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Newfound 'organ' had been missed by standard method for visualizing anatomyResearchers have identified a previously unknown feature of human anatomy with implications for the function of all organs, most tissues and the mechanisms of most major diseases.
13h
New Scientist - News

Newly-discovered human organ may help explain how cancer spreadsA newly discovered network of fluid-filled channels in the human body may be a previously-unknown organ, and it seems to help move cancer cells around the body
11h
Ingeniøren

Minister vil droppe fjernvarmens tilslutningspligtForbrugernes frie valg er vigtigere end målrettet grøn omstilling, lyder forklaringen fra ministeren.
19h
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The Atlantic

The Atlantic Daily: Training for EnlightenmentWhat We’re Following Russian Repercussions: The Trump administration expelled 60 Russian diplomats on Monday in response to the poisoning of a Russian former spy and his daughter on British soil, which many in the international community have accused Russia of perpetrating. (The Kremlin has denied the country’s involvement.) The expulsion, which marks a turning point in President Trump’s stance o
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Live Science

Here's What Growing Inside Your Rubber DuckyThis will take the fun out of bathtime: Rubber ducky toys are teeming with bacteria and fungi, a new study finds.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

Mass extinction with prior warningMass extinctions throughout the history of the Earth have been well documented. Scientists believe that they occurred during a short period of time in geological terms. In a new study, paleobiologists have now shown that signs that the largest mass extinction event in the Earth's history was approaching became apparent much earlier than previously believed, and point out that the same indicators c
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

Newfound 'organ' had been missed by standard method for visualizing anatomyResearchers have identified a previously unknown feature of human anatomy with implications for the function of all organs, most tissues and the mechanisms of most major diseases.
now
Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

Investigators unravel biological roots of pulmonary hypertensionWorking with cells that line the innermost layer of the blood vessels, investigators say they have made a leap forward in understanding the underlying biology behind pulmonary hypertension, a dangerous type of high blood pressure in lungs that ultimately leads to right heart failure and death.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

Preclinical testing suggests some antioxidants may be effective in treating mitochondrial diseaseA systematic study of seven antioxidants commonly taken by children and adults affected with mitochondrial disease provides intriguing clues that at least two compounds should be further evaluated in clinical trials. N-acetylcysteine (NAC) and vitamin E showed compelling results in mitochondrial disease animal models. There are currently no proven effective treatments.
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Latest Headlines | Science News

Parents’ presence promotes a child’s pluckParents’ presence or absence during a learning exercise determines whether their child is fearful later, or willing to explore.
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Live Science

3 Boys Find Mastodon Jawbone in MississippiThree boys in Bovina, Mississippi, are having a very cool spring break, after finding a mastodon jawbone in some recently plowed dirt.
12min
Live Science

These Scientists Have a Wild Plan to Throw Salt into the Atmosphere. Here's Why.Sprinkling large amounts of salt into the atmosphere could stave off climate change, a group of researchers has proposed.
17min
Popular Science

NASA’s most anticipated new telescope just got delayed againNASA James WebbSpace The James Webb Space Telescope has an ever-expanding timeline—and projected cost. NASA just pushed back the launch of the costly and ambitious James Webb Space Telescope. Again. The launch is now pencilled in for sometime around May 2020—delayed by…
17min
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Waymo Expands Its Robo-Fleet with Electric Jaguar SUVsWaymo Jaguar I-PaceThe company will buy 20,000 electric I-Paces and use them to create a massive platoon of self-driving ridesharing cars.
24min
Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

Detection of transcranial direct current stimulation deep in the living human brainTranscranial direct current stimulation (tDCS) produces electric fields (EFs) at subcortical levels of the human brain, report investigators . Data demonstrate that detected voltage changed proportionally with the amount of current applied and varied by pad placement. This clinical evidence reveals that scalp-applied tDCS can indeed generate EFs deep inside the living human brain that are potentia
26min
Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

Vagus nerve stimulation boosts post-stroke motor skill recoveryResearchers have demonstrated a method to accelerate motor skill recovery after a stroke by helping the brain reorganize itself more quickly. In a preclinical study, the scientists paired vagus nerve stimulation with a physical therapy task aimed at improving the function of an upper limb in rodents. The results showed a doubled long-term recovery rate relative to current therapy methods.
26min
Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

New device uses biochemistry techniques to detect rare radioactive decaysResearchers are taking advantage of a biochemistry technique that uses fluorescence to detect ions to identify the product of a radioactive decay called neutrinoless double-beta decay that would demonstrate that the neutrino is its own antiparticle.
26min
Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

Mental health issues linked to risky driving in newly licensed teensMental health symptoms related to attention deficit-hyperactivity disorder (ADHD) and conduct disorder are associated with increased errors in a driving simulator and self-reported risky driving behaviors in adolescents.
26min
Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

How submarine groundwater affects coral reef growthAlthough submarine groundwater is natural, it can act as a conduit for highly polluted water to shorelines. Ecologists shed light on the ways SGD affects coral reef growth.
26min
NYT > Science

How to Spot a Nuclear Bomb Program? Look for Ghostly ParticlesDown a mine shaft in England, researchers plan to test a new method for spotting antineutrinos, which could be a sign of nuclear weapon development.
36min
NYT > Science

James F. Holland, Trailblazing Cancer Researcher, Dies at 92Dr. Holland was called a founding father of chemotherapy, collaborating on drug combinations to contain childhood leukemia and other tumors.
36min
Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

How do snakes eat live crabs? By being finicky dinersBiologists found that three species of Asian water snake use different strategies to prey on similar food resources.
40min
Popular Science

Huawei's P20 Pro smartphone has three rear-facing cameras—here's what each one doesHuawei P20 CameraGadgets It sounds like a gimmick, but each one actually plays a specific role Three cameras team up for Huawei's high-end smartphone camera.
46min
Feed: All Latest

Oracle Wins Latest Round vs. Google in Java Copyright CaseAn appeals court rules that Google violated Oracle's copyright when it built a version of Java for the Android operating system, in the latest twist in an 8-year saga.
54min
The Atlantic

The Atlantic Politics & Policy Daily: Walled InToday in 5 Lines Louisiana authorities said no charges will be filed against two Baton Rouge officers in the death of Alton Sterling, an unarmed black man who was fatally shot in 2016. The Washington Post reports that President Trump is privately pushing for the U.S. military to fund the construction of his proposed border wall. Former Michigan State University Dean William Strampel, who supervis
54min
New on MIT Technology Review

Microsoft’s neo-Nazi sexbot was a great lesson for makers of AI assistantsYandex’s head of machine intelligence says Microsoft’s Tay showed how important it is to fix AI problems fast.
57min
New on MIT Technology Review

Google x-ray project shows AI won’t replace doctors any time soonResearch from Google Cloud finds tht applying AI to medicine is tricky.
1h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Canada to miss 2020 climate target: auditCanada will likely miss a 2020 interim carbon emissions reduction target and will need to take strong measures if it further hopes to meet its Paris agreement commitment, said an audit released Tuesday.
1h
New on MIT Technology Review

Up to 40% of DNA results from consumer genetic tests might be bogus
1h
NYT > Science

NASA’s Webb Telescope Faces More SetbacksNASA James WebbThe space agency announced on Tuesday that its successor to the Hubble telescope has hit a series of testing snags, pushing back a planned launch next year.
1h
New Scientist - News

Gooey nitrogen ice may make Pluto’s crater-free heart look youngThe surface of Sputnik Planitia, part of a heart-shaped plain on Pluto, has no craters at all. They may have been filled in by soft, flowing nitrogen ice
1h
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YouTube and Pinterest Influencers Almost Never Disclose Marketing RelationshipsNew research shows how infrequently bloggers label affiliate marketing campaigns according to FTC guidelines.
1h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

New research shows how submarine groundwater affects coral reef growthGroundwater that seeps into the coastal zone beneath the ocean's surface—termed submarine groundwater discharge (SGD)—is an important source of fresh water and nutrients to nearshore coral reefs throughout the globe. Although submarine groundwater is natural, it can act as a conduit for highly polluted water to shorelines. A recently published study, led by researchers at the University of Hawai'i
1h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Uber gives up autonomous vehicle testing rights in Calif.Uber will not renew its permit to test autonomous vehicles on California public roads when it expires Saturday. And the company will have some explaining to do if it wants to get a new permit.
1h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Facebook sued by housing advocates alleging discriminationFair housing advocates sued Facebook Tuesday, saying it lets landlords and real estate brokers target advertising to discriminate against families with children, women and those with disabilities.
1h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Watchdog: FBI could have tried harder to hack iPhoneFBI officials could have tried harder to unlock an iPhone as part of a terrorism investigation before launching an extraordinary court fight with Apple Inc. in an effort to force it to break open the device, the Justice Department's watchdog said Tuesday.
1h
New on MIT Technology Review

Microsoft’s neo-Nazi sexbot was a great lesson for makers of AI assistantsYandex’s head of machine intelligence says Microsoft’s Tay showed how important it is to fix AI problems fast.
1h
New on MIT Technology Review

This security firm found rogue crypto mining infecting 1,000 customersDarktrace’s AI tools found one crypto side business operating under the floorboards of a bank’s data center.
1h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Bats give French winegrowers a helping hand in moth warHungry moths are the bane of French wine growers' lives due to their ferocious ability to feast on vines, but producers have discovered an unexpected ally in their fight against the insects: bats.
1h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

US investigating fatal Tesla crash in CaliforniaFederal investigators said Tuesday they were examining a fatal crash last week involving a Tesla electric automobile in California.
1h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Oracle's big-money case against Google gets new lifeOracle Google JavaAn appeals court on Tuesday gave Oracle another shot at wringing billions of dollars from Google in a keenly watched legal battle over the use of freely available Java software code.
1h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Patients more likely to accept robotic dentistry for non-invasive proceduresIn an online survey of 502 individuals (260 female), participants were 'significantly less willing to undergo more invasive procedures, such as gum surgery and a root canal, and significantly more willing to undergo procedures such as tooth cleaning or whitening performed by a robot,' Embry-Riddle Aeronautical University researchers said.
1h
The Atlantic

The Problems at Michigan State Went Far Beyond Larry NassarWilliam Strampel L. NassarA former Michigan State University dean—and the former supervisor to the serial sexual abuser Larry Nassar—is now facing his own set of sexual-harassment accusations. William Strampel, who served as dean of the university’s College of Osteopathic Medicine until December 2017, allegedly sexually harassed four MSU students and stored pornography on his university-issued computer, according to a cou
1h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Satellite finds southerly wind shear affecting Tropical Depression JelawatSatellite imagery showed that Tropical Depression Jelawat was still dealing with southerly vertical wind shear that was pushing the bulk of its clouds north of its center.
1h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

New device uses biochemistry techniques to detect rare radioactive decaysUTA researchers are leading an international team developing a new device that could enable physicists to take the next step toward a greater understanding of the neutrino, a subatomic particle that may offer an answer to the lingering mystery of the universe's matter-antimatter imbalance.
1h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Study uncovers new findings on antimicrobial drug synergyNew data from a study led by researchers from the University of Minnesota Medical School could change how future antimicrobial drug combinations are discovered and developed.
2h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

What the first American astronauts taught us about living in spaceNASA's Project Mercury was the United States' first human-in-space program. Between 1961 and 1963, six astronauts carried out successful one-person spaceflights that offered physicians and scientists the first opportunity to observe the effects of living in space on the human body.
2h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

New scheduling model puts airlines on equal plane while easing congestionAir traffic congestion that causes frustrating delays and cancellations can be reduced through flight schedules that don't systematically favor certain airlines over others, according to a new study from Dartmouth College and Carnegie Mellon University.
2h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

New technique sheds light on body language in job interviews, sales calls, team projectsA joint research team from the University of Cambridge and Dartmouth College has developed a system for using infrared light tags to monitor face-to-face interactions. The technique could lead to a more precise understanding of how individuals interact in social settings and can increase the effectiveness of communications coaching.
2h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Are we quantum computers? International collaboration will investigate the brain's potential for quantum computationMuch has been made of quantum computing processes using ultracold atoms and ions, superconducting junctions and defects in diamonds, but could we be performing them in our own brains?
2h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News

The connection between diet, obesity, and cancer: Nutrition experts explore the evidenceAbout one third of cancer cases are estimated to be linked to dietary and other modifiable risk factors, especially for obesity-related cancers such as breast, colorectal, ovarian, endometrial, kidney, gallbladder, esophageal, and pancreatic cancers. In this special theme issue of the Journal of the Academy of Nutrition and Dietetics, food and nutrition practitioners and other health professionals
2h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News

New research shows how submarine groundwater affects coral reef growthAlthough submarine groundwater is natural, it can act as a conduit for highly polluted water to shorelines. A recently published study, led by researchers at the University of Hawai'i at Mānoa's School of Ocean and Earth Science and Technology, sheds light on the ways SGD affects coral reef growth.
2h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Mental health issues linked to risky driving in newly licensed teensMental health symptoms related to attention deficit-hyperactivity disorder (ADHD) and conduct disorder are associated with increased errors in a driving simulator and self-reported risky driving behaviors in adolescents, according to study in Nursing Research, published by Wolters Kluwer.
2h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Putting quantum scientists in the driver's seatScientists at the Department of Energy's Oak Ridge National Laboratory are conducting fundamental physics research that will lead to more control over mercurial quantum systems and materials. Their studies will enable advancements in quantum computing, sensing, simulation, and materials development.
2h
Science : NPR

Why Scientists Aren't Fans Of Creating On-Demand Meteor ShowersA Japanese company is proposing a venture to create on-demand meteor showers using small spheres dropped from a satellite. Scientists aren't really keen to the idea.
2h
Science : NPR

An Engineer's Quest To Save Stephen Hawking's VoiceWhen Stephen Hawking's computer voice was in danger of disappearing, his team called Eric Dorsey for help. The Palo Alto-based engineer worked for the company that helped create Hawking's CallText 5010 speech system.
2h
Live Science

Iron Age People in Scotland Really Knew How to Party, Ancient Trash Heap RevealsAbout 1,700 years ago, Iron Age cooks served a massive, meaty feast along the Scottish coast of the North Sea, offering guests a spectacular view as they chowed down on sheep, pig and otter, and even received party favors — metal rings and brooches.
2h
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Arizona’s Governor Suspends Uber’s Self-Driving Cars After Fatal CrashUber Arizona CarsAs self-driving tech changes life on the street, expect lots of cities and states to write their own rules. They’ve done it before.
2h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

NASA finds Tropical Cyclone Iris shearedTropical Cyclone Iris is being battered by wind shear so strong that it doesn't even look like a circular storm.
2h
Big Think

Facebook is killing democracy with its personality profiling dataWhy you should use Facebook with a healthy dose of skepticism. Read More
2h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News

New device uses biochemistry techniques to detect rare radioactive decaysUTA researchers are now taking advantage of a biochemistry technique that uses fluorescence to detect ions to identify the product of a radioactive decay called neutrinoless double-beta decay that would demonstrate that the neutrino is its own antiparticle.
2h
TED Talks Daily (SD video)

How fungi recognize (and infect) plants | Mennat El GhalidEach year, the world loses enough food to feed half a billion people to fungi, the most destructive pathogens of plants. Mycologist and TED fellow Mennat El Ghalid explains how a breakthrough in our understanding of the molecular signals fungi use to attack plants could disrupt this interaction -- and save our crops.
2h
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'Roseanne'’s Darlene Conner and the Queer Characters Who Hide in Plain SightSara Gilbert's Darlene wasn't gay, but she became an icon to the LGBTQ community.
2h
The Scientist RSS

Endangered Right Whales Have No New Babies This Breeding SeasonTrained spotters haven't seen any newborns, suggesting trouble for the animal's overall survival.
2h
Popular Science

Rats can’t puke, which is bad news for them and great news for usAnimals We could use their unique talents to develop better chemo drugs. Consider, if you will, a repulsive case of food poisoning. You may try to hold it in, but at some point you’re gonna spew. But not every species is that lucky—and one…
2h
Scientific American Content: Global

Meet Your Interstitium, A Newfound "Organ"These fluid-filled spaces were found in the body’s connective tissue -- Read more on ScientificAmerican.com
2h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Vagus nerve stimulation boosts post-stroke motor skill recoveryResearchers at The University of Texas at Dallas have demonstrated a method to accelerate motor skill recovery after a stroke by helping the brain reorganize itself more quickly. In a preclinical study, the scientists paired vagus nerve stimulation with a physical therapy task aimed at improving the function of an upper limb in rodents. The results showed a doubled long-term recovery rate relative
2h
NeuWrite West

Gender differences in recommendation letters for postdoctoral fellowships in geoscienceThis article is part of an ongoing blog series, titled Inequality in STEM: a Dive Into the Data . In this series, we cover recent research exploring and quantifying inequality in STEM. We'll discuss different aspects of inequality, including barriers to career advancement and a chilly social climate, as well as the efficacy of various interventions to combat bias. Our goal with these pieces is to
2h
NYT > Science

Why the Snow in Parts of Europe Was OrangeA mixture of weather phenomena picked up North African dust and carried it far from its source.
2h
The Atlantic

Why Is NASA's Space Telescope Running a Year Behind?For the world’s most powerful space telescope, the finish line keeps getting further and further away. The launch of the James Webb Space Telescope, the successor to the famed Hubble, has been pushed back about a year, from spring 2019 to May 2020, NASA officials said Tuesday. The delay is NASA ’s second in six months for the Webb, an ambitious, $8.8 billion project two decades in the making. And
2h
Live Science

Mysterious Geoglyphs Reveal Amazon Was Densely Populated Before ColumbusEarthworks that span a huge swath of the Amazon River basin reveal some parts of the region were once densely populated.
2h
New on MIT Technology Review

The startup diversifying the AI workforce beyond just “techies”At EmTech Digital, Rachel Thomas of Fast.ai showed how her online-education startup can bring more viewpoints into the world of AI.
2h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News

UMN Medical School study uncovers new findings on antimicrobial drug synergyNew data from a study led by researchers from the University of Minnesota Medical School could change how future antimicrobial drug combinations are discovered and developed.
3h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News

UCLA-designed program helps former HIV-positive inmates maintain health after release from jailResearchers have developed an experimental program to help HIV-positive people maintain their health care regimens after their release from jail. They found that the program was more effective in helping inmates stay on their medications, and in keeping the virus controlled, than the approach that is most commonly used today for former inmates.
3h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Detection of transcranial direct current stimulation deep in the living human brainTranscranial direct current stimulation (tDCS) produces electric fields (EFs) at subcortical levels of the human brain, report investigators at the Medical University of South Carolina in the March 2018 issue of Brain Stimulation. Data demonstrate that detected voltage changed proportionally with the amount of current applied and varied by pad placement. This clinical evidence reveals that scalp-a
3h
New on MIT Technology Review

Alphabet’s moonshot chief: Regulating driverless cars demands testing the “smarts” of the systemsAstro Teller says Waymo stress-tests its vehicles under “pathological situations,” some involving people in Elmo outfits.
3h
Popular Science

Apple's new iPad for students adds Pencil compatibility, more education appsiPad Apple Pencil EducationGadgets Not much in the way of new hardware at Apple's education event. Right now, Google and its army of Chromebooks is winning the hardware game in U.S. schools. Its market share hovers around 60 percent, thanks in large part to its…
3h
Big Think

Elon Musk’s Boring Company wants to sell you its excavated rock in ‘LEGO-like’ kitsWhat’s the Boring Company going to do with all the rock it excavates while digging tunnels? Elon Musk wants to sell it to you in “LEGO-like” kits. Read More
3h
The Scientist RSS

Beckman Coulter: CAR-T Cells 101Immunotherapy's key effector cells
3h
The Scientist RSS

MilliporeSigma: Ultrafiltration RevealedIt's about more than just the membrane!
3h
Live Science

What Makes an E-Cig Taste Good May Also Make It ToxicWith names like "Banana Pudding," "Blueberry Cinnamon-Streusel Muffin" and "Butter Crunch," the flavoring ingredients in electronic cigarettes sound not only harmless but immensely appealing.
3h
Live Science

New Images Spot Elusive 'Snacking' Brain CellsNew images show the brain's "helper cells" nibbling on synapses, the connections between neurons.
3h
Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

BIABooster: A more sensitive device for characterizing DNA in blood circulationBIABooster technology can characterize DNA with new precision and sensitivity. When used to analyze residual DNA circulating in the blood, it has identified promising signatures for monitoring patients with cancer.
3h
Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

Research hints at double the driving range for electric vehiclesWhen it comes to the special sauce of batteries, researchers have discovered it's all about the salt concentration. By getting the right amount of salt, right where they want it, they've demonstrated a small lithium-metal battery can recharge about seven times more than batteries with conventional electrolytes.
3h
Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

3-DIY: Printing your own bioprinterResearchers have developed a low-cost 3-D bioprinter by modifying a standard desktop 3-D printer, and they have released the breakthrough designs as open source so that anyone can build their own system.
3h
Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

Northerners have always been hardy!Pioneering early people who lived at the end of the last ice age actually carried on with life as usual despite plummeting temperatures, a study at a world-famous archaeological site in North Yorkshire suggests.
3h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News

How do snakes eat live crabs? By being finicky dinersUniversity of Cincinnati biologist Bruce Jayne found that three species of Asian water snake use different strategies to prey on similar food resources.
3h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Researchers charge ahead to develop better batteriesThey die at the most inconvenient times. Cellphones go dark during important conversations because a battery hasn't been recharged. Or the automotive industry revs up with excitement for a new battery-powered vehicle, but it needs frequent recharging. Researchers at The University of Texas at Dallas have developed a high-powered, environmentally safe lithium-sulfur substitute that could drasticall
3h
The Atlantic

The Strange Beauty of SandstormsPowerful winds recently drove sand from the Sahara Desert across the Mediterranean Sea into southern Europe and as far as the ski slopes in Sochi, Russia, turning skies red and leaving behind orange-frosted snow. Dust storms range from the size of a tiny dust devil, to a cloud that might cover a continent. In dry regions, strong winds can suddenly create a “haboob,” a rolling wall of sand or dust
3h
The Atlantic

Steven Spielberg's Netflix FearsAs Hollywood continues to ponder the encroaching threat of Netflix to the movie-theater model, one of the industry’s luminaries, Steven Spielberg, has gone on the offensive. Netflix films? They’re just TV movies, according to him. “You certainly, if it’s a good show, deserve an Emmy, but not an Oscar,” Spielberg noted in an interview on the press tour for his upcoming film, Ready Player One . He
3h
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Zuckerberg Will Testify Before Congress on Cambridge ScandalFacebook CEO will answer questions about the company's privacy practices and the use of its data.
3h
Latest Headlines | Science News

Kid-friendly e-cigarette ads appear to workTeens who hadn’t used tobacco products but were receptive to e-cigarettes ads were more likely to try vaping or smoking.
4h
Scientific American Content: Global

Chinese Space Station Could Crash to Earth on Easter WeekendThe tumbling spacecraft’s uncontrolled reentry could resemble that of NASA’s Skylab station from 1979 -- Read more on ScientificAmerican.com
4h
Big Think

What is self-actualization, and how you can use it?The idea of self-actualization can seem like new-age woo. Where's the science behind it? Read More
4h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News

NASA finds Tropical Cyclone Iris shearedTropical Cyclone Iris is being battered by wind shear so strong that it doesn't even look like a circular storm.
4h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Narcissists don't hunt for partners who are already taken -- but it doesn't stop themNarcissists aren't necessarily on the hunt for partners who are already in a relationship -- but that doesn't appear to stand in their way, either, new research suggests.
4h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Satellite finds southerly wind shear affecting Tropical Depression JelawatSatellite imagery showed that Tropical Depression Jelawat was still dealing with southerly vertical wind shear that was pushing the bulk of its clouds north of its center.
4h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News

What the first American astronauts taught us about living in spaceProject Mercury proved that humans could live and work in space, paving the way for all future human exploration.
4h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Gene therapy may help brain heal from stroke, other injuriesScientists have found a genetic trigger that may improve the brain's ability to heal from a range of debilitating conditions, from strokes to concussions and spinal cord injuries.
4h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Study highlights need for better treatment of heart failure patientsResearch highlights the most predominant symptoms of heart failure comorbidities.
4h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Some e-cigarette ingredients are surprisingly more toxic than othersA new study by UNC School of Medicine researchers shows that e-liquids are far from harmless and contain ingredients that can vary wildly from one type of e-cigarette to another.
4h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Treating menopause symptoms reduces abdominal fat tissueWomen who undergo hormone therapy to relieve menopausal symptoms tend to have less fat tissue, particularly in the abdomen, than other menopausal women, according to a new study published in the Endocrine Society's Journal of Clinical Endocrinology & Metabolism.
4h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Gene responsible for electric fish 'spark' found in South American ghost knifefishUnique genetic re-wiring of a sodium channel explains how a family of electric fish can generate the highest frequency of electrical discharge seen in any animal. In a study publishing March 27 in the open-access journal PLOS Biology researchers Ammon Thompson, Daniel Infield and colleagues at the University of Texas, Austin, University of Iowa, and Indiana University Bloomington show that this ev
4h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Cardiovascular disease and multimorbidity: More from the special issue of PLOS MedicineThis week, publication of a Special Issue on cardiovascular disease (CVD) and multimorbidity continues in PLOS Medicine, advised by guest editors Carolyn S. P. Lam, National Heart Centre and Duke-NUS Medical School, Singapore, Kazem Rahimi, The George Institute for Global Health, University of Oxford, UK, and Steven Steinhubl, Scripps Translational Science Institute, USA.
4h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Multidisciplinary care likely cost-effective for chronic kidney disease patientsMedicare-funded multidisciplinary care programs in the US are likely to be cost-effective in patients with mild to moderate chronic kidney disease (CKD), according to a new study published this week in PLOS Medicine by Eugene Lin from Stanford University, California, USA, and colleagues.
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News

High doses of antiviral drug may be effective against EbolaHigh doses of favipiravir extended survival in non-human primates infected with Ebola virus, according to a new study published this week in PLOS Medicine by Jeremie Guedj of INSERM, France, and colleagues.
4h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Some e-cigarette ingredients are more toxic than othersA new study shows that e-liquids in e-cigarettes are potentially far from harmless and contain ingredients that can vary wildly from one type of e-cigarette to another. The study, publishing March 27 in the open-access journal, PLOS Biology, by UNC School of Medicine scientists led by Robert Tarran, created a new screening technique to deduce the different toxicity levels of the more than 7,700 ty
4h
New Scientist - News

How a dedicated cyber-court could halt the rise of online crimeCrimes carried out online are already illegal, so politicians should stop calling for new laws and start enforcing the old ones
4h
New Scientist - News

Horror VR game can ramp up the fear factor if you’re not scaredA virtual reality game monitors your heart rate. If you’re not finding it scary enough, the game automatically intensifies the horror
4h
Live Science

Divers Search for Wreckage of Mystery US Hercules CrashThe aircraft that crashed in 1969 off the coast of England after being commandeered by a rogue U.S. serviceman who was desperate to fly home.
4h
Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

Sediment core from sluice pond contains evidence for 1755 New England earthquakeSigns of a 1755 earthquake that was strong enough to topple steeples and chimneys in Boston can be seen in a sediment core drawn from eastern Massachusetts' Sluice Pond, according to a new report.
4h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Gene responsible for electric fish 'spark' found in South American ghost knifefishUnique genetic re-wiring of a sodium channel explains how a family of electric fish can generate the highest frequency of electrical discharge seen in any animal. In a study publishing 27 March in the open access journal PLOS Biology researchers Ammon Thompson, Daniel Infield and colleagues at the University of Texas, Austin, University of Iowa, and Indiana University Bloomington show that this ev
4h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Putting quantum scientists in the driver's seatAn interdisciplinary, interdepartmental group of scientists at ORNL conducted fundamental physics studies at the nanoscale to support development of experimental platforms that will control dissipation in quantum systems and materials.
4h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Heather Whitson, leader in multimorbidity care, to deliver #AGS18 Yoshikawa LectureThe American Geriatrics Society (AGS) and the AGS Health in Aging Foundation today announced that Heather E. Whitson, MD, MHS, Associate Professor of Medicine and Ophthalmology at the Duke University School of Medicine and Deputy Director at Duke's Center for the Study of Aging and Human Development, will deliver the 2018 Thomas and Catherine Yoshikawa Award plenary presentation on individualizing
4h
Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

Secrets of famous Neandertal skeleton La Ferrassie 1 revealedAnthropologists have provided new insights on one of the most famous Neanderthal skeletons, discovered over 100 years ago: La Ferrassie 1.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

Newly-discovered planet is hot, metallic and dense as MercuryA hot, metallic, Earth-sized planet with a density similar to Mercury -- situated 260 million light years away -- has been detected and characterized by a global team of astronomers.
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Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences current issue

Listen to the whisper of the rocks, telling their ancient story [Physical Sciences]Rovere et al. (1) determine the mass of two megaboulders on Eleuthera and calculate hydrologic flow rates based on a tsunami wave model (2). The authors (1) suggest that a rate of ∼10 m/s is required to “lift or roll” these boulders from the cliff-top strata. Their findings ostensibly dispute...
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Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences current issue

Reply to Hearty and Tormey: Use the scientific method to test geologic hypotheses, because rocks do not whisper [Physical Sciences]Hearty and Tormey (1) challenge our conclusions (2), incorrectly arguing that the megaboulders we discuss were shown to originate from the cliff bottom. A number of mischaracterizations are made by Hearty and Tormey (1) in their letter. First, we do not use a “tsunami wave model.” Second, we do not...
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Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences current issue

Structure of the catalytic F1 head of the F1-Fo ATP synthase from Trypanosoma brucei [Biological Sciences]Trypanosoma brucei is the causative agent of sleeping sickness, which is responsible for thousands of deaths per year in developing countries. The single-cell eukaryotic parasite has an elaborate life cycle that involves both an insect vector and a mammalian host. The mitochondrial F1-Fo ATP synthase is crucial for cell survival...
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Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences current issue

Progesterone activation of zebrafish mineralocorticoid receptor may influence growth of some transplanted tumors [Biological Sciences]Fior et al. (1, 2) provide strong evidence for the benefits of studying the effects of drugs on the growth of human colon cancer explants in zebrafish to identify those drugs that will be effective in treating a specific patient’s tumor. Moreover, their work suggests that a similar approach using...
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Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences current issue

Reply to Katsu and Baker: Using zebrafish PDX to screen drug sensitivity of endocrine-dependent cancers [Biological Sciences]Katsu and Baker (1) highlight a potential weakness in using zebrafish patient-derived xenografts (zPDX) (2) for endocrine-dependent tumors. Katsu and Baker (1) report that, unlike human estrogen receptor (ER), progesterone may activate zebrafish mineralocorticoid receptor (MR) instead of inhibiting it (3). Treatment of zPDXs with progesterone would, therefore, possibly activate...
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Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences current issue

Cross-resistance to dicamba, 2,4-D, and fluroxypyr in Kochia scoparia is endowed by a mutation in an AUX/IAA gene [Agricultural Sciences]The understanding and mitigation of the appearance of herbicide-resistant weeds have come to the forefront of study in the past decade, as the number of weed species that are resistant to one or more herbicide modes of action is on the increase. Historically, weed resistance to auxin herbicides has been...
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Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences current issue

Noncatalytic aspartate at the exonuclease domain of proofreading DNA polymerases regulates both degradative and synthetic activities [Biochemistry]Most replicative DNA polymerases (DNAPs) are endowed with a 3′-5′ exonuclease activity to proofread the polymerization errors, governed by four universally conserved aspartate residues belonging to the Exo I, Exo II, and Exo III motifs. These residues coordinate the two metal ions responsible for the hydrolysis of the last phosphodiester...
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Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences current issue

Reconstructing a metazoan genetic pathway with transcriptome-wide epistasis measurements [Genetics]RNA-sequencing (RNA-seq) is commonly used to identify genetic modules that respond to perturbations. In single cells, transcriptomes have been used as phenotypes, but this concept has not been applied to whole-organism RNA-seq. Also, quantifying and interpreting epistatic effects using expression profiles remains a challenge. We developed a single coefficient to...
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Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences current issue

CD96 expression determines the inflammatory potential of IL-9-producing Th9 cells [Immunology and Inflammation]Recent findings demonstrated proinflammatory functions of interleukin (IL)-9–producing T helper type (Th) 9 cells in the pathogenesis of intestinal bowel diseases (IBDs). However, also antiinflammatory properties have been ascribed to Th9 cells, pointing to a functional heterogeneity. To dissect the specific expression pattern and, especially, diversity of murine antigen-specific Th9...
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Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences current issue

Cyclin-dependent kinase activity is required for type I interferon production [Immunology and Inflammation]Recognition of nucleic acids results in the production of type I IFNs, which activate the JAK/STAT pathway and promote the expression of IFN-stimulated genes. In a search for modulators of this pathway, we discovered an unexpected requirement for cyclin-dependent kinases (CDK) in the production of type I IFN following nucleic...
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Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences current issue

Chronic stress promotes colitis by disturbing the gut microbiota and triggering immune system response [Immunology and Inflammation]Chronic stress is known to promote inflammatory bowel disease (IBD), but the underlying mechanism remains largely unresolved. Here, we found chronic stress to sensitize mice to dextran sulfate sodium (DSS)-induced colitis; to increase the infiltration of B cells, neutrophils, and proinflammatory ly6Chi macrophages in colonic lamina propria; and to present...
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Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences current issue

Predicting cancer outcomes from histology and genomics using convolutional networks [Medical Sciences]Cancer histology reflects underlying molecular processes and disease progression and contains rich phenotypic information that is predictive of patient outcomes. In this study, we show a computational approach for learning patient outcomes from digital pathology images using deep learning to combine the power of adaptive machine learning algorithms with traditional...
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Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences current issue

Linking imaging to omics utilizing image-guided tissue extraction [Medical Sciences]Phenotypic heterogeneity is commonly observed in diseased tissue, specifically in tumors. Multimodal imaging technologies can reveal tissue heterogeneity noninvasively in vivo, enabling imaging-based profiling of receptors, metabolism, morphology, or function on a macroscopic scale. In contrast, in vitro multiomics, immunohistochemistry, or histology techniques accurately characterize these hetero
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Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences current issue

Occurrence, evolution, and functions of DNA phosphorothioate epigenetics in bacteria [Microbiology]The chemical diversity of physiological DNA modifications has expanded with the identification of phosphorothioate (PT) modification in which the nonbridging oxygen in the sugar-phosphate backbone of DNA is replaced by sulfur. Together with DndFGH as cognate restriction enzymes, DNA PT modification, which is catalyzed by the DndABCDE proteins, functions as...
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Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences current issue

Combination of cGMP analogue and drug delivery system provides functional protection in hereditary retinal degeneration [Neuroscience]Inherited retinal degeneration (RD) is a devastating and currently untreatable neurodegenerative condition that leads to loss of photoreceptor cells and blindness. The vast genetic heterogeneity of RD, the lack of “druggable” targets, and the access-limiting blood–retinal barrier (BRB) present major hurdles toward effective therapy development. Here, we address these challenges...
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Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences current issue

Disinhibition of CA1 pyramidal cells by low-dose ketamine and other antagonists with rapid antidepressant efficacy [Neuroscience]Low-dose ketamine, an open-channel N-methyl d-aspartate receptor (NMDAR) antagonist, mediates rapid antidepressant effects in humans that are mimicked in preclinical rodent models. Disinhibition of pyramidal cells via decreased output of fast-spiking GABAergic interneurons has been proposed as a key mechanism that triggers the antidepressant response. Unfortunately, to date, disinhibition has...
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Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences current issue

Resonance with subthreshold oscillatory drive organizes activity and optimizes learning in neural networks [Neuroscience]Network oscillations across and within brain areas are critical for learning and performance of memory tasks. While a large amount of work has focused on the generation of neural oscillations, their effect on neuronal populations’ spiking activity and information encoding is less known. Here, we use computational modeling to demonstrate...
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Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences current issue

Bilobal architecture is a requirement for calmodulin signaling to CaV1.3 channels [Physiology]Calmodulin (CaM) regulation of voltage-gated calcium (CaV) channels is a powerful Ca2+ feedback mechanism that adjusts Ca2+ influx, affording rich mechanistic insights into Ca2+ decoding. CaM possesses a dual-lobed architecture, a salient feature of the myriad Ca2+-sensing proteins, where two homologous lobes that recognize similar targets hint at redundant signaling...
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Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences current issue

Complex electrophysiological remodeling in postinfarction ischemic heart failure [Physiology]Heart failure (HF) following myocardial infarction (MI) is associated with high incidence of cardiac arrhythmias. Development of therapeutic strategy requires detailed understanding of electrophysiological remodeling. However, changes of ionic currents in ischemic HF remain incompletely understood, especially in translational large-animal models. Here, we systematically measure the major ionic cur
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Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences current issue

Arabidopsis TSO1 and MYB3R1 form a regulatory module to coordinate cell proliferation with differentiation in shoot and root [Plant Biology]Fundamental to plant and animal development is the regulated balance between cell proliferation and differentiation, a process intimately tied to cell cycle regulation. In Arabidopsis, mutations in TSO1, whose animal homolog is LIN54, resulted in severe developmental abnormalities both in shoot and root, including shoot meristem fasciation and reduced root...
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Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences current issue

Transcriptome landscape of a bacterial pathogen under plant immunity [Plant Biology]Plant pathogens can cause serious diseases that impact global agriculture. The plant innate immunity, when fully activated, can halt pathogen growth in plants. Despite extensive studies into the molecular and genetic bases of plant immunity against pathogens, the influence of plant immunity in global pathogen metabolism to restrict pathogen growth...
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Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences current issue

Regional pest suppression associated with widespread Bt maize adoption benefits vegetable growers [Agricultural Sciences]Transgenic crops containing the bacterium Bacillus thuringiensis (Bt) genes reduce pests and insecticide usage, promote biocontrol services, and economically benefit growers. Area-wide Bt adoption suppresses pests regionally, with declines expanding beyond the planted Bt crops into other non-Bt crop fields. However, the offsite benefits to growers of other crops from...
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Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences current issue

Human diets drive range expansion of megafauna-dispersed fruit species [Agricultural Sciences]Neotropical fruit species once dispersed by Pleistocene megafauna have regained relevance in diversifying human diets to address malnutrition. Little is known about the historic interactions between humans and these fruit species. We quantified the human role in modifying geographic and environmental ranges of Neotropical fruit species by comparing the distribution...
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Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences current issue

Extrachromosomal circular DNA-based amplification and transmission of herbicide resistance in crop weed Amaranthus palmeri [Agricultural Sciences]Gene amplification has been observed in many bacteria and eukaryotes as a response to various selective pressures, such as antibiotics, cytotoxic drugs, pesticides, herbicides, and other stressful environmental conditions. An increase in gene copy number is often found as extrachromosomal elements that usually contain autonomously replicating extrachromosomal circular DNA molecules...
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Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences current issue

Four millennia of Iberian biomolecular prehistory illustrate the impact of prehistoric migrations at the far end of Eurasia [Anthropology]Population genomic studies of ancient human remains have shown how modern-day European population structure has been shaped by a number of prehistoric migrations. The Neolithization of Europe has been associated with large-scale migrations from Anatolia, which was followed by migrations of herders from the Pontic steppe at the onset of...
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Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences current issue

Early anthropogenic impact on Western Central African rainforests 2,600 y ago [Anthropology]A potential human footprint on Western Central African rainforests before the Common Era has become the focus of an ongoing controversy. Between 3,000 y ago and 2,000 y ago, regional pollen sequences indicate a replacement of mature rainforests by a forest–savannah mosaic including pioneer trees. Although some studies suggested an...
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Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences current issue

Single-molecule peptide fingerprinting [Applied Biological Sciences]Proteomic analyses provide essential information on molecular pathways of cellular systems and the state of a living organism. Mass spectrometry is currently the first choice for proteomic analysis. However, the requirement for a large amount of sample renders a small-scale proteomics study challenging. Here, we demonstrate a proof of concept...
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Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences current issue

Measuring discursive influence across scholarship [Applied Physical Sciences]Assessing scholarly influence is critical for understanding the collective system of scholarship and the history of academic inquiry. Influence is multifaceted, and citations reveal only part of it. Citation counts exhibit preferential attachment and follow a rigid “news cycle” that can miss sustained and indirect forms of influence. Building on...
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Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences current issue

Cryo-EM structure of the bacterial actin AlfA reveals unique assembly and ATP-binding interactions and the absence of a conserved subdomain [Biochemistry]Bacterial actins are an evolutionarily diverse family of ATP-dependent filaments built from protomers with a conserved structural fold. Actin-based segregation systems are encoded on many bacterial plasmids and function to partition plasmids into daughter cells. The bacterial actin AlfA segregates plasmids by a mechanism distinct from other partition systems, dependent...
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Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences current issue

Near-atomic cryo-EM imaging of a small protein displayed on a designed scaffolding system [Biochemistry]Current single-particle cryo-electron microscopy (cryo-EM) techniques can produce images of large protein assemblies and macromolecular complexes at atomic level detail without the need for crystal growth. However, proteins of smaller size, typical of those found throughout the cell, are not presently amenable to detailed structural elucidation by cryo-EM. Here we...
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Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences current issue

Programmable RNA recognition using a CRISPR-associated Argonaute [Biochemistry]Argonaute proteins (Agos) are present in all domains of life. Although the physiological function of eukaryotic Agos in regulating gene expression is well documented, the biological roles of many of their prokaryotic counterparts remain enigmatic. In some bacteria, Agos are associated with CRISPR (clustered regularly interspaced short palindromic repeats) loci...
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Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences current issue

Structural insights into the sequence-specific recognition of Piwi by Drosophila Papi [Biochemistry]The Tudor domain-containing (Tdrd) family proteins play a critical role in transposon silencing in animal gonads by recognizing the symmetrically dimethylated arginine (sDMA) on the (G/A)R motif of the N-terminal of PIWI family proteins via the eTud domains. Papi, also known as “Tdrd2,” is involved in Zucchini-mediated PIWI-interacting RNA (piRNA)...
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Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences current issue

Archaeal acetoacetyl-CoA thiolase/HMG-CoA synthase complex channels the intermediate via a fused CoA-binding site [Biochemistry]Many reactions within a cell are thermodynamically unfavorable. To efficiently run some of those endergonic reactions, nature evolved intermediate-channeling enzyme complexes, in which the products of the first endergonic reactions are immediately consumed by the second exergonic reactions. Based on this concept, we studied how archaea overcome the unfavorable first...
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Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences current issue

Phosphorylation-induced unfolding regulates p19INK4d during the human cell cycle [Biophysics and Computational Biology]Cell cycle progression is tightly regulated by cyclin-dependent kinases (CDKs). The ankyrin-repeat protein p19INK4d functions as a key regulator of G1/S transition; however, its molecular mode of action is unknown. Here, we combine cell and structural biology methods to unravel the mechanism by which p19INK4d controls cell cycle progression. We...
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Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences current issue

Substrate recognition and mechanism revealed by ligand-bound polyphosphate kinase 2 structures [Biophysics and Computational Biology]Inorganic polyphosphate is a ubiquitous, linear biopolymer built of up to thousands of phosphate residues that are linked by energy-rich phosphoanhydride bonds. Polyphosphate kinases of the family 2 (PPK2) use polyphosphate to catalyze the reversible phosphorylation of nucleotide phosphates and are highly relevant as targets for new pharmaceutical compounds and...
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Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences current issue

EF-Tu and EF-G are activated by allosteric effects [Biophysics and Computational Biology]Many cellular processes are controlled by GTPases, and gaining quantitative understanding of the activation of such processes has been a major challenge. In particular, it is crucial to obtain reliable free-energy surfaces for the relevant reaction paths both in solution and in GTPases active sites. Here, we revisit the energetics...
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Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences current issue

Stabilized supralinear network can give rise to bistable, oscillatory, and persistent activity [Biophysics and Computational Biology]A hallmark of cortical circuits is their versatility. They can perform multiple fundamental computations such as normalization, memory storage, and rhythm generation. Yet it is far from clear how such versatility can be achieved in a single circuit, given that specialized models are often needed to replicate each computation. Here,...
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Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences current issue

Lateral cerebellum is preferentially sensitive to high sonic hedgehog signaling and medulloblastoma formation [Developmental Biology]The main cell of origin of the Sonic hedgehog (SHH) subgroup of medulloblastoma (MB) is granule cell precursors (GCPs), a SHH-dependent transient amplifying population in the developing cerebellum. SHH-MBs can be further subdivided based on molecular and clinical parameters, as well as location because SHH-MBs occur preferentially in the lateral...
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Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences current issue

Reintroductions of birds and mammals involve evolutionarily distinct species at the regional scale [Ecology]Reintroductions offer a powerful tool for reversing the effects of species extirpation and have been increasingly used over recent decades. However, this species-centered conservation approach has been criticized for its strong biases toward charismatic birds and mammals. Here, we investigated whether reintroduced species can be representative of the phylogenetic diversity...
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Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences current issue

Rapid growth of the US wildland-urban interface raises wildfire risk [Environmental Sciences]The wildland-urban interface (WUI) is the area where houses and wildland vegetation meet or intermingle, and where wildfire problems are most pronounced. Here we report that the WUI in the United States grew rapidly from 1990 to 2010 in terms of both number of new houses (from 30.8 to 43.4...
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Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences current issue

Nitrate is an important nitrogen source for Arctic tundra plants [Environmental Sciences]Plant nitrogen (N) use is a key component of the N cycle in terrestrial ecosystems. The supply of N to plants affects community species composition and ecosystem processes such as photosynthesis and carbon (C) accumulation. However, the availabilities and relative importance of different N forms to plants are not well...
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Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences current issue

Adaptive diversification of growth allometry in the plant Arabidopsis thaliana [Evolution]Seed plants vary tremendously in size and morphology; however, variation and covariation in plant traits may be governed, at least in part, by universal biophysical laws and biological constants. Metabolic scaling theory (MST) posits that whole-organismal metabolism and growth rate are under stabilizing selection that minimizes the scaling of hydrodynamic...
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Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences current issue

Sign of selection on mutation rate modifiers depends on population size [Evolution]The influence of population size (N) on natural selection acting on alleles that affect fitness has been understood for almost a century. As N declines, genetic drift overwhelms selection and alleles with direct fitness effects are rendered neutral. Often, however, alleles experience so-called indirect selection, meaning they affect not the...
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Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences current issue

DEC2 modulates orexin expression and regulates sleep [Genetics]Adequate sleep is essential for physical and mental health. We previously identified a missense mutation in the human DEC2 gene (BHLHE41) leading to the familial natural short sleep behavioral trait. DEC2 is a transcription factor regulating the circadian clock in mammals, although its role in sleep regulation has been unclear....
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Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences current issue

Requirement for intron structures in activating the Cd8a locus [Genetics]During differentiation of CD4+CD8+ double-positive (DP) thymocytes into the CD4−CD8+ single-positive (CD8SP) thymocytes committed to the cytotoxic T cell lineage, Cd8a transcription is temporally terminated after positive selection and is subsequently reinitiated, a process known as coreceptor reversal. Despite the identification of a transcriptional enhancer in the Cd8a gene that...
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Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences current issue

UBD modifies APOL1-induced kidney disease risk [Medical Sciences]People of recent African ancestry develop kidney disease at much higher rates than most other groups. Two specific coding variants in the Apolipoprotein-L1 gene APOL1 termed G1 and G2 are the causal drivers of much of this difference in risk, following a recessive pattern of inheritance. However, most individuals with...
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Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences current issue

An EZH2-mediated epigenetic mechanism behind p53-dependent tissue sensitivity to DNA damage [Medical Sciences]Renewable tissues exhibit heightened sensitivity to DNA damage, which is thought to result from a high level of p53. However, cell proliferation in renewable tissues requires p53 down-regulation, creating an apparent discrepancy between the p53 level and elevated sensitivity to DNA damage. Using a combination of genetic mouse models and...
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Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences current issue

Cryo-EM reconstruction of AlfA from Bacillus subtilis reveals the structure of a simplified actin-like filament at 3.4-A resolution [Microbiology]Low copy-number plasmid pLS32 of Bacillus subtilis subsp. natto contains a partitioning system that ensures segregation of plasmid copies during cell division. The partitioning locus comprises actin-like protein AlfA, adaptor protein AlfB, and the centromeric sequence parN. Similar to the ParMRC partitioning system from Escherichia coli plasmid R1, AlfA filaments...
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Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences current issue

Blindfold learning of an accurate neural metric [Neuroscience]The brain has no direct access to physical stimuli but only to the spiking activity evoked in sensory organs. It is unclear how the brain can learn representations of the stimuli based on those noisy, correlated responses alone. Here we show how to build an accurate distance map of responses...
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Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences current issue

Deletion of dopamine D2 receptors from parvalbumin interneurons in mouse causes schizophrenia-like phenotypes [Neuroscience]Excessive dopamine neurotransmission underlies psychotic episodes as observed in patients with some types of bipolar disorder and schizophrenia. The dopaminergic hypothesis was postulated after the finding that antipsychotics were effective to halt increased dopamine tone. However, there is little evidence for dysfunction within the dopaminergic system itself. Alternatively, it has...
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Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences current issue

Fatty-acid-binding protein 5 controls retrograde endocannabinoid signaling at central glutamate synapses [Neuroscience]Endocannabinoids (eCBs) are lipid-signaling molecules involved in the regulation of numerous behaviors and physiological functions. Released by postsynaptic neurons, eCBs mediate retrograde modulation of synaptic transmission and plasticity by activating presynaptic cannabinoid receptors. While the cellular mechanisms by which eCBs control synaptic function have been well characterized, the mechan
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Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences current issue

Transitions from a Kondo-like diamagnetic insulator into a modulated ferromagnetic metal in FeGa3-yGey [Physics]One initial and essential question of magnetism is whether the magnetic properties of a material are governed by localized moments or itinerant electrons. Here, we expose the case for the weakly ferromagnetic system FeGa3−yGey, wherein these two opposite models are reconciled, such that the magnetic susceptibility is quantitatively explained by...
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Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences current issue

Metastability and avalanche dynamics in strongly correlated gases with long-range interactions [Physics]We experimentally study the stability of a bosonic Mott insulator against the formation of a density wave induced by long-range interactions and characterize the intrinsic dynamics between these two states. The Mott insulator is created in a quantum degenerate gas of 87-Rubidium atoms, trapped in a 3D optical lattice. The...
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Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences current issue

Universal linear and nonlinear electrodynamics of a Dirac fluid [Physics]A general relation is derived between the linear and second-order nonlinear ac conductivities of an electron system in the hydrodynamic regime of frequencies below the interparticle scattering rate. The magnitude and tensorial structure of the hydrodynamic nonlinear conductivity are shown to differ from their counterparts in the more familiar kinetic...
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Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences current issue

The Great Recession worsened blood pressure and blood glucose levels in American adults [Physiology]Longitudinal, individual-specific data from the Multi-Ethnic Study of Atherosclerosis (MESA) provide support for the hypothesis that the 2008 to 2010 Great Recession (GR) negatively impacted the health of US adults. Results further advance understanding of the relationship by (i) illuminating hypothesized greater negative impacts in population subgroups exposed to more...
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Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences current issue

Mechanistic basis for the activation of plant membrane receptor kinases by SERK-family coreceptors [Plant Biology]Plant-unique membrane receptor kinases with leucine-rich repeat ectodomains (LRR-RKs) can sense small molecule, peptide, and protein ligands. Many LRR-RKs require SERK-family coreceptor kinases for high-affinity ligand binding and receptor activation. How one coreceptor can contribute to the specific binding of distinct ligands and activation of different LRR-RKs is poorly understood....
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Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences current issue

Population genomic analysis of elongated skulls reveals extensive female-biased immigration in Early Medieval Bavaria [Population Biology]Modern European genetic structure demonstrates strong correlations with geography, while genetic analysis of prehistoric humans has indicated at least two major waves of immigration from outside the continent during periods of cultural change. However, population-level genome data that could shed light on the demographic processes occurring during the intervening periods...
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Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences current issue

Psychopaths fail to automatically take the perspective of others [Psychological and Cognitive Sciences]Psychopathic individuals display a chronic and flagrant disregard for the welfare of others through their callous and manipulative behavior. Historically, this behavior is thought to result from deficits in social-affective processing. However, we show that at least some psychopathic behaviors may be rooted in a cognitive deficit, specifically an inability...
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Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences current issue

Towards an unconscious neural reinforcement intervention for common fears [Psychological and Cognitive Sciences]Can “hardwired” physiological fear responses (e.g., for spiders and snakes) be reprogramed unconsciously in the human brain? Currently, exposure therapy is among the most effective treatments for anxiety disorders, but this intervention is subjectively aversive to patients, causing many to drop out of treatment prematurely. Here we introduce a method...
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Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences current issue

Geospatial analysis of near-term potential for carbon-negative bioenergy in the United States [Sustainability Science]Bioenergy with carbon capture and storage (BECCS) is a negative-emissions technology that may play a crucial role in climate change mitigation. BECCS relies on the capture and sequestration of carbon dioxide (CO2) following bioenergy production to remove and reliably sequester atmospheric CO2. Previous BECCS deployment assessments have largely overlooked the...
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Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences current issue

Climate warming enhances snow avalanche risk in the Western Himalayas [Sustainability Science]Ongoing climate warming has been demonstrated to impact the cryosphere in the Indian Himalayas, with substantial consequences for the risk of disasters, human well-being, and terrestrial ecosystems. Here, we present evidence that the warming observed in recent decades has been accompanied by increased snow avalanche frequency in the Western Indian...
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Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences current issue

Correction for Callier, Inner Workings: How the butterfly got its spots (and why it matters) [Correction]INNER WORKINGS Correction for “Inner Workings: How the butterfly got its spots (and why it matters),” by Viviane Callier, which was first published February 13, 2018; 10.1073/pnas.1722410115 (Proc Natl Acad Sci USA 115:1397–1399). The editors note that reference 4 appeared incorrectly. The correct reference 4 was inadvertently omitted from the...
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Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences current issue

Correction for Hoffecker, The complexity of Neanderthal technology [Correction]COMMENTARY Correction for “The complexity of Neanderthal technology,” by John F. Hoffecker, which was first published February 12, 2018; 10.1073/pnas.1800461115 (Proc Natl Acad Sci USA 115:1959–1961). The author notes that, due to a printer’s error, the heading of Table 1 appeared incorrectly. “Computational technic of the Paleolithic” should have instead...
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Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences current issue

Correction for Slik et al., Phylogenetic classification of the world’s tropical forests [Correction]ECOLOGY Correction for “Phylogenetic classification of the world’s tropical forests,” by J. W. Ferry Slik, Janet Franklin, Víctor Arroyo-Rodríguez, Richard Field, Salomon Aguilar, Nikolay Aguirre, Jorge Ahumada, Shin-Ichiro Aiba, Luciana F. Alves, Anitha K, Andres Avella, Francisco Mora, Gerardo A. Aymard C., Selene Báez, Patricia Balvanera, Meredith L. Bastian, Jean-François...
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Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences current issue

Correction for Dixon et al., Heterogeneity within the frontoparietal control network and its relationship to the default and dorsal attention networks [Correction]NEUROSCIENCE Correction for “Heterogeneity within the frontoparietal control network and its relationship to the default and dorsal attention networks,” by Matthew L. Dixon, Alejandro De La Vega, Caitlin Mills, Jessica Andrews-Hanna, R. Nathan Spreng, Michael W. Cole, and Kalina Christoff, which was first published January 30, 2018; 10.1073/pnas.1715766115 (Proc Natl...
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Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences current issue

In This Issue [This Week in PNAS]Near-atomic-scale cryo-EM imaging Development of symmetric protein scaffolds for cryo-EM imaging. Recent developments in single-particle electron cryo-microscopy (cryo-EM) allow structural biologists to visualize structures such as macromolecular complexes in atomic-level detail. Currently, these techniques are mainly applicable to large and highly symmetrical molecules, and the underlying approac
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Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences current issue

Toward new design principles for superior gene silencing [Engineering]Delivery Is the Key Challenge in siRNA Therapies RNA interference (RNAi) or “gene silencing” is a fascinating mechanism in which a cell utilizes a gene’s own RNA sequence to shut down expression of that gene. This process can be employed to investigate the role of genes in disease and to...
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Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences current issue

Ancient deforestation in the green heart of Africa [Earth, Atmospheric, and Planetary Sciences]The forested expanses of Central Africa host the second largest block of tropical rainforest on Earth (after Amazonia), stretching over around 2 × 106 km2. They are the great green heart of Africa, and changes in vegetation cover are likely to have important but poorly understood influences on the climate...
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Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences current issue

The complex simplicity of the bacterial cytoskeleton [Biochemistry]Proper segregation of genetic material is a universal requirement for all living organisms. In eukaryotic organisms, the mitotic spindle, a specialized tubulin-based cytoskeletal structure, actively separates the chromosomes into two new nuclei during cell division (1). For prokaryotes, the story is not much different. Although they contain only one chromosome,...
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Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences current issue

History meets palaeoscience: Consilience and collaboration in studying past societal responses to environmental change [Environmental Sciences]History and archaeology have a well-established engagement with issues of premodern societal development and the interaction between physical and cultural environments; together, they offer a holistic view that can generate insights into the nature of cultural resilience and adaptation, as well as responses to catastrophe. Grasping the challenges that climate...
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Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences current issue

Detection of amyloid fibrils in Parkinson’s disease using plasmonic chirality [Applied Physical Sciences]Amyloid fibrils, which are closely associated with various neurodegenerative diseases, are the final products in many protein aggregation pathways. The identification of fibrils at low concentration is, therefore, pivotal in disease diagnosis and development of therapeutic strategies. We report a methodology for the specific identification of amyloid fibrils using chiroptical...
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Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences current issue

Immune-modulating enzyme indoleamine 2,3-dioxygenase is effectively inhibited by targeting its apo-form [Biochemistry]For cancer cells to survive and proliferate, they must escape normal immune destruction. One mechanism by which this is accomplished is through immune suppression effected by up-regulation of indoleamine 2,3-dioxygenase (IDO1), a heme enzyme that catalyzes the oxidation of tryptophan to N-formylkynurenine. On deformylation, kynurenine and downstream metabolites suppress T...
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Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences current issue

Correlation analysis framework for localization-based superresolution microscopy [Biophysics and Computational Biology]Superresolution images reconstructed from single-molecule localizations can reveal cellular structures close to the macromolecular scale and are now being used routinely in many biomedical research applications. However, because of their coordinate-based representation, a widely applicable and unified analysis platform that can extract a quantitative description and biophysical parameters from the
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Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences current issue

Direct observation of ultrafast large-scale dynamics of an enzyme under turnover conditions [Biophysics and Computational Biology]The functional cycle of many proteins involves large-scale motions of domains and subunits. The relation between conformational dynamics and the chemical steps of enzymes remains under debate. Here we show that in the presence of substrates, domain motions of an enzyme can take place on the microsecond time scale, yet...
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Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences current issue

Cholesterol provides nonsacrificial protection of membrane lipids from chemical damage at air-water interface [Chemistry]The role of cholesterol in bilayer and monolayer lipid membranes has been of great interest. On the biophysical front, cholesterol significantly increases the order of the lipid packing, lowers the membrane permeability, and maintains membrane fluidity by forming liquid-ordered–phase lipid rafts. However, direct observation of any influence on membrane chemistry...
4h
Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences current issue

Simple mechanosense and response of cilia motion reveal the intrinsic habits of ciliates [Microbiology]An important habit of ciliates, namely, their behavioral preference for walls, is revealed through experiments and hydrodynamic simulations. A simple mechanical response of individual ciliary beating (i.e., the beating is stalled by the cilium contacting a wall) can solely determine the sliding motion of the ciliate along the wall and...
4h
Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences current issue

Structural changes of TasA in biofilm formation of Bacillus subtilis [Microbiology]Microorganisms form surface-attached communities, termed biofilms, which can serve as protection against host immune reactions or antibiotics. Bacillus subtilis biofilms contain TasA as major proteinaceous component in addition to exopolysaccharides. In stark contrast to the initially unfolded biofilm proteins of other bacteria, TasA is a soluble, stably folded monomer, whose...
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Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences current issue

News Feature: What happens when lab animals go wild [Pharmacology]Experiments on mice living in more natural habitats can deliver results dramatically different from those in traditional laboratories—with profound implications for biomedical science. In the summer of 2015, a pioneering band of laboratory mice did something their ancestors hadn’t done for roughly 1,000 generations—they went outside. Andrea Graham of Princeton...
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The Scientist RSS

Antibiotics Increase Mouse Susceptibility to Dengue, West Nile, and ZikaThe drugs' disruption of the microbiome makes a subsequent flavivirus infection more severe.
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Estrogen levels do not rise for transgender men treated with testosterone therapyTestosterone therapy is not associated with a rise in estrogen levels among transgender men, according to a new study led by Boston Medical Center (BMC). In fact, the researchers observed an initial decline in estrogen levels, which later stabilized and remained within the normal range during the study's six-year period.
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News

New technique sheds light on body language in job interviews, sales calls, team projectsNew system using infrared light tags to monitor interactions could lead to a more precise understanding of how individuals interact in social settings and can increase the effectiveness of communications coaching.
4h
The Atlantic

The Atlantic Hires Reporter Christi Parsons to Lead Newly Formed Talent LabWashington, D.C. (March 27, 2018)— The Atlantic has hired longtime political journalist Christi Parsons to lead its newly formed Talent Lab, an ambitious newsroom recruitment and staff development initiative. Working with editor in chief Jeffrey Goldberg , executive editor Matt Thompson , and senior newsroom leadership, Parsons will help launch and lead the Talent Lab to ensure excellence in recr
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News

New scheduling model puts airlines on equal plane while easing congestionNew study demonstrates how air traffic congestion can be reduced through flight schedules without favoring certain airlines over others.
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Viden

Apple lancerer ny iPad: Skal bane vej til klasseværelsetApples nyeste og billigste iPad understøtter nu blyant og en række nye værktøjer designet til klasseundervisning.
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Viden

Hvad ved Facebook om mig? Find ud af det herDownload dit liv fra Facebook. Mit fyldte 1,5 gigabyte. Lige til at sælge for Facebook.
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Montana State researchers find that beetle odor could help tackle tamariskThe Montana State University team found that a synthetic version of a pheromone produced by northern tamarisk beetles could be used to double the effectiveness of the beetles in controlling the invasive shrub.
5h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News

3-DIY: Printing your own bioprinterResearchers at Carnegie Mellon University have developed a low-cost 3-D bioprinter by modifying a standard desktop 3-D printer, and they have released the breakthrough designs as open source so that anyone can build their own system.
5h
The Atlantic

The Civil-Rights Movement’s Generation GapEditor’s Note: Read The Atlantic ’s special coverage of Martin Luther King Jr.’s legacy. “T his isn’t a King–Stokely situation.” The reverend’s voice on the telephone was deep and deliberate. He was trying to dissuade us from heading to the Florida statehouse, where a massive sit-in had been organized by young activists protesting the murder of Trayvon Martin, a black teenager, and the acquittal
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The Atlantic

You Don't Look Like Your SelfieYour face is not flat. This might seem self-evident, but as people have begun to live richer, more selfie-filled lives online, a peculiar lacuna has formed around this point. In a recent survey of American plastic surgeons, more than 40 percent reported that patients came in asking for surgery to correct features they felt looked bad in photos posted on social media. Boris Paskhover, a surgeon an
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The Atlantic

The President Sang Amazing Grace“I was driving when I heard ‘The President Sang Amazing Grace,’” Joan Baez told The Atlantic , “and I had to pull over to make sure I heard whose song it was because I knew I had to sing it.” The 77-year-old folk legend included the song in her final album, Whistle Down The Wind , released in early March . Originally written and performed by Zoe Mulford following the 2015 mass shooting in a histo
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

The clouds of spaghetti that keep DNA data safeCells can avoid "data breaches" when letting signaling proteins into their nuclei thanks to a quirky biophysical mechanism involving a blur of spaghetti-like proteins, researchers from the Rockefeller University and the Albert Einstein College of Medicine have shown. Their study appears in the March 23 issue of the Journal of Biological Chemistry.
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New Scientist - News

NASA’s James Webb Space Telescope has been delayed – againNASA James WebbThe James Webb Space Telescope, which will hunt for signs of life on other worlds, was supposed to launch next year. It has now been delayed to May 2020
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New Scientist - News

Lost villages from centuries ago found in the Amazon rainforestEven some of the more remote parts of the Amazon rainforest, far from major rivers, were once densely populated – centuries before the arrival of Europeans
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Latest Headlines | Science News

Powerful New England quake recorded in pond mudThe newfound sediment signature of the 1755 Cape Ann earthquake could be used to trace other prehistoric temblors.
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Popular Science

Impalas are the wimps of the animal kingdom and other species know itAnimals Zebras are more trustworthy African herbivores stay one step ahead of predators by eavesdropping on other species’ alarm calls.
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News

The clouds of spaghetti that keep DNA data safeCells can avoid 'data breaches' when letting signaling proteins into their nuclei thanks to a quirky biophysical mechanism involving a blur of spaghetti-like proteins, researchers from the Rockefeller University and the Albert Einstein College of Medicine have shown. Their study appears in the March 23 issue of the Journal of Biological Chemistry.
5h
Quanta Magazine

Brains Cling to Old Habits When Learning New TricksThe hallmark of intelligence is the ability to learn . As decades of research have shown, our brains exhibit a high degree of “plasticity,” meaning that neurons can rewire their connections in response to new stimuli. But researchers at Carnegie Mellon University and the University of Pittsburgh have recently discovered surprising constraints on our learning abilities. The brain may be highly fle
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Feed: All Latest

Apple iPad for Education: Price, Specs, Release DateiPad Apple Pencil EducationApple refreshed its lowest cost iPad, adding Pencil support and other software features designed for use in schools.
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NYT > Science

Medicare Is Cracking Down on Opioids. Doctors Fear Pain Patients Will Suffer.Officials are close to limiting doses of the painkillers, but doctors say doing so could put older patients into withdrawal or lead them to buy deadly street drugs.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Pink-haired whistleblower at heart of Facebook scandalInstantly recognisable with his pink hair and nose ring, Christopher Wylie claims to have helped create data analysis company Cambridge Analytica before turning whistleblower and becoming "the face" of the crisis engulfing Facebook.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Apple unveils pencil support for $329 iPad at school eventApple is adding the ability to use a digital pencil to draw and write on its cheapest iPad model in an attempt to make the tablet more compelling for creating, teaching and learning.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

NASA delays next-generation space telescope until 2020 (Update)NASA James WebbNASA is delaying the launch of its next-generation space telescope—its highest science priority—until at least 2020.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Earth-bound Chinese spacelab plunging to fiery endAn uncontrolled Chinese space station weighing at least seven tonnes is set to break up as it hurtles to Earth on or around April 1, the European Space Agency has forecast.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Newly-discovered planet is hot, metallic and dense as MercuryA hot, metallic, Earth-sized planet with a density similar to Mercury—situated 260 million light years away—has been detected and characterised by a global team of astronomers, including the University of Warwick.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

New technology reveals secrets of famous Neandertal skeleton La Ferrassie 1An international team of researchers, led by Dr. Asier Gomez-Olivencia of the University of the Basque Country (UPV/EHU) and including Binghamton University anthropologist Rolf Quam, has provided new insights on one of the most famous Neandertal skeletons, discovered over 100 years ago: La Ferrassie 1.
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Repurposing inhibitors may provide new treatment approach for ovarian cancerWistar researchers have found rationale for repurposing a class of antitumor compounds called HDAC inhibitors as a new therapeutic option for ovarian cancer with mutations in the ARID1A gene.
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Newly discovered planet is hot, metallic and dense as MercuryA hot, metallic, Earth-sized planet with a density similar to Mercury -- situated 260 million light years away -- has been detected and characterized by a global team of astronomers, including the University of Warwick.
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Evaluation and treatment of depression may reverse memory and cognitive difficultiesIndividuals with worse depression and mood symptoms are more likely to develop mild cognitive impairment (MCI) and to progress from MCI to dementia. Evaluation and treatment of symptoms of depression may improve or maintain cognitive functioning in some older patients diagnosed with MCI.
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News

New study on nicotinic receptors & LT memory paves way for targeted dementia therapyA new University of Bristol study, which identifies how acetylcholine impacts learning and memory by acting at different receptors, could prove significant in the drive to develop more targeted and effective therapies for dementia.
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Antibiotic use increases risk of severe viral disease in miceDoctors recommend against taking antibiotics for viral infections because they don't work -- antibiotics don't kill viruses -- and do promote antibiotic resistance. Now, a new study from Washington University School of Medicine in St. Louis suggests another reason to avoid the pills: taking antibiotics increases susceptibility to subsequent viral infection, at least in mice.
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Detecting diminished dopamine-firing cells inside brain could reveal earliest signs of Alzheimer'sA new link between diminished input from dopamine-firing cells deep inside the brain and the ability to form new memories could be crucial in detecting the earliest signs of Alzheimer's disease.
6h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Sediment core from sluice pond contains evidence for 1755 New England earthquakeSigns of a 1755 earthquake that was strong enough to topple steeples and chimneys in Boston can be seen in a sediment core drawn from eastern Massachusetts' Sluice Pond, according to a new report published in Seismological Research Letters.
6h
New on MIT Technology Review

The Path to Professional Salvation for Modern IT LeadersToday’s technology leaders must learn how to become transformational business experts, driving the digital opportunity with the CMO or CDO, and looking beyond operational improvements to achieve competitive advantage through innovation.
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Science | The Guardian

Lost Amazon villages uncovered by archaeologists81 settlements have been found in an area once thought to have been near-uninhabited, and research suggests there were hundreds more Once people thought the Amazon was a near-uninhabited rainforest before the Europeans turned up, but researchers say they have found new evidence that it was in fact a hive of human activity and home to millions of people. A new study has revealed details of 81 site
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Inside Science

BRIEF: Pond Mud Holds Evidence of Massachusetts’s Largest Recorded EarthquakeBRIEF: Pond Mud Holds Evidence of Massachusetts’s Largest Recorded Earthquake Deep layers may reveal prehistoric earthquakes, showing how often they strike New England. P1010037_cropped.jpg Brad Hubeny from Salem State University and Emma Howey from Wellesley College take a sediment core from Sluice Pond in Lynn, Massachusetts. Image credits: Katrin Monecke Earth Tuesday, March 27, 2018 - 12:00 N
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Feed: All Latest

The Facebook Privacy Setting That Doesn’t Do Anything at AllFor years, Facebook has left a privacy setting on its site that addresses a problem that no longer exists.
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New on MIT Technology Review

Exclusive: Alphabet X is exploring new ways to use AI in food productionAstro Teller says it’s thinking about how to pair machine learning with other technologies to revolutionize agriculture.
6h
Live Science

Here's Why Antibiotics May Give Viruses a Leg UpWhy are infections from the viruses that cause West Nile fever, dengue and even Zika deadly for some people but mild in others?
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Research hints at double the driving range for electric vehiclesWhen it comes to the special sauce of batteries, researchers at PNNL have discovered it's all about the salt concentration. By getting the right amount of salt, right where they want it, they've demonstrated a small lithium-metal battery can recharge about seven times more than batteries with conventional electrolytes.
6h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Strategic expressionPsychology professor's new research reveals facial expressions as tools for social influence.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Sediment core from sluice pond contains evidence for 1755 New England earthquakeSigns of a 1755 earthquake that was strong enough to topple steeples and chimneys in Boston can be seen in a sediment core drawn from eastern Massachusetts' Sluice Pond, according to a new report published in Seismological Research Letters.
6h
The Atlantic

Practicing for Enlightenment With Video GamesI am determined not to let anyone see it, but my hands hurt. A lot. It’s like the day after a particularly horrible session at the gym, but with all the pain focused into my thumbs and fingertips. The flashing countdown on my screen taunts me: “Continue?” Behind these goading letters, my digital avatar—the archetypal Japanese martial artist, Ryu—lies in broken humiliation at the feet of a petit C
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The Atlantic

Diplomatic Expulsions Won't Deter RussiaIn the span of a day, more than 100 Russian diplomats across North America and Europe were told that they’d be getting the boot—a mass expulsion coordinated by 23 countries in response to this month’s nerve-agent attack on former Russian spy Sergei Skripal and his daughter Yulia in the English city of Salisbury. The move was a stunning show of international solidarity with the United Kingdom, whi
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New Scientist - News

Novichok attack tests the world’s chemical weapons treatyWe have the international tools to resolve uncertainties over the poisoning of Sergei and Yulia Skripal – but they will only work if Russia cooperates
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

Paper-folding art inspires better bandagesCutting kirigami-style slits in stretchy films could make for stickier bandages, heat pads, wearable electronics, according to a new study.
6h
BBC News - Science & Environment

JWST: Hubble 'successor' faces new delayNASA James WebbThe James Webb Space Telescope will not now be launched until "approximately May 2020".
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News

BIABooster: A more sensitive device for characterizing DNA in blood circulationDeveloped and patented in 2012 and 2014 in the Laboratoire d'Analyse et d'Architecture des Systèmes (LAAS-CNRS) and implemented industrially by Picometrics-Technologies, BIABooster technology can characterize DNA with new precision and sensitivity. When used to analyze residual DNA circulating in the blood, it has identified promising signatures for monitoring patients with cancer. These signature
6h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News

New technology reveals secrets of famous Neandertal skeleton La Ferrassie 1An international team of researchers, led by Dr. Asier Gomez-Olivencia of the University of the Basque Country (UPV/EHU) and including Binghamton University anthropologist Rolf Quam, has provided new insights on one of the most famous Neandertal skeletons, discovered over 100 years ago: La Ferrassie 1.
6h
Latest Headlines | Science News

‘Nanobot’ viruses tag and round up bacteria in food and waterViruses called phages evolved to hunt bacteria. With magnetic nanoparticles and genetic engineering, they become nanobots that work for us.
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Scientific American Content: Global

NASA's James Webb Space Telescope Slips to 2020, and Astronomy SuffersDamaged thrusters and a torn sunshield are keeping the telescope grounded perhaps until May of 2020—and throwing astronomy and astrophysics into turmoil -- Read more on ScientificAmerican.com
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The Atlantic

'Learning From History': A Goal? A Delusion? A Trap?Last week, as part of The Atlantic’s discussion of the 15th anniversary of the disastrous invasion of Iraq, I wrote a post called “ The Inevitability of Ignorance .” Its main point was about the necessity, and the impossibility, of trying to “learn” from successes and failures in the past. Everyone has heard the Santayana chestnut/homily/warning about “those who cannot remember the past….” But ev
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The Atlantic

How Roseanne Handled the Culture Wars of Its TimeThis week, Roseanne returns to television, 30 years after its October 18, 1988, debut on ABC. Controversy has already surrounded the new season following the announcement that the title character will be, like the outspoken star Roseanne Barr herself, a Donald Trump supporter. Fans of the original questioned the reboot’s decision to get so overtly political, but Barr defended her decision to crea
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Viden

Brugere i chok: Facebook logger alle sms’er og telefonopkaldFlere Android-brugere har fået sig en slem overraskelse over Facebooks dataindsamling. Facebook undskylder sig med, at brugerne selv har givet tilladelse.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

Parts of the Amazon thought uninhabited were actually home to up to a million peopleParts of the Amazon previously thought to have been almost uninhabited were really home to thriving populations of up to a million people, new research shows.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

Hunting turns bear cubs into mama's boys (and girls)Human hunting changes brown bear reproductive strategies, so that the cubs stay with their mother longer. As a result, the females have fewer offspring, but grow older.
6h
Big Think

Tiangong-1 crash: When and where will the Chinese space station hit Earth?“We are in the process of finding out what filling the sky with hundreds of thousands of satellites does to all life on Earth.” ― Steven Magee Read More
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

New report recommends a nationwide effort to better estimate methane emissionsThe U.S. should take bold steps to improve measurement, monitoring, and inventories of methane emissions caused by human activities, says a new report from the National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine. Better data on methane—a greenhouse gas that contributes to air pollution and threatens public and worker safety—would help inform decisions related to climate, economics, and human
7h
Live Science

This Could Be the 'Beginning of the End' for North Atlantic Right WhalesA lack of new babies for endangered Northern Atlantic right whales makes their future even more uncertain.
7h
New on MIT Technology Review

Waymo is building an autonomous, all-electric SUV with JaguarWaymo Jaguar I-Pace
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Ingeniøren

Vestas tester sol- og vindhybrid i spansk vindmølleparkEn eksisterende 3 MW Vestas-vindmølle og et nyt 372 kW solcelleanlæg er netop blevet koblet sammen og skal som forsøg drives som ét energianlæg i en spansk vindmøllepark.
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News

New report recommends a nationwide effort to better estimate methane emissionsThe US should take bold steps to improve measurement, monitoring, and inventories of methane emissions caused by human activities, says a new report from the National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine. Better data on methane -- a greenhouse gas that contributes to air pollution and threatens public and worker safety -- would help inform decisions related to climate, economics, and h
7h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Research Brief: Older adults often prescribed meds linked to higher side effect risksDrugs with high-risk anticholinergic properties can lead to risks of developing serious adverse events, such as cognitive impairment, falls, dementia, and even mortality in older adults. Yet, relatively little is known about prescribing trends of high-risk anticholinergic medications in the United States of America.Researchers in the University of Minnesota College of Pharmacy conducted a repeated
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Marijuana may lead non-smokers to cigarettesWhile cigarette smoking is declining, marijuana use is rising and, disproportionately, marijuana users also smoke cigarettes. Our new study reports that cannabis use was associated with an increased initiation of cigarette smoking among non-cigarette smokers, and that adults who smoke cigarettes and use cannabis are less likely to quit smoking cigarettes than those who do not use cannabis. Former
7h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News

The future of photonics using quantum dotsFiber-optic cables package everything from financial data to cat videos into light, but when the signal arrives at your local data center, it runs into a silicon bottleneck. Instead of light, computers run on electrons moving through silicon-based chips, which are less efficient than photonics. To break through, scientists have been developing lasers that work on silicon. In this week's APL Photon
7h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Detecting diminished dopamine-firing cells inside the brain could reveal earliest signs of Alzheimer's diseaseDetecting diminished dopamine-firing cells inside the brain could reveal earliest signs of Alzheimer's disease.Sheffield scientists discover a loss of cells that use dopamine may cause part of the brain -- responsible for forming new memories -- to function less effectively.Findings could revolutionize screening for Alzheimer's disease, which affects more than 520,000 people in the UK.
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Despite reductions in infectious disease mortality in US, diarrheal disease deaths on the riseDeaths from infectious diseases have declined overall in the United States over the past three decades. However, the rates of decline varied significantly by counties, according to a new scientific study.
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Parts of the Amazon thought uninhabited were actually home to up to a million peopleParts of the Amazon previously thought to have been almost uninhabited were really home to thriving populations of up to a million people, new research shows.
7h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Hunting turns bear cubs into mama's boys (and girls)Human hunting changes brown bear reproductive strategies, so that the cubs stay with their mother longer. As a result, the females have fewer offspring, but grow older.
7h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Study examines usability of electronic health records, safety eventsThe usability of electronic health records may be associated with some safety events where patients were possibly harmed.
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Decline in deaths from most infectious diseases in US, large differences among countiesDeaths due to most infectious diseases decreased in the United States from 1980 to 2014, although there were large differences among counties.
7h
New on MIT Technology Review

Some of tech’s biggest firms hope to save money with open-source chip designs
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New Scientist - News

Millions of YouTube product reviews may flout advertising rulesAn analysis of YouTube videos and Pinterest pins has found that around 90 per cent of affiliate marketing links are not disclosed, in contravention of advertising rules
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

Why we struggle to get good night's sleep as we get olderNew research has identified the way age impairs the ability of the circadian clock in mammals to re-set itself when exposed to light, resulting in disruption to sleeping patterns and consequent threats to wellbeing.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

Unresolved puzzles in exotic nucleiScientists discuss the structure of unstable and unbound forms of Helium, Lithium, and Beryllium nuclei that have unusually large neutron to proton ratios -- dubbed 'exotic' light nuclei. Many unstable atomic nuclei live long enough to be able serve as targets for further nuclear reactions -- especially in hot environments like the interior of stars.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

Understanding the strange properties of waterThe properties of water have fascinated scientists for centuries, but yet its unique behavior remains a mystery.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

How to deal with embarrassing situationsFeelings of embarrassment can be overcome through mental training. By training your mind to be an observer rather than actively participating in the embarrassing situation it is possible overcome humiliating or distressing feelings, says the author of a new study.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

What interstellar visitor 'Oumuamua can teach usThe first interstellar object ever seen in our solar system, named 'Oumuamua, is giving scientists a fresh perspective on how planets, asteroids and comets form.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

New method speeds up 3-D printing of millimeter-sized imaging lensesResearchers ahve used 3-D printing to make high-quality customized lenses quickly and at low-cost, which could be used for optical imaging, vision correction, and disease diagnosis.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

Up to 38 percent of all annual childhood asthma cases in Bradford, U.K. may be caused by air pollutionNew research highlights the impact of traffic-related air pollution on childhood asthma. The study also shows traffic-related air pollution could be specifically responsible for up to 24 percent of the total number of cases. An international team of researchers has used a newly developed model to assess the impact exposure to nitrogen oxides -- gases that make up air pollution -- has on the develo
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Science : NPR

Mother Bears Are Staying With Their Cubs Longer, Study FindsIn many parts of the world, it is illegal to shoot a brown bear with cubs. The restrictions have made mother bears more likely to spend an extra year with their cubs. (Image credit: Ilpo Kojola/Nature)
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Molecular prison forces diatomic inmates to cell floorA team of scientists including Carnegie's Tim Strobel and Venkata Bhadram now report unexpected quantum behavior of hydrogen molecules, H2, trapped within tiny cages made of organic molecules, demonstrating that the structure of the cage influences the behavior of the molecule imprisoned inside it.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

NASA measures Tropical Cyclone Nora's flooding rains in QueenslandNASA used satellite data to calculate the heavy rainfall created by Tropical Cyclone Nora as it came ashore in northwestern Queensland on March 24, 2018.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Exploring the thermoelectric properties of tin selenide nanostructuresSingle crystal tin selenide (SnSe) is a semiconductor and an ideal thermoelectric material; it can directly convert waste heat to electrical energy or be used for cooling. When a group of researchers from Case Western Reserve University in Cleveland, Ohio, saw the graphenelike layered crystal structure of SnSe, they had one of those magical "aha!" moments.
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BBC News - Science & Environment

Bear cubs spending longer with mothersHunting pressures mean brown bear cubs now spend an extra year with their mothers, say scientists.
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News

NASA measures Tropical Cyclone Nora's flooding rains in QueenslandNASA used satellite data to calculate the heavy rainfall created by Tropical Cyclone Nora as it came ashore in northwestern Queensland on March 24, 2018.
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News

A football coach's overconfidence has a positive impact on the team's resultExperts of the Higher School of Economics have determined that the overconfidence of head football coaches is positively connected with the results of the team. Researchers analyzed the behavior of coaches in the Russian Football Premier League. The results of the study have been published in the International Journal of Sports Science & Coaching.
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Kansas State University researcher studies risk of African swine fever in feedA Kansas State University researcher is studying the risk of African swine fever virus in feed and developing ways to prevent the spread of the disease to the US.
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Molecular prison forces diatomic inmates to cell floorA team of scientists including Carnegie's Tim Strobel and Venkata Bhadram now report unexpected quantum behavior of hydrogen molecules, H2, trapped within tiny cages made of organic molecules, demonstrating that the structure of the cage influences the behavior of the molecule imprisoned inside it.
7h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Paper-folding art inspires better bandagesCutting kirigami-style slits in stretchy films could make for stickier bandages, heat pads, wearable electronics, according to a new study by MIT engineers.
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TED Talks Daily (SD video)

How quantum physics can make encryption stronger | Vikram SharmaAs quantum computing matures, it's going to bring unimaginable increases in computational power along with it -- and the systems we use to protect our data (and our democratic processes) will become even more vulnerable. But there's still time to plan against the impending data apocalypse, says encryption expert Vikram Sharma. Learn more about how he's fighting quantum with quantum: designing secu
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Parts of the Amazon thought uninhabited were actually home to up to a million peopleParts of the Amazon previously thought to have been almost uninhabited were really home to thriving populations of up to a million people, new research shows.
7h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Quantum-dot lasers are promising for integrated photonic circuitsThousands of miles of fiber-optic cables crisscross the globe and package everything from financial data to cat videos into light. But when the signal arrives at your local data center, it runs into a silicon bottleneck. Instead of light, computers run on electrons moving through silicon-based chips—which, despite huge advances, are still less efficient than photonics.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Human hunting influences adaptation in bear cub parentingThe Anthropocene is characterized by human impacts extending to all corners of the globe. New research shows that it effects the relationship between mothers and cubs of the Scandinavian brown bear. Human hunting has changed the characteristics of mother bears' behavior to their cubs.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

NASA launches USU student-built experiment into spaceNASA James WebbAfter long delays caused by storms and rough seas, NASA on Sunday launched a rocket into space carrying an experiment built by students at Utah State University.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Waymo to buy 20,000 Jaguars for robotic ride-hailing serviceWaymo Jaguar I-PaceSelf-driving car pioneer Waymo will buy up to 20,000 electric vehicles from Jaguar Land Rover to help realize its vision for a robotic ride-hailing service.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Expert says Brexit campaign used data mined from FacebookThe computer expert who sparked a global debate over electronic privacy said Tuesday that the official campaign backing Britain's exit from the European Union had access to data that was inappropriately collected from millions of Facebook users.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Taxis paralyse Brussels to protest against UberHundreds of taxis brought traffic to a standstill in Brussels on Tuesday to protest proposed government reforms said to favour ride-hailing competitors like Uber.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Volkswagen in UK court over 'dieselgate'Thousands of British Volkswagen car owners took their compensation battle to London's High Court on Tuesday over the emissions-cheating"dieselgate" scandal that has plagued the German carmaker.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Zuckerberg turns down British MPs for data privacy grillingMark Zuckerberg FacebookFacebook chief Mark Zuckerberg on Tuesday turned down a request by British lawmakers to appear before them to respond to concerns about data privacy as the European Union set a deadline for the US social media giant to respond to its own questions.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

Tattoo electrodes from an ink-jet printerElectrodes for longterm monitoring of electrical impulses of heart or muscles in the form of temporary tattoos produced using an ink-jet printer.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

Cell-penetrating 'nanodrills' show promise for intracellular drug deliveryResearchers have created new nanomaterials able to cross cell membranes, establishing a novel platform for the intracellular delivery of molecular drugs and other cargo.
7h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

World Video Game Hall of Fame announces 2018 finalistsCalling all gamers to help pick World Video Game Hall of Fame inductees. Twelve finalists were named Tuesday for the class of 2018, pitting "Ms. Pac-Man" against "John Madden Football."
7h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Untangling the role of climate on sediment and reef evolution over millennial timescalesClimatic variability like precipitation changes or increase in extreme events such as storms and tropical cyclones is known to significantly modify the Earth's surface. Yet, our understanding of how sediment dynamics and reef evolution might respond to these changes is still limited.
7h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

New 'nanotweezers' open door to innovations in medicine, mobile techIt's difficult to conceptualize a world where humans could casually manipulate nanoscale objects at will or even control their own biological matter at a cellular level with light. But that is precisely what Yuebing Zheng, assistant professor of mechanical engineering at The University of Texas at Austin, is working toward with his "nanotweezers"—a new tool for handling nanoparticles using light t
7h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Exploring the thermoelectric properties of tin selenide nanostructuresSingle crystal tin selenide is a semiconductor and an ideal thermoelectric material; it can directly convert waste heat to electrical energy or be used for cooling. When a group of researchers from Case Western Reserve University saw the graphenelike layered crystal structure of SnSe, they had one of those magical 'aha!' moments. The group reports in the Journal of Applied Physics that they immedi
7h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Foul ball! Time to abolish rule protecting MLB from liability when fans are injuredIn advance of Major League Baseball's opening day on Thursday, new research from Indiana University's Kelley School of Business suggests that the risk of fans being hit by a foul ball or errant bat at games has increased in recent years. The research, accepted for publication by William & Mary Law Review, also argues that it is time to abolish the so-called 'Baseball Rule,' a legal doctrine establ
7h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News

NREL discovers enzyme domains that dramatically improve performanceIt was more than 10 years in the making, but when it came to uncovering the secrets of the molecular structure of enzymes, perseverance paid off. By studying and comparing the workhorse cellulose-degrading enzymes of two fungi, researchers from the Energy Department's National Renewable Energy Laboratory have pinpointed regions on these enzymes that can be targeted via genetic engineering to help
7h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Foul ball! Time to abolish rule protecting MLB from liability when fans are injuredIn advance of Major League Baseball's opening day on Thursday, new research from Indiana University's Kelley School of Business suggests that the risk of fans being hit by a foul ball or errant bat at games has increased in recent years.
7h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Team discovers enzyme domains that dramatically improve performanceIt was more than 10 years in the making, but when it came to uncovering the secrets of the molecular structure of enzymes, perseverance paid off. By studying and comparing the workhorse cellulose-degrading enzymes of two fungi, researchers from the Energy Department's National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL) have pinpointed regions on these enzymes that can be targeted via genetic engineering t
7h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

CERN experiment sees hints of a rare kaon decayWhat if the odds of an event occurring were about one in ten billion? This is the case for the decay of a positively charged particle known as a kaon into another positively charged particle called a pion and a neutrino–antineutrino pair. Yet, such a rare event, which has never been observed with certainty, is something that particle physicists really want to get their hands on. The reason? The St
7h
Big Think

Smithsonian report reveals an unexplored underwater ‘twilight zone’Smithsonian researchers identify an ocean zone with unique species living at the very edge of light. Read More
7h
Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

Study reveals lack of self-awareness among doctors when prescribing opioidsAs health providers struggle to curb the epidemic of opioid abuse, researchers have found that 65 percent of emergency department (ED) physicians surveyed underestimated how often they prescribed the highly addictive pain killers to patients.
7h
Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

Humans risked limb ischemia in exchange for bipedal walkingThe micro X-ray CT was established through joint engineering and medical research, and allows for the visualization of tiny structures in three dimensions. By examining the blood vessels of mice in detail via micro CT, researchers compared the vessels in mice to those in humans and identified characteristic mouse blood vessels that provide a circulation bypass when the femoral artery becomes clogg
7h
Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

AI improves touchscreen interfaces for users with impairmentsA new AI method adapts touchscreen interfaces to make more out of the capabilities of aging users and users with disabilities. People with tremor, dyslexia, Alzheimer's, or poor eyesight can improve efficiency of smartphone use without expensive devices.
7h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Understanding the strange behavior of waterThe properties of water have fascinated scientists for centuries, but yet its unique behaviour remains a mystery.
7h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Unresolved puzzles in exotic nucleiResearch into the origin of elements is still of great interest. Many unstable atomic nuclei live long enough to be able to serve as targets for further nuclear reactions—especially in hot environments like the interior of stars. And some of the research with exotic nuclei is, for instance, related to nuclear astrophysics. In this review published in EPJ A, Terry Fortune from the University of Pen
7h
New on MIT Technology Review

Europe risks being left behind as a tech power
7h
Science : NPR

The Psychology Of Fake NewsHow can we succeed in creating and perpetuating a culture that values and promotes truth? Cognitive scientist Tania Lombrozo considers the science of fake news — and how to protect ourselves. (Image credit: Nodar Chernishev/Getty Images/EyeEm Premium)
8h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Reading of biological molecules improved up to 100x by doubling the sensorsA coupled system of two miniature detectors called nanopores improves detection of biological molecules, including DNA and markers of early disease.
8h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

New study shows what interstellar visitor 'Oumuamua can teach usThe first interstellar object ever seen in our solar system, named 'Oumuamua, is giving scientists a fresh perspective on the development of planetary systems. A new study by a team including astrophysicists at NASA's Goddard Space Flight Center in Greenbelt, Maryland, calculated how this visitor from outside our solar system fits into what we know about how planets, asteroids and comets form.
8h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

How to discover a new 'species' of cloud – a sky spotter's guideClouds form in a multitude of different shapes and sizes, their infinite combinations and position across the sky offering a visual drama in response to the light conditions. But despite their apparent randomness, a detailed naming convention is in place to categorise them.
8h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Worldwide degradation of land and nature threatens prosperity and wellbeingThe world's prosperity and wellbeing are seriously being threatened by the degradation of land and nature. Although there are opportunities to turn things around, fears of further deterioration in the coming decades must not be taken lightly. That is concluded at the Intergovernmental Science-Policy Platform on Biodiversity and Ecosystem Services (IPBES), which serves under the United Nations flag
8h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Coding at birth: Nuffield Council on Bioethics publishes briefing note on whole genome sequencing of babiesThe Nuffield Council on Bioethics has today published a briefing note that examines the ethical issues raised by whole genome sequencing of babies.
8h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News

MSU-based bioinformaticians studied the evolution of broken genes in a fruit flyPseudogenes lose their ability to encode proteins and natural selection stops to notice them, as no mutations in such genes can be harmful. A study conducted with the participation of the specialists from the Faculty of Bioengineering and Bioinformatics, MSU (Lomonosov Moscow State University) confirms this fact but shows that natural selection still has certain influence on some of such genes. An
8h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Childhood friendships may have some health benefits in adulthoodTime spent with friends in childhood is associated with physical health in adulthood, according to data from a multi-decade study of men. The findings, published in Psychological Science, a journal of the Association for Psychological Science, show that boys who spent more time with friends as children tended to have lower blood pressure and lower BMI as men in their early 30s.
8h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News

New 'nanotweezers' open door to innovations in medicine, mobile techIt's difficult to conceptualize a world where humans could casually manipulate nanoscale objects at will or even control their own biological matter at a cellular level with light. But that is precisely what Yuebing Zheng, assistant professor of mechanical engineering at the University of Texas at Austin, is working toward with his 'nanotweezers' -- a new tool for handling nanoparticles using ligh
8h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News

CERN experiment sees hints of rare kaon decay: University of Birmingham physicists play leading roleWhat if the odds of an event occurring were about one in 10 billion? This is the case for the decay of a positively charged particle known as a kaon into another positively charged particle called a pion and a neutrino-antineutrino pair. Yet, such a rare event, which has never been observed with certainty, is something that particle physicists really want to get their hands on.
8h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Kent physiotherapist contributes to guidelines for knee cartilage treatmentA Kent physiotherapist contributes to international guidelines for knee cartilage treatment.Thousands of people worldwide with knee cartilage problems are expected to benefit from updated international guidelines on how to manage the condition.
8h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Screening high-risk individuals can reduce multiple myeloma mortalityMultiple myeloma is a rare incurable disease that is diagnosed in more than 30,000 people each year in the United States. Only half of patients with multiple myeloma are expected to survive five years after their diagnosis. Moffitt Cancer Center researchers are trying to identify patients who are at a higher risk of developing multiple myeloma early in order to improve patient outcomes.
8h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Mass extinction with prior warningMass extinctions throughout the history of the Earth have been well documented. Scientists believe that they occurred during a short period of time in geological terms. In a new study, FAU paleobiologists and their research partners have now shown that signs that the largest mass extinction event in the Earth's history was approaching became apparent much earlier than previously believed, and poin
8h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Untangling the role of climate on sediment and reef evolution over millennial timescalesClimatic variability like precipitation changes or increase in extreme events such as storms and tropical cyclones is known to significantly modify the Earth's surface. Yet, our understanding of how sediment dynamics and reef evolution might respond to these changes is still limited. In a recent study, a team of researchers has designed a new model that simulates sediment transport from mountains
8h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News

From lullabies to live concerts: How music and rhythm shape our social brainsA universal sign of motherhood is the lullaby. The world over, mothers sing to their babies, whether Twinkle Twinkle Little Star, their favorite song from the radio, or even random notes. This universality makes the simple lullaby a great window into the human mind. In a new study, cognitive neuroscientists found that lullabies soothe both moms and babies simultaneously, while playsongs increase b
8h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Square Kilometre Array—technology for a knowledge economyThe Square Kilometre Array South Africa (SKA SA)'s success is underpinned by open and inclusive institutions, fostering and leveraging interrelationships, promoting innovation that may be commercialised, and attracting, retaining and training suitable individuals.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Unpacking a secret of photosynthesisResearchers at University of Stavanger have brought us one step closer to solving the fundamental question how plants build the photosynthetic machinery.
8h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Tattoo electrodes from an ink-jet printer for long-term medical diagnosticsElectrodes for longterm monitoring of electrical impulses of heart or muscles in the form of temporary tattoos produced using an ink-jet printer. An international research group involving TU Graz, Austria, presents this novel method in Advanced Science.
8h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Self-driving cars can't be perfectly safe – what's good enough? 3 questions answeredOn March 19, an Uber self-driving vehicle being tested in Arizona struck and killed Elaine Herzberg, who was walking her bike across the street. This is the first time a self-driving vehicle has killed a pedestrian,and it raises questions about the ethics of developing and testingemerging technologies. Some answers will need to wait until the full investigation is complete. Even so, Nicholas Evans
8h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Insights into early urban lifeAdelheid Otto's research focuses on the development of urban civilization in ancient Mesopotamia. She is now excavating on the site of Ur, one of the world's first cities. The finds yield fascinating insights into urban life 4000 years ago.
8h
Ingeniøren

Telefonberedskab fejlede ved Manchester-terrorVodafone dumpes i en ny uvildig undersøgelse af Manchester-angrebet, der kostede 22 mennesker livet i 2017. Server-problemer blokerede et nødtelefonlinje i 4½ time.
8h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Inaudible infrasound also useful for weather and climate forecastsResearch by Pieter Smets of TU Delft and the KNMI shows that infrasound can be used for weather and climate forecasts. These inaudible low sound waves can be used to gain a better picture of the stratosphere, which can barely be measured in any other way. On Wednesday 28 March, Smets will be awarded his Ph.D. at TU Delft for his work on this subject.
8h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Researcher studies risk of African swine fever in animal feedIf African swine fever virus reaches the U.S., it could cause more than $16.8 billion in economic losses to swine and other industries. It would devastate trade and international markets, researchers say.
8h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Identification of transgenic organismsResearchers at Goethe University Frankfurt have developed a concept called AGameOfClones, which allows them to distinguish whether transgenic organisms carry an inserted foreign gene on one or on both chromosomes. This facilitates breeding and also benefits animal welfare.
8h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

First-ever nuclear reactor monitor will boost neutrino physicsA new U.S. Department of Energy project to develop the first detector able to remotely monitor nuclear reactors will also help physicists test the next generation of neutrino observatories.
8h
Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

Future electric cars could recharge wirelessly while you driveElectric vehicles may one day be able to recharge while driving down the highway, drawing wireless power directly from plates installed in the road that would make it possible to drive hundreds -- if not thousands -- of miles without having to plug in.
8h
Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

Salvage logging is often a pretext for harvesting woodAn increasing proportion of the world's protected forests are subject to extensive logging activities. The practice is called 'salvage logging' and allegedly aims to protect, e.g. areas of windthrow against bark beetle infestation. However, a new study has found that this instrument is used far too often.
8h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News

New study shows what interstellar visitor 'Oumuamua can teach usThe first interstellar object ever seen in our solar system, named 'Oumuamua, is giving scientists a fresh perspective on how planets, asteroids and comets form.
8h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News

How to deal with embarrassing situationsFeelings of embarrassment can be overcome through mental training. This is the finding of a study published in Springer's journal Motivation and Emotion. By training your mind to be an observer rather than actively participating in the embarrassing situation it is possible overcome humiliating or distressing feelings, says Li Jiang of Carnegie Mellon University in the US who led the study.
8h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Honeybees may unlock the secrets of how the human brain worksSheffield academics have discovered honeybee colonies adhere to the same laws as the brain when making collective decisions.
8h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Unresolved puzzles in exotic nucleiIn a new review published in EPJ A, Terry Fortune from the University of Pennsylvania, in Philadelphia, USA, discusses the structure of unstable and unbound forms of Helium, Lithium, and Beryllium nuclei that have unusually large neutron to proton ratios -- dubbed 'exotic' light nuclei. Many unstable atomic nuclei live long enough to be able serve as targets for further nuclear reactions -- especi
8h
The Atlantic

Putin Finally Went Too FarWhen Britain threw out 23 Russian diplomats in response to an assassination attempt on Russian agent Sergei Skripal, Vladimir Putin, the president of Russia and current bad boy of modern geopolitics , shrugged it off. With relations between London and Moscow so strained, the embassy didn’t have all that much to do, anyway. The cost, Putin no doubt felt, was predictable and bearable. Then on Monda
8h
Futurity.org

Therapy may strike 2-pronged blow against breast cancerCombining a cancer therapy with a second drug therapy that helps suppress tumor blood vessels found in cancer cells can help to significantly reduce the spread of breast cancer tumors while also causing cancer cell death, report researchers. Each day, normal human cell tissues express a protein known as p53 that wages war against potential malignancies. However, between 30 and 40 percent of human
8h
Ingeniøren

Kampfly: Danmark skal betale hemmeligt beløb for amerikansk it-opdateringDanmark skal medfinansiere en regning på 22 mia. kroner for en amerikansk it-opdatering af F-35 kampfly. Udgiften er ifølge Forsvarsministeriet med i prisen på 66 mia. kroner for de danske kampfly, men ministeriet mørklægger beløbet.
8h
Popular Science

10 ways to improve your video callsDIY Across five of the most popular apps. Video-calling smartphone apps let you share your face with with anyone, anywhere. These 10 tips will improve your calls on FaceTime, Skype, Duo, and other apps.
8h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Research shows why we struggle to get good night's sleep as we get olderNew research has identified the way age impairs the ability of the circadian clock in mammals to re-set itself when exposed to light, resulting in disruption to sleeping patterns and consequent threats to wellbeing.
8h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Femtosecond laser fabrication: Realizing dynamics control of electronsFemtosecond lasers are capable of processing any solid material with high quality and high precision using their ultrafast and ultra-intense characteristics. With the continuous development of laser technology, ultrafast laser manufacturing would hopefully become one of the primary methods employed in high-end manufacturing in the future.
8h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Understanding the strange behavior of waterThe properties of water have fascinated scientists for centuries, but yet its unique behavior remains a mystery.
8h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News

A combination of cancer immunotherapies could save more livesScientists at the University of Southampton have discovered a new combination of cancer immunotherapy treatment that could improve patients' survival rates.
8h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Tattoo electrodes from an ink-jet printerElectrodes for longterm monitoring of electrical impulses of heart or muscles in the form of temporary tattoos produced using an ink-jet printer. An international research group involving TU Graz presents this novel method in Advanced Science.
8h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News

A new non-destructive technique to detect single quantum level phononsThe precision measurement of phonons, the smallest energy quanta of mechanics, has always been the main constraint to the development of various quantum application technologies. A recent study has shown that quantum non-destructive and single-phonon-level phonon measurements can be achieved through elaborate hybrid optomechanical devices. This result was reported in the SCIENCE CHINA Physics, Mec
8h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Scientists report first results from neutrino mountain experimentThis week, an international team of physicists, including researchers at MIT, is reporting the first results from an underground experiment designed to answer one of physics' most fundamental questions: Why is our universe made mostly of matter?
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Futurity.org

How masculinity affects young men’s marijuana useFriendships and ideas about masculinity have a powerful effect on marijuana use among young minority men, report researchers. Researchers discovered that strong social bonds between men may increase, rather than decrease, marijuana use, contrary to what was previously thought. They also found that men who believe in more traditional masculine gender roles—men are supposed to be strong, successful
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Researchers find that beetle odor could help tackle tamariskIn the fight against an invasive plant colonizing portions of the state, a Montana State University doctoral student is luring shrub-munching beetles with an odor as tantalizing to them as the smell of bacon and pancakes, or perhaps a barbecue, is to humans.
9h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Researchers demonstrate highest reported conductivity for organic radical polymerA team of researchers with Purdue University has demonstrated the highest reported conductivity for an organic radical polymer to date, moving another step closer to their use in electronics. In their paper published in the journal Science, the group describes the technique they used and offer an opinion on why it produced the results they found. Jodie Lutkenhaus, with Texas A&M University writes
9h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Compared to nomadic communities, Silk Road cities were urban food desertsLike passionate foodies who know the best places to eat in every town, Silk Road nomads may have been the gastronomic elites of the Medieval Ages, enjoying diets much more diverse than their sedentary urban counterparts, suggests a new study in the Nature journal Scientific Reports.
9h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News

What else can molecular perovskite do?Combining good detonation performance, high stability and low cost is the major hindrance on high-performance explosives. A recent report by Wei-Xiong Zhang and Xiao-Ming Chen, Sun Yat-Sen University, China, presents a new sort of high-energetic materials produced by molecular perovskites, which achieve both exceptional detonation properties and high stability superior to the current benchmarks of
9h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News

'AGameOfClones': Identification of transgenic organismsResearchers at Goethe University Frankfurt have developed a concept called 'AGameOfClones,' which allows to distinguish easily whether transgenic organisms carry an inserted foreign gene on one or on both chromosomes. This facilitates breeding and also benefits animal welfare.
9h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Salvage logging is often a pretext for harvesting woodAn increasing proportion of the world's protected forests are subject to extensive logging activities. The practice is called 'salvage logging' and allegedly aims to protect, e.g. areas of windthrow against bark beetle infestation. However, a Würzburg study has found that this instrument is used far too often.
9h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News

AI improves touchscreen interfaces for users with impairmentsA new AI method adapts touchscreen interfaces to make more out of the capabilities of aging users and users with disabilities. People with tremor, dyslexia, Alzheimer's, or poor eyesight can improve efficiency of smartphone use without expensive devices.
9h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Humans risked limb ischemia in exchange for bipedal walkingThe micro X-ray CT was established through joint engineering and medical research, and allows for the visualization of tiny structures in three dimensions. By examining the blood vessels of mice in detail via micro CT, researchers compared the vessels in mice to those in humans and identified characteristic mouse blood vessels that provide a circulation bypass when the femoral artery becomes clogg
9h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Preclinical testing suggests some antioxidants may be effective in treating mitochondrial diseaseA systematic study of seven antioxidants commonly taken by children and adults affected with mitochondrial disease provides intriguing clues that at least two compounds should be further evaluated in clinical trials. N-acetylcysteine (NAC) and vitamin E showed compelling results in mitochondrial disease animal models. There are currently no proven effective treatments.
9h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

New method speeds up 3-D printing of millimeter-sized imaging lensesA new method to make a low-cost, high-quality lens quickly using a 3D printer has promising potential to create optical imaging lenses, customized contact lenses for correcting distorted vision, or to even turn iPhones into microscopes for disease diagnosis.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

The secret to making it out of povertyPoverty is an incredibly complex issue. Just ask Martín Burt, former mayor of Asuncion, Paraguay, where one-third of the people live below the poverty line.
9h
New on MIT Technology Review

A cheap, pipette-wielding robot wants to take over the boring bits of research
9h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Next-generation photovoltaics for economical clean energyEnergy sustainability represents one of the grand challenges facing modern society, and thin-film solar photovoltaics provide one of the best opportunities for rapidly expanding renewable energy use. Photovoltaics (PV) using the thin-film semi­conductor cadmium telluride (CdTe) have been commercialized at the gigawatts (GW)-per-year scale, with 17.5 GWs installed globally.
9h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

How to make greener biofuelsThe climate is under pressure. And despite a number of climate agreements, we still have not bent the curve on fossil fuel emissions, which continue to rise. One of the big sinners is the fuel we use for transport.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Do cells have a sweet tooth?Obesity is a global public health crisis that has doubled since 1980. That is why Damaris N. Lorenzo, a professor of Cell Biology and Physiology at UNC-Chapel Hill, has devoted her research to this topic.
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Feed: All Latest

The Stunning Skylines of China's MegacitiesLuca Campigotto captures the country's spectacular urban spaces in his latest photography collection.
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Futurity.org

Kids now sketch more women when asked to ‘draw a scientist’When drawing scientists, US children now depict women more often than ever, an analysis of five decades of “Draw-A-Scientist” studies conducted since the 1960s shows. The change suggests that children’s stereotypes linking science with men have weakened over time, the researchers say, consistent with more women becoming scientists and children’s media depicting more female scientists on televisio
9h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Tackling adherence to treatment on several frontsLearning to become self-sufficient and responsible is part of life's journey through the teen and young adult years. However, for young kidney-graft patients, any mistake or failure in keeping to their strict immunosuppressive therapy can lead to tragic results on the viability of the graft. Transplant specialists and researchers from eight leading pediatric medical centers across Canada and the U
9h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Study reveals lack of self-awareness among doctors when prescribing opioidsAs health providers struggle to curb the epidemic of opioid abuse, researchers at the University of Colorado Anschutz Medical Campus have found that 65 percent of emergency department (ED) physicians surveyed underestimated how often they prescribed the highly addictive pain killers to patients.
9h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Cell-penetrating 'nanodrills' show promise for intracellular drug deliveryResearchers have created new nanomaterials able to cross cell membranes, establishing a novel platform for the intracellular delivery of molecular drugs and other cargo.
9h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News

New method speeds up 3-D printing of millimeter-sized imaging lensesThe Northwestern Engineering research team used 3-D printing to make high-quality customized lenses quickly and at low-cost, which could be used for optical imaging, vision correction, and disease diagnosis.
9h
Scientific American Content: Global

The Future of Sexual ReproductionCould scientists one day use blood and skin cells to replace sperm and eggs? -- Read more on ScientificAmerican.com
9h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Nomads were setting food trends along the Silk RoadsThe Silk Roads stretched from Asia to Europe. From the 2nd century BC until the 16th century AD, people along this trade route exchanged goods like wool, gold, silver, and silk of course—but food has often been missing from understandings of the exchange system. New research is revealing that the food trendsetters along the Silk Road may have been mobile pastoralists, often called "nomads". This w
9h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Reversal of orbital angular momentum arising from an extreme Doppler shiftScientists have demonstrated for the first time how 'twisted' sound waves from a rotating source can produce negative frequencies—akin to turning back time.
9h
New Scientist - News

Our cancer strategies aren’t working – it’s time to change thatPlans to improve cancer survival in England and reduce rich-poor inequities are having little impact. This must be addressed, says Aimilia Exarchakou
9h
Live Science

Oldest Human DNA from Africa Reveals Clues About a Mysterious Ancient CultureThe DNA samples come from one of the most ancient cemeteries in the world.
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The Scientist RSS

Texas Stem Cell Law Opens Door for Controversial TreatmentsThe Scientist looks at one such Houston-based purveyor that has been treating patients abroad for years with mesenchymal stem cells.
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The Scientist RSS

Increase in Global Antibiotics Consumption Driven by Income GainsA study finds substantial growth in use of the drugs this century, linked to gains in wealth in low- and middle-income countries.
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The Scientist RSS

Image of the Day: Morphing CellsBy removing a single gene, researchers change the developmental fate of tumor cells in mice.
9h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Social determinism starts at schoolA social universe is an extraordinarily complex thing. At its own level, a mind-brain is equally complex. When a mind is behaving within in a group, patterns emerge – patterns that the mind can hardly grasp. These complex forms are self-organising, and emerge on their own and for adaptive purposes. They are perfectly fitted to the context in which they are born and each is unique. There is a parti
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Climate policy is a fiendish problem for governments – time for an independent authority with real powersFrom global epidemics to global economic markets to the global climate, understanding complex systems calls for solid data and sophisticated maths. My advice to young scientists contemplating a career in research is: "If you're good at maths, keep it up!"
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Monatomic moment: Researchers help open the door for technology advances using grapheneResearchers at Wright State University have helped pave the way for expanded applications of graphene in everything from space exploration to all-weather sensors.
9h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Public willing to pay to improve water quality, research findsIn the wake of the recent water crisis in Flint, Michigan, in which studies confirmed lead contamination in the city's drinking supply, awareness of the importance of protecting watersheds has increased. User-financed ecosystem service programs can compensate landowners to voluntarily participate in environmental improvement efforts. Now, researchers from the University of Missouri have found in a
9h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Using gold particles to make the invisible visibleGold nanoparticles give us a better understanding of enzymes and other molecules. Biswajit Pradhan, Ph.D. candidate at the Leiden Institute of Physics, uses gold nanorods to study individual molecules that would be challenging to detect otherwise. Resulting knowledge can be applied to many research fields, such as improving solar-cell efficiency and phototherapy of cancer.
9h
Futurity.org

Timing of SNAP benefits can hurt kids’ gradesFor schoolchildren who receive food through the monthly Supplemental Nutrition Assistance Program (SNAP), which day payment arrives can affect academic performance, new research shows. Student scores on end-of-grade reading and math tests vary depending on how much time has elapsed since the family’s SNAP (formerly known as Food Stamps) benefit arrived, with scores peaking between two and three w
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Futurity.org

Prep for fetal surgery involves kickball, chicken breastsTo rehearse for complex surgery on the spinal cords of fetuses, surgeons are practicing on kickballs and chicken breasts. These items, combined with high-tech 3D printing technology, are providing surgical teams with the practice they need to perform a complex but minimally invasive new surgical repair of a particular form of spina bifida. “A kickball is about the size of a uterus at that time in
10h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

AI improves touchscreen interfaces for users with impairmentsResearchers at Aalto University, Finland, and Kochi University of Technology, Japan, developed a new algorithmic approach to user interface optimization that takes individual differences into account.
10h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Salvage logging is often a pretext for harvesting woodAn increasing proportion of the world's protected forests are subject to extensive logging activities. The practice is called "salvage logging" and allegedly aims to protect e.g. areas of windthrow against bark beetle infestation. However, a Würzburg study has found that this instrument is used far too often.
10h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

New way of producing useful compounds from birch for the cosmetics industryVTT Technical Research Centre of Finland has used plant cell culture technology to develop new types of ingredients for the cosmetics industry. Cell cultures, which originated from birch leaves and seeds, produce pigments, as well as compounds that help to preserve products and inhibit the growth of harmful microbes. Cell culture technology is a natural and environmentally friendly production meth
10h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Study suggests race car drivers who are similar in age and stature more likely to crash in good weatherA team of researchers with Korea Advanced Institute of Science and Technology, the U.S. Treasury and the European School of Management and Technology has found via data analysis that Formula 1 race car drivers are more likely to crash if they are racing against an opponent who is similar in age and driving prowess when driving under safe conditions. In their paper published in the Proceedings of t
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Scientific American Content: Global

How to Think about "Implicit Bias"Amidst a controversy, it’s important to remember that implicit bias is real—and it matters -- Read more on ScientificAmerican.com
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Johns Hopkins investigators unravel biological roots of pulmonary hypertensionWorking with cells that line the innermost layer of the blood vessels, Johns Hopkins investigators say they have made a leap forward in understanding the underlying biology behind pulmonary hypertension, a dangerous type of high blood pressure in lungs that ultimately leads to right heart failure and death.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Evolutionary computation has been promising self-programming machines for 60 years – so where are they?What if computers could program themselves? Instead of the laborious job of working out how a computer could solve a problem and then writing precise coded instructions, all you would have to do is tell it what you want and the computer would generate an algorithm that solves your problem.
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Ingeniøren

Diamant giver laserens storebror – maseren – nye mulighederDet er lykkedes en britisk forskergruppe at lave en maser, der ved stuetemperatur udsender kontinuert mikrobølgestråling på samme vis, som en laser udsender lys.
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Rant: No, a $38 Water Bottle Can't Turn You Into a #Brave #BossThere’s no mundanity safe from the impulses of millennial-hungry startups catering to their favorite demographic.
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8 Hot Tech Deals: Dell, Amazon Echo, HTC Vive, August Smart LockGet ready for warmer weather with some tech deals.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Your online privacy depends as much on your friends' data habits as your ownFacebook Data PrivacyIn the aftermath of revelations about the alleged misuse of Facebook user data by Cambridge Analytica, many social media users are educating themselves about their own digital footprint. And some are shocked at the extent of it.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Cell-penetrating 'nanodrills' show promise for intracellular drug deliveryResearchers at Oregon State University and Oregon Health & Science University have created new nanomaterials able to cross cell membranes, establishing a novel platform for the intracellular delivery of molecular drugs and other cargo.
10h
Popular Science

Otters are too small, whales are too big, and seals are just rightAnimals Why size matters in the ocean. Conventional wisdom holds that whales got so big simply because they could. Water makes you buoyant and the oceans are big, and that lack of constraint seems to have…
10h
The Atlantic

Why People Don't Take Lifesaving MedicationsDURBAN, South Africa—Ronald Louw was a human-rights lawyer and professor at the University of KwaZulu-Natal, the South African province that’s one of the most HIV-affected regions of the world, so he must have known about the dangers of the virus. In April 2005, he was taking care of his mother, who had been diagnosed with cancer, when he noticed he had a cough that would not go away. He went to
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The Atlantic

How to Fall in Love Over TextIt’s a coincidence that Penny, the heroine of Mary H.K. Choi’s young-adult novel Emergency Contact , happens to be passing by as Sam, her local barista, is having his first panic attack. She gives him a ride, and her number, and tells him to text her when he gets home. He jokes that she’s his “emergency contact.” Even though their relationship starts with an actual emergency, as the book progress
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Ingeniøren

Forældre kan nu få børns identitet slettet fra udskældte trivelsmålingerUndervisningsminister Merete Riisager(LA) åbner nu for at forældre kan få anonymiseret børns data i trivelsmålinger fra 2015-2017.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Nickel in the X-ray limelightMaking chemicals for industrial processes often requires scientists to use a catalyst—a substance that speeds up a chemical reaction, reducing the amount of energy it takes to make different products.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Wildfires break out in Southern FloridaIt is the end of March and wildfires are already breaking out in the South. In this image taken by the Aqua satellite on March 23, three distinct areas of fire activity can be seen. Smoke billows from the fire sites. The National Interagency Fire Center works in concert with the National Interagency Coordination Center and the Southern Area Coordination Center (SACC) in detecting and reporting fir
10h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Cheetah III robot preps for a role as a first responderIf you were to ask someone to name a new technology that emerged from MIT in the 21st century, there's a good chance they would name the robotic cheetah. Developed by the MIT Department of Mechanical Engineering's Biomimetic Robotics Lab under the direction of Associate Professor Sangbae Kim, the quadruped MIT Cheetah has made headlines for its dynamic legged gait, speed, jumping ability, and biom
10h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Drones help researchers monitor High Plains wheathe Texas A&M AgriLife Research dryland wheat variety nursery near Bushland is being monitored weekly by drone flights, offering wheat breeders a chance to see changes on a more real-time basis.
10h
Scientific American Content: Global

Should Computer Simulations Replace Animal Testing for Heart Drugs?Computational models representing human heart cells show higher accuracy than animal models in predicting an adverse drug effect, such as dangerous arrhythmias -- Read more on ScientificAmerican.com
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

UK MPs demand Zuckerberg testify on data row after he offers deputyMark Zuckerberg FacebookBritish MPs renewed a demand on Tuesday to interview Facebook chief Mark Zuckerberg personally over a data privacy row, after he responded to an earlier request by offering to send one of his deputies.
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Live Science

Doomed 19th-Century Arctic Explorers Suffer in 'The Terror,' But Their Real Story Was Even WorseThe ocean journey made by adventurers who intended to navigate the Northwest Passage went horribly wrong in 1846.
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The Atlantic

Local Nonprofits Receive National Award from The Atlantic and Allstate for Driving Positive Change in Underserved CommunitiesNew Orleans (March 27, 2018)—At a symposium in New Orleans today, The Atlantic and Allstate will announce winners of the third annual Renewal Awards , honoring nonprofits across the country for their innovative, grassroots approach to driving change in their communities and bringing progress to the country. Five winners and five runners-up were selected for the third annual award, which comes wit
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Scientific American Content: Global

How Twitter Bots Help Fuel Political FeudsAutomated social media accounts can create “misinformation networks” that spread falsehoods and fan the flames of partisan disagreement -- Read more on ScientificAmerican.com
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Clean tanks reduce microbial riskSimple measures such as regular maintenance of backyard tanks and rooftops can help reduce microbial contamination of household rainwater, Flinders University experts say.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Scientists print all-liquid 3-D structuresScientists from the Department of Energy's Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory (Berkeley Lab) have developed a way to print 3-D structures composed entirely of liquids. Using a modified 3-D printer, they injected threads of water into silicone oil—sculpting tubes made of one liquid within another liquid.
11h
Live Science

Mount Etna Is Slip-Sliding Toward the SeaMount Etna's entire bulk is moving.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Research reveals snakes' surprising hunting strategiesAnyone who has sat down to a summer crab feast knows how hard, messy and delicious they are.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Newly discovered bacteria can break down biomassDespite decades of research, how ruminants deconstruct plant biomass in their stomachs is still something of a mystery. Now, an international team of scientists has identified a previously unknown family of bacteria and complex enzymes that break down plant biomass and appear to be critical for ruminants to be herbivorous.
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How Cannabis Tech Can Help Build a Better Cup of CoffeeClean, tasty coffee that begins life in a lab takes a cue from the cultivation of marijuana.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Kirigami inspires better bandagesScraped up knees and elbows are tricky places to securely apply a bandage. More often than not, the adhesive will peel away from the skin with just a few bends of the affected joint.
11h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

A space window to electrifying scienceNASA James WebbLightning triggers powerful electrical bursts in Earth's atmosphere almost every second. The inner workings of these magnificent forces of nature are still unknown, but a rare observation by an ESA astronaut gave a boost to the science community. A European detector will take on the challenge of hunting for thunderstorms from space next week.
11h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Self-assembling, tunable interfaces found in quantum materialsA potential revolution in device engineering could be underway, thanks to the discovery of functional electronic interfaces in quantum materials that can self-assemble spontaneously.
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Latest Headlines | Science News

Water may have killed Mars’ magnetic fieldExtra hydrogen near the Red Planet’s iron core could have shut down convection.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Understanding nanocatalysts' 'talk' could better inform designEnzymes are nature's best nanoscale catalysts, and often show what's known as catalytic allostery – that is, reactions at one site affecting reactions at another site, typically a few nanometers away, without direct interaction between the reactants.
11h
Live Science

Meet Your Interstitium, A Newfound 'Organ'Researcher say they've found a network of fluid-filled spaces in tissue that hadn't been seen before.
11h
Scientific American Content: Global

Einstein and the QuantumHe helped invent the concept, but struggled until his death with the idea of a probabilistic universe -- Read more on ScientificAmerican.com
11h
Science | The Guardian

Elephant seen 'smoking' in southern India – videoFootage of an elephant blowing ash has baffled wildlife experts, who say they've never seen behaviour like it before. The video released by the Wildlife Conservation Society may be an example of zoopharmacognosy, animal self-medication Elephant 'smoking' footage baffles experts Continue reading...
11h
Scientific American Content: Global

Wristband Lets the Brain Control a Computer with a Thought and a TwitchAn electronic bracelet is being readied for mental control of computers, prosthetics and other devices—all without the need to drill a hole in your head -- Read more on ScientificAmerican.com
11h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Prehistoric people resilient in the face of extreme climate eventsPioneering early people who lived at the end of the last ice age actually carried on with life as usual despite plummeting temperatures, a study at a world-famous archaeological site in North Yorkshire suggests.
12h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Human threats to the amphibian tree of lifeA new study by researchers at Yale and George Washington University examines the human threats to the amphibian family tree and calls for a rethinking of conservation priorities to preserve species diversity and evolutionary heritage.
12h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Researcher helps classify new means of renewable light energyPurdue professor Jeff Miller worked with researchers from the University of California, Los Angeles to characterize extremely small titanium dioxide that could help convert visible light into renewable energy.
12h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Kepler beyond planets—finding exploding starsAstronomer Ed Shaya was in his office looking at data from NASA's Kepler space telescope in 2012 when he noticed something unusual: The light from a galaxy had quickly brightened by 10 percent. The sudden bump in light got Shaya instantly excited, but also nervous. The effect could be explained by the massive explosion of a star—a supernova!—or, more troublingly, a computer error.
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Science | The Guardian

How social science can help us understand moral tribalism in politicsWe seem to be stuck in a media cycle of outrage that is increasingly polarising people from both sides of the political spectrum. But social science research can offer us insights and channels for change We live in an increasingly polarised society. With each emerging debate—immigration, tax law, sexual misconduct, gun control—it seems we are plunged ever deeper in a cycle of outrage, distrust, a
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Science | The Guardian

Argonauts: the Astronauts of the SeaHow argonaut cephalopods evolved their own architecture to return to the open ocean Cephalopod molluscs, the group of animals that includes octopuses, nautiluses, bobtail squid and cuttlefish amongst its living members, is a small but highly diverse group of animals. The group boasts ocean giants , colour and shape changing octopuses, luminous ink squirters , transparent deep sea squid, aquarium
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The Atlantic

'We Cannot Move Forward if These Kids Are Left Behind'What does it take to widen the circle of opportunity in a rapidly diversifying America? Few questions are more pressing for the country. The Census Bureau recently forecast that racial and ethnic minorities will become a majority of the nation’s under-18 population by 2020, most of the under-30 population by 2027, and a majority of the under-40 population just six years after that. These young pe
12h
The Atlantic

A Cabinet of Conspicuous CorruptionFor spring cleaning this year, President Trump is looking at his Cabinet. The Associated Press reported Monday that Veterans Affairs Secretary David Shulkin is near to being removed. When Trump fired H.R. McMaster as national-security adviser, that torpedoed a plan to dismiss McMaster, Shulkin, and Ben Carson, the secretary of housing and urban development, at once, according to Politico ’s Elian
12h
The Atlantic

Jagged Little (Blue) PillIn April of 2000, Christopher Walken hosted Saturday Night Live . During the show, he would insist that Will Ferrell add “ more cowbell ” to Blue Oyster Cult’s rendition of “(Don’t Fear) the Reaper”; before that, though, he made an appearance in one of SNL ’s satirical ads . Clad in a lemon-yellow sweater and perched next to Ana Gasteyer before a roaring fire—and speaking in a classically Walkeni
12h
The Atlantic

The Worst of Times for Hawkish DesignsLast week, President Trump’s announcement that he would appoint John Bolton as his national-security adviser inspired a lot of concern rooted in his unusually frequent support for new wars —and a defense from David French at National Review , who believes that “the foreign-policy Left still hasn’t learned the lessons of the recent past.” French pushed back against the antiwar view that ongoing en
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Ingeniøren

Strejke kan lukke alle skolers it-systemer ned efter påskeAlle skoler og uddannelsesinstitutioner risikerer at få lukket ned for it-systemer allerede den 3. april, hvis ikke forhandlingsparter finder en løsning på overenskomstforhandlingerne inden da.
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Ingeniøren

Trafikken over Storebælt sætter ny rekord12,8 millioner køretøjer tog turen over Storebælt i 2017, og dermed sætter brotrafikken endnu en årsrekord. Trafikvæksten var dog lavere end de foregående års.
12h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Very thin film could help manage heat flow in future devicesPurdue University researchers have demonstrated the ability of a thin film to conduct heat on just its surfaces, identifying a potential solution to overheating in electronic devices such as phones and computers.
12h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Generating energy from fluctuations of lightResearchers at the Laboratory of Organic Electronics at Linköping University have developed a method and a material that generate an electrical impulse when the light fluctuates from sunshine to shade and vice versa. As a result, it may be possible in the future to harvest energy with the aid of leaves fluttering in the wind
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Tetrahedrality is key to the uniqueness of waterA Japan-based research team has studied the anomalous behavior of tetrahedral liquids such as water. Via computer simulation, they calculated the phase diagrams of a range of model liquids. Varying a parameter called lambda (λ), which controls the amount of tetrahedral structure in the liquid, they found that liquids with greater λ showed more anomalies, such as low-temperature expansion. Water's
12h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Scientists describe the collision of a shockwave and a 'star cradle'A mathematician from MSU together with a Russian colleague modeled the formation of filaments (thread-like matter conglomerates) after the collision of a shockwave with molecular clouds in interstellar space. The work will help the scientists better understand the birth of stars and star systems. The results of the study were published in Computers and Fluids magazine.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Better identification of microscopic fossilsBlue-green algae are one of the oldest organisms in the world and have an important role to play in many ecosystems on Earth. However, it has always been difficult to identify fossils as blue-green algae without any trace of doubt. The reason is their sheath of calcium carbonate. A Master's student at Friedrich-Alexander-Universität Erlangen-Nürnberg (FAU) has now developed a method to assign orga
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Values and gender shape young adults' entrepreneurial and leadershipYoung adults who are driven by extrinsic rewards and money and less by a sense of security are more likely to want to become entrepreneurs and leaders, according to a recent study. The more young people value money and rewards at age 21, the more likely they are to have higher entrepreneurial and leadership aspirations at age 27.
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Women May Have an Alternative to Freezing Their EggsTo stave off what's called "anticipated gamete exhaustion," would-be moms could freeze their ovarian tissue and have it re-implanted it later.
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Sophisticated Tools Lead to Breakthroughs in Prenatal SurgeryModified instruments have led to fewer preterm deliveries and C-sections for mothers, and these surgeries have helped improve survival rates for infants.
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How Science and Tech Are Disrupting Every Stage of Human LifeThe Life Issue: From miracle babies to swipe-happy seniors, how we're born, how we live, how we die—it's all going to change.
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Seniors Get a Wii Bowling League of Their OwnWhen Dennis Berkholtz’s parents moved to a retirement home, he launched the National Senior League for Wii Bowling. It's still going strong.
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Women and Minorities in Tech, By the NumbersMore women than ever are finding work in the legal, medical, and technical fields. So why are women avoiding computer science?
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The Science Behind Antiaging MethodsAs researchers begin to understand how aging works at a molecular level, there’s a glint of promise—and oodles of hype—in new life-­extension treatments.
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App Roundup: Services for Savvy SeniorsWe all get old, and at some point, everyone's going to need an app that embiggens that doggone tiny mouse type.
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It's Getting Easier for Teens to Achieve Early StardomWith access to more tutorials, audiences, and distribution channels than ever before today's kids are truly becoming teen idols.
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A Brief History of Screen Panic, From TVs to TodayFor as long as we've had screens, people have worried whether too much screen time would make kids less healthy, more violent, and hopelessly distracted.
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How Kids Can Use 'Screen Time' to Their AdvantageDevelopmental psychologist Alison Gopnik wants us to take a deep breath—and focus on the quality, not quantity, of the time kids use tech.
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An Alternative to Burial and Cremation for Corpse DisposalAlkaline hydrolysis is a clean, green method for dissolving a body into its chemical building blocks; the runny remains just wash down the drain.
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Monero Privacy Protections Aren’t as Strong as They SeemResearchers point out serious gaps in the privacy promises of stealth cryptocoin Monero.
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What Are Screens Doing to Our Eyes—And Our Ability to See?Our eyes are hardening; we can barely see our phones any more. We must learn to look at the wider world.
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A Baby's Battle for Survival Tests How Far Neonatal Medicine Has ComeThanks to advances in neonatal care, Baby Boy Green joined a generation of premature babies whose survival would have been unimaginable a generation ago.
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What Oversharing on Social Media Taught Me About ParentingSharing my daughter through #MiniMilah helped me connect with a cybervillage of support. Now it’s time to lower the volume.
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Bigger, Brighter, Simpler: A Tablet for the Mature UserWe asked researchers to help us build a device that's optimized for folks whose sight and motor skills are beginning to fade.
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Teen Driving by the NumbersKids aren’t getting behind the wheel as much these days. But contrary to popular belief, it’s not just because of smartphones and social media.
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What Happens When You Track Your Boyfriend on StravaA tale of romance, performance, surveillance, and loss.
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Kiddie YouTube: Companies Are Cashing in on Reality TV for TotsWhile the strategy carries risks, if it pans out, you could soon see more kids in their own Netflix series or on smartphone apps—or wherever kids are.
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Inside Fort Gordon: Where Next-Gen Cyber Troops Are TrainedWhat's happening at the US Army's new cyber branch headquarters marks a change for Fort Gordon. Hell, it might be changing warfare itself—all through a computer screen.
12h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Amazon delivers boost to French grocery giant MonoprixShopping for high-end groceries in France may be about to get a little easier.
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Science | The Guardian

Elephant 'smoking' footage baffles expertsAnimal in India may have been trying to ingest wood charcoal and blowing away the ash Footage of an Asian elephant “smoking” in a forest in southern India has baffled wildlife experts, who say the behaviour has never before been observed. Vinay Kumar, a scientist with the Wildlife Conservation Society’s (WCS) India programme, captured the puffing pachyderm while visiting camera traps in the Nagar
12h
Ingeniøren

Bagmand pågrebet: Malkede banker for milliarder gennem malwareSpansk politi har angiveligt pågrebet hovedbagmanden bag malwareangrebene Carbanak og Cobalt, der har stjålet over 1 mia. euro fra banker verden over.
12h
NYT > Science

Nanny Faces Tough Insanity Test: Did She Know Killing Was Wrong?Yoselyn Ortega, 55, claims she was too psychotic to understand her actions when she killed two small children, but insanity defenses rarely succeed.
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Science | The Guardian

Anglo-Saxon settlement and Roman army camp found in A14 bypass digArchaeologists uncover abandoned villages, prehistoric tools and seven tonnes of pottery in Cambridgeshire It’s taken more than 700 years, but the medieval villagers of Houghton in Cambridgeshire have had the last laugh: the foundations of their houses and workshops have been exposed again, as roadworks carve up the landscape they were forced to abandon when their woodlands were walled off into a
13h
Ingeniøren

Spørg Scientariet: Hvorfor bliver sne tungere, når den smelter?Et par læsere undrer sig over, at den fine sne får tage til at styrte sammen, når den smelter. DMI og Statens Byggeforskningsinstitut forklarer hvorfor.
13h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Light pollution is altering plant and animal behaviourYou could call it fatal attraction. Drawn by artificial lights in our brightening night-time world, animals find their lives in peril.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

New family of selective silver-based anti-cancer drugs discoveredA new family of very promising silver-based anti-cancer drugs has been discovered by researchers in South Africa. The most promising silver thiocyanate phosphine complex among these, called UJ3 for short, has been successfully tested in rats and in human cancer cells in the laboratory.
13h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Superconductivity in an alloy with quasicrystal structureExtraordinary things happen at low temperatures. One of the best examples is superconductivity, a phenomenon wherein the electrical resistance of a solid drops to zero below a critical temperature. Known for a century, superconductivity now has applications in science and industry. Physics and chemistry students can even make their own levitating magnets from superconducting alloys.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Smart conveyor rollers to optimize parcel logistics operationsEngineers from Saarbrücken have developed a system of self-monitoring conveyor rollers to solve crucial logistics problems for sorting offices and parcel services. Drive systems specialist Professor Matthias Nienhaus from Saarland University and his team of engineers have found a way of turning the motor inside every drive roller into a sensor. When the conveyor is running, the drive motors contin
13h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Edges and corners increase efficiency of catalytic convertersCatalytic converters for cleaning exhaust emissions are more efficient when they use nanoparticles with many edges. This is one of the findings of a study carried out at DESY's X-ray source PETRA III. A team of scientists from the DESY NanoLab watched live as noxious carbon monoxide was converted into common carbon dioxide on the surface of noble metal nanoparticles like those used in catalytic co
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Is glass transition driven by thermodynamics?Glassy substances are everywhere, yet this state of matter is not completely understood. The basic picture is clear enough—glasses are solids that lack the regular atomic structure of a crystal. How and why they form, however, are questions that have kept physicists busy for decades. Now, research from Japan has shown that glass formation can be understood if liquid structure is properly described
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New Scientist - News

We must all wake up to the need for a good lie-in at the weekendWithout more of the dream-dense morning sleep that is so important for our brains and health, we risk sleepwalking our way to problems
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Science : NPR

Energy Supplies And Prices Have Grown More UnpredictableEnergy analysts are getting worse at predicting how much oil and gas will come out of the ground in the future, a new study finds. (Image credit: Charlie Riedel/AP)
13h
Ingeniøren

Nye teknikker snyder myndigheders GMO-testNye planteforædlingsteknikker som Crispr/Cas9 kan ikke detekteres i Fødevarestyrelsens kontroller. Derfor er det umuligt at føre kontrol med dem.
13h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

New technique speeds up production of protein nano-armorCarnegie Mellon University researchers have developed methods that speed up the process of developing chemically linked synthetic and biological molecules by more than 10 times in natural conditions. The findings, which marry biology and chemistry, could make the production of bioconjugates for use in biomedicine, materials science, and other fields more efficient and cost effective.
13h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

AkzoNobel to sell chemicals arm for 10.1 bn eurosLeading global paintmaker AkzoNobel announced Tuesday it was selling its chemicals arm to US-based investors Carlyle Group and Singapore's GIC for 10.1 billion euros ($12.6 billion), seeking to restore investor confidence in the Dutch giant.
13h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

How Facebook was able to siphon off phone call and text logsThe news that Facebook's Android app has been collecting call and text histories is yet another black eye for the social media giant. But just why was Facebook able to siphon off records of who its users were contacting—and when—in the first place?
14h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Malaria Cell Atlas launched: Parasite development mapped in unprecedented detailNew single-cell technology has allowed scientists to study malaria parasites at the highest resolution to date. By investigating the genes in individual malaria parasites, scientists from the Wellcome Sanger Institute are beginning to understand the genetic processes each parasite undergoes as it moves through its complicated lifecycle.
14h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Malaria Cell Atlas launched: Parasite development mapped in unprecedented detailNew single-cell technology has allowed scientists to study malaria parasites at the highest resolution to date. By investigating the genes in individual malaria parasites, scientists are beginning to understand the genetic processes each parasite undergoes as it moves through its complicated lifecycle. The results are the first step towards developing the Malaria Cell Atlas, a data resource that w
15h
Science-Based Medicine

Dr. Joel Fuhrman Sells Useless Iodine TestJoel Fuhrman is selling an overpriced iodine urine test that is not valid for testing individuals. Patients may be led to believe they are iodine deficient when they are not. Iodine supplements on the market vary widely including orthomolecular doses, and they make unsupported claims that mislead customers.
15h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Canadian province vows to keep up fight against pipelineThe Canadian province of British Columbia vowed Monday to press on with a legal battle against a controversial oil pipeline after a federal court dealt the province a setback.
15h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Fifty years on, Yuri Gagarin's death still shrouded in mysteryYuri Gagarin, feted as a Soviet national hero for being the first man in space, was killed in a plane crash 50 years ago but the details of his death remain shrouded in mystery.
15h
Ingeniøren

Mobile robotter fra Odense har fundet vej ud i verdenEfter et år med rekordsalg er store produktionsvirksomheder ved at få øjnene op for, hvad selvkørende robotter kan gøre for automatiseringen. Derfor skal MiR i år vokse til næsten tredobbelt størrelse.
15h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Arizona puts brakes on Uber self-driving car testsUber Arizona CarsThe governor of Arizona on Monday put the brakes on Uber's self-driving car program in that state, citing "disturbing and alarming" dashcam footage from a fatal crash in that state.
15h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Take a walk on New York's wild sideFrom coyotes in the Bronx to red foxes in Queens, raccoons in Manhattan, owls in Brooklyn and deer in Staten Island, wildlife roams the urban jungle of New York.
15h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Ultra-thin sun shield could protect Great Barrier ReefAn ultra-fine biodegradable film some 50,000 times thinner than a human hair could be enlisted to protect the Great Barrier Reef from environmental degradation, researchers said Tuesday.
15h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Deleting Facebook's billions: stock sinks as outrage swellsMark Zuckerberg might want to delete the last ten days from his timeline and everyone else's. In a little more than a week, Facebook has turned from one of the market's darlings to a stock investors are running from.
15h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Apple looks to return to head of class in education marketApple is hoping to return to the head of the class in the competition to get high-tech products into U.S. classrooms.
15h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

New cars are quickly getting self-driving safety featuresAutonomous vehicles get all the headlines, but automakers are gradually adding advanced electronic safety features to human-driven cars as they step toward a world of self-driving vehicles.
15h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Up to 38 percent of all annual childhood asthma cases in Bradford may be caused by air pollutionNew research highlights the impact of traffic-related air pollution on childhood asthma. The study also shows traffic-related air pollution could be specifically responsible for up to 24% of the total number of cases.
15h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

On cryptocurrency exchanges, it's better to be a miner than a speculator, study findsSomeone who starts mining a crypto-currency shortly after it is listed on exchanges can potentially earn higher returns than average. But a speculator who enters the market shortly after the currency is listed might potentially earn lower returns.
16h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Improving information security by giving employees optionsComputer users ― at home and at work ― often engage in behaviors that create security risks and privacy threats, despite having a variety of security options available.
16h
Science | The Guardian

Nestlé says it has harnessed science to reduce the sugar in chocolateCompany claims that Milkybar Wowsomes contain 30% less sugar than regular Milkybars Nestlé is claiming a world first by “restructuring” the sugar it uses in its confectionery to produce a white chocolate bar with 30% less sugar than its usual Milkybar brand. Nestlé is the world’s leading producer of packaged foods, but the new “structured sugar” is being produced in its factory in Dalston in Cumb
17h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News

On cryptocurrency exchanges, it's better to be a miner than a speculator, study findsSomeone who starts mining a crypto-currency shortly after it is listed on exchanges can potentially earn higher returns than average. But a speculator who enters the market shortly after the currency is listed might potentially earn lower returns.These are some of the findings from a study where computer scientists estimated the potential profitability of mining versus speculating for 18 crypto-cu
18h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Hepatitis C virus screening rates remain low among baby boomersDespite the steady increase of liver cancer incidence in the United States in recent decades, data from 2015 indicates that less than 13 percent of individuals born between 1945 and 1965 are estimated to have undergone screening for hepatitis C virus (HCV).
18h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Up to 38 percent of all annual childhood asthma cases in Bradford may be caused by air pollutionNew research highlights the impact of traffic-related air pollution on childhood asthma. The study also shows traffic-related air pollution could be specifically responsible for up to 24 percent of the total number of cases. An international team of researchers has used a newly developed model to assess the impact exposure to nitrogen oxides -- gases that make up air pollution -- has on the develo
18h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Survey finds reducing stigma attributed to Alzheimer's is vital to prevention researchStigma associated with Alzheimer's disease may be an obstacle for individuals to seek information about their risk of developing Alzheimer's disease and to participate in clinical studies that discover potential therapies. That's according to the results of a national survey about what beliefs, attitudes and expectations are most often associated with Alzheimer's disease. The survey results are pu
18h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Abnormal brain connections seen in preschoolers with autismPreschoolers with autism spectrum disorder, or ASD, have abnormal connections between certain networks of their brains that can be seen using a special MRI technique, according to a new study. Researchers said the findings may one day help guide treatments for ASD.
18h
Science | The Guardian

Tiangong-1 crash: everything you need to knowMost of China’s broken eight-tonne space station will burn up, though there is a chance some parts will survive. Should you worry about getting hit? China’s prototype space station, Tiangong-1 or “heavenly place”, is falling to Earth and could re-enter the atmosphere as soon as this week. While most of the eight-tonne spacecraft is expected to burn up as it plummets through the atmosphere, there
18h
Ingeniøren

Maskinlærings-bot skaffer fly-kompensation: Finder selv sager i din mailKompensation for forsinkede fly kan nu løses af robotter. Virksomheden Airhelp inddriver kompensation for flyrejser med omfattende brug af automatisering, maskinlæring og mail-bakke gennemgang
18h
Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

Trends of US surface water body area over three decadesA new research study reveals the divergent trends of open surface water bodies in the contiguous United States from 1984 to 2016, specifically, a decreasing trend in the water-poor states and an increasing trend in the water-rich states. Surface water resources are critical for public water supply, industry, agriculture, biodiversity and ecosystem services.
18h
Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

Improve your information security by giving employees more optionsA recent study suggests information security managers and supervisors could have greater success in motivating employees to act more securely by avoiding cold, authoritative commands, and instead create security messages that are relatable and provide options for how employees can better protect information and respond to threats.
18h
Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

Alberta's boreal forest could be dramatically altered by 2100 due to climate changeHalf of Alberta's upland boreal forest is likely to disappear over the next century due to climate change, a new study shows. The upland forest will be replaced after wildfire by open woodland or grassland, according to research from biologists.
18h
Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

Who becomes a hero? It is more than just a personality traitWe tend to think of heroes in terms of a psychological profile: brave, altruistic, strong. But a new study suggests that for at least one kind of heroism, it takes a village to save a life.
18h
Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

Looking deeper into brain functionAs neuroscience enters the era of big data bases, a new approach could offer a deeper and more systematic understanding of brain function, scientists argue.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

Caribou drone study finds 'enormous variation' within herdThe first paper to use drones to record the movement of individual animals within a herd finds enormous variation in the social behavior of caribou.
18h
Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

Prenatal stress changes brain connectivity in-uteroThe time babies spend in the womb is far from idle. The brain is changing more rapidly during this time than at any other time in development. It is an active time for the fetus to grow and explore, and of course connect to its mother. New evidence from in-utero fetal brain scans shows, for the first time, that this connection directly affects brain development.
18h
Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

Opioid analgesics reduce use of antipsychotics in persons with Alzheimer's diseaseInitiating an opioid analgesic reduced the use of antipsychotics and benzodiazepines in persons with Alzheimer's disease, a recent study shows. These drugs are frequently prescribed to treat behavioral and psychiatric symptoms of dementia, which can be worsened by other symptoms, such as pain.
19h
Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

Understanding gravity: The nanoscale search for extra dimensionsScientists have used a pulsed slow neutron beamline to probe the deviation of the inverse square law of gravity below the wavelength of 0.1 nm. The experiment achieved the highest sensitivity for a neutron experiment demonstrated to date, and is a significant step toward determining whether the space we live in is really limited to the three dimensions most are familiar with.
19h
Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

Edges and corners increase efficiency of catalytic convertersCatalytic converters for cleaning exhaust emissions are more efficient when they use nanoparticles with many edges. A team of scientists watched live as carbon monoxide was converted into carbon dioxide on the surface of metal nanoparticles like those used in catalytic converters of cars.
19h
Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

Chance is a factor in the survival of speciesIn a major study, biologists have studied the role of chance in whether a species survives or dies out locally. One possible consequence, according to the researchers, is that although conservation initiatives can save endangered species, sometimes chance can override such efforts.
19h
Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

Intricacies of the pursuit of higher self-controlSelf-control is a central human capacity associated with a wide range of personal and societal advantages. In view of its benefits, increasing self-control among children and adults has been advocated as a remedy to many of society's ailments, from childhood obesity to adulthood criminal behavior. Although widely considered highly beneficial, a recent review uncovers some disadvantages to high sel
19h
Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

Ultrathin endoscope captures neurons firing deep in the brainResearchers have developed an endoscope as thin as a human hair that can image the activity of neurons in the brains of living mice, giving researchers access to areas that cannot be seen with microscopes or other types of endoscopes.
19h
Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

Superconductivity in an alloy with quasicrystal structureScientists have discovered the first superconductive quasicrystal. The crystalline alloy Al-Zn-Mg became quasicrystalline when the Al content was reduced to 15 percent, while remaining a superconductor, with a very low critical temperature of ~0.05 K. The alloy behaved like a conventional weakly coupled superconductor, but the role of electronic states that are unique to quasicrystals (critical ei
19h
Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

Is glass transition driven by thermodynamics?Glassy substances are everywhere, yet this state of matter poses many puzzles. The basic picture is clear enough -- glasses are solids that lack the regular atomic structure of a crystal. How and why they form, however, are questions that have kept physicists busy for decades. Now, research has shown that glass formation can be understood if liquid structure is properly described.
19h
Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

A simple method developed for 3-D bio-fabrication based on bacterial celluloseBacterial cellulose can be used in food, cosmetics and biomedical applications, such as implants and artificial organs.
19h
Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

Drug reduces inflammation in stroke patientsAn anti-inflammatory drug given to patients in the early stages of a stroke has been shown by researchers to reduce harmful inflammation. The drug, Kineret©, licensed for treating rheumatoid arthritis, was given as a small injection just under the skin without giving the patients any identifiable adverse reactions.
19h
Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

New method speeds up development of medicationResearchers have developed a novel method that speeds up the process of determining crystal structures of organic salts and significantly reduces the effort required to do so. As about 40 percent of all active pharmaceutical ingredients are salts, this new crystallographic method is set to greatly accelerate drug development.
19h
Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

Artificial bio-inspired membranes for water filtrationAccess to clean drinking water is considered to be one of the main challenges of the 21st century, and scientists have just opened a path to new filtration processes. Inspired by cellular proteins, they have developed membranes with asymmetric artificial channels in the interior, from which they were able to observe 'chiral' water. Chirality is a property that favors the flow of materials that are
19h
Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

Four types of employees who are potential insider threatsAcademics have identified four types of employees who can become a threat to their companies – and explained the reasons why their workplace behavior declines.
19h
Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

Blood lead levels of Flint children before and after water crisisFlint children's blood lead levels were nearly three times higher almost a decade before the year of the Flint water crisis, new research shows.
19h
Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

How did the guppy cross the ocean?: An unexpected fish appears on a volcanic archipelagoTo the surprise of the scientists, populations of a South American guppy were spotted at the Fernando de Noronha archipelago, a volcanic island in the South Atlantic. Even if being easily adaptable fishes, it was unclear how a small freshwater species had managed to cross the ocean and populate the archipelago. Researchers suggest that the US military in WWII may be behind the phenomenon.
20h
Live Science

The Riddle of Twin TelepathyClaims that some twins share a telepathic bond are anecdotal at best.
20h
Live Science

Vaginal Birth vs. C-Section: Pros & ConsA woman can deliver her baby either by vaginal birth or a C-section. Both delivery methods have advantages and disadvantages.
20h
Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

Are fire ants worse this spring because of Hurricane Harvey?Ecologists are checking to see if Hurricane Harvey's unprecedented floods gave a competitive boost to fire ants and crazy ants, two of southeast Texas' least favorite uninvited guests.
20h
Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

Portable device detects severe stroke in seconds with 92 percent accuracyClinical investigators describe a new visor-like device that detects emergent large-vessel occlusion with 92 percent accuracy. In such cases, emergency medical personnel transfer patients directly to a comprehensive stroke center, routing around less-equipped hospitals and saving valuable time in the process.
20h
Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

Vulnerability and extinction risk of migratory species from different regions and ecosystems worldwideForty million miles of major roads crisscross the Earth's continents -- enough to circle the planet 1,600 times. For humans, these thoroughfares are a boon, enabling them to move with ease from place to place. But for migrating animals who are also hemmed in by dams, rivers, shipping lanes, urban development and agriculture, they create another barrier.
20h
Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

In laboratory, scientist turns off chemo painResearchers describe their success in an animal model in turning off the excruciating pain that often accompanies a colorectal cancer drug.
20h
Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

Biologists discover that female purple sea urchins prime their progeny to succeed in the face of stressThis story begins in the kelp forest and ends with a very important climate change message: All is not lost -- at least not for purple sea urchins.
20h
Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

Crystallography used to analyze fossils and assign them to microscopic organismsBlue-green algae are one of the oldest organisms in the world and have an important role to play in many ecosystems on Earth. However, it has always been difficult to identify fossils as blue-green algae without any trace of doubt. The reason is their unremarkable sheath made of calcium carbonate. A master's student has now developed a method which can help assign organisms to a particular species
20h
Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

Genetic factors for most common disease in the first year of life are identifiedThe acute viral bronchiolitis is the worldwide leading cause of hospitalization during the first year of life. A study crosses data from patients' genetic variations with the disease's different viruses and their respective set of symptoms, paving the way for future developments by precision medicine.
20h
Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

Food waste: The biggest loss could be what you choose to put in your mouthResearchers have now found a novel way to define and quantify a second type of wastage. The scientists have called it 'opportunity food loss,' a term inspired by the 'opportunity cost' concept in economics, which refers to the cost of choosing a particular alternative over better options.
20h
Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

How infighting turns toxic for chimpanzeesHow did a once-unified community of chimpanzees in Gombe National Park, Tanzania, end up at each other's throats? In a new study, researchers mapped the chimps' social networks at different periods leading up to the split to pinpoint when relations began to fray, and test ideas about what caused the rift. The most likely culprit was a power struggle among three top-ranking males, which was made wo
20h
Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

Study offers pearls of wisdom in contested New York oyster restorationIn addition to being a tasty delicacy, oysters provide a variety of ecosystem services. They filter water and cycle vital nutrients. By cementing themselves into complex shell reefs, they provide habitat for hundreds of invertebrate and fish species and reduce storm surges and erosion. These characteristics make oysters a unique tool for restoring polluted coastal waterways.
20h
Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

A new direction for halting the citrus greening epidemicNew clues to how the bacteria associated with citrus greening infect the only insect that carries them could lead to a way to block the microbes' spread from tree to tree, according to a new study.
20h
New on MIT Technology Review

Adobe bets that AI tools can foster real creativityAt EmTech Digital, Gavin Miller, head of Adobe Research, showed off prototypes of AI-enhanced tools for photo and video editing that he thinks could make more time for human artistry.
20h
Science : NPR

Crickets And Cannibals: Unpacking The Complicated Emotion Of DisgustImagine seeing a cockroach skitter across your kitchen counter. Does the thought alone gross you out? This week on Hidden Brain, we discuss disgust. (Image credit: Parth Shah/NPR)
21h
New on MIT Technology Review

To protect artificial intelligence from attacks, show it fake dataGoogle Brain’s Ian Goodfellow explains how AI systems defend themselves, onstage at EmTech Digital
21h
New on MIT Technology Review

Baidu shows off its instant pocket translatorThe Chinese internet giant says it’s made significant strides in machine translation thanks to neural networks.
21h
The Guardian's Science Weekly

A Neuroscientist Explains: how whooping increases your enjoyment – podcastDaniel Glaser explores the complex relationship between mind and body when it comes to emotion
21h
New Scientist - News

Three critically ill children helped by speedy genome sequencingDoctors at Great Ormond Street Hospital have used rapid genome sequencing to diagnose disorders in children in intensive care, and give them better treatments
22h
New on MIT Technology Review

IBM’s Dario Gil says quantum computing promises to accelerate AINeural networks may one day find themselves surpassed by quantum ones.
22h
Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

Combination breast cancer therapy targets tumor cells and the blood vessels that feed themBetween 30 and 40 percent of human breast cancers express a defective (mutant) form of p53, a protein that helps cancer cells proliferate and grow. Researchers found that combining a cancer therapy, which activates p53 and is currently under a clinical trial, with a second drug therapy that helps suppress tumor blood vessels found in cancer cells, can significantly reduce breast cancer tumors whil
22h
Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

Underground neutrino experiment sets the stage for deep discovery about matterScientists have shown they can shield a sensitive, scalable 44-kilogram germanium detector array from background radioactivity. This accomplishment is critical to developing and proposing a much larger future experiment -- with approximately a ton of detectors -- to study the nature of neutrinos.
22h
Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

A CRISPR/Cas9 mutation prevention system could help prevent and fight disease in the futureResearchers developed an in vivo mutation prevention method that enables the DNA-cleaving Cas9 enzyme to discriminate between genomic target sites differing by a single nucleotide and to exclusively cut the unwanted one. In proof-of-concept studies performed in bacterial E. coli strains grown in culture or the mouse gastrointestinal tract, the approach can prevent the survival of antibiotic resist
22h
Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

Atomically thin light-emitting device opens the possibility for 'invisible' displaysEngineers have built a bright-light emitting device that is millimeters wide and fully transparent when turned off. The light emitting material in this device is a monolayer semiconductor, which is just three atoms thick.
22h
Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

Climate policy, carbon emissions from permafrostControlling greenhouse gas emissions in the coming decades could substantially reduce the consequences of carbon releases from thawing permafrost during the next 300 years, according to a new article.
23h
Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

Metabolic profiling may determine aggressiveness, prognosis of prostate cancerA new approach to analyzing prostate gland tissue may help address a major challenge in treating prostate cancer - determining which tumors are unlikely to progress and which could be life threatening and require treatment.
23h
New on MIT Technology Review

China’s AI wizards want to entertain you, cure you, and dominate the worldAt EmTech Digital, three Chinese executives highlighted how far AI has come in the country—and what it plans for the future.
23h
Futurity.org

Smartphone app tracks Parkinson’s symptomsSmartphone software and technology can accurately track the severity of the symptoms of Parkinson’s disease, a new study shows. “…we can create both an objective measure of the progression of Parkinson’s and one that provides a richer picture of the daily lived experience of the disease…” The findings could give researchers and clinicians a new tool to both develop new drugs and better treat the
23h
Futurity.org

How shark poo keeps coral reefs healthyIt’s long been known that sharks help nourish coral reefs, but exactly how—or to what extent—has never really been mapped out. Until now. A study with grey reef sharks ( Carcharhinus amblyrhynchos ), a predatory species commonly associated with coral environments but whose wider ecological role has long been debated, shows that the predators use their fecal matter to transfer vital nutrients from
23h
Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

Treating koalas for chlamydia alters gut microbes, may upset eucalyptus leaf dietAntibiotics used to treat koalas with chlamydia infections may be changing the balance of gut microbes that allows the marsupials to live on a diet of eucalyptus leaves, researchers have found.
23h
Futurity.org

‘Tractor beam’ sensor could find cancer in bloodA new discovery could lead to Star Trek -like biosensor devices that could flag the barest presence of a specific virus, antibody, or protein marker for cancer in blood—or sniff out airborne chemical warfare agents while they’re still far below toxic levels. The discovery follows years of work by Stephen Arnold, professor of applied physics at New York University, who in 1995 discovered that an o
23h
NYT > Science

Global Health: Grindr App to Offer H.I.V. Test RemindersMen using hookup apps are at high risk, so AIDS experts applaud a new effort to help subscribers get tested as often as four times a year.
23h
NYT > Science

The E.P.A. Says It Wants Research Transparency. Scientists See an Attack on Science.A proposed policy would bar the E.P.A. from considering research that doesn't release its raw data for review, blocking some significant work.
23h

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