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Monterey Bay Aquarium study finds sea turtles use flippers to manipulate foodSea turtles use their flippers to handle prey despite the limbs being evolutionarily designed for locomotion, a discovery by Monterey Bay Aquarium researchers published in PeerJ. Research by Jessica Fujii and Dr. Kyle Van Houtan and others reveals a behavior thought to be less likely in marine tetrapods is actually widespread and that this type of exaptation of flippers may have been occurring 70
8h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Dark matter 'missing' in a galaxy far, far awayGalaxies and dark matter go hand in hand; you typically don't find one without the other. So when researchers uncovered a galaxy, known as NGC1052-DF2, that is almost completely devoid of the stuff, they were shocked.
2h
Ingeniøren

Bekymret borger: Er det lovligt at lukke grænsen for vilde dyr?Et vildsvinehegn kan hindre mange forskellige arter i at krydse grænsen fra Tyskland. Det er ikke nødvendigvis tilladt, oplyser EU. Dansk ekspert er ikke bekymret.
5h

LATEST

EurekAlert! - Breaking News

How self-driving cars could shrink parking lotsNew U of T Engineering research shows that adoption of self-driving cars -- also known as autonomous vehicles (AVs) -- could significantly reduce the amount of valuable urban space dedicated to parking.
now
EurekAlert! - Breaking News

A paperlike LCD -- thin, flexible, tough and cheapOptoelectronic engineers have manufactured a special type of LCD that is paper-thin, flexible, light and tough. With this, a newspaper could be uploaded onto a flexible paperlike display that could be updated as fast as the news cycles. It sounds futuristic, but scientists estimate it will be cheap to produce, perhaps only costing $5 for a 5-inch screen. The new optically rewritable LCD design was
now
The Atlantic

Why Is Trump So Quiet?It’s quiet at the White House. Is it … too quiet? Trump-watching over the last few days, since about 1 p.m. on Friday, has been a strange experience. There are things happening, and even some big ones; the parade of occasional anonymously sourced West Wing stories continue. There are certain risks to writing this on a Wednesday afternoon, but this might be, as Josh Barro says , the first slow new
12min
Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

By river, ocean, or wind, rocks round the same wayRiver rocks tend to be rounded, as do grains of dune sand and beach glass. Geophysicist Douglas Jerolmack of the University of Pennsylvania led a team in showing that all of these types of particles acquire a curved shape in a similar manner. The finding may help scientists understand how floodplains are built and predict when ash or dust clouds are likely to form.
14min
Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

Decades-long trends, not flawed vaccine, explain resurgent whooping coughResearchers and public health officials have struggled to explain the resurgence of whooping cough in the US since the late 1970s, and the suspected shortcomings of the current generation of vaccines are often blamed. But a new study concludes that the resurgence of the highly contagious respiratory disease is the result of factors that began in the middle of the last century, long before the late
14min
Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

Latest nanowire experiment boosts confidence in Majorana sightingIn the latest experiment of its kind, researchers have captured the most compelling evidence to date that unusual particles lurk inside a special kind of superconductor. The result confirms theoretical predictions first made nearly a decade ago.
14min
Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

Misestimating travel times may stop people from walking or biking to workThe extra amount of time needed to walk or bike to work is often cited as a reason most people drive instead. But people are often bad at guessing how it takes to get somewhere, and researchers say most people think it will take longer to walk or bike somewhere than it actually does.
14min
EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Researchers identify chemical compound that inhibits Ebola virus replicationAn organic chemical compound shows effective antiviral activity against Ebola virus and several other viruses, according to a study led by Georgia State University.
21min
Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

Most of Earth's water was likely present before the moon-forming giant impactBased on an extensive collection of lunar and terrestrial samples, a new study probing the elusive origins of the moon -- now typically thought to have formed from a collision between a proto-Earth and a solid impactor -- supports theories of a collision with extremely high energy. So high, in fact, that it resulted in nearly complete mixing of materials between the impactor and proto-Earth.
28min
Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

West Greenland Ice Sheet melting at the fastest rate in centuriesNew study from the West Greenland Ice Sheet shows that weather patterns and summer warming combine to drive ice loss that is at the highest levels in at least 450 years.
28min
Live Science

A Man's 'Beer Belly' Was Actually a Massive TumorA New Jersey man's "beer belly" turned out to be a 30-lb. (13.6 kilograms) tumor.
36min
Live Science

2 Pilots in Different Planes Saw the Same UFO. The FAA Can't Explain It.The FAA is completely stumped by this mysterious sighting over Arizona.
36min
NYT > Science

Trilobites: Drones Spy Caribou on a Treacherous, Icy CrossingWatching the herd from above offered a more complete view of the animals’ varying behaviors, and could suggest insights into other migratory species.
37min
Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

13,000-year old human footprints found off Canada's Pacific coastHuman footprints found off Canada's Pacific coast may be 13,000 years old, according to a new study.
42min
EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Dark matter is a no show in ghostly galaxyAstronomers using W. M. Keck Observatory and Gemini data in Hawaii have encountered a galaxy that appears to have almost no dark matter. Since the Universe is dominated by dark matter, and it is the foundation upon which galaxies are built, '...this is a game changer,' according to Principal Investigator Pieter van Dokkum of Yale University.
43min
Popular Science

Big box stores are dying. What do we do with all the bodies?Technology How to remove, reuse, or recycle these fallen retail giants. The big box store’s meteoric rise is matched only by its rapid decline. Architects, urban planners, and activists are now searching for ways to repurpose these retail…
47min
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Supernova may have 'burped' before explodingOnly by increasing the rate at which telescopes monitor the sky has it been possible to catch more Fast-Evolving Luminous Transients (FELTs) and begin to understand them.
57min
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NASA finds Tropical Storm Jelawat strengtheningInfrared imagery from NASA's Aqua satellite revealed that Tropical Storm Jelawat was getting stronger as it moved through the Northwestern Pacific Ocean.
57min
Live Science

Gonorrhea's Always Bad, But This Man's Case Might Be the 'Worst Ever'This could be the "worst ever" case of antibiotic-resistant gonorrhea that doctors have seen.
59min
New on MIT Technology Review

This iridescent butterfly is made out of beating heart cells
1h
Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

Plants, fungi and bacteria work together to clean polluted landHighly complex interactions among roots, fungi and bacteria underlie the ability of some trees to clean polluted land, according to a novel study by bioinformatics and plant-biology experts.
1h
Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

Parental conflict can do lasting damage to kidsEven relatively low-level adversity like parental conflict can do lasting damage to children, a new study finds. Shy children are especially vulnerable.
1h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Latest nanowire experiment boosts confidence in Majorana sightingIn the latest experiment of its kind, researchers have captured the most compelling evidence to date that unusual particles lurk inside a special kind of superconductor. The result, which confirms theoretical predictions first made nearly a decade ago at the Joint Quantum Institute (JQI) and the University of Maryland (UMD), will be published in the April 5 issue of Nature.
1h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News

West Greenland Ice Sheet melting at the fastest rate in centuriesNew study from the West Greenland Ice Sheet shows that weather patterns and summer warming combine to drive ice loss that is at the highest levels in at least 450 years.
1h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Double danger: The peril of childbirth for women with rheumatic heart diseaseWomen of childbearing age who suffer from Rheumatic Heart Disease in low- to moderate-income countries like Uganda face a double danger: Increased risk of complications during pregnancy -- including death -- while also bearing a cultural burden and expectation that they'll become mothers.That was among the findings in a recent study led by researcher Allison Webel, an assistant professor at the Fr
1h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Potential biomarkers in animals could signal Ebola virus infection before symptoms appearScientists have identified potential biomarkers in nonhuman primates exposed to Ebola virus (EBOV) that appeared up to four days before the onset of fever, according to research published today in the journal Science Translational Medicine. The work, a collaboration between the U.S. Army Medical Research Institute of Infectious Diseases (USAMRIID) and Boston University (BU), could pave the way for
1h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News

By river, ocean, or wind, rocks round the same wayRiver rocks tend to be rounded, as do grains of dune sand and beach glass. Geophysicist Douglas Jerolmack of the University of Pennsylvania led a team in showing that all of these types of particles acquire a curved shape in a similar manner. The finding may help scientists understand how floodplains are built and predict when ash or dust clouds are likely to form.
1h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Low birthweight in newborns linked to protein in placentaUCLA scientists have discovered higher levels of a protein called humanin in the placenta tissue of women who give birth to severely underweight infants. The researchers suspect that levels of humanin rise to protect the fetus during placenta failure.
1h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Women with polycystic ovary syndrome have double the risk of liver diseaseIncreased male hormones result in women with polycystic ovaries having a two-fold increased risk of developing non-alcoholic fatty liver disease.
1h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Decades-long trends, not flawed vaccine, explain resurgent whooping coughResearchers and public health officials have struggled to explain the resurgence of whooping cough in the US since the late 1970s, and the suspected shortcomings of the current generation of vaccines are often blamed. But a new University of Michigan-led study concludes that the resurgence of the highly contagious respiratory disease is the result of factors that began in the middle of the last ce
1h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Most of Earth's water was likely present before the moon-forming giant impactBased on an extensive collection of lunar and terrestrial samples, a new study probing the elusive origins of the moon -- now typically thought to have formed from a collision between a proto-Earth and a solid impactor -- supports theories of a collision with extremely high energy. So high, in fact, that it resulted in nearly complete mixing of materials between the impactor and proto-Earth.
1h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Understanding the resurgence of whooping cough in the USScientists might have an explanation for the severe and surprising resurgence of whooping cough in the US whooping cough (also called pertussis) is caused by the bacterial pathogen Bordetella pertussis and results in roughly 195,000 infant deaths worldwide every year, mostly in the developing world.
1h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News

BU study: Diagnosing Ebola before symptoms arriveBoston University researchers studied data from 12 monkeys exposed to Ebola virus, and discovered a common pattern of immune response among the ones that got sick. This response occurred four days before the onset of fever -- the first observable symptom of infection. The work, published in the journal Science Translational Medicine, suggests a possible biomarker for early diagnosis of the disease
1h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News

CNIC scientists identify a promising target for the treatment of heart failureThe mitochondrial protease OMA1 is activated when the heart is stressed. Inhibition of OMA1 protects cardiomyocytes, preventing their death and the deterioration in heart function characteristic of heart failure, one of the main causes of death in the world. The study is published today in Science Translational Medicine and was conducted by researchers at the Centro Nacional de Investigaciones Car
1h
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New colon cancer finding could lead to earlier diagnosis -- and better outcomesFor many years, physicians have puzzled over why people with 'clean' colonoscopies went on to develop colon cancer. New findings from OMRF may help explain why, and the discovery could lead to ways to detect these cancers earlier and more effectively.
1h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News

13,000-year old human footprints found off Canada's Pacific coastHuman footprints found off Canada's Pacific coast may be 13,000 years old, according to a study published March 28, 2018 in the open-access journal PLOS ONE by Duncan McLaren and colleagues from the Hakai Institute and University of Victoria, Canada.
1h
Big Think

What the American Dream means today versus what it originally meantWhat is the American Dream? The ever-changing definition of it might surprise you nearly as much as what it used to mean. Read More
1h
The Scientist RSS

Scientists Reverse Their Controversial Findings of CRISPR's Off-Target EffectsLast year, researchers claimed the gene-editing method had accuracy issues, but a new whole-genome sequencing analysis by the same team finds otherwise.
1h
New Scientist - News

We’ve spotted a weird galaxy that’s missing all its dark matterMost galaxies have more mysterious dark matter than bright stars and gas. But this galaxy has no dark matter, killing off some alternate ideas of gravity
1h
Big Think

Cambridge Analytica whistleblower says company helped swing Brexit voteFormer Cambridge Analytica employee Christopher Wylie made a series of surprising assertions about the data mining company to British lawmakers on March 27. Read More
1h
Science | The Guardian

Prehistoric human footprints unearthed on Canada shorelineScientists find 29 prints on island in British Columbia, supporting theory that early Americans arrived from Asia Whether it was a family day out at the beach, complete with prehistoric equivalent of a bucket and spade, we’ll never know, but one thing is for sure: about 13,000 years ago a little band of humans were pottering about on a shore in western Canada. Researchers have unearthed 29 footpr
1h
Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

Social awareness increases demonstrate brain changing in adults with autismResearchers have demonstrated in a pilot study that a clinician-driven virtual learning platform, tailored to young adults on the autism spectrum, shows improved social competency. Findings reveal that increases in socio-emotional and socio-cognitive abilities correlate with brain change.
1h
Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

Turtle shells help decode complex links between modern, fossil speciesA new study shows how scientists can use animals' physical features -- also known as morphology -- to make connections between a modern species and its fossilized relatives, even if they look strikingly different.
1h
Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

Scientists discover promising off-switch for inflammationThe switch puts the brake on overactive immune cells at the heart of many inflammatory diseases such as arthritis, IBD, and heart disease. The scientists behind the discovery are now keen to explore whether the findings can be exploited in the effort to develop new anti-inflammatory medicines.
1h
Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

Draining peatlands gives global rise to greenhouse laughing-gas emissionsDrained fertile peatlands around the globe are hotspots for the atmospheric emission of laughing-gas - a powerful greenhouse gas called nitrous oxide, which is partly responsible for global warming and destruction of the ozone layer, a new study shows.
1h
Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

Genome does not like to excessively change in male germ cellsResearchers report the function of GTSF1 in germ cells. The study shows that GTSF1 is an essential factor for secondary piRNA biogenesis probably through the step where PIWI-piRNA complexes grasp and/or stabilize the target RNA. The discovery gives important insights on how male germ cells avoid the genome instability caused by excessive retrotransposition.
1h
Live Science

Oldest Human Footprints in North America Discovered: Here's What They RevealAbout 13,000 years ago, two shoeless adults and a child squished their bare feet through wet clay near the water's edge, leaving footprints that still exist today.
1h
NYT > Science

Trilobites: Earliest Known Human Footprints in North America Found on Canadian IslandScientists found the preserved footprints to be 13,000 years old, and suggested they shored up a hypothesis that early settlers of North America traveled along the Pacific coast.
1h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

By river, ocean, or wind, rocks round the same wayThe milky, smooth texture of beach glass evokes a history of turbulent transport, rough edges abraded away to produce curves. The same smooth features can be seen in river rocks and dune sands.
1h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

13,000-year old human footprints found off Canada's Pacific coastHuman footprints found off Canada's Pacific coast may be 13,000 years old, according to a study published March 28, 2018 in the open-access journal PLOS ONE by Duncan McLaren and colleagues from the Hakai Institute and University of Victoria, Canada.
1h
Latest Headlines | Science News

Live heart cells make this material shift color like a chameleonA new material made of heart cells from rats and hydrogel changes color as the living cells contract and relax.
1h
Latest Headlines | Science News

Footprints put people on Canada’s west coast 13,000 years agoIsland tracks indicate early New World settlers’ traveled down the North American Pacific coast about 13,000 years ago.
1h
Scientific American Content: Global

Why It's So Hard to #DeleteFacebookSocial media mine behavior patterns to tailor online experiences and appeal to individual psychological needs -- Read more on ScientificAmerican.com
1h
Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

Weather phenomena such as El Niño affect up to two-thirds of the world's harvestsLarge-scale weather cycles, such as the one related to the El Niño phenomenon, affect two-thirds of the world's cropland. In these so called climate oscillations, air pressure, sea level temperature or other similar factors fluctuate regularly in areas far apart in a way that causes rain and temperature patterns to shift significantly.
1h
Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

Next-gen lithium-metal batteries for electric vehicles, smart gridsElectric vehicles, wind turbines or smart grids require batteries with far greater energy capacity than currently available. A leading contender is the lithium-metal battery. However, dendrite, or sharp needles, made of clumps of lithium atoms can cause the batteries to heat up, lose efficiency and occasionally short-circuit. Using supercomputers, researchers have simulated the behavior of graphen
1h
Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

Photosynthesis uses vibrations as 'traffic signals'Researchers have discovered a new role for protein vibrations in controlling the transformation of sunshine into useful energy. The study illuminates a mechanism that could help design better solar materials.
1h
Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

Teaching machines to spot the essentialPhysicists have developed a novel machine-learning algorithm that analyses large data sets describing a physical system and extract from them the essential information needed to understand the underlying physics.
1h
Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

Mitochondrial replacement moratorium should be reconsidered, researchers sayMothers with mitochondrial DNA mutations often give birth to children who face incurable and fatal illnesses. But a much-studied form of mitochondrial replacement (MR) could prevent the transmission of such diseases from mothers to children, researchers say. Law schools therefore urge the US to allow for the replacement of mutation-bearing mitochondria to prevent fatal illnesses in children.
1h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Brain-wide tracing of single neurons reveals breadth of information transfer from visual cortexAn international collaboration of neuroscientists have today published a paper in Nature demonstrating the breadth of neural communication in visual cortex using a combination of methods for tracing the projections of individual neurons across the brain.
2h
Latest Headlines | Science News

Brain waves of concertgoers sync up at showsDuring a live musical performance, audience members’ brain waves get in sync.
2h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

EasyJet chief says European airline shakeup is not overThe European aviation sector is likely to see further consolidation after a number of airline bankruptcies, the new chief executive of British low-cost airline EasyJet said on Wednesday.
2h
BBC News - Science & Environment

Australia's indigenous languages have one source, study saysAll indigenous languages can be traced to a mother tongue dubbed Proto-Australian, researchers say.
2h
Science | The Guardian

Galaxy without any dark matter baffles astronomersScientists surprised to find NGC 1052-DF2 devoid of mysterious substance, but say its absence strengthens case for its existence A distant galaxy that appears completely devoid of dark matter has baffled astronomers and deepened the mystery of the universe’s most elusive substance. The absence of dark matter from a small patch of sky might appear to be a non-problem, given that astronomers have n
2h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Bovine genetics: The startling diversity of Buša cattleIn a study of the genetic structure and population dynamics of a unique breed of cattle that is indigenous to Southeastern Europe, Ludwig-Maximilians-Universitaet (LMU) in Munich researchers have discovered a remarkable degree of genetic variation.
2h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Largest-ever genetic study of stroke provides new insight into the diseaseAn international research group studying 520,000 people from around the world has identified 22 new genetic risk factors for stroke, tripling the number of gene regions known to affect stroke risk. These results provide new clues on stroke mechanisms and could help scientists identify drug targets for treatment. The work is the largest genetic study on stroke ever.
2h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Hubble finds first galaxy in the local Universe without dark matterAn international team of researchers using the NASA/ESA Hubble Space Telescope and several other observatories have, for the first time, uncovered a galaxy that is missing most -- if not all -- of its dark matter. This discovery of the galaxy NGC 1052-DF2 challenges currently-accepted theories of and galaxy formation and provides new insights into the nature of dark matter. The results are publish
2h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Dark matter goes missing in oddball galaxyGalaxies and dark matter go together like peanut butter and jelly. You typically don't find one without the other.
2h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Dark matter is a no show in ghostly galaxyAstronomers using Gemini and W. M. Keck Observatory data in Hawai'i have encountered a galaxy that appears to have almost no dark matter. Since the universe is dominated by dark matter, and it is the foundation upon which galaxies are built, '...this is a game changer,' according to Principal Investigator Pieter van Dokkum of Yale University.
2h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News

A chink in bacteria's armorScientists have untangled the structure of a recently discovered bacterial wall-building protein, found in nearly all bacteria. The discovery unveils potential weak spots in the protein's molecular make-up. The findings can pave the way to next-generation broad-spectrum drugs that disrupt the protein's function and disarm harmful bacteria
2h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Scientists discover promising off-switch for inflammationThe switch puts the brake on overactive immune cells at the heart of many inflammatory diseases such as arthritis, IBD, and heart disease. The scientists behind the discovery are now keen to explore whether the findings can be exploited in the effort to develop new anti-inflammatory medicines.
2h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Revolutionary brain-mapping technique provides new blueprint for cortical connectionsResearchers used MAPseq, a revolutionary brain mapping method, to make a discovery that will force neuroscientists to rethink how areas of the cortex communicate with one another. They discovered how neurons in the primary visual cortex project to other cortical areas, each cell often linking up with cells in multiple areas, in patterned ways.
2h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Majorana trilogy completedSince the breakthrough discovery of the Majorana particle in 2012 in Delft, researchers faced great challenges. The group of professor Leo Kouwenhoven at QuTech and Microsoft collaborated with theorists and material scientists of various institutes to understand the next steps required to improve the experiments. Now, the scientists provide a definite proof for Majorana existence paving the way to
2h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News

How do you make a galaxy without dark matterA team of astronomers has discovered a unique galaxy -- the first of its kind -- that appears to contain virtually no dark matter. It is an exceptional find since galaxies are commonly thought to contain more dark matter than the ordinary matter that makes up a galaxy's stars, gas and dust. Also, it is generally accepted that galaxies first formed from concentrations of dark matter that act like '
2h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Fungi found in the guts of healthy adults just travel throughFungi found in the gastrointestinal tracts of healthy adults are largely transient and stem from the mouth or foods recently consumed, according to new research published this week in mSphere, an open-access journal from the American Society for Microbiology.
2h
Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

Dark matter goes missing in oddball galaxyGalaxies and dark matter go together like peanut butter and jelly. You typically don't find one without the other.
2h
Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

A chink in bacteria's armorScientists have untangled the structure of a recently discovered bacterial wall-building protein, found in nearly all bacteria. The discovery unveils potential weak spots in the protein's molecular make-up. The findings can pave the way to next-generation broad-spectrum drugs that disrupt the protein's function and disarm harmful bacteria.
2h
Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

Scientists print all-liquid 3-D structuresScientists have developed a way to print 3-D structures composed entirely of liquids. Using a modified 3-D printer, they injected threads of water into silicone oil -- sculpting tubes made of one liquid within another liquid.
2h
Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

Relationship changes after bariatric surgeryIndividuals who have undergone bariatric surgery have a higher probability of getting married, separating from their partner or getting divorced, according to a new study.
2h
Live Science

Mysterious Brown Spots on King Tut's Tomb Are 'Dead'Mysterious brown spots on the ancient artwork of Tutankhamun's tomb are not growing larger as previously feared.
2h
The Scientist RSS

Is the Interstitium Really a New Organ?A study confirms that the spaces between cells are fluid-filled, rather than tightly packed with connective tissue, but pathologists say the findings' implications remain to be seen.
2h
The Economist: The world this week

Politics this week
2h
The Economist: The world this week

Business this week
2h
The Economist: The world this week

KAL’s cartoon
2h
Science | The Guardian

Discovery of MRSA-busting antibiotic gives hope against resistant superbugsNew drug tested on mice could be used to treat human infections that no longer respond to routine antibiotics, say scientists The discovery of a new class of antibiotics that can wipe out persistent infections of the hospital superbug MRSA has raised fresh hopes for progress in the fight against antimicrobial resistance . Health officials around the world have seen a steady rise in bacterial infe
2h
Science | The Guardian

Top marine scientists defend attack on Great Barrier Reef researchResearchers from Australia’s leading marine science agency respond to criticism by two academics that doubts much of their work Scientists at Australia’s leading marine science agency say an attack on the integrity of their research into threats to the Great Barrier Reef was flawed and based on “misinterpretation” and “selective use of data”. The Australian Institute of Marine Science (Aims) rese
2h
BBC News - Science & Environment

Ghostly galaxy may be missing dark matterScientists have imaged a "transparent" galaxy that may have no dark matter.
2h
Live Science

Astrophysicists Claim They Found a 'Galaxy Without Dark Matter'Dark matter, if it exists, should be everywhere. But scientists just spotted a galaxy that seems to have none at all.
2h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Berkeley Lab scientists print all-liquid 3-D structuresScientists have developed a way to print 3-D structures composed entirely of liquids. Using a modified 3-D printer, they injected threads of water into silicone oil -- sculpting tubes made of one liquid within another liquid.
2h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Turtle shells help decode complex links between modern, fossil speciesA new study by Florida Museum of Natural History researcher Natasha Vitek shows how scientists can use animals' physical features -- also known as morphology -- to make connections between a modern species and its fossilized relatives, even if they look strikingly different.
2h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Turtle shells help decode complex links between modern, fossil speciesImagine that Labradors and golden retrievers died out a million years ago, leaving only fossilized skeletons behind. Without the help of DNA, how could we determine that a fossil Labrador, a fossil retriever and a modern Chihuahua all belong to the same species, Canis lupus familiaris? And could we look at the wide variety of dogs today to gain clues about lost diversity in the past?
2h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Scientists unravel the structure of common bacterial wall-building proteinThe wall that surrounds bacteria to shield them from external assaults has long been a tantalizing target for drug therapies. Indeed, some of modern medicine's most reliable antibiotics disarm harmful bacteria by disrupting the proteins that build their protective armor.
2h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Fungi found in the guts of healthy adults just travel throughFungi found in the gastrointestinal tracts of healthy adults are largely transient and stem from the mouth or foods recently consumed, according to new research published this week in mSphere, an open access journal from the American Society for Microbiology.
2h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Majorana trilogy completedSince the breakthrough discovery of the Majorana particle in 2012 in Delft, the group of professor Leo Kouwenhoven at QuTech and Microsoft have collaborated with theorists and material scientists of various institutes to understand the next steps required to improve the experiments. Now, the scientists have provided a definite proof for the existence of the Majorana, paving the way toward Majorana
2h
NYT > Science

Your Cute Rubber Duck May Be a Haven for BacteriaA study of bath toys found the water inside yellow ducks swimming with microbes, including bacteria often associated with hospital infections.
2h
Feed: All Latest

The Case of the Missing Dark MatterPhysicists have discovered a galaxy 65 million light years away with so little dark matter that it may contain none at all.
2h
Quanta Magazine

A Victory for Dark Matter in a Galaxy Without AnyAstronomers have long noticed an invisible elephant in the room — so-called dark matter, which seems heavier than all the visible stars, gas and dust in the cosmos by a ratio of 6-to-1. Though no one knows what dark matter actually is, its presence has been inferred from its gravitational influence on ordinary matter in galaxy after galaxy — until now. Astronomers have found a galaxy that appears
2h
Scientific American Content: Global

Astronomers Boggle at Distant Galaxy Devoid of Dark MatterThe newfound object NGC1052-DF2 defies easy explanation, and could lead to breakthroughs in our understanding of how galaxies form and evolve -- Read more on ScientificAmerican.com
2h
Scientific American Content: Global

Wildlife on the MoveWe can marry online maps, animal movement data, and storytelling to create compelling visual experiences for the benefit of wildlife conservation -- Read more on ScientificAmerican.com
2h
Big Think

There’s still no scientific way to know who’s about to start shootingA new report charges that there hasn’t yet been enough concerted. research on what makes a person become a mass shooter. Read More
2h
Latest Headlines | Science News

Dark matter is MIA in this strange galaxyA galaxy without dark matter bolsters the case that the invisible substance really exists.
2h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Draining peatlands gives global rise to greenhouse laughing-gas emissionsDrained fertile peatlands around the globe are hotspots for the atmospheric emission of laughing-gas—a powerful greenhouse gas called nitrous oxide, which is partly responsible for global warming and destruction of the ozone layer, a new study shows.
2h
Viden

Facebook udskyder lyttende højtaler efter data-skandaleEn planlagt lancering af en højtaler, der kan se og lytte med indenfor hjemmets fire vægge, er udskudt på ubestemt tid.
2h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Relationship changes after bariatric surgeryIndividuals who have undergone bariatric surgery have a higher probability of getting married, separating from their partner or getting divorced, according to a Swedish study published in JAMA Surgery.
2h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Draining peatlands gives global rise to greenhouse laughing-gas emissionsDrained fertile peatlands around the globe are hotspots for the atmospheric emission of laughing-gas - a powerful greenhouse gas called nitrous oxide, which is partly responsible for global warming and destruction of the ozone layer, a new study shows.
2h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Why has this tiny island seen a sharp rise in shark bites?A small island has become a hotbed for shark bites and people may be partly to blame.
3h
New on MIT Technology Review

A robotic camera system films sports like a human
3h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Photosynthesis uses vibrations as 'traffic signals'Researchers have discovered a new role for protein vibrations in controlling the transformation of sunshine into useful energy. The study illuminates a mechanism that could help design better solar materials.
3h
The Atlantic

The Sprawling, Empathetic Adventure of SagaImage Comics’ space-opera comic-book series Saga imagines a vast universe with strange inhabitants. There’s a telepathic, bald cat who yowls “LYING” at people who don’t tell the truth. There’s a queer, disemboweled ghost who works nights as a sassy teenage babysitter. And there’s a drunken cyclops who writes trashy romance novels, but may secretly be the galaxy’s leading intellectual. In one scen
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Popular Science

The deadliest animals in America, rankedAnimals The most terrifying critters might be right in your backyard. There are plenty of ways to get killed by an animal in America—and plenty of scary species to choose from. But the most dangerous critters might not be the ones you’re…
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

Dramatic increase in flooding on coastal roadsResearchers have found that in the past 20 years roads along the East Coast have experienced a 90 percent increase in flooding -- often making the roads in these communities impassable, causing delays, as well as stress, and impacting transportation of goods and services.
3h
Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

Simulations document self-assembly of proteins and DNAWhat makes particles self-assemble into complex biological structures? Often, this phenomenon is due to the competition between forces of attraction and repulsion, produced by electrical charges in various sections of the particles, called patches. Physicists have now developed an algorithm to simulate the molecular dynamics of these patchy particles.
3h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Playboy quits Facebook over data privacy scandalPlayboy announced Wednesday it was suspending its activities on Facebook to avoid being "complicit" in a wide-ranging scandal over misuse of private data.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Plants, fungi and bacteria work together to clean polluted landHighly complex interactions among roots, fungi and bacteria underlie the ability of some trees to clean polluted land, according to a novel study by bioinformatics and plant-biology experts from McGill University and Université de Montréal.
3h
New Scientist - News

Why the UK’s plastic bottle deposit plan doesn’t go far enoughThe UK government’s plan to introduce a refundable deposit on plastic bottles is a good start, but producers must pay the entire cost of dealing with waste
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Investing in public education earns high marks for greater upward mobilityInvesting in education may help boost economic opportunities for the next generation, according to a team of economists.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Overcoming a battery's fatal flawAs renewable energy grows as a power source around the world, one key component still eludes the industry: large-scale, stable, efficient and affordable batteries.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Research finds dramatic increase in flooding on coastal roadsHigh tide floods, or so-called "nuisance flooding," that happen along shore roadways during seasonal high tides or minor wind events are occurring far more frequently than ever before. Researchers at the University of New Hampshire have found that in the past 20 years roads along the East Coast have experienced a 90 percent increase in flooding - often making the roads in these communities impassa
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

It's a trap—Researchers identify the process by which holes get trapped in ZnO nanoparticlesWhen a solar cell absorbs a photon of light, it starts an electronic race against time. Two particles—a negatively charged electron and positively charged "hole"—generate electricity if they fully separate.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

Can the causal order between events change in quantum mechanics?Researchers have developed a new theoretical framework to describe how causal structures in quantum mechanics transform. They analyze under which conditions quantum mechanics allows the causal structure of the world to become 'fuzzy.' In this case, a fixed order of events is not possible.
3h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Misestimating travel times may stop people from walking or biking to workWorries about the extra time needed to walk or bike to work is a big reason people hop into their cars for their daily commute, but walking or biking probably wouldn't take as long as they think, according to researchers.
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The Atlantic

One of the Biggest and Most Boring Cyberattacks Against an American City YetWant to hear a boring story? I can’t submit an expense report for a recent out-of-town work trip. I’ve got all the receipts, except one from long-term parking at the Atlanta airport. A sensor lets me in and out of the parking lot there, and my account gets charged automatically. Later, I can download a receipt from a website, which I submit to accounting at my university, which creates an expense
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The Atlantic

Why Did Kim Jong Un Just Visit China?Kim Jong Un Chinese North KoreanFor months, China seemed to be a side player as relations improved between North Korea and South Korea. Kim Jong Un, the leader of North Korea, kicked off the year with an address celebrating the completion of his nuclear deterrent after months of boasting about his increasing nuclear capability. In his speech, he also expressed interest in North Korea’s participation in the Winter Olympics. That
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Photosynthesis uses vibrations as 'traffic signals'Researchers have discovered a new role for protein vibrations in controlling the transformation of sunshine into useful energy. The study illuminates a mechanism that could help design better solar materials.
3h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Public willing to pay to improve water qualityResearchers from the University of Missouri have found in a nationwide survey that members of the public are more willing to pay for improved water quality than other ecosystem services such as flood control or protecting wildlife habitats.
3h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Overcoming a battery's fatal flawElectric vehicles, wind turbines or smart grids require batteries with far greater energy capacity than currently available. A leading contender is the lithium-metal battery. However, dendrite, or sharp needles, made of clumps of lithium atoms can cause the batteries to heat up, lose efficiency and occasionally short-circuit. Using supercomputers at the Texas Advanced Computing Center, researchers
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Weather phenomena such as El Niño affect up to two-thirds of the world's harvestsAccording to researchers at Aalto University, Finland, large-scale weather cycles, such as the one related to the El Niño phenomenon, affect two-thirds of the world's cropland. In these so called climate oscillations, air pressure, sea level temperature or other similar factors fluctuate regularly in areas far apart in a way that causes rain and temperature patterns to shift significantly.
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Misestimating travel times may stop people from walking or biking to workThe extra amount of time needed to walk or bike to work is often cited as a reason most people drive instead. But people are often bad at guessing how it takes to get somewhere, and researchers say most people think it will take longer to walk or bike somewhere than it actually does.
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NYT > Science

Trilobites: Arctic Foxes on a Swedish Mountain Turned ‘Blue.’ It Was a Good Thing.The immigration of just three new foxes dramatically reduced inbreeding in an isolated population, providing some support for a disputed conservation strategy.
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Ingeniøren

Professor: Vi mangler regler for, hvad vores forsyningsdata kan bruges tilDer mangler klare retningslinjer for, hvordan forsyningsselskaber og myndigheder bruge borgerne forsyningsdata, advarer juraprofessor.
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Scientific American Content: Global

Climate Change Is Becoming a Top Threat to BiodiversityWarming rivals habitat loss and land degradation as a threat to global wildlife -- Read more on ScientificAmerican.com
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Feed: All Latest

The Fall of the TV Family in Trump's AmericaDonald Trump ruined television—just look at the *Roseanne* reboot.
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New on MIT Technology Review

SoftBank and Saudi Arabia aim to build a mind-bogglingly huge solar power system
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The Atlantic

What Congress Should Ask Mark ZuckerbergFacebook Privacy DataMark Zuckerberg will be headed to Washington. No one knows precisely when or to whom, but he himself has said he would be “happy” to testify. That he has never been before Congress is one of those minor miracles that only technology companies seem capable of generating through their bulky “policy” (i.e. lobbying) teams and still considerable popularity. But times are changing and in the wake of t
4h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News

It's a trap!Scientists at the US Department of Energy's (DOE) Argonne National Laboratory have published a new study that identifies the process by which holes get trapped in nanoparticles made of zinc oxide, a material of potential interest for solar applications because it absorbs ultraviolet light.
4h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Is there association between weight-loss surgery, change in relationships?Weight-loss surgery was associated with relationship changes for patients.
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Popular Science

There are still undiscovered species of clouds—and you can find them yourselfScience Head in the clouds? Then it's time to make yourself a useful citizen scientist. Clouds form in a multitude of different shapes and sizes, their infinite combinations and position across the sky offering a visual drama in response to the light…
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Big Think

Science figures out if bearded men make better fightersResearchers study whether bearded men have advantages in fighting. Read More
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

Simplifying and speeding up drug developmentResearchers have developed a method to examine millions of potential self-produced drug candidates in one go.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

Meditate regularly for an improved attention span in old ageRegular and intensive meditation sessions over the course of a lifetime could help a person remain attentive and focused well into old age. This is according to the most extensive longitudinal study to date examining a group of meditation practitioners.The research evaluates the benefits that people gained after three months of full-time meditation training and whether these benefits are maintaine
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Science | The Guardian

Why did I risk my privacy with home DNA testing? I blame my Neanderthal heritage | Arwa MahdawiDIY genetics testing is a growth industry. But I probably didn’t need it to tell me I’ll never be an elite athlete. And then there are the security implications … I have made a terrible mistake. I have sold all my DNA on the internet. Actually, it’s worse than that: I recently paid a not-insignificant sum to a technology company that could decide to sell my DNA on the internet. Why did I do this?
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Science | The Guardian

Julia Kristeva was communist secret agent, Bulgaria claimsRenowned psychoanalyst and philosopher alleged to have become collaborator in 1970s The renowned Bulgarian psychoanalyst and philosopher Julia Kristeva worked as an agent and collaborator with the Balkan country’s secret services during the communist era, a state commission has claimed. Kristeva, 76, is the author of more than 30 books and worked alongside leading French intellectuals such as Jac
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Tiangong-1 crash—why it's so hard to predict where space debris will land and what can be done about itThe now defunct Chinese space station Tiangong-1 is en route to crash into Earth – completing its "atmospheric reentry phase". While experts have been aware that this would happen for more than a year, there has been huge uncertainty around the exact timing. As the station's orbital altitude has decreased, however, this uncertainty has gradually reduced and it is now possible to determine that it
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Investing in public education earns high marks for greater upward mobilityInvesting in education may help boost economic opportunities for the next generation, according to a team of economists.
4h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Plants, fungi and bacteria work together to clean polluted landHighly complex interactions among roots, fungi and bacteria underlie the ability of some trees to clean polluted land, according to a novel study by bioinformatics and plant-biology experts from McGill University and Université de Montréal.
4h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News

UNH Research finds dramatic increase in flooding on coastal roadsResearchers at the University of New Hampshire have found that in the past 20 years roads along the East Coast have experienced a 90 percent increase in flooding -- often making the roads in these communities impassable, causing delays, as well as stress, and impacting transportation of goods and services.
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TED Talks Daily (SD video)

Academic research is publicly funded -- why isn't it publicly available? | Erica StoneIn the US, your taxes fund academic research at public universities. Why then do you need to pay expensive, for-profit journals for the results of that research? Erica Stone advocates for a new, open-access relationship between the public and scholars, making the case that academics should publish in more accessible media. "A functioning democracy requires that the public be well-educated and well
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

Drug that kills mosquitoes could be used to fight malariaResearchers have shown the large potential impact of a completely new type of antimalarial drug that kills mosquitoes, as opposed to existing drugs that target the parasite, to reduce the spread of malaria.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

Heart disease, stroke less widespread among foreign-born vs. US-born adultsForeign-born adults living in the United States had a lower prevalence of coronary heart disease and stroke than US-born adults in nationally representative data spanning 2006-2014, according to new research.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Why it's so hard to #DeleteFacebook—constant psychological boosts keep you hookedFacebook Data PrivacyHere we go again: another Facebook controversy, yet again violating our sense of privacy by letting others harvest our personal information. This flareup is a big one to be sure, leading some people to consider leaving Facebook altogether, but the company and most of its over 2 billion users will reconcile. The vast majority will return to Facebook, just like they did the last time and the many ti
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The Atlantic

Today's Rebels Are Model ChildrenAnyone used to worrying about coddled young people , their backbone eroded by oversolicitous elders and smartphone addiction , was in for a surprisingly mature show of spine at last weekend’s March for Our Lives. The Parkland, Florida, survivors-turned-prodigy-activists and their followers—along with Dreamers and other youthful protesters lately—couldn’t possibly be denounced as out-of-control “b
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Test for antibiotic associated kidney damage in children with cystic fibrosis identifiedNew research, published in Nature Scientific Reports, conducted by the University and partners highlights effective methods for identifying a common side effect in children receiving drug treatments for Cystic fibrosis.
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News

The physics of finance helps solve a century-old mysteryBy unleashing the power of big data and statistical physics, researchers in Japan have developed a model that aids understanding of how and why financial Brownian motion arises.
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Rapid pair production - Detection of a new reaction path in the atmosphereScientists have now observed a particularly rapid type of pair production in the laboratory: Hydrocarbons double when two peroxyl radicals react with each other. This means that stable products with the carbon skeleton of both peroxyl radicals are formed, which very likely will have a peroxide structure. Proof of this reaction path has now become possible with the aid of state-of-the-art measuring
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News

New study shows drug that kills mosquitoes could be used to fight malariaResearchers from the Liverpool School of Tropical Medicine (LSTM) have shown the large potential impact of a completely new type of antimalarial drug that kills mosquitoes, as opposed to existing drugs that target the parasite, to reduce the spread of malaria.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

On dangerous ground—land degradation is turning soils into desertsIf any of us still has the slightest doubt that we are facing an ecological crisis on an unprecedented scale, then a new report on land degradation, released this week by the Intergovernmental Science-Policy Platform on Biodiversity and Ecosystem Services (IPBES), provides yet another piece of evidence.
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Ingeniøren

Spørg Scientariet: Hvad sker der, når Solen brænder ud?Flere læsere er interesserede i Solens – og vores – skæbne, når den brænder ud. Lektor på Aarhus Universitet kigger frem i tiden.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Image: Proba-1 pyramid spottingA view looking north to south of Egypt's famous Giza Pyramid Complex, as seen by ESA's Proba-1 minisatellite.
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Futurity.org

Who should get naloxone training first? Heavy opioid usersThe most frequent and most public opioid abusers may be the best people to train how to give anti-overdose drugs to fellow users in trouble, a new study suggests. Public health departments and community organizations have started to train opioid users to administer naloxone to save other users who overdose. The question is which users should get training priority? “A user can’t administer naloxon
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

Early growth after pre­term birth is linked to cog­nit­ive func­tion­ing in adult­hoodPreterm born children are more likely to have problems in cognitive functioning and mental health. Then again, most preterm infants grow up to be just as happy, healthy and smart as their peers. Among the preterm infants, who are at risk?
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

Decade of fossil collecting gives new perspective on Triassic period, emergence of dinosaursA project spanning countries, years and institutions has attempted to reconstruct what the southern end of the world looked like during the Triassic period, 252 to 199 million years ago.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

The tragic story of America's only native parrot, now extinct for 100 yearsIt was winter in upstate New York in 1780 in a rural town called Schoharie, home to the deeply religious Palatine Germans. Suddenly, a flock of gregarious red and green birds flew into town, seemingly upon a whirlwind.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

3 Facebook Messenger app users file lawsuit over privacyThree Facebook Messenger app users have filed a lawsuit claiming the social network violated their privacy by collecting logs of their phone calls and text messages.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

NASA set to launch rocket carrying Penn State led experimentNASA will launch a suborbital sounding rocket—research rockets that fly a parabolic path, spending only about five minutes in space—carrying a Penn State led experiment to test a newly-developed X-ray spectrograph and study the X-rays from a supernova remnant in the Milky Way galaxy. The Water Recovery X-ray rocket, or WRX, is scheduled for launch April 4, 2018 from Kwajalein Atoll, the Republic o
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Big Think

5 key moments that led to the rise of the Intellectual Dark WebCutting through liberalism and conservatism, important thinkers are trying to navigate a polarized world. This often leads to uncomfortable confrontations. Read More
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The Atlantic

Is Peace on the Horizon for Afghanistan?Is it time for optimism in Afghanistan? On February 28, Afghan President Ashraf Ghani offered the Taliban peace talks without preconditions as a way to end the nearly two-decade-long conflict in his country. A month later, as delegates from more than 20 countries gathered in Tashkent, the capital of Uzbekistan, to discuss ways to restore stability to Afghanistan, there still hasn’t been a formal
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Futurity.org

Experts: Lift the ban on mitochondrial replacementExperts in medicine and law are urging the US to allow for the replacement of mutation-bearing mitochondria to prevent fatal illnesses in children. Mothers with mitochondrial DNA mutations often give birth to children who face incurable and fatal illnesses. But a much-studied form of mitochondrial replacement (MR) could prevent the transmission of such diseases from mothers to children, researche
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

New service aims to follow users across multiple devicesSome 60 companies including such leading brands as Subway, Sprint and the NFL are joining forces to help each other follow you around online.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

5 charts show how expensive it is to have kids in the U.S. todayToday, roughly one in five women in the U.S. doesn't have children. Thanks in part to this decline in birthrate, for the first time in U.S. history, there may soon be more elderly people than children.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Scientists penalised by motherhood, shows researchFemale academics with young children find it more difficult to access research funding and generate attention for their results than their male counterparts, according to a new study presented at the Royal Economic Society's Annual Conference (28 March 2018).
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Fifth International Symposium on Arctic ResearchThe Fifth International Symposium on Arctic Research (ISAR-5) was held in Tokyo from January 15 to 18, 2018, the largest of Asia's non-Arctic nations. The participants included 344 persons from 18 countries and regions, with 100 young researchers as well. Researchers from various research fields -- natural sciences, engineering, social sciences, and humanities -- participated in the symposium and
5h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Can the causal order between events change in quantum mechanics?Researchers at the University of Vienna and the Austrian Academy of Sciences develop a new theoretical framework to describe how causal structures in quantum mechanics transform. They analyze under which conditions quantum mechanics allows the causal structure of the world to become 'fuzzy.' In this case, a fixed order of events is not possible. The results are published in the renowned journal Ph
5h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Research uncovers a potential new strategy to fight ovarian cancerResearchers discovered a potential novel way to regulate ovarian cancer growth.
5h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Meditate regularly for an improved attention span in old ageRegular and intensive meditation sessions over the course of a lifetime could help a person remain attentive and focused well into old age. This is according to the most extensive longitudinal study to date examining a group of meditation practitioners. Published in Springer's Journal of Cognitive Enhancement, the research evaluates the benefits that people gained after three months of full-time m
5h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Mitochondrial replacement moratorium should be reconsidered, researchers sayProfessors from Brown's medical school and Harvard's law school urge the US to allow for the replacement of mutation-bearing mitochondria to prevent fatal illnesses in children.
5h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News

A new method for quantitative estimation of the degree of similarity of coordination polyhedraThe problem of the relationship between the structure of materials and their physical properties is one of the global problems of the present day. For many years, researchers of the Lobachevsky University's Faculty of Physics have been working to solve it. In particular, systematic experimental and theoretical studies of the atomic structures of crystals of various materials are conducted at the U
5h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Wider coverage of satellite data better detects magma supply to volcanoesUsing satellite imaging, Penn State researchers for the first time identified a major magma supply into a reservoir extending almost two miles from the crater of a volcano in Nicaragua.
5h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Teaching machines to spot the essentialTwo physicists at ETH Zurich and the Hebrew University of Jerusalem have developed a novel machine-learning algorithm that analyses large data sets describing a physical system and extract from them the essential information needed to understand the underlying physics.
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Inside Science

Under Pressure, Helium Stops Being a BystanderUnder Pressure, Helium Stops Being a Bystander The noble gas can help bring atoms together. HeliumTank.jpg Image credits: Rob Marmion/ Shutterstock Technology Wednesday, March 28, 2018 - 08:45 Charles Q. Choi, Contributor (Inside Science) -- Helium is the most chemically inert element in the universe, but last year, scientists proved it could successfully form a stable compound with another eleme
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New on MIT Technology Review

China’s citizens do care about their data privacy, actually
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Tesla: Crash was worsened by missing freeway barrier shieldA missing or damaged safety shield on the end of a California freeway barrier worsened the impact of a crash involving a Tesla SUV that killed a man last week, the electric car maker said on its website.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

Ragweed casts shade on soy productionRagweed, its pollen potent to allergy sufferers, might be more than a source of sneezes. In the Midwest, the plant may pose a threat to soybean production. Scientists have found that ragweed can drastically reduce soybean yield.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

'Fog harp' increases collection capacity for clean waterThe study demonstrates how a vertical array of parallel wires may change the forecast for fog harvesters. In a design the researchers have dubbed the 'fog harp,' these vertical wires shed tiny water droplets faster and more efficiently than the traditional mesh netting used in fog nets today.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

Sea turtles use flippers to manipulate foodSea turtles use their flippers to handle prey despite the limbs being evolutionarily designed for locomotion. Research reveals a behavior thought to be less likely in marine tetrapods is actually widespread and that this type of exaptation of flippers may have been occurring 70 million years earlier than previously thought.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Simulations document self-assembly of proteins and DNAWhat makes particles self-assemble into complex biological structures? Often, this phenomenon is due to the competition between forces of attraction and repulsion, produced by electric charges in various sections of the particles. In nature, these phenomena often occur in particles that are suspended in a medium—referred to as colloidal particles—such as proteins, DNA and RNA. To facilitate self-a
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Towards greater MRI sensitivity by harnessing quantum hyperpolarizationResearchers at the University of Melbourne have developed a technique which could increase the sensitivity of magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) for patient diagnosis.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Study changes long-held concepts of cell decodingScientists at the National Institute on Drug Abuse (NIDA) Intramural Research Program (IRP) have uncovered evidence that shows a more complex and elaborate role for the body's hard-working G protein-coupled receptors (GPCRs) than previously thought, suggesting a conceptual advance in the fields of biochemistry and pharmacology. With more than 800 members in the human genome, GPCRs are the largest
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

The startling diversity of Buša cattleIn a study of the genetic structure and population dynamics of a unique breed of cattle that is indigenous to Southeastern Europe, LMU researchers have discovered a remarkable degree of genetic variation.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Transhumanism—advances in technology could already put evolution into hyperdrive – but should they?Biological evolution takes place over generations. But imagine if it could be expedited beyond the incremental change envisaged by Darwin to a matter of individual experience. Such things are dreamt of by so-called "transhumanists". Transhumanism has come to connote different things to different people, from a belief system to a cultural movement, a field of study to a technological fantasy. You c
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Feed: All Latest

Model How Light Reflects Off a Mirror With PythonAnything you can do with a pencil and paper is worth doing in code.
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Live Science

Archaeologists Were Surprised to Find the Mummy of an Egyptian Priestess in This 'Empty' CoffinAn ancient Egyptian coffin, previously thought to be empty, holds the mummified remains of an Egyptian priestess who lived 2,500 years ago.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Novel synthetic biology technique could lead to breakthroughs in disease treatmentSynthetic biology offers a vision for the future of medicine, where cells could be re-engineered to fight diseases such as cancer and diabetes. For this to happen, scientists use viruses to infect and transfer new properties to cells so they behave in a certain way. But there hasn't been a reliable method to ensure all cells behave in the same way, even if they are not infected uniformly—until now
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Life beyond Earth—no plate tectonics, no problemScientists looking for life on distant planets are making plans to search non-Earth-like planets based on discoveries within our solar system that are challenging long-standing ideas about habitable zones, plate tectonics and more.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Information experts optimizing potato productionFarmers can optimize harvesting procedures and improve yields, food manufacturers can improve planning reliability. Information systems specialists at Saarland University are working to optimize the entire potato production chain, from field to fork. When it comes to the world's most popular tuber, Professor Wolfgang Maaß and his team are aiming to make all of the processes totally transparent. St
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Monitoring electric current offers high-precision, sensor-free means to control valves and locksUsing a new technique developed by drive systems engineers at Saarland University, electromagnetic valves can precisely control the amount of liquid they dispense and electromagnetic door locks can close smoothly and quietly. All that the engineers in Saarbrücken need is a magnetically permeable metal bolt that moves within a coil of wound copper wire and their sensor-free, patent-pending control
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Weather phenomena such as El Nino affect up to two-thirds of the world's harvestsAir pressure, sea level temperature or other similar factors fluctuate regularly in areas far apart in a way that causes rain and temperature patterns to shift significantly.
5h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Can the causal order between events change in quantum mechanics?Researchers at the University of Vienna and the Austrian Academy of Sciences develop a new theoretical framework to describe how causal structures in quantum mechanics transform. They analyse under which conditions quantum mechanics allows the causal structure of the world to become "fuzzy." In this case, a fixed order of events is not possible. The results are published in the renowned journal Ph
5h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Silicon Valley played by a different set of rules. Facebook's crisis could put an end to thatFacebook was 2 years old when it introduced its most transformative feature: a news feed that offered users a running list of updates about their friends' love lives, favorite new bands and latest vacation photos.
5h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Wider coverage of satellite data better detects magma supply to volcanoesUsing satellite imaging, Penn State researchers for the first time identified a major magma supply into a reservoir extending almost two miles from the crater of a volcano in Nicaragua.
5h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Simulations document self-assembly of proteins and DNAWhat makes particles self-assemble into complex biological structures? Often, this phenomenon is due to the competition between forces of attraction and repulsion, produced by electrical charges in various sections of the particles, called patches. In a new study published in EPJE, physicists have developed an algorithm to simulate the molecular dynamics of these patchy particles.
5h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Scientists elucidate the crystal structure of sodium borideAn international team of scientists predicts the ground-state structure of sodium boride.Researchers worked out the chemical composition, crystal structure, and properties of Na2B30 -- a compound that remains stable at standard conditions and has long been the subject of heated debate. The compound is potentially superhard and can exist at standard conditions.
5h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Study changes long-held concepts of cell decodingScientists at the National Institute on Drug Abuse Intramural Research Program have uncovered evidence that shows a more complex and elaborate role for the body's hard-working G protein-coupled receptors than previously thought, suggesting a conceptual advance in the fields of biochemistry and pharmacology.
5h
Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

Knitting electronics with yarn batteriesWhen someone thinks about knitting, they usually don't conjure up an image of sweaters and scarves made of yarn that can power watches and lights. But that's just what one group is reporting. They have developed a rechargeable yarn battery that is waterproof and flexible. It also can be cut into pieces and still work.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Researchers write book on development of masculinity among black malesThe development of masculinity among black males and its relationship to racial identity and race-related traumas and stress is the focus of a new book written by Wright State University's Steven Kniffley Jr. and two of his graduate students.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Active shooter drills may reshape how a generation of students views schoolRecent school shootings and the March for Our Lives rallies held in cities around the world on March 24 have rekindled debates over how to keep students safe.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

New survey of mountain gorillas underway in UgandaA team of researchers is currently combing through the forests of the aptly named Bwindi Impenetrable National Park for signs of mountain gorillas. This is part of a major effort to understand the conservation status of this great ape and other wildlife that shares its habitat.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Veterinarian clarifies misconceptions about toxoplasmosis, offers safety tipsToxoplasmosis is a disease that can have devastating effects on an unborn child, and many women have been erroneously advised to get rid of their cat if they are pregnant, says Susan Nelson, veterinarian and clinical professor at Kansas State University's Veterinary Health Center.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Measuring the economy with location dataCarrying your smartphone around everywhere has become a way of life. In doing so, you produce a surprising amount of data about your role in the economy—where you shop, work, travel, and generally hang out.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

A long-awaited modernisation of ceramic production methodsThousands of years after the ceramic production process was invented, a new solution has finally been developed, with a high potential impact on production cost, percentages of rejects and overall industry sustainability.
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Popular Science

A beginner's guide to flying your drone without crashing itDIY Safely take to the skies. So you've just purchased a shiny new drone. Follow these tips to fly your expensive device without endangering other people—or risking damaging your drone.
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The Atlantic

Chicago’s Awful DivideCHICAGO—Americans hear a lot these days about the country’s urban-rural divide. Rural counties are poorer; urban ones richer. Rural areas are losing jobs; urban ones are gaining them. People with a college education are leaving rural areas. They’re moving to urban places. Behind this divergence lies a straightforward story: The twin forces of globalization and technological change are enriching a
5h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Towards greater MRI sensitivity by harnessing quantum hyperpolarizationResearchers at the University of Melbourne have developed a technique which could increase the sensitivity of magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) for patient diagnosis.
5h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Catching the right fishETH researchers have developed a method to examine millions of potential self-produced drug candidates in one go.
5h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Communication via calcium waveThe hormone auxin is a key regulator of plant growth and development. But how it sets these processes in motion has been unclear. Scientists from the University of Würzburg have now uncovered central details.
5h
New on MIT Technology Review

Facebook has overhauled its privacy settingsFacebook Data Privacy
6h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Quantum speed-up predicted for charging quantum batteriesWhile batteries have been improving in recent times, at their core today's batteries still operate on the same basic electrochemical principles developed in the 18th and 19th centuries. Some physicists are now wondering whether quantum phenomena may revolutionize conventional battery chemistry and lead to the development of an entirely new class of potentially more powerful batteries.
6h
Scientific American Content: Global

Busting the Myths of Meditation with Dan HarrisSavvy Psychologist Dr. Ellen Hendriksen talks to award-winning journalist and news anchor Dan Harris to bust the myths that stop you from meditating -- Read more on ScientificAmerican.com
6h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Subduction of the Pacific plate resulted in the destruction of the North China CratonWhy the North China Craton became active 1-2 million years ago after 2 billion years of quiescence? The newest research suggested that its small size and the intra-plate weak zones make it vulnerable to destruction (internal reason). The subductions of the surrounding plates, also contribute to its destabilization (external factor).
6h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Genome does not like to excessively change in male germ cellsOsaka University researchers report the function of GTSF1 in germ cells. The study shows that GTSF1 is an essential factor for secondary piRNA biogenesis probably through the step where PIWI-piRNA complexes grasp and/or stabilize the target RNA. The discovery gives important insights on how male germ cells avoid the genome instability caused by excessive retrotransposition.
6h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Genes in songbirds hold clues about human speech disorders, UCLA biologists reportNew insights about how songbirds learn to sing provide promising clues about human speech disorders and may lead to new ways of treating them.
6h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Surgeons transform static 'Mona Lisa' smiles to joyous onesBy modifying a muscle transplant operation, Johns Hopkins surgeons report they are able to restore authentic facial expressions of joy -- wide and even smiles -- to selected patients with one-sided facial muscle paralysis due to birth defects, stroke, tumors or Bell's palsy.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

The mechanisms of plant agingEuropean researchers investigated the molecular mechanisms that drive stress-related responses that cause aging and death in plants. The goal is to generate resilient crop varieties.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Bigger pipes in space for handling the data explosionEarth observation is being held back by our inability to transport all the data generated down to earth. Irish researchers have developed a new set of pipes, in the shape of a smart system of optical feeder links, to fix the data bottleneck.
6h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Labs still lead but French bulldogs leap in popularity in USAmericans still love Labrador retrievers, but the nation's flirtation with French bulldogs has reached new heights.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Daimler, BMW to merge car-sharing, other digital services (Update)Automakers Daimler and BMW have agreed to merge their transportation services businesses so they can expand offerings in ride-hailing apps, car-sharing, parking, and charging electric cars.
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With ‘Sniffs’ and ‘Licks,’ Petzbe Makes Social Media Nice AgainWhen people are impersonating their pets online, they tend to be really, really nice.
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Feed: All Latest

The Next Cold War Is Here, and It's All About DataThe General Data Protection Regulation coming to Europe this spring emphasizes how different societies value personal data and privacy.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Tabby's star dims againThe team of astrophysicists studying KIC 8462852, more well known as Tabby's star, has reported that the star recently dimmed again, and did so quite dramatically. The group, led by LSU's Tabby Boyajian who discovered the odd behavior of the star back in 2015, has been documenting their findings on their web site.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Archaeologists open ancient Egyptian coffin thought to be empty and find it contains mummy remainsA team of archaeologists working at a University of Sydney Museum was recently surprised to discover mummy remains inside of an ancient coffin that was thought to be empty. The team has detailed their discovery and subsequent efforts to study the remains in Muse, a University of Sydney publication.
6h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Two radio relics discovered in the galaxy cluster Abell 168Indian astronomers have detected two radio relics in the nearby merging galaxy cluster known as Abell 168. The discovery, which could improve our understanding of merging processes in galaxy clusters, was detailed March 16 in a paper published on the arXiv pre-print repository.
6h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Going vegan, America could feed an additional 390 million people, study suggestsMore than 41 million Americans find themselves at risk of going hungry at some point during the year, the U.S. Department of Agriculture says.
6h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Increase in heart rate as blood pressure falls could be early sign of neurological diseaseA simple bedside test that matches a change in heart rate with a drop in blood pressure after a patient stands may help doctors diagnose certain degenerative brain diseases, according to a new study led by researchers at NYU School of Medicine.
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Scientific American Content: Global

I Love PreprintsAs a young researcher, I find these draft versions of potential journal articles invaluable -- Read more on ScientificAmerican.com
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Japan's Takeda eyes takeover of ShireJapan's Takeda Pharmaceutical said Wednesday it is considering buying Ireland-based drugmaker Shire as part of its attempts to boost overseas acquisitions.
6h
Ingeniøren

3D-briller til afsløring af forurening samler støvMens en enkelt region har succes med at afdække fortidens forurenede lossepladser med 3D-briller og luftfotos, er udbredelsen af teknikken overordnet set en nitte.
6h
Futurity.org

Foul ball! Strike out 105-year-old ‘Baseball Rule’?About 1,750 fans are hurt each year by foul balls at Major League Baseball games every year. That’s about two injuries for every three games. In light of opening day on Thursday, a new study suggests it’s time to abolish the so-called “Baseball Rule,” a legal doctrine established in 1913 to immunize teams from liability. A fan seated 60 feet from home plate has four-tenths of a second to react to
6h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Dragonfly-inspired nano coating kills bacteria upon contactStudies have shown that the wings of dragonflies and cicadas prevent bacterial growth due to their natural structure. The surfaces of their wings are covered in nanopillars making them look like a bed of nails. When bacteria come into contact with these surfaces, their cell membranes get ripped apart immediately and they are killed. This inspired researchers from the Institute of Bioengineering an
6h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

System transforms 3-D structure of a protein into a 2-D contact mapProteins constantly move and change their conformation. Molecular dynamics typically answers the question of what the possible conformations of proteins are. Proteins, however, have a highly complicated and crowded structure, and understanding the changes in their behavior is a challenging task due to the high number of coordinates to monitor. Digesting the large amount of molecular data often inv
6h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

How AI is helping to predict and prevent suicidesSuicide is a growing public health concern. In Canada, 4,000 lives are claimed by suicide each year —that is 10 lives per day.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Team develops a new method for tracing protein sources of farmed and wild salmonMore than half of the world's fish and seafood products come from aquaculture. The increasing demand and the simultaneous decline of the natural stocks due to overfishing have led to strong growth of the aquaculture industry for decades. To reduce costs and impact on wild fish stocks, carnivorous fish are increasingly fed plant-based diets in aquaculture. However, the rapid development in aquacult
7h
Scientific American Content: Global

Momentum Isn't Magic--Vindicating the Hot Hand with the Mathematics of StreaksNearly every basketball player, coach or fan believes that some shooters have an uncanny tendency to experience the hot hand -- Read more on ScientificAmerican.com
7h
Futurity.org

Newly found metallic exoplanet is a lot like MercuryScientists have discovered a hot, metallic, Earth-sized planet with a density similar to Mercury located 339 light years away from Earth. “…Mercury-like planets are perhaps not as rare as we thought…” “Mercury stands out from the other solar system terrestrial planets, showing a very high fraction of iron and implying it formed in a different way. We were surprised to see an exoplanet with the sa
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Futurity.org

Our faces show what we want, not what we feelOur facial expressions stem primarily from what we want out of social interactions, not our feelings, new research suggests. “The traditional view of our facial expressions is that they’re about us, that they reveal our moods and emotions,” says Alan J. Fridlund, an associate professor in the department of psychology and brain sciences at the University of California, Santa Barbara. “Our faces ar
7h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Fleet of automated electric taxis could deliver environmental and energy benefitsIt may be only a matter of time before urban dwellers can hail a self-driving taxi, so researchers at Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory and UC Berkeley decided to analyze the cost, energy, and environmental implications of a fleet of self-driving electric vehicles operating in Manhattan. They found that shared automated electric vehicles, or SAEVs, could get the job done at a lower cost - by a
7h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Knitting electronics with yarn batteriesWhen someone thinks about knitting, they usually don't conjure up an image of sweaters and scarves made of yarn that can power watches and lights. But that's just what one group is reporting in ACS Nano. They have developed a rechargeable yarn battery that is waterproof and flexible. It also can be cut into pieces and still work.
7h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Automated electric taxis could help reduce greenhouse gas emissions and costsWord on the street is that self-driving cars are the next big thing. But current vehicles emit a lot of greenhouse gases, and self-driving cars will initially come with a steep purchase price. Now, one group reports in ACS' Environmental Science & Technology, that, with a mathematical model, they've shown that self-driving, electric taxis could reduce emissions, energy use and overall costs.
7h
Popular Science

Hunting regulations are forcing animals to change in all sorts of waysAnimals We put a lot of pressure on species to adapt. In just a few thousand years we drastically changed the temperament of dogs by domesticating them, and in a couple hundred managed to diversity them into separate…
7h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Energy reduction in public buildings: learning to lead from the frontBuildings in EU-27 Member States represent up to 24 billion m2 of floor space, responsible for 40 percent of Europe's energy consumption and 36 percent of CO2 emissions – both key contributors to climate change. In response, a number of European directives promoting energy efficiency and ambitious goals for achieving nearly zero-energy buildings will be enforced in the coming years.
7h
The Scientist RSS

Image of the Day: New NeuronsScientists discover a molecular factor that allows them to follow neurons from birth to maturity.
7h
Feed: All Latest

Why Climate Change Skeptics Are Backing GeoengineeringUnder the Trump administration, untested, privately funded projects to manipulate the climate have been gaining unprecedented momentum.
7h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Why genes don't hold all the answers for biologistsIt is still widely believed that the gene is the foundation of life – that its discovery has provided information about how all living beings are controlled by the genetic factors they inherit from their parents.
7h
The Atlantic

Dear Therapist: My Son Has an Impractical, Ridiculous Career PlanEditor’s Note: Every Wednesday, Lori Gottlieb answers questions from readers about their problems, big and small. Have a question? Email her at dear.therapist@theatlantic.com. Dear Therapist, A few months ago, on a college tour, our 18-year-old son announced that he had found his purpose and future career: He wants to do stand-up comedy. The fact is, he’s got some talent in this area. He’s comfor
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

TV ad spending takes hit from 'cord cutting'Television is gradually losing its share of the US advertising market as Americans shift to digital platforms and move away from pay packages, a market tracker said on Wednesday.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Facebook revamps privacy tools as tighter EU rules draw nearFacebook Data PrivacyFacebook is giving its privacy tools a makeover as it reels from criticisms over its data practices and faces tighter European regulations in the coming months.
7h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Broader research perspective unveils more about changing life opportunities in urban fisheriesAs cities grow, the traditional lifestyle for small-scale fishing can be threatened, while at the same time cities create development opportunities. Using a wider analytical perspective, researchers can disclose a more diverse picture of development opportunities, threats, and conflicts for small scale fisheries than researches commonly do. This is shown a new dissertation from Gothenburg Universi
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

New ornithomimosaur from Arkansas describedLast week, a new species of dinosaur was described in the Journal of Vertebrate Paleontology. The dinosaur, Arkansaurus fridayi, is an ornithomimosaur the Early Cretaceous of Arkansas, and represents the first dinosaur to be described from that state. In fact, it's now be honored as the State Dinosaur of Arkansas. And although the paper itself is not Open Access, the data is Open Access and can be
7h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Fleet of automated electric taxis could deliver environmental and energy benefitsIt may be only a matter of time before urban dwellers can hail a self-driving taxi, so researchers at the Department of Energy's Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory (Berkeley Lab) and UC Berkeley decided to analyze the cost, energy, and environmental implications of a fleet of self-driving electric vehicles operating in Manhattan.
7h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Cambridge Analytica scandal—Facebook's user engagement and trust declineFacebook Data PrivacyFacebook has been hit with the biggest trauma in the company's 14-year history in the wake of the Cambridge Analytica scandal, but it's far from dead – as a public utility it is as relevant as ever.
7h
Science-Based Medicine

Augmented Reality in MedicineAugmented reality has the potential to revolutionize how physicians access data while caring for patients, whether in the operating room or clinic.
7h
Scientific American Content: Global

The Sun Is Spitting Out Strange Patterns of Gamma Rays--and No One Knows WhyThe discovery, although mysterious, might provide a new window into the depths of our most familiar star -- Read more on ScientificAmerican.com
7h
Ingeniøren

Molekyle har C-C binding længere end den teoretiske maksimumsværdiKulstof-kulstof-bindingen har en teoretisk maksimal længde på 1,803 ångstrøm. Det ved et nyt kulbrintemolekyle tilsyneladende ikke.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

How male germ cells avoid genome instabilityA group of researchers at Osaka University reported the function of GTSF1 in male germ cells. The study, which can be read in EMBO Reports, shows that GTSF1 is an essential factor for secondary piRNA biogenesis by regulating piRNA-mediated cleavage of target RNA. The discovery gives important insights on how male germ cells avoid the genome instability commonly seen in other types of cells.
7h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Communication via calcium waveBased on what we know today, the plant hormone auxin influences all aspects of plant growth and development. It makes corn thrive from germination to harvest, causes trees to grow skyward and date palms to produce sweet fruits. This makes auxin a significant driver of plant biomass creation on our planet. This is already suggested by its name which derives from Greek auxánō, meaning "I grow".
7h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

How a game-based approach to teaching helps improve learningResearchers from Keele University's Medical School have developed a game-based approach to teaching doctors in training, which helps to improve their learning about how drugs work.
7h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Global analysis of large carnivore habitatsAlthough humans have driven lions, tigers, wolves, bears and other large carnivores from much of their home territories across the planet, scientists have identified more than 280 areas where these animals could potentially be reintroduced to restore ecosystems on practically every continent.
7h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Gender differences in vocational interests decrease with age, study findsGender differences in vocational interests increase drastically during puberty but tend to decrease across the lifespan, a new study found.
7h
The Atlantic

The Zen Diaries of Garry Shandling Is a Eulogy Worth WatchingThere’s a moment during the second half of Judd Apatow’s documentary about Garry Shandling when the purpose of the movie becomes clear. Apatow has spent more than four hours chronicling the life and career of his mentor and friend, and after all this time piecing together home videos and personal photographs and testimonials and Shandling’s own diaries, you get a glimpse of what it must have been
7h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Researchers develop a method to examine millions of potential self-produced drug candidates in one goSearching for new drugs is like fishing in the dark: the prospect of catching something is very uncertain, and it requires patience, skill and – of course – money. ETH researchers led by Dario Neri have developed a new screening method that speeds up the search for drugs, making it cheaper and more efficient, as they reported in the journal Nature Chemistry.
8h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Study shows most American banks fail to offer safe, affordable checkingAcross the country, affordable checking is becoming a thing of the past. Bank of America recently ended its free online checking account offer, but "main street banks" and small institutions are taking similar measures. A report co-authored by University of Kansas researchers shows that a majority of American banks are failing to offer safe and affordable checking accounts, missing industry standa
8h
The Scientist RSS

Tadpoles Keep Eating Because They Dont Feel FullBaby frogs don't develop the neural circuitry responsible for feeding inhibition until they begin metamorphosing into adults.
8h
Live Science

See How a Single Cell Dies in Gory, Intricate DetailMillions of cell corpses are piling up inside you. Who cleans them up?
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Feed: All Latest

How Apple Lost Its Place in the ClassroomApple's new, cheaper iPad still can't compete with Chromebooks in the classroom.
8h
Feed: All Latest

This Startup Makes Augmented Reality Social—and UbiquitousUbiquity6 wants to be a platform on which others build AR experiences.
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Feed: All Latest

Facebook Will Make It Easier for You to Control Your Personal DataFacebook Data PrivacyThe changes put all the privacy settings in a single place, instead of being spread out across nearly 20 different screens.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Predicting costly outages with drone analyticsLance Li clicks through an endless, uniform sea of purple, pink, and yellow rectangles. He stops and zooms in on a narrow section that's glowing white.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Study finds sea turtles use flippers to manipulate foodSea turtles use their flippers to handle prey despite the limbs being evolutionarily designed for locomotion, a discovery by Monterey Bay Aquarium researchers published today in PeerJ.
8h
Live Science

'Demonic' Fish Glows in Eerie PhotoAn unsettling image of a very strange fish skeleton seems more suited to a conversation about demonology than one about marine biology.
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Live Science

Dear Alpaca Thieves, Please Return This Alpaca's Missing BrotherBambi the Kiwi alpaca is blind, and according to the Rodney Times "relies heavily on Charisma to help him find his way around his home.
8h
Live Science

Chinese Space Station May Crash Like NASA's SkylabThe uncontrolled fall to Earth of China's Tiangong-1 space lab may share some similarities with the end of the Skylab space station in 1979; some of Skylab's pieces rained down on rural Australia.
8h
Latest Headlines | Science News

Umbilical cord banking gets a lot of buzz. Why all the excitement?Here are the facts behind the promise of umbilical cord banking and cord blood transplants.
8h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Student uses big data to examine global digital gender gapWhile most young people use social media to be social, Princeton senior Masoomali Fatehkia is using it to advance social good.
8h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Characterization of a water world in a multi-exoplanetary systemA team of astronomers from 11 countries, led by researchers at the Instituto de Astrofísica e Ciências do Espaço (IA), were able to determine the precise mass of two small exoplanets orbiting the variable star HD 106315.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Four types of employees who are potential insider threatsAcademics have identified four types of employees who can become a threat to their companies – and explained the reasons why their workplace behaviour declines.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Cretaceous croc had steamy pastThe death, decay and burial of an ancient extinct crocodilian from outback Queensland has revealed more about Cretaceous Period landscapes in Australia.
8h
Scientific American Content: Global

Why You Can't Learn about Money behind a Pro-Science Political Group314 Action, raising millions of dollars for candidates, is not required to disclose donors but says most gifts are small -- Read more on ScientificAmerican.com
8h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

A runaway star in the Small Magellanic CloudAstronomers have discovered a rare "runaway" star that is speeding across its galaxy at a 300,000 miles per hour (at that speed it would take about half a minute to travel from Los Angeles to New York). The runaway star (designated J01020100-7122208) is located in the Small Magellanic Cloud, a close neighbor of the Milky Way Galaxy, and is believed to have once been a member of a binary star syste
8h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Near completion of work at the tomb of King TutankhamenThe Getty Conservation Institute (GCI) announced today that it has nearly completed its work at the Tomb of Tutankhamen in Egypt, one of the most famous cultural heritage sites in the world. The project—a multiyear collaboration between the GCI and Egypt's Ministry of Antiquities (formerly known as the Supreme Council of Antiquities) focused on conservation and the creation of a sustainable plan f
8h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

The difficulties of taking humans out of transportationA Purdue University professor says the idea of commuters working as their vehicle drives them to their jobs faces more hurdles than people realize.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Genes in songbirds hold clues about human speech disorders, biologists reportInsights into how songbirds learn to sing provide promising clues about human speech disorders and may lead to new ways of treating them, according to new research published in the journal eLife.
8h
Ingeniøren

Snapchat kopierer Facebook: Vil give tredjeparter adgang til brugernes dataSnapchat tester i øjeblikket en beta-version af en ny API, der kan give tredjeparter adgang til brugernes data.
9h
Dagens Medicin

Interessant afgørelseHøjesteretsdom er et et kæmpe vink til Styrelsen for Patientsikkerhed om at slappe linen, når det gælder individer og i stedet fortsætte de seneste tyve års drejning væk fra straf.
9h
Dagens Medicin

Svendborg-lægen frifundet i HøjesteretSvendborg-læge kan ikke holdes strafferetligt ansvarlig for et diabetes-dødsfald i 2013 på Svendborg Sygehus. Det står klart, efter Højesteret i en principiel domsafsigelse har frifundet lægen.
9h
Ingeniøren

Statsstøtte til biogas dyrere end al anden energistøtteBiogas sluger en fjerdedel af støtten til vedvarende energi, men leverer kun ti procent af den grønne energi. Dansk Folkeparti og de Radikale vil bremse støttefesten ved kommende energiforligs-forhandlinger
9h
The Atlantic

The Supreme Court's Choice on Partisan GerrymanderingDemocratic Republican MarylandMany students choose law school after getting their freshman math grades, and law-school curricula make little attempt to build numeracy among these refugees. Because complex issues inevitably involve statistical information, that gap in legal education can cause mischief, especially when it affects judges. For example, it may explain the Supreme Court’s rather puzzling revisit to the political g
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The Atlantic

The Weaponized CensusSo far, 2018 has been the time for passionate fights about strange things. Facebook quizzes, self-driving cars, expensive dinner tables, and porn stars have all become critical pieces of the political landscape. The weird has become the mundane, and even the most obscure and arcane pieces of political machinery have had their day as hot-button issues that could define the country’s future. Add th
9h
The Atlantic

The Very Male Trump AdministrationEarlier this month, a woman broke a glass ceiling: President Donald Trump announced that he would name Gina Haspel , a career intelligence officer, the first female director of the Central Intelligence Agency. Yet Haspel is something of a rarity, an Atlantic analysis of 2,475 Trump appointees shows. The White House has named twice as many men as women to administration positions. This gender skew
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The Atlantic

America Cannot Bear to Bring Back Indentured ServitudeIn 1624, Jane Dickenson petitioned the governor of Virginia for relief from bondage. Four years earlier, her husband had signed a contract of indenture to pay for his immigration from England; it obliged him to labor for a man named Nicholas Hide for a period of seven years. Before the indenture was up, however, Jane’s husband was killed in the Second Anglo-Powhatan War, and she was taken captive
9h
Science : NPR

Teaching And Learning At The Boundaries Of 2 CulturesWe all stand to lose from the gulf between the sciences and the humanities, and the classroom is the ideal place for conversations between these two cultures to unfold, says professor Marcelo Gleiser. (Image credit: Getty Images)
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Scientists elucidate the crystal structure of sodium borideAn international team of scientists jointly with Professor Artem Oganov of Skoltech and the Moscow Institute of Physics and Technology report the chemical composition, crystal structure and properties of Na2B30 ‒ a compound that remains stable at standard conditions and has long been the subject of heated debate. The results of the study were published in Physical Review B.
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New Scientist - News

How birds focus even with eyes on opposite sides of their headsBirds find it difficult to fix their gaze on an object, because their eyes don’t face forwards, but one species has found an ingenious solution
9h
BBC News - Science & Environment

Tech trials to find Antarctica's 'missing' iron meteoritesA Manchester-led team tests the detector system it will use in Antarctica to find hidden iron meteorites.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

A more sensitive device for characterizing DNA in blood circulationDeveloped and patented in 2012 and 2014 in the Laboratoire d'Analyse et d'Architecture des Systèmes (LAAS-CNRS) and implemented industrially by Picometrics-Technologies, BIABooster technology characterizes DNA with new precision and sensitivity. When used to analyze residual DNA circulating in the blood, it has identified promising signatures for monitoring patients with cancer. These signatures,
9h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Geologists report earlier evidence of impending mass extinction in the Permian, and present-day parallelsMass extinctions throughout the history of the Earth have been well documented. Scientists believe that such extinctions occurred during a short period of time in geological terms. In a new study, palaeobiologists at Friedrich-Alexander-Universität Erlangen-Nürnberg (FAU) and their research partners have now shown there were apparent signs of the largest mass extinction event in the Earth's histor
9h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Bioinformaticians studied the evolution of broken genes in a fruit flyPseudogenes lose their ability to encode proteins, which is unaffected by natural selection, as no mutations in such genes are harmful. A study conducted with the participation of the specialists from the Faculty of Bioengineering and Bioinformatics, MSU (Lomonosov Moscow State University) confirms this, but shows that natural selection still has a certain influence on some of such genes. An artic
9h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Femtosecond laser fabrication—realizing dynamics control of electronsFemtosecond lasers are capable of processing any solid material with high quality and high precision using their ultrafast and ultra-intense characteristics. With the continuous development of laser technology, ultrafast laser manufacturing could become one of the primary methods employed in high-end manufacturing in the future.
9h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Indian billionaire proposes funding Facebook rivalAn Indian billionaire who promised to help fund a rival to Facebook said Wednesday he had been "overwhelmed" with the response as the world grapples with concerns about data privacy.
9h
Ingeniøren

Uber skar voldsomt ned på lidarsensorer to år før dødeligt uheldUber gik fra syv lidarsensorer til én, da de i 2016 skiftede deres selvkørende bilflåde ud med nye biler fra Volvo. Dermed har Uber's nuværende generation af selvkørende biler en blind vinkel, der gør det sværere at få spotte fodgængere.
10h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Finding the Achilles heel of cancerA research team led by Monica Bettencourt Dias, from Instituto Gulbenkian de Ciencia, discovered important features of cancer cells that may help clinicians fighting cancer. The researchers observed that the number and size of tiny structures that exist inside cells, called centrioles, are increased in the most aggressive subtypes of cancer. This study will be published in Nature Communications on
10h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Heart disease, stroke less widespread among foreign-born vs. US-born adultsForeign-born adults living in the United States had a lower prevalence of coronary heart disease and stroke than US-born adults in nationally representative data spanning 2006-2014, according to new research in Journal of the American Heart Association, the Open Access Journal of the American Heart Association/American Stroke Association.
10h
Ingeniøren

Politiet samler indsatsen mod it-relateret kriminalitetEt nyt center for it-relateret økonomisk kriminalitet under Københavns Politi skal opklare bedrageri og svindel på nettet.
10h
Ingeniøren

Tummelumsk kinesisk rumstation rammer Jorden i påskenFor godt halvandet år siden erkendte Kina at have mistet kontrollen over Tiangong-1. Radarbilleder viser en næsten intakt nedlagt rumstation, der inden for få dage vil styrte ned.
10h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Heat wave drives massive carbon loss at World Heritage siteSeagrasses in Shark Bay, Australia released massive amounts of carbon dioxide after a devastating heat wave killed them, according to a new study.
11h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Quebec to tax some tech firmsQuebec will start applying a sales tax to some internet companies such as Netflix and AirBnb starting in 2019, the government of the French speaking province said Tuesday.
11h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

SoftBank, Saudi Arabia announce massive solar power projectSoftBank Group Corp. Chief Executive Masayoshi Son announced Wednesday a $200 billion solar power project in Saudi Arabia, which promises to be the largest of its kind.
11h
Science : NPR

No Fooling: Chinese Space Lab Might Plunge From Orbit On April 1China's Tiangong-1, launched in 2013, is expected to re-enter the Earth's atmosphere sometime between March 31 and April 2, according to the European Space Agency. (Image credit: VCG/VCG via Getty Images)
11h
Ingeniøren

Det skal være lettere at sikkerhedsgodkende samarbejdende robotterNyt europæisk samarbejde skal gøre samarbejdende robotter mere sikre og hur­tigere at få godkendt.
11h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

UK plans plastic bottle charge to tackle pollutionBritain on Wednesday announced plans for consumers to pay a deposit on plastic bottles as part of a broader push to tackle pollution.
12h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Slippery start for Venezuela's petro crypto coinThe government of crisis-torn Venezuela, struggling to overcome chronic liquidity shortages and burdened by US sanctions, launched the first government-backed cryptocurrency, the petro, earlier this year.
12h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Australian indigenous languages have common source: studyAll indigenous languages in Australia descend from a single common tongue, a study revealed Wednesday in findings that shed new light on the country's cultural history.
12h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Solar seeks its place under Spanish sunSun-drenched Spain should be a natural for solar energy, and it is here that the technology is making an effort to stand on its feet financially without subsidies.
12h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Japan embracing cryptocurrencies despite big theft casesFour years after popular Tokyo-based bitcoin exchange Mt. Gox was hacked and went bankrupt, the case still casts a shadow over the regulatory regime put in place to protect Japan's thriving cryptocurrency market.
12h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

BMW sued in US over diesel emissionsGerman luxury carmaker BMW has been sued in the United States over "defeat devices" installed in tens of thousands of vehicles in order to cheat diesel emissions tests, lawyers for the plaintiffs said Tuesday.
13h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Rogue waves hit Hawaii fishing vessel that sank, owner saysThe owner of a fishing vessel that sank off Hawaii over the weekend said Tuesday two massive rogue waves hit the boat, swamping it and forcing the crew to abandon ship.
13h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Ragweed casts shade on soy productionRagweed, its pollen potent to allergy sufferers, might be more than a source of sneezes. In the Midwest, the plant may pose a threat to soybean production.
13h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Norfolk's iconic swallowtail butterfly at risk from climate changeNorfolk's butterflies, bees, bugs, birds, trees and mammals are at major risk from climate change as temperatures rise—according to new research from the University of East Anglia.
13h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Decade of fossil collecting gives new perspective on Triassic period, emergence of dinosaursAfter a great mass extinction shook the world about 252 million years ago, animal life outside of the ocean began to take hold. The earliest mammals entered the scene, and reptiles—including early dinosaurs—lived on Pangea, the name given to the giant landmass in which all of the world's continents were joined as one.
13h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

'Fog harp' increases collection capacity for clean waterFog harvesting may look like whimsical work.
13h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Want people to fund your Kickstarter project? Sell them on your reputation firstWhen trying to entice people to invest in your product on a crowdfunding website, potential funders are more concerned about your ethical characteristics than your actual ability to make and deliver the product, according to new research from Binghamton University, State University of New York.
13h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Volcanic growth for bitcoin in chilly IcelandAt a secret location in the midst of one of Iceland's breathtaking lava fields stands a warehouse whose non-descript siding belies the fact it is ground zero in a digital gold rush for cryptocurrencies that is burning through more electricity than Icelanders' homes.
13h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Study: Parental conflict can do lasting damage to kidsEven relatively low-level adversity like parental conflict can do lasting damage to children, a new study finds. Shy children are especially vulnerable.
15h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Social awareness increases prove brain changing in adults with autismResearchers at the Center for BrainHealth at The University of Texas at Dallas, in collaboration with co-leading authors at George Washington University and Yale, have demonstrated in a pilot study that a clinician-driven virtual learning platform, tailored to young adults on the autism spectrum, shows improved social competency. Findings published in Autism Research reveal that increases in socio
15h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Want people to fund your Kickstarter project? Sell them on your reputation firstWhen trying to entice people to invest in your product on a crowdfunding website, potential funders are more concerned about your ethical characteristics than your actual ability to make and deliver the product, according to new research from Binghamton University, State University of New York.
15h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Mandatory nutrition policies may impact sugar consumptionMandatory nutrition policies could be a valuable tool in helping high school students to lower their sugar intake, a University of Waterloo study has found.
15h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Ragweed casts shade on soy productionRagweed, its pollen potent to allergy sufferers, might be more than a source of sneezes. In the Midwest, the plant may pose a threat to soybean production. Scientists have found that ragweed can drastically reduce soybean yield.
15h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Researchers reveal how brain circuits are affected by infections in mothers and newbornsMcLean Hospital neuroscientists have found that immune system activation during pregnancy and right at birth can cause alterations in the brain's neural circuits during young adulthood that are consistent with behavioral symptoms common in autism spectrum disorder (ASD) and other developmental conditions.
15h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Decade of fossil collecting gives new perspective on Triassic period, emergence of dinosaursA project spanning countries, years and institutions has attempted to reconstruct what the southern end of the world looked like during the Triassic period, 252 to 199 million years ago.
15h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News

'Fog harp' increases collection capacity for clean waterThe study demonstrates how a vertical array of parallel wires may change the forecast for fog harvesters. In a design the researchers have dubbed the 'fog harp,' these vertical wires shed tiny water droplets faster and more efficiently than the traditional mesh netting used in fog nets today.
15h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Liver cancer caused by alcohol consumption may have worse prognosis than other formsA new study indicates that patients with alcohol-related liver cancer often do not live as long as patients with liver cancer that is not associated with alcohol consumption, mainly due to diagnoses at later stages. Published early online in CANCER, a peer-reviewed journal of the American Cancer Society, the findings indicate that efforts should be made to improve both screening for early signs of
15h
Ingeniøren

Detail-gigant: Lad være med at antage, at du kan stole på noget som helst dataDen hollandske detailhandel-kæmpe Albert Heijn har 1.000 butikker i Holland, og ingen af dem har noget lager. Det kræver præcise data.
15h
Ingeniøren

Atomskrot: Midlertidigt lager kan holde 100 årFolketingets partier nu er enige om et 50-årslager for radioaktivt affald. Kravene til det er imidlertid de samme, som til et lager, der kan holde i 100 år. Politikernes plan er fortsat at grave affaldet ned efter 2073.
16h
Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

Prosthetic memory system successful in humansScientists have demonstrated the successful implementation of a prosthetic system that uses a person's own memory patterns to facilitate the brain's ability to encode and recall memory.
17h
Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

Narcissists don't hunt for partners who are already taken -- but it doesn't stop themNarcissists aren't necessarily on the hunt for partners who are already in a relationship - but that doesn't appear to stand in their way, either, new research suggests.
17h
The Scientist RSS

Former Medical Dean at Michigan State in Jail for Porn, Sexual AssaultFollowing the conviction of MSU's Larry Nassar for sexual abuse, his former boss, William Strampel, is charged with misconduct and possessing videos of female students.
17h
cognitive science

Neural Networks Learn by Recyclingsubmitted by /u/NaiveSkeptic [link] [comments]
17h
New on MIT Technology Review

For better AI, diversify the people building itSpeakers at EmTech Digital offered up tangible solutions to the problem of bias in AI.
18h
New on MIT Technology Review

AI is rapidly changing the types and location of the best-paying jobsBerkeley’s Laura Tyson thinks we shouldn’t worry about technological unemployment, but should fear inequality.
18h
Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

Facial expressions as tools for social influenceA psychology professor reveals facial expressions as tools for social influence.
18h
Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

The clouds of spaghetti that keep DNA data safeCells can avoid 'data breaches' when letting signaling proteins into their nuclei thanks to a quirky biophysical mechanism involving a blur of spaghetti-like proteins, researchers have shown.
18h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Moving light-dark exposure could reduce disruption faced by night shift workersNew research published in The Journal of Physiology shows that our brain clock can be shifted by light exposure, potentially to align it with night shift patterns. It highlights that a 'one size fits all' approach to managing sleep disruption in shift workers may not be appropriate. A personalized approach, with light-dark exposure scheduled and taking into account whether someone is a 'morning' o
19h
BBC News - Science & Environment

Drinks bottles and can deposit return scheme proposedA money-back scheme for returning glass, plastic bottles and cans in England is to be introduced.
19h
The Atlantic

Mitt Romney Is Not Joining the ResistanceAt first, it looked like little more than a classic Mitt Romney flip-flop. It began Monday in Provo, Utah, where Romney—the former Republican presidential nominee, current Senate candidate, and noted Donald Trump antagonist—sought to make the case in a Q&A with voters that he was more conservative than the president on a range of issues. Utah’s Daily Herald reported: Romney went so far as to say
20h
Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

New findings on antimicrobial drug synergyNew data could change how future antimicrobial drug combinations are discovered and developed.
20h
Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

The future of photonics using quantum dotsFiber-optic cables package everything from financial data to cat videos into light, but when the signal arrives at your local data center, it runs into a silicon bottleneck. Instead of light, computers run on electrons moving through silicon-based chips, which are less efficient than photonics. To break through, scientists have been developing lasers that work on silicon. Researchers now write tha
20h
Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

Putting quantum scientists in the driver's seatAn interdisciplinary, interdepartmental group of scientists conducted fundamental physics studies at the nanoscale to support development of experimental platforms that will control dissipation in quantum systems and materials.
20h
Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

What the first American astronauts taught us about living in spaceProject Mercury proved that humans could live and work in space, paving the way for all future human exploration.
20h
New on MIT Technology Review

Fake news 2.0: personalized, optimized, and even harder to stopArtificial intelligence will automate and optimize fake news, warns a technology supplier to the CIA.
20h
Futurity.org

Should states have their own foreign policy?A new paper raises crucial legal and political questions about states having their own foreign policy and suggests that, in key ways, California already does. “How will the federal government respond if there are multiple voices speaking for the United States in the international arena?” California—the country’s most populous state and the world’s sixth largest economy—is challenging the legal li
20h
Futurity.org

Living underwater comes with size limitsWhile whales or large elephant seals might make you think animals that live in the ocean are unlimited in size, their growth is actually more constrained than those on land, research indicates. “It’s not that water allows you to be a big mammal, it’s that you have to be a big mammal in water—you don’t have any other options.” The finding is in contrast to previous theories suggesting that pressur
20h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Norfolk's iconic swallowtail butterfly at risk from climate changeNew research reveals that Norfolk's butterflies, bees, bugs, birds, trees and mammals are at major risk from climate change as temperatures rise. Researchers carried out the first in-depth audit of its kind for a region in the UK to see how biodiversity might be impacted in Norfolk as the world warms. The study finds that the region's Swallowtail Butterfly, which can't be found anywhere else in th
20h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Prosthetic memory system successful in humans, study findsScientists at Wake Forest Baptist Medical Center and the University of Southern California have demonstrated the successful implementation of a prosthetic system that uses a person's own memory patterns to facilitate the brain's ability to encode and recall memory.
20h
Futurity.org

Cellulose know-how could lead to better biofuelResearchers have identified the major steps in how plants create cellulose, and the tools their cells use to create it, including the proteins that transport critical components to the location where it’s made. “[Cellulose] makes up about 95 percent of paper and 90 percent of cotton, and its derivatives are even in the emulsifiers in ice cream…” A comprehensive look at how plants build cellulose,
20h
Futurity.org

‘Micro magnets’ method detects pesticides in veggiesFood scientists have created a quick and highly sensitive screening technique that can detect tiny amounts of a common type of synthetic pesticide in vegetables. The strategy uses magnetic nanoparticles to simplify extraction of the pesticide, pyrethorid, reducing the screening process to under two hours. These kinds of pesticides are widely used in vegetable farming and while they improve crop y
20h
Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

Researchers charge ahead to develop better batteriesThey die at the most inconvenient times. Cellphones go dark during important conversations because a battery hasn't been recharged. Or the automotive industry revs up with excitement for a new battery-powered vehicle, but it needs frequent recharging. Researchers have developed a high-powered, environmentally safe lithium-sulfur substitute that could drastically lengthen battery life.
20h
Futurity.org

Listen: U.S. companies have outsized pull at the World BankNew research focuses on the influence multinational corporations have over the World Bank. The World Bank, established at the Bretton Woods Conference in 1944, was originally founded to rebuild Western Europe after the devastation of the Second World War. Later in the 1970s, it shifted its focus to alleviating poverty worldwide.. As he explains in a recent University of Rochester Quadcast, Randy
20h
Futurity.org

How infighting chimps led to a 4-year ‘civil war’Power. Ambition. Jealousy. The same things that fuel deadly clashes in humans can also tear apart chimpanzees, our closest animal relatives, according to a new study. In the early 1970s, primatologist Jane Goodall and colleagues studying chimpanzees in Gombe National Park, Tanzania, watched as a once-unified chimp community disintegrated into two rival factions. What followed was a period of kill
20h
Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

Exploring the thermoelectric properties of tin selenide nanostructuresSingle crystal tin selenide is a semiconductor and an ideal thermoelectric material; it can directly convert waste heat to electrical energy or be used for cooling. When a group of researchers saw the graphene-like layered crystal structure of SnSe, they had one of those magical 'aha!' moments.
20h
Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

Molecular prison forces diatomic inmates to cell floorA team of scientists now report unexpected quantum behavior of hydrogen molecules trapped within tiny cages made of organic molecules, demonstrating that the structure of the cage influences the behavior of the molecule imprisoned inside it.
20h
Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

Untangling the role of climate on sediment and reef evolution over millennial timescalesClimatic variability like precipitation changes or increase in extreme events such as storms and tropical cyclones is known to significantly modify the Earth's surface. Yet, our understanding of how sediment dynamics and reef evolution might respond to these changes is still limited. In a recent study, a team of researchers has designed a new model that simulates sediment transport from mountains
20h
Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

CERN experiment sees hints of rare kaon decayWhat if the odds of an event occurring were about one in 10 billion? This is the case for the decay of a positively charged particle known as a kaon into another positively charged particle called a pion and a neutrino-antineutrino pair. Yet, such a rare event, which has never been observed with certainty, is something that particle physicists really want to get their hands on.
20h
Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

New 'nanotweezers' open door to innovations in medicine, mobile techIt's difficult to conceptualize a world where humans could casually manipulate nanoscale objects at will or even control their own biological matter at a cellular level with light. But that is precisely what mechanical engineers are working toward with their 'nanotweezers' -- a new tool for handling nanoparticles using light that could create opportunities for innovations in nanotechnology and ind
20h
Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

Childhood friendships may have some health benefits in adulthoodTime spent with friends in childhood is associated with physical health in adulthood, according to data from a multi-decade study of men. The findings show that boys who spent more time with friends as children tended to have lower blood pressure and lower BMI as men in their early 30s.
20h
Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

Honeybees may unlock the secrets of how the human brain worksAcademics have discovered honeybee colonies adhere to the same laws as the brain when making collective decisions.
20h
The Atlantic

The Atlantic Daily: Training for EnlightenmentWhat We’re Following Russian Repercussions: The Trump administration expelled 60 Russian diplomats on Monday in response to the poisoning of a Russian former spy and his daughter on British soil, which many in the international community have accused Russia of perpetrating. (The Kremlin has denied the country’s involvement.) The expulsion, which marks a turning point in President Trump’s stance o
21h
Live Science

Here's What Growing Inside Your Rubber DuckyThis will take the fun out of bathtime: Rubber ducky toys are teeming with bacteria and fungi, a new study finds.
21h
Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

Mass extinction with prior warningMass extinctions throughout the history of the Earth have been well documented. Scientists believe that they occurred during a short period of time in geological terms. In a new study, paleobiologists have now shown that signs that the largest mass extinction event in the Earth's history was approaching became apparent much earlier than previously believed, and point out that the same indicators c
21h
Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

Newfound 'organ' had been missed by standard method for visualizing anatomyResearchers have identified a previously unknown feature of human anatomy with implications for the function of all organs, most tissues and the mechanisms of most major diseases.
21h
Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

Investigators unravel biological roots of pulmonary hypertensionWorking with cells that line the innermost layer of the blood vessels, investigators say they have made a leap forward in understanding the underlying biology behind pulmonary hypertension, a dangerous type of high blood pressure in lungs that ultimately leads to right heart failure and death.
21h
Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

Preclinical testing suggests some antioxidants may be effective in treating mitochondrial diseaseA systematic study of seven antioxidants commonly taken by children and adults affected with mitochondrial disease provides intriguing clues that at least two compounds should be further evaluated in clinical trials. N-acetylcysteine (NAC) and vitamin E showed compelling results in mitochondrial disease animal models. There are currently no proven effective treatments.
21h

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