Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

More than 2,500 cancer cases a week could be avoidedMore than 135,500 cases of cancer a year in the UK could be prevented through lifestyle changes, according to new figures.
9h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Brain development disorders in children linked to common environmental toxin exposuresExposures of pregnant women and children to common thyroid-hormone-disrupting toxins may be linked to the increased incidence of brain development disorders, according to a review published in Endocrine Connections. The review describes how numerous, common chemicals can interfere with normal thyroid hormone actions, which are essential for normal brain development in fetuses and young children, a
30min
The Neurocritic

25 Years of Cognitive Neuroscience in BostonThe 25th Annual Meeting of the Cognitive Neuroscience Society starts off with a big bang on Saturday afternoon with the Big Theory versus Big Data Debate, moderated by David Poeppel . 1 Big Theory versus Big Data: What Will Solve the Big Problems in Cognitive Neuroscience? My non-commital answers are: (1) Both. (2) It depends. (on what you want to do: predict behavior 2 (or some mental state), ex
47min

LATEST

Science | The Guardian

Inside the secret life of the teenage brain – Science Weekly podcastHannah Devlin speaks to neuroscientist Prof Sarah-Jayne Blakemore about her groundbreaking research into the adolescent brain Subscribe and review on Acast , Apple Podcasts , Soundcloud , Audioboom and Mixcloud . Join the discussion on Facebook and Twitter Your teenage years may have faded to a distant or hazy memory, or perhaps you’re in the thick of adolescence right now. Wherever you are on li
1h
BBC News - Science & Environment

Hamelin Bay: Nearly 150 beached whales die in AustraliaRescuers manage to return just six surviving pilot whales to deeper waters in Western Australia.
1h
Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

Study suggests method to boost growth of blood vessels and muscleResearchers have reversed age-related endurance loss in mice by treating them with a compound that promotes new blood vessel growth. Their study found the compound, which reactivates longevity-linked sirutin proteins, promotes blood vessel and muscle growth, boosting endurance of elderly mice by up to 80 percent.
1h
Latest Headlines | Science News

New spending bill mostly boosts money for science researchHere’s a quick look at how science agencies fared in the newly passed spending package.
2h
Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

Law of particle dynamics of granular gases: Increasing temps in cooling systemsFor the first time, scientists have demonstrated that the kinetic energy from particles in granular gases such as dust clouds can rise temporarily even though energy is constantly being drawn out of the system. Their research adds further detail to Haff's law (devised 35 years ago), which states that the granular temperature in closed systems continually decreases.
2h
Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

First proof a synthesized antibiotic is capable of treating superbugsA 'game changing' new antibiotic which is capable of killing superbugs has been successfully synthesized and used to treat an infection for the first time -- and could lead to the first new class of antibiotic drug in 30 years.
2h
Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

Higher-dose RT lowers risk of recurrence but does not improve survival for men with prostate cancerHigh-dose radiotherapy did not improve survival for men with intermediate-risk prostate cancer but did improve biochemical control and rates of distant metastases, when compared to standard radiotherapy. Men who received higher-dose radiotherapy underwent fewer salvage therapies to control tumors that had grown larger or had spread to another body site; however, they also experienced more side eff
2h
Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

Is knee pain linked to depression?According to researchers, knee osteoarthritis affects some 55 percent of people over age 40 in Japan. A research team recently published a study examining the effects of knee pain on depression since, until now, few studies have focused on how knee pain and impaired knee function relate to depression.
2h
Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

Older adults who have slower walking speeds may have increased risk for dementiaBecause there's currently no cure for dementia, it's important to know about risk factors that may lead to developing it. For example, researchers have learned that older adults with slower walking speeds seem to have a greater risk than those with faster walking speeds. Recently, researchers have learned more about changes in walking speed, changes in the ability to think and make decisions, and
2h
The Atlantic

The Atlantic Daily: The Wider ImplicationsWhat We’re Following The New NSA: Trump’s decision to replace National-Security Adviser H.R. McMaster with John Bolton has major implications for the president’s North Korea strategy. Bolton, who served in the Reagan and both Bush administrations, has been a foreign-policy hawk throughout his career. His regular appearances on Fox News might be one reason for the president’s choice—though the two
2h
Popular Science

Is this Jupiter, or a pizza? Join our Jovian guessing game.Space Our solar system's largest planet is a master of disguise. Yes, Jupiter is gorgeous, but it’s also a master of disguise. Here at Popular Science we’re always awed by the beautiful images of the largest planet in the solar…
2h
NYT > Science

Why Can’t Dying Patients Get the Drugs They Want?A Republican-backed “Right to Try” bill would allow patients to sidestep F.D.A. approval. But the true gatekeepers are the drug companies themselves.
2h
NYT > Science

Gary Lincoff, 75, Dies; Spread the Joy of Mushrooms Far and WideOver the decades, Mr. Lincoff, a self-taught mycologist, found more than 400 species of mushrooms in Central Park, just two blocks from his apartment.
2h
The Scientist RSS

Worlds First Commercial iPSC Cell Plant Opens in JapanThe $340 million, 30,000-square-foot center will produce cells for therapeutic applications.
2h
Live Science

Viagra for … Cancer Prevention? Early Mouse Study Has Surprising ResultsThe "little blue pill" could one day have a surprising use as a cancer prevention drug, early research in mice suggests.
2h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

UK regulators search Cambridge Analytica officesBritish regulators on Friday began searching the London offices of Cambridge Analytica (CA), the scandal-hit communications firm at the heart of the Facebook data scandal, shortly after a judge approved a search warrant.
3h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

New US law changes rules for cross-border data requestsA measure signed into law Friday by President Donald Trump changes the rules for cross-border law enforcement requests to internet firms and could render moot a long-running court battle between the US government and Microsoft.
3h
The Atlantic

The Atlantic Politics & Policy Daily: Bolton Down the HatchesToday in 5 Lines After threatening to veto a $1.3 trillion spending bill Friday morning, President Trump signed the measure , averting a government shutdown and funding the government through September. Trump campaign officials reportedly encouraged young adviser George Papadopoulos to accept an interview with a Russian news agency before the 2016 election. The Trump administration announced sanc
3h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News

E-cigarette aerosol exposure causes craniofacial abnormalities in miceAt the 47th Annual Meeting of the American Association for Dental Research (AADR), held in conjunction with the 42nd Annual Meeting of the Canadian Association for Dental Research (CADR), Suraj Kandalam, Virginia Commonwealth University, Richmond, presented a poster titled 'E-cigarette Aerosol Exposure Causes Craniofacial Abnormalities in Mice.' The AADR/CADR Annual Meeting is in Fort Lauderdale,
3h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Opioid abuse/dependence in those hospitalized due to periapical abscessAt the 47th Annual Meeting of the American Association for Dental Research (AADR), held in conjunction with the 42nd Annual Meeting of the Canadian Association for Dental Research (CADR), Veerasathpurush Allareddy, University of Iowa, College of Dentistry & Dental Clinics, Iowa City, presented a poster titled 'Opioid Abuse/Dependence in Those Hospitalized Due to Periapical Abscess.' The AADR/CADR
3h
Feed: All Latest

Eye Tracking Is Coming to Virtual Reality Sooner Than You Think. What Now?VR Game Oculus GoThis week made it clear that the technology is racing into to our consumer immersive-tech devices. But with great power comes great responsibility.
3h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Mayors' political leanings strongly influence thoughts on city health policy effectivenessA new Drexel University study found that cities' lead decision-makers view how effective municipal policies are at reducing health disparities differently based on their social ideologies.
3h
Big Think

Elon Musk deletes SpaceX and Tesla Facebook pages after Cambridge Analytica scandalElon Musk FacebookAfter concerns over data security, Elon Musk has elected to remove his companies from Facebook entirely. Read More
4h
NYT > Science

Q&A: Unique Identifiers in Animal DNAGenetic fingerprinting can distinguish individuals from one another in many different species — even to identify poached or illegally trafficked animals.
4h
The Atlantic

Trump Can't Get What He Wants and Doesn't Know WhyIn the end, Donald Trump had to sign the bill—for the military, he said. But he didn’t have to like it. That was the upshot of a peculiar and rambling set of remarks (even by his standards) the president made early Friday afternoon as he signed a bill funding the government through September. “I’ve signed this omnibus budget bill. There are a lot of things I’m unhappy about in this bill,” Trump s
4h
Live Science

In a Final TV Appearance, Stephen Hawking Imagines Humanity Colonizing Alien WorldsOne of Stephen Hawking’s final television projects was the documentary "Leaving Earth," airing March 25.
4h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Two Americans, one Russian dock with International Space StationA Soyuz capsule carrying two Americans and a Russian cosmonaut has docked with the International Space Station.
4h
The Atlantic

Uber’s Collision, Facebook’s DisgraceIt has been a wretched week for the American technology industry. There is the big story: the double revelation that Cambridge Analytica, ostensibly a voter-profiling company, used data from 49.5 million Facebook accounts without securing users’ permission; and that thousands of third-party developers who once built seemingly innocuous apps on Facebook’s platform may have their own caches of priv
4h
The Atlantic

Why Did Elon Musk Delete His Facebook Pages?Elon Musk FacebookThis week’s revelations about a British political consultancy’s use of data from 50 million Facebook users for potentially shady purposes has prompted many people to declare they will quit the social network in protest. One of the newest additions to the bandwagon is Elon Musk, the wealthy entrepreneur with companies like Tesla and Space X to his name—and he followed through in a very public way.
4h
Feed: All Latest

Craigslist Shuts Personal Ads for Fear of New Internet LawThe online classified site, and others, say they fear increased liability for content posted by others under law intended to curb sex trafficking.
4h
Popular Science

Sinus infections can get to your brain—but don't panicHealth Traveling through the blood-brain barrier is difficult. The infectious bacteria that infiltrate our sinuses can—VERY RARELY—make its way to the brain. Because the sinuses are so close to the brain, on rare occasions an…
4h
Big Think

Stephen Hawking had pinned his hopes on ‘M-theory’ to fully explain the universe – here’s what it isDuring the second string revolution, in 1995, physicists proposed that the five consistent string theories are actually only different faces of a unique theory. Read More
4h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Effect of deployment on use of e-cigarettes in US militaryAt the 47th Annual Meeting of the American Association for Dental Research (AADR), held in conjunction with the 42nd Annual Meeting of the Canadian Association for Dental Research (CADR), Prescott McWilliams, United States Air Force, San Antonio, Texas and the Uniformed Services University of the Health Sciences (USU), Postgraduate Dental College (PDC), presented a poster titled 'Effect of Deploym
4h
The Scientist RSS

USDA Ordered to Publish Complete Animal Welfare ReportsIn 2017, the agency began posting redacted records, but Congress is now demanding full transparency.
4h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Reliance merges music apps amid streaming rise in IndiaIndian conglomerate Reliance Industries said Friday it was integrating its music app with sector leader Saavn in a $1 billion deal that shows the high hopes for streaming in the billion-plus market.
4h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

The sorry state of Earth's species, in numbersThe Intergovernmental Science-Policy Platform on Biodiversity and Ecosystem Services (IPBES) issued a dire diagnosis Friday of Earth's plant and animal species.
4h
Feed: All Latest

Everyone Knows How to Secure Elections. So Do ItWith $380 million in the spending bill earmarked for securing digital elections, the time for talk is over.
4h
Live Science

Did These Children Have Their Hearts Ripped Out as a Sacrifice to an Ancient Rain God?Construction workers in northern Peru recently uncovered a grisly discovery: The skeletal remains of 47 ancient people, including those of at least 12 children who were likely sacrificed by the ancient Chimú culture about 1,500 years ago.
5h
Feed: All Latest

Gadget Lab Podcast: More Questions Than Answers in Uber's Fatal Arizona CrashThis week, Alex Davies and Aarian Marshall join us to discuss the latest news in self-driving car safety.
5h
Big Think

American healthcare shows why we can't trust market spin doctorsFree-market fans often fail to see how self-interest can create diseased-market games. Robert Frank helps diagnose American healthcare's deadly trillion-dollar disease. Read More
5h
Feed: All Latest

Spending Bill Gives Green Energy Its R&D Budget—But That's Not All It NeedsTrump stands for coal. Congress doesn't.
5h
Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

New innovations in cell-free biotechnologyA new platform to conduct cell-free protein synthesis could lead to improved quality of manufactured protein therapeutics and biomaterials.
5h
The Atlantic

John Bolton's Radical Views on North KoreaThe Trump administration’s plan for dealing with North Korea’s nuclear-weapons program currently consists of two main components: an international campaign of economic sanctions and diplomatic pressure against the Kim regime, plus direct nuclear talks this spring between Donald Trump and Kim Jong Un. The president’s new national-security adviser , John Bolton, doesn’t seem to believe that either
5h
The Guardian's Science Weekly

Inside the secret life of the teenage brain – Science Weekly podcastHannah Devlin speaks to neuroscientist Prof Sarah-Jayne Blakemore about her groundbreaking research into the adolescent brain
5h
Live Science

Whale Murder Was Sexually Motivated, Whale Detectives SayBiologists have accused a killer whale of murdering another whale's child. Here are the facts of the case.
5h
NYT > Science

At Hamburger Central, Antibiotics for Cattle That Aren’t SickMany industrial feedlots see routine use of antibiotics as essential. Some cattlemen disagree, calling them “performance enhancing drugs.”
5h
NYT > Science

Elon Musk Joins #DeleteFacebook With a Barrage of TweetsElon Musk FacebookMr. Musk deleted the Facebook pages of two of his companies, SpaceX and Tesla. He and the Facebook C.E.O., Mark Zuckerberg, have, er, not always gotten along.
5h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News

For patients with drug-resistant infections, infectious diseases experts may be lifesavingResearchers analyzed records for approximately 4,200 patients with infections resistant to multiple antibiotics from 2006 to 2015 at one academic medical center. Thirty-day mortality rates were about 50 percent lower among patients with certain multidrug-resistant infections who had infectious diseases (ID) specialists involved in their care. Among patients with Enterobacteriaceae infections resis
5h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

India asks Cambridge Analytica for information on dataIndia's government on Friday sent a notice to U.K.-based Cambridge Analytica asking whether it has misused data to profile Indians and influence their elections.
5h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

British bases in Cyprus slash songbird poaching numbersThe British military said Friday it has clamped down on poachers around its bases in Cyprus, leading to a big reduction in the number of migratory birds killed.
5h
Live Science

Here Are Some of the Most Common Causes of Food PoisoningMillions of Americans deal with the misery of food poisoning each year, and a new report looks at some of the most common germs that made people sick in 2017.
5h
Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

Bystander T cells can steal the show in resolving inflammationNew research reveals that bystander cell accumulation antagonizes rather than abets cell-killing by specific CTLs, curbing inflammation. The finding is noteworthy because that chief anti-inflammatory role has been traditionally ascribed to what are called regulatory T cells, or 'Tregs,' which dampen autoimmune responses. The new study challenges this notion and suggests alternate mechanisms can al
5h
Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

High-sensitivity 3-D technique using single-atom measurementsResearchers have unveiled a stunningly accurate technique for scientific measurements which uses a single atom as the sensor, with sensitivity down to 100 zeptoNewtons.
5h
Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

Arctic wintertime sea ice extent is among lowest on recordSea ice in the Arctic grew to its annual maximum extent last week, and joined 2015, 2016 and 2017 as the four lowest maximum extents on record, according to scientists.
5h
The Scientist RSS

Merino Sheep Provide Clue to Curly HairThe cells on one side of each wool fiber are longer than the cells on the other, researchers find.
5h
New Scientist - News

Astronaut pee could keep plants alive in space for decadesOn missions to Mars and beyond, astronauts will have to grow their own food. Urine has been shown in space simulations to keep wheat and soy alive over 20 years
5h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Cloud firm Dropbox surges in Wall Street debut (Update)Dropbox IPO CompanyDropbox shares surged Friday as the cloud data storage firm made its Wall street debut following a public offering raising some $750 million.
6h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Broadcom shareholders approve plan to move back to USBroadcom said Friday that its shareholders overwhelmingly approved a plan to move the computer chipmaking giant back to the United States from Singapore.
6h
Live Science

What's Up with This 'Smoke-Breathing' Elephant?An elephant in India seems to have a smoking habit. Sort of.
6h
Popular Science

IQ is a really stupid conceptScience It's stacked against most of the world. IQ tests measure your ability to perform well on one particular type of test. But research shows that everything from healthcare access to GDP can influence a child's…
6h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Facebook as an election weapon, from Obama to TrumpThe use of Facebook data to target voters has triggered global outrage with the Cambridge Analytica scandal. But the concept is nothing new: Barack Obama made extensive use of the social network in 2008 and stepped up "micro-targeting" in his 2012 re-election effort.
6h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Arctic wintertime sea ice extent is among lowest on recordSea ice in the Arctic grew to its annual maximum extent last week, and joined 2015, 2016 and 2017 as the four lowest maximum extents on record, according to scientists at the NASA-supported National Snow and Ice Data Center (NSIDC) and NASA.
6h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Gene boosts rice growth and yield in salty soilSoil salinity poses a major threat to food security, greatly reducing the yield of agricultural crops. Rising global temperatures are expected to accelerate the buildup of salt in soil, placing an increasing burden on agricultural production. In a new study published in The Plant Cell, a team of researchers identified a gene that limits yield losses in rice plants exposed to salt stress and deciph
6h
Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

Flexible ultrasound patch could make it easier to inspect damage in odd-shaped structuresResearchers have developed a stretchable, flexible patch that could make it easier to perform ultrasound imaging on odd-shaped structures, such as engine parts, turbines, reactor pipe elbows and railroad tracks -- objects that are difficult to examine using conventional ultrasound equipment. The ultrasound patch is a versatile and more convenient tool to inspect machine and building parts for defe
6h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

NASA tracks a weaker comma-shaped Tropical Cyclone MarcusTropical Cyclone Marcus continues to parallel Western Australia and remain far from the coast, while weakening. NASA's Aqua satellite analyzed the storm in infrared light and saw a comma-shaped Marcus.
6h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

NASA begins latest airborne Arctic ice surveyAn unusual hole in the sea ice cover over the Arctic Ocean and unexplored areas of the bedrock beneath the Greenland Ice Sheet are among the targets for this year's mapping of Arctic ice conditions by NASA's Operation IceBridge airborne mission.
6h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Team discovers a significant role for nitrate in the Arctic landscapeNitrogen, an essential plant nutrient, is most readily absorbed by plants in its ammonium and nitrate forms. Because of the very low nitrate levels found in arctic tundra soil, scientists had assumed that plants in this biome do not use nitrate. But a new study co-authored by four Marine Biological Laboratory (MBL) Ecosystems Center scientists challenges this notion. The study has important implic
6h
Inside Science

Once Overlooked, Walruses Turn Out to Be Champion DiversOnce Overlooked, Walruses Turn Out to Be Champion Divers Once thought to stay shallow, a new study finds the tusked mammals are among the deepest divers in the sea. Walrus.jpg Image credits: Christopher Michel via flickr Rights information: CC BY 2.0 Creature Friday, March 23, 2018 - 14:15 Annie Roth, Contributor (Inside Science) -- Walruses may not be as fast or agile as their seal cousins, but
6h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Arctic wintertime sea ice extent is among lowest on recordSea ice in the Arctic grew to its annual maximum extent last week, and joined 2015, 2016 and 2017 as the four lowest maximum extents on record, according to scientists at the NASA-supported National Snow and Ice Data Center (NSIDC) and NASA.
6h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Gene boosts rice growth and yield in salty soilSoil salinity poses a major threat to food security, greatly reducing the yield of agricultural crops. Rising global temperatures are expected to accelerate the buildup of salt in soil, placing an increasing burden on agricultural production. In a new study published in The Plant Cell, a team of researchers identified a gene that limits yield losses in rice plants exposed to salt stress and deciph
6h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Research discovers how some cancers resist treatmentAn international team of researchers led by Lucio Miele, M.D., Ph.D., Professor and Chair of Genetics at LSU Health New Orleans School of Medicine, and Justin Stebbing, BM BCh MA, Ph.D, Professor of Cancer Medicine and Medical Oncology at Imperial College of Medicine in London, has found new genetic mutations that promote the survival of cancer cells. The research also provided a clearer understan
6h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Flexible ultrasound patch could make it easier to inspect damage in odd-shaped structuresResearchers have developed a stretchable, flexible patch that could make it easier to perform ultrasound imaging on odd-shaped structures, such as engine parts, turbines, reactor pipe elbows and railroad tracks -- objects that are difficult to examine using conventional ultrasound equipment. The ultrasound patch is a versatile and more convenient tool to inspect machine and building parts for defe
6h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Bystander T cells can steal the show in resolving inflammationa team led by La Jolla Institute for Allergy and Immunology (LJI) diabetes researcher Matthias von Herrath, M.D., reveals that bystander cell accumulation antagonizes rather than abets cell-killing by specific CTLs, curbing inflammation. This is noteworthy because that chief anti-inflammatory role has been traditionally ascribed to what are called regulatory T cells, or 'Tregs,' which dampen autoi
6h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Researchers unveil high-sensitivity 3-D technique using single-atom measurementsResearchers at Griffith University working with Australia's Commonwealth Scientific and Industrial Research Organisation (CSIRO) have unveiled a stunningly accurate technique for scientific measurements which uses a single atom as the sensor, with sensitivity down to 100 zeptoNewtons.
6h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

New innovations in cell-free biotechnologyA Northwestern University-led team has developed a new way to manufacture proteins outside of a cell that could have important implications in therapeutics and biomaterials.
6h
Big Think

Study: Great Pacific Garbage Patch now three times the size of FranceResearchers have known since 1997 that a massive patch of garbage has been swirling around in the Pacific Ocean. A new study shows that the patch has grown far faster than expected. Read More
6h
Big Think

How to hallucinate at home, without mind bending drugsAlways wanted trip but don't want to risk brain damage? We might have a solution for you. Read More
6h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Scientists unveil high-sensitivity 3-D technique using single-atom measurementsResearchers at Griffith University working with Australia's Commonwealth Scientific and Industrial Research Organisation (CSIRO) have unveiled a stunningly accurate technique for scientific measurements which uses a single atom as the sensor, with sensitivity down to 100 zeptoNewtons.
6h
Latest Headlines | Science News

A single atom can gauge teensy electromagnetic forcesThe force of scattering particles of light was measured in zeptonewtons, a billionth of a trillionth of a newton.
6h
Scientific American Content: Global

Ready Player One: We Are Surprisingly Close to Realizing Just Such a VR DystopiaIn the Steven Spielberg movie’s vision of the future, people go to school, go to work, socialize and spend leisure time in a vast virtual environment -- Read more on ScientificAmerican.com
6h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Study shows implications of access to high-quality fruits and vegetables'Fruit and vegetable desirability is lower in more rural built food environments of Montana, USA using the Produce Desirability(ProDes) Tool' was published in the journal Food Security.
6h
Feed: All Latest

Tumblr Names Russian Propaganda Accounts After Long SilenceOn Friday, after months of silence, Tumblr named 84 accounts it says were devoted to spreading propaganda and disinformation on the platform.
6h
New Scientist - News

Most complex biocomputer ever is made from human cellsScientists have engineered 9 human cells to work as a simple, programmable computer. It could lead to implants that automatically detect and treat disease
6h
Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

Significant role for nitrate in the Arctic landscapeBecause of the very low nitrate levels found in arctic tundra soil, scientists had assumed that plants in this biome do not use nitrate. But a new study challenges this notion. The study has important implications for predicting which arctic plant species will dominate as the climate warms, as well as how much carbon tundra ecosystems can store.
7h
Popular Science

Five rad and random DIY kits I found this weekGadgets The end-of-week dispatch from PopSci's commerce editor. Vol. 43. Throughout the week I spend hours scouring the web for things that are ingenious or clever or ridiculously cheap.
7h
TED Talks Daily (SD video)

The genius of the London Tube Map | Michael BierutDesign legend Michael Bierut tells the story of the accidental success of one of the most famous maps in the world -- the London Tube Map.
7h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Laser-based sensing system can detect methane leaks from miles awayA new field instrument developed by a collaborative team of CU Boulder researchers can detect and quantify methane leaks as tiny as one-quarter of a human exhalation from nearly a mile away.
7h
The Atlantic

Once Again, a Massive Group of Whales Strands ItselfWhales WA Hamelin BayThe short-finned pilot whale is a large species of dolphin with a dark-grey body and a bulbous head. It’s an intensely social animal that spends its life in the company of others. And that, sadly, is also how it sometimes dies. On Thursday night, around 150 short-finned pilot whales stranded themselves at Hamelin Bay, a site on Australia’s western coast around 200 miles south of Perth. If they la
7h
The Atlantic

Photos of the Week: Spring Equinox, World Water Day, Dracula the PterosaurThe Luminale festival in Germany, Space Needle renovations in Seattle, the fiery Fallas festival in Spain, pointy boots in Mexico, St. Patrick's Day in Ireland, a rocket launch in Kazakhstan, and much more.
7h
New Scientist - News

Skin spray heals US woman’s flesh-eating bacteria woundsA US woman has been treated with an experimental skin spray after losing a third of her skin to flesh-eating bacteria
7h
New Scientist - News

In 30 years Asian-Pacific fish will be gone, and then we’re nextAn assessment of Earth’s biodiversity predicts catastrophic losses within decades, with severe knock-on effects for human civilisation like shortages of food
7h
Science : NPR

Reduce, Reuse, Rethink: Remaking RecyclingIt's time to go beyond the blue bin. (Image credit: Natalie Behring/Getty Images)
7h
Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

20-year-old assumptions in solar cell production refutedResearchers have investigated the manufacturing process of solar cells. The researchers proved that assumptions on chemical processes that were commonplace among researchers and producers for the past 20 years are, in fact, inaccurate.
7h
New on MIT Technology Review

America’s new sex-trafficking bill led Craigslist to pull its personal adsCraigslist Section Service
7h
Scientific American Content: Global

The Season Finale of This Is Us Offers an Important Public Health LessonIt made the concept and consequences of "social determinants of health" come alive -- Read more on ScientificAmerican.com
7h
The Atlantic

Marriage Proposals Are StupidThe marriage proposal is one of the most ritualized moments in modern American life. Growing up, many girls are instilled with a specific idea of how it should go: He’ll take us somewhere romantic—we’ll have no idea what’s happening—he’ll get down on one knee—we’ll start crying—he’ll pop the question—we’ll immediately say yes. It should be magical. But for a lot of heterosexual couples, the propo
7h
New on MIT Technology Review

IBM is facing allegations of rampant age discrimination
8h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News

First proof a synthesized antibiotic is capable of treating superbugsA 'game changing' new antibiotic which is capable of killing superbugs has been successfully synthesized and used to treat an infection for the first time -- and could lead to the first new class of antibiotic drug in 30 years.
8h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News

New innovations in cell-free biotechnologyProfessor Michael Jewett's new platform to conduct cell-free protein synthesis could lead to improved quality of manufactured protein therapeutics and biomaterials.
8h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Increasing temperatures in cooling systemsFor the very first time, scientists from Friedrich-Alexander-Universität Erlangen-Nürnberg (FAU), the University of Leicester and the University of Vigo have proven that the kinetic energy from particles in granular gases such as dust clouds can rise temporarily even though energy is constantly being drawn out of the system. Their research adds further detail to Haff's law (devised 35 years ago),
8h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News

New accreditation program sets framework for rectal cancer care in the USThe National Accreditation Program for Rectal Cancer establishes guidelines for a multidisciplinary team approach to help meet its proposed quality measures.
8h
Science | The Guardian

Trump adviser John Bolton worked with Cambridge Analytica on YouTube voter experimentThe new national security adviser appeared in videos for experiment targeting videos to different ‘psychographic’ profiles Donald Trump’s new national security adviser John Bolton collaborated with the data analytics firm Cambridge Analytica on an experiment to target YouTube videos to different “psychographic” profiles of US voters, the Guardian can reveal. Related: Who is John Bolton, Trump's n
8h
Popular Science

Scientists have identified a gene that's killing purebred dogs. Does that even matter?Animals Inbred dogs are kind of doomed. Bull terrier owners might feel some sense of relief upon hearing that a team of international researchers have identified a genetic mutation behind lethal…
8h
Latest Headlines | Science News

Venus may be home to a new kind of tectonicsVenus’ surface seems to be divided into jostling blocks of crust, defying conventional wisdom about how the surfaces of rocky planets work.
8h
Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

Diagnosing breast cancer using red lightOptical Mammography, which uses harmless red or infrared light, has been developed for use in conjunction with X-rays for diagnosis or monitoring in cases demanding repeated imaging where high amounts of ionizing radiation should be avoided.
8h
Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

Staphylococcus aureus: A new mechanism involved in virulence and antibiotic resistanceA research team has characterized a Staphylococcus aureus gene involved in virulence, biofilm formation and resistance to certain antibiotics. These results open up new avenues for understanding the control of S. aureus virulence mechanisms.
8h
Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

Mutations of the bassoon gene causing new brain disorderNewly discovered gene mutations may help explain the cause of a disease that drastically impairs walking and thinking.
8h
Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

Landfills: A future source of raw materialsDecontamination of landfills and open dumpsites could prove profitable – both financially and for the environment.
8h
Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

Keeping a tight hold on things: Robot-mounted vacuum grippers flex their artificial musclesA short electric pulse is all it takes to generate and release a powerful vacuum in the blink of an eye. The novel vacuum gripper enables robot arms to pick up objects and move them around freely in space. The system works without the need for compressed air to generate the vacuum, it is energy efficient, quiet and suitable for use in clean rooms.
8h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Team discovers a significant role for nitrate in the Arctic landscapeBecause of the very low nitrate levels found in arctic tundra soil, scientists had assumed that plants in this biome do not use nitrate. But a new study co-authored by four Marine Biological Laboratory (MBL) Ecosystems Center scientists challenges this notion. The study has important implications for predicting which arctic plant species will dominate as the climate warms, as well as how much carb
8h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News

NASA tracks a weaker comma-shaped Tropical Cyclone MarcusTropical Cyclone Marcus continues to parallel Western Australia and remain far from the coast, while weakening. NASA's Aqua satellite analyzed the storm in infrared light and saw a comma-shaped Marcus.
8h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Decades of research identify source of galaxy-sized stream of gasA cloud of gas 300,000 light-years long is arching around the Milky Way, shunted away from two dwarf galaxies orbiting our own. For decades, astronomers have wanted to know which of the two galaxies, the Large and Small Magellanic Clouds, is the source of the gas that has been expelled as the two galaxies gravitationally pull at one another. The answer will help astronomers understand how galaxies
8h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Older adults who have slower walking speeds may have increased risk for dementiaBecause there's currently no cure for dementia, it's important to know about risk factors that may lead to developing it. For example, researchers have learned that older adults with slower walking speeds seem to have a greater risk than those with faster walking speeds. Recently, researchers from the UK. teamed up to learn more about changes in walking speed, changes in the ability to think and m
8h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Scientists develop elastic metal rods to treat scoliosisNUST MISIS scientists jointly with their colleagues from the Ecole de Technologie Superiore (Montreal, Canada) have experienced a new combination of alloy processing that produces solid and durable implants that are fully compatible with the human body. The research article is published in the Journal of Alloys and Compounds.
8h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Opioid prescribing patterns of oral and maxillofacial surgeons: A nationwide surveyAt the 47th Annual Meeting of the American Association for Dental Research (AADR), held in conjunction with the 42nd Annual Meeting of the Canadian Association for Dental Research (CADR), Brandon Michael Syme, University of Iowa College of Dentistry, Iowa City, presented a poster titled 'Opioid Prescribing Patterns of Oral and Maxillofacial Surgeons: A Nationwide Survey.' The AADR/CADR Annual Meet
8h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Effect of an opioid prescribing protocol on provider prescribing behaviorAt the 47th Annual Meeting of the American Association for Dental Research (AADR), held in conjunction with the 42nd Annual Meeting of the Canadian Association for Dental Research (CADR), Chad Lowell Wagner, University of Minnesota School of Dentistry, Minneapolis, presented a poster titled 'Effect of an Opioid Prescribing Protocol on Provider Prescribing Behavior.' The AADR/CADR Annual Meeting is
8h
Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

Paleontologists put the bite on an ancient reptile from New EnglandScientists have identified a new species of reptile from prehistoric Connecticut and, boy, does it have a mouth on it. Named Colobops noviportensis, the creature lived 200 million years ago and had exceptionally large jaw muscles -- setting it apart from other reptiles at the time. Even compared to the wide diversity of reptile species today, Colobops noviportensis had quite the bite.
8h
Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

How a genetic mutation can interfere with the powerhouses of cellsScientists have identified the molecular consequences of a previously undefined genetic mutation. This mutation interferes with the functioning of the mitochondria, known as the powerhouses of cells. It usually occurs following what would normally be a harmless infection in early childhood, leading to a severe disease and subsequently to the brain no longer being able to maintain control of key bo
8h
Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

Dental oral craniofacial tissue regeneration consortiaThe ability to robustly and predictably regenerate dental, oral and craniofacial (DOC) tissues through tissue engineering and/or regenerative medicine strategies is a major goal for clinicians. While many technologies have shown proof of principle in small animals, few have made it into the clinic.
8h
New on MIT Technology Review

How Trump’s new tariffs could damage American tech
8h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Helping prevent falls in older adults with dementiaResearchers have recently focused on the role that dementia and other cognitive problems may play in falling, in hopes of discovering ways to manage and prevent falls. They published their study in the Journal of the American Geriatrics Society.
8h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Is knee pain linked to depression?According to researchers, knee osteoarthritis affects some 55 percent of people over age 40 in Japan. A research team from the country recently published a study in the Journal of the American Geriatrics Society examining the effects of knee pain on depression since, until now, few studies have focused on how knee pain and impaired knee function relate to depression.
8h
Scientific American Content: Global

Congress Says Biomass Is Carbon-Neutral, but Scientists DisagreeUsing wood as fuel source could actually increase CO2 emissions -- Read more on ScientificAmerican.com
8h
Feed: All Latest

DOJ Indicts 9 Iranians For Brazen University CyberattacksIranian US DoJA new indictment asserts a long string of attacks against hundreds of universities and private companies, in which Iran pilfered more than $3 billion worth of intellectual property.
8h
Popular Science

The role of humans in self-driving cars is even more complicated after Uber's fatal crashTechnology The death of a pedestrian raises questions about how humans should act when robots are in control. A fatal Uber crash raises questions about the role of a human in a self-driving car.
8h
Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

Searching for long-term success in weight management? Forget dieting and eat regularlyEarly adulthood is particularly critical for putting on weight. According to a recent study common factors among young women and men who succeeded in managing their weight in the long term included eating regularly rather than dieting.
9h
Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

Non-psychoactive cannabis ingredient could help addicts stay cleanA preclinical study in rats has shown that there might be value in using a non-psychoactive and non-addictive ingredient of the Cannabis sativa plant to reduce the risk of relapse among recovering drug and alcohol addicts. The study's findings inform the ongoing debate about the possible medical benefits of non-psychoactive cannabinoids.
9h
Latest Headlines | Science News

Why science still can’t pinpoint a mass shooter in the makingArguments flare over mass public shootings that remain scientifically mysterious.
9h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

US charges Iranians in massive hacking schemeIranian US DoJThe United States unveiled charges on Friday against nine Iranians for their alleged involvement in a massive state-sponsored hacking scheme which targeted hundreds of universities in the US and abroad and stole "valuable intellectual property and data."
9h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Higher-dose RT lowers risk of recurrence but does not improve survival for men with prostate cancerResults of a recent NRG Oncology study, NRGOncology/RTOG 0126, show that high-dose radiotherapy did not improve survival for men with intermediate-risk prostate cancer but did improve biochemical control and rates of distant metastases, when compared to standard radiotherapy. Men who received higher-dose radiotherapy underwent fewer salvage therapies to control tumors that had grown larger or had
9h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News

More people miss NHS appointments when the clocks go forwardThe number of missed hospital outpatient appointments increases following the clock change on March 25 2018.Patients are 5% more likely to miss an appointment in the week after the clocks go forward compared with the previous week. NHS figures show that there were 8 million missed appointments in 2016/17. Each hospital outpatient appointment costs £120 so missed appointments represent a significan
9h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Diagnosing breast cancer using red lightAt the OSA Biophotonics Congress: Biomedical Optics meeting, held 3-6 April in Hollywood, Florida, USA, researchers from Milan, Italy, will report an advance in instrument development that increases the sensitivity of OM by as much as 1000-fold.
9h
Ingeniøren

Ny Femern-forsinkelse kan koste en halv milliardFemern-selskabet vil ikke oplyse, hvad den nye forsinkelse af den tyske miljøgodkendelse ventes at koste. Men selskabets egne beregninger viser, at forsinkelsen kan fordyre tunnelprojektet med 500 millioner kroner.
9h
NYT > Science

American Adults Just Keep Getting FatterA large scale federal survey has documented the continuing rise in severe obesity, which increases the risks for heart disease, diabetes and some cancers.
9h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Diagnosing breast cancer using red lightOptical Mammography, or OM, which uses harmless red or infrared light, has been developed for use in conjunction with X-rays for diagnosis or monitoring in cases demanding repeated imaging where high amounts of ionizing radiation should be avoided. At the OSA Biophotonics Congress: Biomedical Optics meeting, held 3-6 April in Hollywood, Florida, USA, researchers from Milan, Italy, will report an a
9h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Craigslist ends personal ads after US sex trafficking bill passesCraigslist Section ServiceCraigslist said Friday it shut down its personal ads section as concerns grew over unintended consequences of a law approved by Congress which could hold websites liable for promoting sex trafficking.
9h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Royal Caribbean picks up world's largest cruise shipFrench shipbuilder STX handed over the world's biggest cruiseliner, the Symphony of the Seas, to US giant Royal Caribbean International on Friday ahead of its maiden voyage in the Mediterranean.
9h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

NASA sees Tropical Cyclone Nora become a hurricaneNASA satellite imagery showed that Tropical Cyclone Nora developed an eye as it strengthened into a hurricane north of Australia. NASA-NOAA's Suomi NPP satellite provided forecasters with a visible image of the storm, formerly named Tropical Cyclone 16P.
9h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Paleontologists put the bite on an ancient reptile from New EnglandScientists have identified a new species of reptile from prehistoric Connecticut and, boy, does it have a mouth on it.
9h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Mysterious head of a pharaoh discoveredSwansea University Egyptology lecturer Dr Ken Griffin has found a depiction of one of the most famous pharaoh's in history Hatshepsut (one of only a handful of female pharaohs) on an object in the Egypt Centre stores, which had been chosen for an object handling session.
9h
Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

Mysterious head of a pharaoh discovered by Swansea EgyptologistEgyptologists have found a depiction of one of the most famous pharaoh's in history Hatshepsut (one of only a handful of female pharaohs) on an object in the Egypt Center stores, which had been chosen for an object handling session.
9h
Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

Which piece resembles your color perception for #theDress image?A novel algorithm to simulate the color appearance of objects under chromatic illuminants has been proposed. "#theDress image" refers to a photo that went viral on the Internet in February 2015, when viewers disagreed over the colors seen in the dress. The discussion revealed differences in human color perception and prompted studies in vision science.
9h
Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

Microorganisms can escape from a dead end by swimmingResearchers have shown that microorganisms can ingeniously escape from a dead end by swimming. The results pave the way to understanding the spread of infectious diseases.
9h
Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

Metastatic cancer cells modify bone remodeling with small RNA secretion in bone metastasisProstate cancer frequently metastasizes and spreads to bone, causing severe pain, fractures, and other complications. The mechanisms that allow cancer cells to modify bone remodeling are incompletely understood. Researchers have now identified a microRNA, miR-940, that is abundant in exosomes secreted by prostate cancer cells and can trigger bone-forming lesions in mice. The findings indicate that
9h
Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

Breakthrough antimalarial drug delivery system using mesoporous silica nanoparticlesDrug delivery systems (DDSs) are important methods of delivering medicine to affected areas. An international collaborative research group has successfully developed the world's first DDS for antimalarial drugs. The treatment has increased efficiency up to 240 times as much as when antimalarial medicine is taken orally.
9h
Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

Germany was covered by glaciers 450,000 years agoResearchers have obtained new chronological data for the timing of the Elsterian and Saalian glacial cycles in central Germany. They found that the first Quaternary glaciation, which covered huge parts of Europe in ice, occurred as early as 450,000 years ago and not - as previously thought - around 350,000 years ago. The researcher further showed that once these glaciers had retreated, the first p
9h
Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

Growing and surviving: How proteins regulate the cell cycleCell division is the basis of all life. Even the smallest errors in this complex process can lead to grave diseases like cancer. Certain proteins have to be switched on or off at certain times for everything to go according to plan. Biophysicists and medical biochemists have managed to describe the underlying mechanism of this process.
9h
The Atlantic

Roseanne vs. the 'Nasty Woman'“We’re not going to talk about who the Conners are going to vote for. I think people would turn us off real quick.” That was Roseanne Barr, talking with the Los Angeles Times about the politics of the original version of her hit ABC sitcom. It was 1992: The American presidential campaign, Bill Clinton versus George H. W. Bush versus Ross Perot, was being waged. Dan Quayle was arguing about family
9h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

There are 8 million reasons why you should care if Magic Leap succeedsWhen it comes to tech, the most buzzed-about companies often raise big investments—and big questions.
9h
Science : NPR

How Social Media Can Reveal Overlooked Drug ReactionsEven big clinical studies can miss important drug side effects. Researchers, doctors and drugmakers are looking at patients' experiences posted on social media for clues on problems that were missed. (Image credit: Roy Scott/Getty Images/Ikon Images)
9h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News

NASA sees Tropical Cyclone Nora become a hurricaneNASA satellite imagery showed that Tropical Cyclone Nora developed an eye as it strengthened into a hurricane north of Australia. NASA-NOAA's Suomi NPP satellite provided forecasters with a visible image of the storm, formerly named Tropical Cyclone 16P.
9h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Searching for long-term success in weight management? Forget dieting and eat regularlyEarly adulthood is particularly critical for putting on weight. According to a recent study conducted at the University of Helsinki, common factors among young women and men who succeeded in managing their weight in the long term included eating regularly rather than dieting.
9h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Helping older adults discontinue using sedativesn a new study, published in the Journal of the American Geriatrics Society, researchers looked at a way to help older adults taper off and stop using sedatives. This was based on an earlier study that suggested giving older adults an educational brochure outlining the problems that sedatives pose and instructions for safely taking themselves off the medication.
9h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Paleontologists put the bite on an ancient reptile from New EnglandScientists have identified a new species of reptile from prehistoric Connecticut and, boy, does it have a mouth on it. Named Colobops noviportensis, the creature lived 200 million years ago and had exceptionally large jaw muscles -- setting it apart from other reptiles at the time. Even compared to the wide diversity of reptile species today, Colobops noviportensis had quite the bite.
9h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Increases in obesity, severe obesity continue among adults in USObesity and severe obesity continued to grow among adults in the United States between 2007-2008 and 2015-2016 but there were no significant overall changes among youth.
9h
Big Think

The 1% spent more on art than on wine last year. Yay?The report, released by "advisors to the wealthy," shows what the rich spend their investment money on. Hint: It's not factories. Read More
9h
Big Think

What would school be like if Albert Einstein was your principal?Einstein didn't like the schools he went to, how would he improve them? Read More
9h
The Atlantic

A Short Guide to John Bolton's Government CareerIt is only fitting that, within the same week the United States marks 15 years since the 2003 Iraq invasion, John Bolton has been named the president’s national security adviser. Bolton advocated for another U.S. invasion of Iraq, following the first Gulf War, as far back as the 1990s, when he called on President Clinton to oust Saddam Hussein. Later, as under secretary of state for arms control,
9h
Feed: All Latest

Best Travel Gear: Mophie, Amazon Kindle, Allbirds, Lululemon, HexFit everything for your trip into a bag that slides under the seat in front of you.
9h
Ingeniøren

Kan MIT overhale Iter indenom med en lille fusionsreaktor?Sammen med en spinout virksomhed vil Massachusetts Institute of Technology udvikle verdens kraftigste superledende elektromagneter til brug for små fusionsreaktorer, der kan levere 100-200 MW.
9h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Six clouds you should know about – and what they can reveal about the weatherModern weather forecasts rely on complex computer simulators. These simulators use all the physics equations that describe the atmosphere, including the movement of air, the sun's warmth, and the formation of clouds and rain.
9h
Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

New study elucidates link between PCOS and anxietyMaternal obesity and androgen excess induce sex-specific anxiety in the offspring, according to a study on mice. The findings may help explain why children born to mothers with polycystic ovary syndrome (PCOS) have increased risk of developing anxiety later in life.
9h
TED Talks Daily (SD video)

How to tame your wandering mind | Amishi JhaAmishi Jha studies how we pay attention: the process by which our brain decides what's important out of the constant stream of information it receives. Both external distractions (like stress) and internal ones (like mind-wandering) diminish our attention's power, Jha says -- but some simple techniques can boost it. "Pay attention to your attention," Jha says.
9h
New on MIT Technology Review

Iranian hackers broke into systems used by 8,000 American professorsIranian US DoJ
9h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Mysterious head of a pharaoh discovered by Swansea EgyptologistSwansea University Egyptology lecturer Dr Ken Griffin has found a depiction of one of the most famous pharaoh's in history Hatshepsut (one of only a handful of female pharaohs) on an object in the Egypt Centre stores, which had been chosen for an object handling session.
9h
Dana Foundation

What Art Can Tell Us About the BrainDana Alliance member and Professor of Neurobiology Margaret S. Livingstone, Ph.D. , spoke about art and the brain on Tuesday night at this year’s annual Irving H. Jurow Lecture at New York University’s College of Art and Science. Her lecture demonstrated to the audience how looking at art reveals how we see and what mechanisms are at work in the brain to create visual perception. All artists use
9h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Cambridge Analytica—the data analytics industry is already in full swingRevelations about Cambridge Analytica have laid bare the seeming lack of control that we have over our own data. Suddenly, with all the talk of "psychographics" and voter manipulation, the power of data analytics has become the source of some concern.
9h
The Atlantic

The Beauty and Sadness of Isle of Dogs“All barks have been rendered into English.” If one were to ask a gathering of committed moviegoers to pick the director most likely to open a film with this notification, I’m confident that a majority would pick Wes Anderson. And they would, of course, be correct. Isle of Dogs , the director’s ninth feature and second foray into stop-motion animation, is as precious, minutely detailed, and magni
9h
Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

Breast cancer: New mechanism discovered for dissemination of metastatic tumor cellsMalignant tumor cells from a primary tumor have to pass into the bloodstream in order to form metastases in other organs. It is accepted in medical research that, in breast cancer for example, tumor cells first of all enter the vascular system and then colonize the sentinel lymph nodes closest to the primary tumor. From there they travel along the lymph channels via further secondary lymph nodes a
9h
Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

Grouping students into ability-based sets holds back less able pupilsStudents classed as less able are being hindered by being grouped into ability-based sets, according to new research.
9h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Sociologist advises vigilance against evangelical 'spiritual warriors' set on converting Indigenous peoplesA new evangelical sect targeting Indigenous people in Canada is an ominous trend that should be closely watched, says a University of Alberta sociologist.
10h
New on MIT Technology Review

Facebook is offering itself up for regulation. How would we do that?
10h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Luxembourg researchers refute 20-year-old assumptions in solar cell productionResearch led by the University of Luxembourg investigated the manufacturing process of solar cells. The researchers proved that assumptions on chemical processes that were commonplace among researchers and producers for the past 20 years are, in fact, inaccurate. The physicists published their findings in the renowned scientific journal Nature Communications.
10h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Non-psychoactive cannabis ingredient could help addicts stay cleanA preclinical study in rats has shown that there might be value in using a non-psychoactive and non-addictive ingredient of the Cannabis sativa plant to reduce the risk of relapse among recovering drug and alcohol addicts. The study's findings inform the ongoing debate about the possible medical benefits of non-psychoactive cannabinoids. So says Friedbert Weiss, leader of an investigative team at
10h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Sentinel-3B launch preparations in full swingWith the Sentinel-3B satellite now at the Plesetsk launch site in Russia and liftoff set for 25 April, engineers are steaming ahead with the task of getting Europe's next Copernicus satellite ready for its journey into orbit.
10h
Futurity.org

Want to be happier? Little changes can helpA new book explains some of the factors that contribute to happiness and offers practical tips on how to increase our own happiness. “…psychological health is just as much about knowing how to recover from the negative times… as it is about actually building happiness.” That might mean more sleep, a more regular exercise schedule, or practicing meditation or mindfulness. It could also mean unders
10h
Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

Rival competition makes ant sperm better swimmersAnt sperm recognize rival sperm and become more mobile, faster and straighter swimmers as a result, according to a new study. The study looked at the factors that modify sperm behavior when there is competition with sperm from other males in a social insect which only mates on a single day during its lifetime.
10h
Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

Analyzing past failures may boost future performance by reducing stressA new study suggests for the first time that reflection of past failures might prepare an individual for the next challenge by changing the body's response to stress. The research team found that writing about a past failure led to lower levels of the 'stress' hormone, cortisol, better choices and better outcomes on a new stressful task. This technique may help improve performance in a variety of
10h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Image: Netherlands iceThe Dutch are now starting to see their famous spring flowers poke through the winter soil, but a few weeks ago it was a different story as a cold snap took grip.
10h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Fallout from cyberattack on Atlanta computers still unclear (Update)More than 24 hours after a ransomware cyberattack targeting the city of Atlanta's computer network was discovered, the fallout still wasn't clear.
10h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Facebook fallout—Americans' privacy at risk across entire tech, information industryFacebook Data Cambridge AnalyticaAs fallout from the revelation of Cambridge Analytica's misuse of Facebook user information continues, many are mistakenly calling this incident a breach. Facebook is right to claim this incident was no breach — this is Facebook's platform working exactly as designed.
10h
The Atlantic

Congress Ignores Trump's Priorities for Science FundingUpdated on March 23 at 2:31 p.m. ET When President Donald Trump was sworn into office, much of the science community braced for the worst . Trump had long shown a stubborn disregard for any scientific knowledge that differed from his beliefs. Many scientists wondered what havoc the new president, empowered by a Congress controlled by Republicans, might wreak on the policies that affected their wo
10h
Science | The Guardian

The week in wildlife – in picturesA thirsty wolf, an albatross chick and a family of capybaras are among this week’s pick of images from the natural world Continue reading...
10h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Monitor climate change, not predators, to protect lake diversityClimate change and other environmental factors are more threatening to fish diversity than predators, according to new research from the University of Guelph.
10h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Molecule discovered in dirt could help against multi-resistant bacteriaMom always said you could get germs from playing in the dirt. Now, scientists have taken that advice a step further: a Rockefeller University team collected more than 2,000 soil samples from nearby New York City parks, and around the world, in an effort to discover bacterial molecules with potential as drugs.
10h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Germany was covered by glaciers 450,000 years agoThe timing of the Middle Pleistocene glacial-interglacial cycles and the feedback mechanisms between climatic shifts and earth-surface processes are still poorly understood. This is largely due to the fact that chronological data of sediment archives representing periglacial, but also potentially warmer climate periods, are very sparse until now.
10h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Researchers make breakthrough in light trapping technology for industrial multicrystalline silicon solar cellsScientists from the Solar Energy Research Institute of Singapore (SERIS) at the National University of Singapore (NUS) have developed a low-cost and effective technique to texture diamond-wire sawn (DWS) multicrystalline silicon (mc-Si) wafers. DWS wafers sliced using diamond-coated wires allow substantial cost savings compared to traditional slurry-cut wafers. Texturing is the process of rougheni
10h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

A new laser source for infrared chemical imaging: a promising tool for early cancer diagnosticSébastien Février, researcher at XLIM (CNRS/Université de Limoges), and his team demonstrated that a bench-top, optical fibre-based laser source can be used to perform infrared spectromicroscopy with a precision rivaling, and in some regards even surpassing, that of experiments at large-scale synchrotron facilities.
10h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Why the world needs the humble glass spongeRecent research from the University of Alberta reveals how fishing practices like trawling may be affecting the health of sponges that act like natural water filters.
10h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Germany was covered by glaciers 450,000 years agoResearchers of the Max Planck Institute for Evolutionary Anthropology in Leipzig, Germany, have obtained new chronological data for the timing of the Elsterian and Saalian glacial cycles in central Germany. They found that the first Quaternary glaciation, which covered huge parts of Europe in ice, occurred as early as 450,000 years ago and not - as previously thought - around 350,000 years ago. Th
10h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Monitor climate change, not predators, to protect lake diversity: StudyClimate change and other environmental factors are more threatening to fish diversity than predators, according to new research from the University of Guelph.It is a surprising and important finding, as humans rely upon freshwater lakes for more than one-fifth of their protein needs worldwide, says lead author Prof. Andrew MacDougall in U of G's Department of Integrative Biology.
10h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News

A scientific study characterizes two new Galician olive varieties for the first timeThe research, done in collaboration with the University of Cordoba, recognizes the potential and high quality of these olive oils.
10h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News

How a genetic mutation can interfere with the powerhouses of cellsA Freiburg molecular medicine specialist's team discovers a new disease mechanism in the mitochondria.
10h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Brain's tiniest blood vessels trigger spinal motor neurons to developA new study has revealed that the human brain's tiniest blood vessels can activate genes known to trigger spinal motor neurons, prompting the neurons to grow during early development. The findings could provide insights into how amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS) and other neurodegenerative disorders may develop. To make the discovery, investigators successfully re-created living tissues of the b
10h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Bariatric surgery for severely obese teens may help prevent premature heart diseaseFor teens with severe obesity, the predicted 30-year risk of having a heart disease event, such as a heart attack or stroke, could be cut in half one year after bariatric surgery, according to a modeling study. The model found that reduction in risk could be sustained every year for up to five years after surgery.
10h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Exposed: The path of ransomware paymentsThe murky ecosystem of ransomware payments comes into focus in new research led by Damon McCoy, an assistant professor of computer science and engineering at the NYU Tandon School of Engineering. Ransomware attacks, which encrypt and hold a computer user's files hostage in exchange for payment, extort millions of dollars from individuals each month, and comprise one of the fastest-growing forms of
10h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Native forest protections are deeply flawed, yet may be in place for another 20 yearsState governments are poised to renew some of the 20-year-old Regional Forest Agreements (RFAs) without reviewing any evidence gathered in the last two decades.
10h
The Atlantic

The Push for Harsher School Discipline After ParklandThe February 14 Parkland shooting that killed 17 people has led to a slew of policy proposals, including the headline-grabbing call from President Trump and others for laws that would arm educators with guns. There have also been appeals for schools to increase the number of armed law-enforcement officers on campus and to fortify their buildings. Trump says he wants schools to be as secure as air
10h
New Scientist - News

This is why it’s so hard to bring yourself to delete FacebookFacebook is made to keep you coming back for another fix, which spells trouble for the #DeleteFacebook movement, says Lara Williams
10h
Dagens Medicin

Nyt udspil: Psykiske lidelser og misbrug skal behandles i regionerneRegionerne vil ændre behandlingstilbud til mennesker med psykisk sygdom og misbrug, så de undgår at blive kastebold mellem sektorerne. Nu skal behandlingstilbuddene samles i regionerne.
10h
Dagens Medicin

Københavns Kommune vil hjælpe stofbrugere med at teste deres stofferEt pilotforsøg i Københavns Kommune med test af euforiserende stoffer skal øge sikkerheden og føre til færre indlæggelser. Overlæge ser risiko for modsatte effekt.
10h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

UN reports see a lonelier planet with fewer plants, animalsEarth is losing plants, animals and clean water at a dramatic rate, according to four new United Nations scientific reports on biodiversity.
10h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Intracellular transport in 3-DLudwig Maximilian University researchers have visualized the complex interplay between protein synthesis, transport and modification.
10h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Landfills – a future source of raw materialsDecontamination of landfills and open dumpsites could prove profitable – both financially and for the environment. This is demonstrated by Yahya Jani in a new dissertation in environmental science from Linnaeus University.
10h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Consuming a large meal temporarily costs dominant animals their leadership positionNew research, led by the University of Glasgow and published today in Current Biology, found that fish who consumed a large meal had to move to the back of their swimming social group due to reduced aerobic capabilities cause by food digestion.
10h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

How economists tracked a disease in Flint's water crisisAt first glance, it seems like an unlikely pairing: How could economists conceivably help decipher what caused the public health crisis in Flint, Michigan, in 2014-15?
10h
Feed: All Latest

How Much Energy Can You Store in a Rubber Band?On a scale from "light thwack" to "geez, watch it with that thing!"
10h
Feed: All Latest

The Ryan Coogler Effect: What the Success of 'Black Panther' Means for Black DirectorsRyan Coogler’s massive Marvel movie has the potential to kick down doors for scores of other directors, with Ava DuVernay helping to lead that charge.
10h
Feed: All Latest

Everything You Need to Know About Facebook and Cambridge AnalyticaAll of WIRED's coverage on the scandal plaguing the social media giant.
10h
Futurity.org

‘Origami’ gripper unfurls like an earwig’s amazing wingThe wing of an earwig is a lot like origami—but its elaborate design is far more ingenious than anything humans can make. Researchers have been studying the secret of these wings and have created an artificial structure that functions on the same principle. When open, the earwig wing expands ten times larger than when closed—one of the highest folding ratios in the animal kingdom. The large wing
10h
Futurity.org

New way to study protein complexes doesn’t break them upResearchers have developed a new way to study protein complexes. Proteins are the worker bees of the cell, mainly ganging up to form macromolecular, multicomponent complexes to perform intricate cellular tasks. “Proteins are the main drivers of pretty much every critical cellular process—everything from cell division to cell death…” Trying to characterize such protein complexes and all of their f
10h
Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

Different neural strategies for junior high school male and female English learnersResearchers have studied the neural response of Japanese junior high school students learning English as a second language, while listening to English sentences. More proficient boys showed more activation in parts of the brain associated with grammatical rules (syntax); girls used a wider range of language information, including speech sounds (phonology) and meaning of words and sentences (semant
10h
Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

The brain learns completely differently than we've assumed since the 20th centuryBased on experimental evidence physicists publish revolutionary new theory on brain learning that contradicts the most common assumption in neuroscience, will transform our understanding of brain function, and open new horizons for advanced deep learning algorithms.
10h
Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

In a severe childhood neurodegeneration, novel mechanism foundNeurology researchers investigating a rare but devastating neurological regression in infants have discovered the cause: gene mutations that severely disrupt crucial functions in mitochondria, the energy-producing structures within cells. The specific disease mechanism, in which mutations disrupt a critical mitochondrial enzyme, has not previously been implicated in a human disease.
10h
Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

An integrated workflow for interaction proteomics -- as versatile as the Swiss Army KnifeResearchers have developed an integrated workflow for interaction proteomics, which -- as they describe it -- proves almost as versatile as the Swiss Army Knife.
10h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

How to fight Insectageddon with a garden of native plantsPeople across North America love to garden, yet the vast majority of garden plants are non-native species.
10h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Low-paid 'women's work'—why early childhood educators are walking outAustralia's early childhood educators, including those working in community and private childcare centres, will walk off the job on March 27 to demand better pay. Some centres will be closed for the whole day and parents will be asked to keep their children at home.
10h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Researchers refute 20-year-old assumptions in solar cell productionResearch led by the University of Luxembourg investigated the manufacturing process of solar cells. The researchers proved that assumptions on chemical processes that were commonplace among researchers and producers for the past 20 years are, in fact, inaccurate.
10h
Popular Science

Naps are really beneficial. Here's how to take them.DIY Learn how to make any time naptime. Sneaking a little midday snooze feels unspeakably indulgent, whether it lasts a few minutes or a full REM cycle. But does it improve your health? We look into what…
10h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Metastatic cancer cells modify bone remodeling with small RNA secretion in bone metastasisProstate cancer frequently metastasizes and spreads to bone, causing severe pain, fractures, and other complications. The mechanisms that allow cancer cells to modify bone remodeling are incompletely understood. Researchers at Tokyo Medical and Dental University (TMDU) identified a microRNA, miR-940, that is abundant in exosomes secreted by prostate cancer cells and can trigger bone-forming lesion
10h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Exposed: The path of ransomware paymentsThe murky ecosystem of ransomware payments comes into focus in a forthcoming paper by university and industry researchers. It provides the first detailed account of the ransomware payment ecosystem, from initial attack to cash-out. Ransomware attacks, which encrypt and hold a computer user's files hostage in exchange for payment, extort millions of dollars from individuals each month, and comprise
10h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Growing and surviving: How proteins regulate the cell cycleCell division is the basis of all life. Even the smallest errors in this complex process can lead to grave diseases like cancer. Certain proteins have to be switched on or off at certain times for everything to go according to plan. Biophysicists and medical biochemists at Martin Luther University Halle-Wittenberg (MLU) have managed to describe the underlying mechanism of this process.
10h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Breakthrough antimalarial drug delivery system using mesoporous silica nanoparticlesDrug delivery systems (DDSs) are important methods of delivering medicine to affected areas. An international collaborative research group based in Kumamoto University, Japan has successfully developed the world's first DDS for antimalarial drugs. The treatment has increased efficiency up to 240 times as much as when antimalarial medicine is taken orally.
10h
Science | The Guardian

There are plenty more like Cambridge Analytica. I know – I've used the data | Poppy NoorIn a world where companies have a monopoly over our eyeballs, the Facebook scandal is the tip of the iceberg In 2007, a Facebook application popped up that allowed users to take a quiz that would tell them exactly what kind of person they were: how emotionally stable they were compared with their friends, or how friendly they were. They were invited to tick a little box to share their information
11h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Freezing frog cells for conservationFor the first time, Australian frog cells have been successfully frozen and re-grown in culture, offering hope of a new technique to safeguard endangered amphibians.
11h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Staphylococcus aureus: A new mechanism involved in virulence and antibiotic resistanceAn Institut Pasteur-CNRS research team has characterized a Staphylococcus aureus gene involved in virulence, biofilm formation and resistance to certain antibiotics. These results open up new avenues for understanding the control of S. aureus virulence mechanisms. This work was recently published in the journal PLoS Pathogens.
11h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Access and utilization of dental services for Medicaid children 2013-2015At the 47th Annual Meeting of the American Association for Dental Research (AADR), held in conjunction with the 42nd Annual Meeting of the Canadian Association for Dental Research (CADR), Natalia I. Chalmers, D.D.S., Ph.D. of the DentaQuest Institute, Westborough, Mass., presented an oral session titled 'Access and Utilization of Dental Services for Medicaid Children 2013-2015.' The AADR/CADR Annu
11h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Dental oral craniofacial tissue regeneration consortia: A new paradigmThe 47th Annual Meeting of the American Association for Dental Research (AADR), held in conjunction with the 42nd Annual Meeting of the Canadian Association for Dental Research (CADR), featured a symposium titled 'Dental Oral Craniofacial Tissue Regeneration Consortia: A New Paradigm.' The AADR/CADR Annual Meeting is in Fort Lauderdale, Fla., USA from March 21-24, 2018.
11h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Microorganisms can escape from a dead end by swimmingResearchers have shown that microorganisms can ingeniously escape from a dead end by swimming.The results pave the way to understanding the spread of infectious diseases.
11h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Which piece resembles your color perception for #theDress image?A novel algorithm to simulate the color appearance of objects under chromatic illuminants has been proposed by Ichiro Kuriki of Tohoku University.
11h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News

The bassoon causing new brain disorderNewly discovered gene mutations may help explain the cause of a disease that drastically impairs walking and thinking.
11h
Ingeniøren

Designerstjerne brænder ud syv måneder for tidligtKunstprojektet 'The Humanity Star' drev tilbage til Jordens atmosfæren og brændte op efter kun to måneder i rummet.
11h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Genetic switch activates transformation of stem cells into heart muscle cellsThe discovery of a genetic switch that triggers stem cells to turn into heart cells is a major step in finding treatment for damaged hearts.
11h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

High-resolution full color images can be formed using silicon-nanostructure pixelsColor prints produced on contemporary printers have a resolution of a few thousand dots per inch (dpi), but an alternative strategy that harnesses the power of nanotechnology can improve this resolution by an order of magnitude.
11h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Reusing electric pylons to design the roof of a train stationFor his Master's project, Joseph Desruelle devised a plan to reuse steel bars from dismantled electricity pylons to make a new roof for the Lausanne train station. This approach is still theoretical, but reusing materials in this way could one day become commonplace.
11h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Chemists develop new method to identify proteinsroteins are the worker bees of the cell, mainly ganging up to form macromolecular, multicomponent complexes to perform intricate cellular tasks.
11h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Microscopy trifecta examines how cells engulf nutrients, virusesScientists have a better understanding of a mechanism that allows cells to internalize beneficial nutrients and not-so-beneficial viruses, thanks to collaboration among researchers from two South Dakota universities and the National Institutes of Health.
11h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Research examines whether media can promote parent/child conversation about difficult topicsA new study of more than 5,000 teens, young adults and parents in four regions of the world found that watching the series 13 Reasons Why prompted teen and parent conversations about bullying, suicide and mental health.
11h
Futurity.org

For tough drug-resistant infections, specialists save livesInfectious disease specialists helped cut the 30-day death rate of patients with tough-to-treat, drug-resistant infections by more than half, report researchers. “The research emphasizes the positive influence infectious diseases physicians have on patient care and outcomes,” says Jason P. Burnham, the study’s first author and an instructor in medicine at Washington University School of Medicine
11h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Study tracks protein's role in stem cell functionMCL-1 is a member of the BCL-2 family of proteins important for blocking apoptosis, or programmed cell death. Many types of cancer cells escape the body's effort to kill them by overexpressing MCL-1.
11h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Researchers track Chinese space station as it fallsA defunct Chinese space station, Tiangong-1, is expected to fall to Earth any day now—on March 31, give or take a few days. When it does, it will be the largest manmade object to re-enter Earth's atmosphere in a decade.
11h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Expanding rings vital for viable embryosScientists have discovered a process during mammalian embryonic development that is critical for early embryos to develop into healthy blastocysts.
11h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Potential insecticide discovered in Earth's longest animalA family of potent protein neurotoxins have been discovered in bootlace worms, a University of Queensland researcher has found.
11h
Scientific American Content: Global

National Flood Insurance Is Underwater Because of Outdated ScienceThe FEMA program will continue to be financially unviable until it uses the latest research to help fix its broken system -- Read more on ScientificAmerican.com
11h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Researchers test new solutions to carcass disposal during food-animal disease outbreaksIowa State University researchers have completed testing of a key component of a new concept for disposing of animal carcasses following a disease outbreak. The research someday may help producers facing animal disease emergencies, such as in 2015 when avian influenza resulted in disposal of millions of chickens and turkeys in Iowa and other states.
11h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Forced sterilization programs in California once harmed thousands – particularly LatinasIn 1942, 18-year-old Iris Lopez, a Mexican-American woman, started working at the Calship Yards in Los Angeles. Working on the home front building Victory Ships not only added to the war effort, but allowed Iris to support her family.
11h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Mars Curiosity celebrates sol 2,000NASA's Mars Curiosity rover just hit a new milestone: its two-thousandth Martian day, or sol, on the Red Planet. An image mosaic taken by the rover in January offers a preview of what comes next.
11h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Hidden medical text read for the first time in a thousand yearsAn influential physician and a philosopher of early Western medicine, Galen of Pergamon was the doctor of emperors and gladiators. One of his many works, "On the Mixtures and Powers of Simple Drugs," was an important pharmaceutical text that would help educate fellow Greek-Roman doctors.
11h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Automated sea vehicles for monitoring the oceansA new company from ESA's UK business incubator has developed an autonomous boat that is propelled by the waves and carries ocean sensors powered by solar energy.
11h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Physicists at crossroads in trying to understand universeScientists at Rutgers University–New Brunswick and elsewhere are at a crossroads in their 50-year quest to go beyond the Standard Model in physics.
11h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Research suggests low density of snow leopards in Nepal's Conservation AreaThe snow leopard is a mammal species of the cat family found at high altitudes in Nepal and other countries around the Himalayan range. However, it has been included in the vulnerable category of IUCN Red list of threatened species in recent years for various reasons.
11h
Live Science

Did Human Noise Pollution Drive 150 Whales To Beach Themselves in Australia?A commercial fisherman in Australia spotted an alarming site this morning: Upward of 100 whales were stranded and dying on a beach at Hamelin Bay, about 180 miles south of Perth.
11h
New Scientist - News

US wants first drones that can kill people truly independentlySmall drones that can automatically spot, identify and target vehicles and people are planned by the US military, although humans would still be overseeing them
11h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

First-ever observations of a living anglerfish, a female with her tiny mate, coupled for lifeDown deep off the south slope of São Jorge Island in the Azores, west of Portugal in the North Atlantic Ocean, a fearsome-looking fish and her parasitically attached mate drift almost helplessly, salvaging precious energy in their dark, food-scarce environment.
11h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

When are many-body effects significant?NUS computational chemists have developed a method that can quickly identify which interactions between groups of molecules, or between parts of a very large molecule, are small and may be ignored. This enables the interactions between molecules to be computed more efficiently and accurately.
11h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Switching conduction mode—a step towards topological transistorsFLEET researchers achieved a significant landmark in the search for a functional topological transistor in 2017, using an applied electric field to switch the electronic conduction mode of a topological material.
11h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News

IPBES: Biodiversity and nature's contributions continue dangerous decline, scientists warnAfter three years of work by more than 550 leading experts from over 100 countries, the Intergovernmental Science-Policy Platform on Biodiversity and Ecosystem Services (IPBES) today published assessments of biodiversity and ecosystem services worldwide (except the poles and open oceans), divided into four major regions. IPBES, with 129 State Members, says biodiversity continues to decline in ever
11h
Ingeniøren

Energidebat: Skal landbruget tvinges ind i klimakampen?Skal landbruget pålægges at reducere deres CO2-udledning – for eksempel via en afgift på dyrehold og kunstgødning? Som optakt til forhandlingerne om et nyt energiforlig har vi bedt to centrale aktører og de politiske partier om et bud.
11h
Viden

'Lægen lo, da jeg sagde, at jeg ville have donorafføring'En afføringstransplantation i England kurerede Mette Thomsens irritable tyktarm, men der er lang vej igen, før vi indfører behandlingen i Danmark, siger overlæge.
11h
Feed: All Latest

Uber’s Fatal Crash, a Model 3 Review, and More Car NewsPlus, Elon Musk gets a nice Tesla compensation package, and everything else you missed this week.
11h
Scientific American Content: Global

What Does It Mean When We Call Addiction a Brain Disorder?The term acknowledges that addiction is a chronic but treatable medical condition involving changes to circuits involved in reward, stress and self-control -- Read more on ScientificAmerican.com
11h
The Atlantic

What Trump's Choice of Bolton RevealsRemember “bring in the grown-ups”? They have all now been carried off, with the sole exception of Secretary of Defense James Mattis. Instead, Trump is staffing his administration and his legal team with familiar personalities from his preferred cable-news channel—much like an imperious child demanding that his crib be stuffed with his TV-cartoon favorites. Now perhaps the most important West Wing
11h
The Scientist RSS

Image of the Day: Leprosy LesionResearchers identify two blood-clotting proteins that could be biomarkers for cardiovascular reactions in patients with leprosy.
12h
Science | The Guardian

Delete Facebook? That’s as hard as giving up sugar | Dean BurnettPlenty of people say they’re going to do it, but in the end can’t. So why do social networks have such a hold? The recently exposed Cambridge Analytica scandal, where intrepid Observer journalists revealed that more than 50 million Facebook profiles were harvested without consent for political ends, has shaken the worlds of media, politics, even international relations . Facebook itself has also t
12h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Genome of American cockroach sequenced for the first timeA team of researchers with South China Normal University and the Chinese Academy of Sciences has for the first time sequenced the genome of the American cockroach. In their paper published in the journal Nature Communications, the group describes features of the genome likely to prove useful to the insect in adapting so well to human environments.
12h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Diffusiophoresis found to be critical factor for getting clothes cleanA team of researchers with members from the University of Hawaii, the Unilever company and Princeton University has found that the critical factor involved in cleaning clothes in a washing machine is a phenomenon called diffusiophoresis, a type of diffusion caused by electric fields, combined with chemophoresis, diffusion caused by differences in concentration gradients. They have published their
12h
Futurity.org

Could heat ‘brain switch’ lead to Alzheimer’s treatment?A newly discovered class of proteins that heat actives can be useful tools for regulating the activity of individual neurons in the brain through changes in temperature, according to a new paper. These tools will advance fundamental brain research and potentially lead to “deep brain stimulation” treatments used for Alzheimer’s and Parkinson’s patients. “Thermogenetic tools, which utilize heat to
12h
Popular Science

These fish build group homes that double as devious shrimp trapsAnimals Teamwork is dreamwork. We don't generally think of fish as being super collaborative animals. But Neolamprologus obscurus—found only in a single lake in Zambia—teams up to dig burrows that…
12h
Ingeniøren

Professor: Hvem har ansvaret for Uber-ulykken?Er det Uber, chaufføren, offeret, Volvo eller samfundet, der har ansvaret, når en fodgænger bliver påkørt af en selvkørende bil?
12h
TED Talks Daily (SD video)

The rhythm of Afrobeat | Sauti SolFrom Beyoncé to Drake and beyond, the world is rocking to the rhythm of Afrobeat. Feel the music as Kenyan afro-pop superstars Sauti Sol take the TED stage to perform three songs: "Live and Die in Afrika," "Sura Yako" and "Kuliko Jana."
12h
Feed: All Latest

How a Boise, Idaho Company Thrives in the Global Chip BusinessMicron Technology is the only remaining US maker of DRAM, the short-term memory chips found in computers and smartphones.
12h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Amazon Echo vs Google Home vs Apple HomePod: Which is right for you?You've no doubt heard the buzz about smart speakers. Why else would you be reading this article? A few years ago, if you wanted a smart speaker with a hands-free digital assistant, there was only one option. The Amazon Echo was one-of-a-kind when it debuted in November 2014, and it launched into uncharted waters unsure if it would find a home with consumers.
12h
Science-Based Medicine

A Woman Dies from a Severe Allergic Reaction After Live Bee Acupuncture SessionA woman in Spain has died from a severe allergic reaction after a session of live bee acupuncture. With low plausibility, the potential for fatal outcomes, no evidence to suggest that benefits outweigh even minor side effects, and lots of dead bees, this is an intervention that should be avoided.
12h
The Atlantic

McMaster's Choice“They have their exits and their entrances,” wrote Shakespeare, and so it is, as we see some actors deliver frantic speeches while others leap, slide, or crawl on and off the foreign-policy stage. Rex Tillerson said farewell to the Department of State much as he entered it: clueless about government service, clueless about his department, and clueless about his boss. He invoked the cliché of Wash
12h
Ingeniøren

ANALYSE: Med en Kattegatbro bliver der ikke noget med at køre gratis over StorebæltEn Kattegatforbindelse er økonomisk afhængig af, at man fastholder prisen for at køre over Storebælt, selv om broen er betalt ud. Bliver Storebælt gratis, skal staten finde 21 milliarder kroner.
13h
BBC News - Science & Environment

Whales in mass stranding on Western Australia beachAbout 150 animals wash up on a beach south of Perth, prompting a major rescue effort.
13h
BBC News - Science & Environment

Engineering giantA new museum dedicated to IK Brunel reveals the man behind the carefully cultivated public image.
13h
BBC News - Science & Environment

Human-eye VRVR has suffered from an image problem, so could very high resolution headsets be the answer?
13h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Antimicrobial used in toiletries could become option against malariaA study conducted at the University of Campinas (UNICAMP) in Brazil shows that triclosan, an antimicrobial compound used in soap, toothpaste, deodorant and many other products, can inhibit target genes in the malaria parasite during two crucial stages of its life cycle in humans—the hepatic stage, when it reproduces in the host's liver cells, and the erythrocytic stage, when it infects red blood c
13h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Sharpening the X-ray view of the nanocosmA novel lens offers scientists the sharpest X-ray images yet from the nano world. The device is made from alternating layers of tungsten carbide and silicon carbide and can focus hard X-rays into a spot of less than ten nanometers in diameter. The study, led by Saša Bajt from the German research center Deutsches Elektronen-Synchrotron DESY, is reported in Light: Science and Applications.
13h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Microarray rapid test speeds up detection during a Legionella pneumophila outbreakIn an outbreak of Legionnaires' disease, finding the exact source as quickly as possible is essential to preventing further infections. To date, a standard analysis takes days. Researchers at the Technical University of Munich have now developed a rapid test that achieves the same result in about 35 minutes.
13h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

The efficiency of nature-inspired metaheuristics in limited-budget expensive global optimizationGlobal optimization problems in which evaluation of the objective function is an expensive operation arise frequently in engineering, machine learning, decision making, statistics, optimal control, etc. A general global optimization problem requires to find a point x* and the value f(x*) being the global (i.e., the deepest) minimum of a function f(x) over an N-dimensional domain D, where f(x) can
13h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Wealth inequality—closing the gap by taxing land and bequestsTo reduce wealth inequality without diminishing the economic performance of a country, a policy package of bequest taxes and land value taxes could be the optimal solution. Such a policy package would, in fact, have a strong advantage over corporate taxation, according to a new study published in the journal International Tax and Public Finance. It is the first analysis to include the so-far negle
13h
New Scientist - News

CRISPR immune system lets silkworms defeat viral infectionsThe CRISPR immune system from bacteria has been engineered into silkworms, allowing them to fight off a virus that plagues the silk industry
13h
Ingeniøren

Grønlands sundhedsvæsen ramt af it-nedbrud: Kom kun med akutte tilfældeOmfattende it-nedbrud har ramt sundhedsvæsenet i Grønland - borgere opfordret til til kun at komme med akutte problemer.
13h
Ingeniøren

It-supportchef fra Region Sjælland dømt for bestikkelseEn it-supportchef fra Region Sjælland har fået en dom på 60 dages betinget fængsel for at have modtaget bestikkelse.
13h
Dagens Medicin

Her er regionernes bestyrelse og udvalgsformændDanske Regioner har sat navn på bestyrelses- og udvalgsmedlemmer.
13h
New Scientist - News

Fresh water can pull stains out of fabric with an electric fieldRinsing fabrics with lots of fresh water after soaping them up creates a small electric field that pulls dirt particles lodged deep between fabric fibres
13h
NYT > Science

150 Whales Beached in Australia, as Rescuers Fight to Save ThemPoor weather and the threat of sharks were hindering emergency efforts.
13h
Feed: All Latest

Montecito Is Everything Bad About Climate Change in a Single California TownIn four months, the southern California town has seen mudslides, the largest wildfire in state history, and now flash floods.
13h
Feed: All Latest

Uber's Fatal Crash and the Ethics of Testing Self-Driving CarsThe true ethical dilemma with driverless cars isn't the trolley problem—it's whether we should be testing them on public streets at all.
13h
Latest Headlines | Science News

50 years ago, invasive species traveled the Suez CanalHundreds of Red Sea species used the Suez Canal to migrate to the Mediterranean Sea, leading to the decline of some native species.
13h
Scientific American Content: Global

A Quest for Old, Cold MudSediments from frigid lakes on Baffin Island tell the story of climate change over the past 10,000 years -- Read more on ScientificAmerican.com
13h
Ingeniøren

Hør ugens podcast om Kattegatbro og kæmpevulkanerTransformator handler denne uge om den Kattegatforbindelse, som regeringen har trukket frem af skuffen igen – nu uden togskinner. Vi taler også om den ikke-negligerbare trussel fra kæmpevulkaner.
13h
Viden

Sådan stopper du apps på Facebook i at snage i dit liv50 millioner Facebook-brugere har fået misbrugt deres data. Undgå at blive den næste.
14h
Viden

Eksperter: Uber skyld i dødsulykke med førerløs bilEn almindelig bilist ville have undgået fodgængeren, lyder vurderingen fra flere eksperter, efter politiet har frigivet en video af dødsulykken.
14h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

South Africa's Naspers cashes in $10bn Tencent stakeSouth African internet and entertainment group Naspers on Friday raised $9.8 billion (7.8 billion euros) selling two percent of its hugely-profitable stake in Chinese technology giant Tencent.
14h
Ingeniøren

Reaktioner på Kattegatbro: Hvad nu med alle de andre vejprojekter?Industrien jubler, miljøorganisationerne advarer, og områder langt fra Kattegat advarer mod at prioritere to nye broer uden at bygge de veje, som de har brug for
14h
Scientific American Content: Global

Wave of Climate Migration Looms, but It "Doesn’t Have to Be a Crisis"Slow-onset climate impacts could displace 140 million in their own countries by 2050 -- Read more on ScientificAmerican.com
14h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Scientists explore the structure of a key region of longevity protein telomeraseScientists from Moscow State University (MSU) working with an international team of researchers have identified the structure of one of the key regions of telomerase—a so-called "cellular immortality" ribonucleoprotein. Structural and functional studies on this protein are important for the development of potential anticancer drugs. The results of the study have been published in Nucleic Acids Res
14h
Futurity.org

Finally, the mysterious first part of photosynthesis comes into viewResearchers have been able to capture the moment a photon sparks the first steps of energy conversion in photosynthesis. Photosynthesis has driven life on this planet for more than 3 billion years—first in bacteria, then in plants—but we don’t know exactly how it works. The new research could shed more light on the process. In photosynthesis, light strikes colored molecules that are embedded with
14h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News

The brain learns completely differently than we've assumed since the 20th centuryBased on experimental evidence physicists publish revolutionary new theory on brain learning that contradicts the most common assumption in neuroscience, will transform our understanding of brain function, and open new horizons for advanced deep learning algorithms.
14h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Analyzing past failures may boost future performance by reducing stressA new study suggests for the first time that reflection of past failures might prepare an individual for the next challenge by changing the body's response to stress. The US research team found that writing about a past failure led to lower levels of the 'stress' hormone, cortisol, better choices and better outcomes on a new stressful task. This technique may help improve performance in a variety
14h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Generation of a stable biradicalBoron has a range of uses, from laundry bleaches to heat-proof glass and ceramics. Chemists at Julius-Maximilians-Universität Würzburg (JMU) in Bavaria, Germany, have a particular interest in the chemistry of this element and have been researching the fundamental properties of boron for years. These researchers have now succeeded in twisting molecules with multiple bonds between boron atoms, leadi
14h
Futurity.org

Cell discovery could personalize treatment for glaucomaResearchers have taken a step closer to the goal of precision medicine for treating glaucoma and other neurodegenerative vision diseases. For the first time, scientists identified a wide variety of previously unknown cell subtypes in the human eye. The cells—called retinal ganglion cells, also known as RGCs—are the neurons that take visual information from the eye to the brain for processing and
14h
Live Science

China's 8.5-Ton Space Lab Expected to Fall to Earth Over Easter WeekendChina’s Tiangong-1 space lab will likely fall to Earth between March 30 and April 2, according to the latest prediction by the European Space Agency’s (ESA) Space Debris Office in Darmstadt, Germany.
14h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Africa's young professionals embracing 'gospel of bitcoin'In a sleek new high-rise in Uganda's capital, an enthusiastic lecturer described his financial success with the cryptocurrency bitcoin while his earnings were projected on a screen.
14h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Scientists dedicate the birth of a new black hole to Stephen HawkingOne of the MASTER Global Robotic Net telescopes (MSU) located on Tenerife (Spain, Canary Islands) helped astronomers observe the gamma-ray burst caused by the collapse of a star and the formation of a black hole in its place. Standard telescopes are unable to point to gamma-ray bursts error-boxes fast enough to monitor the change in its brightness and obtain any information about its source. The s
14h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

When the Mediteranean Sea flooded human settlementsAround 7,600 years ago, the emergence of agricultural settlements in Southeastern Europe and subsequent progress of civilization suddenly came to a standstill. This was most likely caused by an abrupt sea level rise in the northern Aegean Sea. Researchers of the Senckenberg Biodiversity and Climate Research Centre, the Goethe University in Frankfurt and the University of Toronto have now detected
14h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Skilled female potters travelled around the Baltic nearly 5000 years agoResearchers at the archaeology laboratory have determined the origin and trajectories of clay pottery from nearly 5000 years ago. During the Corded Ware Culture period, Finland, Estonia and Sweden produced skilful female artisans who learned to create fashionable and innovative pottery in the eastern region of the Gulf of Finland. The Baltic Sea countries also had a close network for trade in pott
14h
The Atlantic

This Is So Much Bigger Than FacebookAfter five days of silence, Mark Zuckerberg finally acknowledged the massive data compromise that allowed Cambridge Analytica to obtain extensive psychographic information about 50 million Facebook users. His statement, which acknowledged that Facebook had made mistakes in responding to the situation, wasn’t much of an apology—Zuckerberg and Facebook have repeatedly demonstrated they seem to have
14h
The Atlantic

What Gun-Control Activists Can Learn From the Civil-Rights MovementHundreds of thousands of young Americans are expected to show up at the March for Our Lives rally in Washington, D.C., on Saturday to demand that Congress do something about gun control. In the aftermath of the horrific high-school shooting in Parkland, Florida, these activists are trying to end the political gridlock on gun violence. The march is a display of grass-roots enthusiasm, intended to
14h
Dagens Medicin

13 organisationer opfordrer til at trække lovforslag om Genom Center tilbageI et åbent brev opfordrer 13 organisationer Folketinget til at trække lovforslaget om Nationalt Genom Center tilbage grundet uklare juridske formuleringer.
14h
Live Science

This Mysterious Deep-Sea Creature Has Never Been Seen Alive Before. Until Now.In the deep North Atlantic, a small but ghastly-looking anglerfish floats in the inky-black water, eerily lit by her wispy, glowing fishing lure and the specks of light illuminating her long fin rays.
14h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Apple's new flagship Chicago store is for sale, and could fetch $170 million or moreApple iPad MacBookApple's new flagship store on Michigan Avenue is going up for sale and could fetch at least $170 million.
14h
Big Think

Meltdown: Why our systems fail and what we can do about itToday, we are in the golden age of meltdowns. More and more of our systems are in the danger zone, but our ability to manage them hasn’t quite caught up. Read More
14h
Ingeniøren

Klimaændringer forhindrer Vikingeskibsmuseet i at udbygge under jordenUanset om Vikingeskibsmuseet bliver affredet eller ej, bliver der brug for mere plads. Indtil for nylig lød planen på underjordiske udbygninger. Men de er nu skyllet væk.
14h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

What Facebook's Mark Zuckerberg didn't say (and what it took him hours to)Mark Zuckerberg apologized—but you had to wait for it.
15h
Live Science

Move Over, 'Tomb Raider': Here Are 11 Pioneering Women ArchaeologistsPopular "Tomb Raider" Lara Croft can't hold a candle to these groundbreaking women in archaeology.
15h
Ingeniøren

Roskildes nye elbusser kommer fra KinaRoskilde Kommune slipper for den store ladeinfrastruktur, når de bliver først med elbusser på alle linjer. Det skyldes den kinesiske batteristrategi.
15h
Dagens Medicin

Udgifter til medicin steg med over en halv mia. kr. i 2017Regionernes medicinudgifter steg i 2017 med 654 mio. kr. Lægemiddelindustriforeningen mener, at der er behov for flerårige budgetter eller særlige puljer, som kan hjælpe regionerne med at absorbere store udgiftsstigninger på medicinområdet.
15h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Firefox maker Mozilla to stop Facebook advertising because of data scandalMozilla, the makers of the popular Firefox web browser, said it will stop advertising on Facebook following a data scandal impacting tens of millions of users.
15h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

How listening to random sound can unlock a trapped mindDavid Tobin took to the stage at a recent technology conference in downtown Los Angeles, asked the 500 attendees to close their eyes, and turned up the sound so they could sample his wares: a textured, layered soundscape that he calls an "audiojack."
15h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Olive ridley turtles hatch in Mumbai after two decadesTiny olive ridley turtles have hatched in India's financial capital Mumbai for the first time in two decades after a major cleanup of a beach, officials said Friday.
15h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Facebook needed third-party apps to grow. Now it's left with a privacy crisisFacebook Data Cambridge AnalyticaFacebook had only 20 million users when it opened up its budding platform to outside app developers in 2007, giving them much-needed access to the social network's growing web of friends and family.
15h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Investigating the enigmatic link between periodontal inflammation and retinal degenerationAt the 47th Annual Meeting of the American Association for Dental Research (AADR), held in conjunction with the 42nd Annual Meeting of the Canadian Association for Dental Research (CADR), Hyun Hong, The Dental College of Georgia at Augusta University, presented a poster titled 'Investigating the Enigmatic Link Between Periodontal Inflammation and Retinal Degeneration.' The AADR/CADR Annual Meeting
15h
Science | The Guardian

Sorry, Jordan Peterson: rage isn’t a great look for a self-help guru | Nesrine MalikA run-in with Cathy Newman, a Twitter meltdown … maybe the would-be philosopher’s problem is being challenged Why is Jordan Peterson so angry? For someone whose whole routine is based on telling men to “toughen up”, the clinical psychologist and author of the bestseller 12 Rules for Life: An Antidote to Chaos , who rose to prominence in the UK after his run-in with Cathy Newman on Channel 4 , seem
15h
The Atlantic

The Two Major Deals Congress Couldn't StrikeCongress crammed something for just about everyone into the $1.3 trillion spending package unveiled on Wednesday—more money for the military, border security, the opioid epidemic, infrastructure, student loans, election security, and even a few modest measures to prevent gun violence . But lawmakers whiffed on striking agreements on two of their biggest priorities of the last six months: stabiliz
15h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Apple is about to become the biggest R&D spender in the worldCritics of Apple used to point to its $250 billion-plus mountain of cash, much of it held overseas, and its relatively puny research and development budget and say, "Get spending!" The era of parsimony is over. After the GOP tax cut, Apple said it will be repatriating hundreds of billions of dollars, paying up to $38 billion in taxes on it, over the coming years.
15h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

'OK, Google, send cash to my friend': Google Assistant lets you use voice to pay back IOUsThe Google Assistant can now help you pay back the money you owe a friend. Google announced that starting today you'll be able to send or request money from the contacts on your Android device or iPhone, via a voice command along the lines of "Hey Google, send Janie $15 for lunch today."
15h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Google honors geochemist Katsuko SaruhashiGoogle is using its logo Thursday to honor a pioneer in geochemistry.
15h
The Atlantic

The Vatican Is Wooing Silicon ValleyROME—Barely 100 yards away from a statue of Giordano Bruno, the freethinking friar who was burned at the stake in 1600 after the Catholic Church found him guilty of heresy, some of the world’s brightest young people gathered earlier this month for the opening of an unprecedented event: a hackathon convened by the Vatican. Pope Francis blessed it. Google and Microsoft backed it. Dubbed VHacks, the
15h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Fed up with Facebook? Here's how to break it offFacebook Data CambridgeFed up with Facebook? You're not alone. A growing number of people are deleting it, or at least wrestling with whether they should, in light of its latest privacy debacle—allegations that a Trump-linked data-mining firm stole information on tens of millions of users to influence elections.
16h
Science | The Guardian

How the earliest plants made our world muddyThe first plants to make it on to land altered mud production and where it formed rocks, changing our planet forever How and when the earliest plants made the first move on to land is always a hot topic for palaeobotanists. We know that early land plants likely evolved from freshwater algae, gaining a bunch of necessary adaptations in the process. Plants needed to support themselves, protect them
16h
Nyheder - Forskning - Videnskab

Unge der bruger hash hver måned dropper ofte uddannelseUnge med et 'jævnligt' forbrug af hash – dvs. bare ti gange om året – har også...
16h
Nyheder - Forskning - Videnskab

Færre kvote 2-ansøgere efter karakterkravKøbenhavns Universitet oplever et fald i antallet af kvote 2-ansøgere i forhold til sidste...
16h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Japan firms face charges over alleged maglev bid-riggingJapanese authorities on Friday pressed criminal charges against four major construction firms suspected of colluding to win contracts for Japan's multi-billion-dollar maglev project.
16h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Nissan not changing autonomous drive tests over Uber crashNissan's chief planning officer said Friday the Japanese automaker does not plan to change its road tests for self-driving vehicles after the recent fatal accident of an Uber autonomous vehicle.
16h
Dagens Medicin

Nyt forskningscenter skal gøre danske læger bedre til at bruge stråleterapiNationalt Forskningscenter for Stråleterapi skal øge viden om strålebehandling, så den kommer flere patienter til gavn.
16h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Scientists release mammoth survey of Nature's vital signsScientists will deliver a comprehensive assessment Friday of the state of biodiversity—the animals and plants that humankind depends on to survive but has driven into a mass species extinction.
16h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Hackers demanding bitcoin ransom attack Atlanta city computersHackers demanding ransom payable in bitcoin have attacked computers of the Atlanta city government in the southern US state of Georgia, officials say.
16h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Mahathir raises 'remote takeover' theory in MH370 mysteryMalaysia's veteran ex-leader Mahathir Mohamad said Friday that missing flight MH370 might have been taken over remotely in a bid to foil a hijack, reviving one of the many conspiracy theories surrounding its disappearance.
16h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Zuckerberg's shine dims as guardian of Facebook usersMark Zuckerberg rose to wealth and fame with a mission of connecting everyone through Facebook, but now faces the wrath of users outraged he isn't doing more to defend their data.
16h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Tyson the stray hippo captured in MexicoA stray hippopotamus that had been roaming around the countryside in Mexico has been captured after a 10-day hunt and relocated to a wildlife refuge, authorities said Tuesday.
16h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

More than 130 pilot whales die in mass Australia beachingAt least 135 short-finned pilot whales died Friday after a mass beaching in Australia as rescuers worked to herd those still alive back out to sea.
16h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Uber Self-Driving Crash Calls Safety, Rules Into QuestionVideo of a fatal pedestrian crash involving a self-driving Uber vehicle that some experts say exposes flaws in autonomous vehicle technology is prompting calls to slow down testing on public roads and renewing concerns about regulatory readiness.
16h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Facebook's widening crisis over user dataFacebook is facing the most serious crisis in its 14-year history as it deals with fallout from a major leak of user data to political consultants associated with the 2016 Trump campaign.
16h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Grouping students into ability-based sets holds back less able pupilsStudents classed as less able are being hindered by being grouped into ability-based sets, according to new research published today in the Cambridge Journal of Education.
17h
Ingeniøren

Bilgigant: Vi skal ikke acceptere latterlige manuelle data-processerAnalytics skal være en del af kernen i din virksomhed - ikke en tilføjelse, siger analysechef hos Jaguar Land Rover.
18h
Ingeniøren

Ethical hacking: Må man dele en it-sårbarhed?Har man ret til at bringe andre folks system-integritet i fare, hvis det er for at forhindre et større angreb, eller er det endda en undladelsessynd, hvis man lader være? Version2 har snakket Responsible Disclosure Policy med Claus Vesthammer, COO i Improsec.
18h
Science | The Guardian

Four in 10 cancer cases could be prevented by lifestyle changesActions like drinking less alcohol and keeping weight down could help prevent 2,500 cases a week, figures show Almost four in 10 cancer cases in the UK could be prevented if British people changed their lifestyles by drinking less alcohol, keeping their weight down, ditching cigarettes and avoiding overdoing it on a sunbed, among other actions, research has revealed. New figures from Cancer Resea
18h
Science | The Guardian

Selective schools make no difference to GCSE results, study saysAnalysis undercuts argument that grammar schools are needed for the brightest pupils to reach their full academic potential Selective schools make no difference to pupils’ GCSE results, according to a scientific analysis that undercuts the argument that grammar schools are necessary for the brightest pupils to reach their full academic potential. The study showed that the 7% difference in perform
18h
Dagens Medicin

Bent Hansen bliver politisk kommentator på Dagens MedicinRegionernes tidligere formand vil analysere ideologien bag beslutningerne i sundhedssektoren. Og ingen vil blive skånet.
18h
Ingeniøren

Leder: Vandprøve-skandalen – ansvaret kan altså ikke outsources
18h
The Atlantic

Radio Atlantic: The Family Unit in a Divided EraThe family is where the forces that are driving Americans farther apart—political polarization, generational divides, class stratification, Facebook fights—literally hit home. Economic, ideological, and technological shifts pose uncertain consequences for what Daniel Patrick Moynihan called “the basic social unit of American life.” And not even a burgeoning industry of experts can tell parents wh
20h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Different neural strategies for junior high school male and female English learnersResearchers from Tokyo Metropolitan University studied the neural response of Japanese junior high school students learning English as a second language, while listening to English sentences. More proficient boys showed more activation in parts of the brain associated with grammatical rules (syntax); girls used a wider range of language information, including speech sounds (phonology) and meaning
20h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Care providers' understanding of obesity treatment is limitedDespite the high prevalence of obesity among US adults, provision of recommended treatments for obesity remains low.
20h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Sharpening the X-ray view of the nanocosmA novel lens offers scientists the sharpest X-ray images yet from the nano world. The device is made from alternating layers of tungsten carbide and silicon carbide and can focus hard X-rays into a spot of less than ten nanometers in diameter as a team lead by Saša Bajt from the German research center Deutsches Elektronen-Synchrotron DESY report in Light: Science and Applications, a journal of the
20h
Ingeniøren

Derfor er flydende biobrændsel blevet henvist til et liv i skyggenAnalyse: El fra vind og sol har stjålet rampelyset i debatten om fremtidens transportsystem. Men eksperter er enige om, at der er brug for flydende biobrændsler for at sikre bæredygtighed i transporten.
20h
ArXiv Query

Spectral Statistics of Non-Hermitian Random Matrix EnsemblesRecently Burkhardt et. al. introduced the $k$-checkerboard random matrix ensembles, which have a split limiting behavior of the eigenvalues (in the limit all but $k$ of the eigenvalues are on the order of $\sqrt{N}$ and converge to semi-circular behavior, with the remaining $k$ of size $N$ and converging to hollow Gaussian ensembles). We generalize their work to consider non-Hermitian ensembles wi
23h
New Scientist - News

Does your kids’ DNA matter more than which school they go to?How well your kids do at school depends in part on the DNA you bequeathed them. What’s not clear is what we should do about this
23h
Feed: All Latest

'Pacific Rim Uprising' Review: A Big, Loud Movie That Needs Guillermo del ToroFor all its scale and sound, the kaiju sequel packs none of the punch of the 2013 original.
23h
BBC News - Science & Environment

How science GCSEs in England are changingStudents will be graded numerically on a scale from 9 to 1.
1d
BBC News - Science & Environment

How DNA can be used to store computer dataBritish scientists think DNA could be used to solve a global problem - where to store all our data.
1d
Feed: All Latest

Facebook’s New Data Restrictions Will Handcuff Even Honest ResearchersFacebook Data Cambridge AnalyticaIt was already hard for researchers to use Facebook's data. It looks like it's about to get harder.
1d
EurekAlert! - Breaking News

More than 2,500 cancer cases a week could be avoidedMore than 135,500 cases of cancer a year in the UK could be prevented through lifestyle changes, according to new figures from a Cancer Research UK landmark study.
1d
EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Care home admissions risk breaching human rights of older peopleThousands of older people in low and middle-income countries are at risk of abuse and human rights violations when being admitted to care homes, according to new research led by the University of East Anglia (UEA).The study provides the first systematic analysis of admissions practices for residential long-term care facilities, assessing the extent to which older people are involved in admission d
1d
Science | The Guardian

New MS drug could slow symptoms of 'untreatable' form of diseaseSiponimod offers hope for people with secondary progressive MS, in which disabilities get worse over time A new drug for multiple sclerosis could slow the progression of symptoms of a form of the disease for which effective treatments have proved elusive, research suggests. It is thought about 100,000 people in the UK and 2,500,000 people worldwide have MS, a neurological condition that can affec
1d
Live Science

Reproductive System: Facts, Functions & DiseasesThis may be the most important system in the body. Without the ability to reproduce, a species dies.
1d
Futurity.org

Better test for ovarian cancer would take Pap fartherResearchers have developed a test that provides a safe and minimally invasive method for earlier diagnosis of ovarian and endometrial cancers. This test—called PapSEEK—aims to analyze small amounts of cancer DNA obtained from Pap samples from the cervix, uterus, as well as blood by identifying common genetic mutations associated with these cancers. A team from the Research Institute of McGill Uni
1d
Feed: All Latest

Trump’s Latest China Tariffs Could Hurt Tech—and Even Social MediaPresident Trump says he will impose tariffs on about $60 billion of Chinese goods in response to "tremendous intellectual property theft."
1d
EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Men should be included in trials to find better treatments for breast cancerProfessor Robert Mansel, Chair of the 11th European Breast Cancer Conference (EBCC-11) and Emeritus Professor of Surgery at Cardiff University School of Medicine, UK, has called for men to be included in trials to improve treatments for breast cancer. This follows new research presented at EBCC-11 on Friday that show that if women are pre-treated with targeted drugs to shrink tumours before surger
1d
EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Women report fewer adverse side effects from partial or reduced breast radiotherapyThe average number of moderate or marked side-effects reported by breast cancer patients is lower if they are treated with radiotherapy to part of the breast or a reduced dose to the whole breast, rather than with standard radiotherapy to the whole breast, according to new findings presented at the 11th European Breast Cancer Conference.
1d
EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Low risk of a local recurrence 5 years after surgery for early breast cancer patientsWomen with small, low grade, well-defined breast tumours and a genetic profile that shows they are at low risk of the cancer metastasising have only a 1.4% risk of the cancer returning to the site of the original tumour or the nearby lymph nodes within five years, according to new results from a large randomised trial of nearly 7000 patients presented at the European Breast Cancer Conference.
1d
EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Fewer breast cancer patients need radical surgery if they are pre-treated with targeted drugsExtensive surgery involving mastectomy and removal of several lymph nodes can be safely avoided for more women with some types of breast cancer, if they receive targeted drugs before surgery, according to research presented at the 11th European Breast Cancer Conference.
1d
NYT > Science

Trilobites: What Makes Some Hair Curly? Not Quite What Scientists ThoughtAfter testing two theories about what makes sheep’s wool kinky, researchers found flaws in existing ideas about how different types of cells contribute to curliness in hair.
1d
The Atlantic

The Atlantic Daily: The Next GenerationWhat We’re Following Shake-Ups on Trump’s Team: President Trump is replacing National-Security Adviser H.R. McMaster with John Bolton, a former United Nations ambassador who’s advocated for military action against North Korea. Here’s what that means. Earlier in the day, Trump’s personal lawyer John Dowd announced he’s stepping down from the president’s legal team in the Russia case. Dowd’s decisi
1d
NeuWrite San Diego

“Find My Friends”, Brain editionHave you ever felt hyper-aware of where another person is, almost like you’ve got some internal GPS that’s automatically tracking their location? Perhaps you’ve felt this way (however creepily) when you’ve had a major crush on someone, to the point that you’re exceptionally tuned in to where that person is in a room at any […]
1d
Futurity.org

Progress toward workplace gender equality has ‘stalled out’Progress towards gender equality has slowed or stalled entirely since the latter half of the 20th century, when, for many measures of gender inequality, women rapidly made up ground, according to a report. “We’re in a new world of snail’s pace change…” The State of the Union report, published by the Stanford University Center on Poverty and Inequality, addresses key questions about gender inequal
1d
Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

For graphite pellets, just add elbow greaseResearchers crush and press functionalized graphene to make strong, light graphite pellets that hold promise for electronic and catalytic applications.
1d
Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

Using light to turn yeast into biochemical factoriesResearchers have used a combination of light and genetic engineering to controlling the metabolism, or basic chemical process, of a living cell. Building on techniques that already have transformed the field of neuroscience, the researchers used light to control genetically-modified yeast and increase its output of commercially valuable chemicals.
1d
Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

Direct evidence of exposure of pregnant women to herbicide ingredientThe first birth cohort study of its kind has found more than 90 percent of a group of pregnant women in Central Indiana had detectable levels of glyphosate, the active ingredient in Roundup, the most heavily used herbicide worldwide.
1d
Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

Waterbirds affected by low water, high salt levels in lakesA recent study shows food sources for migratory birds decline with low water levels and high salt content in lakes.
1d
Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

The mouse brain can prioritize hunger by suppressing pain when survival is at stakeDifferent behaviors are often studied in isolation, leaving unanswered questions about how the brain processes needs and prioritizes behaviors to ensure survival. Now, researchers have shown that pain and hunger interact in complex ways in mice: extreme hunger suppresses less-urgent inflammatory pain, but leaves them able to feel and react to more life-and-death kinds of pain. The study pinpoints
1d
The Atlantic

McMaster Is Out, an Even Bigger North Korea Hawk Is InOn Thursday, Donald Trump replaced a man who built the case for war with North Korea as a last resort with a man who just made the case for war with North Korea as more of a first resort. Trump announced that National-Security Adviser H.R. McMaster will be succeeded by John Bolton, the George W. Bush-era United Nations ambassador who has advocated for U.S. military action to prevent Saddam Hussei
1d
Futurity.org

You won’t believe how metrics drive clickbait newsNew research shows how “clickbait” caught on in the modern newsroom and how data metrics have changed journalism. “Articles that couldn’t be compared before now can be compared using a single metric: clicks. That transforms the internal dynamic of newsrooms.” We’ve all been lured by captivating headlines from online news publications: You’ll never believe it. What happens next will shock you. Eig
1d
Futurity.org

U.S. forests caught up in climate change loopClimate change-induced shifts in rainfall and temperature are causing a swing in the abundance of numerous tree species, a new study suggests. “Without a long-term dataset with millions of trees, we probably could not have detected these changes.” That means that some forests in the eastern United States are already starting to look different. More importantly, it also means the ability of those
1d
Futurity.org

Mat ‘baits, hooks, and destroys’ pollution in waterResearchers have created a polymer mat has the ability to fish biologically harmful contaminants from water through a strategy known as “bait, hook, and destroy.” Tests with wastewater showed the mat can efficiently remove targeted pollutants, in this case a pair of biologically harmful endocrine disruptors, using a fraction of the energy required by other technology. The technique can also treat
1d
Futurity.org

Think you’d be Robin Hood? Most are OK with inequalityVoters in modern democracies have long had the power to take from the rich, give to the poor, and erase the huge economic inequalities that separate the vast majority of people from the super-wealthy elites. But given the chance to do as Robin Hood famously did, most people show little interest in making dramatic wealth transfers, instead choosing to redistribute only about 12 percent of all fund
1d
NYT > Science

Greenhouse Gas Emissions Rose Last Year. Here Are the Top 5 Reasons.The world needs to reduce emissions to avoid drastic global warming. For now, a new study shows, we’re moving in the opposite direction.
1d
Dagens Medicin

Hjemmeprøve får flere kvinder testet for HPVFlere kvinder bliver screenet for livmoderhalskræft, hvis de får tilsendt en hjemmetest, viser undersøgelse fra Region Midtjylland.
1d
Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

Epidural stimulation shown to normalize blood pressure following spinal cord injuryWorking with human research participants, researchers have found that spinal cord epidural stimulation can safely and effectively elevate blood pressure in individuals with SCI along with chronic hypotension.
1d
Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

Obesity surgery linked to positive outcomes in very obese teens with diabetesThis study is the first to compare glycemic control in two groups of very obese adolescents with type 2 diabetes.
1d
Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

Research suggests low density of snow leopards in Nepal`s Conservation AreaThe snow leopard is a mammal species of the cat family found at high altitudes in Nepal and other countries around the Himalayan range. However, it has been included in the vulnerable category of IUCN Red list of threatened species in recent years for various reasons.
1d
Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

One in 10 people have traces of cocaine or heroin on their fingerprintsScientists have found that drugs are now so prevalent that 13 percent of those taking part in a test were found to have traces of class A drugs on their fingerprints -- despite never using them.
1d
Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

Pap test fluids used in gene-based screening test for two gyn cancersCervical fluid samples gathered during routine Papanicolaou (Pap) tests are the basis of a new screening test for endometrial and ovarian cancers.
1d
Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

Gene-based test for urine detects, monitors bladder cancerResearchers have developed a test for urine, gathered during a routine procedure, to detect DNA mutations identified with urothelial cancers.
1d
Live Science

Your Grilled Burger May Come with a Side of High Blood PressureRegularly eating meats that are sizzled on the grill may increase the risk of high blood pressure, a new study suggests.
1d
Futurity.org

Scientists create images with groups of bacteriaResearchers are able to shape the growth of bacterial communities by working with light and genetically engineered bacteria, creating intricate designs, from polka dots to stripes to circuits, overnight. The technique, described in the Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences , can achieve biofilms grown at a resolution of 25 micrometers, which is about one-tenth the size of a grain of tab
1d
Popular Science

The great Pacific garbage patch is even trashier than we thoughtEnvironment The ocean is flooded with plastic. Plastic is everywhere, from our homes and everyday lives all the way up to the illusorily pristine Arctic. The oceans are no exception—our high seas are accumulating…
1d
New on MIT Technology Review

Jeff Bezos gave a sneak peek into Amazon’s futureAmazon is a notoriously secretive company, but its recent conference provides a glance at its far-out plans.
1d
The Atlantic

The Atlantic Politics & Policy Daily: Without a DowdToday in 5 Lines The House passed a $1.3 trillion spending bill, sending it to the Senate for approval. Congress has until the end of Friday to pass the measure. John Dowd, the lead lawyer representing President Trump in the Russia investigation, resigned; his departure marks the second major change to the president’s legal team this week. The House Intelligence Committee voted along party lines
1d
Science : NPR

The Trash Patch In The Pacific Is Many Times Bigger Than We ThoughtIn total, scientists say there are about 79,000 tons of plastic in this area, which is more than double the size of Texas. (Image credit: UniversalImagesGroup/UIG via Getty Images)
1d
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Waterbirds affected by low water, high salt levels in lakes: studyA recent study from researchers at the University of Montana, National Audubon Society, Oregon State University and East Cascades Audubon Society shows food sources for migratory birds decline with low water levels and high salt content in lakes.
1d
Science | The Guardian

Spacewatch: European Space Agency increases research in other solar systemsThe Ariel mission to study the composition of exoplanets is one of a number of exploratory missions at the ESA The European Space Agency announced this week that its next science mission will be a space telescope to study the composition of planets around other stars. The Atmospheric Remote‐sensing Infrared Exoplanet Large‐survey mission (Ariel) was chosen as part of the Cosmic Vision programme t
1d
Dagens Medicin

StikpillenEr der mon reel vilje til at løse ulighed i sundhed?
1d
Dagens Medicin

»Fantastiske patienter giver mig lyst til at gå på arbejde hver dag«Overlæge Gitte Ahle er valgt som ny formand for Dansk Psykiatrisk Selskab. Hendes visioner er at forbedre behandlingen for patienterne og styrke rekrutteringen af yngre læger.
1d
Dagens Medicin

»Hvis det havde været let, så havde nogen sikkert gjort det for lang tid siden«Sundhedsminister Ellen Trane Nørby (V) indrømmer, at planen for det nære sundhedsvæsen er en kompleks størrelse. Hun erkender, at der gennem arbejdsprocessen har været knas på linjen. »Det er jo ingen hemmelighed, at der var rygende uenighed.«
1d
The Atlantic

Can Anyone Unseat Mark Zuckerberg?On Wednesday, Mark Zuckerberg, the founder and chief executive of Facebook, gave his first public interviews since the Cambridge Analytica story broke. He spoke with outlets that form an outline, in a way, of the modern shape of American media. So there was The New York Times and CNN , of course; as well as Wired , the Bay Area’s cultural organ; and Recode , the tech industry’s paper of record. A
1d
New on MIT Technology Review

Getting your genome sequenced might not make you spend more on health care
1d
Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

Deep impact: Deep-sea wildlife more vulnerable to extinction than first thoughtThe existence of the unusual yeti crabs (Kiwaidae) -- a family of crab-like animals whose hairy claws and bodies are reminiscent of the abominable snowman -- since 2005, but already their future survival could be at risk. New Oxford University research suggests that past environmental changes may have profoundly impacted the geographic range and species diversity of this family. The findings indic
1d
Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

Early life experiences influence DNA in the adult brainIn the perennial question of nature versus nurture, a new study suggests an intriguing connection between the two. Scientists report that the type of mothering a female mouse provides her pups actually changes their DNA. The work lends support to studies about how childhood environments affect brain development in humans and could provide insights into neuropsychiatric disorders such as depression
1d
Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

Trouble hearing? It could increase your risk of an injuryA new report finds people with 'a lot of trouble hearing' are twice as likely to suffer from accidental injuries.
1d
Popular Science

Musical instruments and apps that teach you how to playTechnology An experienced human teacher is the best, but these gadgets can get you started. This tech won’t teach you Axl Rose moves, but they can help start your musical journey.
1d
EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Study supports biomarker assay for emergency department diagnosis of acute heart failureA multi-institutional study supports the value of a biomarker to accurately diagnose or rule out acute heart failure in patients seen for shortness of breath at hospital emergency departments.
1d
EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Waterbirds affected by low water, high salt levels in lakesA recent study from researchers at the University of Montana, National Audubon Society, Oregon State University and East Cascades Audubon Society shows food sources for migratory birds decline with low water levels and high salt content in lakes.
1d
Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

Antimicrobial used in toiletries could become option against malariaNot only it inhibits enzymes essential to Plasmodium's survival in two key stages of its lifecycle in humans, but triclosan also performed well in tests against resistant parasites, an international study reveals. The efficiency of malaria treatment with mostly used drugs is undermined by resistant lineages and by the fact that patients present severe side effects in 10 percent of the cases.
1d
Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

Unusual blood clots in leprosy patients characterizedFor years, doctors have observed that some patients with leprosy develop unusual blood clots which can lead to stroke or heart attack. Now, researchers have for the first time characterized these blood clots, leading to a new understanding of how leprosy affects the circulatory system and potential new screening tests to predict leprosy reactions.
1d
Live Science

Why This Lab Reeks of Animal Flesh and Contains a Suitcase Full of SlimeFor one lab, the key to filling in the fossil record is in watching eels, worms and hagfish rot.
1d
The Atlantic

What Russian Scientists Are Saying About Nerve AgentsIt’s paralyzing. It can be lethal. And only a state actor is capable of producing it. This much we know about the class of nerve agents known as Novichok, a type of which British authorities say was used earlier this month to poison a former Russian spy, his daughter, and a British police officer in the English city of Salisbury. But that leaves room for substantial mystery. Who developed it? How
1d
The Atlantic

Mon Dieu: A Post-Brexit U.K. Passport Made in FranceIf Brexit was supposed to be a victory for sovereign rights and national identity, what better way to celebrate than with a new passport? It’ll be blue and gold—just like the country’s passports were before they conformed to the EU’s burgundy color scheme in 1988. Also, it will be made by a Franco-Dutch conglomerate, which can produce it more cheaply than a competing British firm. The new passpor
1d
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

AT&T will use Time Warner as 'weapon' if merger goes ahead: US Justice DeptWill AT&T's acquisition of Time Warner give it a "weapon" to crush pay television rivals or help it catch up with "runaway" technology giants?
1d
EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Rate of hip replacement revision surgery declines in all age groups -- except middle ageAs more patients undergo total hip arthroplasty (THA) before age 65, the rate of repeat hip surgery due to complications has risen sharply in this younger age group, reports a study in the March 21, 2018, issue of The Journal of Bone & Joint Surgery. The journal is published in partnership with Wolters Kluwer.
1d
The Scientist RSS

President of SUNYs College of Environmental Science and Forestry ResignsQuentin Wheeler's firing of department chairs earlier this year didn't sit well with university faculty members.
1d
The Scientist RSS

Proposed US Spending Bill Boosts Science FundingNIH, NSF, and the DOE's Office of Science will be among the agencies with budget increases if the omnibus bill is passed.
1d
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

NASA eyes powerful Tropical Cyclone MarcusWhile a Category 4 hurricane on the Saffir-Simpson hurricane wind scale, NASA-NOAA's Suomi NPP satellite passed over Tropical Cyclone Marcus in the Southern Indian Ocean.
1d
The Atlantic

The Atlantic Announces Ideas Columnists Ibram X. Kendi, Annie Lowrey, Alex Wagner, and Kevin D. WilliamsonWashington, D.C. (March 22, 2018)— The Atlantic has named the first four contributors to its forthcoming section for ideas, opinion, and commentary at TheAtlantic.com, announcing new roles for The Atlantic ’s Annie Lowrey and Alex Wagner , and the hires of Ibram X. Kendi and Kevin D. Williamson . Politics editor Yoni Appelbaum will lead the section as its first editor. “These are all writers whos
1d
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

For graphite pellets, just add elbow greaseIt's easy and economical to make shiny pellets of graphite from functionalized graphene, according to scientists at Rice University.
1d
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Jaguars and well-managed logging concessions can coexist, say conservationistsLogging activities in biodiverse forests can have a huge negative impact on wildlife, particularly large species such as big cats, but a new study proves that the Western Hemisphere's largest cat species—the jaguar (Panthera onca)—can do well in logging concessions that are properly managed, according to conservationists from the San Diego Zoo Global and the Bronx Zoo-based WCS (Wildlife Conservat
1d
Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

Measurement chip detects LegionellaIn an outbreak of Legionnaires' disease, finding the exact source as quickly as possible is essential to preventing further infections. To date, a standard analysis takes days. Researchers have now developed a rapid test that achieves the same result in about 35 minutes.
1d
Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

Bacteria eat greenhouse gas with a side of proteinWith the ability to leech heavy metals from the environment and digest a potent greenhouse gas, methanotrophic bacteria pull double duty when it comes to cleaning up the environment. But before researchers can explore potential conservation applications, they first must better understand the bacteria's basic physiological processes. New research has identified two never-before-studied proteins, ca
1d
Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

Home genetic tests should be interpreted by expertsResults from at-home genetic tests are not always accurate. A new study now shows that up to 40 percent of direct-to-consumer (DTC) genetic tests provide incorrect readings in the raw data.
1d
EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Study finds direct evidence of exposure of pregnant women to herbicide ingredientThe first birth cohort study of its kind has found more than 90 percent of a group of pregnant women in Central Indiana had detectable levels of glyphosate, the active ingredient in Roundup, the most heavily used herbicide worldwide.
1d
EurekAlert! - Breaking News

In a severe childhood neurodegeneration, novel mechanism foundNeurology researchers investigating a rare but devastating neurological regression in infants have discovered the cause: gene mutations that severely disrupt crucial functions in mitochondria, the energy-producing structures within cells. The specific disease mechanism, in which mutations disrupt a critical mitochondrial enzyme, has not previously been implicated in a human disease.
1d

Vil du være med til at finde de mest interessante nyheder? Send email herom til BioNyt

Se nyheder fra en tidligere dato

Tegn abonnement på

BioNyt Videnskabens Verden (www.bionyt.dk) er Danmarks ældste populærvidenskabelige tidsskrift for naturvidenskab. Det er det eneste blad af sin art i Danmark, som er helliget international forskning inden for livsvidenskaberne.

Bladet bringer aktuelle, spændende forskningsnyheder inden for biologi, medicin og andre naturvidenskabelige områder som f.eks. klimaændringer, nanoteknologi, partikelfysik, astronomi, seksualitet, biologiske våben, ecstasy, evolutionsbiologi, kloning, fedme, søvnforskning, muligheden for liv på mars, influenzaepidemier, livets opståen osv.

Artiklerne roses for at gøre vanskeligt stof forståeligt, uden at den videnskabelige holdbarhed tabes.