Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

First direct Australia-Europe passenger service takes offThe "Kangaroo Route" from Australia to Britain became a shorter hop Saturday when the first direct passenger service left Perth for London, with the 17-hour flight set to break aviation records.
9h
Ingeniøren

Automekaniker bag offgrid-system til elcyklerJonas Gissel kalder sig hardcore nørd. Han blev iværksætter ved et tilfælde og tager utraditionelle metoder i brug for at sælge sin idé.
10h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Dissecting artificial intelligence to better understand the human brainIn the natural world, intelligence takes many forms. It could be a bat using echolocation to expertly navigate in the dark, or an octopus adapting its behavior to survive in the deep ocean. Likewise, in the computer science world, multiple forms of artificial intelligence are emerging. As will be presented at the CNS conference, cognitive neuroscientists are using those emerging networks to enhanc
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LATEST

Science | The Guardian

Starwatch: a blue moon in VirgoThe second full moon of the month can aid starwatchers to identify the faint constellation of Virgo The month ends this week with a blue moon. Last week was the equinox, when day and night are of equal length. It took place on 20 March. From now on in the northern hemisphere, spring has begun and the days will get progressively longer. In the southern hemisphere, the seasons are reversed. This eq
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Scientific American Content: Global

Paleo Profile: The Fish from ChinaA newly named prehistoric fish is a reminder that there's more to the fossil record than dinosaurs and toothy reptiles -- Read more on ScientificAmerican.com
9min
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

New life for Portugal's oldest forest ravaged by firesAround 3,000 volunteers on Sunday began an ambitious reforestation project in Portugal's oldest forest, ravaged by last year's devastating wild fires.
15min
Live Science

Flat-Earther Blasts Himself into the Sky on Homemade Rocket (and He Survives)"Mad" Mike Hughes launched himself from the Mojave Desert on a self-made rocket before landing back to Earth, a little dinged up.
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March For Our Lives: One High School Student's ExperienceA look through the lens of a young Atlanta-area photographer who took part in yesterday's demonstration.
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Scientific American Content: Global

Celebrating Sun-Earth Day: A Total Eclipse of the MindThe art and perception behind the 2017 Total Solar Eclipse -- Read more on ScientificAmerican.com
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Big Think

Is the speed of light slowing down?Several things in nature go faster than the speed of light, without challenging general relativity. Read More
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

Smaller and faster: The terahertz computer chip is now within reachFollowing three years of extensive research, physicists have created technology that will enable our computers —- and all optic communication devices —- to run 100 times faster through terahertz microchips.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

Dissecting artificial intelligence to better understand the human brainIn the natural world, intelligence takes many forms. It could be a bat using echolocation to expertly navigate in the dark, or an octopus adapting its behavior to survive in the deep ocean. Likewise, in the computer science world, multiple forms of artificial intelligence are emerging. Cognitive neuroscientists are using those emerging networks to enhance understanding of one of the most elusive i
4h
The Atlantic

Remembering the Taste of DamascusAfter my parents fled the war in Syria for Egypt in 2013, they did their best to recreate their old life. My mother, a stellar cook and hostess, arranged the living room in their new home in Cairo to resemble the one they’d left in Damascus, filling an elegant bowl on the coffee table with little chocolates wrapped in colorful paper, and throwing her decorative cushions from Syria across the sofa
4h
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The Junker Race in Norway Where All That Counts Is FunMoney, speed, and prestige are the hallmarks of auto racing. Take all that away, and you get Norwegian bilcross.
5h
The Atlantic

A Generation Under SiegeForty days ago, Emma Gonzalez was a promising 18-year-old American high-school student. She was well-spoken, and curious, and funny, and rebellious, but in the restrained way that self-aware kids dabble in rebelliousness. Late last summer, when she decided to shave her head, she delivered a PowerPoint to her parents to persuade them to go along with it. “People asked me, ‘Are you taking a feminis
5h
Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

Making monitors brighter: Controlling the color of OLEDsOrganic light-emitting diodes (OLEDs) are used in smartphones and televisions to facilitate the high-contrast display of colors. Conjugated polymers are also often employed as organic semiconductors in such diodes. Researchers have found out how the spatial structure of these polymers can be used to control the colors of the OLEDs and help to increase the brightness of monitors.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

AI tool promotes positive peer groups to tackle substance abuseWhen it comes to fighting substance abuse, research suggests the company you keep can make the difference between recovery and relapse. Researchers have created an algorithm that sorts intervention program participants -- who are voluntarily working on recovery -- into smaller groups, or subgroups, in a way that maintains helpful social connections and breaks social connections that could be detri
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Scientific American Content: Global

Wonderful Things: A Transparent PlantFilmy ferns live up to their name -- Read more on ScientificAmerican.com
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Live Science

In Photos: A Look at China's Space Station That's Crashing to EarthTiangong-1, China's first space station, is currently falling back to Earth and will soon make an uncontrolled entry through our atmosphere. Here's a look back at the 9-ton space lab.
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Smart Suitcases: Raden A28, Rimowa Limbo Multiwheel Electronic TagIncrease your total baggage awareness with some technologically enhanced luggage.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

Using simplicity for complexity: Shedding light on the perception of motionA team of biologists has deciphered how neurons used in the perception of motion form in the brain of a fly -- a finding that illustrates how complex neuronal circuits are constructed from simple developmental rules.
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Ingeniøren

Arken: Kunst skal få unge til at tænke over digital påvirkningPå kunstmuseet Arken smelter kunst og teknologi sammen, når unge bruger kunsten til at forstå og fortolke nettets koder.
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Live Science

Why Is Easter Called 'Easter'?Everyone knows that chocolate eggs don't date from the roots of Christianity, but neither does the name (which the Venerable Bede says came from a pagan goddess).
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The Atlantic

Letters: How to Interpret a PoemAmerica's Most Widely Misread Literary Work The text accompanying a new Atlantic video , animated by Jackie Lay, challenged the prevailing interpretation of Robert Frost’s “The Road Not Taken” as an ode to individualism. Like “The Road Not Taken,” “Mending Wall” is another Frost poem that can be interpreted many different ways. My wife and I were both high school English teachers many years ago a
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Facebook's Cambridge Analytica Scandal Tops This Week's Internet News RoundupFrustration with Mark Zuckerberg's company has dominated the chatter on social media.
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Viden

Biodiversitet - hvad er det? Danskerne aner det ikkeBiodiversitet har afgørende betydning for vores natur. Men over 60 procent af danskerne ved slet ikke, hvad ordet betyder, viser ny undersøgelse.
7h
Scientific American Content: Global

Almond Growers Are Breeding a Novel Replacement for the Embattled HoneybeeThe world's largest almond grower is creating a novel replacement for the embattled honeybee -- Read more on ScientificAmerican.com
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Science : NPR

CDC Now Has Authority To Research Gun Violence. What's Next?Mark Rosenberg oversaw gun violence research at the CDC until the Dickey amendment stopped that work. Now, with new language in the legislation Trump signed, he explains how that work can begin again.
7h
Live Science

How Much Space Junk Hits Earth?China's Tiangong-1 space station isn't the first spacecraft to shed bits of junk onto Earth, and it won't be the last.
8h
Ingeniøren

Ugens debat: Plastic- eller mulepose? Hvad er bedst for miljøet?En undersøgelse fra DTU om miljøeffekten af indkøbsposer, udsendt af Miljøstyrelsen, skabte i sidste uge stor debat.
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Thanks to Translation Tech, Talking to Strangers Will Be Even EasierInstant translation will help us all enjoy a more intimate experience, no matter where we explore.
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Latest Headlines | Science News

How past disasters can help us prepare for the futureIn The Big Ones, seismologist Lucy Jones examines the science behind some of the most catastrophic natural disasters in human history.
8h
Scientific American Content: Global

How Do Forensic Engineers Investigate Bridge Collapses, Like the One in Miami?Investigators will study video, design plans and the “accelerated bridge construction” method for clues -- Read more on ScientificAmerican.com
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The Atlantic

The Many Eras of Al Pacino's StardomWhen Al Pacino was up for the lead role of Michael Corleone in The Godfather, according to Hollywood folklore, the studio balked at casting him. Not just because he was a relative unknown (Paramount wanted Warren Beatty, Robert Redford, or Ryan O’Neal, depending on who you believe), but also because Pacino was so far from their traditional image of a marquee idol. Short, bug-eyed, and intense, th
9h
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Forget Self Driving. The Future is in Self ParkingCompanies are already testing systems like collaborative parking, remote-control summoning, and special picker-upper robots.
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An Alternate Reality Game That Takes Freshmen Orientation to a New LevelA massive ARG became an obsession at the University of Chicago. It also taught students how to handle not getting along.
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Guccifer 2.0's Slip-Up Shows That Even Elite Hackers Make MistakesNo matter how much mystique a hacker persona has, the individual or group behind it inevitably makes operations security errors sometimes.
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The Cambridge Analytica Data Apocalypse Was Predicted in 2007The scientists warned us about big data and corporate surveillance. They tried to warn *themselves*.
9h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

CEO says Waymo dedicated to safe self-driving technologyThe leader of Google's self-driving car spinoff Waymo says he is confident in the company's technology and its capability to interact with pedestrians.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Quackery and superstition: species pay the costA pinch of powdered chimpanzee bone, some gecko saliva, a dash of vulture brain.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

In Ivory Coast, 'drone academy' offers youth the chance to soar"Drones have become my passion," says Noursely Doumbia, who holds a degree in electronics and is currently learning to pilot drones as part of a pioneering programme in Ivory Coast's economic capital Abidjan.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Overproduction threatens Andes superfood havenFrom atop the Andes mountains to the depths of the Amazon rainforest and frigid Patagonia, indigenous people have long eaten quinoa, camu camu and calafate, a healthy diet that has become a global phenomenon now threatened by overproduction.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Lights go dark for Earth Hour to highlight climate changeIn Paris, the Eiffel Tower went dark. In London, a kaleidoscope of famous sites switched off their lights—Tower Bridge, Big Ben, Piccadilly Circus, Buckingham Palace, the London Eye.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

UK watchdog evaluates evidence from Cambridge AnalyticaBritain's information regulator said Saturday it was assessing evidence gathered from a raid on the office of data mining firm Cambridge Analytica, part of an investigation into alleged misuse of personal information by political campaigns and social media companies like Facebook.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Facebook apologises for data scandal in UK newspaper adsFacebook Mark ZuckerbergFacebook chief Mark Zuckerberg took out full-page ads in almost all of Britain's national newspapers Sunday to apologise for a huge data privacy scandal.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Ride-hailing apps run Indonesian tuk-tuks off roadUber Grab Southeast AsianAuto-rickshaw driver Zainuddin used to make decent money navigating Jakarta's congested roads and narrow alleyways.
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Viden

Hver fjerde har fedtlever: Simpel scanning kan sikre tidlig indsatsForskere fra SDU har udviklet en ny scanningsmetode, der nemt kan 'spotte' de fede, danske levere, inden de udvikler sig til alvorlig sygdom.
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BBC News - Science & Environment

I was expected to marry so I went to Antarctica insteadMeena was raised a ‘good Indian girl' who was expected to get married, but she's off to Antarctica.
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The Atlantic

As Students 'March for Our Lives,' What Are the Feasible Aims for Gun Control?The gun massacre in Parkland, Florida, was nearly six weeks ago. In those weeks, thousands more Americans have died from gun violence. (The average rate is around 90 per day, more than half of them suicides and the rest homicides or accidents.) Today hundreds of thousands of students and others have joined the “March for Our Lives” to demand a solution to what seems America’s most insoluble probl
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The Atlantic

A Domestic Budget to Make Barack Obama ProudPresident Obama finally got a Republican-controlled Congress to fund his domestic budget. All it took was Donald Trump in the White House to get it done. In the $1.3 trillion spending bill that President Trump reluctantly signed on Friday, lawmakers did more than reject the steep cuts in dollars and programs that Trump proposed for domestic agencies a year ago. Across much of the government, Repu
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The Atlantic

Go Ahead, Relitigate 2016Russia John DowdAmericans famously love litigation . Relitigation? Not so much, especially when it concerns the last presidential election. “Clinton Confirms That Democrats Will Relitigate the 2016 Primary Until the Sun Swallows the Earth,” Slate sighed in September. “Bernie Sanders Is Sick of Re-litigating the 2016 Election,” Vanity Fair reported around the same time. “I don't think that relitigating a primary,
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The Atlantic

A Modest Plea for Patriotic HistoryIt is telling that those who speak loudest about Making America Great Again tend to refer to themselves as nationalists rather than patriots. George Orwell took the measure of contemporary nationalism in a 1945 essay on the subject. Nationalism, he noted, is “the habit of assuming that human beings can be classified like insects.” Patriotism, on the other hand, is “devotion to a particular place
10h
Science | The Guardian

Sarah-Jayne Blakemore: ‘It is, strangely, acceptable to mock and demonise teenagers’The neuroscientist, who has written a book on the teenage brain, on the turmoil of adolescence and whether mindfulness can help Sarah-Jayne Blakemore, professor in cognitive neuroscience at University College London, is the author of a groundbreaking new book, Inventing Ourselves: The Secret Life of the Teenage Brain , in which she explains the development of the brain during the precarious, enric
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Viden

VIDEO Sonne svitser Zuckerbergs "undskyld" - og guider dig ud af Facebook-suppedasenNikolaj Sonne går ugens Facebook-skandale efter i sømmene og forklarer, hvorfor den er så pokkers problematisk - også for dig.
12h
Ingeniøren

Spørg Scientariet: Kan høretelefoner med kunstig varme forhindre mellemørebetændelse?En læser har været på ferie i varmen, hvilket gavnede familiens yngstes ører. Kan denne effekt mon genskabes i dansk klima? Det svarer overlæge fra Rigshospitalet på.
12h
Scientific American Content: Global

Federico Ardila's Favorite TheoremAn audio tour of matroid theory and music -- Read more on ScientificAmerican.com
14h
The Atlantic

The Powerful Silence of the March for Our LivesPolitical marches are typically meant to make noise: voices raised, anger articulated, struggles for justice made loud and unavoidable. The March for Our Lives, held on Saturday in Washington, D.C., and in satellite events across the United States, followed, in that sense, activist tradition: It included speeches, rousing and passionate. Its participants carried signs, their messages clever and b
19h
Science | The Guardian

Being a driverless car passenger proves ‘unsettling and extraordinary’The latest UK entry in the race to revolutionise roads goes for a spin despite the first such vehicle death in the US last week How many people does it take to drive a driverless car? Five: a safety driver behind the wheel, an operator to program the route, and three engineers monitoring it in another car behind. It is, to be fair, barely even a prototype. The autonomous car unveiled in Milton Key
20h
Big Think

Guns do kill people: Gun restrictions for violent misdemeanors lower homicides by 23%Turns out that laws (already in action in 22 states) that don't allow violent people to own firearms actually lower homicides. Read More
20h
The Atlantic

The Students Who Weren’t Just Marching for ParklandHundreds of thousands of people rallied in Washington, D.C. on Saturday to express outrage at recent mass shootings in American schools, and to push Congress to enact stricter gun laws. But for many students in the U.S.—and especially students of color—gun violence at school isn’t the only problem. Rather, it’s the violence they face regularly in their homes and yards, in their neighborhoods and
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Big Think

'Plastic island' in Pacific now twice the size of TexasIt's a dubious honor, but humanity has managed to amass a giant trash mass about twice the size of Texas, or three times the size of France, or about 1,600 miles. Read More
22h

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