EurekAlert! - Breaking News

How did the guppy cross the ocean?: An unexpected fish appears on a volcanic archipelagoTo the surprise of the scientists, populations of a South American guppy were spotted at the Fernando de Noronha archipelago, a volcanic island in the South Atlantic. Even if being easily adaptable fishes, it was unclear how a small freshwater species had managed to cross the ocean and populate the archipelago. In an article published in the open-access journal ZooKeys, researchers suggest that th
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Ingeniøren

Hastig ny Kattegat-plan: Vejdirektoratet fik to uger til ny analyseKun 14 dage havde Vejdirektoratet til at udarbejde en beregning af økonomien i to Kattegatbroer kun for biler. Anlægsprisen blev skønnet ved at ringe til det rådgiverfirma, som for ti år siden gennemførte den første screening.
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The Scientist RSS

Caloric Restriction Slows Signs of Aging in HumansFindings from a randomized, controlled trial finds that reducing food intake decreases metabolism and reduces oxidative damage to tissues and cells.
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Futurity.org

Super thin device is a step toward ‘invisible’ screensEngineers have created a light-emitting device that’s just millimeters wide and totally transparent when it’s turned off. The material in the device is a monolayer semiconductor, which is just three atoms thick. The device opens the door to invisible displays on walls and windows—displays that would be bright when turned on but see-through when turned off—or in futuristic applications such as lig
5min
Futurity.org

What the sinking of the Titanic reveals about A.I.An algorithm that can predict which passengers survived the 1912 Titanic disaster with 97 percent accuracy demonstrates the power and the shortcomings of artificial intelligence, a new book argues. AI may get things right, this finding shows, but for all the wrong reasons. Meredith Broussard, a journalism professor at New York University, outlines this paradox in her new book Artificial Unintelli
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Futurity.org

Listen: How ‘smart city’ sensors keep an eye on ChicagoImagine a health monitor for the city, but rather than measuring heart rate or daily steps, this device measures everything from air quality to vehicle traffic. The idea may sound like science fiction, but it’s becoming a reality for cities like Chicago through the Array of Things project, a collaborative effort among scientists, universities, local government, and community members to collect re
11min
Science : NPR

Scientists In Africa Wonder If There's Bias Against Their ResearchThe problem is, it's hard to prove. Journals deny it. But some academics say they've experienced it firsthand. (Image credit: TONY KARUMBA/AFP/Getty Images)
12min
The Atlantic

The Atlantic Daily: ‘The Casualties of Principle’What We’re Following Stormy Story: In an interview on 60 Minutes , the adult-film actor Stormy Daniels descirbed an alleged sexual encounter she had with Donald Trump in 2006, stating, “I thought of it as a business deal.” She also alleged that she was threatened in 2011 by someone who told her to “leave Trump alone [and] forget the story” that she had promised to a tabloid. (A lawyer for Trump’s
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BBC News - Science & Environment

Yuri Gagarin: First man in spaceIt's 50 years since the death of Yuri Gagarin, the Russian Cosmonaut who was the first man to travel into space.
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Futurity.org

1 in 3 young adults say they’ve ridden with an impaired driverOne-third of young adults aged 19 and 20 report riding in a motor vehicle with an impaired driver at the wheel at least once in the past year, a new study reports. Marijuana use, not alcohol, was more likely to be the cause of the impairment. Researchers used data from the NEXT Generation Health Study, a nationally representative survey of US adolescents and young adults focusing on health and be
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Live Science

Why Aren't There Any Supersize Whales?Whales are giant beasts, but why aren't even larger, supersize whales swimming around?
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Popular Science

Astronomers think they saw a star exploding out of a giant gas bubbleSpace Basically just a cosmic cocoon. It appeared as a flash of light on the arm of a distant spiral galaxy. It outshone neighboring stars, an attention-grabbing display of brilliance that peaked after 2.2…
38min
Live Science

This Medieval Mother Had a Gruesome 'Coffin Birth' After Medieval Brain SurgeryA chilling skeleton in Italy shows a mother who gave birth after she and her baby were already dead.
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Latest Headlines | Science News

When tickling the brain to stimulate memory, location mattersConflicting results regarding the benefits of brain stimulation may be explained by the precise location of electrodes.
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Blog » Languages » English

Get ready for the March Marathon!Gotten your fill of March madness yet? But wait, there’s more! It’s time for a marathon, Eyewirers. Let’s see if we can smash our current record. Surely we can! There’s something in the air. The March Marathon will start at 8 PM EDT on 3/28 , and you’ll have 24 hours to grow and complete 1-2 cells. Bonuses for Normal Play Trace 20 cubes – 2,000 point bonus Trace 50 cubes – 5,000 point bonus Trace
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cognitive science

A new paper in JPSP suggests that charisma enhances leadership ability, but only up to a point.submitted by /u/markmana [link] [comments]
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The Atlantic

The Atlantic Politics & Policy Daily: Stormy With a Chance of LawsuitsToday in 5 Lines President Trump ordered the expulsion of 60 Russian diplomats from the United States and the closure of the Russian consulate in Seattle. Trump’s personal lawyer, Michael Cohen, challenged adult-film star Stormy Daniels’s charge that someone threatened her with physical harm if she spoke publicly about an alleged affair with Trump. Daniels is now suing Cohen for defamation. The W
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NYT > Science

China’s Space Station May Crash to Earth on April Fools’ DayExperts predict the abandoned space station, Tiangong-1, will fall back to Earth around this weekend. But the risk to anyone on the ground is almost nil.
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Popular Science

Last week in tech: Facebook and Uber probably wish they could hide under a sheet of ketchupTechnology Also, be sure to check out the latest episode of our podcast. Catch up on the big tech news from this week including Facebook's data scandal and a fatal self-driving car accident.
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The Scientist RSS

U.S. Alleges Iranian Cyber Theft at Research UniversitiesThe hacking involved data belonging to thousands of professors at 320 institutions worldwide.
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Study suggests uncertainty in e-cigarettes' usefulness for quitting smokingAn analysis of data from a previous study of more than 1,350 smokers intending to quit after a hospitalization found that those who reported using electronic cigarettes during the study period were less likely to have successfully quit smoking six months after entering the study. The study's design does not allow the conclusion that e-cigarettes are not useful smoking cessation aids.
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The Atlantic

Trump's 'Good Relationship' With Russia Is Slipping AwayDonald Trump says building a “good relationship” with Russia isn’t about his interests, but America’s. Russia “can help solve problems with North Korea, Syria, Ukraine, ISIS, Iran and even the coming Arms Race,” the president noted last week in explaining why he had congratulated Vladimir Putin on his victory in an unfree election. On Monday, however, the U.S.-Russian relationship went from bad t
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New on MIT Technology Review

A robot’s biggest challenge? Teenage bullies.Robots are increasing becoming dependable coworkers and service providers, as two speakers at this year’s EmTech Digital conference demonstrate.
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Blog » Languages » English

Ever wonder where retinal ganglion axons end up?Retinal ganglion axon terminations innervating corticothalamo neurons of the LGN. Image: Josh Morgan’s Lab Axons of retinal ganglion cells, as are mapped by Eyewirers, converge to become the optic nerve. Our dataset ends before that happens, so we’ve not gotten to see where those axons end up. Until now! The image above shows the endpoints of cells like those that send projections out of the Eyew
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Live Science

You Could Soon Buy an 'Artificial Meteor Shower' — for a Hefty FeeA Japanese company has a plan to commercialize dropping metal pellets from space.
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Improve your information security by giving employees more optionsA recent study published in the Journal of Management Information Systems suggests information security managers and supervisors could have greater success in motivating employees to act more securely by avoiding cold, authoritative commands, and instead create security messages that are relatable and provide options for how employees can better protect information and respond to threats.
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Canada-US Free Trade Agreement (CUSFTA) increased caloric intake in CanadaA new study published in the American Journal of Preventive Medicine shows that the 1989 Canada-US Free Trade Agreement (CUSFTA) was associated with an increase in caloric availability of approximately 170 kilocalories per person per day in Canada. These findings suggest that the rise in caloric intake and obesity in Canada since the early 1990s can be partially attributed to its close trade and i
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Atlanta still feeling the effects of ransomware cyberattackAtlanta's mayor says the city continues to operate despite ongoing troubles caused by a cyberattack on its computer network last week.
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Dana Foundation

Mindfulness for the Developing BrainOn Thursday, March 15th, Know Science , an organization that advocates the knowledge of new science and scientific research to the public, hosted the talk “Regulating the Brain: The Science of Mindfulness” at the Zuckerman Mind Brain Behavior Institute in New York City. This was an event presented as part of Brain Awareness Week . Meriah DeJoseph, the presenter for the evening, is a project coord
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

Mitochondrial disease patients face difficult road to diagnosisA new study documents the prolonged and difficult path patients face before they are diagnosed with mitochondrial diseases, a group of rare, debilitating genetic disorders.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

Antibody removes Alzheimer's plaques, in micePlaques of a brain protein called amyloid beta are a characteristic sign of Alzheimer's disease. But nestled within the plaques are small amounts of another Alzheimer's protein: APOE. Now, researchers have shown that an antibody not only targets APOE for removal but sweeps away plaques in mice. The findings could lead to a way to halt the brain damage triggered by amyloid plaques while the disease
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

Younger aged children with symptoms of ADHD have reduced brain sizeChildren as young as four years old with symptoms of Attention-Deficit/Hyperactivity Disorder (ADHD) showed reduced brain volumes in regions essential for behavioral control, according to a new study. The research represents the first comprehensive examination of cortical brain volume in preschool children with ADHD and provides an indication that anomalous brain structure is evident in the early
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Tesla starts community college courses to train techniciansElectric car maker Tesla Inc. is fostering community college training programs for what could be new blue-collar jobs as mechanics for the growing number of battery-powered vehicles.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Twitter bans crytocurrency ads on fraud fearsTwitter Cryptocurrency AdsTwitter on Monday announced a ban on ads for initial offerings of cryptocurrency or sales of virtual currency tokens, sending the value of bitcoin diving below $8,000.
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The Atlantic

A Grandpa's-Eye View of the March for Our LivesWhen I asked my mother and my grandfather how the Parkland shooting made them feel, they both said nearly the same thing: “It felt like an attack on the integrity of [my] memories,” said my mom. “It interfered with those pleasant thoughts of living there,” my grandpa said. When my mom was a teenager, she lived with her parents in Coral Springs, Florida. Their house was one mile away from what’s n
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

NASA renews focus on Earth's frozen regionsIn 2018, NASA will intensify its focus on one of the most critical but remote parts of our changing planet with the launch of two new satellite missions and an array of airborne campaigns.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

What three feet of seawater could mean for the world's turtlesNinety percent of the world's coastal freshwater turtle species are expected to be affected by sea level rise by 2100, according to a study from the University of California, Davis.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Study reveals trends of US surface water body area over three decadesA University of Oklahoma research study, led by Professor Xiangming Xiao, reveals the divergent trends of open surface water bodies in the contiguous United States from 1984 to 2016, specifically, a decreasing trend in the water-poor states and an increasing trend in the water-rich states. Surface water resources are critical for public water supply, industry, agriculture, biodiversity and ecosyst
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Study links climate policy, carbon emissions from permafrostControlling greenhouse gas emissions in the coming decades could substantially reduce the consequences of carbon releases from thawing permafrost during the next 300 years, according to a new paper published this week in the Proceedings of National Academy of Sciences.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Treating koalas for chlamydia alters gut microbesKoalas are one of Australia's iconic animals, but they have been hard hit by an epidemic of Chlamydia infections contributing to a steep decline in numbers. Sick koalas brought to wildlife hospitals may be treated with antibiotics to clear up the chlamydia, but the antibiotics themselves can have severe side effects in the animals.
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News

OU study reveals trends of US surface water body area over three decadesA University of Oklahoma research study, led by Professor Xiangming Xiao, reveals the divergent trends of open surface water bodies in the contiguous United States from 1984 to 2016, specifically, a decreasing trend in the water-poor states and an increasing trend in the water-rich states. Surface water resources are critical for public water supply, industry, agriculture, biodiversity and ecosyst
2h
Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

New targeted therapy schedule could keep melanoma at bayOptimizing the timing of targeted therapies for melanoma reverses tumor growth, and resistance can be mitigated.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

Hybrid chickadees found deficient at learning and memoryScientists have found that hybrid chickadees have marked deficiencies in learning and memory compared to their pure species parents, a possible selective disadvantage. The study is the first to identify deficiencies in learning and memory in a hybrid of any species.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

Study challenges previous findings that antidepressants affect breastfeedingNew research does not support the previously observed negative impacts of antidepressant use on breastfeeding.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

Blowin' in the wind -- A source of energy?It may in the future be possible to harvest energy with the aid of leaves fluttering in the wind. Researchers have developed a method and a material that generate an electrical impulse when the light fluctuates from sunshine to shade and vice versa.
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Live Science

What Will Happen to China's Tiangong-1 As It Falls Through the Atmosphere?Heat and friction will destroy the space station.
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Big Think

What are the psychological dynamics when a couple tries to change a habit together?Changing an unhealthy habit depends a lot on your belief that you can do it, something psychologists call self-efficacy. Take smoking, for example. Your belief that you are capable of quitting will influence the likelihood you will decide to quit in the first place, the amount your smoking reduces ... Read More
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Metabolic profiling may determine aggressiveness, prognosis of prostate cancerA new approach to analyzing prostate gland tissue may help address a major challenge in treating prostate cancer - determining which tumors are unlikely to progress and which could be life threatening and require treatment.
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Study links climate policy, carbon emissions from permafrostControlling greenhouse gas emissions in the coming decades could substantially reduce the consequences of carbon releases from thawing permafrost during the next 300 years, according to a new paper published this week in the Proceedings of National Academy of Sciences.
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Treating koalas for chlamydia alters gut microbesAntibiotics used to treat koalas with chlamydia infections may be changing the balance of gut microbes that allows the marsupials to live on a diet of eucalyptus leaves, researchers at UC Davis and the University of the Sunshine Coast have found.
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Discovery (uploads) on YouTube

Protecting Ocean Anchor Species | Racing Extinction (360 Video)Anchor species like manta rays and whale sharks are vital to the survival of our oceans. But they are largely threatened around the world. Join marine biologist Luke Tipple as he swims alongside these magnificent animals and shares why we all need to protect them. Join a conservation biologist on an interactive mission to learn how animals critical to the world’s ecosystem thrive and survive in t
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Discovery (uploads) on YouTube

Racing Extinction: Operation ConservationStep inside the world of endangered species in Discovery's interactive VR experience. Join a conservation biologist on an interactive mission to learn how animals critical to the world’s ecosystem thrive and survive in the wild. For a more immersive experience download and watch on the Discovery VR app – now available on Google Daydream! Visit http://www.discoveryvr.com/ to get started Subscribe
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

Why are whales so big?Examining body sizes of ancient and modern aquatic mammals and their terrestrial counterparts reveals that life in water restricts mammals to a narrow range of body sizes -- big enough to stay warm, but not so big they can't find enough food.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

Tetrahedrality is key to the uniqueness of waterWater holds a special place among liquids for its unusual properties, and remains poorly understood. For example, it expands just upon the freezing to ice, and becomes less viscous under compression, around atmospheric pressure. Rationalizing these oddities is a major challenge for physics and chemistry. Recent research suggests they result from the degree of structural ordering in the fluid.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

New insights into how cellulose is built could indicate how to break it apart for biofuelsA comprehensive look at how plants build cellulose, a compound used in a variety of humanmade materials including paper and cotton, could have important implications for its use in biofuels. Researchers have identified the major steps in the process as well as the tools used by plant cells to create cellulose, including proteins that transport critical components to the location where cellulose is
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

How to make a good impression when saying helloYou can hear the perfect hello. And now you can see it too. Researchers have established an experimental method that unveils the filter (mental representation) we use to judge people when hearing them. What is the ideal intonation for coming across as determined or trustworthy? This method is already used for clinical purposes, with stroke survivors, and it opens many new doors for the study of la
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

Promising drug may stop cancer-causing gene in its tracksScientists are testing a promising drug that may stop a gene associated with obesity from triggering breast and lung cancer, as well as prevent these cancers from growing.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

What three feet of seawater could mean for the world's turtlesNinety percent of the world's coastal freshwater turtle species are expected to be affected by sea level rise by 2100, according to a new study.
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Scientific American Content: Global

Rotting Flesh Offers Insight on FossilizationTo learn more about decay and fossilization, researchers conduct unorthodox experiments--like dissecting decomposing animals in the lab. Christopher Intagliata reports. -- Read more on ScientificAmerican.com
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Popular Science

Here's how Popular Science covered 'Star Trek' in 1967Science From the December '67 issue: 'TV's Star Trek: How they mix science fact with fiction.' You're ready to believe that the fantastic adventures of television's popular spacemen will be possible in 200 years, for their "science" is a logical projection of…
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Genetic factors for most common disease in the first year of life are identifiedThe acute viral bronchiolitis is the worldwide leading cause of hospitalization during this period. A study crosses data from patients' genetic variations with the disease's different viruses and their respective set of symptoms, paving the way for future developments by precision medicine.
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NYT > Science

For Many Strokes, There’s an Effective Treatment. Why Aren’t Some Doctors Offering It?As many as 30 percent of stroke patients do not receive a clot-busting drug because a vocal minority of physicians believe it to be dangerous.
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NYT > Science

Getty Completes Study of Paintings at King Tut’s TombGetty Conservation Institute scientists, in a joint conservation program with Egypt, have found that mysterious brown spots on murals were dead mold and fungus.
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News

What three feet of seawater could mean for the world's turtlesNinety percent of the world's coastal freshwater turtle species are expected to be affected by sea level rise by 2100, according to a study published today from the University of California, Davis.
3h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Promising drug may stop cancer-causing gene in its tracksMichigan State University scientists are testing a promising drug that may stop a gene associated with obesity from triggering breast and lung cancer, as well as prevent these cancers from growing.
3h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Blowin' in the wind -- A source of energy?It may in the future be possible to harvest energy with the aid of leaves fluttering in the wind. Researchers at the Laboratory of Organic Electronics at Linköping University have developed a method and a material that generate an electrical impulse when the light fluctuates from sunshine to shade and vice versa.
3h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Study challenges previous findings that antidepressants affect breastfeedingNew research does not support the previously observed negative impacts of antidepressant use on breastfeeding.
3h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Tetrahedrality is key to the uniqueness of waterA Japan-based research team studied the anomalous behavior of tetrahedral liquids, such as water. By computer simulation, they calculated the phase diagrams of a range of model liquids. Varying a parameter called lambda (λ), which controls the amount of tetrahedral structure in the liquid, they found that liquids with greater λ showed more anomalies, such as low-temperature expansion. Water's valu
3h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Food waste: The biggest loss could be what you choose to put in your mouthIn a study published in the Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences (PNAS), USA, researchers at the Weizmann Institute of Science and their colleagues have now found a novel way to define and quantify this second type of wastage. The scientists have called it 'opportunity food loss,' a term inspired by the 'opportunity cost' concept in economics, which refers to the cost of choosing a part
3h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Stanford researchers learn why aquatic mammals need to be big, but not too bigExamining body sizes of ancient and modern aquatic mammals and their terrestrial counterparts reveals that life in water restricts mammals to a narrow range of body sizes -- big enough to stay warm, but not so big they can't find enough food.
3h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Why are whales so big?Examining body sizes of ancient and modern aquatic mammals and their terrestrial counterparts reveals that life in water restricts mammals to a narrow range of body sizes -- big enough to stay warm, but not so big they can't find enough food.
3h
Live Science

China's Out-Of-Control Space Station Is Nowhere Near the Biggest Thing to Fall From SpaceHere's how China's Tiangong-1 space station will compare to other uncontrolled re-entries when it hits the atmosphere.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

In a trade war, aviation giant Boeing could be a sitting duckThe sparkling new Boeing 787s bound for China Southern Airlines and Air China are waiting to be delivered, but the prospect of a trade war could make for a less rosy future.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

Understanding charge transfers in molecular electronicsScientists have found a way to understand and manipulate the transition of charges in molecular junctions.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

First IVF bison calf joins wild herdEight bison -- four calves and their mothers -- were released in mid-March on public lands in northern Colorado. A 10-month-old calf known as IVF 1 was among the newcomers.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

Insect toxin detected in the world's longest animalThe longest animal in the world, the bootlace worm, which can be up to 55 meters long, produces neurotoxins that can kill both crabs and cockroaches. The toxins could be used in agricultural insecticides, among other things.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

'Phubbing' can threaten our basic human needs, research showsNew research has shown that ignoring someone you're with in a social setting to concentrate on your mobile phone -- called 'phubbing' -- can can have a negative effect on relationships by threatening our basic human need to belong.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

The rhythm of genes: How the circadian clock regulates 3-D chromatin structureBiologists and geneticists have uncovered how the circadian clock orchestrates the 24-hour cycle of gene expression by regulating the structure of chromatin, the tightly wound DNA-protein complex of the cell. The work is published in Genes & Development.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Cat-and-mouse game: Mountain lion roams California backyardsA mountain lion roamed through backyards in a neighborhood outside Los Angeles before wildlife officers tranquilized it.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Five ways to halt 'critical' land decayScientists warned Monday that land degradation imperils the health and well-being of billions of people, threatening food and water supplies while fuelling conflict, mass migration and disease spread.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Is Zuckerberg willing to act boldly to fix Facebook crisis?As questions mounted last year about whether Facebook had been exploited to tilt the U.S. presidential election, Mark Zuckerberg's to-do list landed him on a fishing trawler off Alabama's Gulf coast.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

'Beginning of the end?' No new babies for endangered whalesThe winter calving season for critically endangered right whales is ending without a single newborn being spotted off the southeast U.S. coast, a reproductive drought unseen for three decades that experts say brings the rare species a perilous step closer to extinction.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Hybrid chickadees found deficient at learning and memoryFor a long time, hybridization—when distinct species mate and produce offspring—was thought to be a mistake. Yet, advancements in genomic testing tools have revealed naturally occurring hybridization as a fairly common phenomenon—with a role in natural selection, in some cases.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Researchers estimate the vulnerability and extinction risk of migratory species from different regions and ecosystemsForty million miles of major roads crisscross the Earth's continents—enough to circle the planet 1,600 times. For humans, these thoroughfares are a boon, enabling them to move with ease from place to place. But for migrating animals who are also hemmed in by dams, rivers, shipping lanes, urban development and agriculture, they create another barrier.
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Science | The Guardian

Calls to rein in antibiotic use after study shows 65% increase worldwide• Drug resistant infections kill half a million people a year Increase in antibiotic use is largely in developing world A dramatic rise in global antibiotic consumption has led public health experts to call for fresh strategies to rein in excessive use of the drugs, and for major investments to provide clean water, sanitation and vaccines in countries where infectious diseases are rife. The unres
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Latest Headlines | Science News

Modern chimp brains share similarities with ancient hominidsMRIs suggest certain brain folding patterns don’t mark ancient humanlike neural advances after all, raising questions about hominid brain evolution.
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Popular Science

Can exercising the mind improve our abilities, or is it just another self-improvement fantasy?Science Scientists still aren’t sure why brain training only works for some people. Scientists still aren’t sure why brain training only works for some people.
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Popular Science

These techniques are proven to boost certain cognitive functionsScience Included: how memory athletes stuff their noggins with so much knowledge. Meditation, Sudoku puzzles, and techniques that help memory athletes stuff their noggins with so much knowledge.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Biologists discover that female purple sea urchins prime their progeny to succeed in the face of stressThis story begins in the kelp forest and ends with a very important climate change message: All is not lost—at least not for purple sea urchins.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Simulating G-force to test plant gravity perception in mustard seedlingsWhen plants on Earth search for nutrients and water, what drives their direction? Very simply, gravitational force helps them find the easiest path to the substances they need to grow and thrive. What happens if gravity is no longer part of the equation?
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Food waste: The biggest loss could be what you choose to put in your mouthAbout a third of the food produced for human consumption is estimated to be lost or wasted globally. But the biggest waste, which is not included in this estimate, may be through dietary choices that result in the squandering of environmental resources. In a study published in the Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences (PNAS), researchers at the Weizmann Institute of Science and their col
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Spiders and scorpions have co-opted leg genes to build their headsArthropods are among the most successful animals on the planet. They inhabit the sea (horseshoe crabs), the sky (fruit flies), and the earth (scorpions) in vast numbers and are defined by their exoskeleton exteriors and segmented legs and bodies.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Researchers learn why aquatic mammals need to be big, but not too bigAnyone who has witnessed majestic whales or lumbering elephant seals in person would be forgiven for associating ocean life with unlimited size in mammals, but new research reveals that mammal growth is actually more constrained in water than on land.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

New insights into how cellulose is built could indicate how to break it apart for biofuelsA comprehensive look at how plants build cellulose, the primary building block of the walls of most plant cells that is used in a wide variety of manmade materials, could have important implications for its use in biofuels. Researchers at Penn State have identified the major steps in the process as well as the tools used by plant cells to create cellulose, including proteins that transport critica
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

Music lessons improve children's cognitive skills and academic performanceThe first large-scale, longitudinal study adapted into the regular school curriculum finds that structured music lessons significantly enhance children's cognitive abilities -- including language-based reasoning, short-term memory, planning and inhibition -- leading to improved academic performance. Visual arts lessons were also found to significantly improve children's visual and spatial memory.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

New laser technique may help detect chemical warfare in atmosphereThe Department of Homeland Security could benefit from a reliable, real-time instrument that could scan the atmosphere for toxic agents in order to alert communities to a biological or chemical attack. Optics and photonics experts are developing just such a technology to accomplish that.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

Neuroscientists say daily ibuprofen can prevent Alzheimer's diseaseNeuroscientists have successfully carried out studies suggesting that, if started early enough, a daily regimen of the non-prescription NSAID (nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drug) ibuprofen can prevent the onset of Alzheimer's disease.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

Vampire bat immunity and infection risk respond to livestock rearingThe availability of livestock as a food source for vampire bats influences their immune response and infection by bacterial pathogens, according to a new article. Because cattle ranching is common in areas where the bats live, the findings have implications for human as well as animal health.
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The Atlantic

Why Are So Many Women Dying From Pregnancy in D.C.?Maternity Desert , a new documentary from The Atlantic , follows Amber Pierre, a 24-year-old African-American woman living in southeast D.C. Pierre is pregnant with her second child. After two previous miscarriages, she is navigating a high-risk pregnancy that, combined with her Medicaid coverage, requires she visit a hospital every two weeks to be seen by an Ob-Gyn. Following the 2017 closures o
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News

LC-MS/MS Identification and characterization of biodegradation products of NitroprostonNitroproston biodegradants were identified in vitro using LC-HRMS/MS. Amounts of Nitroproston and its biodegradation products in rat, rabbit and human plasma and human whole blood samples were measured by the target LC-MS/MS method. Nitroproston is rapidly hydrolyzed in rodent compared to human plasma incubations. Whereas Nitroproston is relatively stable in human plasma an enhanced hydrolytic act
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Science : NPR

Clockwork Orange? Why Russian Ski Slopes Are Being Blanketed In The Strange ColorThe skies over Crete were an eerie orange, too. Why the tangerine tint? Powerful storms in North Africa blew sands from the Sahara across the Mediterranean. (Image credit: Margarita Alshina/AP)
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Futurity.org

Even quick bursts of exercise can cut your death riskEven short bursts of exercise throughout the day could work to reduce our risk of disease and death, new research shows. For decades, Americans have heard confusing barrage of messages about how best to counteract the health risks of sedentary lifestyles: walk 10,000 steps a day; do a seven-minute workout from a phone app; flip heavy tires in an arduous boot camp class. The findings, published in
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

Global carbon emissions could be cut 3 percent by following the UK's exampleThe UK cut its emissions from electricity production by 25 percent in 2016, using a strategy many countries could adopt to quickly lower carbon emissions.
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Hybrid chickadees found deficient at learning and memoryScientists at Lehigh University and Franklin & Marshall College have found that hybrid chickadees have marked deficiencies in learning and memory compared to their pure species parents, a possible selective disadvantage. The study, published today in Evolution, is the first to identify deficiencies in learning and memory in a hybrid of any species.
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Prenatal choline intake increases grey and white matter in pigletsCholine intake during pregnancy can influence infant metabolism and brain development, according to a series of studies from the University of Illinois. Although the role of choline in neurodevelopment has been studied before in rodents, the new research, done with pigs, has more relevance to humans.
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Live Science

Why Is China's Space Station Falling to Earth in the First Place?The one-module station is in an uncontrolled fall and will re-enter the atmosphere somewhere underneath the spacecraft's orbit, but nobody knows exactly when or where that will happen.
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Science : NPR

Why Not Talk About Death?Many people just don't want to talk about what it means to live in the face of death. Astrophysicist Adam Frank reflects on life and death — and invites others to do the same. (Image credit: Christopher Furlong/Getty Images)
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Rocky habitats need to be protected for endangered amphibians to surviveAn international team of scientists led by the University of Plymouth has published research in the PLOS ONE journal showing that rare amphibians living on rocky plateaus in western India are in desperate need of greater protection as their habitats are being eroded.
4h
New on MIT Technology Review

AI savants, recognizing bias, and building machines that think like peopleDespite impressive advances, three speakers at EmTech Digital show how far there is to go in the AI world.
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The Atlantic

John Bolton Is MisunderstoodOver the past few days, many have tried to distill John Bolton’s worldview, to get a sense of how he might shape the foreign policy of the Trump administration as he takes up the post of national-security adviser. His detractors have paid particularly close attention to his bellicose statements about North Korea, arguably the country’s most pressing security challenge, and his forceful critiques
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Rocky habitats need to be protected for endangered amphibians to surviveRare amphibians living on rocky plateaux in western India are in desperate need of greater protection as their habitats are being eroded by expansions in population, industry and tourism, new research has shown.
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News

New targeted therapy schedule could keep melanoma at bayOptimizing the timing of targeted therapies for melanoma reverses tumor growth, and resistance can be mitigated.
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The Atlantic

The People Trump's War on Drugs Will Actually PunishThe War on Drugs 3.0 began in earnest just last week. And it could have the same devastating effect on communities of color as the ones that came before. In Manchester, New Hampshire—the hardest-hit city in a state that’s become the epicenter of America’s opioid crisis—President Trump announced a new plan ostensibly designed to combat the epidemic. The president played something of a warrior king
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Latest Headlines | Science News

Humpback whale bumps have marine biologists stumpedChristine Gabriele is taking tissue samples from humpback whales in Hawaii to determine why more and more have nodular dermatitis.
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Combination breast cancer therapy targets tumor cells and the blood vessels that feed themBetween 30 and 40 percent of human breast cancers express a defective (mutant) form of p53, a protein that helps cancer cells proliferate and grow. Researchers at the University of Missouri found that combining a cancer therapy, which activates p53 and is currently under a clinical trial, with a second drug therapy that helps suppress tumor blood vessels found in cancer cells, can significantly re
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Rapid adaptationBiologists discover that female purple sea urchins prime their progeny to succeed in the face of stress.
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News

In laboratory, SLU scientist turns off chemo painSaint Louis University researchers describe their success in an animal model in turning off the excruciating pain that often accompanies a colorectal cancer drug.
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Animal migrationsResearchers estimate the vulnerability and extinction risk of migratory species from different regions and ecosystems.
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Portable device detects severe stroke in seconds with 92 percent accuracyIn results published online on March 6, 2018, in the Journal of Neurointerventional Surgery, clinical investigators at the Medical University of South Carolina, Mount Sinai, the University of Tennessee Health Sciences Center and elsewhere describe a new visor-like device that detects emergent large-vessel occlusion with 92 percent accuracy. In such cases, emergency medical personnel transfer patie
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The Atlantic

Silicon Valley Explores the Darker Side of the IndustryThere’s arguably never been a better time for Silicon Valley to be on the air. As Mark Zuckerberg takes out full-page newspaper ads apologizing for Facebook’s recently revealed data leaks, America’s queasiness with the apps and tech companies that have become integral to daily life is reaching critical levels. HBO’s Silicon Valley is, first and foremost, a silly, heightened workplace comedy. But
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Big Think

Flat-Earther “Mad” Mike Hughes finally blasts off in homemade rocketMike Hughes finally launched his homemade rocket 1,875 feet into the sky. Now, the 61-year-old has plans to build another rocket to go even higher... Read More
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The Atlantic

The Unsettling Familiarity of XXXTentacionXXXTentacion, creator of what’s now the No. 1 album in the country, is exactly the kind of artist who seems designed to make adults feel out of touch. But the funny thing is that if you listen to his album, ? , you’ll hear a young man trying to sound like a lot of different people who’ve come before him. When the 20-year-old Jahseh Dwayne Onfroy raps, he can seem like another of the playful mumbl
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The Atlantic

The People Who Can Control Their Goose Bumps“It starts in the back of my neck,” Javier Palejko told me over Skype. “It’s like I have a muscle there and I just make it work.” The “it” in this case was goose bumps, which Palejko, a 34-year-old tech worker in Argentina, says he can control at will. Like most unexceptional people—by which I mean, people whose goose bumps only appear when we’re cold or feeling intense emotions—I could not even
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The Atlantic

Four More Years of Censoring Culture in EgyptCAIRO—One evening last month, Russian belly-dancer Eicatrina Andreeva was performing at a floating nightclub on the Nile River. Toward the end of her act, her manager noticed a middle-aged man in a leather jacket who stood out against the touristy crowd. “I knew he was a cop straight away,” the manager said. “I begged him, ‘Please, just let her finish her set. Give her 15 minutes.’” The policeman
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Are fire ants worse this spring because of Hurricane Harvey?Rice University ecologists are checking to see if Hurricane Harvey's unprecedented floods gave a competitive boost to fire ants and crazy ants, two of southeast Texas' least favorite uninvited guests.
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Why does sleep become disrupted in old age?The brain maintains its ability to generate local neural oscillations during sleep throughout the lifespan, according to a study of young and old mice published in JNeurosci. The research indicates that age-related disruptions in sleep and associated large-scale brain activity, are not due to changes in the activity of individual neurons.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Kepler solves mystery of fast and furious explosionsThe universe is full of mysterious exploding phenomena that go boom in the dark. One particular type of ephemeral event, called a Fast-Evolving Luminous Transient (FELT), has bewildered astronomers for a decade because of its very brief duration.
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Blog » Languages » English

Narwhal vs. Unicorn vs. Pegasus: Narwhals win!It was a ~magical~ competition, but in the end the magic of mother nature out-bid the magic of mythology. Congrats to team Narwhal and thanks to all who participated! Leaderboard: Art by MJ Kim
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Spotify warns of slower sales growth as New York listing nearsSpotify, the world's leading music streaming site, said Monday that its sales growth was likely to slow this year, but that it still expected to post a narrower annual loss.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Germany vows 'stricter' Facebook oversight after data leakGermany's justice minister on Monday said Facebook should face "stricter" oversight and be more transparent with its users, as the tech giant struggles to contain the fallout from a huge data privacy scandal.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Research reveals a new direction for halting the citrus greening epidemicNew clues to how the bacteria associated with citrus greening infect the only insect that carries them could lead to a way to block the microbes' spread from tree to tree, according to a study in Infection and Immunity by scientists at Boyce Thompson Institute (BTI) and the Agricultural Research Service (ARS).
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Live Science

Black Holes Devour Stars, Spit Out Clues to How Galaxies GrowBlack holes may spit out energy in the form of radio waves in direct proportion to the amount of mass the black holes consume, new data suggests.
5h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Frequent, public drug users may be good candidates for overdose-treatment trainingThe most frequent and public opioid users may be the best available candidates for naloxone training, according to a new study from scientists at Johns Hopkins Bloomberg School of Public Health.
5h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Research reveals a new direction for halting the citrus greening epidemicNew clues to how the bacteria associated with citrus greening infect the only insect that carries them could lead to a way to block the microbes' spread from tree to tree, according to a study in Infection and Immunity by scientists at Boyce Thompson Institute (BTI) and the Agricultural Research Service (ARS).
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Scientific American Content: Global

EPA Plan Would Discount Health Benefits of Reducing CO2 EmissionsReducing smog pollutants could avoid 3,600 premature deaths, previous estimates suggested -- Read more on ScientificAmerican.com
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Facebook shares in fresh slide amid US consumer agency probeFTC Facebook PrivacyA US consumer protection agency said Monday it has opened an investigation into Facebook's privacy practices, in another blow to the social network struggling to deal with a growing crisis on misuse of its member data.
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New Scientist - News

Mercury’s long-lost cousin found in distant planetary systemAn exoplanet discovered 340 million light years away may shed some light on how Mercury got to be such a weird world – a tiny planet made mostly of an iron core
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New Scientist - News

A star has been seen exploding faster than any other on recordA supernova exploded and hit maximum brightness over 2.2 days – the fastest one we’ve spotted. A shell of gas from its dying star may have amped up its light
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

FTC, states increase pressure on Facebook on privacy (Update)FTC Facebook PrivacyU.S. regulators and state attorneys general are increasing pressure on Facebook as they probe whether the company's data-collection practices have hurt the people who use its services.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Study offers pearls of wisdom in contested New York oyster restorationIn addition to being a tasty delicacy, oysters provide a variety of ecosystem services. They filter water and cycle vital nutrients. By cementing themselves into complex shell reefs, they provide habitat for hundreds of invertebrate and fish species and reduce storm surges and erosion. These characteristics make oysters a unique tool for restoring polluted coastal waterways.
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Futurity.org

Gut cells turn up in lung tumorsResearchers recently spotted a miniature stomach, duodenum, and small intestine hidden among the cells of lung tumor samples. Tumors are notoriously mixed up; cells from one part often express different genes and adopt different sizes and shapes than cells from another part of that same tumor. This discovery was still a surprise, however. The team discovered that these cells had lost a gene calle
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

How infighting turns toxic for chimpanzeesPower. Ambition. Jealousy. According to a new study, the same things that fuel deadly clashes in humans can also tear apart chimpanzees, our closest animal relatives.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Low energy Iris not expected to make much of an impactLow energy Iris which originated on March 24, 2018 is likely to hover around a low end Category 1 cyclone. Iris will track south through the Coral Sea. The Vanuatu Meteorological Service says Tropical Cyclone Iris has moved away from Vanuatu. The category one cyclone was moving west southwesterly at 53 kph and is now in the Coral Sea. The potential for Tropical Cyclone Iris to further intensify an
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Jelawat not seen as a threat to the PhilippinesTropical Depression Jelawat, a newly-formed tropical cyclone over Western Micronesia is expected to strengthen into a Tropical Storm and enter the southeastern border of the Philippines by this afternoon (March 26). However, this storm is too far away to actually affect any part of the country. The developing center was located over the western part of Micronesia (near 6.6N 139.5E), about 560 km e
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Who becomes a hero? It is more than just a personality traitWe tend to think of heroes in terms of a psychological profile: brave, altruistic, strong.
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Study offers pearls of wisdom in contested New York oyster restorationA new study finds these stakeholder groups actually share many of the same concerns, notably risks to public health and the economy, while also acknowledging the potential ecological benefits. This means that both groups may be receptive to similar appeals for oyster restoration projects in the future.
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News

How infighting turns toxic for chimpanzeesHow did a once-unified community of chimpanzees in Gombe National Park, Tanzania, end up at each other's throats? In a new study, researchers mapped the chimps' social networks at different periods leading up to the split to pinpoint when relations began to fray, and test ideas about what caused the rift. The most likely culprit was a power struggle among three top-ranking males, which was made wo
6h
New on MIT Technology Review

China hopes to build the chips that will control millions of driverless cars
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

It's a girl: first IVF bison calf joins NoCo herdAnd then there were... 44. Eight bison—four calves and their mothers—were released in mid-March on public lands in northern Colorado, bringing the total number of animals in the Laramie Foothills Bison Conservation Herd to 44.
6h
New on MIT Technology Review

We’re learning more about Uber’s driverless technology, and it isn’t good
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Viden

Dyre- og plantearter er i frit dødsfald over hele klodenUdviklingen truer menneskets eksistensgrundlag, lyder konklusionen fra 550 forskere, der har bidraget til rapporter om tab af biodiversitet i fire regioner på kloden.
6h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

The rhythm of genes: How the circadian clock regulates 3-D chromatin structureEPFL biologists and geneticists have uncovered how the circadian clock orchestrates the 24-hour cycle of gene expression by regulating the structure of chromatin, the tightly wound DNA-protein complex of the cell. The work is published in Genes & Development.
6h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Boys, fathers and mentors work together for STEM engagementBoth the medium and the message are STEM—encouraging fourth and fifth-grade African-American and Latino boys to embrace the cool factor of science, technology, engineering and mathematics through hands-on engineering activities with their fathers and other mentors from the University of Houston.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

How did the guppy cross the ocean? An unexpected fish appears on a volcanic archipelagoWhile people tend to describe tropical oceanic islands as 'paradises on Earth' and associate them with calm beaches, transparent warm waters and marvellous landscapes, archipelagos are often the product of a fierce natural force—volcanoes which erupt at the bottom of the sea.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

CRISPR/Cas9 mutation prevention system could help prevent and fight disease in the futureMany life-threatening diseases are caused or exacerbated by a mere change of a single nucleotide building block in the universal genetic DNA code. Such "point mutations" can turn a single cell in the human body into a cancerous cell that goes on to grow into a tumor, or they can turn antibiotic-sensitive into antibiotic-resistant bacteria that cause untreatable infections. In an ideal world, clini
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Alberta's boreal forest could be dramatically altered by 2100 due to climate change, study saysHalf of Alberta's upland boreal forest is likely to disappear over the next century due to climate change, a new study shows.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Vampire bat immunity and infection risk respond to livestock rearingThe availability of livestock as a food source for vampire bats influences their immune response and infection by bacterial pathogens, according to a new paper in Philosophical Transactions of the Royal Society B. Because cattle ranching is common in areas where the bats live, the findings have implications for human as well as animal health.
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Feed: All Latest

Watch Astronauts Answer Your Burning Questions About SpaceWe've assembled seven astronauts to prove just how smart and cool they are by answering the top 50 Googled questions about space.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Understanding charge transfers in molecular electronicsAn international research team, which includes University of Central Florida Professor Enrique del Barco and Christian A. Nijhuis of the National University of Singapore, has found a way to understand and manipulate the transition of charges in molecular junctions.
6h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Atomically thin light-emitting device opens the possibility for 'invisible' displaysUC Berkeley engineers have built a bright-light emitting device that is millimeters wide and fully transparent when turned off. The light emitting material in this device is a monolayer semiconductor, which is just three atoms thick.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Underground neutrino experiment sets the stage for deep discovery about matterIf equal amounts of matter and antimatter had formed in the Big Bang more than 13 billion years ago, one would have annihilated the other upon meeting, and today's universe would be full of energy but no matter to form stars, planets and life. Yet matter exists now. That fact suggests something is wrong with Standard Model equations describing symmetry between subatomic particles and their antipar
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

New laser technique may help detect chemical warfare in atmosphereThe Department of Homeland Security could benefit from a reliable, real-time instrument that could scan the atmosphere for toxic agents in order to alert communities to a biological or chemical attack. UCF optics and photonics Professor Konstantin Vodopyanov is developing just such a technology to accomplish that.
6h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Low energy Iris not expected to make much of an impactLow energy Iris which originated on March 24, 2018 is likely to hover around a low end Category 1 cyclone. Iris will track south through the Coral Sea.
6h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Atomically thin light-emitting device opens the possibility for 'invisible' displaysUC Berkeley engineers have built a bright-light emitting device that is millimeters wide and fully transparent when turned off. The light emitting material in this device is a monolayer semiconductor, which is just three atoms thick.
6h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Keeping the genetic codeWyss Institute researchers developed an in vivo mutation prevention method that enables the DNA-cleaving Cas9 enzyme to discriminate between genomic target sites differing by a single nucleotide and to exclusively cut the unwanted one. In proof-of-concept studies performed in bacterial E. coli strains grown in culture or the mouse gastrointestinal tract, the approach can prevent the survival of an
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Infection prevention and control programs are essential to antibiotic stewardship effortsInfection prevention and control (IPC) and antibiotic stewardship (AS) programs are inextricably linked, according to a joint position paper published today by the Association for Professionals in Infection Control and Epidemiology (APIC), the Society for Healthcare Epidemiology of America (SHEA), and the Society of Infectious Disease Pharmacists (SIDP) in APIC and SHEA's peer-review journals, the
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News

New study finds younger aged children with symptoms of ADHD have reduced brain sizeChildren as young as four years old with symptoms of attention-deficit/hyperactivity disorder (ADHD) showed reduced brain volumes in regions essential for behavioral control, according to a study published today in the Journal of the International Neuropsychological Society. The study, funded by the National Institutes of Health, represents the first comprehensive examination of cortical brain vol
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Mutation promts lung tumor cells to morph into gut cellsResearchers were surprised when they recently spotted a miniature gut hidden in the cells of lung tumor samples. They discovered that these cells had lost a gene called NKX2-1 that acts as a master switch, flipping a network of genes to set the course for a lung cell. Without it, the cells follow the path of their nearest developmental neighbor -- the gut -- much like a train jumping tracks when a
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Landslide modeling after Kaikoura Quake provides data to first respondersHours after the 2016 Kaikoura earthquake hit New Zealand, researchers were able to share information with first responders about where significant landsliding might have occurred to block roads and rivers, according to a new report in the Bulletin of the Seismological Society of America.
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Feed: All Latest

How a Store of Rhino Semen Could Save the SpeciesThomas Hildebrandt has been collecting samples from the white rhinoceros with colleagues for about 15 years.
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Feed: All Latest

The FTC Is Officially Investigating Facebook's Data PracticesThe Federal Trade Commission's probe comes on the heels of the Cambridge Analytica scandal, in which 50 million Americans' Facebook data was reportedly improperly retained by the data firm.
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Science | The Guardian

Did you solve it? The art of the dealThe solutions to today’s puzzles In my puzzle blog earlier today I set the following three questions: 1) Which of the face up cards in the bottom row should replace the face down card in the top row to complete the pattern? Continue reading...
6h
Big Think

Facebook harvested phone call and text data from Android users for yearsFacebook Data AndroidHave an Android phone or device? You might want to read this. Read More
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

A new way to find better battery materialsResearchers have developed a new way to find materials that could be used as electrodes in lighter, safer rechargeable batteries.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

Sewage sludge leads to biofuels breakthroughResearchers have discovered a new enzyme that will enable microbial production of a renewable alternative to petroleum-based toluene, a widely used octane booster in gasoline that has a global market of 29 million tons per year.
6h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Landslide modeling after Kaikoura Quake provides data to first respondersHours after the 2016 Kaikoura earthquake hit New Zealand, researchers were able to share information with first responders about where significant landsliding might have occurred to block roads and rivers, according to a new report in the Bulletin of the Seismological Society of America.
6h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Study explores impact of firms' financial restatements on bank loansDr. Rebecca Files and Dr. Umit Gurun, of the Naveen Jindal School of Management at the University of Texas at Dallas, investigated whether restatements by economically related firms also influence the terms of a loan, such as an increased interest rate, for borrowers. Their study was recently published in Contemporary Accounting Research.
6h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News

The rhythm of genes: How the circadian clock regulates 3-D chromatin structureEPFL biologists and geneticists have uncovered how the circadian clock orchestrates the 24-hour cycle of gene expression by regulating the structure of chromatin, the tightly wound DNA-protein complex of the cell. The work is published in Genes & Development.
6h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Jelawat not seen as a threat to the PhilippinesTropical Depression Jelawat, a newly formed tropical cyclone over Western Micronesia is expected to strengthen into a Tropical Storm and enter the southeastern border of the Philippines by this afternoon (March 26).
6h
New on MIT Technology Review

Exclusive: This is the most dexterous robot ever createdThe most nimble-fingered machine yet shows how machine learning can teach robots to recognize and pick up different types of objects, a skill that could transform many factories and warehouses.
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New on MIT Technology Review

Lawmakers still really, really want to crack iPhones
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

Important development could reduce numbers of fish required in toxicology researchScientists have developed a new method which could help assess the effects of chemicals on digestive systems.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

Let them eat xylose: Yeast engineered to grow efficiently on novel nutrientsResearchers have created a genetically modified yeast that can more efficiently consume a novel nutrient, xylose, enabling the yeast to grow faster and to higher cell densities, raising the prospect of a significantly faster path toward the design of new synthetic organisms for industrial applications, according to a new study.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

Breakthrough in battle against rice blastScientists have found a way to stop the spread of rice blast, a fungus that destroys up to 30% of the world's rice crop each year.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

Cancer patients' pain eased by simple bedside chartPatients with cancer could benefit from a simple bedside system to manage their pain, a study suggests.
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New on MIT Technology Review

Cell-phone metadata worries are adding to the fallout from Facebook’s data scandal
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Insect toxin detected in the world's longest animalThe longest animal in the world, the bootlace worm, which can be up to 55 meters long, produces neurotoxins that can kill both crabs and cockroaches. This has been shown in a new study conducted by researchers at Uppsala University, Linnaeus University and the Swedish Species Information Centre at the Swedish University of Agricultural Sciences. The study was published in Scientific Reports, March
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News

'Phubbing' can threaten our basic human needs, research showsNew research has shown that ignoring someone you're with in a social setting to concentrate on your mobile phone -- called 'phubbing' -- can can have a negative effect on relationships by threatening our basic human need to belong.
7h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News

First IVF bison calf joins NoCo herdEight bison -- four calves and their mothers -- were released in mid-March on public lands in northern Colorado. A 10-month-old calf known as IVF 1 was among the newcomers.
7h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Underground neutrino experiment sets the stage for deep discovery about matterIn a study published in Physical Review Letters, collaborators of the MAJORANA DEMONSTRATOR, an experiment led by the Department of Energy's Oak Ridge National Laboratory, have shown they can shield a sensitive, scalable 44-kilogram germanium detector array from background radioactivity. This accomplishment is critical to developing and proposing a much larger future experiment -- with approximate
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Viden

Sne i Sahara: Her er fem ekstreme klimahændelser sidste årSidste år var præget af flere voldsomme klimakatastrofer, fortæller klimaprofessor.
7h
Big Think

A vertical map of Earth: How high or low can you go?From La Rinconada in Peru to South Africa's deepest mines: the quest for gold drives people to the greatest heights and depths on Earth. Read More
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Popular Science

Scientists want YOU to help them study amphibious lil plantsNexus Media News Toddlers, teens and retirees are helping researchers understand how tiny plants respond to climate change. Microplants enlisted the help of 11,000 volunteers willing to spend time analyzing liverwort photos, either remotely online or via an in-person digital kiosk at one of…
7h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Understanding charge transfers in molecular electronicsAn international research team, which includes University of Central Florida Professor Enrique del Barco and Christian A. Nijhuis of the National University of Singapore, has found a way to understand and manipulate the transition of charges in molecular junctions.
7h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Vampire bat immunity and infection risk respond to livestock rearingThe availability of livestock as a food source for vampire bats influences their immune response and infection by bacterial pathogens, according to a new paper in Philosophical Transactions of the Royal Society B. Because cattle ranching is common in areas where the bats live, the findings have implications for human as well as animal health.
7h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Canadian neuroscientists say daily ibuprofen can prevent Alzheimer's diseaseA Vancouver-based research team led by Canada's most cited neuroscientist, Dr. Patrick McGeer, has successfully carried out studies suggesting that, if started early enough, a daily regimen of the non-prescription NSAID (nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drug) ibuprofen can prevent the onset of Alzheimer's disease.
7h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News

New laser technique may help detect chemical warfare in atmosphereThe Department of Homeland Security could benefit from a reliable, real-time instrument that could scan the atmosphere for toxic agents in order to alert communities to a biological or chemical attack. UCF optics and photonics Professor Konstantin Vodopyanov is developing just such a technology to accomplish that.
7h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News

MSU-based scientists described the collision of a shock wave and a 'star cradle'A mathematician from MSU together with a Russian colleague modeled the formation of filaments (thread-like matter conglomerates) after the collision of a shock wave with molecular clouds in the interstellar space. The work will help the scientists better understand the birth of stars and star systems. The results of the study were published in Computers and Fluids magazine.
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Music lessons improve children's cognitive skills and academic performanceThe first large-scale, longitudinal study adapted into the regular school curriculum finds that structured music lessons significantly enhance children's cognitive abilities -- including language-based reasoning, short-term memory, planning and inhibition -- leading to improved academic performance. Visual arts lessons were also found to significantly improve children's visual and spatial memory.
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News

MSU-based physicists witnessed the turning of a dielectric into a conductorA scientist from the Faculty of Physics, MSU together with Russian and foreign colleagues studied changes in the behavior of electrons in one of the types of dielectrics with high time resolution and witnessed how the material turned into a conductor under the influence of ultra-short laser impulses. The method may be used to study high-speed processes. The theoretical study was published in Natur
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Britain's emissions dropped by 6 percent in 2016 by switching from coal to natural gasBritain's emissions dropped by 6 percent in 2016 by switching from coal to natural gas a new study from the University of Sheffield has revealed.
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Light is enough to peer through a mouse skullHaving selected proper light waves, researchers have demonstrated a more than 10-fold improvement of light energy delivery to targets that are too deeply embedded to visualize with current optical imaging. Able to picture through a young mouse skull in the laboratory, this noninvasive technique does not cause any damage to tissues and does not need injections of fluorescent molecules to label the
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Reconciling Paris Agreement goals for temperature, emissionsAs society faces the challenge of limiting warming to no more than 2 degrees Celsius, new research finds an apparent contradiction: Achieving that goal doesn't necessarily require cutting greenhouse gas emissions to zero, as called for in the Paris Agreement. But under certain conditions, even zero emissions might not be enough.
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Global carbon emissions could be cut 3 percent by following the UK's exampleThe UK cut its emissions from electricity production by 25 percent in 2016, using a strategy many countries could adopt to quickly lower carbon emissions.
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Children with autism and their younger siblings less likely to be fully vaccinatedChildren with autism and their younger siblings are significantly less likely to be fully vaccinated than the general population, according to new Kaiser Permanente research published today in JAMA Pediatrics.
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Yeast adaptation study finds diploids evolve more slowly than haploidsA team of Lehigh University set out to answer a basic question: how do the rates of adaptation differ between haploid and diploid organisms? They found that diploids--with two copies of the genome--evolve more slowly than haploids--with only one copy. They also that the beneficial mutations diploids pick up look different compared to what is seen in haploids. Their results have been published in a
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Are antibiotic courses prescribed for sinus infection too long?Most antibiotic courses to treat an acute sinus infection in adults were 10 days or longer, even though the Infectious Diseases Society of America recommends five to seven days for uncomplicated cases.
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Vaccination rates for children with autism spectrum disorder, their younger siblingsChildren with autism spectrum disorder (ASD) and their younger siblings were less likely to be fully vaccinated compared with the general population.
7h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Receptivity to e-cigarette ads among young adults in the US leads to cigarette smokingReceptivity to advertising for e-cigarettes, cigarettes and cigars were confirmed to be associated with those who would try the respective tobacco product within one year. However, receptivity to e-cigarette advertising also independently increased the odds that 12- to 21-year-olds who have never smoked would try cigarette smoking within the next year by 60 percent. This finding, publishing in the
7h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Team brings subatomic resolution to 'computational microscope'Scientists have built a 'computational microscope' that can simulate the atomic and subatomic forces that drive molecular interactions. This tool will streamline efforts to understand the chemistry of life, model large molecular systems and develop new pharmaceutical and industrial agents, the researchers say.
7h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News

New standards for ancient protein studies set forth by multi-national group of researchersA team of researchers from institutions at the leading edge of the new field of palaeoproteomics have published guidelines to provide it with a firm foundation. Ancient proteins are used to study everything from extinct species to ancient human diets to the evolution of diseases, and more. The guide, published in Nature Ecology & Evolution, aims to support good practices in the field and to ensure
7h
Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

Neural fingerprints of altruismFor at least 150 years, we know that traumatic brain injury can change several domains of behavior, impairing social behavior or memory, for instance, depending on which brain areas have been damaged. However, mapping the relation between brain areas and behavior can be tough, especially for complex behavior such as altruism. In this study, war veterans with brain lesion were studied to elucidate
7h
Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

Top sports leagues heavily promote unhealthy food and beverages, new study findsThe majority of food and beverages marketed through multi-million-dollar television and online sports sponsorships are unhealthy -- and may be contributing to the escalating obesity epidemic among children and adolescents in the US.
7h
Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

Captured on film for the first time: Microglia nibbling on brain synapsesFor the first time, researchers have captured microglia nibbling on brain synapses. Their findings show that the special glial cells help synapses grow and rearrange, demonstrating the essential role of microglia in brain development.
7h
Quanta Magazine

The Infinite Primes and Museum Guard Proofs, ExplainedIn January, I spoke with Günter Ziegler , one of the authors of Proofs From THE BOOK , a compilation of some of the most beautiful and elegant proofs in mathematics. The collection was inspired by the legendary mathematician Paul Erdős , who envisioned an infinite book in which God had written the perfect proof for each theorem. Today I want to share a couple of my favorite proofs from THE BOOK .
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NYT > Science

Insects Flew Before Anything Else Did. So How Did They Get Their Wings?Hundreds of millions of years ago, two tissues fused to form wings on ancient beetles, a genetic experiment finds.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Reconciling Paris Agreement goals for temperature, emissions—study finds two targets don't always go hand in handAs society faces the challenge of limiting warming to no more than 2 degrees Celsius, new research finds an apparent contradiction: Achieving that goal doesn't necessarily require cutting greenhouse gas emissions to zero, as called for in the Paris Agreement. But under certain conditions, even zero emissions might not be enough.
7h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Global carbon emissions could be cut three percent by following the UK's exampleThe UK cut its emissions from electricity production by 25% in 2016, using a strategy many countries could adopt to quickly lower carbon emissions.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Team brings subatomic resolution to 'computational microscope'Scientists have built a "computational microscope" that can simulate the atomic and subatomic forces that drive molecular interactions. This tool will streamline efforts to understand the chemistry of life, model large molecular systems and develop new pharmaceutical and industrial agents, the researchers say.
7h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Yeast adaptation study finds diploids evolve more slowly than haploidsExperimental evolution is a good way to enhance our current understanding of how genomes—or sets of chromosomes in an organism's cells—evolve and the role of individual mutations in adaptation.
7h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

New standards for ancient protein studies set forth by multi-national group of researchersA team of researchers from institutions at the leading edge of the new field of palaeoproteomics have published guidelines to provide it with a firm foundation. Ancient proteins are used to study everything from extinct species to ancient human diets to the evolution of diseases, and more. The guide, published in Nature Ecology & Evolution, aims to support good practices in the field and to ensure
7h
Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

Treatment rates for dangerously high cholesterol remains lowLess than 40 percent of people with severe elevations in cholesterol are being prescribed appropriate drug treatment, according to a nationally representative study.
7h
Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

Drug-related mortality rates are not randomly distributed across the USBetween 2006 and 2015 there were more than 515,000 deaths from drug overdoses and other drug-related causes in the US. The economic, social, and emotional tolls of these deaths are substantial, but some parts of the US are bearing heavier burdens than others. Evidence from the first national study of county-level differences suggests that addressing economic and social conditions will be key to re
7h
Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

New family of promising, selective silver-based anti-cancer drugs discoveredA new family of potential silver-based anti-cancer drugs has been discovered by researchers in South Africa. The most promising complex among these has been successfully tested in rats and in several human cancer cell lines in laboratory studies. The complex is as effective against human esophageal cancer cells, as a widely-used chemotherapy drug, but at a ten times lower dose, and much lower toxi
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

Machine learning model provides rapid prediction of C. difficile infection riskInvestigators have developed investigational 'machine learning' models, specifically tailored to individual institutions, that can predict a patient's risk of developing C. difficile much earlier than it would be diagnosed with current methods.
7h
The Atlantic

Trump's Legal Threats BackfireMinutes after the Stormy Daniels interview on 60 Minutes , Team Trump fired off a heavy-breathing lawyer’s letter , bristling with phrases like “cease and desist” and “retract and apologize.” This is exactly the approach by which Donald Trump inadvertently made millions for Michael Wolff. Having so spectacularly backfired the first time, why do it again? The short answer is: Team Trump knows noth
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Looking deeper into brain functionAs neuroscience enters the era of big data bases, a new approach could offer a deeper and more systematic understanding of brain function, HBP scientists argue in an article in the current issue of the renowned journal Trends in Cognitive Science.
7h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Who becomes a hero? It is more than just a personality traitWe tend to think of heroes in terms of a psychological profile: brave, altruistic, strong. But a new study suggests that for at least one kind of heroism, it takes a village to save a life.
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Alberta's boreal forest could be dramatically altered by 2100 due to climate change, study saysHalf of Alberta's upland boreal forest is likely to disappear over the next century due to climate change, a new study shows. The upland forest will be replaced after wildfire by open woodland or grassland, according to research from University of Alberta biologists, conducted in collaboration with Natural Resources Canada researchers.
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Novel blueprint for faster implementation of more evidence-based healthcare solutionsIndiana University and Regenstrief Institute investigators have developed and tested Agile Implementation -- a catalytic platform for transforming the current healthcare delivery system (HC 1.0) into a patient and family centric, high reliability, learning healthcare delivery system (HC 2.0). 'Agile Implementation: A Blueprint for Implementing Evidence-Based Healthcare Solutions' is published onli
7h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Argonne's powerful X-rays key to confirming water source deep below Earth's surfaceA study published in Science last week relies on extremely bright X-ray beams from the US Department of Energy's Advanced Photon Source at Argonne National Laboratory to confirm the presence of naturally occurring water at least 410 kilometers below the Earth's surface. This exciting discovery could change our understanding of how water circulates deep in the Earth's mantle and how heat escapes fr
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

UAE says its first nuclear reactor completeThe United Arab Emirates said Monday that one of four nuclear reactors at its debut plant has been completed as it moves closer to becoming the first Arab nation to produce atomic power.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Enzyme discovery enables first-time microbial production of an aromatic biofuelResearchers at the U.S. Department of Energy Joint BioEnergy Institute (JBEI) and Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory (Berkeley Lab) have discovered a new enzyme that will enable microbial production of a renewable alternative to petroleum-based toluene, a widely used octane booster in gasoline that has a global market of 29 million tons per year.
8h
TED Talks Daily (SD video)

What if we paid doctors to keep people healthy? | Matthias MüllenbeckWhat if we incentivized doctors to keep us healthy instead of paying them only when we're already sick? Matthias Müllenbeck explains how this radical shift from a sick care system to a true health care system could save us from unnecessary costs and risky procedures -- and keep us healthier for longer.
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Ingeniøren

Efter rådgiverne blev fyret: Italienere skal bygge supersygehus i KøgeItalienske Itinera og CMB har vundet opgaven for totalentreprisen på det kommende supersygehus i Køge. Det sker efter den oprindelige rådgivergruppe blev fyret.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Elon Musk's vision to colonize Mars updated in New SpaceElon Musk TeslaIn "Making Life Multi-Planetary" Elon Musk, CEO and Lead Designer at SpaceX, presents the updated design for the Big Falcon Rocket (BFR), the powerful rocket intended to propel a newly modified space vehicle to the International Space Station and beyond to fulfill his vision for establishing a human presence on Mars. The article, a summary of Mr. Musk's presentation at the 68th International Astro
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Particle detectors meet canvasArtworks are part of our cultural and historical heritage. Yet, according to the Fine Arts Expert Institute, nearly half of the artworks circulating on the market are fakes. So how can you tell if a Rembrandt painting is really a Rembrandt and if a Monet is really a Monet? Moreover, how do you make sure a painting of great value is kept in perfect condition for many generations to come? Museums, a
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Patients to skip the lab, get immediate results with new blood test technologyThe often costly, time consuming process of obtaining bloodwork and urinalysis could soon get a major overhaul. Researchers at the University of South Florida in Tampa have created a mobile version of the "Enzyme Linked Immunosorbent Assay" (ELISA), the gold standard technique used to detect the presence of an antibody or antigen. Instead of sending patients to a laboratory, new cellphone-based te
8h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News

A new way to find better battery materialsResearchers at MIT and elsewhere have developed a new way to find materials that could be used as electrodes in lighter, safer rechargeable batteries.
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Study tracks impact of neonatal abstinence syndrome on state Medicaid programsIn the United States, one infant is born every 15 minutes with withdrawal symptoms after being exposed to opioids before birth, according to a new study published in the journal Pediatrics.
8h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News

The structure is decisiveBlue-green algae are one of the oldest organisms in the world and have an important role to play in many ecosystems on Earth. However, it has always been difficult to identify fossils as blue-green algae without any trace of doubt. The reason is their unremarkable sheath made of calcium carbonate. A master's student at Friedrich-Alexander-Universität Erlangen-Nürnberg has now developed a method wh
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Analysis of the 9p21.3 sequence associated with coronary artery diseaseBefore a conclusive link between the SDs and the cardiovascular diseases can be made, further analysis is required on the CAD interval in more patients with coronary artery disease and in the human population, using the TAR cloning technique in combination with qPCR or Droplet digital PCR developed in this work.
8h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Elon Musk's vision to colonize Mars updated in New SpaceIn 'Making Life Multi-Planetary' Elon Musk, CEO and Lead Designer at SpaceX, presents the updated design for the Big Falcon Rocket, the powerful rocket intended to propel a newly modified space vehicle to the International Space Station and beyond to fulfill his vision for establishing a human presence on Mars.
8h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Sewage sludge leads to biofuels breakthroughResearchers at the US Department of Energy Joint BioEnergy Institute (JBEI) and Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory (Berkeley Lab) have discovered a new enzyme that will enable microbial production of a renewable alternative to petroleum-based toluene, a widely used octane booster in gasoline that has a global market of 29 million tons per year.
8h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Ultrathin endoscope captures neurons firing deep in the brainResearchers have developed an endoscope as thin as a human hair that can image the activity of neurons in the brains of living mice, giving researchers access to areas that cannot be seen with microscopes or other types of endoscopes.
8h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Patients to skip the lab, get immediate results with new blood test technologyEngineers have developed a mobile version of the Enzyme Linked Immunosorbent Assay (ELISA), proving a cheap and easy way to obtain bloodwork and urinalysis without visiting a laboratory.
8h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Study uncovers the intricacies of the pursuit of higher self-controlSelf-control is a central human capacity associated with a wide range of personal and societal advantages. In view of its benefits, increasing self-control among children and adults has been advocated as a remedy to many of society's ailments, from childhood obesity to adulthood criminal behavior. Although widely considered highly beneficial, a recent review uncovers some disadvantages to high sel
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Ultrathin endoscope captures neurons firing deep in the brainResearchers have developed an endoscope as thin as a human hair that can image the activity of neurons in the brains of living mice. Because it is so thin, the endoscope can reach deep into the brain, giving researchers access to areas that cannot be seen with microscopes or other types of endoscopes.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Spain breaks up cybercrime gang after $1.2 billion spreePolice in Spain have captured a cybercrime gang made up of Ukrainians and Russians that allegedly stole more than 1 billion euros ($1.24 billion) from financial institutions worldwide in a five-year spree, authorities said Monday.
8h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

UAE awards major refining contracts to Korea's SamsungAbu Dhabi National Oil Company said Monday it has awarded two contracts worth $3.5 billion to South Korea's Samsung Engineering to boost output at the largest refinery in the United Arab Emirates.
8h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Land decay to displace tens of millions, global survey warnsLand degradation will unleash a mass migration of at least 50 million people by 2050—as many as 700 million unless humans stop depleting the life-giving resource, dozens of scientists warned Monday.
8h
Big Think

The serious health consequences of not dreamingForty percent of Americans get less than seven hours of sleep per night. But there's another key ingredient we're missing: dreams. Read More
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Artificial bio-inspired membranes for water filtrationAccess to clean drinking water is considered to be one of the main challenges of the 21st Century, and scientists have just opened a path to new filtration processes. Inspired by cellular proteins, they have developed membranes with asymmetric artificial channels in the interior, from which they were able to observe "chiral" water1. Chirality is a property that favors the flow of materials that ar
8h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Improving human-data interaction to speed nanomaterials innovationData is only as good as humans' ability to analyze and make use of it.
8h
BBC News - Science & Environment

Stephen Hawking's final interview: A beautiful UniverseThe Cambridge physicist's last broadcast interview covered gravitational waves from neutron star mergers.
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Dana Foundation

Santiago Ramón y Cajal: The Artist as ScientistSantiago Ramón y Cajal is “the most famous scientist about whom very little is known,” said Eric Himmel, the speaker at Thursday night’s talk about the man whose prolific drawings helped revolutionize the field of neuroscience. But by the end of the evening’s event, the audience walked away with a much better understanding of how an aspiring artist, steered into medicine by his doctor father, fou
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Ingeniøren

Appleboss efter Facebook-skandale: Det er tid til udførlig regulering af tech-branchenDet haster, hvis vi vil ændre på den praksis, Cambridge Analytica repræsenterer, lyder det fra Tim Cook.
8h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Values and gender shape young adults' entrepreneurial and leadershipYoung adults who are driven by extrinsic rewards and money and less by a sense of security are more likely to want to become entrepreneurs and leaders, according to a recent study.
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Half of vision impairment in first world is preventableAround half of vision impairment in Western Europe is preventable, according to a new study published in the British Journal of Ophthalmology.
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Obesity is shifting cancer to young adultsA Case Western Reserve University School of Medicine researcher has compiled evidence from more than 100 publications to show how obesity increases risk of 13 different cancers in young adults. The meta-analysis describes how obesity has shifted certain cancers to younger age groups, and intensified cellular mechanisms promoting the diseases.
8h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Lightweight metal foam blocks blastwave, debris from high-explosive roundsNew research shows that stainless steel composite metal foam (CMF) can block blast pressure and fragmentation at 5,000 feet per second from high explosive incendiary (HEI) rounds that detonate only 18 inches away.
8h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Physicists measured the properties of ultrashort X-ray pulsesProfessor of Skobeltsyn Institute of Nuclear Physics, MSU and his foreign colleagues determined the physical parameters of ultrashort X-ray laser pulses with high temporary resolution. The results of the study were published in Nature Photonics journal.
8h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Prenatal stress changes brain connectivity in-uteroThe time babies spend in the womb is far from idle. The brain is changing more rapidly during this time than at any other time in development. It is an active time for the fetus to grow and explore, and of course connect to its mother. As being presented at the CNS conference, new evidence from in-utero fetal brain scans shows, for the first time, that this connection directly affects brain develo
8h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Caribou drone study finds 'enormous variation' within herdThe first paper to use drones to record the movement of individual animals within a herd finds enormous variation in the social behavior of caribou.
8h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Themed issue lays foundation for emerging field of collective movement ecologyCollective movement is one of the great natural wonders on Earth and has long captured our imaginations. But there's a lot we don't understand about how collective movement drives -- and is driven by -- broader ecological and evolutionary processes. A special themed issue gathers contributions from a range of researchers working in the emerging field of collective movement ecology, which is poised
8h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Program to recruit under-represented minority high schoolers into medicine shows promise'We have a problem finding doctors who will work in medically underserved areas,' says Joel Atance, Ph.D., lead author of this study and director of the SEE program. 'The best way to fix this is by recruiting doctors from those communities because we know they are most likely to return home when they're ready to practice.'
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Spin-off from astronomy—measuring water pollution with your mobileLeiden astronomers and ecologists are developing an instrument that lets people measure the quality of surface water with a smartphone.This international citizen science project, MONOCLE, is a collaboration between scientists and local people in Tanzania, Brazil and four European countries.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Students create 3-D printed robot prosthetic limb for amputeesStudents at The University of Manchester have designed and built a 3-D printed, low-cost robotic prosthetic hand that could provide a much cheaper alternative for amputees.
8h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Worried about your Facebook data?Facebook Data AndroidLast weekend, the New York Times revealed that data analytics firm Cambridge Analytica misused data from as many as 50 million Facebook profiles to aid messaging tied to the Trump campaign in the 2016 presidential election.
8h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Research sheds new light on improving rice yieldsLight is essential for plant growth but getting the right amount for crops out in the field at the mercy of the climate is very difficult, now plant scientists have found a way to tackle this with the help of a protein that allows rice crops to regulate the amount of light they can safely use.
8h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Chance is a factor in the survival of speciesIn a major study, biologists at Lund University in Sweden have studied the role of chance in whether a species survives or dies out locally. One possible consequence according to the researchers, is that although conservation initiatives can save endangered species, sometimes chance can override such efforts.
8h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

A model for optimising the use of local trainsThe University of Seville has participated in a project dedicated to optimising both planning and transport systems. David Canca (University of Seville) and Eva Barrena (University Pablo de Olavide) led the study in which they considered the importance of where to locate the yards where local trains are kept overnight.
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Popular Science

Nike's Flyknit 360 sneakers fit like 3D-printed socksTechnology Weaving specific yarns into complex 3D patterns give Nike's Flyknit 360 shoes a secure fit. Nike's new Flyknit sneakers fit like futuristic sports socks.
8h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

We know how food production needs to change if crisis is to be avoided – so why isn't this happening?As the world races toward a projected 9 billion inhabitants, the failings of dominant food systems are impossible to deny. Current food production methods are severely polluting. They are the cause of malnutrition. They are also inequitable, and unjustifiably wasteful. And they are concentrated in the hands of few corporations. Entangled in the multiple crises humanity is facing, establishing glob
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

New study challenges myth that low-income parents and children suffer from a 'poverty of aspiration'Children from low-income families risk being failed by schools – because of the belief their parents lack ambition for them, a University of Stirling academic has claimed.
8h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

New book on fungal diseases of urban treesTrees can get sick too. In urban areas, this usually means that the infested tree has to be felled for safety reasons. Empa researcher Francis Schwarze is familiar with wood and fungal pathogens and has developed methods to assess trees without damaging procedures and, if necessary, to heal them with selected antagonists. He has now published his knowledge on this topic in a new book.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Study results suggest wild birds suffer personality disorders due to ingestion of heavy metalsA team of researchers from the University of Antwerp has found evidence of heavy metal ingestion by wild birds causing changes in their personalities. In their paper published in Science of The Total Environment, the group describes the multiple ways they studied bird behavior near a site known for emitting cadmium and lead, and what they found.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Mushroom geographyIowa has corn, Idaho has potatoes and, unbeknownst to many, Pennsylvania has mushrooms. Chester County, Pennsylvania, produces roughly 50 percent of all mushrooms grown in the United States. The top 50 growers in Chester County produced roughly 405 million pounds during the 2015-16 growing season, valued at approximately $391 million, according to a 2017 report from the USDA National Agricultural
8h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Study links college football game days to increase in sexual assault reportsCollege football game days have long been associated with alcohol-fueled partying on campuses, but a new study shows they're also linked to an increase in reports of sexual assault.
8h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Earth's magnetosphereEnveloping our planet and protecting us from the fury of the Sun is a giant bubble of magnetism called the magnetosphere. It deflects most of the solar material sweeping towards us from our star at 1 million miles per hour or more. Without the magnetosphere, the relentless action of these solar particles could strip the Earth of its protective layers, which shield us from the Sun's ultraviolet rad
8h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Smartphone sensor can detect dirty waterDenmark, like many other European countries, is lucky. When we pour ourselves a refreshing glass of tap water, we generally don't need to worry about bacteria.
8h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Neural fingerprints of altruismFor at least 150 years, we know that traumatic brain injury can change several domains of behavior, impairing social behavior or memory, for instance, depending on which brain areas have been damaged. However, mapping the relation between brain areas and behavior can be tough, especially for complex behavior such as altruism. In this study, war veterans with brain lesion were studied to elucidate
8h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Chance is a factor in the survival of speciesIn a major study, biologists at Lund University in Sweden have studied the role of chance in whether a species survives or dies out locally. One possible consequence according to the researchers, is that although conservation initiatives can save endangered species, sometimes chance can override such efforts.
8h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Edges and corners increase efficiency of catalytic convertersCatalytic converters for cleaning exhaust emissions are more efficient when they use nanoparticles with many edges. This is the result of a study carried out at DESY's X-ray source PETRA III. A team of scientists from the DESY NanoLab watched live as carbon monoxide was converted into carbon dioxide on the surface of metal nanoparticles like those used in catalytic converters of cars. The scientis
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Caribou drone study finds 'enormous variation' within herdHerd animals may not be as conformist as we thought, according to new research published in Philosophical Transactions of the Royal Society B. The first paper to use drones to record the movement of individual animals within groups, it is also among the first to study social interactions within those groups as they migrate.
8h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Themed issue lays foundation for emerging field of collective movement ecologyOn land, in air, and through water, many species of animals move together in groups. Thundering herds of wildebeest migrate across the Serengeti; murmurations of starlings move as if one to avoid hawks; and pods of dolphins work together to hunt schools of sardines. Collective movement is one of the great natural wonders on Earth and has long captured our imaginations. But there's a lot we don't u
8h
Futurity.org

These frog dads guard their eggs from ‘cannibals’Adult male white-spotted bush frogs are the sole caregivers of their offspring, devotedly guarding their fertilized eggs from cannibalistic male frogs and other predators, a new study shows. The frog, Raochestes chalazodes , was presumed extinct until its rediscovery in 2011 in the Western Ghats of India, and is currently listed as critically endangered. Frogs typically lay their eggs in or above
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BBC News - Science & Environment

European Space Agency teams with ICEYE Finnish start-upThe European Space Agency will work with Finland's ICEYE on ways to exploit its novel radar satellites.
9h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Drug reduces inflammation in stroke patientsAn anti-inflammatory drug given to patients in the early stages of a stroke has been shown by researchers at The University of Manchester and Salford Royal NHS Foundation Trust to reduce harmful inflammation.The drug, Kineret©, licenced for treating rheumatoid arthritis, was given as a small injection just under the skin without giving the patients any identifiable adverse reactions.
9h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Artificial bio-inspired membranes for water filtrationAccess to clean drinking water is considered to be one of the main challenges of the 21st century, and scientists have just opened a path to new filtration processes. Inspired by cellular proteins, they have developed membranes with asymmetric artificial channels in the interior, from which they were able to observe 'chiral' water. Chirality is a property that favors the flow of materials that are
9h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News

New method speeds up development of medicationUZH researchers have developed a novel method that speeds up the process of determining crystal structures of organic salts and significantly reduces the effort required to do so. As about 40 percent of all active pharmaceutical ingredients are salts, this new crystallographic method is set to greatly accelerate drug development.
9h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Remake, refill, reuse: Recycling at the synapse revealedOIST researchers have shown that the speed of neurotransmitter recycling at the synapse is determined by the refilling speed of vesicles.
9h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Understanding gravity: The nanoscale search for extra dimensionsA Japan-US research collaboration involving Osaka University has used a pulsed slow neutron beamline to probe the deviation of the inverse square law of gravity below the wavelength of 0.1 nm. The experiment achieved the highest sensitivity for a neutron experiment demonstrated to date, and is a significant step toward determining whether the space we live in is really limited to the three dimensi
9h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News

A simple method developed for 3-D bio-fabrication based on bacterial celluloseBacterial cellulose can be used in food, cosmetics and biomedical applications, such as implants and artificial organs.
9h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Worsening worldwide land degradation now 'critical,' undermining well-being of 3.2 billion peopleThe dangers of worsening land degradation, causing the loss of biodiversity and ecosystem services, are detailed for policymakers, together with a catalogue of corrective options, in the three-year assessment report by more than 100 leading experts from 45 countries, launched today. Land degradation caused by human activities is undermining the well-being of two fifths of humanity, driving species
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The Atlantic

Stormy Daniels's Oh-So-Familiar StoryDonald Trump M. Cohen“Got an idea, honeybunch,” Donald Trump allegedly told the porn actress Stormy Daniels in a hotel room in Lake Tahoe in 2006. “Would you ever consider going on [ The Celebrity Apprentice ]—and being a contestant?” After that proposal, as Daniels told Anderson Cooper on 60 Minutes on Sunday night, she went to the bathroom, and when she came out, Trump had relocated himself to the end of the bed. I
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Metalens achieves near-unity numerical apertureResearchers have designed an optical lens with the highest free-space numerical aperture to date, achieving a value of just under 1. As the numerical aperture indicates the highest possible resolution that a lens can attain, the new lens can focus light with unprecedented ability, as well as collect light from wide angles. These abilities should make the lens particularly useful for low-light appl
9h
Live Science

Why Is Orange Snow Falling Across Eastern Europe?Winter sports enthusiasts posted truly weird images of an orange landscape after tinted snow fell across Eastern Europe Friday.
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Feed: All Latest

The Blockchain Solution to Our Deepfake ProblemsWIRED columnist Antonio Garcia Martinez on how the blockchain can help us tell the difference between real videos and fake ones.
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Futurity.org

Can you sue a self-driving car?Last week, the first fatality involving a self-driving Uber car occurred in Tempe, Arizona. As new autonomous technologies develop, offering us self-driving cars, trains, buses, and drone deliveries, what are the legal issues? And what regulation do we need? Robert Rabin, a law professor at Stanford University, answers some questions. The post Can you sue a self-driving car? appeared first on Fut
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Ingeniøren

Spildvarme fra industrien kan dække forbruget i 128.000 huseDanske kraftværker og virksomheder producerer årligt nok uudnyttet overskudsvarme til at dække fjernvarmeforbruget i 128.000 parcelhuse, viser ny analyse fra Dansk Industri.
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Is glass transition driven by thermodynamics?Researchers at the University of Tokyo's Institute of Industrial Science simulated glass formation in supercooled liquids. To probe whether atomic slowing depends on local ordered structures, they measured a parameter based on atom packing. This indicated a statistical structure-dynamics correlation, confirming vitrification is thermodynamically driven. The length-scales of this correlation are li
9h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Finnish drivers use WhatsApp, PokémonGo and Tinder while drivingResearchers at the University of Jyväskylä tracked how Finnish drivers use their smartphones while driving. Drivers seem to use the same applications in traffic as elsewhere, without much moderation. Unexpectedly, heavy smartphone users even increased their phone use in dense traffic. It seems that some of the heavy users accept the risks resulting from the high levels of visual-manual distraction
9h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Opioid analgesics reduce use of antipsychotics in persons with Alzheimer's diseaseInitiating an opioid analgesic reduced the use of antipsychotics and benzodiazepines in persons with Alzheimer's disease, a recent study from the University of Eastern Finland shows. These drugs are frequently prescribed to treat behavioral and psychiatric symptoms of dementia, which can be worsened by other symptoms, such as pain. The results were published in International Psychogeriatrics.
9h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Superconductivity in an alloy with quasicrystal structureA Japanese research team led by Nagoya University discovered the first superconductive quasicrystal. The crystalline alloy Al-Zn-Mg became quasicrystalline when the Al content was reduced to 15 percent, while remaining a superconductor, with a very low critical temperature of ~0.05 K. The alloy behaved like a conventional weakly coupled superconductor, but the role of electronic states that are un
9h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Scientists launch global effort to model pancreatic beta cell, solve diabetesWith 'crowd-sourced' science and perspectives from researchers worldwide, University of Southern California scientists aim to create a 3-D model of the pancreatic beta cell. Ultimately, scientists believe that a complete replica of the cell and its systems will help them identify possible new treatments to curb diabetes.
9h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Smaller and faster: The terahertz computer chip is now within reachUsing a Metal-Oxide-Nitride-Oxide-Silicon (MONOS) structure, Levy and his team have come up with a new integrated circuit that uses flash memory technology--the kind used in flash drives and discs-on-key--in microchips. If successful, this technology will enable standard 8-16 gigahertz computers to run 100 times faster and will bring all optic devices closer to the holy grail of communications: th
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Science | The Guardian

Study: wind and solar can power most of the United States | John AbrahamWind, solar, and storage could meet 90–100% of America’s electricity needs In order to combat climate change, we need to rapidly move from fossil fuel energy to clean, renewable energy. The two energy sources I am most interested in are wind and solar power; however, there are other sources that have great potential. Some people doubt how much wind and solar can supply to a country’s electricity
9h
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Cantina Talk: Rian Johnson Knows How You Feel About 'The Last Jedi'The writer-director has seen all the frustrated fan reactions to his film—and he's cool with it.
9h
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Best Unlimited Data Plans: T-Mobile, AT&T, Sprint, VerizonWhich wireless carrier has the best unlimited data service (and price)?
9h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Plastics in oceans are mounting, but evidence on harm is surprisingly weakPlastics in the world's oceans are set to treble in the next ten years, according to a new UK government report. They are also contributing to a rubbish heap in the Pacific Ocean that is as big as France. These are the latest instalments of one of the most prominent environmental concerns of recent years.
9h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Lightweight metal foam blocks blastwave, debris from high-explosive roundsNew research from North Carolina State University and the U.S. Army's Aviation Applied Technology Directorate shows that stainless steel composite metal foam (CMF) can block blast pressure and fragmentation at 5,000 feet per second from high explosive incendiary (HEI) rounds that detonate only 18 inches away.
9h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Researchers developing materials for quantum computingCreation of innovative materials is one of the most important areas of modern science. Active development of Industry 4.0 requires new properties from composite elements of electronics. Researches of scientists from South Ural State University are implemented within this area. SUSU's Crystal Growth Laboratory performs modification of properties and structure of ferrites, which are oxides of iron w
9h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Astronomers discover a giant planet orbiting a brown dwarfUsing microlensing technique, astronomers have found a new giant planet orbiting a brown dwarf located in the bulge of the Milky Way galaxy. The newly discovered exoplanet, designated OGLE-2017-BLG-1522Lb, is most likely 25 percent less massive than Jupiter. The finding is reported March 14 in a paper published on arXiv.org.
9h
Scientific American Content: Global

The Joys of Scientific OutreachIt’s important, it’s fun, and more and more young researchers are diving in -- Read more on ScientificAmerican.com
9h
Futurity.org

Mystery solved: 6-inch skeleton isn’t an alien after allNew research stamps out any remaining questions about a tiny, mysterious skeleton’s home planet—it’s without a doubt human. And, more than that, the analysis answers questions about remains that have long been a genetic enigma. After five years of deep genomic analysis, Garry Nolan, professor of microbiology and immunology at Stanford University, and Atul Butte, director of the Institute for Comp
9h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News

New climate model developed by Russian and German scientistsTo find solutions for some tasks in climate research, we need calculations for hundreds, thousands, or even millions of years. Such tasks are, for example, ice age periodization. Another group of tasks that requires huge longitudinal calculations is climate forecasting, a type of research where we don't have definitive information about coefficients of used models.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

How smartphones are heating up the planetWhen we think about climate change, the main sources of carbon emissions that come to mind for most of us are heavy industries like petroleum, mining and transportation.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Extending traceable measurements inside the human bodyThe National Institute of Standards and Technology (NIST) is now providing a new measurement service that can improve the quality of magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) and provide a path for using MRI to make precise and traceable measurements inside the human body. It culminates many years of research by NIST scientists working at the frontier of quantitative medical imaging for precision medicine.
9h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Synchronized fluctuation-type art illuminationAn industry-university collaboration joint research team led by Osaka University developed synchronized fluctuation-type art illumination, in which the natural rhythm (tremor) of candle light can be produced even in artificial light by using technology to synchronize fluctuations in light with rhythms in nature.
9h
Futurity.org

Anglerfish and her ‘sexual parasite’ seen alive for first timeA fearsome-looking fish and her parasitically attached mate drift almost helplessly, salvaging precious energy in their dark, food-scarce environment deep off the south slope of São Jorge Island in the Azores, west of Portugal in the North Atlantic Ocean. Humans have never seen the pair alive—until now. Researchers, led by Kirsten and Joachim Jakobsen, aboard the LULA1000 , a submersible operated
10h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Mt. Etna found to be sliding downhill towards the seaA small team of researchers from the U.K and France has found evidence indicating that Sicily's Mt. Etna is sliding very slowly downhill toward the sea. In their paper published in Bulletin of Volcanology, the group describes their 11-year study of the volcano and the evidence they found for its movement.
10h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

New method speeds up development of medicationUniversity of Zurich researchers have developed a novel method that speeds up the process of determining the crystal structures of organic salts and significantly reduces the effort required to do so. As about 40 percent of all active pharmaceutical ingredients are salts, this new crystallographic method is set to greatly accelerate drug development.
10h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Understanding gravity: The nanoscale search for extra dimensionsOften, practical limits control the experimental measurements that can be made, governing the difference between what we expect to be true based on the most likely predictions of models and calculations, and findings that have been supported by testing. A team of researchers has now used the world's highest intensity neutron beamline facility, at J-PARC in central Japan, to push the limits of sens
10h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

A simple method developed for 3-D bio-fabrication based on bacterial celluloseBacterial cellulose (BC) nanofibers are promising building blocks for the development of sustainable materials with the potential to outperform conventional synthetic materials. BC, one of the purest forms of nanocellulose, is produced at the interface between the culture medium and air, where the aerobic bacteria have access to oxygen. Biocompatibility, biodegradability, high thermal stability an
10h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

The mechanics of a parkour landingHave you ever watched a person leaping from buildings or vaulting over railings and wondered, "How did they do that?"
10h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Early life had evolutionary power to survive radical changes in environmentLife on Earth could have originated in cold conditions near the surface, before spreading to warmer environments, according to research that analyzes the possible gene sequences belonging to the earliest life.
10h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Improving human-data interaction to speed nanomaterials innovationA new paper takes a step toward realizing the promise of nanomaterials. Authored by Jeffrey M. Rickman of Lehigh University, the article, published in npj Computational Materials, describes a new way to map material properties relationships that are highly multidimensional in nature. Rickman employs methods of data analytics in combination with a visualization strategy called parallel coordinates
10h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News

New family of promising, selective silver-based anti-cancer drugs discoveredA new family of potential silver-based anti-cancer drugs has been discovered by researchers in South Africa. The most promising complex among these has been successfully tested in rats and in several human cancer cell lines in laboratory studies. The complex is as effective against human esophageal cancer cells, as a widely-used chemotherapy drug, but at a ten times lower dose, and much lower toxi
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Ingeniøren

Global opvarmning øger risikoen for skibbrud i NordatlantenHavis fra Arktis truede sidste forsommer sejlruterne 3000 km borte, hvor handelsskibe, fiskefartøjer og færger måtte have hjælp af isbryder, mens andre skibe sank.
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Popular Science

Five animals you shouldn’t take relationship advice from (and one you should)Animals No matter how cute sea otters are when they hold hands. Anglerfish are not the only example of terrible relationship dynamics in the animal kingdom. What about sea otters? If only we could take a page out of their book and…
10h
The Scientist RSS

Image of the Day: Hungry HookwormsResearchers discover anti-malarials called quinolones can halt the development of the parasites, offering a potential therapeutic avenue.
10h
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'One Strange Rock’: How NatGeo’s Docuseries Made Earth A Bit More OtherworldlyDarren Aronofsky and a team of nature-doc specialists turn Earth into a miracle experienced from afar.
10h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

New physics lessons help girls catch upMany school pupils fail at physics because they misunderstand the fundamental concepts. A new teaching method can change this – ETH researchers have now proven its effect. It particularly helps intelligent girls to learn more effectively.
10h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Taiwan's HTC to get Google boost as it posts biggest lossTaiwan's struggling smartphone maker HTC posted its worst-ever quarterly loss on Monday, but said it expects a boost from the $1.1 billion deal with Google sealed earlier this year.
11h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Facebook faces scrutiny for pulling Android call, text dataOn the same day Facebook bought ads in U.S. and British newspapers to apologize for the Cambridge Analytica scandal, the social media site faced new questions about collecting phone numbers and text messages from Android devices.
11h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Using technology to combat bias in hiringTop tech companies have a diversity problem. Reports show that Facebook and YouTube—and many companies like them—struggle to build a workforce that is reflective of the U.S. population. Why? Some say that the lack of diversity comes from a lack of qualified candidates. Stephanie Lampkin MBA '13 argues that's just not true. That's why she launched Blendoor, a blind job app combatting what she says
11h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Researchers charge ahead to develop better batteriesBatteries die at the most inconvenient times. Cellphones go dark during important conversations because a battery hasn't been recharged. Or the automotive industry revs up with excitement for a new battery-powered vehicle, but it needs frequent recharging. Or yardwork is delayed because the battery for your string trimmer is dead.
11h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Study explores impact of firms' restatements on loansWhen a company makes a mistake in its financial statements, it has to reissue them, which can have serious consequences including a loss in market value and investor confidence.
11h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Image: Hubble's exquisite view of a stellar nurseryThe exquisite sharpness of this 2005 image from NASA/ESA's Hubble Space Telescope has plucked out an underlying population of infant stars embedded in the nebula NGC 346 that are still forming from gravitationally collapsing gas clouds.
11h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

A smart car that can read brain signalsEPFL and Nissan researchers are able to read a driver's brain signals and send them to a smart vehicle so that it can anticipate the driver's moves and facilitate the driving process. Nissan recently unveiled this brain-to-vehicle (B2V) technology.
11h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Federal highway program led to inequality and polarization, according to researcherIf you need convincing that the road to hell is paved with good intentions, just talk to Stanford political scientist Clayton Nall about the federal highway system.
11h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Future 'ocean cities' need green engineering above and below the waterlinePopulation growth has seen skylines creep ever higher and entire cities rise from ocean depths. The latest "ocean city" is the Chinese-developed Forest City project. By 2045, four artificial islands in Malaysia will cover 14km² of ocean (an area larger than 10,000 Olympic swimming pools), and support 700,000 residents.
11h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Image: Star-forming filamentsThe plane of the Milky Way is rich in star-forming regions, such as the one pictured in this stunning scene by ESA's Herschel space observatory. To the far-infrared eye of Herschel, this region reveals an intricate network of gas filaments and dark bubbles interspersed by bright hotspots where new stars come to life.
11h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Ionized molecules trace galactic outflowsThere is a process at work in most galaxies that affects both the central black hole mass as well as the galaxy's global velocity structure and luminosity. Astronomers suspect that feedback of some kind is involved, and one popular mechanism is outflowing gas. The outflow would deplete a galaxy of the raw material needed both for making new stars and for enhancing the black hole's mass.
11h
Latest Headlines | Science News

This spinning moon shows where debris from giant impacts fellA new map shows that light-colored lunar plains point back to huge impact basins, raising questions about the age and history of the moon.
11h
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Ski Resorts Fight Climate Change With Snow Blowers and Buses"We are going to have to be appreciative of what we get.”
11h
Feed: All Latest

This Brooklyn Architect Wants to Rewire Puerto Rico with SolarArchitect Jonathan Marvel is building solar arrays to serve community centers, and soon, he hopes, communities.
11h
Scientific American Content: Global

No Cell Phone Reception? That's Good News for JaguarsA new study finds the big cats and other endangered animals do best in places where there’s no coverage -- Read more on ScientificAmerican.com
11h
Live Science

Weirdly Dimmable 'Alien Megastar' Darkens AgainOne of the biggest dips in the brightness of Tabby's star points to a possible source for its dusty light-blocker.
11h
Live Science

If the Falling Chinese Space Station Hits You, Is Anyone Liable?The crashing space lab's orbital path includes the United States and most of the population of the world. On the off chance a piece of Tiangong-1 hits you, here's who is liable.
11h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Scientists develop elastic metal rods to treat scoliosisNUST MISIS scientists jointly with their colleagues from the Ecole de Technologie Superiore (Montreal, Canada) have experienced a new combination of alloy processing that produces solid and durable implants that are fully compatible with the human body. The research article is published in the Journal of Alloys and Compounds.
12h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Researchers simulate how 'coherent structures' affect solar wind heatingResearchers from Centrum Wiskunde & Informatica (CWI), the national research institute for mathematics and computer science in the Netherlands, have studied how solar wind particles are accelerated and heated. In particular, they discovered how coherent structures in the solar wind, where the magnetic fields and electrical currents are enhanced, affect the energy transfer responsible for heating.
12h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Dynamic tunneling junctions at the atomic intersection of two twisted graphene edgesLeiden physicists and chemists have managed to bring two graphene layers so close together that an electric current spontaneously jumps across. In the future, this could enable scientists to study the edges of graphene and use them for sequencing DNA with a precision beyond existing technologies. The study is published in Nano Letters.
12h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

On chaotic SE Asian roads, local hero Grab zips past UberUber may be the world's biggest ride-hailing company but it was left in the dust in Southeast Asia by homegrown upstart Grab, which knew better how to navigate the chaotic highways and byways of an eclectic region.
12h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Terahertz computer chip now within reachFollowing three years of extensive research, Hebrew University of Jerusalem (HU) physicist Dr. Uriel Levy and his team have created technology that will enable computers and all optic communication devices to run 100 times faster through terahertz microchips.
12h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Researchers discover a way to control the colour of OLEDsOrganic light-emitting diodes (OLEDs) are used in smartphones and televisions to facilitate the high-contrast display of colours. Conjugated polymers are also often employed as organic semiconductors in such diodes. Researchers at the University of Bayreuth have found out how the spatial structure of these polymers can be used to control the colours of the OLEDs and help to increase the brightness
12h
Scientific American Content: Global

A Megaflood-Powered Mile-High Waterfall Refilled the Mediterranean [Video]Buried sediments near Sicily suggest water rushed into the sea’s partially dried-out eastern basin at speeds reaching 100 miles per hour -- Read more on ScientificAmerican.com
12h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Air bubbles in ancient glass reveal production techniqueAn artist, a physicist and a classicist at ANU may have together overturned a 2,000-year old theory about Roman glass making.
12h
Live Science

Is West Texas Sinking Into a Hole of Its Own Making?Oil and gas drilling are doing strange things to the West Texas landscape.
12h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Watch it, Facebook: new EU data rules may have broad impactFacebook CEO Mark Zuckerberg is promising to do a better job protecting user data following reports that a political consultant misused the personal information of millions of the company's subscribers. The fact is, European regulators are already forcing him to do so.
12h
Viden

Verdens meteorologer rynker brynene over 2017: Et helt igennem forfærdeligt år- Alle de parametre, vi vurderer ud fra, gik den forkerte vej sidste år, siger Jesper Theilgaard.
12h
Futurity.org

Scientists trace ransomware payments across the globeNew research brings the murky ecosystem of ransomware payments into focus. Ransomware attacks, which encrypt and hold a computer user’s files hostage in exchange for payment, extort millions of dollars from individuals each month and comprise one of the fastest-growing forms of cyber attack. In a paper they’ll present at the IEEE Symposium on Security and Privacy in May, researchers provide the f
12h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Study examines blood lead levels of Flint children before and after water crisisFlint children's blood lead levels were nearly three times higher almost a decade before the year of the Flint water crisis, new research shows.
12h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Let them eat xylose: Yeast engineered to grow efficiently on novel nutrientsResearchers at Tufts University have created a genetically modified yeast that can more efficiently consume a novel nutrient, xylose, enabling the yeast to grow faster and to higher cell densities, raising the prospect of a significantly faster path toward the design of new synthetic organisms for industrial applications, according to a study published today in Nature Communications.
12h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Captured on film for the first time: Microglia nibbling on brain synapsesFor the first time, EMBL researchers have captured microglia nibbling on brain synapses. Their findings show that the special glial cells help synapses grow and rearrange, demonstrating the essential role of microglia in brain development. Nature Communications will publish the results on March 26.
12h
New Scientist - News

Stephen Hawking was a brilliant ambassador for scienceThe death of Stephen Hawking has not just deprived the world of a great scientist, it has deprived science of an effective ambassador to the non-scientific world
12h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Advanced knowledge and new technologies in gas hydrate researchGas hydrates are considered a potential source of energy. Over the past 10 years, the Submarine Gas Hydrate Deposits (SUGAR) project has significantly expanded the basic knowledge of gas hydrates and resulted in the development of new technologies for gas hydrate exploration, production and associated environmental monitoring. Now, the project is concluding with a final conference at the Helmholtz
12h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Let them eat xylose: Yeast engineered to grow efficiently on novel nutrientsResearchers at Tufts University have created a genetically modified yeast that can more efficiently consume a novel nutrient, xylose, enabling the yeast to grow faster and to higher cell densities, raising the prospect of a significantly faster path toward the design of new synthetic organisms for industrial applications, according to a study published today in Nature Communications.
12h
Feed: All Latest

Why Some Schools Pay More Than Others When Buying From AppleAdministrators face tough restrictions from Apple and often don't share data, leaving them in the dark when they go to buy computers and software.
12h
Ingeniøren

Techtopia #45: Selvkørende Uber-bil slår fodgænger ihjelPodcast: Tragisk og længe ventet. Den første fodgænger er kørt ned af en selvkørende bil, men hvordan og hvorfor skete det?
12h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Robot-mounted vacuum grippers flex their artificial musclesA short electric pulse is all it takes to generate and release a powerful vacuum in the blink of an eye. The novel vacuum gripper developed by the research team led by Professor Stefan Seelecke at Saarland University enables robot arms to pick up objects and move them around freely in space. The system works without the need for compressed air to generate the vacuum, it is energy efficient, quiet
12h
Ingeniøren

Forsker: Kvantecomputere vil være en katastrofe for eksisterende krypteringSandsynligvis vil alle krypteringsalgoritmer, der anvendes i dag, give nul sikkerhed, når kvantecomputere er klar, mener forsker.
13h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Growing and surviving: How proteins regulate the cell cycleCell division is the basis of all life. Even the smallest errors in this complex process can lead to grave diseases like cancer. Certain proteins have to be switched on or off at specific times for proper cell division. Biophysicists and medical biochemists at Martin Luther University Halle-Wittenberg (MLU) have described the underlying mechanism of this process. They report how different signalin
13h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Breakthrough antimalarial drug delivery system using mesoporous silica nanoparticlesDrug delivery systems (DDSs) control the dosage and timing of drugs. Numerous DDS studies have been conducted, but most have focused on treatments for cancer. New research from Kumamoto University uses a DDS to treat malaria.
13h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Algorithm successfully simulates color perception for #theDress imageA novel algorithm to simulate the color appearance of objects under chromatic illuminants has been proposed by Ichiro Kuriki of Tohoku University. The figure shows the result of applying this algorithm to #theDress image.
13h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Study characterizes two new Galician olive varieties for the first timeOlive oil is one of the main sources of fat in the Mediterranean diet. Olive oil is remarkable for its nutrients, and Spain is the number one producer. Though most Spanish olive oil production takes place in Andalusia, over the last few years, other regions within Spain have begun to produce high-quality olive oil using their own native olive varieties.
13h
NYT > Science

Out There: Meet TESS, Seeker of Alien WorldsNASA’s new spacecraft, to be launched next month, will give scientists a much clearer view of the planets orbiting stars near to us.
13h
NYT > Science

The New Health Care: What We Know (and Don’t Know) About How to Lose WeightOne conclusion from a much-discussed study: The best diet is the one you can stick to.
13h
Ingeniøren

Iranske hackere anklages for at stjæle forskning fra danske universiteterTre danske universiteter har været udsat for hackerangreb af personer, der formentlig er tilknyttet Irans militær. Og de er lang fra alene.
13h
New Scientist - News

Neanderthals ambushed cave bears as they awoke from hibernationOur extinct cousins the Neanderthals seem to have targeted cave bears, which were normally intimidating foes, while they were sleepy and weak from hibernating through the winter
13h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Treatment rates for dangerously high cholesterol remains lowLess than 40 percent of people with severe elevations in cholesterol are being prescribed appropriate drug treatment, according to a nationally representative study reported in the American Heart Association's journal Circulation.
13h
Ingeniøren

MH370-teori: Eftersøgningsskib leder efter vrag med guldskatteAmerikansk firma betaler tusindvis af dollars i døgnet for at lede efter Malaysia Airlines-flyet, uden sikkerhed for at få noget igen. Eksperter mener dog, at eftersøgningen også går efter noget andet.
13h
Science : NPR

Birth Control Apps Find A Big Market In 'Contraception Deserts'For some U.S. women who buy hormonal contraception via an app, it's all about convenience — birth control pills in the mail, without an office visit. But in Texas there's much more to it. (Image credit: Paige Vickers for NPR)
13h
Ingeniøren

Hængebro skyld i enorm ekstra-regning for at bringe tog over KattegatTogtrafikkens vanskeligheder på hængebroer kombineret med nødvendigheden af en hængebro på grund af international skibsfart kan forklare, at Kattegatforbindelsen ifølge nyt notat bliver 66 milliarder billigere uden jernbane. Men ekstraregningen er højere end ventet.
14h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Warming world will affect fish size and fisheriesCurrent fishery targets may become unachievable as the planet warms.
14h
Science-Based Medicine

The deadly false hope of German alternative cancer clinicsWe at SBM have written about German cancer clinics that offer a combination of cancer quackery, some real medicine, plus unproven experimental therapies, all at a high cost, both financially and in false hope. Finally, an exposé of these clinics has been published. What these clinics are doing is even worse than even we had feared.
14h
Nyheder - Forskning - Videnskab

Ny dekan skal styrke forskning og uddannelse på HumanioraDet Humanistiske Fakultet på Københavns Universitet får ny dekan 1. august 2018. Et...
14h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Important development could reduce numbers of fish required in toxicology researchScientists at the University of Plymouth, working in partnership with AstraZeneca, have developed a new method which could help assess the effects of chemicals on digestive systems.
15h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Important development could reduce numbers of fish required in toxicology researchScientists have developed a new technique to examine the effects of chemicals on digestive systems of fish and support research into gut related conditions.
15h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Gunmaker Remington files for bankruptcyUS gunmaker Remington filed for bankruptcy on Sunday, as the more than 200-year-old firearms manufacturer vies to restructure its massive debts.
15h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Uber exits SE Asia in new retreat from global marketsUber sold its Southeast Asian business to rival Grab on Monday, ending a bruising battle between the ride-hailing behemoths and marking the US firm's latest retreat from international markets.
15h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Waymo chief says his tech would have averted fatal Uber crashThe CEO of Waymo, the Google subsidiary tasked with developing driverless cars, has said the recent death of a pedestrian in an accident involving an autonomous car would not have occurred with his company's technology.
15h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Space pioneer Yury Gagarin killed in plane crash 50 years agoThe first man in space, Russian Yury Gagarin, was killed in a mysterious plane crash a half-century ago, just seven years after his historic feat, a Soviet-era propaganda coup.
15h
Ingeniøren

Åbne standarder dirker automations­industrien opÅbne kommunikationsprotokoller vinder frem i fremstillingsindustrien, når data fra maskiner sendes op i skyen. Det gør det lettere og hurtigere at samarbejde om udviklingsprojekter og skabe et økosystem til Industri 4.0.
15h
Science | The Guardian

The dark truth about chocolateGrand health claims have been made about chocolate, but while it gives us pleasure, can it really be good for us? Chocolate has been touted as a treatment for agitation, anaemia, angina and asthma. It has been said to awaken appetite and act as an aphrodisiac. You may have noticed we’re still on the letter A. More accurately, and to avoid adding to considerable existing confusion, it is the seeds
16h
Science | The Guardian

Brainstorm: Detective Stories from the World of Neurology; Unthinkable: The World’s Strangest Brains – reviewBooks by Suzanne O’Sullivan and Helen Thomson offer fascinating insights into the ‘maverick brain’ and rare mental conditions When I was a boy I had a recurring dream that Lilliputian figures were scurrying under my bed. I can’t recall if they bound my hands and feet like Gulliver, but I certainly found their activities fascinating and made no effort to resist, even when, on occasion, they succeed
16h
Science | The Guardian

Can you solve it? The art of the dealPuzzles to play your cards right UPDATE: To see the solutions click here. Hello guzzlers, Today’s three problems require you to spot three different patterns in a set of playing cards. Continue reading...
16h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Breakthrough in battle against rice blastScientists have found a way to stop the spread of rice blast, a fungus that destroys up to 30% of the world's rice crop each year.
16h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

New research shows fertilization drives global lake emissions of greenhouse gasesA paper published this week in the journal Limnology and Oceanography Letters is the first to show that lake size and nutrients drive how much greenhouse gases are emitted globally from lakes into the atmosphere.
16h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Scientists to publish first-ever land health reportScientists will publish the first-ever analysis Monday of the global state of land and its ability to sustain a fast-growing human population that relies on it for 95 percent of all food.
16h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Toshiba awaits regulator approval for key chip unit saleEmbattled Japanese conglomerate Toshiba said Monday it was still waiting for regulators to approve the key sale of its chip unit, a delay that could stymie plans to complete the deal this month.
16h
Ingeniøren

Søfartsstyrelsen vil registrere skibe i blockchain-løsningSom det første land i verden vil Danmark registrere skibe i et blockchain-register. Løsningen kan erstatte en besværlig analog proces, mener Søfartsstyrelsen.
16h
Big Think

Random fact roundup, March 19th—26th, 2018!What do hot dogs, the Vatican, and the Large Hadron Collider have in common? They're all in our random fact roundup where we bring you some favorite facts about three subjects. Read More
17h
Science | The Guardian

The human microbiome: why our microbes could be key to our healthA plethora of conditions, from obesity to anxiety, appear to be linked to the microbes inside us. Nicola Davis explains why the microbiome is such a hot topic of research What are microbiomes? Both inside and out, our bodies harbour a huge array of micro-organisms. While bacteria are the biggest players, we also host single-celled organisms known as archaea, as well as fungi, viruses and other mi
17h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News

New research shows fertilization drives global lake emissions of greenhouse gasesA paper published this week in the journal Limnology and Oceanography Letters is the first to show that lake size and nutrients drive how much greenhouse gases are emitted globally from lakes into the atmosphere.
18h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Breakthrough in battle against rice blastScientists have found a way to stop the spread of rice blast, a fungus that destroys up to 30 percent of the world's rice crop each year.
18h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Study: More people rely on government catastrophic drug plansGovernment spending for the catastrophic drug program in Ontario rose 700 per cent between 2000 and 2016, during which there was a three-fold increase in the use of this plan, a new study has found.
18h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Top sports leagues heavily promote unhealthy food and beverages, new study findsThe majority of food and beverages marketed through multi-million-dollar television and online sports sponsorships are unhealthy -- and may be contributing to the escalating obesity epidemic among children and adolescents in the US.
18h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Machine learning model provides rapid prediction of C. difficile infection riskInvestigators from Massachusetts General Hospital, the University of Michigan and Massachusetts Institute of Technology have developed investigational 'machine learning' models, specifically tailored to individual institutions, that can predict a patient's risk of developing C. difficile much earlier than it would be diagnosed with current methods.
18h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Oxycodone use shifts in Australia after tamper-resistant versions introducedAfter the introduction of tamper-resistant oxycodone in Australia, dispensing rates for higher-strength formulations decreased for people younger than 65 years, but there was no change in older adults, according to new research in CMAJ (Canadian Medical Association Journal).
18h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Drug-related mortality rates are not randomly distributed across the USBetween 2006 and 2015 there were more than 515,000 deaths from drug overdoses and other drug-related causes in the US. The economic, social, and emotional tolls of these deaths are substantial, but some parts of the US are bearing heavier burdens than others. Evidence from the first national study of county-level differences suggests that addressing economic and social conditions will be key to re
18h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Smoking in patients with heart attack reduced with vareniclineIn patients who have had a heart attack, the drug varenicline significantly reduced smoking during the following year, found a randomized controlled trial published in CMAJ (Canadian Medical Association Journal).
18h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Cancer patients' pain eased by simple bedside chart, study showsPatients with cancer could benefit from a simple bedside system to manage their pain, a study suggests.
18h
ArXiv Query

A spectrum of routing strategies for brain networksCommunication of signals among nodes in a complex network poses fundamental problems of efficiency and cost. Routing of messages along shortest paths requires global information about the topology, while spreading by diffusion, which operates according to local topological features, is informationally "cheap" but inefficient. We introduce a stochastic model for network communication that combines
19h
The Atlantic

Gun Safety: The Importance of Technology, the Legacy of SlaveryFor an index of the two-dozen previous items in the post-Parkland gun-safety series, please see the bottom of this post. In this installment, I offer reader messages on two main themes. One is whether it matters to talk about the specific “killing power” of the AR-15 and the ammunition it uses. The other is about the specific historical background of the “well regulated militia” phrase in the Sec
20h
The Atlantic

What the Stormy Daniels Interview Demands of CongressDonald Trump M. CohenOn Sunday, Stormy Daniels, a longtime adult-film actress, appeared on 60 Minutes to share her account of her bygone relationship with President Donald Trump. The most salacious behavior that she described is of relatively little consequence, even if totally true—it would be completely in character for the man Americans have gotten to know during years of trashy tabloid coverage to (per her accoun
20h
Science : NPR

A NASA Astronaut Stays In Orbit With SpaceX And BoeingSunita Williams was the second female commander of the International Space Station. Now, she says her new job working with private companies to develop space technologies feels like a new frontier. (Image credit: NASA)
20h
Big Think

The beauty of Stephen Hawking's sense of humorHe was one of the most intelligent men on the planet. But he had a knack for making people laugh, and it helped him spread his message of science and discovery. Read More
21h
cognitive science

Older adults who have slower walking speeds may have increased risk for dementiasubmitted by /u/SophiaDevetzi [link] [comments]
21h
Science : NPR

The Great Pacific Garbage 'Patch' Much Bigger Than Previously ThoughtThe most thorough examination of the infamous "Pacific Garbage Patch"-- a floating swath of debris caught in a gyre — shows it's bigger, way bigger, than thought. And it's mostly plastic.
22h
Science : NPR

Cape Town's Water Crisis Marks Divide Between Rich And PoorWealthy residents of the South African city are coping with the drought by drilling bore holes into the aquifer. But compliance with water restrictions may have put off the day when the taps run dry.
22h
Science : NPR

Idaho Joins Other States With Informed Consent For 'Abortion Reversal' ProceduresDr. Daniel Grossman shares his concerns with NPR's Sarah McCammon about so-called abortion reversal procedures and state laws mandating that doctors inform women about them.
22h
Futurity.org

Maybe helium isn’t too ‘noble’ to react after allHelium is a noble gas, meaning that it has been believed to be “too aloof” to react with the other elements on the periodic table. A new theoretical explanation, however, shows how helium may be capable of forming stable solid compounds—the myriad combinations of chemical elements that create all kinds of materials. The research also suggests that the gas—whose supply on Earth has been decreasing
23h
Futurity.org

Tau-amyloid link points to new Alzheimer’s targetResearchers have discovered a link between two proteins related to Alzheimer’s disease, tau and amyloid beta, finding that people with more amyloid in their brains also produce more tau. It’s a paradox of the disease: Plaques of the sticky protein amyloid beta are the most characteristic sign in the brain of the deadly neurodegenerative disease. However, many older people have such plaques in the
23h
Futurity.org

To make graphite pellets from graphene, crush itIt’s easy and economical to make shiny pellets of graphite from functionalized graphene, according to new research. Researchers can press chemically altered graphene powder into a lightweight, semiporous solid that retains many of the strong and conductive qualities of graphite, the form of carbon found in pencils, lubricants, and other products that normally require high-temperature processing.
1d
Futurity.org

When we’re lying, our ‘hot spots’ kickstart suspicionWhile there is no clear visual signal to show someone is lying, new research suggests there’s often something in people’s behavior that could settle the uncertainty. The findings suggest that lie detection is a process often initiated by non-verbal clues, rather than a moment, determined by non-verbal communication. “The only way to ever know someone is lying for certain is with unimpeachable, co
1d
Futurity.org

How we can prevent another financial crisisCurrent banking regulations need to change to prevent a repeat of the 2007-2009 financial crisis, a new paper reports. Anjan Thakor, professor of finance at Olin Business School at Washington University in St. Louis, argues that two issues must be addressed: US and European banks need to understand that insolvency was the issue that rocked the world, not liquidity. The current standards for bank
1d
Big Think

The U.S. military has a weapon that can create human speech out of thin airThe non-lethal weapons lab of the military unveils a futuristic weapon that can create speech and heat out of thin air dozens of miles away. Read More
1d

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