts nerve agent in the spotlight
1d

Science current issue

Accounting rules hobble Spanish institutes
1d

Science current issue

Hawking's bid to save quantum theory from black holes
1d

Science current issue

Stephen Hawking, betting man
1d

Science current issue

Protein may explain morning sickness, and worse
1d

Science current issue

A research behemoth is born in Britain
1d

Science current issue

The realist
1d

Science current issue

Are wood pellets a green fuel?
1d

Science current issue

Early life experience shapes neural genome
1d

Science current issue

RNA targeting and translation in axons
1d

Science current issue

From rock-stable to reactive phosphorus
1d

Science current issue

A radical advance for conducting polymers
1d

Science current issue

Targeting angiogenic metabolism in disease
1d

Science current issue

Expanded health systems for sustainable development
1d

Science current issue

Before we called it "climate change"
1d

Science current issue

Knowledge, wisdom, and the brain
1d

Science current issue

Shortfin mako sharks threatened by inaction
1d

Science current issue

Mitigate risk for Malaysia's mangroves
1d

Science current issue

India's Ph.D. scholar outreach requirement
1d

Science current issue

Editors Note
1d

Science current issue

The Cancer Immunotherapy Revolution
1d

Science current issue

Too much of a good thing?
1d

Science current issue

Sticker shock
1d

Science current issue

Cancer immunotherapy using checkpoint blockadeThe release of negative regulators of immune activation (immune checkpoints) that limit antitumor responses has resulted in unprecedented rates of long-lasting tumor responses in patients with a variety of cancers. This can be achieved by antibodies blocking the cytotoxic T lymphocyte–associated protein 4 (CTLA-4) or the programmed cell death 1 (PD-1) pathway, either alone or in combination. The
1d

Science current issue

Personalized vaccines for cancer immunotherapyCancer is characterized by an accumulation of genetic alterations. Somatic mutations can generate cancer-specific neoepitopes that are recognized by autologous T cells as foreign and constitute ideal cancer vaccine targets. Every tumor has its own unique composition of mutations, with only a small fraction shared between patients. Technological advances in genomics, data science, and cancer immun
1d

Science current issue

CAR T cell immunotherapy for human cancerAdoptive T cell transfer (ACT) is a new area of transfusion medicine involving the infusion of lymphocytes to mediate antitumor, antiviral, or anti-inflammatory effects. The field has rapidly advanced from a promising form of immuno-oncology in preclinical models to the recent commercial approvals of chimeric antigen receptor (CAR) T cells to treat leukemia and lymphoma. This Review describes opp
1d

Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

Mysterious skeleton shows molecular complexity of bone diseasesA bizarre human skeleton, once rumored to have extraterrestrial origins, has gotten a rather comprehensive genomic work-up, the results of which are now in.
1d

Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

High-energy ions' movement affected by silicon crystal periodicityThe thinner the silicon crystal, the easier it is to manipulate the trajectories of very high-energy ions in particle accelerators. Further applications include materials analysis, semiconductor doping and beam transport in large particle accelerators. All of these rely on our understanding of how positively-charged high-energy particles move through crystals.
1d

Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

Skilled female potters traveled around the Baltic nearly 5,000 years agoDuring the Corded Ware Culture period, Finland, Estonia and Sweden received skilful female artisans, who had learned to create fashionable and innovative pottery in the eastern region of the Gulf of Finland. The Baltic Sea countries also had a close network for trade in pottery.
1d

Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

3-D printing used to create metallic glass alloysResearchers have now demonstrated the ability to create amorphous metal, or metallic glass, alloys using 3-D printing technology, opening the door to a variety of applications -- such as more efficient electric motors, better wear-resistant materials, higher strength materials, and lighter weight structures.
1d

BBC News - Science & Environment

Origin of 'six-inch mummy' confirmedScientists investigate an unusual, small, mummified skeleton from Chile to establish its medical history.
1d

Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

NIST facilitates first-ever spectrum sharing between military and public wireless usersFor the past three years, an important broker has had its eyes on a prime piece of property that it wants to allocate to multiple tenants to ensure maximum use. However, the "For Lease" sign isn't on some quiet suburban street, along a beachfront vista, or any physical location at all. It's posted in front of a small portion of the radiofrequency (RF) spectrum that the broker wants two "renters"—t
1d

Big Think

‘I’m really sorry that this happened’: Zuckerberg breaks silence on Cambridge Analytica scandalFacebook Data Cambridge AnalyticaIn his first media appearances since the Cambridge Analytica story broke, Mark Zuckerberg spoke to several publications about how Facebook plans to protect user data going forward. Read More
1d

Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Wood pellets: Renewable, but not carbon neutralA return to firewood is bad for forests and the climate. So reports William Schlesinger, President Emeritus of the Cary Institute of Ecosystem Studies, in an Insights article published today in the journal Science.
1d

Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Genetic cause of deadly skin condition afflicting bull terriers discoveredIn a new study published March 22nd, 2018 in PLOS Genetics, Anina Bauer of the University of Bern and a large international research team, report the discovery of a mutation that causes lethal acrodermatitis (LAD), a deadly condition that causes skin lesions on the paws and face of affected dogs.
1d

Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Gulf of Mexico dead zone not expected to shrink anytime soonAchieving water quality goals for the Gulf of Mexico may take decades, according to findings by researchers at the University of Waterloo.
1d

Feed: All Latest

Uber Crash Proves Cities Are Asleep at the WheelWIRED columnist Susan Crawford on the lessons from Uber’s self-driving tragedy—and why cities can’t just blindly welcome autonomous vehicles to the streets.
1d

Ingeniøren

Kan kold fusion vinde anerkendelse under sit nye navn, LENR?Store forventninger, bristede løfter, hemmelighedskræmmeri grænsende til paranoia, blind tiltro, tvivlsomme tests og beskyldninger om svindel og bedrag. Alle er de forbundet med kold fusion og tanken om, at kernereaktioner ved lav temperatur er løsningen på verdens energiproblemer. Skepsis tilråd...
1d

Scientific American Content: Global

Primeval Salt Shakes Up Ideas on How the Atmosphere Got Its OxygenOur planet may have gained breathable air in the geologic blink of an eye -- Read more on ScientificAmerican.com
1d

Big Think

Graphene hair dye: Scientists use miracle nanomaterial to make non-toxic dyeScientists find a groundbreaking application of the supermaterial graphene. Read More
1d

Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

Probing RNA epigenetics and chromatin structures to predict drug resistance in leukemiaA research team has begun to unravel the role of RNA epigenetics and chromatin structure in the regulation of 5-azacytidine, a DNA hypomethylating agent in certain leukemias. The results could lead to novel strategies and biomarkers that could reduce the risk of drug resistance.
1d

Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

Designing a new material for improved ultrasoundDevelopment of a theoretical basis for ultrahigh piezoelectricity in ferroelectric materials led to a new material with twice the piezo response of any existing commercial ferroelectric ceramics, according to researchers.
1d

Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

Advanced vaccines could limit future outbreaks, scientists sayNovel vaccine technologies are critical to improving the public health response to infectious disease threats that continually emerge and re-emerge, according to scientists. In a new article, experts highlight innovations that could significantly shorten the typical decades-long vaccine development timeline.
1d

Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

Novel genomics tool enables more accurate identification of rare mutations in cancer cellsA new computational method allows scientists to identify rare gene mutations in cancer cells with greater accuracy and sensitivity than currently available approaches. The technique is called Lancet and represents a major advance in the identification of tumor cell mutations, a process known as somatic variant calling.
1d

Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

Stopping exercise can increase symptoms of depressionStopping exercise can result in increased depressive symptoms, according to new mental health research.
1d

Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

Generation of a stable biradicalResearchers in Germany have succeeded in twisting molecules so much that their double bonds have been completely destroyed. The result: unusually stable biradicals.
1d

Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

Antibiotics often inappropriately prescribed for hospitalized kids, global study suggestsNearly a third of all antibiotics prescribed for hospitalized children globally were intended to prevent potential infections rather than to treat disease, according to new results.
1d

Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

Whether sustained or sporadic, exercise offers same reductions in premature death riskDespite confusing messages, new data shows all moderate or vigorous activity -- even when done in short bursts throughout the day -- can reduce Americans' risk of disease and death, according to new research.
1d

Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

Gut bacteria determine speed of tumor growth in pancreatic cancerThe population of bacteria in the pancreas increases more than a thousand fold in patients with pancreatic cancer, and becomes dominated by species that prevent the immune system from attacking tumor cells.
1d

Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

Millions of Americans seek and find illicit marijuana onlineResearchers found marijuana shopping searches nearly tripled in the United States from 2005 to 2017, peaking between 1.4 and 2.4 million searches each month. Mail-order marijuana retailers occupied half of the first-page results, and three out of every four searches resulted in a mail-order marijuana retailer as the very first suggested link.
1d

Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

Attacking lymphoma at the sourceThe efficacy of target specific therapies in lymphoma is limited to subgroups of patients. Scientists have identified a mechanism that confers resistance against a common therapy for lymphoma. They propose an alternative treatment that targets lymphoma signaling at its root, and show that it can be effective in a broader group of patients.
1d

Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

Landscape ridges may hold clues about ice age and climate changeResearchers say the landscape may also hold answers to how glaciers helped form the current terrain and provide insight into the progression of climate change.
1d

Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

Compound to prevent breast cancer cells from activating in brainResearchers have used computer modeling to find an existing investigational drug compound for leukemia patients to treat triple negative breast cancer once it spreads to the brain.
1d

The Atlantic

Congress's 'Baby Steps' on GunsOn Saturday, hundreds of thousands of people are expected to march on Washington, D.C., and other major American cities to demand legislative action to combat gun violence and mass shootings. By the time they do, Congress will have acted, but just barely: Lawmakers are about to take their first, small steps toward tightening enforcement of the nation’s gun laws and bolstering security at schools.
1d

EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Eating pecans had significant effect on biomarkers of heart disease and type 2 diabetesA new study published in Nutrients shows that eating just 1.5 ounces of pecans -- one small handful -- every day may protect adults at risk for developing cardiovascular disease (CVD) and type 2 diabetes (T2D).
1d

Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

Being hungry shuts off perception of chronic painFinding food is a necessary survival skill, but so is avoiding pain. Research using mice showed that being hungry activates a neural pathway that inhibits the perception of and response to chronic pain. The findings offer up new targets for treating pain.
1d

Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

Breakthrough could aid development of bee-friendly pesticidesEfforts to create pesticides that are not toxic to bees have been boosted by a scientific breakthrough.
1d

Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

Physical disability boosts parenting effort, beetles study showsAnimals that carry a physical impediment can work harder to rear their young as a result, an insect study has shown. They may behave this way in case they are not able to reproduce again, scientists suggest.
1d

Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

In field tests, device harvests water from desert airYou really can extract clean drinking water right from the air, even in the driest of deserts, researchers have found. They've demonstrated a real-world version of a water-harvesting system based on metal organic frameworks, or MOFs, that they first described last year.
1d

NYT > Science

Matter: Was a Tiny Mummy in the Atacama an Alien? No, but the Real Story Is Almost as StrangeKnown as “Ata,” the six-inch-long skeleton was discovered in Chile and may have had genetic mutations causing a bone disorder never before documented.
1d

NYT > Science

Global Health: South Sudan Halts Spread of Crippling Guinea WormsIt has been 15 months — longer than the worm’s life cycle — since the last case of infection, which means the parasite is nearing eradication in the country.
1d

Ingeniøren

Analyse: En tredjedel af varmeforbruget i danske boliger bør spares vækDen billigeste vej til et fossiluafhængigt Danmark indebærer, at varmeforbruget i boliger skal være 31 procent lavere. Det viser ny analyse, der håber at råbe energipolitikerne op.
1d

The Atlantic

The Dark Humanity of BarryThe first murder in Barry happens offscreen. Barry (Bill Hader) walks robotically out of a hotel bathroom toward a bed where—the camera pans to reveal—a man has been shot in the head. Barry removes the silencer from a revolver and grimaces, slightly, as if he has indigestion. He pats himself down to check he hasn’t forgotten anything, looks at his watch, and leaves the room. The premise of Bill H
1d

Live Science

Freezing This Nerve Could Trick Your Body into Losing WeightTo lose weight, freeze your nerves? That's the idea behind a new approach that may hold promise for weight loss.
1d

Big Think

Congressional appropriations bill has a surprise for NASA: More than it asked forGood news for space exploration? Read More
1d

Feed: All Latest

Instagram Announces You'll Soon See "Newer" Posts In Your FeedInstagram Feed PostsWhat users really want is a chronological feed, but today's announcement is at least an acknowledgement that not everything about the algorithmic timeline is working.
1d

EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Once-mysterious 'Atacama Skeleton' illuminates genetics of bone diseaseThe skeleton, discovered in a leather pouch behind an abandoned church, was pristine: a tiny figure, just six inches long, with a cone-shaped head, 10 pairs of ribs, and bones that looked like those of an eight-year-old child. Found in the Atacama Desert of Chile and later affectionately nicknamed "Ata," the skeleton made its way onto the black market for archeological finds and then to a collecto
1d

EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Wealth inequality: Closing the gap by taxing land and bequestsTo reduce wealth inequality without diminishing the economic performance of a country, a policy package of bequest taxes and land value taxes could be the optimal solution. Such a policy package would, in fact, have a strong advantage over corporate taxation, a new study published in the journal International Tax and Public Finance finds. It is the first analysis to include the so far neglected fa
1d

EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Six-inch human skeleton discovered with multiple disease-associated mutationsA six-inch human skeleton was discovered with multiple disease-associated mutations.
1d

EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Mysterious skeleton shows molecular complexity of bone diseases, Stanford-UCSF study findsA bizarre human skeleton, once rumored to have extraterrestrial origins, has gotten a rather comprehensive genomic work-up, the results of which are now in, researchers from the Stanford University School of Medicine report.
1d

New on MIT Technology Review

Beijing is letting its first driverless cars take to the roads
1d

The Economist: The world this week

KAL’s cartoon
1d

The Economist: The world this week

Business this week
1d

The Economist: The world this week

Politics this week
1d

The Atlantic

Why the FBI Fires People for 'Lack of Candor'When Attorney General Jeff Sessions fired former FBI Deputy Director Andrew McCabe last week, just hours short of McCabe’s retirement, he cited an internal FBI investigation that concluded McCabe “lacked candor” in his conversations with investigators when asked about disclosures to the media during the 2016 election. But what does that actually mean? “Lack of candor is untruthfulness or an attem
1d

Science | The Guardian

Genetic tests reveal tragic reality of Atacama 'alien' skeletonMummified remains from Chilean ghost town revealed to be baby girl with malformations so bizarre they led to speculation over alien life When the mummified remains of a six-inch humanoid were found in an abandoned mining town in Chile’s Atacama desert 15 years ago, speculation on its origins ran wild. The skeleton, which was sold to a private collector in Spain, was so bizarre it appeared in a do
1d

Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

How reciprocity can magnify inequalityPeople tend to reciprocate others' actions in ways that increase disparities in wealth, according to new findings. In a series of studies, researchers find that people may see kindness through wealth-tinted glasses, repaying the most to those who need it the least.
1d

Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

Great Pacific Garbage Patch growing rapidly, study showsA new study shows that 1.8 trillion pieces of plastic weighing 80,000 metric tons are currently afloat in an area known as the Great Pacific Garbage Patch -- and the problem is rapidly getting worse.
1d

Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

Plants really do feed their friendsResearchers have discovered that as plants develop they craft their root microbiome, favoring microbes that consume very specific metabolites. Their study could help scientists identify ways to enhance the soil microbiome for improved carbon storage and plant productivity.
1d

Live Science

No, It's Not an Alien — Here's What That Tiny, Pointy-Headed Skeleton Really IsScientists have decoded a genetic explanation for an "alien" skeleton.
1d

Live Science

Trash in the Great Pacific Garbage Patch Has Quadrupled, Maybe Even 16-upledThe Great Pacific Garbage Patch is getting denser. The enormous plastic soup floating in the vast North Pacific spans more than 617,000 square miles, and its density is now between four and 16 times greater than previous estimates.
1d

EurekAlert! - Breaking News

A wearable system to monitor the stomach's activity throughout the dayA team of researchers has developed a wearable, non-invasive system to monitor electrical activity in the stomach over 24 hours--essentially an electrocardiogram but for the gastro-intestinal (GI) tract.Applications include monitoring GI activity for patients outside of a clinical setting, which cuts down costs. Monitoring for longer periods of time also increases the likelihood of capturing abnor
1d

EurekAlert! - Breaking News

PSU study: Kids from wealthier families feel more control over livesSociology professor Dara Shifrer examined which measures of socioeconomic status -- parents' education, family income, race and parents' occupation -- have the greatest influence over a child's locus of control and why
1d

Scientific American Content: Global

Oil Giant Accepts Climate Consensus, Denies Responsibility for WarmingLawyers for Chevron in climate suit argue energy demand, not extraction, drives emissions -- Read more on ScientificAmerican.com
1d

Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

A glimmer of hope for health of moose in northern USMaine hunters might be allowed to harvest more of its iconic land mammal this year because of strong survival rates.
1d

Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

NASA sees Tropical Cyclone 16P developNASA's Terra satellite passed over the Arafura Sea and captured an image of newly developed Tropical Cyclone 16P.
1d

The Atlantic

My Cow Game Extracted Your Facebook DataFacebook Data CambridgeFor a spell during 2010 and 2011, I was a virtual rancher of clickable cattle on Facebook. It feels like a long time ago. Obama was serving his first term as president. Google+ hadn’t arrived, let alone vanished again. Steve Jobs was still alive, as was Kim Jong Il. Facebook’s IPO hadn’t yet taken place, and its service was still fun to use—although it was littered with requests and demands from
1d

The Atlantic

Trump Proves IndefensibleUpdated on March 22 at 1:15 p.m. John Dowd announced he will depart his position as President Trump’s lead personal lawyer in the Russia investigation, the second person to leave that job in less than a year. Dowd announced his exit late Thursday morning. The specifics of the decision remain obscure— The Washington Post described it, somewhat paradoxically, as “ a largely mutual decision ”—but th
1d

EurekAlert! - Breaking News

NASA sees Tropical Cyclone 16P developNASA's Terra satellite passed over the Arafura Sea and captured an image of newly developed Tropical Cyclone 16P.
1d

EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Why hospital staff sympathize with patients who self-dischargePatients who discharge themselves from hospital should be viewed more positively say researchers, who discovered sympathy for their decision among hospital staff.Approximately 2 percent to 3 percent of patients discharge themselves from hospital against medical advice each year in the UK and US, with the numbers increasing each year.Many people who self discharge return to hospital, with readmissi
1d

EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Nutrient-deficient diet a key Type 2 diabetes contributor for South Asians living in USLess nutritious dietary choices made by South Asians living in developed countries like the US are a key contributor to the group's rising rate of Type 2 diabetes, UT Southwestern researchers report.
1d

EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Metagenomics of early childhood oral health and early childhood cariesAt the 47th Annual Meeting of the American Association for Dental Research (AADR), held in conjunction with the 42nd Annual Meeting of the Canadian Association for Dental Research (CADR), Kimon Divaris, University of North Carolina-Chapel Hill, the AADR representative to the IADR/AADR Publications Committee, presented a poster titled 'Metagenomics of Early Childhood Oral Health and Early Childhood
1d

EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Effects of periodontitis on the colon microbiomeAt the 47th Annual Meeting of the American Association for Dental Research (AADR), held in conjunction with the 42nd Annual Meeting of the Canadian Association for Dental Research (CADR), Miriam Walker, Meharry Medical College School of Dentistry, Nashville, Tenn., presented a poster titled 'Effects of Periodontitis on the Colon Microbiome.' The AADR/CADR Annual Meeting is in Fort Lauderdale, Fla.
1d

Feed: All Latest

How YouTube Uses Mechanical Turk Tasks to Help Train Its AIA Mechanical Turk task shared with WIRED provides a glimpse into how algorithms are trained to spot and sort content on the video platform.
1d

Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

New NASA model finds landslide threats in near real-time during heavy rainsFor the first time, scientists can look at landslide threats anywhere around the world in near real-time, thanks to satellite data and a new model developed by NASA.
1d

Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

The universal language of hormonesBioinformatics specialists have studied a specific class of hormones which is relevant for plants, bacteria and indirectly for humans, too. Their results challenge previous scientific assumptions.
1d

Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

When the Mediteranean Sea flooded human settlementsAround 7,600 years ago, the emergence of agricultural settlements in Southeastern Europe and subsequent progress of civilization suddenly came to a standstill. This was most likely caused by an abrupt sea level rise in the northern Aegean Sea. Researchers have now detected evidence of this in the fossils of tiny calcifying marine algae preserved in seafloor sediments.
1d

Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

Scientists develop tiny tooth-mounted sensors that can track what you eatEngineers have developed miniaturized sensors that, when mounted directly on a tooth and communicating wirelessly with a mobile device, can transmit information on glucose, salt and alcohol intake. Researchers note that future adaptations of these sensors could enable the detection and recording of a wide range of nutrients, chemicals and physiological states.
1d

Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Soybean genomes unmaskedApproximately 340 million metric tons of soybeans are produced globally each year, with the market for soybeans worth $40 billion in the U.S. alone. Having a map of soybean genes is key for breeders, who work to develop varieties that farmers can use to help battle diseases and other environmental factors. For nearly a decade, only one soybean cultivar—"Williams 82"—had been sequenced, but MU scie
1d

Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Designing a new material for improved ultrasoundDevelopment of a theoretical basis for ultrahigh piezoelectricity in ferroelectric materials led to a new material with twice the piezo response of any existing commercial ferroelectric ceramics, according to an international team of researchers from Penn State, China and Australia.
1d

The Atlantic

The Millions Left Marooned by BrexitAt first, Elena Remigi thought getting British citizenship would be a formality. Though she was born in Milan, she had lived in the United Kingdom for more than a decade. She owned a house, she had a car, and she even got permanent residency—an arduous process that involves filling out an 85-page application and providing a stack of documents to prove eligibility. But after Britons voted in June
1d

Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Physical disability boosts parenting effort, beetles study showsAnimals that carry a physical impediment can work harder to rear their young as a result, a study of insects has shown.
1d

Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

High GPA could work against young women job huntersStellar grades in college could hurt - rather than help - women new to the job market, according to a new study that suggests employers place more value on the perceived "likability" of female applicants than on their academic success.
1d

The Scientist RSS

Bees Molecular Responses to Neonicotinoids DeterminedResearchers pinpoint a protein that can metabolize at least one of the insecticides, highlighting a route to identifying compounds that are friendlier to the critical pollinators.
1d

EurekAlert! - Breaking News

NIH scientists say advanced vaccines could limit future outbreaksNovel vaccine technologies are critical to improving the public health response to infectious disease threats that continually emerge and re-emerge, according to scientists at the National Institute of Allergy and Infectious Diseases (NIAID), part of the National Institutes of Health. In a perspective in The Journal of the American Medical Association, the experts highlight innovations that could
1d

EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Military surgeons report 'alarming frequency' of bench press injuriesA new study has found that serious chest muscle injuries are occurring with 'alarming frequency' among deployed service members who lift weights. The injuries -- tears of the pectoralis major tendon -- occurred while doing bench press weight training. The injuries then required surgical repair and six months recovery.
1d

EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Designing a new material for improved ultrasoundDevelopment of a theoretical basis for ultrahigh piezoelectricity in ferroelectric materials led to a new material with twice the piezo response of any existing commercial ferroelectric ceramics, according to an international team of researchers from Penn State, China and Australia.
1d

EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Sagging confidence can lead to more self-interested behaviour -- or less.New research says that experiencing low confidence in one area can lead to attempts to boost our status in another, even if it means engaging in fraud. If we seek better financial status, we may behave more selfishly, or cheat. We may go in the opposite direction though, choosing altruism as the best way to restore our confidence.
1d

EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Discovery offers hope for improving physical performance as we ageLeading researchers from UNSW and Harvard have identified that replacing two naturally molecules in mice can reverse the aging process of blood vessels, boosting their exercise capacity and physical endurance.
1d

EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Sex differences and organ transplant rejectionIn general, the influence of biological sex on transplant outcomes has not been rigorously studied and largely underappreciated. A new study by investigators at Brigham and Women's Hospital assesses what is currently known about the influence of biological sex differences, possible mechanisms that may explain discrepancies between rejection rates for male and female recipients and what questions r
1d

EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Long thought to only cause a rare disease, this mutation may ward off malariaThe discovery sheds light on how humans who live in close quarters with malaria-carrying mosquitos may evolve defenses against the disease.
1d

EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Being hungry shuts off perception of chronic painFinding food is a necessary survival skill, but so is avoiding pain. Research using mice at the University of Pennsylvania showed that being hungry activates a neural pathway that inhibits the perception of and response to chronic pain. The findings offer up new targets for treating pain.
1d

EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Hidden variationDifferent tissues have shockingly variable sensitivities to genes that drive normal and malignant cell proliferation, study shows.Research unmasks hundreds of cancer-driving genes invisible to gene sequencing.Findings could explain why individual cancer drivers appear in some tumors and not others, could inspire tissue-specific strategies for cancer treatment.
1d

EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Sulfur amino acid restriction diet triggers new blood vessel formation in micePutting mice on a diet containing low amounts of the essential amino acid methionine triggered the formation of new blood vessels in skeletal muscle, according to a new study from Harvard T.H. Chan School of Public Health. The finding adds insight to previous research showing that a methionine-restricted diet extends lifespan and healthspan, suggesting that improved vascular function may contribut
1d

EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Growth factor gradients in migration-permissive hydrogels for salivary gland assemblyAt the 47th Annual Meeting of the American Association for Dental Research (AADR), held in conjunction with the 42nd Annual Meeting of the Canadian Association for Dental Research (CADR), Kelsea Marie Hubka, a Rice University graduate student and visiting student at University of Texas Health Science Center School of Dentistry, Houston, Texas, presented a poster titled 'Growth Factor Gradients in
1d

EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Study suggests method to boost growth of blood vessels and muscleMIT researchers have reversed age-related endurance loss in mice by treating them with a compound that promotes new blood vessel growth. Their study, led by senior author Leonard Guarente, found the compound, which reactivates longevity-linked sirutin proteins, promotes blood vessel and muscle growth, boosting endurance of elderly mice by up to 80 percent.
1d

EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Toward precision medicine: First comprehensive look at human retinal cell diversityIn work that brings researchers closer to the goal of precision medicine approaches to treating glaucoma and other neurodegenerative vision diseases, a new IUPUI study has, for the first time, been able to identify a wide variety of previously unknown cell subtypes in the human eye.
1d

EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Keys found to bee-friendly neonicsDiscovery of why two of the most economically important bee species are immune to one neonicotinoid insecticide but not to others promises to yield chemical treatments that protect crops from pests without harming these essential pollinators, honeybees and bumblebees.Bee pollinators are equipped with biochemical defence systems, in the form of specific enzymes, that define their sensitivity to ins
1d

EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Breakthrough could aid development of bee-friendly pesticidesEfforts to create pesticides that are not toxic to bees have been boosted by a scientific breakthrough.
1d

EurekAlert! - Breaking News

The circadian clock controls the cell cycle and tumor growth in plantsBiological rhythms are ubiquitous in nature, from the beating of the heart to the rhythms of flowering plants. A research team led by the Spanish researcher, Paloma Mas, has shown that the two main cellular oscillators -- the circadian clock and the cell cycle -- are closely connected. The study demonstrates that the circadian clock controls the speed of the cell cycle, regulating the cell divisio
1d

EurekAlert! - Breaking News

From signal propagation to consciousness: New findings point to a potential connectionResearchers have discovered a novel mechanism through which information can be effectively transmitted across many areas in the brain -- a finding that offers a potentially new way of understanding how consciousness arises.
1d

EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Scientists pinpoint cause of vascular aging in miceScientists identify mechanism behind vascular aging, muscle demise in mice. Treatment with chemical compounds reversed vascular aging, stimulated blood vessel growth and blood flow, boosted exercise capacity in aging animals.
1d

EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Boosting enzyme may help improve blood flow, fitness in elderlyAn enzyme called SIRT1 declines in the blood vessels with age and restoring it reverses the effects of vascular aging. After receiving a supplement called NMN, older mice showed increased capillary density, blood flow, mobility, and endurance.
1d

EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Calorie restriction trial in humans suggests benefits for age-related diseaseOne of the first studies to explore the effects of calorie restriction on humans showed that cutting caloric intake by 15 percent for two years slowed aging and metabolism and protected against age-related disease. The study, which will appear March 22 in the journal Cell Metabolism, found that calorie restriction decreased systemic oxidative stress, which has been tied to age-related neurological
1d

EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Using simplicity for complexity -- new research sheds light on the perception of motionA team of biologists has deciphered how neurons used in the perception of motion form in the brain of a fly -- a finding that illustrates how complex neuronal circuits are constructed from simple developmental rules.
1d

EurekAlert! - Breaking News

The mouse brain can prioritize hunger by suppressing pain when survival is at stakeDifferent behaviors are often studied in isolation, leaving unanswered questions about how the brain processes needs and prioritizes behaviors to ensure survival. Now, researchers have shown that pain and hunger interact in complex ways in mice: extreme hunger suppresses less-urgent inflammatory pain, but leaves them able to feel and react to more life-and-death kinds of pain. The study, published
1d

EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Some neonicotinoid pesticides are more toxic to bees than others; here's whyYou've probably heard that the safety of neonicotinoid pesticides to bees is a matter of considerable controversy. However, neonicotinoids show varying toxicity to bees. Now, researchers reporting in the journal Current Biology on March 22 have new evidence in honeybees and bumble bees that helps to explain why bees differ in their sensitivity to different neonicotinoids.
1d

Big Think

Darwinian differences: How the theory of evolution viewed women as inferiorIn line with his own ingrained assumptions, the standard ones of Victorian England, Darwin maintained that female inferiority is an inescapable consequence of nature. Read More
1d

New Scientist - News

Calorie restriction may extend lifespan by changing your sleepCutting the calories you eat by 15 per cent may make you live longer – and it could be because it makes your body shut down more deeply during sleep
1d

New on MIT Technology Review

Uber could blame its driver for this week’s fatal accident, but it shouldn’t
1d

Feed: All Latest

Will Cutting Calories Make You Live Longer?The biggest-ever human study of calorie restriction tries to answer that question.
1d

Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Unique communication strategy discovered in stem cell pathway controlling plant growthA team of plant geneticists at Cold Spring Harbor Laboratory (CSHL) has identified a protein receptor on stem cells involved in plant development that can issue different instructions about how to grow depending on what peptide (protein fragment) activates it.
1d

Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

Early numeracy performance of young kids linked to specific math activities at homeNew research finds links between certain math skills in young children and specific numerical activities undertaken at home with parents. The study also finds that the more parents engage in mathematical activities with their children, the higher their early numeracy performance.
1d

Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

Animal nutrition: Excess phosphorus damages the kidneyA new study carried out by veterinarians shows that high phosphorus intake, comparable to the average level provided by prepared cat food, can be deleterious to kidney function in healthy cats.
1d

Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

Surpassing critical blood pressure threshold could signal hypertension regardless of ageA new study supports updated blood pressure guidelines that redefine hypertension at a lower threshold.
1d

NYT > Science

The Ruthless Phronima, and Other Hidden Wonders of the SeaAt the American Museum of Natural History, “Unseen Oceans” shines a light on the animals that call the ocean home and the humans who study them.
1d

Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Long thought to only cause a rare disease, this mutation may ward off malariaA genetic mutation that may protect people from malaria, but was thought to be rare, is surprisingly common, suggest the findings of a new study led by scientists at The Scripps Research Institute (TSRI). The discovery sheds light on how humans who live in close quarters with malaria-carrying mosquitos may evolve defenses against the disease.
1d

Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

The circadian clock controls the cell cycle and tumor growth in plantsBiological rhythms are ubiquitous in nature, from the beating of the heart to the rhythms of flowering plants. This rhythmicity is in some instances determined by the oscillations in the activity of cellular proteins, which mark the rhythms of the processes they control. The two main cellular oscillators are the so-called circadian clock and the cell cycle. The circadian clock is responsible for g
1d

Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Keys found to bee-friendly neonicsDiscovery of why two of the most economically important bee species are immune to one neonicotinoid insecticide but not to others promises to yield chemical treatments that protect crops from pests without harming these essential pollinators, honeybees and bumblebees.
1d

Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Toward precision medicine: First comprehensive look at human retinal cell diversityIn work that brings researchers closer to the goal of precision medicine approaches to treating glaucoma and other neurodegenerative vision diseases, a new IUPUI study has, for the first time, been able to identify a wide variety of previously unknown cell subtypes in the human eye. The cells—called retinal ganglion cells, also known as RGCs—are the neurons that take visual information from the ey
1d

Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Ford, Mahindra partner on small electric vehicle, some SUVsFord and Mahindra Group are teaming up to develop a small electric vehicle and some new SUVs.
1d

Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Worried about being on Facebook? Some options explainedFacebook Data Cambridge AnalyticaA snowballing Facebook scandal over the hijacking of personal data from millions of its users has many wondering whether it's time to restrict access to their Facebook information or even leave the social network altogether, with the #deletefacebook movement gaining traction.
1d

EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Physical disability boosts parenting effort, beetles study showsAnimals that carry a physical impediment can work harder to rear their young as a result, an insect study has shown. They may behave this way in case they are not able to reproduce again, scientists suggest.
1d

EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Probing RNA epigenetics and chromatin structures to predict drug resistance in leukemiaA University of Chicago based research team has begun to unravel the role of RNA epigenetics and chromatin structure in the regulation of 5-azacytidine, a DNA hypomethylating agent in certain leukemias. The results could lead to novel strategies and biomarkers that could reduce the risk of drug resistance.
1d

EurekAlert! - Breaking News

High GPA could work against young women job huntersStellar grades in college could hurt -- rather than help -- women new to the job market, according to a new study that suggests employers place more value on the perceived 'likability' of female applicants than on their academic success.
1d

EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Unique communication strategy discovered in stem cell pathway controlling plant growthResearchers have identified a receptor on plant stem cells that can issue different instructions about how to grow. Tweaking this pathway can lead to bigger fruits or more seeds in important food crops.
1d

EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Study finds medical students receive little formal instruction in radiation oncologyMedical school students receive little formal instruction in radiation oncology, a Loyola study has found. Researchers who surveyed radiation oncology departments at academic medical centers found that only 41 percent of departments reported that at least one faculty member taught a topic related to radiation oncology. In only 25 percent of departments, a faculty member taught topics focused speci
1d

EurekAlert! - Breaking News

The universal language of hormonesBioinformatics specialists from the University of Würzburg have studied a specific class of hormones which is relevant for plants, bacteria and indirectly for humans, too. Their results challenge previous scientific assumptions.
1d

EurekAlert! - Breaking News

How reciprocity can magnify inequalityPeople tend to reciprocate others' actions in ways that increase disparities in wealth, according to findings published in Psychological Science, a journal of the Association for Psychological Science. In a series of studies, researchers find that people may see kindness through wealth-tinted glasses, repaying the most to those who need it the least.
1d

Scientific American Content: Global

U.S. Science Agencies Set to Win Big in Budget DealCongress is preparing to vote on legislation that includes historic $37 billion for the NIH -- Read more on ScientificAmerican.com
1d

Scientific American Content: Global

Why Is It So Hard to Talk about Money?10 financial questions for the one you love -- Read more on ScientificAmerican.com
1d

Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Robotic collaboration in timber constructionDigitalisation has found its way into timber construction, with entire elements already being fabricated by computer-aided systems. The raw material is cut to size by the machines, but in most cases it still has to be manually assembled to create a plane frame. In the past, this fabrication process came with many geometric restrictions.
1d

Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Breakthrough in photonic biosensors could lead to super-accurate diagnostic and detectorsUniversity Professor of Applied Physics Stephen Arnold and his team at the New York University Tandon School of Engineering have made a discovery that could lead to Star Trek-like biosensor devices capable of flagging the barest presence in blood of a specific virus or antibody, or protein marker for a specific cancer; or sniffing out airborne chemical warfare agents while they are still far below
1d

Dana Foundation

Neuroscience and Society: Buildings and the BrainPanelists Justin Hollander, Eve Edelstein, and Margaret Calkins listen to a question from the audience. About 1/3 of the people in the audience were architects. Panelists Justin Hollander, Eve Edelstein, and Margaret Calkins listen to a question from the audience. About 1/3 of the people in the audience were architects. “Design saves lives,” Eve Edelstein says. She and her two fellow panelists at
1d

New Scientist - News

Male balding may be cured by injecting epilepsy drug into scalpThinning on top? An epilepsy drug that might be painlessly injected into the scalp could treat premature hair loss in men.
1d

New Scientist - News

Heavy metal poisoning may be changing birds’ personalitiesGreat tits exposed to toxic metals like cadmium and lead alter their behaviour, becoming less exploratory and more cautious, suggesting their personalities have been reshaped
1d

Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Experts: Uber SUV's autonomous system should have seen womanTwo experts say video of a deadly crash involving a self-driving Uber vehicle shows the sport utility vehicle's laser and radar sensors should have spotted a pedestrian, and computers should have braked to avoid the crash.
1d

Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Can Zuckerberg's media blitz take the pressure off Facebook?In the wake of a privacy scandal involving a Trump-connected data-mining firm, Facebook CEO Mark Zuckerberg embarked on a rare media mini-blitz in an attempt to take some of the public and political pressure off the social network.
1d

Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Video: The explosive consequences of cow burpsCows burp up more gas than you might think possible when they're digesting grass.
1d

The Atlantic

A Spree of Violence Can Shake a Community's WorldviewAfter 19 days, the fear and anxiety that have haunted the city of Austin, Texas, may have reached an end on Wednesday. The suspect in a series of bombings blew himself up in a truck as the police approached. Six different bombs, considered linked by the police, have killed two people and injured five more since March 2. Four of them exploded in Austin; one went off in a FedEx facility in Schertz,
1d

EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Harvard scientists ask 'what is the point?' in challenge to acupuncture researchersThe effectiveness of acupuncture compared to standard treatments has led to its growing inclusion in pain guidelines and in delivery organizations like the US military and Veterans Administration, yet many continue to believe acupuncture lacks scientific credibility.
1d

EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Scientists explored the structure of the key region of 'immortality and aging' enzymeScientists from Moscow State University (MSU) working in an international team of researchers identified the structure of one of the key regions of telomerase -- a cell immortality enzyme. Structural and functional studies on this protein are important for the development of potential anticancer drugs. The results of the study have been published in the highly-rated Nucleic Acids Research journal.
1d

EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Breakthrough in photonic biosensors could lead to super-accurate diagnostics and detectorsStephen Arnold and his team at NYU Tandon's MicroParticle PhotoPhysics Laboratory for BioPhotonics are the first to find a way to determine the density of charges on an area of a whisperinig gallery mode micro-bead's surface, as well as the charge of an ensnared nanoparticle or virus, which could allow researchers and manufacturers not just to identify nanoparticles, but to manipulate them.
1d

EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Stopping exercise can increase symptoms of depressionStopping exercise can result in increased depressive symptoms, according to new mental health research from the University of Adelaide.
1d

EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Novel genomics tool enables more accurate identification of rare mutations in cancer cellsA new computational method developed by researchers at the New York Genome Center (NYGC) allows scientists to identify rare gene mutations in cancer cells with greater accuracy and sensitivity than currently available approaches. The technique, reported in today's Communications Biology from Nature Research publishing, is called Lancet and represents a major advance in the identification of tumor
1d

Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

Custom sequences for polymers using visible lightResearchers have used a light-sensitive iridium-palladium catalyst to make 'sequential' polymers, using visible light to change how different building blocks are combined into polymer chains. By simply switching the light on or off, they were able to realize different compositions along the polymer chain, allowing precision control over physical properties and material function. This may drastical
1d

Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

Electric textile lights a lamp when stretchedWorking up a sweat from carrying a heavy load? That is when the textile works at its best. Researchers have developed a fabric that converts kinetic energy into electric power. The greater the load applied to the textile and the wetter it becomes the more electricity it generates.
1d

Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

Laser-based system offers continuous monitoring of leaks from oil and gas operationsResearchers have conducted the first field tests for a new laser-based system that could one day be used to continuously monitor for costly and dangerous methane leaks at oil and gas production sites.
1d

Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

Hip hop music teaches children, parents to recognize stroke and act quicklyThe 'Hip Hop Stroke' initiative uses hip hop music lyrics to effectively educate economically-disadvantaged, minority children and parents about stroke.
1d

Big Think

Ancient deer-like creatures returned to the ocean to become whales. But why?Researchers are starting to get a handle on why ancient creatures returned to the ocean after their ancient ancestors climbed out of it. Read More
1d

EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Researchers use 3-D printing to create metallic glass alloysResearchers have now demonstrated the ability to create amorphous metal, or metallic glass, alloys using 3-D printing technology, opening the door to a variety of applications -- such as more efficient electric motors, better wear-resistant materials, higher strength materials, and lighter weight structures.
1d

EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Signalling study sheds light on conditions from alopecia to cancerResearchers from the University of Dundee and the Francis Crick Institute have made a significant discovery about a cellular pathway associated with developmental defects and a myriad of diseases ranging from alopecia to colorectal cancer.The research, jointly led by Dundee's Dr. Gopal Sapkota and Professor Sir Jim Smith of the Crick, examined the role of a protein called PAWS1 in the Wnt signalli
1d

EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Skilled female potters travelled around the Baltic nearly 5000 years agoDuring the Corded Ware Culture period, Finland, Estonia and Sweden received skilful female artisans, who had learned to create fashionable and innovative pottery in the eastern region of the Gulf of Finland. The Baltic Sea countries also had a close network for trade in pottery.
1d

EurekAlert! - Breaking News

The explosive consequences of cow burps (video)Cows burp up more gas than you might think possible when they're digesting grass. Most of that gas is methane, a potent greenhouse gas, which is bad news for the planet. This video from Reactions explains why the chemistry of cow guts is such a busy area of study.
1d

EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Health check can spot psychologically vulnerable personsIf mental health was made part of a health check, then it would be possible to detect vulnerable people who have not received assistance from doctors or psychologists for their psychological problems. This is shown by a new study from Aarhus University.
1d

EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Trouble hearing? It could increase your risk of an injuryA new report finds people with 'a lot of trouble hearing' are twice as likely to suffer from accidental injuries.
1d

EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Is hearing loss associated with increased risk of accidental injury?Difficulty hearing was associated with increased risk of accidental injury and individuals reporting 'a lot of trouble' hearing were twice as likely to be hurt.
1d

EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Does genome sequencing increase downstream costs?The MedSeq Project, led by investigators at Brigham Women's Hospital, is the first randomized trial to provide whole genome sequencing to both presumably healthy patients as well as those with a known cardiology issue. The research team found that after six months, downstream health care costs did not significantly differ between patients who had received whole genome sequencing and those that did
1d

EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Freeloading orchid relies on mushrooms above and below groundThe orchid species Gastrodia pubilabiata mimics rotting mushrooms or fermented fruit, and is pollinated by fruit flies who mistakenly lay their eggs in its flowers. If there are rotting mushrooms near the orchid, its pollination rate increases. As well as using mushrooms to attract insect pollinators, G. pubilabiata survives by absorbing nutrients from the fungal hyphae of mushrooms. This is the f
1d

EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Design approach developed for important new catalysts for energy conversion and storageNorthwestern University researchers have discovered a new approach for creating important new catalysts to aid in clean energy conversion and storage. The method also has the potential to impact the discovery of new optical and data storage materials and catalysts for higher efficiency processing of petroleum products at lower cost. The researchers created a catalyst that is seven times more activ
1d

Scientific American Content: Global

Worn Like a Helmet, a New Brain Scanner Aims to Make It Easier to Treat Kids with EpilepsyLightweight equipment is not much larger than what a bicyclist would wear -- Read more on ScientificAmerican.com
1d

New Scientist - News

Fallout from Facebook data scandal may hit health researchFacebook Data Cambridge AnalyticaUse of social media data is important to research in many fields but the fallout over the Cambridge Analytica claims may hamper that, says Annabel Latham
1d

Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

High-energy ions' movement affected by silicon crystal periodicityThe thinner the silicon crystal, the better. Indeed, thinner crystals provide better ways to manipulate the trajectories of very high-energy ions in particle accelerators. Further applications include materials analysis, semiconductor doping and beam transport in large particle accelerators. All of these rely on our understanding of how positively-charged high-energy particles move through crystal
1d

Ingeniøren

Minister bekræfter: Femerns miljøgodkendelse forsinkesFemernforbindelsen bliver ikke miljøgodkendt af de tyske myndigheder i årets første halvdel, som man på dansk side ellers havde troet og håbet på. Godkendelsen vil senest komme ved årets udgang, fortæller den slesvig-holstenske transportminister til delstatsparlamentet
1d

Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

Identifying the chemical forming carcinogens in recycled waterEngineers at wastewater recycling plants can rest easy knowing that their methods for minimizing the formation of a potent carcinogen are targeting the right chemical compound. Chemists have confirmed the chemical responsible for the formation of the carcinogen N-nitrosodimethyalmine, or NDMA, in recycled wastewater.
1d

Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

Scientists control molecular alignment on a graphene surfaceScientists have developed a simple way to align molecules in one direction on a flat graphene surface. Efficiently controlling molecular alignment is expected to lead to significant progress in surface chemistry and molecular engineering, as well as materials science.
1d

Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

Robust superhydrophobic films fabricated from anisotropic silica particlesScientists have developed an emulsion-based one-pot synthesis of anisotropic silica by adding various silane coupling agents provides an effective strategy to control particle morphology and modification.
1d

Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

Brewing hoppy beer without the hopsSynthetic biology has created microbes that produce drugs, flavors, aromas and fuels. Now scientists have used the same tricks, with the help of CRISPR-Cas9, to get yeast to produce the flavor of hops. They added genes from mint and basil and used the yeast to brew a beer that tasters said had notes of 'fruit-loops' and 'orange blossom,' with no off flavors. The yeast helps brewers avoid expensive
1d

Feed: All Latest

Best Travel Apps: Signal, Sitata, Haven, SaferVPN, Mobile Passport, FoneTracFloods. Thieves. Hackers. Tackle any situation abroad with these mobile assistants.
1d

Feed: All Latest

Ad Blocker: What the World Would Look Like Without AdvertisingJorge Pérez Higuera imagines how the world might look if you could block ads IRL.
1d

Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Blockbuster antitrust trial over AT&T, Time Warner merger beginsThe US government faces off in court Thursday against AT&T and Time Warner in the biggest antitrust case in decades over their bid to merge and create a powerful new television behemoth.
1d

Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Freeloading orchid relies on mushrooms above and below groundThe non-photosynthesizing orchid species Gastrodia pubilabiata smells like rotting mushrooms or fermented fruit, and is pollinated by fruit flies who mistakenly lay their eggs in its flowers. If there are rotting mushrooms near the orchid, its pollination rate increases. As well as using mushrooms to attract insect pollinators, G. pubilabiata survives by absorbing nutrients from the fungal hyphae
1d

New on MIT Technology Review

What Zuckerberg said, and what he didn’t
1d

EurekAlert! - Breaking News

High-energy ions' movement affected by silicon crystal periodicityThe thinner the silicon crystal, the easier it is to manipulate the trajectories of very high-energy ions in particle accelerators. Further applications include materials analysis, semiconductor doping and beam transport in large particle accelerators. All of these rely on our understanding of how positively-charged high-energy particles move through crystals. This process, called ion channelling,
1d

EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Generation of a stable biradicalThe world of chemistry has witnessed another step forward: researchers at the University of Würzburg in Germany have succeeded in twisting molecules so much that their double bonds have been completely destroyed. The result: unusually stable biradicals.
1d

EurekAlert! - Breaking News

MSU-based scientists dedicated the birth of a new black hole to Stephen HawkingOne of the MASTER Global Robotic Net telescopes (MSU) located on Tenerife (Spain, Canary Islands) helped the scientists observe the gamma-ray burst caused by the collapse of a star and the formation of a black hole in its place. Usual telescopes are unable to point to gamma-ray bursts error-boxes fast enough to monitor the change in its brightness and obtain any information about its source.
1d

EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Children with physical disabilities are at higher risk of poor mental healthA new study from Lund University in Sweden shows that even children with limited physical disabilities are at risk of developing mental issues later in life. Girls and adolescents from socio-economically vulnerable families are at greatest risk. The study was published in the reputable journal PLOS ONE.
1d

EurekAlert! - Breaking News

North and south cooperation to combat tuberculosisTuberculosis can be cured and could be eradicated. For this to happen, however, patients have to receive the right treatment. Researchers at the Makerere University and the University of Zurich were able to demonstrate that the levels of medication used are often too low. As a result, patients remained contagious with the dangerous disease for longer than necessary.
1d

TED Talks Daily (SD video)

Need a new idea? Start at the edge of what is known | Vittorio Loreto"Where do great ideas come from?" Starting with this question in mind, Vittorio Loreto takes us on a journey to explore a possible mathematical scheme that explains the birth of the new. Learn more about the "adjacent possible" -- the crossroads of what's actual and what's possible -- and how studying the math that drives it could explain how we create new ideas.
1d

Science | The Guardian

Climate science on trial as high-profile US case takes on fossil fuel industryCourtroom showdown in San Francisco pitted liberal cities against oil corporations, and saw judge host unusual climate ‘tutorial’ The science of climate change was on trial on Wednesday when leading experts testified about the threats of global warming in a US court while a fossil fuel industry lawyer fighting a high-profile lawsuit sought to deflect blame for rising sea levels. The hearing was p
1d

Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

Blackbirds in the city: Bad health, longer lifeBlackbirds live longer in cities than in forests. But their telomeres, the repetitive stretches of DNA at the ends of the chromosomes, show that these city birds have a much poorer health status than their rural cousins.
1d

Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

Targeting immune cells to slow progression of ALSNew research into Amyotrophic Lateral Sclerosis (ALS) - also known as motor neuron disease - shows that specific immune cells may help slow progression of the disease, an important step towards developing new therapies to treat patients.
1d

Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

Antioxidants and amino acids could play role in the treatment of psychosisA scientific paper has revealed that some nutrients found in food may help reduce the symptoms of psychotic illness, when used in the early stages of treatment.
1d

Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Mitochondria mutation mystery solved: Random sorting helps get rid of dudsYou probably know about the 23 pairs of chromosomes safely stowed in your cells' nuclei. That's where the vast majority of your genes can be found. But there are 37 special genes—a very tiny fraction of the human genome—located in mitochondria, the structures inside your cells that breathe and produce energy.
1d

EurekAlert! - Breaking News

When the Mediteranean Sea flooded human settlementsAround 7,600 years ago, the emergence of agricultural settlements in Southeastern Europe and subsequent progress of civilization suddenly came to a standstill. This was most likely caused by an abrupt sea level rise in the northern Aegean Sea. German Researchers in Frankfurt and colleagues of the University of Toronto have now detected evidence in the fossils of tiny calcifying marine algae preser
1d

EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Obesity surgery prevents severe chronic kidney disease and kidney failurePatients that underwent weight-loss surgery ran a significantly lower risk of developing severe chronic kidney disease and kidney failure, when compared to conventionally treated patients, according to a study published in International Journal of Obesity.
1d

Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Pacific plastic dump far larger than feared: studyThe vast dump of plastic waste swirling in the Pacific ocean is now bigger than France, Germany and Spain combined—far larger than previously feared—and is growing rapidly, a study published Thursday warned.
1d

Futurity.org

Opioid misuse more likely for educated baby boomersThe more educated a baby boomer, the more likely they are to misuse prescription opioids, new research suggests. The study, which surveyed 130 participants in Western New York, investigated the risk factors for prescription opioid misuse in adults with chronic pain older than 50. The research concludes that those who attended at least some college were 2.5 times more likely to misuse opioids than
1d

Dagens Medicin

Børns tarmbakterier afslører risiko for astmaEn umoden sammensætning af bakterier i tarmene hos børn født af mødre med astma øger børnenes risiko fr selv at udvikle astma. Det viser et nyt studie, hvis konklusioner peger på, at astma kan forebygges ved at påvirke bakterierne i tarmen hos små børn.
1d

Dagens Medicin

Nyt allergicenter skal være en international ledestjerneSystematisk udredning og behandling af allergipatienter skal opprioriteres i Danmark. Sådan lyder én af mange ambitioner for et nyt allergicenter, Comprehensive Clinical Care Center, under Odense Universitetshospital, som agter at løfte dansk allergologi op i international klasse.
1d

Dagens Medicin

Eksperter foreslår sundhedsklynger for bedre sammenhængskraftFrede Olesen, Kjeld Møller Pedersen og Leif Vestergaard Petersen mener, at der mangler sammenhæng i sundhedsvæsenet. De foreslår, at der bliver oprettet klynger, som politikere i regionerne og kommunerne skal rette sig efter.
1d

Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Want to fight crime? Plant some flowers with your neighborNeighborhoods struggling with physical decline and high crime often become safer simply when local residents work together to fix up their neighborhood.
1d

Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

US facing off against AT&T to block merger with Time WarnerThe Trump administration is facing off against AT&T to block the telephone giant from absorbing Time Warner, in a case that could shape how consumers get—and how much they pay for—streaming TV and movies.
1d

Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Researchers fabricate robust superhydrophobic films from anisotropic silica particlesRecent research published in a paper in Nano by a group of researchers from Nanjing Tech University showed an emulsion-based one-pot synthesis of anisotropic silica by adding various silane coupling agents provides an effective strategy to control particle morphology and modification.
1d

Futurity.org

For food-related emissions, this U.S. diet is the worstOn any given day, 20 percent of Americans account for nearly half of US diet-related greenhouse gas emissions, and eating lots of beef is largely responsible, according to a new study. To estimate the impact of US dietary choices on greenhouse gas emissions, the researchers built a database that assessed the environmental impacts involved in producing more than 300 types of food. Then they linked
1d

The Atlantic

Trump’s Pick For CDC Director Is Experienced But ControversialIn the first year of his administration, Donald Trump has repeatedly filled important scientific positions with candidates who seem to be either unqualified for the roles or diametrically opposed to the very purpose of those roles. Scott Pruitt was chosen to lead the Environmental Protection Agency after having repeatedly sued it . Rick Perry became Secretary of Energy, heading a department that
1d

The Atlantic

The Problem With Biden's Fantasy About Beating Up TrumpCrazy Joe Biden D. TrumpAt the University of Miami on Wednesday, Joe Biden had an odd fantasy. He declared that had he heard Donald Trump boasting about sexually assaulting women in high school, he would have taken “him behind the gym and beat the hell out of him.” Biden has said something similar before. He shouldn’t say it again. The reason is obvious: America’s leaders shouldn’t glorify violence. It’s a point liberal
1d

Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Researchers prove complex connection between plants and what soil microbes eatResearchers at the Department of Energy's Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory (Berkeley Lab) and UC Berkeley have discovered that as plants develop they craft their root microbiome, favoring microbes that consume very specific metabolites. Their study could help scientists identify ways to enhance the soil microbiome for improved carbon storage and plant productivity.
1d

New on MIT Technology Review

Google hopes blockchain tech will help it win the cloud war
1d

EurekAlert! - Breaking News

New study highlights unique state of 'restful alertness' during Transcendental MeditationA new study using functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) suggests that Transcendental Meditation is associated with a unique state of 'restful alertness.' The study, which monitored blood flow, found that, compared to eyes-closed rest, during Transcendental Meditation there was increased activity in the prefrontal cortex, indicating the sort of alertness also seen in other meditations. Howev
1d

EurekAlert! - Breaking News

UNH researchers find landscape ridges may hold clues about ice age and climate changeResearchers at the University of New Hampshire say the landscape may also hold answers to how glaciers helped form the current terrain and provide insight into the progression of climate change.
1d

EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Mobile 'dual-comb' device significantly improves methane leak detectionAccurately detecting, locating and quantifying leaks of methane is critically important for both environmental and economic reasons. Unfortunately, traditional methods are slow, labor-intensive, limited to small coverage areas and expensive to operate over time. Now, researchers at NIST and partners have demonstrated a novel solution that features an innovative adaptation of a Nobel Prize-winning
1d

EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Laser-based system offers continuous monitoring of leaks from oil and gas operationsResearchers have conducted the first field tests for a new laser-based system that could one day be used to continuously monitor for costly and dangerous methane leaks at oil and gas production sites.
1d

EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Researchers fabricate robust superhydrophobic films from anisotropic silica particlesRecent research published in a paper in NANO by a group of researchers from Nanjing Tech University showed an emulsion-based one-pot synthesis of anisotropic silica by adding various silane coupling agents provides an effective strategy to control particle morphology and modification.
1d

EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Scientists control molecular alignment on a graphene surfaceScientists at Nagoya University have developed a simple way to align molecules in one direction on a flat graphene surface. Efficiently controlling molecular alignment is expected to lead to significant progress in surface chemistry and molecular engineering, as well as materials science.
1d

EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Researchers target immune cells to slow progression of ALSNew research into Amyotrophic Lateral Sclerosis (ALS) - also known as motor neuron disease - shows that specific immune cells may help slow progression of the disease, an important step towards developing new therapies to treat patients.
1d

Latest Headlines | Science News

Why it’s great to have a geologist in the houseEditor in Chief Nancy Shute enthuses about learning how ancient plans may have helped make Earth muddy.
1d

Latest Headlines | Science News

Readers ponder children’s pretend play, planetary dust storms and moreReaders had questions about children’s fantasy play, lasers creating 3-D images and dust storms on Mars.
1d

Ingeniøren

Energitilsynet politianmelder to energiselskaber for markedsmanipulationPå baggrund af en konkret mistanke til to markedsaktører om markedsmanipulation har Energitilsynet – højst usædvanligt – overgivet to sager til politimæssig efterforskning.
1d

Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Researchers find landscape ridges may hold clues about ice age and climate changeTake a drive through the countryside near the New Hampshire Seacoast and you might notice a series of tiny rolling hills that look like regularly-spaced ridges. While the repeating pattern may be eye-catching for drivers, and sometimes challenging for bicycle riders, researchers at the University of New Hampshire say they may also hold answers to how glaciers helped form the current terrain and pr
1d

Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

How energy storage is starting to rewire the electricity industryThe market for energy storage on the power grid is growing at a rapid clip, driven by declining prices and supportive government policies.
1d

Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

New robotic arm that could service satellites or pick apples developedAn innovative new type of robotic arm that could be useful in outer space or in the orchards has been developed by Ben-Gurion University of the Negev (BGU) researchers.
1d

Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Researchers identify the molecule responsible for a potent carcinogen found in recycled wastewaterEngineers at wastewater recycling plants can rest easy knowing that their methods for minimizing the formation of a potent carcinogen are targeting the right chemical compound.
1d

Futurity.org

‘Brain stethoscope’ turns brain waves into soundNew research shows that medical students and nurses—non-specialists, in other words—can listen to a new “brain stethoscope” and reliably detect so-called silent seizures—a neurological condition where patients have epileptic seizures without any of the associated physical convulsions. When a doctor or nurse suspects something is wrong with a patient’s heart, there’s a simple way to check: use a s
1d

Futurity.org

Obesity may kill a bunch of taste budsFood scientists have discovered that when mice are fed a high-fat diet and become obese, they lose nearly 25 percent of their tongue’s taste buds. As a result, the mice—through an obesity-triggered metabolic malfunction—may be encouraged to eat more food. “Our obese mice would not be getting as much input from taste.” “This is a potential human mechanism for getting fat,” says senior author Robin
1d

New on MIT Technology Review

The digital athletes of the future: Earning $1.6 million behind a keyboardClement Ivanov is one of the top Dota 2 players in the world.
1d

Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Israeli firm says it can turn garbage into plastic goldHawks, vultures and storks circle overhead as Christopher Sveen points at the heap of refuse rotting in the desert heat. "This is the mine of the future," he beams.
1d

Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Using optogenetics to program yeast to produce more isobutanolA team of researchers at Princeton University has developed a way to cause yeast to produce more isobutanol, a possible candidate for use as a biofuel. In their paper published in the journal Nature, the team describes their use of optogenetics to increase isobutanol production by yeast.
1d

Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

How employers can boost social mobility by changing the way they recruitSocial mobility has rarely been far from the top of the political agenda in Britain in recent years. Yet despite two decades of rhetorical commitment to the cause, Britain is still a deeply divided country.
1d

BBC News - Science & Environment

Plastic patch in Pacific Ocean growing rapidly, study showsIt is estimated some 80,000 tonnes of plastic is circulating in a patch between Hawaii and California.
1d

Dana Foundation

Missouri Student Takes Top Prize at USA Brain BeeThe winners of the USA National Brain Bee Championship were announced after taking place in Baltimore, Maryland, during last week’s Brain Awareness Week . Akhil Kondepudi from St. Louis, Missouri, took home the first-place prize at the annual, three-day competition, held this year from March 16 to 18. Competition was fierce as the 54 participants each placed first in their respective regional Bra
1d

Quanta Magazine

Black Hole Echoes Would Reveal Break With Einstein’s TheoryWe all dream the same dream, here in theoretical physics. We dream of the day when one of our equations will be plotted against data and fit spot on. It’s rare for this dream to come true. Even if it does, some don’t live to see it. Take, for example, Albert Einstein, who passed away in 1955, 60 years before his equations’ most stunning consequence was confirmed: Space-time has periodic ripples —
1d

New Scientist - News

The Great Pacific Garbage Patch is gobbling up ever more plasticThere's at least four times as much plastic floating in the Pacific as we thought, and a lot of it may have floated over from Japan after the 2011 Tohoku tsunami
1d

Big Think

Breakthrough treatment may cure 50% of all cases of blindnessHalf of all blindness in humans is due to macular degeneration. There looks to be a cure. Read More
1d

Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Researchers use 3-D printing to create metallic glass alloys in bulkResearchers have now demonstrated the ability to create amorphous metal, or metallic glass, alloys using three-dimensional (3-D) printing technology, opening the door to a variety of applications – such as more efficient electric motors, better wear-resistant materials, higher strength materials, and lighter weight structures.
1d

Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Researchers find leaky apps that put privacy at riskA bug in Facebook's advertising platform made it possible for potential hackers to uncover users' phone numbers, according to a paper presented by Northeastern associate professor Alan Mislove at the the Federal Trade Commission conference PrivacyCon last month.
1d

Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

How researchers diagnosed a 200-million-year-old infected predator biteNature, red in tooth and claw.
1d

Ingeniøren

Vikingeskibsmuseet frygter vindenDe seneste års voldsomme stormfloder og kraftige vind har medført omfattende skader på det i forvejen skrøbelige Vikingeskibsmuseum. Bygningen bevæger sig mere end før, mener museet.
1d

Dagens Medicin

Fysioterapi giver astma- patienter kontrol over åndedrættetForkert vejrtrækning er en af de hyppigste årsager til, at astmapatienter kæmper en svær kamp med at få kontrol over deres sygdom. Fysioterapi kan reducere åndedrætsproblemerne markant, og det kan betyde, at færre patienter har brug for behandling med dyre biologiske lægemidler.
1d

Dagens Medicin

Sundhedsminister udnævner direktør for ny patientklagestyrelseFagdirektør fra Skat tiltræder 1. maj som direktør i Styrelsen for Patientklager.
1d

Dagens Medicin

Bent Hansen: Klynge-forslag lyder spændendeDer er flere lovende elementer i det forslag om en ny-organisering af sundhedsvæsenet i klynger, mener afgående formand for Danske Regioner, Bent Hansen (S). Han har dog også visse forbehold.
1d

Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Gut bacteria can mean life or death for birdsIn her upcoming thesis at Lund University in Sweden, biologist Elin Videvall shows that the composition of gut bacteria in birds has a major impact on whether their offspring will survive their first three months.
1d

Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Laser-based system offers continuous monitoring of leaks from oil and gas operationsResearchers have conducted the first field tests for a new laser-based system that can pinpoint the location of very small methane leaks over an area of several square miles. The new technology could one day be used to continuously monitor for costly and dangerous methane leaks at oil and gas production sites.
1d

Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Opinion: It's time to claim ownership of our digital livesKurt Cobain, former lead singer of Nirvana, famously sang "Just because you're paranoid don't mean they aren't after you." And 'after you' seems to be exactly what they are. I am referring to the tech-giants who are collecting, analysing and peddling user data, controlling the information super highways, and harvesting, bundling, and selling it off to advertisers. Their prime asset is information
1d

Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

The universal language of hormonesBioinformatics specialists from the University of Würzburg have studied a specific class of hormones which is relevant for plants, bacteria and indirectly for humans, too. Their results challenge previous scientific assumptions.
1d

EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Antioxidants and amino acids could play role in the treatment of psychosisNutrients found in food may help reduce the symptoms of psychotic illness, when used in the early stages of treatment. The systematic review, examined if nutrient supplementation could provide effective 'add on' treatment for young people with psychosis.
1d

Latest Headlines | Science News

The great Pacific garbage patch may be 16 times as massive as we thoughtThe giant garbage patch between Hawaii and California weighs at least 79,000 tons, a new estimate suggests.
1d

Popular Science

Make your Android and iOS devices work togetherDIY Create harmony between your gadgets. Android and iOS don't always play nicely with each other. But you can still use both types of device. Here are some tips for making them work together smoothly.
1d

Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Imaging technologies turn up the focus on crime scenesCombining multiple images and cutting-edge technology is helping forensic science to give law enforcement agencies, juries and the judiciary the clearest ever picture of what happens at the scene of a crime.
1d

Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Who or what is to blame for the misuse of data, technology or those who control it?Facebook Data Cambridge AnalyticaFollowing Mark Zuckerberg's apology for millions of Facebook users having their data exploited, Cybersecurity expert, Dr. Daniel Dresner, writes that it isn't the technology we should be worrying about, but the people creating and using these tools instead.
1d

Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

The bottled water industry's healthy originsHuge outcry ensued from my recent article about how Brexit would hurt Britain's bottled water industry. The outcry wasn't to do with Brexit. Instead, it was over the very existence of a bottled water business.
1d

Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Adaptive radiations in the MesozoicBony fishes are the most diverse of all extant vertebrate groups. A comprehensive phylogenetic analysis of the group now provides new insights into its 250-million-year evolutionary history.
1d

Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

IBM demonstrates new breakthrough in AI performanceIBM has demonstrated a new breakthrough in AI performance. By using machine learning on POWER9 with NVIDIA Tesla V100 GPUs, IBM technology can now predict the likelihood of a user clicking online advertisements 46x faster than previous published results.
1d

Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Astronauts need extra exercise and calories in spaceIt takes physical activity to stay heart-healthy on Earth and even more to stay healthy in space.
1d

Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Why populations can't be saved by a single breeding pairTwo days ago, the last male northern white rhino (Ceratotherium simum cottoni) died. His passing leaves two surviving members of his subspecies: both females who are unable to bear calves.
1d

Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Many people feel lonely in the city, but perhaps 'third places' can help with thatLoneliness is a hidden but serious problem in cities worldwide. Urban loneliness is connected to population mobility, declining community participation and a growth in single-occupant households. This threatens the viability of our cities because it damages the social networks they rely on.
1d

Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Easy pets or fast dogs? The problem with labelling greyhoundsRacing greyhounds suffered around 5,000 injuries last year, and more than 900 were put down. As many as 257 animals were destroyed at the trackside, another 333 were killed due to the cost of treatment or a poor prognosis, and at least 348 were destroyed because they could not be rehomed.
1d

Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Why African farmers should balance pesticides with other control methodsInsect pests cause almost half of the crop losses in Africa. If the continent is to feed its growing population, farmers must find ways to control them. Pests account for high losses in other developing regions too.
1d

Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Innovative detectors quickly pinpoint radiation sourceInnovative "lighthouse" detectors that use a sweeping beam to quickly pinpoint a radiation source in seconds are reducing radiation exposure for workers and opening up new areas for robotic monitoring to avoid potential hazards.
1d

Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Fair sharing of water resources is key, says expertTo really do something about our massive overconsumption of water, we should limit the strain we put on rivers and freshwater basins. Information on the water use of our products should be transparent and clear. And in the end, individual citizens would have to change their lifestyle fundamentally. Taking shorter showers simply is not enough. Prof Arjen Hoekstra of the University of Twente, wrote
1d

EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Plants really do feed their friendsResearchers at the Department of Energy's Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory (Berkeley Lab) and UC Berkeley have discovered that as plants develop they craft their root microbiome, favoring microbes that consume very specific metabolites. Their study could help scientists identify ways to enhance the soil microbiome for improved carbon storage and plant productivity.
1d

EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Gene-based test for urine detects, monitors bladder cancerResearchers at The Johns Hopkins Kimmel Cancer Center have developed a test for urine, gathered during a routine procedure, to detect DNA mutations identified with urothelial cancers.
1d

EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Oral microbiome and anthropometry changes following caries arrest using silver-nitrate/fluoride-varnishAt the 47th Annual Meeting of the American Association for Dental Research (AADR), held in conjunction with the 42nd Annual Meeting of the Canadian Association for Dental Research (CADR), Hailey Taylor, University of California, San Francisco, presented an oral session titled 'Oral Microbiome and Anthropometry Changes Following Caries Arrest Using Silver-Nitrate/Fluoride-Varnish.' The AADR/CADR An
1d

EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Salivaomics: Saliva extracellular RNA (exRNA) and saliva proteome WikiThe 47th Annual Meeting of the American Association for Dental Research (AADR), held in conjunction with the 42nd Annual Meeting of the Canadian Association for Dental Research (CADR), featured a symposium titled 'Salivaomics: Saliva Extracellular RNA (exRNA) & Saliva Proteome Wiki.' The AADR/CADR Annual Meeting is in Fort Lauderdale, Fla., USA from March 21-24, 2018.
1d

Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Even in best-case emission scenarios, sea levels may still rise until 2300Scientists have long warned of rising sea levels as a major consequence of human-driven climate change, and the effects can already be seen today. Higher temperatures generated by our greenhouse gas (GHG) emissions are increasing the volume of ocean waters and melting mountain glaciers, ice caps and ice sheets. Even more daunting, the full impact of our current emissions will only be felt centurie
1d

Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Relativistic heavy ion collider begins 18th year of experimentsThe first smashups of two new types of particles at the Relativistic Heavy Ion Collider (RHIC)—a U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office of Science user facility for nuclear physics research at Brookhaven National Laboratory—will offer fresh insight into the effects of magnetism on the fireball of matter created in these collisions. Accomplishing this main goal of the 15-week run of RHIC's 18th yea
1d

Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Combining cutting-edge materials for more efficient, sensitive gaseous sensorsThe human nose can distinguish among a trillion different combinations of smells. Even so, there are plenty of gases that our noses can't detect at the level of sensitivity we need. That's where gaseous sensors come in. While some of the first sensors were animals – like canaries in coal mines – we've since replaced them with technologies that can detect miniscule amounts of chemicals in the air.
1d

Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Regulating Facebook won't prevent data breachesFacebook Data Cambridge AnalyticaAfter revelations that political consulting firm Cambridge Analytica allegedly appropriated Facebook user data to advise Donald Trump's 2016 U.S. presidential campaign, many are calling for greater regulation of social media networks, saying a "massive data breach" has occurred.
1d

Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Researchers pilot system using electrodialysis to produce safe drinking waterThe demand for cost-effective desalination is increasing with the growing population and the need for safe drinking water, driving continuous innovation in the sector. REvivED water, a pilot project led by FUJIFILM Manufacturing Europe B.V., is focusing on the potential of electrodialysis for desalination applications, both as stand-alone systems and in combination with established desalination te
1d

Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Nature provides the means for the sustainable management of floodsSoon, spring and the melting snow will yet again be visible as flooding around Finland. Although major floods caused by extreme weather phenomena are rare in the Nordic countries, floods cause financial loses even here each year. Climate change is expected to increase flooding in the future.
1d

Dagens Medicin

Ny vaccinationsteknik skal skåne allergikere for mange stikForskere fra Aarhus Universitetshospital tester effekten af at injicere allergivacciner direkte i lymfeknuderne i stedet for i underhuden. Håbet er, at det kan reducere antallet af indsprøjtninger markant.
1d

Dagens Medicin

Patienter kan få tilskud til medicinsk cannabisRegeringen og Dansk Folkeparti har indgået en aftale, der giver patienter op til 100 pct. i tilskud til medicinsk cannabis.
1d

The Atlantic

Trump's Embarrassing BlusterDonald Trump is an undignified lout who cannot master his own emotions enough to be anything better. The latest evidence of his unfitness for the office he holds came from his phone this morning: Crazy Joe Biden is trying to act like a tough guy. Actually, he is weak, both mentally and physically, and yet he threatens me, for the second time, with physical assault. He doesn’t know me, but he woul
1d

Live Science

Astronomer Announces He Has Discovered ... MarsIn an online publication, this astronomer reports the detection of a very bright object in the night sky that wasn't there before. Turns out, he's thousands of years late for this discovery.
1d

EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Pap test fluids used in gene-based screening test for two gyn cancersCervical fluid samples gathered during routine Papanicolaou (Pap) tests are the basis of a new screening test for endometrial and ovarian cancers developed by researchers at the Johns Hopkins Kimmel Cancer Center.
1d

EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Researchers identify compound to prevent breast cancer cells from activating in brainResearchers at Houston Methodist used computer modeling to find an existing investigational drug compound for leukemia patients to treat triple negative breast cancer once it spreads to the brain.
1d

EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Identifying the chemical forming carcinogens in recycled waterEngineers at wastewater recycling plants can rest easy knowing that their methods for minimizing the formation of a potent carcinogen are targeting the right chemical compound. USC Viterbi School of Engineering Assistant Professor Daniel McCurry, undergraduate student Meredith Huang and master's student Shiyang Huang have confirmed the chemical responsible for the formation of the carcinogen N-nit
1d

Futurity.org

Uganda rainfall study sheds light on baby brain swellingEven though many of the global climate models predict an increase in rainfall for Uganda, over the past 34 years, rainfall in the area has decreased by around 12 percent, according to new research. Rainfall levels in Uganda impact agriculture, food security, wildlife habitats, and regional economics as well as the prevalence of certain diseases. “We didn’t plan to study the climate,” says Steven
1d

New Scientist - News

The plan to suck huge amounts of drinkable water out of thin airThe finalists for the XPrize Water Abundance competition have been announced, where the challenge is to suck two tonnes of water out of the air a day
1d

Viden

Ofte bekymret? Så er du måske afhængig af sociale medierBestemte personlighedstræk kan have indflydelse på, om du bliver afhængig af sociale medier, viser ny undersøgelse.
1d

Latest Headlines | Science News

How oral vaccines could save Ethiopian wolves from extinctionA mass oral vaccination program in Ethiopian wolves could pave the way for other endangered species and help humans, too.
1d

NYT > Science

Wreck of the Juneau Is Found, 76 Years After 5 Brothers PerishedThe ship was torn apart by Japanese torpedoes during World War II. Hundreds of sailors died, including the five Sullivan brothers of Waterloo, Iowa.
1d

Feed: All Latest

*RuPaul's Drag Race*: How Drag Fueled Pop Culture's Slang Engine of the MomentFrom face-beating to "yas, queen"-ing, drag slang has crossed all the way over—but is its past getting lost?
1d

Futurity.org

Extra fiber with meals may boost insulin in type 2 diabetesA fiber supplement can help patients with type 2 diabetes increase their insulin secretion, even after a high-fat, high-carbohydrate meal, a small study shows. “Dietary fiber is known to reduce the incidence of diabetes and cardiovascular disease in large epidemiological studies,” says Paresh Dandona, professor and chief of the division of endocrinology in the Jacobs School of Medicine and Biomed
1d

Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

New theory to explain why planets in our solar system have different compositionsA team of researchers with the University of Copenhagen and the Museum für Naturkunde, Leibniz-Institut für Evolutions has come up with a new explanation regarding the difference in composition of the planets in our solar system. In their paper published in the journal Nature, they describe their study of the calcium-isotope composition of certain meteorites, Earth itself, and Mars, and use what t
1d

Dagens Medicin

Opråb fra det nære sundhedsvæsen: Vi har brug for en ambitiøs planI to år har det nære sundhedsvæsen ventet utålmodigt på Sundhedsministeriets store plan. Kravet om en ambitiøs plan med klart definerede politiske rammer kommer enstemmigt fra læger, sygeplejersker og administratorer.
1d

Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

The tradeoffs inherent in earthquake early warning systemsA team of researchers with the U.S. Geological Survey and the California Institute of Technology has found that modern earthquake early warning (EEW) systems require those interpreting their messages to take into consideration inherent tradeoffs. In their paper published on the open access site Science Advances, the group describes their study of EEW systems, what they found and offer suggestions
1d

Ingeniøren

Medie: Tysk godkendelse af Femern-forbindelsen udskudt endnu en gangDe danske myndigheder har længe forventet, at myndighederne i Slesvig-Holsten ville godkende Femern-forbindelsen til sommer. Men ifølge mediet Finans, har bygherreorganisationen Femern A/S afleveret de nødvendige dokumenter så sent, at godkendelsen nu først forventes i slutningen af året. Femern ...
1d

Live Science

Photos: WWII Battleship 'USS Juneau' DiscoveredWreckage from the USS Juneau was located off the Solomon Islands by the Research Vessel (R/V) Petrel. It is the final resting place of the five Sullivan brothers who served and died together.
1d

The Scientist RSS

Image of the Day: Infection ImagingA new technique could allow researchers to better understand bacteria-host interactions over the course of an infection.
1d

The Scientist RSS

Waning Protection from Vaccination Explains Rise in Mumps CasesA study finds that the vaccine's effects wear off as a person ages, suggesting a need for booster shots.
1d

The Scientist RSS

Neanderthal Genomes Hint at Speciess Population HistoryDNA analysis gives clues to how the ancient hominin's population split and how they interacted with modern humans.
1d

EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Attacking lymphoma at the sourceThe efficacy of target specific therapies in lymphoma is limited to subgroups of patients. EPFL scientists have identified a mechanism that confers resistance against a common therapy for lymphoma. They propose an alternative treatment that targets lymphoma signaling at its root, and show that it can be effective in a broader group of patients. The study is published in the journal Blood.
1d

EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Gut bacteria determine speed of tumor growth in pancreatic cancerThe population of bacteria in the pancreas increases more than a thousand fold in patients with pancreatic cancer, and becomes dominated by species that prevent the immune system from attacking tumor cells.
1d

Popular Science

New Zealand just took care of a $3.6 million mouse infestationEnvironment The million dollar mouse is dead. Long live the million dollar mouse. Compared to New Zealand, we are all terrible at getting rid of mice. They just totally eradicated the 200,000 or so rodents scurrying around the subantarctic Antipodes…
1d

Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Short-faced bears, largest carnivores in the Ice Age, became omnivores to surviveBased on the analysis of fossil teeth conducted by Alejandro Romero from the University of Alicante's Departament of Biotechnology, a study shows that short-faced bears (Arctodus simus), the largest carnivores in the Ice Age, became omnivores to survive. The study, led by the University of Málaga (UMA) researcher Borja Figueirido, was recently published in the journal Scientific Reports.
1d

The Atlantic

King Wanted More Than Just DesegregationEditor’s Note: Read The Atlantic ’s special coverage of Martin Luther King Jr.’s legacy. Image Above: The folk singer Joan Baez joins King in escorting children to their newly integrated school in Grenada, Mississippi, in 1966. A bout employment, housing, and the military—institutions central to Americans’ social life—Martin Luther King Jr. had plenty to say. But about schools and education, perh
1d

Dagens Medicin

Tranedans
1d

Feed: All Latest

As Pedestrian Deaths Spike, Scientists Scramble for AnswersResearchers do have a culprit in mind—that thing in your hand.
1d

Feed: All Latest

See the Bike Cyclist Lael Wilcox Uses to Ride 20,000 Miles a YearLael Wilcox pedals a distance nearly equal to a trip around the globe every 12 months.
1d

Feed: All Latest

Robot Microscopes Demystify Plankton, the Sea's Most Vital ResidentsResearchers are developing clever robots that use AI to examine and classify plankton, the pivotal organisms at the base of our oceanic food chain.
1d

Feed: All Latest

The "Yelp Effect" of Patient Surveys Is Making Us SickWIRED Columnist Maryn McKenna on how online patient surveys are driving doctors to overprescribe antibiotics and driving up the number of drug-resistant infections.
1d

Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Relativistic effects on long-range interactions between objectsA team led by researchers María José Caturla and Carlos Untiedt, from the University of Alicante Department of Applied Physics, have studied the importance of relativistic effects on long-range interactions between objects. They have published their results in two articles from the American Physical Society's flagship journal Physical Review Letters.
1d

Science-Based Medicine

PSA Screening for Prostate CancerPSA testing is controversial. A new study finds that PSA screening for prostate cancer offers no survival benefits.
1d

Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

US firms face tough legal battles in China IP theftIt took a crucial piece of evidence for Microsoft to win one of its numerous anti-piracy lawsuits in China: A computer seller telling an investigator that he could install a Windows 7 knock-off for free.
1d

Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Mars mission—Testing instruments in the Black ForestMeteorite impacts and geological formations: So far, exploration of Mars has focused on its surface. The "InSight" mission of NASA and European partners starting on May 5, 2018 will now concentrate on the "inner values" of the red planet: How big is its core? Is it liquid like the Earth's outer core or solid like the Earth's inner core? How thick is the crust? To study the structure of Mars, NASA,
1d

Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Britain says Facebook must go further in data scandalBritain's culture minister said Thursday that Facebook chief Mark Zuckerberg's plan to fix problems at the world's biggest social media network did not go far enough.
1d

Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Scientists control molecular alignment on a graphene surfaceA group of scientists at Nagoya University have developed a simple and powerful method to construct perfectly unidirectional molecular assembly structures on graphenes, according to a study reported in the journal Scientific Reports. Discovered accidentally during other research, the method relies on a common laboratory tool, atomic force microscopy (AFM), to control molecular alignment.
1d

Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Gaia status update—safe mode and recoveryLast month, ESA's Gaia satellite experienced a technical anomaly followed by a 'safe mode' event. After thorough examination, the spacecraft was successfully recovered and resumed normal scientific operations, while the mission team keeps investigating the exact cause of the anomaly.
1d

Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

The existential case for ditching Alexa and other AIAlexa's creepy laugh is far from the most worrying thing about her. This is despite the fact that Amazon's digital assistant – which allows users to access the internet and control personal organisation tools simply by speaking to the device – has been reported to spontaneously chuckle to herself. We shouldn't be too concerned about her going rogue and turning on us either – a Terminator-style tak
1d

Live Science

Here's Why Cockroaches Can Survive Just About AnythingTheir genes let them essentially eat insecticides for breakfast.
1d

Dagens Medicin

Bent Hansen: Der er brug for et skifte i sundhedspolitikkenBent Hansen (S) brugte sin sidste formandstale i Danske Regioner på at efterlyse et paradigmeskifte i sundhedspolitikken. Kommuner og regioner skal samarbejde tættere, visse opgaver skal regionerne helt overtage, og sammenhængen skal sikres, sagde han.
1d

Dagens Medicin

Regeringen roste regionerne – og takkede BentSiden regionerne blev etableret er sundhedsvæsenet blevet forbedret markant, sagde økonomi- og indenrigsminister Simon Emil Ammitzbøll-Bille (LA), da han leverede regeringens hilsen og tog afsked med Bent Hansen (S) ved Danske Regioners generalforsamling.
1d

Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Switching gears toward efficient datacenters with photonicsHow can we scale-up datacenters in such a way that they can handle more data at lower cost, while consuming less energy? At Eindhoven University of Technology, Ph.D. student Gonzalo Guelbenzu developed strategies to process the same amount of data at half the energy consumption, and taking up only one quarter of the space that is currently needed.
1d

Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

New foundation promotes soft skills for workers in IndiaTraining workers with soft skills like time and stress management, problem solving, communication and teamwork can have big impacts on the productivity of workers and company profits, says a University of Michigan researcher.
1d

Scientific American Content: Global

Long-term Gains: Pre-K Programs Lead to Furthered Education Later in LifeLargest study to date of publicly funded early education program shows a major, sustained educational boost -- Read more on ScientificAmerican.com
1d

Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Scientists study spawning salmon through a riverbed lensEach year on the United Nations-designated World Water Day, March 22, people around the world consider the importance of fresh water to ecosystems and to us. On World Water Day 2018, the National Science Foundation (NSF) looks at Earth's critical zone—the realm on our planet's surface between the forest canopy and bedrock—and the role North America's West Coast rivers play in sustaining spawning s
1d

Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Amount of plastics in the environment set to riseA leading Heriot-Watt academic has issued a statement on the news that the amount of plastic in the ocean is set to treble in a decade unless litter is curbed.
1d

Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Hurricane Harvey's toxic impact deeper than public toldA toxic onslaught from the nation's petrochemical hub was largely overshadowed by the record-shattering deluge of Hurricane Harvey as residents and first responders struggled to save lives and property.
1d

Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Researchers discover new accuracies in cancer-fighting, nano drug deliveryA promising discovery for advanced cancer therapy reveals that the efficiency of drug delivery in DNA nanostructures depends on their shapes, say researchers at Missouri University of Science and Technology and the University of Kansas in a scientific paper published today.
1d

Science : NPR

New Zealand Eradicates Invasive Mice From Antipodes IslandsIn 2013, the government began a program to get rid the rodents from the subantarctic island, which is a World Heritage Site that is home to dozens of unique and endangered species. (Image credit: Wikimedia Commons)
1d

Ingeniøren

Nyt Kattegat-regnestykke bygger på misvisende talDen 58 milliarder kroner dyre broforbindelse over Kattegat kan tilbagebetales af bilisterne på 32 år, hvis prisen for at krydse Storebælt altså forbliver uændret. Men regeringen har i fire måneder vidst, at prisen falder med 25 procent om få år.
1d

EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Scientists develop tiny tooth-mounted sensors that can track what you eatA team of engineers have developed miniaturized sensors that, when mounted directly on a tooth and communicating wirelessly with a mobile device, can transmit information on glucose, salt and alcohol intake. Researchers note that future adaptations of these sensors could enable the detection and recording of a wide range of nutrients, chemicals and physiological states.
1d

Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Keeping a healthy perspective on social mediaSocial media can be a place to keep up with friends, make plans or hear about events. At the same time, it can be a bombardment of news and information, which may get stressful. Navigating social media use is all about keeping things in perspective. So how do we do that?
1d

Ingeniøren

KL-rapport skamroser Cambridge AnalyticaKommunernes Landsforening roser de udskældte Cambridge Analytica i en rapport, der har kostet 730.000 skattekroner. Rapporten er i forvejen problematisk, da den på intet tidspunkt forholder sig til etik omkring dataindsamling eller -brug.
1d

The Atlantic

Pacific Rim Uprising: It's Robots vs. Monsters, AgainLet us consider the giant, person-shaped robot. Call them mechas , or zords , or evangelions , or, in the case of the Pacific Rim movie series, Jaegers: skyscraper-sized, sometimes nuclear-powered metal humanoids usually tasked with fighting something else that’s very big. What is it that appeals about such an impractical contraption, which can barely throw a punch in a crowded city without takin
1d

The Atlantic

The Third Education RevolutionWhen the giant Indian technology-services firm Infosys announced last November that it would open a design and innovation hub in Providence, the company’s president said one of the key reasons he chose Rhode Island was its strong network of higher-education institutions: Brown University, the Rhode Island School of Design, and the Community College of Rhode Island. In a higher-education system th
1d

Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Synthetic carbohydrate wards off pneumococcal infectionsMore effective vaccines against certain forms of pneumonia and meningitis could soon be available. A team of scientists at the Max Planck Institute of Colloids and Interfaces in Potsdam has identified a synthetic carbohydrate that provides extremely effective protection for animal models – at least – against a particularly dangerous strain of pneumoccoci bacteria, which doctors refer to as serotyp
1d

Feed: All Latest

Shatter, Batter, Wax: How Cannabis Extracts Come to BeIt's sticky, it's icky, it's cannabis-derived oleoresin!
1d

Feed: All Latest

Where Could Bitcoin Succeed as a Currency? In a Failed StateFaced with runaway inflation and a weak national currency, Venezuelans are turning to cryptocurrencies to store savings and conduct some transactions.
1d

Feed: All Latest

Tesla Model 3 Review: The Best Electric Car You Can't BuyElon Musk TeslaElon Musk's car for the masses lives up to the hype. Now he just has to build the thing.
1d

Live Science

Why #OddlySatisfying Videos Are So … SatisfyingWhy people love videos of slime, sand, factory equipment and cake decorating.
1d

Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Image: Bolivian deforestationMarking the International Day of Forests, this Copernicus Sentinel-2 image shows an area of Bolivia that was once covered by trees but has now been cleared for resettlement schemes and agriculture.
1d

Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Electric textile lights a lamp when stretchedResearchers at Chalmers University of Technology have developed a fabric that converts kinetic energy into electric power. The greater the load applied to the textile and the wetter it becomes, the more electricity it generates. The results are now published in Flexible Electronics.
1d

Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

A versatile, integrated workflow for interaction proteomicsProteins do not function in isolation, and their interactions with other proteins define their cellular functions. Therefore, detailed understanding of protein-protein interactions (PPIs) is the key for deciphering regulation of cellular networks and pathways. These complex networks of stable and transient associations can be studied by affinity purification mass spectrometry (AP-MS) and complemen
1d

Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Ships in the English Channel have highest rate of sulphur violations in northern EuropeResearchers at Chalmers University of Technology have shown that between 87 and 98 percent of ships comply with the tougher regulations for sulphur emissions that were introduced in northern Europe in 2015. The lowest levels of compliance were observed in the western part of the English Channel and in the middle of the Baltic Sea.
1d

Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Mystery of superior Leeuwenhoek microscope solved after 350 yearsResearchers from TU Delft and Rijksmuseum Boerhaave have solved an age-old mystery surrounding Antonie van Leeuwenhoek's microscopes. A unique collaboration at the interface between culture and science has proved conclusively that the linen trader and amateur scholar from Delft ground and used his own thin lenses.
1d

Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Design approach developed for new catalysts for energy conversion and storageNorthwestern University researchers have discovered a new approach for creating important new catalysts to aid in clean energy conversion and storage. The design method also has the potential to impact the discovery of new optical and data storage materials, catalysts that impact pharmaceutical synthesis and catalysts that allow for higher efficiency processing of petroleum products at much lower
1d

Scientific American Content: Global

We Need to Talk More about Physician BurnoutAddressing it might call for the foundation of a new culture in medicine that allows for the space, connection and inspiration required for all clinicians to be healers -- Read more on ScientificAmerican.com
1d

Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Inbred organisms are more likely to develop tumoursInbreeding could lead to increased rates of cancer, putting both humans and endangered animals at risk according to a review led by researchers at Deakin University's Centre for Integrative Ecology.
1d

Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Custom sequences for polymers using visible lightResearchers from Tokyo Metropolitan University used a light-sensitive iridium-palladium catalyst to make "sequential" polymers, using visible light to change how building blocks are combined into polymer chains. By simply switching the light on or off, they were able to realize different compositions along the polymer chain, allowing precise control over physical properties and material function.
1d

Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

The environment determines Caribbean hummingbirds' vulnerabilityHummingbird specialization and vulnerability are often predicted based on physical traits. Scientists have now found that this is not the case for hummingbirds on the Caribbean islands. Instead, the bird's environment is the determining factor. The new study was led by scientists from Center for Macroecology, Evolution and Climate, University of Copenhagen, and published today in the scientific jo
1d

Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Evidence for a giant flood in the central Mediterranean SeaMarine scientists have uncovered evidence of one of the largest floods in Earth's history in the central Mediterranean seafloor. The flood, known as the Zanclean flood, is thought to have ended the Messinian Salinity Crisis (MSC), a period during which the Mediterranean Sea became partially dried up. Due to shrinkage of its connection with the Atlantic Ocean, the Mediterranean Sea was transformed
1d

Ingeniøren

Partier mørklægger brug af Facebook-data om vælgerePartierne på Christiansborg nægter at løfte sløret for, om de bruger omdiskuterede Facebook-data. Ifølge politiske konsulenter bruger alle danske partier ellers disse data til at påvirke vælgerne.
1d

New Scientist - News

Space ‘disco ball’ satellite just fell back down to EarthThe Humanity Star, an orbiting geodesic sphere that reflects sunlight, was expected to circle earth until September but it came down early
1d

Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

A potential drug target against a large family of parasites is identifiedApicomplexa form one of the largest and most diverse groups of obligate intracellular parasites, capable of infecting almost every kind of animal. It is estimated that between 1.2 and 10 million species exist, but only about 5,000-6,000 have been identified to date. These include Plasmodium, which that causes malaria and about 440,000 deaths every year, Toxoplasma, which causes congenital disease
1d

Scientific American Content: Global

Looking for Planet Nine, Astronomers Gaze into the AbyssTwo years on, the search for our solar system’s missing world is as frenzied as ever—and the putative planet is running out of places to hide -- Read more on ScientificAmerican.com
1d

Ingeniøren

Lockout kan skade dansk rumfart mange år fremDele af DTU Space har bedt om at blive undtaget fra en konflikt i april, fordi det vil kunne ramme tre uhyre vigtige rumfartsmissioner og ødelægge instituttets gode kontakt med Nasa.
1d

Dagens Medicin

Danmark er europamester i ambulant behandlingDanmark ligger i toppen i forhold til resten af Europa, når det gælder ambulant behandling. Det viser nye tal udarbejdet af OECD.
1d

EurekAlert! - Breaking News

In field tests, device harvests water from desert airYou really can extract clean drinking water right from the air, even in the driest of deserts, MIT researchers have found. They've demonstrated a real-world version of a water-harvesting system based on metal organic frameworks, or MOFs, that they first described last year.
1d

EurekAlert! - Breaking News

An integrated workflow for interaction proteomics -- as versatile as the Swiss Army KnifeResearchers of the University of Helsinki, Finland, developed an integrated workflow for interaction proteomics, which -- as they describe it -- proves almost as versatile as the Swiss Army Knife.
1d

EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Golden touch: Next-gen optical disk to solve data storage challengeScientists from Australia and China have drawn on the durable power of gold to demonstrate a new type of high-capacity optical disk that can hold data securely for more than 600 years. The technology could offer a more cost-efficient and sustainable solution to the global data storage problem while enabling the critical pivot from Big Data to Long Data, opening up new realms of scientific discover
1d

EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Early numeracy performance of young kids linked to specific math activities at homeNew research finds links between certain math skills in young children and specific numerical activities undertaken at home with parents. The study also finds that the more parents engage in mathematical activities with their children, the higher their early numeracy performance.
1d

EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Electric textile lights a lamp when stretchedWorking up a sweat from carrying a heavy load? That is when the textile works at its best. Swedish researchers have developed a fabric that converts kinetic energy into electric power. The greater the load applied to the textile and the wetter it becomes the more electricity it generates. The results are now published in the Nature Partner journal Flexible Electronics.
1d

Feed: All Latest

How a Controversial New Sex-Trafficking Law Will Change the WebA bill that would amend a bedrock internet law in the name of curbing online sex trafficking is headed to President Trump after Senate approval Wednesday.
1d

The Atlantic

Has Trump Already Sealed the GOP's Fate in 2018?Every time Donald Trump breaks a window, congressional Republicans obediently sweep up the glass. That’s become one of the most predictable patterns of his turbulent presidency—and a defining dynamic of the approaching midterm elections. Each time they overtly defend his behavior, or implicitly excuse him by failing to object, they bind themselves to him more tightly. It happened again last weeke
1d

The Atlantic

The Blesser's CurseVULINDLELA, South Africa—Mbali N. was just 17 when a well-dressed man in his 30s spotted her. She was at a mall in a nearby town, alone, when he called out. He might have been captivated by her almond eyes and soaring cheekbones. Or he might have just seen her for what she was: young and poor. She tried to ignore him, she told me, but he followed her. They exchanged numbers. By the time she got h
1d

Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Golden touch: Next-gen optical disk to solve data storage challengeScientists from Australia and China have drawn on the durable power of gold to demonstrate a new type of high-capacity optical disk that can hold data securely for more than 600 years.
1d

Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

In field tests, device harvests water from desert airIt seems like getting something for nothing, but you really can get drinkable water right out of the driest of desert air.
1d

Ingeniøren

Video af Uber-ulykke rejser spørgsmålSøndag blev en kvinde det første offer for selvkørende biler, men politiet sagde hurtigt, at bilens video viser, at ulykken havde været umulig at undgå. Nu har politiet frigivet videoen.
1d

Dagens Medicin

Bent Hansen: Regeringen må til lommerneDen afgående regionsformands sidste tale til generalforsamlingen
1d

BBC News - Science & Environment

Anger over Sheffield's plan to fell healthy treesSheffield City Council's plan to fell thousands of healthy trees prompts angry protests.
1d

Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Facebook, Google warn Singapore against 'fake news' lawInternet giants Facebook and Google on Thursday warned Singapore against introducing new laws to combat "fake news", saying that existing legislation is adequate to address the problem.
1d

Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Flood protection is everyone's responsibilityThe complex interactions between floods and society are currently being investigated at TU Wien. The economy needs the central government to organise flood protection. Humans have an impact on water sources through dams, regulations and agriculture. And the risk of flooding affects society and economic decisions. The complicated interplay of these factors is being investigated at TU Wien.
1d

Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Theory of non-orthogonalization and spatial localization for convection-allowing ensemble forecastConvection-allowing ensemble forecasting has significant research and application value, and the initial perturbation generation method plays an important role in the improvement of its accuracy. Recently, a research group led by Chaohui Chen from National University of Defense Technology proposed a new method to generate initial perturbation with full consideration of the strong locality of a con
1d

Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Blue holes bring forgotten chemical element back on stageAbout a third of all Swiss exports result from fundamental discoveries in synthetic chemistry. Certain drugs and perfumes, as well as food and agricultural products—and even Ferrari's famous red colour—are derived from new molecular structures invented by Swiss scientists. Chemists at the University of Geneva (UNIGE), Switzerland, have just discovered that chemical bonds based on antimony, a forgo
1d

EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Antioxidants and amino acids could play role in the treatment of psychosisA scientific paper has revealed that some nutrients found in food may help reduce the symptoms of psychotic illness, when used in the early stages of treatment.The systematic review, led by Dr Firth, honorary Research Fellow at The University of Manchester and Research Fellow at NICM Health Research Institute, Western Sydney University an examined if nutrient supplementation could provide effectiv
1d

EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Whether sustained or sporadic, exercise offers same reductions in death riskDespite confusing messages, new data shows all moderate or vigorous activity -- even when done in short bursts throughout the day -- can reduce Americans' risk of disease and death, according to research appearing in the Journal of the American Heart Association.
1d

EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Hip hop music teaches children, parents to recognize stroke and act quicklyThe 'Hip Hop Stroke' initiative uses hip hop music lyrics to effectively educate economically-disadvantaged, minority children and parents about stroke.
1d

Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Digital innovation can enhance cultural heritage, hears conferenceDigitalisation has a role to play in the conservation and promotion of modern-day cultural heritage but should enhance real-life experiences, rather than replace them, experts say.
1d

Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

World's carbon emissions on the rise again: IEAHarmful carbon emissions from energy rose in 2017 for the first time in three years, the International Energy Agency said Thursday, proof that the world's efforts to fight climate change are falling short.
1d

BBC News - Science & Environment

Curiosity rover: 2,000 days on MarsThe Nasa robot this week celebrates 2,000 martian days investigating the surface of the Red Planet.
1d

Dagens Medicin

Dette bør I se på, nye regionsmedlemmerLæsernes dom er ganske tydelig. Sundheden er plaget af manglende ressourcer, både i form af penge og personale. Det påvirker tydelig trivslen blandt de ansatte.
1d

Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Indonesia women face daily swim for clean waterIndonesian villager Mama Hasria swims upstream with about 200 empty jerry cans tied to her back, a daily trip she and other local women make to get clean water for their community on Sulawesi island.
1d

Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Commonwealth Games abandons data mining after Facebook scandalFacebook Data Cambridge AnalyticaA plan to mine data from Commonwealth Games visitors who use free and fast wifi in Australia was abandoned Thursday as a privacy scandal swirls around social media giant Facebook.
1d

Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Invasive beetle threatens Japan's famed cherry blossomsAcross Japan's capital, delicate pink and white cherry blossoms are emerging, but the famed blooms are facing a potentially mortal enemy, experts say: an invasive foreign beetle.
1d

Ingeniøren

Arbejdspres er hovedskurken bag stressHalvdelen af alle højtuddannede på det danske arbejdsmarked føler sig stressede, viser ny AC-undersøgelse. Ansvaret skal flyttes fra den enkelte medarbejder til arbejdsgiverne, mener IDA.
1d

Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

YouTube follows Amazon into movie theatersYouTube has announced it is making a movie in-house to be released in theaters, in a development seen as a step towards the model of new-media innovator Amazon.
1d

Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Toyota suspends self-driving car tests after Uber deathJapanese automaker Toyota said Thursday it was suspending tests of its self-driving cars so staff could "emotionally process" after an autonomous Uber car killed a pedestrian in an accident.
1d

Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Hong Kong shops defy ban on trade in pangolin scalesOn a winding Hong Kong street where shops keep a dizzying array of dried produce, one highly valued ingredient is still being sold despite being subject to an international ban: deep-fried scales of endangered pangolins.
1d

Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

EU: new rules will make data breaches 'very expensive' for firmsEU justice commissioner Vera Jourova warned Wednesday that data protection scandals such as that currently engulfing Facebook would become "very expensive" for companies from May under new EU regulations.
1d

Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

30 treated for gas exposure as Indonesia volcano belchesThirty people were treated for sulfur gas poisoning after Mount Ijen in eastern Java belched toxic fumes from its crater, Indonesia's disaster agency said Thursday.
1d

Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Deadly crash raises questions about Uber self-driving systemVideo of a deadly self-driving vehicle crash in suburban Phoenix shows a pedestrian walking from a darkened area onto a street just moments before an Uber SUV strikes her.
1d

Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Sea lions gobbling fragile fish in US Northwest survival warThe 700-pound sea lion blinked in the sun, sniffed the sea air and then lazily shifted to the edge of the truck bed and plopped onto the beach below.
1d

Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Army's brain-like computers moving closer to cracking codesU.S. Army Research Laboratory scientists have discovered a way to leverage emerging brain-like computer architectures for an age-old number-theoretic problem known as integer factorization.
1d

Viden

Zuckerberg: Ja, vi har begået fejlFacebooks chef, Mark Zuckerberg, indrømmer, at der er blevet begået fejl i sag om dataudnyttelse.
1d

Viden

Cambridge Analytica har ledere fra hele verden som kunderVirksomheden, der er anklaget for ulovligt at bruge personlig data fra Facebook, har en bredt internationalt portfolio.
1d

Viden

Data-skandale spreder sig til KenyaOppositionen i Kenya vil til bunds i Cambridge Analyticas indblandingen i landets præsidentvalg.
1d

Viden

Cambridge Analytica-chef suspenderetDirektør for analysefirma, der er under anklage for misbrug af Facebook, er suspenderet efter brud på interne regler.
1d

Viden

Facebook-misbrug: Sådan kan onlineværktøj afsløre din personlighedMetoder brugt i Facebook skandale er inspireret af forskning fra Cambridge University. Onlineværktøj kan aflure din personlighed ved brug af dine likes.
1d

Viden

Hvad er Cambridge Analytica? - 'datajægerne', der er under anklage for misbrug af FacebookCambridge Analytica er centrum i en sag om misbrug af personlig data, Facebook og præsidentvalg i USA.
1d

Viden

Whistleblower: Selskab stjæler 50 millioner profiler på Facebook for at hjælpe TrumpFacebook er ramt af det hidtil største datatyveri. Delstatsmyndighed har indledt en efterforskning af sagen.
1d

Ingeniøren

Blå blok vil bygge Kattegat-broer uden tog: Bilisterne kan betale dem på 32 år58 milliarder kroner vil det ifølge den første overslagsberegning fra Vejdirektoratet koste at bygge to broer på hhv. 19 og 20 km fra Røsnæs på Sjælland til Hov i Jylland samt ekstra motorveje over Samsø og til Kalundborg.
1d

Science | The Guardian

One in 10 people have class A drugs on their fingertips, study saysTraces of cocaine or heroin were found on 13% of people who said they did not take the drugs More than one in 10 people who have never used class A drugs may have traces of cocaine or heroin on their fingertips, forensic scientists say. Researchers found tiny amounts of the illegal substances on 13% of volunteers who took part in a study after declaring they did not take the drugs. Continue readi
1d

Ingeniøren

Dansk firma finder to nye sårbarheder i IBM NotesI dag offentliggør det danske sikkerhedsfirma Improsec to nye sårbarheder i IBM Notes. Sårbarhederne gjorde det muligt at opnå fuld kontrol over maskinerne, der benyttede softwaren.
1d

Ingeniøren

‘Arrogant’ sagde overlæge, da chef for Sundhedsplatformen fremlagde resultaterDårlig stemning på Dansk IT’s konference om offentlig it, frembragt af overlæge fra region, der ikke er berørt af Epic-system.
1d

Viden

Fjerne exoplaneter har vand - men alt for meget af detEt solsystem med jordlignende planeter har formentlig vand på overfladen. Men nye beregninger viser, at der måske er så meget vand, at liv ikke kan eksistere.
1d

EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Antibiotics often inappropriately prescribed for hospitalized kids, global study suggestsNearly a third of all antibiotics prescribed for hospitalized children globally were intended to prevent potential infections rather than to treat disease, according to the results of a worldwide survey published in the Journal of the Pediatric Infectious Diseases Society.
1d

EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Three-in-one molecule shows promise in helping certain breast cancer patientsA newly designed three-part molecule could be the one answer patients with a certain form of breast cancer are looking for, scientists report.This chimera, created by a team at the Georgia Cancer Center, has the ability to simultaneously decrease the expression of three growth factors that are over-expressed in some cancers.
1d

EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Ships in the English Channel have highest rate of sulphur violations in northern EuropeResearchers at Chalmers University of Technology have shown that between 87 and 98 percent of ships comply with the tougher regulations for sulphur emissions that were introduced in northern Europe in 2015. The lowest levels of compliance were observed in the western part of the English Channel and in the middle of the Baltic Sea.
1d

EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Custom sequences for polymers using visible lightResearchers from Tokyo Metropolitan University used a light-sensitive iridium-palladium catalyst to make 'sequential' polymers, using visible light to change how different building blocks are combined into polymer chains. By simply switching the light on or off, they were able to realize different compositions along the polymer chain, allowing precision control over physical properties and materia
1d

EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Millions of Americans seek and find illicit marijuana onlineResearchers found marijuana shopping searches nearly tripled in the United States from 2005 to 2017, peaking between 1.4 and 2.4 million searches each month. Mail-order marijuana retailers occupied half of the first-page results, and three out of every four searches resulted in a mail-order marijuana retailer as the very first suggested link.
1d

EurekAlert! - Breaking News

One in 10 people have traces of cocaine or heroin on their fingerprintsScientists have found that drugs are now so prevalent that 13 percent of those taking part in a test were found to have traces of class A drugs on their fingerprints -- despite never using them.
1d

EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Bacteria may promote pancreatic cancer by suppressing the immune systemBacterial load was significantly higher in pancreatic tumor samples from patients with pancreatic ductal adenocarcinoma compared with pancreatic tissue from normal individuals, and in studies using mice, eliminating certain 'bad' bacteria slowed the growth of pancreatic cancer, reversed immune suppression, and upregulated the immune checkpoint protein PD1.
1d

Ingeniøren

Energinet: Vi har ikke et sikkert sted til it-beredskabsplanerDen danske energisektor risikerer at blive mere sårbar end sikker, når Energinet kræver at få tilsendt komplette it-beredskabsplaner for 62 el- og gasselskaber. Sådan lyder kritikken fra Dansk Energi.
1d

Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

One in ten people have traces of cocaine or heroin on their fingerprintsScientists have found that drugs are now so prevalent that 13 per cent of those taking part in a test were found to have traces of class A drugs on their fingerprints - despite never using them.
1d

New on MIT Technology Review

How the AI cloud could produce the richest companies everAmazon, Google, and Microsoft all want to dominate the business of providing artificial-intelligence services through cloud computing. The winner may have the OS of the future.
1d

Feed: All Latest

What Would Regulating Facebook Look Like?In an interview with WIRED, Mark Zuckerberg seemed to accept the idea of some US regulation. Other countries could provide the blueprint.
1d

Feed: All Latest

Mark Zuckerberg's Cambridge Analytica Interviews Ignore the Big QuestionsFacebook's CEO addresses the Cambridge Analytica mess, but avoids the bigger questions.
1d

BBC News - Science & Environment

'Radical change' needed on countrysideThe UK government is failing rural communities and the natural environment, a report says.
1d

Feed: All Latest

Mark Zuckerberg Q&A: The Facebook CEO Talks Cambridge Analytica, the Company’s Problems, and Big DataFacebook CEO Mark Zuckerberg talks with WIRED Editor-in-Chief Nicholas Thompson about Cambridge Analytica's use of Facebook data and the company's response.
1d

Feed: All Latest

In San Francisco’s Big Oil lawsuit, Climate Science Gets a Day in CourtSan Francisco and Oakland are suing oil companies for money to protect against sea level rise.
1d

Feed: All Latest

Uber Video Shows the Kind of Crash Self-Driving Cars Are Made to AvoidAnd that the human safety driver was looking away from the road in the seconds leading up to the fatal impact.
2d

EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Flu and pneumonia infections increase risk of having a heart attack and strokePeople who have had flu or pneumonia may be six times more likely to suffer from a heart attack or stroke in the days after infection, according to new research published in the European Respiratory Journal.
2d

EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Certain diabetes drugs may be linked to increased risk of inflammatory bowel diseaseUse of certain diabetes drugs, known as dipeptidyl peptidase-4 inhibitors, is associated with an increased risk of inflammatory bowel disease, the digestive condition that causes stomach pain and bloating, finds a study published by The BMJ today.
2d

EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Tai chi as good as or better than aerobic exercise for managing chronic painThe ancient martial art of tai chi has similar or greater benefits than aerobic exercise for people with the chronic pain condition fibromyalgia, finds a trial published by The BMJ today.
2d

Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

Administering antibiotics through the corneaResearchers have developed ocular inserts which allow a patient's cornea to absorb more antibiotics than current methods.
2d

Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

Brain-like computers moving closer to cracking codesScientists have discovered a way to leverage emerging brain-like computer architectures for an age-old number-theoretic problem known as integer factorization.
2d

Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

How often do medical problems lead to bankruptcy?A team of researchers has found that medical expenses account for roughly 4 percent of bankruptcy filings among nonelderly adults in the U.S.
2d

Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

Mat baits, hooks and destroys pollutants in waterA polymer mat has the ability to fish biologically harmful contaminants from water through a strategy known as 'bait, hook and destroy.'
2d

EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Model created to help life insurers calculate breast cancer survivors' risk of deathAs early detection and treatment of breast cancer improves, more and more women are surviving the disease. However, they still face challenges, which include determining the moment when it might be reasonable to state they are 'cured' of the disease, and obtaining life insurance. At the European Breast Cancer Conference Dutch researchers describe how they have created a model to help life insurers
2d

EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Average size of breast tumors decreased following introduction of screening but is now increasingThe average size of breast cancers at diagnosis decreased dramatically in the 1980s and 1990s following the introduction of screening, according to research presented at the 11th European Breast Cancer Conference.
2d

NYT > Science

AIDS Researcher Robert R. Redfield Named to Lead the C.D.C.Dr. Redfield, a Baltimore AIDS researcher and advocate for medication-assisted therapies to treat addiction, will take over the public health agency.
2d

NYT > Science

More Cases Are Reported of Unusual Cancer Linked to Breast ImplantsWomen with breast implants have an increased risk of a type of lymphoma that can usually be cured by surgery alone — but not always.
2d

Futurity.org

Did scientists accidentally push ‘science in crisis’ story?The available evidence doesn’t justify the media’s generalizations about a crisis in science, argues a new essay. One of the recurring media narratives about the nature of science today is that it is “broken” or “in crisis.” Some stories about the failure to reproduce study results or the rising retraction rate or incidents of scientific fraud have also involved assertions about a “systemic crisi
2d

Live Science

Are People Actually Smoking Bug-Spray-Laced Drugs? Either Way, It's a Bad Idea.Street drugs in Indianapolis may be laced with an unusual ingredient: household bug spray, according to news reports.
2d

The Atlantic

The Atlantic Daily: A Particular Mix of PressuresWhat We’re Following Border Blues: A senior White House official and two senior House Republican aides told The Atlantic that President Trump is threatening to veto a $1.3 trillion government spending bill over border-wall funding measures. Read Elaina Plott’s report. Although the president looked at eight prototypes for the wall during his recent visit to California, construction of his key camp
2d

The Atlantic

Why Are There Suddenly So Many Nor'Easters?Wednesday is the first full day of spring in the Northern Hemisphere, but you wouldn’t know it on the U.S. East Coast. A huge, ponderous snowstorm is lurching its way up the Atlantic seaboard, dumping snow from Washington to Boston. More than two inches per hour are falling in some places. At Washington’s Reagan National Airport, it hasn’t snowed this much, this late in the season, in more than 5
2d

Futurity.org

How COPD pathogen thrives in hostile surroundingsNew research offers new insights into how the most harmful pathogen in chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) lives and adapts to its hosts. The research, published in the Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences , tracks the pathogen over months and even years. “By helping us understand how this pathogen survives in a hostile environment in human airways, this research is helping us
2d

Science : NPR

Research Misconduct Allegations Shadow New CDC DirectorCritics say the Trump administration failed to properly vet Dr. Robert Redfield. Sen. Patty Murray says a past research controversy suggests a "pattern of ethically and morally questionable behavior." (Image credit: Craig Barritt/Getty Images for Aid for Aids/Getty Images)
2d

New on MIT Technology Review

Google lends its machine-learning tool to fight deforestation
2d

The Atlantic

Zuckerberg Offers the Bare Minimum on the Cambridge Analytica MessFacebook Data Cambridge AnalyticaTwo years and four months after Facebook found out that Cambridge Analytica might have illicitly pulled user data from its platform, and five days after the latest round of stories about the political consultancy’s electioneering, Mark Zuckerberg finally made a statement about the situation. Despite Facebook previously contesting that it was a “data breach,” Zuckerberg offered up the exact soluti
2d

Popular Science

Good news: these exoplanets probably have water. Bad news: AHHH SO MUCH WATER.Space You can get too wet for life. But after so many years of looking for signs of water on other worlds, how could there possibly be a place where there’s too much water for life? Let’s take a look.
2d

New on MIT Technology Review

Mark Zuckerberg (finally) admits huge data scandal is “a breach of trust” between Facebook and its usersFacebook Mark Zuckerberg
2d

Vil du være med til at finde de mest interessante nyheder? Send email herom til BioNyt

Se nyheder fra en tidligere dato

Tegn abonnement på

BioNyt Videnskabens Verden (www.bionyt.dk) er Danmarks ældste populærvidenskabelige tidsskrift for naturvidenskab. Det er det eneste blad af sin art i Danmark, som er helliget international forskning inden for livsvidenskaberne.

Bladet bringer aktuelle, spændende forskningsnyheder inden for biologi, medicin og andre naturvidenskabelige områder som f.eks. klimaændringer, nanoteknologi, partikelfysik, astronomi, seksualitet, biologiske våben, ecstasy, evolutionsbiologi, kloning, fedme, søvnforskning, muligheden for liv på mars, influenzaepidemier, livets opståen osv.

Artiklerne roses for at gøre vanskeligt stof forståeligt, uden at den videnskabelige holdbarhed tabes.