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EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Just one high-fat meal sets the perfect stage for heart diseaseA single high-fat milkshake, with a fat and calorie content similar to some enticing restaurant fare, can quickly transform our healthy red blood cells into small, spiky cells that wreak havoc inside our blood vessels and help set the perfect stage for cardiovascular disease, scientists report.
19h
Live Science

This Hidden 'Royal' Jewel, Taken from India, Will Sell for Millions of DollarsA very fancy, expensive, hidden diamond is about to be openly sold for the first time in its 300-year history.
51min
Futurity.org

This joint supplement may speed up melanomaChondroitin sulfate, a dietary supplement for strengthening joints, can speed the growth of a type of melanoma, according to experiments conducted in cell culture and mouse models. One particular mutation in the B-raf gene (V600E) can be found in about half of melanomas. Jing Chen and colleagues found that chondroitin sulfate can boost growth by melanoma cells carrying the V600E mutation, but not
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Futurity.org

Controlling rust makes beautiful ‘nanoflowers’ for storageResearchers have developed a straightforward way to make a type of conducting polymers with high surface area—called “nanoflowers”—potentially useful for energy transfer and storage. If you could brush your cheek against a nanoflower’s microscopic petals, you’d find them cool, hard, and… rusty. Common rust forms the inner skeleton of these lovely and intricate nanostructures, while their outer la
30min
Futurity.org

Isotopes suggest Maya traded dogs for ceremoniesThe Maya raised and traded dogs and other animals, likely for ceremonial use, new research shows. Police detectives analyze isotopes in human hair to find out where a murder victim was born and grew up. The coauthors of the new study in the Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences combined clues from carbon, nitrogen, oxygen, and strontium isotope analysis to investigate the lives of Maya
29min
Futurity.org

Stable schedules for workers boost retail salesGiving sales associates more stable schedules leads to increased sales and labor productivity, according to a new study. Working in partnership with retailer the Gap, the research is the first randomized, controlled experiment designed to shift low-wage, hourly jobs toward more stable schedules. “[A shifting schedule] makes it hard to fulfill responsibilities on and off the job…” The intervention
37min
Futurity.org

Silk Road nomads ate way better than city dwellersSilk Road nomads may have been the “foodies” of the Medieval Ages. New research shows they enjoyed much more diverse diets than did their settled urban counterparts. “Historians have long thought that urban centers along the Silk Road were cosmopolitan melting pots where culinary and cultural influences from far off places came together, but our research shows that nomadic communities were probab
44min
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Facebook's Election Safeguards Are Still a Work in ProgressThe social media giant Thursday outlined several attempts to help protect the midterm elections, but still has a long way to go.
1h
The Atlantic

The Atlantic Daily: The Future of FactsWhat We’re Following The Doctor Is In: President Trump nominated Rear Admiral Ronny Jackson, the White House physician, as the new secretary of veterans affairs after firing the agency’s former head, David Shulkin, on Wednesday. Jackson’s 12 years in his position have earned him bipartisan support, but he lacks administrative experience, making him an unorthodox choice to take over one of the U.S
1h
Popular Science

Frog skin secretions offer the first ray of hope in a deadly fungal epidemicAnimals A few amphibians in Panama are suddenly showing signs of resistance. In Panama, some frogs are defying the odds and becoming resistant to a deadly fungus that has plagued their populations.
1h
Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

Epilepsy drug exposure in womb is linked to poorer school test results, study revealsResearchers have found that exposure to epilepsy drugs in the womb is linked to significantly poorer school test results among 7-year-olds.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

Double danger: The peril of childbirth for women with rheumatic heart diseaseWomen of childbearing age who suffer from Rheumatic Heart Disease in low- to moderate-income countries like Uganda face a double danger: Increased risk of complications during pregnancy -- including death -- while also bearing a cultural burden and expectation that they'll become mothers, according to a new study.
1h
Live Science

The Knuckle-Cracking Debate Gets TwistyA new paper contradicts old research about why knuckles crack.
1h
The Atlantic

The Atlantic Politics & Policy Daily: This Day in Infrastructure WeekToday in 5 Lines During a speech meant to promote his infrastructure plan, President Trump touted his proposed border wall and discussed topics ranging from North Korea to ABC’s Roseanne . Hours after President Trump announced that White House physician Ronny Jackson would replace David Shulkin as secretary of veterans affairs, Shulkin published an op-ed in The New York Times in which he blamed h
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Popular Science

DJI's commercial drones can now carry more sensors into dangerous situationsTechnology The Payload SDK allows tech companies to make gadgets that integrate into DJI's drones. If you have ever wanted a drone that can detect radiation, you may soon be in…
1h
Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

Now you see it: Invisibility material created byMaterials inspired by disappearing Hollywood dinosaurs and real-life shy squid can quickly change how they reflect heat. That makes them invisible to infrared night vision tools.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

Dietary supplement shows promise for reversing cardiovascular agingA novel nutraceutical called nicotinomide riboside has been found to kick-start the same biological pathways as calorie restriction does, and boost arterial health in people with mild hypertension.
1h
Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

Herring larvae could benefit from an acidifying oceanExcess carbon dioxide in the atmosphere is making the oceans more acidic. Some studies show that's bad news for fish, including commercially important species. But a new study shows that herring might be able to tolerate this change.
1h
The Atlantic

Trump’s Complaints About Amazon Have a Historical PrecedentIn the early 1900s, Charlie Harger, a writer for this magazine, visited a small country store on “the frontier” to talk to its proprietor. (He did not mention, in the eight full pages of the story where exactly that small retailer was located, because that’s how journalism was done in those days.) The unnamed proprietor was looking out beyond his windows stocked with hoes and pancake flour, to th
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Jaguar's New F-Pace SUV Is Fast, Sporty, and ExpensiveIt goes from 0 to 60 in 4.1 seconds, and it has fatter tires and updated aerodynamics to match.
2h
The Atlantic

The U.S. and Russia Are Caught in a Downward SpiralRussia ordered 60 U.S. diplomats to leave the country by April 5, and said the American consulate in St. Petersburg must close by March 31. This action—the expulsion of 60 diplomats and the closing of a consulate—is a precise parallel to a move announced this week by the Trump administration, which was responding to Moscow’s alleged role in the attempted assassination by nerve agent of Sergei Skr
2h
The Atlantic

Have You Ever Really Seen the Moon?On a whim, Wylie Overstreet set up his telescope outside his apartment. He wanted to look at the moon. He had no idea he would, in a matter of hours, inspire awe in hundreds of strangers on the streets of Los Angeles. “It's incredible how many people have never looked through a telescope,” Alex Gorosh, a friend of Overstreet’s, told The Atlantic. “Many people thought the image wasn't real—they th
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

Twisting graphene into spiralsResearchers report the successful synthesis of the smallest spring you've ever seen -- hexa-peri-hexabenzo[7]helicene, or 'helical nanographene'.
2h
Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

How personality affects gamified diabetes self-managementResearchers have designed and tested an app for self-managing diabetes for insight into how personality differences might explain why mobile health apps help some patients more than others.
2h
Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

Expert panel reliable and accurate in identifying injuries in young childrenThe reliability and accuracy of a nine-member expert panel was measured in determining the likelihood of abuse in more than 2,000 cases. The results of the study found nearly perfect reliability and accuracy of the panel both individually and as a composite.
2h
Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

More accurate estimates of methane emissions from dairy cattle developedLeading the worldwide effort to get a better handle on methane emissions from animals, an international consortium of researchers devised more accurate models to estimate the amount of the potent greenhouse gas produced by dairy cattle.
2h
Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

New math bridges holography and twistor theoryA new perspective bridges two approaches to understanding quantum gravity.
2h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Facebook's limits on using data brokers won't stop trackingFacebook's decision to stop working with third-party data collectors might earn it public-relations points, but it does little to protect your privacy.
2h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Tougher US rules needed on autonomous cars: advocateAccidents involving autonomous cars could slow the advance of the technology and demonstrate the need for tougher federal standards, a leading highway safety advocate said Thursday.
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The Scientist RSS

Scientists in Chile Protest Mummy StudyThe Chilean government contends that the remains of a mummified fetus, recently sequenced by US researchers, were exhumed illegally.
2h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

NASA astronauts go spacewalking days after reaching orbitTwo new arrivals at the International Space Station went spacewalking Thursday less than a week after moving in, completing all their work despite a slightly shortened excursion.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Facebook cooperating with New York probe: prosecutorFacebook Data PrivacyFacebook has begun to produce documents and wants to be "cooperative" with a New York investigation into the Cambridge Analytica data breach, state attorney general Eric Schneiderman said Thursday.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Researchers investigate riverbank erosion and resilience in coastal BangladeshCoastal residents in Bangladesh are losing their homes and farmland at an astonishing rate due to riverbank erosion, which affects roughly 1 million people and displaces 50,000 to 200,000 every year.
2h
Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

Sugar-coated nanosheets developed to selectively target pathogensScientists have developed a process for creating ultrathin, self-assembling sheets of synthetic materials that can function like designer flypaper in selectively binding with viruses, bacteria, and other pathogens. The new platform could potentially be used to inactivate or detect pathogens.
2h
Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

Flipping lipids for cell transport-tubulesAn enzyme that flips lipids from the outer to the inner layer of the cell membrane launches the process that permits cells to engulf external substances.
2h
Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

Slow, steady waves keep brain hummingVery slow brain waves, long considered an artifact of brain scanning techniques, may be more important than anyone had realized. Researchers have found that very slow waves are directly linked to state of consciousness and may be involved in coordinating activity across distant brain regions.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

A decade after housing bust, mortgage industry on shaky ground, experts warnDespite tough banking rules put in place after last decade's housing crash, the mortgage market again faces the risk of a meltdown that could endanger the U.S. economy, warn two Berkeley Haas professors in a paper co-authored by Federal Reserve economists. The threat reflects a boom in nonbank mortgage companies, a category of independent lenders that are more lightly regulated and more financiall
2h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Researchers develop model to show how bacteria grow in plumbing systemsBacteria in tap water can multiply when a faucet isn't used for a few days, such as when a house is vacant over a week's vacation, a new study from University of Illinois engineers found. The study suggests a new method to show how microbial communities, including those responsible for illnesses like Legionnaires' disease, may assemble inside the plumbing systems of homes and public buildings.
3h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Anti-aging protein alpha Klotho's molecular structure revealedResearchers from UT Southwestern's Charles and Jane Pak Center for Mineral Metabolism and Clinical Research and Internal Medicine's Division of Nephrology recently published work in Nature that reveals the molecular structure of the so-called "anti-aging" protein alpha Klotho (a-Klotho) and how it transmits a hormonal signal that controls a variety of biologic processes. The investigation was perf
3h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Walleye fish populations are in declineWalleye, an iconic native fish species in Wisconsin, the upper Midwest and Canada, are in decline in northern Wisconsin lakes, according to a study published this week in the Canadian Journal of Fisheries and Aquatic Sciences.
3h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Poor grades tied to class times that don't match our biological clocksIt may be time to tailor students' class schedules to their natural biological rhythms, according to a new study from UC Berkeley and Northeastern Illinois University.
3h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Research enhances performance of Germany's new fusion deviceA team of U.S. and German scientists has used a system of large magnetic "trim" coils designed and delivered by the U.S. Department of Energy's (DOE) Princeton Plasma Physics Laboratory (PPPL) to achieve high performance in the latest round of experiments on the Wendelstein 7-X (W7-X) stellarator. The German machine, the world's largest and most advanced stellarator, is being used to explore the s
3h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Scientist modifies digital cinema technology for future space missionsRochester Institute of Technology researchers are developing and testing an astronomical imager inspired by an Oscar-award winning cinema projection system.
3h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Detecting volcanic eruptionsTo borrow from a philosophical thought experiment: If a volcano erupts in a remote part of the world and no one hears it, does it still make a sound?
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Latest Headlines | Science News

Some frogs may be bouncing back after killer chytrid fungusFrogs in Panama may be developing defenses against a fatal skin disease, a new study suggests.
3h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Study on frogs helps scientists understand disease outbreak and progressionThe search for answers to protect Central American frogs from extinction is also giving scientists clues on how to predict and respond to emerging diseases and epidemics in humans, plants and other wildlife.In their paper published in the magazine Science, March 30, University of Nevada, Reno's Jamie Voyles and her colleagues document the recovery of some tropical amphibians following continued ex
3h
Science : NPR

U.S. Utilities Look To Electric Cars As Their Savior Amid Decline In DemandAfter years of rising demand, utility companies are staring down a projected decline in the demand for electricity. They say the budding electric car industry could save them. (Image credit: Johannes Eisele /AFP/Getty Images)
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Science : NPR

What If A Drug Could Make Your Blood Deadly To Mosquitoes?That's what researchers wondered as they look at new ways to stop the spread of malaria. A new study reports on the impact of ivermectin on skeeters. (Image credit: Smith Collection/Gado/Getty Images)
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Blog » Languages » English

March Marathon: Results!Awesome sauce!!! You folks finished this first 432-cube cell in 4 hours 38 minutes, which is a brand new amazing record, and you finished the second 1086-cube cell in 15 hours 30 minutes. Nicely done, everybody! Your bonuses will be calculated after 8 PM EDT tonight. Tune in next week after Happy Hour, too, when we’ll rename according to player votes. Players qualified to nominate a name or vote
3h
Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

Target and mechanism of antibacterial drug fidaxomicin (Dificid) discoveredScientists have determined the molecular target and mechanism of the antibacterial drug fidaxomicin (trade name Dificid). Fidaxomicin was approved in 2011 for treatment of the CDC 'urgent threat' bacterial pathogen Clostridium difficile (C. diff) and currently is one of two front-line drugs for treatment of C. diff.
3h
Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

Novel RNA-based therapy to target West Nile virus developedResearchers have developed a new RNA therapy, delivered through the nose, to treat mice infected with West Nile Virus. The innovative approach reduced the virus in the brain, allowing the immune system to destroy the virus and develop long-term protection against West Nile Virus disease, the researchers said.
3h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Walleye fish populations are in declineWalleye, an iconic native fish species in Wisconsin, the upper Midwest and Canada, are in decline in northern Wisconsin lakes, according to a study published this week. It now takes 1.5 times longer to produce the same amount of walleye as it did in 1990.
3h
Popular Science

One day your sweaty workout clothes could power electronic devicesNexus Media News Scientists have developed a fabric that generates electricity when stretched—and works better wet. Anyone watching Swedish scientist Anja Lund working out on an aerobic stepper recently might have thought it a strange way to get fit. She was stepping while holding a…
3h
The Atlantic

The Doctor Who Suddenly Got Nine Million PatientsNine million veterans will soon be under the care of the emergency-physician rear admiral Ronny Jackson, pending confirmation of his appointment Wednesday to lead the U.S. Department of Veterans Affairs. This seemingly mundane appointment—a doctor and naval officer with years of experience as White House physician under both Trump and Obama—is of great consequence. It comes at a time when the VA
3h
The Atlantic

The Atlantic Expands Podcast Portfolio and Hires Katherine Wells as First Executive ProducerWashington, D.C. (March 29, 2018)— As part of its multi-platform expansion, The Atlantic is growing its podcast division. Katherine Wells will return to the newsroom from Gimlet Media to be executive producer of The Atlantic ’s growing portfolio of original podcasts, editor in chief Jeffrey Goldberg announced today. The Atlantic is also set to launch its third podcast, Crazy/Genius, in May. Hoste
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

Monkeys' brains synchronize as they collaborate to perform a motor taskScientists have previously shown that when one animal watches another performing a motor task, such as reaching for food, mirror neurons in the motor cortex of the observer's brain start firing as though the observer were also reaching for food. New research suggests mirroring in monkeys is also influenced by social factors, such as proximity to other animals, social hierarchy and competition for
3h
cognitive science

According to research by University of Pennsylvania neuroscientists, the brain has a way to suppress chronic pain when an animal is hungry, allowing it to go look for food while leaving intact the response to acute pain.submitted by /u/SophiaDevetzi [link] [comments]
3h
TED Talks Daily (SD video)

Why I choose humanism over faith | Leo IgweAs a humanist, Leo Igwe doesn't believe in divine intervention -- but he does believe in the power of human beings to alleviate suffering, cure disease, preserve the planet and turn situations of poverty into prosperity. In this bold talk, Igwe shares how humanism can free Africans from damaging superstitions and give them the power to rebuild the continent.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

Study may help explain why iron can worsen malaria infectionResearchers have a possible explanation for why iron can sometimes worsen malaria infection. By studying mice and samples from malaria patients, the researchers found that extra iron interferes with ferroportin, a protein that prevents a toxic buildup of iron in red blood cells and helps protect these cells against malaria infection. They also found that a mutant form of ferroportin that occurs in
3h
Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

Biophysics: Bacterial adhesion in vitro and in silicoResearchers have characterized the physical mechanism that enables a widespread bacterial pathogen to adhere to the tissues of its human host.
3h
Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

Lesson learned? Massive study finds lectures still dominate STEM educationAn analysis of more than 2,000 college classes in science, technology, engineering and math has found that 55 percent of STEM classroom interactions consisted mostly of conventional lecturing -- a style that prior research has identified as among the least effective at teaching and engaging students.
3h
Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

Polymers that mimic chameleon skinBiological tissues have complex mechanical properties -- soft-yet-strong, tough-yet-flexible -- that are difficult to reproduce using synthetic materials. Researchers have now managed to produce a biocompatible synthetic material that replicates tissue mechanics and alters color when it changes shape, like chameleon skin. It promises new materials for biomedical devices.
3h
Live Science

The Opioid Epidemic is Getting Even Worse, As Fentanyl Deaths SoarDeaths from synthetic opioids such as fentanyl doubled in just a year.
4h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News

A decade after housing bust, mortgage industry on shaky ground, experts warnNew regulations on banks fueled a boom in nonbank mortgage companies, a category of independent lenders that are more lightly regulated and more financially fragile than banks. These lenders now originate half of all US home mortgages yet have little capital of their own.
4h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Nanoscale alloys from elements thought to be incapable of mixingA multi-institutional team of scientists describes a new technique that can meld ions from up to eight different elements to form what are known as high entropy alloyed nanoparticles. The atoms of the elements that make up these particles are distributed evenly throughout and form a single, solid-state crystalline structure -- a feat that has never been achieved before with more than three element
4h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Now you see it: Invisibility material created by UCI engineersMaterials inspired by disappearing Hollywood dinosaurs and real-life shy squid have been invented by UCI engineers, according to new findings in Science this Friday.
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Child sexual abuse in US costs up to $1.5 million per child death, study findsChild sexual abuse in the United States is costly, with an average lifetime cost of $1.1 million per death of female victims and $1.5 million per death of male victims, according to a new study.
4h
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You Can Model China’s Tiangong-1 Space Station CrashWhen and where will the Chinese space station land? We can’t know for sure—but we can examine some variables.
4h
Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

Mice 'eavesdrop' on rats' tear signalTears might not seem to have an odor. But studies have shown that proteins in tears act as pheromonal cues. For example, the tear glands of male mice produce a protein that makes females more receptive to sex. New research finds that rat tears contain proteins with similar functions. Mice can pick up on the rats' tear proteins, too, apparently tipping them off that predators are around.
4h
Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

Pig model of Huntington's offers advantages for testing treatmentsA team of scientists has established a 'knock in' pig model of Huntington's disease (HD), an inherited neurodegenerative disease, anticipated to be useful for testing treatments.
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Popular Science

We asked a neural network to bake us a cake. The results were...interesting.Technology It, uh, had blood in it? Programmer Janelle Shane trained her neural network on 24,044 recipes and asked it to concoct one all its own. And, well, you can have the first bite.
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Opioid use prevalent among electronic dance music partygoersOne in 10 electronic dance music (EDM) party attendees have misused opioids in the past year, exceeding the national average, finds a study by the Center for Drug Use and HIV/HCV Research (CDUHR) at NYU Meyers College of Nursing.
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Plastic surgery abroad can lead to severe complications after returning to the USPatients traveling to developing countries for plastic surgery procedures may experience severe complications--requiring extensive and costly treatment after they return to the United States, reports a study in the April issue of Plastic and Reconstructive Surgery, the official medical journal of the American Society of Plastic Surgeons (ASPS).
4h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Anti-aging protein alpha Klotho's molecular structure revealedResearchers from UT Southwestern's Charles and Jane Pak Center for Mineral Metabolism and Clinical Research and Internal Medicine's Division of Nephrology recently published work in Nature that reveals the molecular structure of the so-called 'anti-aging' protein alpha Klotho (a-Klotho) and how it transmits a hormonal signal that controls a variety of biologic processes.
4h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Poor grades tied to class times that don't match our biological clocksIt may be time to tailor students' class schedules to their natural biological rhythms. A study from UC Berkeley and Northeastern Illinois University shows that students whose circadian rhythms were out of sync with their class schedules received lower grades due to 'social jet lag,' a condition in which peak alertness times are at odds with work, school or other demands.
4h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Breast cancers detected at smaller size in women with implantsBreast augmentation with implants does not interfere with the ability to detect later breast cancers--in fact, cancers may be detected at a smaller size in breasts with implants, according to a study in the April issue of Plastic and Reconstructive Surgery, the official medical journal of the American Society of Plastic Surgeons (ASPS).
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Researchers develop model to show how bacteria grow in plumbing systemsBacteria in tap water can multiply when a faucet isn't used for a few days, such as when a house is vacant over a week's vacation, a new study from University of Illinois engineers found. The study suggests a new method to show how microbial communities, including those responsible for illnesses like Legionnaires' disease, may assemble inside the plumbing systems of homes and public buildings.
4h
Viden

Tech-fiaskoer på museum: Vi skal lære af vores fejltagelser!Svensk museum fejrer mislykket forbrugerelektronik, fordi dimserne kan gøre os klogere.
4h
Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

The Sahara Desert is expandingThe Sahara Desert has expanded by about 10 percent since 1920, according to a new study. The research is the first to assess century-scale changes to the boundaries of the world's largest desert and suggests that other deserts could be expanding as well.
4h
Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

What stops mass extinctions? Lessons from amphibian die-off in PanamaWhat slows or stops a disease epidemic if the pathogen is still present? It appears that wild frogs are becoming increasingly resistant to the chytrid fungal disease that has decimated amphibian populations around the world.
4h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Boeing says effect from computer virus was limitedBoeing Co. says it detected an attack using the wannacry computer virus but that the intrusion caused little damage or disruption.
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Scientific American Content: Global

Scientists Find Mini Gastrointestinal Tract Growing Inside TumorCancerous cells may pick up the characteristics of nearby organs, evading treatment -- Read more on ScientificAmerican.com
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The Scientist RSS

Collapsing Bubbles May Make Knuckle Cracks NoisyA new mathematical model suggests the 'popping' sound comes from partial bursts of gas sacs in joint fluid.
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The Scientist RSS

Frogs Fight Back From Fungal AttackA decade after chytridiomycosis killed scores of amphibians in Panama, some species are recovering. New research indicates why.
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The Scientist RSS

Genetic Mutation Linked to Cot DeathAlterations to a protein involved in breathing may help explain some cases of sudden infant death syndrome, a study finds.
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Detecting volcanic eruptionsGeophysicist Robin Matoza leads a case study of an eruption of Calbuco in Chile to evaluate data delivered by infrasound sensors
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NYT > Science

Matter: A Few Species of Frogs That Vanished May Be on the ReboundA new study in Panama finds some types of frogs are returning, after being decimated by a deadly fungus that has vanquished amphibians around the world.
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The Atlantic

The Meaning of France's March Against Anti-SemitismPARIS—On April 4 of last year, a 67-year-old Jewish woman in Paris named Sarah Halimi was beaten to death and thrown off the balcony of her third-story apartment in a public housing complex by a neighbor who shouted “Allahu Akbar.” It took 10 months and a public outcry that began with France’s Jewish community, the largest in Europe, before prosecutors officially called the attack an anti-Semitic
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The Atlantic

The Shadowy Operative at the Center of the Russia ScandalBuried in a late-night court filing in Robert Mueller’s expansive probe of Russian interference in the 2016 presidential election was an explosive claim: An adviser to President Donald Trump’s campaign and transition teams had knowingly been in contact with a former Russian intelligence officer as late as September 2016, prosecutors said. The revelation is the strongest connection to date between
4h
Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

Detailed structure illuminates brain-enhancing drug's actionA drug that reverses the effects of a cellular stress response restores learning and memory in mice with concussions. Now researchers can see the atomic-scale details of how the drug interacts with its protein target.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

Virus found to adapt through newly discovered path of evolutionBiologists have discovered evidence for a new path of evolution, and with it a deeper understanding of how quickly organisms such as viruses can adapt to their environment. The researchers say their findings, which address longstanding mysteries of how genes acquire new functions and how mutations arise to ease transmission from one host to another, could be applied to investigations of viral dise
4h
Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

Scientists mix the unmixable to create 'shocking' nanoparticlesMaking a giant leap in the 'tiny' field of nanoscience, a multi-institutional team of researchers is the first to create nanoscale particles composed of up to eight distinct elements generally known to be immiscible, or incapable of being mixed or blended together. The blending of multiple, unmixable elements into a unified, homogenous nanostructure, called a high entropy alloy nanoparticle, great
4h
Viden

Nu får iPhone-ejere fuld kontrol over batterietApple klar med længe ventet opdatering til styresystemet iOS, som skal hjælpe brugere med slidte batterier og langsomme iPhones.
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Viden

Skidne, spejlede og skotske: Derfor elsker vi ægHønseægget har været et af påskens foretrukne spiser siden 1600-tallet, og hvert år fortærer hver dansker mere end 200 af dem. Gastrofysiker forklarer, hvorfor vi elsker æg.
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Big Think

Amazon’s stock falls after Trump tweets the company doesn’t pay enough taxesDonald Trump AmazonPresident Donald Trump attacked Amazon on Twitter Thursday morning, arguing that the online retailer doesn’t pay enough taxes and the USPS is its “delivery boy.” Read More
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Big Think

A new tooth-mounted sensor will soon help you lose weightAlthough there are many advantages, it could be problematic for one particular group of people. Read More
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Polymers that mimic chameleon skinBiological tissues have complex mechanical properties -- soft-yet-strong, tough-yet-flexible -- that are difficult to reproduce using synthetic materials. An international team (CNRS, Université de Haute-Alsace, ESRF the European Synchrotron, University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill and University of Akron) has managed to produce a biocompatible synthetic material that replicates tissue mechani
5h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News

What stops mass extinctions?What slows or stops a disease epidemic if the pathogen is still present? It appears that wild frogs are becoming increasingly resistant to the chytrid fungal disease that has decimated amphibian populations around the world.
5h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Lesson learned? Massive study finds lectures still dominate STEM edAn analysis of more than 2,000 college classes in science, technology, engineering and math has found that 55 percent of STEM classroom interactions consisted mostly of conventional lecturing -- a style that prior research has identified as among the least effective at teaching and engaging students.
5h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Scientists mix the unmixable to create 'shocking' nanoparticlesMaking a giant leap in the 'tiny' field of nanoscience, a multi-institutional team of researchers is the first to create nanoscale particles composed of up to eight distinct elements generally known to be immiscible, or incapable of being mixed or blended together. The blending of multiple, unmixable elements into a unified, homogenous nanostructure, called a high entropy alloy nanoparticle, great
5h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Biophysics: Bacterial adhesion in vitro and in silicoLudwig-Maximilians-Universitaet in Munich researchers have characterized the physical mechanism that enables a widespread bacterial pathogen to adhere to the tissues of its human host.
5h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Evading detection by an infrared camera, octopus styleInspired by organisms that can change the nature of their skin, such as octopuses, researchers have developed a device with tunable infrared reflectivity. The advancement could help hide objects from infrared (heat-sensing) cameras, among other applications.
5h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News

A chameleon-inspired material that stiffens and changes colorResearchers have developed a new material that mimics the dynamic properties of skin as it tenses -- and that changes colors in the process.
5h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Limiting tumors' ability to hide from the immune systemScientists have discovered a way to stop tumors from shedding certain proteins that the immune system uses to identify and attack tumors.
5h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Resampling of hard-hit region suggests amphibians may be developing resistance to deadly fungusAs amphibian populations globally continue to be ravaged by chytridiomycosis, a disease caused by a deadly fungal pathogen, a new study suggests that some populations in Panama may have started becoming more resistant to the fungus about a decade after it began significantly impacting them.
5h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News

The Sahara Desert is expandingThe Sahara Desert has expanded by about 10 percent since 1920, according to a new study by University of Maryland scientists. The research is the first to assess century-scale changes to the boundaries of the world's largest desert and suggests that other deserts could be expanding as well.
5h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Virus found to adapt through newly discovered path of evolutionBiologists have discovered evidence for a new path of evolution, and with it a deeper understanding of how quickly organisms such as viruses can adapt to their environment. Publishing in the journal Science, the researchers say their findings, which address longstanding mysteries of how genes acquire new functions and how mutations arise to ease transmission from one host to another, could be appl
5h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News

NIH study may help explain why iron can worsen malaria infectionResearchers at NIH have a possible explanation for why iron can sometimes worsen malaria infection. By studying mice and samples from malaria patients, the researchers found that extra iron interferes with ferroportin, a protein that prevents a toxic buildup of iron in red blood cells and helps protect these cells against malaria infection. They also found that a mutant form of ferroportin that oc
5h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Detailed structure illuminates brain-enhancing drug's actionA drug that reverses the effects of a cellular stress response restores learning and memory in mice with concussions. Now researchers can see the atomic-scale details of how the drug interacts with its protein target.
5h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Kidney dysfunction contributes to severe malariaUnderstanding the most severe presentations of malaria is key to lowering the mortality associated with the infectious disease, which currently stands around 500,000 deaths a year. Researchers have now reinforced the idea that kidney dysfunction is a contributing factor to severe Plasmodium vivax malaria cases.
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Science current issue

Structure of the nucleotide exchange factor eIF2B reveals mechanism of memory-enhancing moleculeRegulation by the integrated stress response (ISR) converges on the phosphorylation of translation initiation factor eIF2 in response to a variety of stresses. Phosphorylation converts eIF2 from a substrate to a competitive inhibitor of its dedicated guanine nucleotide exchange factor, eIF2B, thereby inhibiting translation. ISRIB, a drug-like eIF2B activator, reverses the effects of eIF2 phosphor
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Science current issue

Response to Comment on "Enhanced water permeability and tunable ion selectivity in subnanometer carbon nanotube porins"Horner and Pohl argue that high water transport rates reported for carbon nanotube porins (CNTPs) originate from leakage at the nanotube-bilayer interface. Our results and new experimental evidence are consistent with transport through the nanotube pores and rule out a defect-mediated transport mechanism. Mechanistic origins of the high Arrhenius factor that we reported for narrow CNTPs at pH 8 r
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Keeping science honest
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News at a glance
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Congress gives science a record funding boost
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U.K. trials of airway transplants are in limbo
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U.S. blames 'massive hack of research data on Iran
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Meteorite divide points to solar system chaos
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X-ray 'ghost images could cut radiation doses
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New missions aim to make a short list of exo-Earths
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Putting immune cells on a diet
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Change is key to frog survival
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Natural killers join the fight against cancer
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Making room for new memories
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Li metal battery, heal thyself
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Force matters in hospital-acquired infections
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Neuronal-immune system cross-talk in homeostasis
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Mashing up metals with carbothermal shock
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Anatomy of STEM teaching in North American universities
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What's in a name?
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Questioning quantum mechanics
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First in Fly: Drosophila Research and Biological Discovery
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Mining threatens Colombian ecosystems
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Ocean deoxygenation: Time for action
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Amazon sugar cane: A threat to the forest
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AAAS Annual Meeting examines need for diversity in science
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SciLine scores successes in first five months of operation
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AAAS annual election: Preliminary announcement
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Active camouflage from a polymer
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Attacking olefins with chiral acids
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Rebalancing mechanisms during sleep
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Helping NK cells find their way
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Genetic clines and climate change
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The problem of pertussis
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Shaking the small from the even smaller
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ISRIB mechanism of action
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Resistance is not futile
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Sulfur steps aside for nitrogen
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Healing away the dendrites
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Nanoparticle synthesis gets a shock
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Iron's grip on malaria
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How a pathogen holds on to its host
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Nongenetic variation drives viral evolution
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Neuro-immune cell cross-talk
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Messaging by oncogenic kinase
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Infiltration inhibition
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Now you see it, now you don't
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Searching the solar system with pulsars
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Blood biomarkers for melanoma therapy
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A bat's STING is less potent
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We choose what we want to hear
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Right time, right speed, right size
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A scaffold for small proteins
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Enacting a program's plans for synthesis
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Science current issue

A bound reaction intermediate sheds light on the mechanism of nitrogenaseReduction of N 2 by nitrogenases occurs at an organometallic iron cofactor that commonly also contains either molybdenum or vanadium. The well-characterized resting state of the cofactor does not bind substrate, so its mode of action remains enigmatic. Carbon monoxide was recently found to replace a bridging sulfide, but the mechanistic relevance was unclear. Here we report the structural analysi
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Science current issue

Carbothermal shock synthesis of high-entropy-alloy nanoparticlesThe controllable incorporation of multiple immiscible elements into a single nanoparticle merits untold scientific and technological potential, yet remains a challenge using conventional synthetic techniques. We present a general route for alloying up to eight dissimilar elements into single-phase solid-solution nanoparticles, referred to as high-entropy-alloy nanoparticles (HEA-NPs), by thermall
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Science current issue

Adaptive infrared-reflecting systems inspired by cephalopodsMaterials and systems that statically reflect radiation in the infrared region of the electromagnetic spectrum underpin the performance of many entrenched technologies, including building insulation, energy-conserving windows, spacecraft components, electronics shielding, container packaging, protective clothing, and camouflage platforms. The development of their adaptive variants, in which the i
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Science current issue

Activation of olefins via asymmetric Bronsted acid catalysisThe activation of olefins for asymmetric chemical synthesis traditionally relies on transition metal catalysts. In contrast, biological enzymes with Brønsted acidic sites of appropriate strength can protonate olefins and thereby generate carbocations that ultimately react to form natural products. Although chemists have recently designed chiral Brønsted acid catalysts to activate imines and carbo
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Science current issue

Nanofluidic rocking Brownian motorsControl and transport of nanoscale objects in fluids is challenging because of the unfavorable scaling of most interaction mechanisms to small length scales. We designed energy landscapes for nanoparticles by accurately shaping the geometry of a nanofluidic slit and exploiting the electrostatic interaction between like-charged particles and walls. Directed transport was performed by combining asy
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Science current issue

Chameleon-like elastomers with molecularly encoded strain-adaptive stiffening and colorationActive camouflage is widely recognized as a soft-tissue feature, and yet the ability to integrate adaptive coloration and tissuelike mechanical properties into synthetic materials remains elusive. We provide a solution to this problem by uniting these functions in moldable elastomers through the self-assembly of linear-bottlebrush-linear triblock copolymers. Microphase separation of the architect
5h
Science current issue

Self-heating-induced healing of lithium dendritesLithium (Li) metal electrodes are not deployable in rechargeable batteries because electrochemical plating and stripping invariably leads to growth of dendrites that reduce coulombic efficiency and eventually short the battery. It is generally accepted that the dendrite problem is exacerbated at high current densities. Here, we report a regime for dendrite evolution in which the reverse is true.
5h
Science current issue

Shifts in disease dynamics in a tropical amphibian assemblage are not due to pathogen attenuationInfectious diseases rarely end in extinction. Yet the mechanisms that explain how epidemics subside are difficult to pinpoint. We investigated host-pathogen interactions after the emergence of a lethal fungal pathogen in a tropical amphibian assemblage. Some amphibian host species are recovering, but the pathogen is still present and is as pathogenic today as it was almost a decade ago. In additi
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Science current issue

Erythrocytic ferroportin reduces intracellular iron accumulation, hemolysis, and malaria riskMalaria parasites invade red blood cells (RBCs), consume copious amounts of hemoglobin, and severely disrupt iron regulation in humans. Anemia often accompanies malaria disease; however, iron supplementation therapy inexplicably exacerbates malarial infections. Here we found that the iron exporter ferroportin (FPN) was highly abundant in RBCs, and iron supplementation suppressed its activity. Con
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Science current issue

Hippocampal ripples down-regulate synapsesThe specific effects of sleep on synaptic plasticity remain unclear. We report that mouse hippocampal sharp-wave ripple oscillations serve as intrinsic events that trigger long-lasting synaptic depression. Silencing of sharp-wave ripples during slow-wave states prevented the spontaneous down-regulation of net synaptic weights and impaired the learning of new memories. The synaptic down-regulation
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Science current issue

Molecular mechanism of extreme mechanostability in a pathogen adhesinHigh resilience to mechanical stress is key when pathogens adhere to their target and initiate infection. Using atomic force microscopy–based single-molecule force spectroscopy, we explored the mechanical stability of the prototypical staphylococcal adhesin SdrG, which targets a short peptide from human fibrinogen β. Steered molecular dynamics simulations revealed, and single-molecule force spect
5h
Science current issue

Binding of ISRIB reveals a regulatory site in the nucleotide exchange factor eIF2BThe integrated stress response (ISR) is a conserved translational and transcriptional program affecting metabolism, memory, and immunity. The ISR is mediated by stress-induced phosphorylation of eukaryotic translation initiation factor 2α (eIF2α) that attenuates the guanine nucleotide exchange factor eIF2B. A chemical inhibitor of the ISR, ISRIB, reverses the attenuation of eIF2B by phosphorylate
5h
Science current issue

Antibody-mediated inhibition of MICA and MICB shedding promotes NK cell-driven tumor immunityMICA and MICB are expressed by many human cancers as a result of cellular stress, and can tag cells for elimination by cytotoxic lymphocytes through natural killer group 2D (NKG2D) receptor activation. However, tumors evade this immune recognition pathway through proteolytic shedding of MICA and MICB proteins. We rationally designed antibodies targeting the MICA α3 domain, the site of proteolytic
5h
Science current issue

Destabilizing mutations encode nongenetic variation that drives evolutionary innovationEvolutionary innovations are often achieved by repurposing existing genes to perform new functions; however, the mechanisms enabling the transition from old to new remain controversial. We identified mutations in bacteriophage ’s host-recognition gene J that confer enhanced adsorption to ’s native receptor, LamB, and the ability to access a new receptor, OmpF. The mutations destabilize particles
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Science current issue

New Products
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Technology Feature | Live-cell imaging: Deeper, faster, wider
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Figuring out how I belong
5h
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Comment on "Enhanced water permeability and tunable ion selectivity in subnanometer carbon nanotube porins"Tunuguntla et al . (Reports, 25 August 2017, p. 792) report that permeation of single-file water occurs faster through carbon nanotubes than through aquaporins. We show that this conclusion violates fundamental thermodynamic laws: Because of its much lower activation energy, aquaporin-mediated water transport must be orders of magnitude faster. Leakage at the nanotube-membrane interface may expla
5h
The Atlantic

Why Are Some Frogs Surviving a Global Epidemic?In December 2004, Joyce Longcore was dispatched on an unusual mission. At the time, Longcore, a mycologist at the University of Maine, was one of the world’s only experts on a division of fungi called Chytridiomycota, or chytrids. A few years earlier, she had identified a new genus and species of chytrid called Batrachochytrium dendrobatidis—Bd for short—that turned out to be a primary cause of t
5h
Live Science

The Sahara Desert Is Growing. Here's What That MeansSince 1920, the Sahara Desert has grown by about 10 percent.
5h
New on MIT Technology Review

How network theory predicts the value of BitcoinMetcalfe’s Law, which measures the value of a network, can calculate a cryptocurrency’s value—and predict when to get out.
5h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Microsoft shakes up ranks to shoot for the cloudWindows Microsoft AIMicrosoft on Thursday announced a big managerial shakeup including the departure of the head of its Windows group as the technology pushes deeper into a future in the cloud.
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Feed: All Latest

Some Frogs May Be Developing a Chytrid Fungus ResistanceCertain frog species are rebounding after a fungal invasion, probably not because the fungus got any less deadly—the frogs may be evolving to resist the pathogen.
5h
Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

NASA visualizes the dance of a melting snowflakeNASA has produced the first three-dimensional numerical model of melting snowflakes in the atmosphere. The model provides a better understanding of how snow melts can help scientists recognize the signature in radar signals of heavier, wetter snow -- the kind that breaks power lines and tree limbs -- and could be a step toward improving predictions of this hazard.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

Scientists develop novel chip for fast and accurate disease detection at low costA novel invention holds promise for a faster and cheaper way to diagnose diseases with high accuracy. They have developed a tiny microfluidic chip that could effectively detect minute amounts of biomolecules without the need for complex lab equipment.
5h
Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

Once we can capture CO2 emissions, here's what we could do with itThe carbon dioxide (CO2) emitted from power plants each year doesn't have to go into the atmosphere. Researchers are optimistic that within the next decade we will be able to affordably capture CO2 waste and convert it into useful molecules for feedstock, biofuels, pharmaceuticals, or renewable fuels.
5h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Making a leap from high-ability high school to college of lesser academic status can be a real downerMaking the transition from high school to college may be stressful—but it can be downright depressing for students who graduate from a school with peers of high academic ability and wind up at a college with students of lesser ability, according to a new study.
5h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

NASA visualizes the dance of a melting snowflakeNASA has produced the first three-dimensional numerical model of melting snowflakes in the atmosphere. Developed by scientist Jussi Leinonen of NASA's Jet Propulsion Laboratory in Pasadena, California, the model provides a better understanding of how snow melts can help scientists recognize the signature in radar signals of heavier, wetter snow—the kind that breaks power lines and tree limbs—and c
5h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Fat-sensing hormone helps control tadpole metamorphosisWhen tadpoles are but tadpoles, they're voracious eaters, chomping down all of the plant matter in their paths.
5h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Lesson learned? Massive study finds lectures still dominate STEM educationAn analysis of more than 2,000 college classes in science, technology, engineering and math has imparted a lesson that might resonate with many students who sat through them: Enough with the lectures, already.
5h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Bacterial adhesion in vitro and in silicoLudwig-Maximilians-Universitaet (LMU) researchers in Munich, Germany, have characterized the physical mechanism that enables a widespread bacterial pathogen to adhere to the tissues of its human host.
5h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

What stops mass extinctions? Lessons from amphibian die-off in PanamaBlack plague killed between 30 to 50 percent of people worldwide. The cause, Yersinia pestis, is still around, but people are not dying of the plague. An even more devastating modern disease caused by the chytrid fungus wiped entire frog and salamander populations off the map. New results from work at the Smithsonian Tropical Research Institute (STRI) in Panama published in the Mar. 29 edition of
5h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Virus found to adapt through newly discovered path of evolutionBucking a central tenet of biology, researchers at the University of California San Diego and their colleagues have discovered evidence for a new path of evolution, and with it a deeper understanding of how quickly organisms such as viruses can adapt to their environment.
5h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

The Sahara Desert is expanding—world's largest desert grew by 10 percent since 1920The Sahara Desert has expanded by about 10 percent since 1920, according to a new study by University of Maryland scientists. The research is the first to assess century-scale changes to the boundaries of the world's largest desert and suggests that other deserts could be expanding as well. The study was published online March 29, 2018, in the Journal of Climate.
5h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Study may help explain why iron can worsen malaria infectionResearchers at the National Institutes of Health have a possible explanation for why iron can sometimes worsen malaria infection. By studying mice and samples from malaria patients, the researchers found that extra iron interferes with ferroportin, a protein that prevents a toxic buildup of iron in red blood cells and helps protect these cells against malaria infection. They also found that a muta
5h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Scientists mix the unmixable to create 'shocking' nanoparticlesMaking a giant leap in the 'tiny' field of nanoscience, a multi-institutional team of researchers is the first to create nanoscale particles composed of up to eight distinct elements generally known to be immiscible, or incapable of being mixed or blended together. The blending of multiple, unmixable elements into a unified, homogenous nanostructure, called a high entropy alloy nanoparticle, great
5h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Chocolate unwrapped—what's inside your Easter treat?What happens when you X-ray a chocolate rabbit? How complex is the wafer and chocolate composite of a Kit Kat? And why does the inside of a Ferrero Rocher resemble moon rock?
5h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Intensifying Tropical Storm Jelawat evaluated by NASA's GPM satelliteThe Global Precipitation Measurement mission or GPM core observatory satellite flew almost directly above large intensifying tropical storm Jelawat and found strong storms generating very heavy rainfall.
5h
Science : NPR

Gonorrhea Strain Thwarts 2 Main Drugs, Raising Concerns It's Becoming UntreatableThis is the latest in a long history of gonorrhea developing resistance to antibiotics. It's the first global report of gonorrhea that is resistant to the two main drugs used to treat it. (Image credit: BSIP/UIG via Getty Images)
5h
Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

Fat-sensing hormone helps control tadpole metamorphosisWhen tadpoles are but tadpoles, they're voracious eaters, chomping down all of the plant matter in their paths.
5h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Intensifying Tropical Storm Jelawat evaluated by NASA's GPM satelliteThe Global Precipitation Measurement mission or GPM core observatory satellite flew almost directly above large intensifying tropical storm Jelawat and found strong storms generating very heavy rainfall.
5h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News

UMD Researchers explore how personality affects gamified diabetes self-managementResearchers at the University of Maryland designed and tested an app for self-managing diabetes for insight into how personality differences might explain why mobile health apps help some patients more than others.
5h
New on MIT Technology Review

States that are passing laws to govern “smart contracts” have no idea what they’re doingLegislation meant to clarify things for blockchain developers could end up hurting innovation.
5h
New Scientist - News

Far-off black hole appears to be shredding and devouring a starWe may be watching a supermassive black hole rip a star limb from limb. As it swallows bits of the star, it will release enough energy to stay bright for months
6h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Patients who travel abroad for plastic surgery can bring home serious complicationsWith the promise of inexpensive procedures luring patients to travel abroad for plastic surgery, medical tourism has become an expanding, multi-billion-dollar industry. But while the initial procedure may be cheap, it can place a significant burden on US public health systems when patients return from abroad with complications. A new study by investigators at Brigham and Women's Hospital describes
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The Atlantic

Why Does Trump Keep Attacking Amazon?Amazon Donald TrumpPresident Trump may have earnest reasons for his onslaught against Amazon, which he renewed Thursday morning on Twitter. But it’s the latest case where Trump’s previous statements suggest he has more personal, and dangerous, motives than he claims. A day after Axios reported that Trump is “obsessed” with the huge retailer, he confirmed the story in a tweet: I have stated my concerns with Amazon l
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Science | The Guardian

Ways to step up the fight against global antimicrobial resistance | LettersDecision-makers must acknowledge the pivotal role that water, sanitation and hygiene play in preventing infection, writes WaterAid’s Margaret Batty . Meanwhile Matt Ball of the The Good Food Institute says moving to plant-based and clean meat is the best thing we can do to avoid pandemics of antibiotic-resistant superbugs With drug-resistant infections now causing the deaths of half a million peop
6h
Live Science

Mesmerizing 'Self-Healing' Liquid Sculptures Hold Their Shape: How It WorksScientists have devised a fascinating and beautiful way to create watery sculptures within other liquids.
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Science | The Guardian

Mosquito early warning app detects the insects from their buzzResearchers plan to save lives by identifying the sound of malaria-carrying species Artificial intelligence researchers have developed a mosquito early warning system that raises the alarm when the insects are near by detecting the whine of their wingbeats. The system uses an app that can run on a £20 mobile phone to analyse sounds in the environment and issue a warning if it hears the telltale b
6h
NeuWrite San Diego

The animals snakes have nightmares aboutThe Box Jellyfish has venom so powerful that its human victims go straight into shock. The bite of a king cobra can result in the death of a healthy human adult within fifteen minutes. One drop of venom from a cone snail is capable of killing more than twenty humans. We live in fear of […]
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Big Think

What’s the real deal with office romance?A survey by SimplyHired examines the experiences and feelings of people who’ve had office affairs and people who haven’t. Read More
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Science : NPR

'Aggressive' Advance Directive Permits Halting Food And Water In Severe DementiaSupporters call this right-to-die proposal the strongest move yet to document a person's advance wishes in cases of severe dementia. Critics say it would deny basic care to society's most vulnerable. (Image credit: Skynesher/Getty Images )
6h
Popular Science

Some of your favorite products have absurd medicinal historiesScience When men were men and sodas were cocaine-laced nerve tonics. From sodas like Coca Cola to cleaning products like Lysol, many of our favorite household objects owe their start to strange medical ideas. The most popular example is…
6h
Live Science

King Tut, the Boy Soldier? Here's What Other Stories Aren't Telling You.Many news reports describing this warrior-pharaoh hypothesis aren't telling you the whole story.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

Two brain regions linked to conceptual organizationIf your idea of a perfect dog is an abstract rendering of canine qualities extracted across many encounters in your life, you are not alone in how your brain connects memories, say scientists.
6h
Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

Archaeologist discovers Cornish barrow siteAn untouched Bronze-Age burial mound has been discovered by chance. The site dates back to around 2,000 BC and was discovered when an archaeologist, who was conducting geophysical surveys of a known site outside the village of Looe in Cornwall, was approached by a farmer about a possible site in a neighboring field.
6h
New on MIT Technology Review

Microsoft is launching a huge reorganization to focus on AI and the cloud
7h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Medical group offers steps to address physician burnoutFramework and Principles on Well-Being Aim to Benefit Patients and Strengthen Health Care Systems
7h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News

A medical charter: Commitments to limit physician burnout, promote well-beingMore than half of U.S. physicians say they experience burnout in their work. Today, Mayo Clinic and other leading medical centers have published a "Charter on Physician Well-Being" as an intended model for medical organizations to not only minimize and manage physician burnout, but also promote physician well-being. The charter, which has been endorsed or supported by many major medical organizati
7h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News

New work from Ron Crystal's lab on treating hereditary adrenal disordersA new study has definitively shown that a single treatment with gene therapy using adeno-associated viral (AAV) vector gene delivery to replace the defective gene responsible for congenital adrenal hyperplasia (CAH) will only temporarily alleviate the hereditary disorder.
7h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Unprecedented contrast agent to measure the age of skin and blood vesselsIBS scientists have synthesized the first contrast agent to observe and measure elastin, the protein that gives strength to blood vessel walls, and flexibility to skin. The dye could be useful to better understand the role of elastin in biological processes and to verify the health of blood vessels and organs. The full study can be read in Chem.
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Slow, steady waves keep brain hummingVery slow brain waves, long considered an artifact of brain scanning techniques, may be more important than anyone had realized. Researchers at Washington University School of Medicine in St. Louis have found that very slow waves are directly linked to state of consciousness and may be involved in coordinating activity across distant brain regions.
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Pig model of Huntington's offers advantages for testing treatmentsA team of scientists has established a 'knock in' pig model of Huntington's disease (HD), an inherited neurodegenerative disease, anticipated to be useful for testing treatments.
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Researchers increase understanding of coarse-to-fine human visual perceptionIn a recent study published in Neuron, Dr. WANG Wei's lab at the Institute of Neuroscience of the Chinese Academy of Sciences revealed an unexpected neural clustering preserving visual acuity from V1 into V4, enabling the spatiotemporal separation of processing local and global features along the hierarchy. The study for the first time showed an unexpected compartmentation of area V4 into SF-selec
7h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Researchers develop a novel RNA-based therapy to target West Nile virusA Yale-led research team developed a new RNA therapy, delivered through the nose, to treat mice infected with West Nile Virus. The innovative approach reduced the virus in the brain, allowing the immune system to destroy the virus and develop long-term protection against West Nile Virus disease, the researchers said.
7h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Researchers define target and mechanism of antibacterial drug fidaxomicin (dificid)A team of Rutgers University and international scientists has determined the molecular target and mechanism of the antibacterial drug fidaxomicin (trade name Dificid). Fidaxomicin was approved in 2011 for treatment of the CDC 'urgent threat' bacterial pathogen Clostridium difficile (C. diff) and currently is one of two front-line drugs for treatment of C. diff.
7h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Once we can capture CO2 emissions, here's what we could do with itThe carbon dioxide (CO2) emitted from power plants each year doesn't have to go into the atmosphere. Researchers are optimistic that within the next decade we will be able to affordably capture CO2 waste and convert it into useful molecules for feedstock, biofuels, pharmaceuticals, or renewable fuels. On March 29 in the journal Joule, a team of Canadian and US scientists describe what we should ma
7h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Mice 'eavesdrop' on rats' tear signalTears might not seem to have an odor. But studies have shown that proteins in tears act as pheromonal cues. For example, the tear glands of male mice produce a protein that makes females more receptive to sex. Research published in Current Biology on March 29 finds that rat tears contain proteins with similar functions. Mice can pick up on the rats' tear proteins, too, apparently tipping them off
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

Static friction between surfaces can be made to disappear entirelyResearchers have demonstrated how to entirely suppress static friction between two surfaces. This means that even a minuscule force suffices to set objects in motion. Especially in micromechanical parts, where only small forces are at play, a vanishing static friction can lead to hugely improved levels of efficiency.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

Chemical synthesis with artificial intelligence: Researchers develop new computer methodThe board game Go was long considered to be a bastion reserved for human players due to its complexity. Now, however, the world's best players no longer have any chance of winning against the 'AlphaGo' software. Researchers have now demonstrated that the recipe for the success of this software can be put to excellent use to plan chemical syntheses.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

Dolphins tear up nets as fish numbers fallFishing nets suffer six times more damage when dolphins are around - and overfishing is forcing dolphins and fishermen ever closer together, new research shows.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

Launch switch for most common malignant pediatric brain tumorA delicate balance during brain development could have profound implications for understanding and treating medulloblastoma, the most common malignant brain tumor affecting children.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

Noninvasive stimulation device can help prevent migraine attacksA migraine is much more than just a bad headache. Migraine symptoms, which can be debilitating for many people, are the sixth leading cause of disability, according to the World Health Organization.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

Giant Viruses in the Sea: Bodo saltans virus genome has 1.39 million bases of DNABodo saltans virus, whose genome weighs in at 1.39 million bases of DNA, is one of the largest giant viruses ever isolated, and the largest known to infect zooplankton.
7h
Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

Fossils highlight Canada-Russia connection 53 million years agoA new 53 million-year-old insect fossil called a scorpionfly discovered at B.C.'s McAbee fossil bed site bears a striking resemblance to fossils of the same age from Pacific-coastal Russia, giving further evidence of an ancient Canada-Russia connection.
7h
Live Science

Carving of Famed Pharaoh Hatshepsut Found in StorageA new carving of Hatshepsut has been discovered in storage.
7h
New Scientist - News

Dog brain scans show if they are looking at a happy or sad faceDogs can recognise different human facial expressions, like happy or sad, and now a simple brain scan can reveal which expression a dog is looking at
7h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Mice 'eavesdrop' on rats' tear signalTears might not seem to have an odor. But studies have shown that proteins in tears do act as pheromonal cues. For example, the tear glands of male mice produce a protein that makes females more receptive to sex. Now researchers reporting in Current Biology on March 29 have found that rat tears contain proteins with similar functions. The new study also shows that mice pick up on the rats' tear pr
7h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Once we can capture CO2 emissions, here's what we could do with itThe thousands of metric tons of carbon dioxide (CO2) emitted from power plants each year doesn't have to go into the atmosphere. Researchers are optimistic that within the next decade we will be able to affordably capture CO2 waste and convert it into useful molecules for feedstock, biofuels, pharmaceuticals, or renewable fuels. On March 29 in the journal Joule, a team of Canadian and US scientist
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Scientific American Content: Global

This Entire Island May Have to Be Raised Up to Counter Rising SeaSome residents of California’s Balboa Island think such a plan is “insane” -- Read more on ScientificAmerican.com
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NASA visualizes the dance of a melting snowflakeNASA has produced the first three-dimensional numerical model of melting snowflakes in the atmosphere. Developed by scientist Jussi Leinonen of NASA's Jet Propulsion Laboratory in Pasadena, California, the model provides a better understanding of how snow melts can help scientists recognize the signature in radar signals of heavier, wetter snow -- the kind that breaks power lines and tree limbs --
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Fat-sensing hormone helps control tadpole metamorphosisWhen tadpoles are but tadpoles, they're voracious eaters, chomping down all of the plant matter in their paths.
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Tumor suppressor protein targets liver cancerSalk Institute scientists, together with researchers from Switzerland's University of Basel and University Hospital Basel, discovered a protein called LHPP that acts as a molecular switch to turn off the uncontrolled growth of cells in liver cancer.
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Making a leap from high-ability high school to college of lesser academic status can be a real downerMaking the transition from high school to college may be stressful -- but it can be downright depressing for students who graduate from a school with peers of high academic ability and wind up at a college with students of lesser ability, according to a new study.
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The link between urban design and childhood obesityChildren who live in more walkable neighborhoods have a smaller waist measurement and a lower BMI (body mass index). Those are the findings of a Montreal research team led by INRS professor Tracie A. Barnett. According to the results of the study published in Preventive Medicine by Adrian Ghenadenik (lead author) with Professor Barnett (senior contributing author), urban design is a factor in the
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New on MIT Technology Review

CRISPR plants won’t be regulated
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The Atlantic

The Controversial Study of a Girl Who Ufologists Called ‘Alien’Before the media frenzy, before the documentary about aliens, before her bone fragments were ground up for DNA analysis, she was a girl. She was tiny when she died. Six inches. Perhaps she was stillborn or died very young. Her body was reportedly found wrapped in cloth with a purple ribbon and buried—with intentionality, it would seem—near a church in La Noria, an abandoned town in the Atacama de
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

Dining out associated with increased exposure to harmful chemicalsDining out more at restaurants, cafeterias and fast-food outlets may boost total levels of potentially health-harming chemicals called phthalates in the body, according to a study out today.
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Big Think

This Saturday, look up! It’s the last Blue Moon we’ll see for over two years“Blue Moon, I saw you standing alone, without a dream in my heart, without a love of my own. ” — Elvis Presley Read More
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Researchers investigate 'baby' tyrannosaur fossil unearthed in MontanaFor now, there are just a few things researchers and students at the University of Kansas want people to dig about the new dinosaur they recently excavated in Montana's Hell Creek Formation.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

The next Kirkland? Online retailers create their own brandsIn Andrea Bright's home, Kleenex tissues, Charmin toilet paper and Glad trash bags have all been replaced by one brand: Prince & Spring.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Dutch to shut EU's largest gas field over quake riskThe Dutch government plans to rapidly cut production at Europe's biggest gas field after a raft of damaging earthquakes, aiming to eventually the shut the taps by 2030, top officials announced on Thursday.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

New frog species found in Venezuela and ColombiaVenezuelan and Colombian scientists have identified a new species of frog in the Perija mountain range shared by both countries that is home to unusual species like this small amphibian.
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Science : NPR

'Aggressive' Advance Directive Permits Halting Food And Water In Severe DementiaSupporters call this right-to-die proposal the strongest move yet to document a person's advance wishes in cases of severe dementia. Critics say it would deny basic care to society's most vulnerable. (Image credit: Skynesher/Getty Images )
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New on MIT Technology Review

AI can invent new ways to create complex molecules
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NYT > Science

Trilobites: Why Do Cracking Knuckles Make That Noise? You Might Need a CalculatorResearchers developed a mathematical model to test competing theories for what causes the popping sound that will either irritate you or signal relief.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Human-centered design is key to forming partnerships for large-scale conservation successTo recruit more fishers to help with marine conservation, cast a wider net.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Anti-viral components in soybean meal may promote growth and health in pigsSwine diets are carefully formulated to provide the perfect balance of protein, carbohydrates, vitamins, minerals, and fats. But what if those diets also provided health-promoting bioactive compounds that could make animals more resilient to disease? A new article from the University of Illinois notes that soy-derived compounds may be doing just that.
7h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Scientists develop sugar-coated nanosheets to selectively target pathogensResearchers have developed a process for creating ultrathin, self-assembling sheets of synthetic materials that can function like designer flypaper in selectively binding with viruses, bacteria, and other pathogens.
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The Atlantic

A New Plan to Create an 'Islam of France'When French President Emmanuel Macron said in an interview last month that he plans to “set down markers on the entire way in which Islam is organized in France,” he wasn’t making an unprecedented announcement. Rather, he was pledging to succeed where his predecessors have failed. Successive governments since the 1980s have tried to create a brand of Islam particular to France, with the dual obje
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The Atlantic

Ready Player One Is a Mile Wide and a Pixel DeepReady Player One is a beautifully, expensively realized vision of hell. The year is 2045, and the world is an overpopulated wasteland; in Columbus, Ohio, the fastest-growing city on Earth, people live in shipping containers stacked on top of each other. The American dream is a rotting corpse, and instead of hoping for a better life, people while away their days in the OASIS: a virtual-reality rea
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Live Science

Jesus' Baptism Site Surrounded by Bombs and Booby Traps (But Not for Long)One of the holiest sites in Christianity is surrounded by thousands of active land mines. Not for long.
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Expert panel reliable and accurate in identifying injuries in young childrenThe reliability and accuracy of a nine -- member expert panel was measured in determining the likelihood of abuse in more than 2,000 cases. The results of the study that published recently in the Journal of Pediatrics found nearly perfect reliability and accuracy of the panel both individually and as a composite.
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Topical solution may be less toxic option for patients with noncancerous skin growthA team of researchers at the GW School of Medicine and Health Sciences compared the toxicological impact of cryosurgery with an FDA-approved topical 40 percent hydrogen peroxide solution (A-101) for the treatment of seborrheic keratosis, in human skin equivalents derived from darker skin types. The findings were recently published in the Journal of the American Academy of Dermatology.
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Human-centered design is key to forming partnerships for large-scale conservation successThe findings, published in PLOS ONE on March 9, question previous assumptions in the field that the payments themselves are the most effective motivator of participation.
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Scientists develop sugar-coated nanosheets to selectively target pathogensA team led by Berkeley Lab scientists has developed a process for creating ultrathin, self-assembling sheets of synthetic materials that can function like designer flypaper in selectively binding with viruses, bacteria, and other pathogens. The new platform could potentially be used to inactivate or detect pathogens.
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Neurocognitive risk may begin before treatment for young leukemia patientsChemotherapy agents have been associated with neurocognitive side effects in young leukemia survivors. Now St. Jude Children's Research Hospital scientists have evidence the disease and genetics might also play a role.
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Access, affordability of health care in years after ACA for cancer survivorsCancer survivors were more likely to be insured but they still reported greater difficulties accessing and affording health care than adults without cancer, although the proportion of cancer survivors reporting those issues decreased in years that coincided with implementation of the Affordable Care Act (ACA).
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Accurately diagnosing genetic disease prevents cancer, saves livesNew research testing a method of genetic screening in colon cancer patients could be the key to preventing cancer for thousands of people.
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The Atlantic

Why President Trump Is Going It Alone on InfrastructureIf recent history is a guide, President Trump won’t be getting much infrastructure money from Congress anytime soon. Republicans stiffed former President Barack Obama’s repeated requests to splurge on roads and bridges, and they just got done slashing federal revenues through tax cuts and boosting spending on the military and domestic agencies—including a modest bump for infrastructure. But the d
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Pinterest Adds New 'People You Follow' Tab to Your FeedThe new "following" tab shows you pins from people you follow in reverse-chronological order.
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Quanta Magazine

Whisper From the First Stars Sets Off Loud Dark Matter DebateThe news about the first stars in the universe always seemed a little off. Last July, Rennan Barkana , a cosmologist at Tel Aviv University, received an email from one of his longtime collaborators, Judd Bowman . Bowman leads a small group of five astronomers who built and deployed a radio telescope in remote western Australia. Its goal: to find the whisper of the first stars. Bowman and his team
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Scientists use AI to predict biological age based on smartphone and wearables dataResearches at longevity biotech company GERO and Moscow Institute of Physics and Technology have developed a computer algorithm that uses Artificial Intelligence to predict biological age and the risk of mortality based on physical activity. The paper is published in Scientific Reports.
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New Scientist - News

Syncing our brain activity may help us interact with each otherWhen monkeys interact, neurons in their brains show the same activity patterns. We may be able to harness this synchronisation to learn to work together better
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The Atlantic

The Man With the Most Valuable Work Experience in the WorldChris Urmson led Google’s self-driving car team from its early days all the way until the company shed its Google skin and emerged under the Alphabet umbrella as Waymo, the obvious leader in driverless cars. But though Urmson pushed the organization far enough up the technological mountain to see the possibility that Waymo would be the first to commercially deploy automated vehicles, he did not m
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TED Talks Daily (SD video)

The role of faith and belief in modern Africa | Ndidi NwuneliNdidi Nwuneli has advice for Africans who believe in God -- and Africans who don't. To the religious, she advises against using God to outsource responsibility for what happens in their lives. To the non-religious, she asks that they keep an open mind and work with faith-based organizations, especially on issues like health care and education. "There's so much potential that can be realized when w
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

Anthropogenic lead still present in European shelf seasOver many decades lead (Pb) has been released into the atmosphere due to human activities, such as combustion of leaded fuel. Researchers have now been able to show that following the phase-out of leaded gasoline in Europe over the last decades, there has been a 4-fold reduction in Pb concentrations in the European shelf seas. Nevertheless, the legacy of the historical global Pb pollution is still
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

Scientists penalized by motherhoodDespite gender balance at lower levels of academia, challenges still exist for women progressing to more senior roles. This research challenges to what extent a motherhood penalty could be at play.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

Estimating the effect of genetic mutations on neurodevelopmental disorders more accuratelyAbout 3% to 7% of the general population have neurodevelopmental and psychiatric disorders, including intellectual disabilities, autism spectrum disorder and schizophrenia. Genetic tests commonly performed in these patients identify in 10-15% of cases, mutations contributing to neurodevelopmental disorders. However, the effect of 90% of these mutations is not known because they are very rare. How
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Scientists found a new genus and species of frogsA team of scientists from MSU and their foreign colleagues discovered a previously unknown species and genus of batrachians Siamophryne troglodytes. These frogs live in the only one place on Earth -- a limestone cave in Thailand. The location of the cave is not disclosed to protect the animals. The results of the study will lead to the reconsideration of evolutionary history of the relevant group
8h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Anti-viral components in soybean meal may promote growth and health in pigsSwine diets are carefully formulated to provide the perfect balance of protein, carbohydrates, vitamins, minerals, and fats. But what if those diets also provided health-promoting bioactive compounds that could make animals more resilient to disease? A new article from the University of Illinois notes that soy-derived compounds may be doing just that.
8h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Effective rehabilitation in COPDBy 2020, COPD will be the third most common cause of morbidity and mortality worldwide. In the current issue of Deutsches Ärzteblatt International (Dtsch Arztebl Int 2018; 115: 117-23), the group of authors led by Rainer Gloeckl investigates the question to which extent pulmonary rehabilitation can contribute to improving the quality of life of persons with COPD.
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Live Science

This Truck-Size Dinosaur Terrorized Prey with Razor-Sharp 'Meat Hooks'A truck-size dinosaur that sported sharp, long claws the length of bowling pins once tore across the South American landscape, terrorizing animals it hoped to eat about 85 million years ago, a new study finds.
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Nyheder - Forskning - Videnskab

Neutronspredning bringer os et skridt nærmere kvantecomputerenEn stor udfordring i fremtidens kvantecomputer ligger i, at man skal kunne holde på kvanteinformationen...
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Big Think

Diamond origins: 4 fascinating ways natural diamonds formDiamonds can be formed in one of four fascinating ways. Read More
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

More accurate estimates of methane emissions from dairy cattle developedLeading the worldwide effort to get a better handle on methane emissions from animals, an international consortium of researchers devised more accurate models to estimate the amount of the potent greenhouse gas produced by dairy cattle.
8h
Live Science

You Can Overcome Embarrassment with Mental Training, Fart-Filled Study FindsIf you are prone to embarrassment, you might be too self-centered. Here's a mental trick to overcome it.
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Anthropogenic lead still present in European shelf seasOver many decades lead (Pb) has been released into the atmosphere due to human activities, such as combustion of leaded fuel. A group of researchers led by GEOMAR, Kiel have now been able to show that following the phase-out of leaded gasoline in Europe over the last decades, there has been a 4-fold reduction in Pb concentrations in the European shelf seas. Nevertheless, the legacy of the historic
9h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News

More accurate estimates of methane emissions from dairy cattle developedLeading the worldwide effort to get a better handle on methane emissions from animals, an international consortium of researchers devised more accurate models to estimate the amount of the potent greenhouse gas produced by dairy cattle.
9h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Researchers describe the dynamics of P. falciparum infections in adults without feverIn adults with asymptomatic infections by Plasmodium falciparum, the number of parasites in blood falls to very low levels within the first four days after detection, which suggests that these individuals contribute to malaria transmission for a limited time period. The study, led by ISGlobal -- a center supported by the 'la Caixa' Foundation -- will help design interventions to detect and treat t
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

France prepares 1.5 billion euro push to foster AI researchPresident Emmanuel Macron is to unveil Thursday a bold plan to make France a centre of reference for artificial intelligence research, aimed at drawing homegrown and foreign talent in a field dominated by US and Chinese players.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Cracked it! Experts find answer to the knuckle-popping puzzle (Update)It has puzzled scientists for over 100 years but now they appear to have cracked it: what, exactly, is it that causes that wince-inducing sound when you pop your knuckles?
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

US astronauts begin spacewalk to perform ISS repairsTwo American astronauts exited the International Space Station Thursday for a lengthy spacewalk to replace old hoses on its cooling system and other equipment upgrades, footage from the US space agency NASA showed.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

One species described multiple times: How taxonomists contribute to biodiversity discoveryWhile working on a rare little known group of Oriental wasps that most likely parasitise the eggs of grasshoppers, locusts or crickets, not only did a team of four entomologists discover four previously unknown species, but they also found that another four species within the same genus (Habroteleia) were in fact all one and the same - a fifth species discovered more than a century ago.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Fossils highlight Canada-Russia connection 53 million years agoA new 53 million-year-old insect fossil called a scorpionfly discovered at B.C.'s McAbee fossil bed site bears a striking resemblance to fossils of the same age from Pacific-coastal Russia, giving further evidence of an ancient Canada-Russia connection.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Archaeologist discovers Cornish barrow siteAn Archaeologist at The Australian National University (ANU) has discovered a prehistoric Bronze-Age barrow, or burial mound, on a hill in Cornwall and is about to start excavating the untouched site which overlooks the English Channel.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Is your Easter egg bad for the environment?With Easter fast approaching, the thought of chocolate is probably on all our minds, but could the UK's love of chocolate be having a damaging effect on the environment?
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Photographing a Robot Isn't Just Point and ShootPhotographer Giulio di Sturco's latest subject is a humanoid named Sophia—and capturing her essence took time.
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The microenvironment of diabetic retinopathy supports lymphatic neovascularization'We asked whether proliferative diabetic retinopathy involves the growth of new lymphatic vessels in addition to blood vessels -- and, indeed, we found expression of lymphatic markers in the PDR tissues.' The new study, conducted at the University of Helsinki, Finland, was published in the Journal of Pathology.
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Hungarian agency powerless in holding healthcare funding decisions to accountNew research from the University of Bath raises issues about transparency and decision-making for healthcare policies in Hungary.
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Estimating the effect of genetic mutations on neurodevelopmental disorders more accuratelyA recent study, co-edited by Canadian researchers (CHU Sainte-Justine, the Université de Montréal) and French researchers (the Institut Pasteur and the university Paris-Diderot), presents a model that can predict the effect of a genetic variant on a person's cognitive traits and estimate the impact of genetic mutations on IQ. This discovery opens the way to a better interpretation of genetic analy
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Scientists penalized by motherhoodDespite gender balance at lower levels of academia, challenges still exist for women progressing to more senior roles. This research challenges to what extent a motherhood penalty could be at play.
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Dolphins tear up nets as fish numbers fallFishing nets suffer six times more damage when dolphins are around - and overfishing is forcing dolphins and fishermen ever closer together, new research shows.
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Chemical synthesis with artificial intelligence: Researchers develop new computer methodThe board game Go was long considered to be a bastion reserved for human players due to its complexity. Nowadays, however, the world's best players no longer have any chance of winning against the 'AlphaGo' software. Researchers at the University of Muenster have now demonstrated that the recipe for the success of this software can be put to excellent use to plan chemical syntheses. The study has
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The limits of frictionIn collaboration with their Italian colleagues, researchers from the University of Konstanz have demonstrated how to entirely suppress static friction between two surfaces. This means that even a minuscule force suffices to set objects in motion. Especially in micromechanical parts, where only small forces are at play, a vanishing static friction can lead to hugely improved levels of efficiency.
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News

One species described multiple times: How taxonomists contribute to biodiversity discoveryWhile working on a rare little known group of Oriental wasps that likely parasitize the eggs of grasshoppers, locusts or crickets, not only did a team of four entomologists discover four previously unknown species, but they also found that another four species were in fact one and the same. Their study, published in the open-access journal Zookeys, is a fine example for the important role played b
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News

NUS scientists develop novel chip for fast and accurate disease detection at low costA novel invention by a team of researchers from the National University of Singapore holds promise for a faster and cheaper way to diagnose diseases with high accuracy. Professor Zhang Yong from the Department of Biomedical Engineering at the NUS Faculty of Engineering and his team have developed a tiny microfluidic chip that could effectively detect minute amounts of biomolecules without the need
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Monkeys' brains synchronize as they collaborate to perform a motor taskThough their purpose and function are still largely unknown, mirror neurons in the brain are believed by some neuroscientists to be central to how humans relate to each other. Deficiencies in mirror neurons might also play a role in autism and other disorders affecting social skills.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Researchers capture first representative of most abundant giant viruses in the seaBodo saltans virus, the first isolated representative of the most abundant giant viruses in the sea, has been unveiled by researchers at the University of British Columbia.
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Ingeniøren

Cambridge Analytica underviste skeptiske, danske pr-folkLeder i det kontroversielle britiske analysefirma berettede om, hvordan brugerdata kombineret med psykologisk profilering på individniveau får folk til at svinge dankortet eller ændre politisk standpunkt.
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New on MIT Technology Review

Uber settled with the family of its autonomous-car crash victim
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Big Think

How our obsession with self-esteem created the Selfie GenerationIn his latest book, Will Storr traces the lineage from self-esteem to selfie. Read More
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The Atlantic

The White House Doctor and the Dual-Officeholding BanPresident Trump’s announcement on Wednesday that he is nominating his White House physician—Rear Admiral Ronny Jackson—to replace David Shulkin as secretary of veterans affairs has reinvigorated a long-running debate over the proper relationship between the military and the senior echelons of the civil government. Indeed, few modern presidents have surrounded themselves with as many current and f
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Popular Science

How to wash your clothes without wearing them outDIY Extend your t-shirt’s lifespan. If you’re tired of your shirts fading and workout clothes stretching into flimsy wrecks, here's how to tweak your laundry habits to give them longer lives.
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News

New math bridges holography and twistor theoryA new perspective bridges two approaches to understanding quantum gravity.
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Molecular basis of neural memory -- reviewing 'neuro-mimetic' technologiesFrom the perspective of neuroscientists, the authors review the IBM Brain Chip and the Blue Brain Project, and find them flawed by key oversights.
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Is your Easter egg bad for the environment?A recent study by researchers at The University of Manchester and published in the journal Food Research International has looked at the carbon footprint of chocolate and its other environmental impacts. It has done this by assessing the impacts of ingredients, manufacturing processes, packaging and waste.
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Study reveals epilepsy drug exposure in womb is linked to poorer school testResearchers from the Neurology Research Group in the Swansea University Medical School found that exposure to epilepsy drugs in the womb is linked to significantly poorer school test results among 7 year olds.
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Twisting graphene into spiralsResearcher for the first time synthesize helical nanographene.
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Kesterite solar cells: Germanium promises better opto-electronic properties than tinSpecific changes in the composition of kesterite-type semiconductors make it possible to improve their suitability as absorber layers in solar cells. As a team at the Helmholtz-Zentrum Berlin showed, this is particularly true for kesterites in which tin was replaced by germanium. The scientists examined the samples using neutron diffraction at BER II and other methods. The work was selected for th
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Oregon memory researchers link two brain regions to conceptual organizationIf your idea of a perfect dog is an abstract rendering of canine qualities extracted across many encounters in your life, you are not alone in how your brain connects memories, say University of Oregon scientists.
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Fossils highlight Canada-Russia connection 53 million years agoA new 53 million-year-old insect fossil called a scorpionfly discovered at B.C.'s McAbee fossil bed site bears a striking resemblance to fossils of the same age from Pacific-coastal Russia, giving further evidence of an ancient Canada-Russia connection.
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New on MIT Technology Review

Tariffs on China won’t stop its tech rise—but curbs on its US investments might
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Study reveals number of hours it takes to make a friendTurns out the ancient Greek knew what he was talking about.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Fire alarm wallpaper detects, resists, and warns of house firesResearchers have designed a "fire alarm wallpaper" made of environmentally friendly, nonflammable materials—including some of the materials found in bone, teeth, and hormones—that can detect a fire, prevent the fire from spreading, and give off an alarm when a fire occurs. When exposed to heat, the wallpaper is transformed from an electrically insulating state into an electrically conductive one,
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Why are more people doing gig work? They like itThanks to companies like Lyft, TaskRabbit and Instacart, it's never been easier for Americans who can afford it to zip from place to place, get groceries delivered or let someone else walk their dog. Likewise, the number of Americans who are self-employed or independent contractors is soaring.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Trump assails Amazon on taxes, retail competitionDonald Trump AmazonUS President Donald Trump slammed Amazon on Thursday over taxes and retail competition, sparking fresh worries for the technology sector pressured by Facebook's privacy scandal.
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Self-managed health care technology should consider chronic disease patients' valuesHelping patients better manage their own health is a crucial goal -- both medically and economically -- but achieving that goal will require health care technologies that are sensitive to patients' values, researchers at Washington State University are finding.
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Monkeys' brains synchronize as they collaborate to perform a motor taskScientists have previously shown that when one animal watches another performing a motor task, such as reaching for food, mirror neurons in the motor cortex of the observer's brain start firing as though the observer were also reaching for food. New Duke research appearing March 29 in the journal Scientific Reports suggests mirroring in monkeys is also influenced by social factors, such as proximi
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Researchers capture first representative of most abundant giant viruses in the seaBodo saltans virus, whose genome weighs in at 1.39 million bases of DNA, is one of the largest giant viruses ever isolated, and the largest known to infect zooplankton.
10h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News

ANU archaeologist discovers Cornish barrow siteUntouched Bronze-Age burial mound discovered by chance by ANU Archaeologist, Dr. Catherine Frieman. She will begin a 14-day archaeological dig on Easter Saturday to examine the site.
10h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Noninvasive stimulation device can help prevent migraine attacksA migraine is much more than just a bad headache. Migraine symptoms, which can be debilitating for many people, are the sixth leading cause of disability, according to the World Health Organization.
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BBC News - Science & Environment

Scientists explain the sound of knuckle crackingWhat's behind the snapping sound when we crack our knuckles? Scientists have the answer.
10h
Big Think

If you're an LGBTI traveller, red on this map means dangerDo you enjoy 'non-traditional sexual relationships'? Then mind where you travel. Read More
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The Atlantic

Scientists Still Don't Know Exactly Why Knuckles CrackThe study , Vineeth Chandran Suja confesses, was born in a moment of frustration. As a graduate student at École Polytechnique, he had to design a research project for a class on biomechanics. He was drawing a blank—until he instinctively cracked his knuckles. “I thought, ‘This is something interesting and maybe fun,’” Suja says. Of all the studies published on knuckle cracking, no one had mathem
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

The hybrid trapYou know you're sailing into the wind when your theory suggests that the Toyota Prius may end up being a business mistake. But innovation expert Fernando Suarez isn't the type to take the easy downwind course.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Studying supernovae, finding the origins of lifeMany stars die with a whimper, subsiding into cool, small stars, but the most massive go out with a bang. These giants produce elements in their cores, and when the stars explode into the spectacular phenomena known as supernovae, the power of the event scatters the elements far into space. You could even say that supernovae are responsible for life on Earth, since the explosions are the source of
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Scientists create world's first 3-D thermal image of volcanoScientists from the University of Aberdeen have created the world's first 3-D thermal image of an active volcano.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

The limits of frictionFriction is created when two surfaces slide one on top of the other. Since this consumes additional energy, this so-called sliding friction is considered an irksome yet inevitable aspect of dynamic processes. However, to set a stationary object in motion, its static friction must be overcome first. In collaboration with their Italian colleagues, researchers from the University of Konstanz have dem
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Futurity.org

Earlier detection of Ebola may be possibleIn a new study with monkeys with Ebola, scientists discovered a common pattern of immune response among the ones that got sick, occurring four days before the onset of fever—the first observable symptom of infection. The finding raises the possibility of a biomarker for early diagnosis of the disease. Currently, there is no way to diagnose Ebola until symptoms arrive. “Four days! Think about it.
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Science | The Guardian

What causes knuckles to crack? Scientists now think they knowNew model explains how pressure changes in joint fluid air bubbles create the noise The sound of popping knuckles has long been a source of bafflement for scientists. Now researchers say they might have cracked its origins. While previous research has shown that not all joints can make the sound, and that those that do can only be cracked once every 20 minutes or so, quite what is behind the audi
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GoPro Hero: Specs, Price, Release DateGoPro Camera HeroThe new camera, called simply GoPro Hero, can't do 4K, but it's a great value at $1`99.
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Here's Why Putting Porn in the Blockchain Won't Kill the TechnologyOpinion: A new paper says dirty content encoded in the blockchain could make cryptocurrencies illegal. That's wrong.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Space weather threatens high-tech lifeShortly after 4 a.m. on a crisp, cloudless September morning in 1859, the sky above what is currently Colorado erupted in bright red and green colors. Fooled by the brightness into thinking it was an early dawn, gold-rush miners in the mountainous region of what was then called the Kansas Territory woke up and started making breakfast. What happened in more developed regions was even more disorien
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Study reveals startling new evidence of effects of climate change in the ArcticNew research led by U of T Mississauga geographer Igor Lehnherr provides startling evidence that remote areas in Canada's Arctic region—once thought to be beyond the reach of human impact—are responding rapidly to warming global temperatures.
10h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Researcher discusses the future of space exploration technologyFor almost 20 years, humans have maintained a continuous presence beyond Earth. The International Space Station has provided a habitat where humans can live and work for extended periods of time. Yet, despite having established a permanent base for life in space, terra firma is always in reach—within 254 miles, to be exact. If a crew member were to fall seriously ill, he or she could make the retu
10h
Scientific American Content: Global

Math Cracks a Knuckle-Cracking MysteryThe source of knuckle cracking sounds is much debated—but new mathematical models may reconcile two opposing views. Christopher Intagliata reports. -- Read more on ScientificAmerican.com
10h
Latest Headlines | Science News

Why cracking your knuckles can be so noisyKnuckles crack due to the partial collapse of bubbles in joint fluid, a new study suggests.
10h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News

UTSW study helps explain launch switch for most common malignant pediatric brain tumorBy detailing the mechanisms underlying the development of medulloblastoma tumors, the most common malignant brain tumor affecting children, these findings could lead to new treatments, noted Dr. Mukhopadhyay, a W.W. Caruth, Jr. Scholar in Biomedical Research.
10h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Study reveals potential stability of ocean processes despite climate changeThe ocean is a major influence on the world's climate and must be included in modelling to predict future climate change.
10h
New Scientist - News

13 absurdly comic AI April Fool’s pranks you’ll want to tryArtificial intelligence has created a list of suggested April Fool’s pranks. Some seem cunning, others are completely nonsensical
10h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

ScarTrace helps understand how multicellular organisms develop from embryonic progenitorsA team of researchers with Oncode Institute, Hubrecht Institute-KNAW and University Medical Center Utrecht in The Netherlands has developed a new method to conduct whole-organism clone tracing using single-cell sequencing. In their paper published in the journal Nature, the group describes how they used their new method to conduct research on barcoded zebrafish cells.
10h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Why the black-white infant mortality gap exists and how to eradicate itThe infant mortality rate (IMR) is a key national indicator of population health. Despite technological advances in medicine, the IMR in the United States is high relative to other developed countries—particularly for black infants.
10h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Dolphins tear up nets as fish numbers fallFishing nets suffer six times more damage when dolphins are around – and overfishing is forcing dolphins and fishermen ever closer together, new research shows.
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The Scientist RSS

Image of the Day: Pleistocene FootprintsResearchers find impressions left by a human some 13,000 years ago in British Columbia.
10h
The Scientist RSS

New Class of Drugs Kills MRSA in MiceResearchers find two new antibiotics that offer promise in the fight against drug-resistant bacteria.
10h
The Atlantic

The Lie Detector in the Age of Alternative Facts“I have submitted myself to multiple lie detector tests.” That was Russell Simmons, responding to a lawsuit , filed last week, that accuses him of rape—the 16th allegation of sexual misconduct that has been made against the mogul since November. Adam Grandmaison, better known as Adam22, the founder of the hip-hop podcast No Jumper , recently addressed the accusations of rape and assault made agai
10h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Study suggests Earth's water was present before impact that caused creation of the moonA team of researchers from the U.K., France and the U.S. has found evidence that suggests that most of the water on Earth was present before the impact that created the moon. In their paper published on the open access site Science Advances, the group describes their study and comparison of moon and Earth rocks, and what they found.
11h
Live Science

A Cancer 'Vaccine' Cured 97% of Tumors in Mice. What's That Mean for People?A promising new cancer "vaccine" will soon be tested in humans for the first time.
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Live Science

Discover the Science of 'Star Wars' and 'Black Panther' at Future ConDelve into the science of science fiction as Live Science visits Future Con in Washington, D.C.
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Live Science

Crashing Chinese Space Station Will Go Down Shooting — FireballsScientists expect that as the station burns up, it will generate huge fireballs visible from the ground.
11h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Anaerobic microfiltration membranes for wastewater could slow the spread of antibiotic resistanceAccumulating grime on sewage treatment membranes has long been considered a problem, yet it may help remove antibiotic-resistant bacteria and antibiotic resistance genes from wastewater that is treated in anaerobic membrane bioreactors.
11h
Popular Science

The ultimate guide to hitting a home runScience Let's nerd out about the physics of hitting a baseball as hard as you possibly can. If ever there were a sport to completely nerd out about, it’s baseball. Geeks across America have been crunching data for years on what makes certain players or teams so…
11h
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MuslimCrypt Steganography App Helps Jihadists Send Secret MessagesThe unfortunately named MuslimCrypt uses steganography to pass discreet messages through images online.
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The Tricky Ethics of the NFL Sharing Troves of Player DataThe NFL will start sharing RFID data on its players with every team—opening up questions about the ethics of analytics in the game.
11h
The Atlantic

Mormons’ Weekly Family Ritual Is an Antidote to Fast-Paced LivingEvery Monday evening, Mormons around the world pause, as families. Together they pray, sing, play games, eat snacks. This is all standard fare for many American households, but the difference is that for Mormons, it’s built into every Monday night (or sometimes another night) and it has an official, deceptively generic-sounding name: family home evening. The weekly gathering is far more than a fa
11h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Genome archaeologists uncover the origin of a plant hormoneIn their quest for the origin of the universal auxin hormone in plants, Wageningen-based biochemists and bioinformaticists took on the mantle of archaeologists. Deep in the evolutionary history of plant life on earth, about a billion years ago, they came across the protein fragments that were already related to the plant hormone at that time. The journey of discovery reveals information that gives
11h
Scientific American Content: Global

Pushing the Boundaries of "Show, Don't Tell"Malofiej 2018 and the role of infographics in the evolution of storytelling -- Read more on ScientificAmerican.com
11h
BBC News - Science & Environment

Up close: The moment a cheetah joined a safariBritton Hayes was on safari with his step uncle in Tanzania when a cheetah entered the vehicle.
11h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

With China's space station about to crash land, who's responsible if you get hit by space junk?The defunct Chinese space station Tiangong-1 is falling back to Earth and about to crash land some time over the next few days. Most experts expect much of it to burn up as it enters the atmosphere, but it is likely that some pieces of the 8.5-tonne station will survive re-entry.
11h
New Scientist - News

DNA sequencing of babies is here: Should it be available to all?A new bioethics report suggests restricting genomic screening of newborn children. Should it be tightly controlled, wonders Alex Pearlman
11h
New Scientist - News

Bursting your Twitter bubble actually makes you more extremeRepublicans and Democrats had their social media bubbles popped. Rather than opening them up to new ideas, it strengthened what they already believed
11h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Good neighbours really do matter, according to a new studyPoorer countries with 'bad' neighbours are more likely to perform less well when it comes to human rights according to new research from the University of Nottingham.
11h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Would stepping on the first butterfly really change the history of evolution?Martha Jones: It's like in those films: if you step on a butterfly, you change the future of the human race.
11h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Renault shares accelerate on Nissan merger talkShares in French automaker Renault shifted up several gears on Thursday, reaching the highest level in a decade, following a report that it was in talks with its alliance partner Nissan about a merger.
11h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

A bridge so far: China's controversial megaprojectTouted as an engineering wonder, the world's longest sea bridge, which connects Hong Kong, Macau and mainland China, includes a snaking road crossing and an underwater tunnel and reportedly uses enough steel to build 60 Eiffel Towers.
11h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Flights cancelled as sandstorm engulfs Sudanese capitalA thick sandstorm engulfed the Sudanese capital on Thursday, forcing authorities to cancel flights and shut schools in Khartoum and other nearby towns.
11h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

India sends notice to Facebook over alleged data breachIndia's government has sent a notice to Facebook asking whether the personal data of Indian voters and users has been compromised by U.K.-based Cambridge Analytica or any other downstream entity.
11h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

China's defunct space lab hurtling toward Earth for re-entryChina's defunct and reportedly out-of-control Tiangong 1 space station is expected to re-enter Earth's atmosphere sometime this weekend. It poses only a slight risk to people and property on the ground, since most of the bus-size, 8.5-ton vehicle is expected to burn up on re-entry, although space agencies don't know exactly when or where that will happen.
11h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Thai beach from DiCaprio movie gets breather from touristsThe daily hordes of tourists have exhausted the Thai beach made famous by the Leonardo DiCaprio movie.
11h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

World's top cocoa producers fight to protect forestsPark rangers in the world's top cocoa producer, Ivory Coast, are waging a campaign to protect national forests from the illegal farming of the raw ingredient in chocolate.
11h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Online sex trafficking bill will make things worse for victims, expert saysA controversial bill to crack down on online sex trafficking was recently passed by Congress and sent to President Donald Trump's desk, but anti-trafficking advocates and experts, including a University of Notre Dame Law School professor, say the bill won't help the problem and will likely make things worse.
11h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Low pressure reduces bubble troubleSpray coating and inkjet-based electronics manufacture are among the industrial applications in which liquid droplets are applied to a surface. But minuscule air bubbles that get trapped beneath the droplet as it lands can affect the coating's quality and uniformity.
11h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Stable scheduling increases sales and employee productivity, study findsA new study co-authored by a UChicago scholar demonstrates that giving sales associates more stable schedules leads to increased sales and labor productivity.
11h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Making rusty polymers for energy storageIt's called a nanoflower, but if you could brush your cheek against its microscopic petals, you would find them cool, hard and … rusty.
11h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Three generations of data show how wealthy (white) families stay wealthyRecent research has shown the enormous differences in how white and black Americans maintain income positions across two generations. Now, a new study traces family wealth across three generations, and reveals large gaps in the transmission of that wealth.
12h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

What protein is that?Imaging mass spectrometry (IMS) makes it possible to see the spatial distribution of molecules in a thin tissue section based on their molecular masses. It is a powerful tool for biomarker discovery, but identifying proteins detected by IMS remains a difficult task.
12h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Scholar examines biracial youth's political attitudes and self-identification factorsBiracial youth who identify with the races of both of their parents tend to be more socially progressive and liberal than their peers who are of a single racial background, according to new research from a Stanford political scientist.
12h
Scientific American Content: Global

The Fight to Keep Tobacco SacredNative Americans have the highest smoking rates in the country. Some tribal members are attempting to reverse that trend in a surprising way -- Read more on ScientificAmerican.com
12h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Exceptionally efficient extraction may improve management of nuclear fuelAfter used nuclear fuel is removed from a reactor, it emits heat for decades and remains radioactive for thousands of years. The used fuel is a mixture of major actinides (uranium, plutonium), fission products (mainly assorted metals, including lanthanides) and minor actinides (i.e., americium, curium and neptunium). After the cesium-137 and strontium-90 fission products decay in a few hundred yea
12h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Understanding the Earth under HawaiiIn the 1960s, some 50 years after German researcher Alfred Wegener proposed his continental drift hypothesis, the theory of plate tectonics gave scientists a unifying framework for describing the large-scale motion of the surface plates that make up the Earth's lithosphere—a framework that subsequently revolutionized the geosciences.
12h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

First test success for largest Mars mission parachuteThe largest parachute ever to fly on a Mars mission has been deployed in the first of a series of tests to prepare for the upcoming ExoMars mission that will deliver a rover and a surface science platform to the Red Planet.
12h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Software technology that simulates LED devices for rapid development of light sourcesA Purdue-affiliated company is developing a new time and cost effective software technology that could offer a more efficient and realistic way to model and simulate light emitting diodes (LEDs) in order to achieve more powerful and more efficient LED light sources often used in general lighting, automobile lighting and consumer electronics.
12h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Image: Tiangong-1 spotted in space via radarIn the next few days, an unoccupied Chinese space station, Tiangong-1, is expected to reenter the atmosphere following the end of its operational life. Most of the craft should burn up.
12h
Latest Headlines | Science News

Opioids kill. Here’s how an overdose shuts down your bodyPowerful opioids affect many parts of the body, but the drugs’ most deadly effects are on breathing.
12h
Feed: All Latest

How Coders Are Fighting Bias in Facial Recognition SoftwareFacial recognition systems are better at identifying whites than people of other ethnic groups. Companies like Gfycat are trying to fix the problem.
12h
Feed: All Latest

Xbox One Spring Sale Roundup (2018): Life is Strange, Overwatch, and MoreWe picked the best Xbox One games and deals in Microsoft's massive 2018 Xbox Spring Sale!
12h
Feed: All Latest

The Paradox of Universal Basic IncomeWIRED columnist Joi Ito on the polarizing, poorly understand concept of universal basic income—and why its moment may have finally arrived.
12h
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'Ready Player One' Review: a Virtually Empty Good TimeSteven Spielberg's adaptation of Ernest Cline's VR-fueled adventure novel is fun—but doesn't go beyond its pop culture thrills.
12h
Ingeniøren

Nu kan du købe en flyvende bilEn serieproduceret flyvende bil er for første gang klar til salg. En hurtig overhaling via luften bliver det dog næppe til.
12h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Flipping lipids for cell transport-tubulesResearchers are getting closer to understanding the molecular processes that cause parts of cell membranes to morph into tiny tubes that can transport molecules in and out of cells.
12h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Researchers identify molecular structure of the GATOR1 protein complex that regulates cellular growth signalsA team of researchers from Whitehead Institute and the Howard Hughes Medical Institute has revealed the structure of a key protein complex in humans that transmits signals about nutrient levels, enabling cells to align their growth with the supply of materials needed to support that growth. This complex, called GATOR1, acts as a kind of on-off switch for the "grow" (or "don't grow") signals that f
12h
Scientific American Content: Global

Stephen Hawking: The Universe Does Not Forget, and Neither Will WeHis work distinguished him as one of the greatest physicists of our generation; his character distinguished him as one of its greatest men -- Read more on ScientificAmerican.com
12h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Strings of electron-carrying proteins may hold the secret to 'electric bacteria'Could a unique bacterium be nature's microscopic power plant?
12h
New Scientist - News

One year until Brexit: 7 big issues that must be solvedThe UK must answer difficult questions on climate change, food security, aviation and more as it leaves the EU on 29 March 2019
12h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Scientists develop topological defect detection methodAn international scientific team has developed a new method of probing topological structures and their topological phase transitions. The method is based on examining the reflection spectrum of electromagnetic waves reflecting off an object from different impact angles. The accuracy of the method's results has been verified experimentally in both IR and microwave spectra. Results were published i
12h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

'Marsquakes' could shake up planetary scienceStarting next year, scientists will get their first look deep below the surface of Mars.
12h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

NASA prepares to launch next mission to search sky for new worldsNASA's Transiting Exoplanet Survey Satellite (TESS) is undergoing final preparations in Florida for its April 16 launch to find undiscovered worlds around nearby stars, providing targets where future studies will assess their capacity to harbor life.
12h
Scientific American Content: Global

New Studies Link Cell Phone Radiation with CancerResearchers call for greater caution, but skeptics say the evidence from rat studies is not convincing -- Read more on ScientificAmerican.com
12h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Flipping lipids for cell transport-tubulesAn enzyme that flips lipids from the outer to the inner layer of the cell membrane launches the process that permits cells to engulf external substances.
13h
The Atlantic

The Diet That Might Cure DepressionAt the turn of the 20th century, prominent physicians who were trying to understand where mental illness comes from seized on a new theory: autointoxication. Intestinal microbes, these doctors suggested, are actually dangerous to their human hosts. They have a way of inducing “fatigue, melancholia, and the neuroses,” as a historical article in the journal Gut Pathogens recounts. “The control of m
13h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

OpenFermion practice tool for quantum computer codingIn a global effort, researchers are working toward quantum computers. In the meantime, they have to learn how to write code for these devices, which are fundamentally different from conventional computers. A collaboration of scientists led by Google, and including physicists from Leiden University and TU Delft, have developed a practice tool for chemists called OpenFermion.
13h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Scientists discover function of Cas4 protein in CRISPR-Cas defence systemsResearchers around the globe have increasingly been using a bacterial defence mechanism called CRISPR-Cas9 as a tool to surgically edit DNA in living cells. This new technique has made gene editing a lot easier and more precise. But how these systems function in nature is still not fully understood. Researchers at Delft University of Technology have now determined the role of one of the proteins i
13h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

The physics of finance helps solve a century-old mysteryBy unleashing the power of big data and statistical physics, researchers in Japan have developed a model that aids understanding of how and why financial Brownian motion arises. Researchers at Tokyo Institute of Technology (Tokyo Tech) have brought the worlds of physics and finance one step closer to each other.
13h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Detection of a new reaction path in the atmosphereScientists have now observed a particularly rapid type of pair production in the laboratory: Hydrocarbons double when two peroxyl radicals react with each other. This means that stable products with the carbon skeleton of both peroxyl radicals are formed, which very likely will have a peroxide structure. Proof of this reaction path has now become possible with the aid of state-of-the-art measuring
13h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

A new method for quantitative estimation of the degree of similarity of coordination polyhedraThe problem of the relationship between the structure of materials and their physical properties is one of the global problems of the present day. For many years, researchers of the Lobachevsky University's Faculty of Physics have been working to solve it. In particular, systematic experimental and theoretical studies of the atomic structures of crystals of various materials are conducted at the U
13h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Subduction of the Pacific plate resulted in the destruction of the North China CratonWhy did the North China Craton become active ~1 to 2 million years ago after 2 billion years of quiescence? The newest research suggested that one internal factor is its small size and the intra-plate weak zones make it vulnerable to destruction. Externally, the subduction of the surrounding plates also contributes to its destabilization. The subduction and retreating of the (Paleo-) Pacific plate
13h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Teaching machines to spot essential information in physical systemsTwo physicists at ETH Zurich and the Hebrew University of Jerusalem have developed a novel machine-learning algorithm that analyses large data sets describing a physical system and extract from them the essential information needed to understand the underlying physics.
14h
Futurity.org

Neutrino experiments could rewrite Standard Model of PhysicsResearchers have shown that they can shield a sensitive, scalable 44-kilogram germanium detector array from background radioactivity, a key step towards solving a much bigger mystery. If equal amounts of matter and antimatter had formed in the Big Bang more than 13 billion years ago, they would have annihilated one other upon meeting—and today’s universe would be full of energy but no matter to f
14h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Kobe's smart city project begins undergroundThe underground complex Santica in the heart of Kobe is the target of a three-year initiative to develop an airflow control system based on AI sensors that detect the movement of people and air currents. The project was commissioned by Japan's Ministry of Environment as a Low Carbon Technology Research and Development Program. It is a collaboration between Kobe University, Nikken Sekkei Research I
14h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Dietary supplement shows promise for reversing cardiovascular agingA novel nutraceutical called nicotinomide riboside has been found to kick-start the same biological pathways as calorie restriction does, and boost arterial health in people with mild hypertension.
14h
Futurity.org

Drug may halt cancer-causing gene linked to obesityScientists are testing a drug that may stop a gene associated with obesity from triggering breast and lung cancer. The findings, which also suggest the drug could prevent these cancers from growing, are based on two studies in Cancer Prevention Research . The first preclinical study , led by Karen Liby, associate professor in the pharmacology and toxicology department at Michigan State University
14h
Science | The Guardian

Who We Are and How We Got Here by David Reich review – new findings from ancient DNAUsing advances in DNA sequencing, the geneticist shows the effects of migrations and the mongrel nature of humanity in this fascinating study “Arrival of Beaker folk changed Britain for ever , ancient DNA study shows”, ran a Guardian headline in February, concerning the people whose ancestry lay in central Europe and further east to the steppes. Now comes the author of that study, Harvard genetic
14h
Ingeniøren

TDC gearer mobilnettet til Internet of ThingsNu er det længe ventede Narrowband IoT-netværk klar i hovedstaden, og snart flere andre danske byer. Det er teleselskabernes bud på den trådløse teknologi der skal bruges til Internet of Things over længere afstande
14h
The Atlantic

The Deeply Underdeveloped Worldview of John BoltonSurvey the history of American national-security advisors going back to the position’s creation in the mid-twentieth century, and two things about John Bolton stand out. The first is his militancy: his incessant, almost casual, advocacy of war. The second—which has gotten less attention but is deeply intertwined with the first—is the parochialism of his life experience. Many national-security adv
14h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Switzerland at epicentre of cryptocurrency revolutionSwitzerland has become a global hub for cryptocurrencies and the blockchain technology they are built on, with investors flocking to the wealthy Alpine nation to get in on the virtual action.
16h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

G7 nations agree on a 'common vision' for AIGroup of Seven countries have agreed to a "common vision" for the development of artificial intelligence, a Canadian minister said Wednesday.
16h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Cryptocurrency boom breathes life into Alpine villageUp until a century ago, the southern Swiss village of Gondo was famous for gold mining, but the industry closed and Gondo fell on harder times.
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Science | The Guardian

Why is the UK government so infatuated with nuclear power?As the nuclear option looks less and less sensible, it becomes harder to explain Whitehall’s enthusiasm. Might it be to do with the military? Against a worldwide background of declining fortunes for nuclear power , UK policy enthusiasm continues to intensify. Already pursuing one of the most ambitious nuclear new-build agendas in the world , Britain is seeking to buck 50 years of experience to de
16h
Ingeniøren

Galakse uden mørkt stof er måske bedste bevis for eksistensen af mørkt stofEn lille galakse har mere end 400 gange mindre mørkt stof end forventet - måske slet intet. Den observation kan falsificere alternative teorier uden mørkt stof, påpeger astronomer, der har gjort opdagelsen.
17h
Science | The Guardian

The fight against antibiotic resistance must not be confined to the rich world | Caroline PurslowA cheap, rapid test to tell if an infection is caused by a virus or bacteria would be a huge prize for the developing world We cannot hope to address antibiotic resistance in developing countries in the same way that we approach this global health crisis in the developed world. Strict policy interventions to reduce use of antibiotics, as employed in the UK, cannot be upheld to the same extent in
17h
Science-Based Medicine

Direct Primary Care Agreements and Chiropractors: A bad deal for patientsChiropractors are not "primary care physicians" and shouldn't be allowed to pretend otherwise by entering into "direct primary care" agreements with their patients.
18h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Software automatically generates knitting instructions for 3-D shapesCarnegie Mellon University computer scientists have developed a system that can translate a wide variety of 3-D shapes into stitch-by-stitch instructions that enable a computer-controlled knitting machine to automatically produce those shapes.
19h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Herring larvae could benefit from an acidifying oceanExcess CO2 in the atmosphere is making the oceans more acidic. Some studies show that's bad news for fish, including commercially important species. But a new study shows that herring might be able to tolerate this change.
19h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Pitt physicians devise emergency and trauma care referral map for USIn response to repeated calls for an integrated emergency care system in the US, University of Pittsburgh physicians rose to the challenge and divided the nation into hundreds of referral regions that describe how patients access advanced care, in a way that respects geopolitical borders.
19h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Hockey victories may increase heart attack risk in Canadian menThe thrill of a hockey victory may put younger men at an increased risk for heart attack. A new study published in the Canadian Journal of Cardiology found an increase in hospital admissions for men under 55 presenting with symptoms of ST-elevation myocardial infarction (STEMI) or heart attack the day after a Montreal Canadiens win. There was little evidence within the general population of a rela
19h
Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

A moveable feast: Antibiotics give C. diff a nutrient-rich environment, no competitionUsing a mouse model, researchers have found that antibiotic use creates a "banquet" for Clostridium difficile, by altering the native gut bacteria that would normally compete with C. diff for nutrients. The findings could lead to the development of probiotics and other strategies for preventing C. diff infection.
19h
Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

A next-generation non-hormonal contraceptive for women is being developed in SwedenA hormone-free women's contraceptive with no side effects is one promising use for a new technique developed by researchers kto tighten up the mucous membrane – the body’s first line of defense in protecting its inner lining.
20h
Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

Rapid emissions reductions would keep CO2 removal and costs in checkRapid greenhouse-gas emissions reductions are needed if governments want to keep in check both the costs of the transition towards climate stabilization and the amount of removing already emitted CO2 from the atmosphere. To this end, emissions in 2030 would need to be at least 20 percent below what countries have pledged under the Paris climate agreement, a new study finds.
20h
Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

Moving light-dark exposure could reduce disruption faced by night shift workersNew research shows that our brain clock can be shifted by light exposure, potentially to align it with night shift patterns. It highlights that a 'one size fits all' approach to managing sleep disruption in shift workers may not be appropriate. A personalized approach, with light-dark exposure scheduled and taking into account whether someone is a 'morning' or 'evening' person, could reduce shift
20h
Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

Iconic swallowtail butterfly at risk from climate changeNew research reveals that Norfolk's butterflies, bees, bugs, birds, trees and mammals are at major risk from climate change as temperatures rise. Researchers carried out the first in-depth audit of its kind for a region in the UK to see how biodiversity might be impacted in Norfolk as the world warms. The study finds that the region's Swallowtail Butterfly, which can't be found anywhere else in th
20h
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SF Motors Brings the Latest Electric SUV to Challenge TeslaThe Chinese-backed automaker is the most recent addition to a growing armada of automakers making electric cars.
20h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Dining out associated with increased exposure to harmful chemicals called PhthalatesDining out more at restaurants, cafeterias and fast-food outlets may boost total levels of potentially health-harming chemicals called phthalates in the body, according to a study out today.
22h
The Atlantic

Trump's Surprise Pick to Head the VAPresident Trump broke a period of strange silence Wednesday afternoon with an equally peculiar announcement. The first part of the announcement wasn’t a big shock. Confirming days of reports, Trump fired Veterans Affairs Secretary David Shulkin, who was embroiled in a scandal over his spending during a trip to Europe last summer. It was the second part that was a surprise: The president is nomina
22h
Live Science

Lise Meitner: Life, Findings and LegacyLise Meitner was a pioneering physicist who discovered nuclear fission. Her contributions have often been overlooked.
23h
NYT > Science

Chile and Its Scientists Protest Research on Tiny MummyThe Chilean government said it would start an inquiry into whether the remains of a tiny baby girl were illegally exhumed and smuggled out of the country.
23h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Rapid emissions reductions would keep CO2 removal and costs in checkRapid greenhouse-gas emissions reductions are needed if governments want to keep in check both the costs of the transition towards climate stabilization and the amount of removing already emitted CO2 from the atmosphere. To this end, emissions in 2030 would need to be at least 20 percent below what countries have pledged under the Paris climate agreement, a new study finds.
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Futurity.org

Economic justice was always part of MLK Jr.’s messageAs the 50th anniversary of the murder of civil rights leader Dr. Martin Luther King Jr. approaches, historian Michael Honey reminds us in a new book that labor rights and economic justice were always part of his progressive message. The book, To the Promised Land: Martin Luther King and the Fight for Economic Justice , (W.W. Norton, 2018) comes out on April 3—the day before the 50-year anniversar
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Futurity.org

Walking or biking to work is quicker than you’d thinkWorries about the extra time needed to walk or bike to work are a big reason people hop into their cars for their daily commute, but those worries may be unfounded. For a new study, people estimated how long it would take them to bike or walk to a common location in town. The majority estimated incorrectly, with most thinking it would take longer than it actually did. The findings clarify the bar
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Rapid emissions reductions would keep CO2 removal and costs in checkRapid greenhouse gas emissions reductions are needed if governments want to keep in check the costs of both the transition toward climate stabilization and the effort to remove existing CO2 from the atmosphere. To this end, emissions in 2030 would need to be at least 20 percent below what countries have pledged under the Paris climate agreement, a new study finds—an insight that is directly releva
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

Supernova may have 'burped' before explodingThe slow fade of radioactive elements following a supernova allows astrophysicists to study them at length. But the universe is packed full of flash-in-the pan transient events lasting only a brief time, so quick and hard to study they remain a mystery. Only by increasing the rate at which telescopes monitor the sky has it been possible to catch more Fast-Evolving Luminous Transients (FELTs) and b
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

Chemical compound inhibits Ebola virus replicationAn organic chemical compound shows effective antiviral activity against Ebola virus and several other viruses, according to a new study.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

A paperlike LCD -- thin, flexible, tough and cheapOptoelectronic engineers have manufactured a special type of LCD that is paper-thin, flexible, light and tough. With this, a newspaper could be uploaded onto a flexible paperlike display that could be updated as fast as the news cycles. It sounds futuristic, but scientists estimate it will be cheap to produce, perhaps only costing $5 for a 5-inch screen.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

How self-driving cars could shrink parking lotsNew research shows that adoption of self-driving cars -- also known as autonomous vehicles (AVs) -- could significantly reduce the amount of valuable urban space dedicated to parking.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

Surgeons transform static 'Mona Lisa' smiles to joyous onesBy modifying a muscle transplant operation, surgeons report they are able to restore authentic facial expressions of joy -- wide and even smiles -- to selected patients with one-sided facial muscle paralysis due to birth defects, stroke, tumors or Bell's palsy.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

Genes in songbirds hold clues about human speech disordersNew insights about how songbirds learn to sing provide promising clues about human speech disorders and may lead to new ways of treating them.
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Futurity.org

How trees, fungi, and bacteria team up against pollutionRoots, fungi, and bacteria may team up to help some trees to clean polluted land, according to a new study. Fast-growing trees, such as willows, are known to tolerate and even rejuvenate soil contaminated with petroleum by-products or heavy metals. The clean-up of soil in this way is known as phytoremediation, a process is commonly attributed to “secondary metabolism”—the production of specialize
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

Plant growth: Communication via calcium waveThe hormone auxin is a key regulator of plant growth and development. But how it sets these processes in motion has been unclear. Scientists have now uncovered central details.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

Increase in heart rate as blood pressure falls could be early sign of neurological diseaseA simple bedside test that matches a change in heart rate with a drop in blood pressure after a patient stands may help doctors diagnose certain degenerative brain diseases, according to a new study.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

Frequency of alpha brain waves could be used to assess a person’s predisposition to painThe frequency of alpha brain waves can be used as a measure of an individual’s vulnerability to developing and experiencing pain, researchers have discovered.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

How brain circuits are affected by infections in mothers and newbornsNeuroscientists have found that immune system activation during pregnancy and right at birth can cause alterations in the brain's neural circuits during young adulthood that are consistent with behavioral symptoms common in autism spectrum disorder (ASD) and other developmental conditions.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

Finding the Achilles heel of cancerA research team has discovered important features of cancer cells that may help clinicians fighting cancer. The researchers observed that the number and size of tiny structures that exist inside cells, called centrioles, are increased in the most aggressive subtypes of cancer.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

Mandatory nutrition policies may impact sugar consumptionMandatory nutrition policies could be a valuable tool in helping high school students to lower their sugar intake, a new study has found.
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Futurity.org

Physics explains why soft stuff doesn’t clog drainsNew research explains why soft objects are less likely to clog a drain or get stuck while passing through an opening. “It’s new physics and yet it’s so simple…” For decades, scientists have studied how groups of solid objects—everything from falling grains of sand to a rushing crowd of panicked people—can get stuck as they try to pass through a small opening. The classic result is known as “faste
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Live Science

How Easy Would It Be to Repeal the 2nd Amendment? History Has an AnswerIt would take serious popular support.
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Science | The Guardian

Cot death could partly be down to genetic mutation, say researchersRare mutation associated with breathing muscles is key to sudden infant death syndrome, says study in Lancet Scientists have uncovered a new and potentially important genetic mutation implicated in cot deaths, which they say could take research for ways to prevent such tragedies in a new direction. The rare genetic mutation is associated with the breathing muscles. “Previously the whole focus of
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Feed: All Latest

Why Are New York Taxi Drivers Killing Themselves?Drivers say competition from Uber and Lyft is lowering their incomes, contributing to four recent driver suicides.
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Futurity.org

‘Fish hooks’ speed up the search for new drugsResearchers have developed a new screening method that speeds up the search for drugs, making it cheaper and more efficient. At the center of the method is a new DNA-encoded chemical library (DECL) that contains 35 million different drug candidates. Such collections are nothing new, but the structure and scope of the substances contained in this one are something special. Going fishing Each of th
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Futurity.org

Why a supernova ‘phantom blast’ fades so quicklyNew research gives astronomers a better understanding of a certain kind of mysterious, quickly fading supernova. While most exploding stars flare brightly and then slowly fade over weeks to months, an unusual group of supernovas noticed only in the last 10 years flare up and disappear within days. “This is a new way for massive stars to die and distribute material back into space.” Now, thanks to
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The Atlantic

The Atlantic Daily: Another Part of the StoryWhat We’re Following Diplomatic Developments: North Korean leader Kim Jong Un surprised international observers this week with a visit to Chinese President Xi Jinping in Beijing. The meeting demonstrates that China will likely be a major player as negotiations over North Korea’s nuclear program continue. Uri Friedman breaks down what the leaders talked about. Immigration Debate: The Trump adminis
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The Atlantic

The Hopeful Face of Middle America“I think that youth should be heard—and not only heard, but listened to,” says a teenager in the short documentary My America . As the reverberations from last weekend’s Marches for Our Lives continue to make headlines, Barnaby Roper’s film offers a galvanizing portrait of youth in America’s heartland. Roper traversed middle America in search of answers after the 2016 election. “People would alwa
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Popular Science

Why a galaxy with no dark matter could make it hard to prove there’s no dark matterSpace What’s the matter with dark matter? Astronomer Pieter van Dokkum and colleagues wanted to know more about how these huge, star sparse structures worked, but detailed observations of this galaxy recently…
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

Bovine genetics: The startling diversity of Buša cattleIn a study of the genetic structure and population dynamics of a unique breed of cattle that is indigenous to Southeastern Europe, researchers have discovered a remarkable degree of genetic variation.
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Feed: All Latest

NASA's New Parker Probe Will Skim the Sun's SurfaceEngineers hope a special heat shield will keep the craft cool while it collects space weather info.
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Live Science

Poisoned by Bitter Squash, Two Women Lose Their HairBitter squash leaves more than just a bad aftertaste.
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The Atlantic

What Does 'Denuclearization' Mean to Kim Jong Un?Kim Jong Un North Korean ChineseOne of the oddest things about the current flurry of diplomacy with North Korea is that it has played out like a game of telephone: South Korean officials dined with Kim Jong Un in Pyongyang and then flew to Washington, D.C., bearing a message that Kim was willing to discuss “denuclearization,” which inspired Donald Trump to agree to an unprecedented summit this spring with the North Korean leade
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The Atlantic

The Atlantic Politics & Policy Daily: Pardon?Today in 5 Lines A lawyer for President Trump reportedly floated the idea of pardoning former advisers Michael Flynn and Paul Manafort with their lawyers last year. During a White House briefing, Press Secretary Sarah Huckabee Sanders refuted the report , saying presidential pardons for the two have “never come up.” White House Press Secretary Sarah Huckabee Sanders referred to the 2016 shooting
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News

The American Society For Aesthetic Plastic Surgery reports that modern cosmetic surgical proceduresNew data from the American Society for Aesthetic Plastic Surgery (ASAPS) shows that many modern cosmetic surgical procedures are on the rise, and that surgical procedures account for 77% of all surveyed physicians' business. The latest annual survey (Cosmetic Surgery National Data Bank Statistics) from the organization now reflects input exclusively from ABPS board-certified plastic surgeons, whic
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Scientists find link between congenital cardiac malformation and adult adrenal cancerWhy do rare tumors of the adrenal gland sometimes occur in patients who have been born with a severe heart defect that limits their oxygen? Dr. Patricia Dahia of UT Health San Antonio and collaborators from Brazil and Spain found an explanation.
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Global cancer trial sets new standard for post-surgery chemotherapySome stage III colon cancer patients can cut in half the number of chemotherapy treatments they receive after surgery, significantly reducing the costs, treatment time, and long-term toxic effects of chemotherapy, according to results of a unique global clinical trial collaboration published for the first time in the New England Journal of Medicine.
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The Scientist RSS

Study Finds Inaccuracies in 40 Percent of DTC Genetic Testing ResultsAn analysis of 49 patient samples finds high proportions of false positives and misinterpretation.
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Feed: All Latest

How To Download Your Facebook Data and What To Look For in ItFacebook Data PrivacyHere's how to parse the downloadable file of data the social network has about you.
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Science | The Guardian

UK man has world-first case of super-strength gonorrhoeaPublic Health England say case is first global report of strand resilient to main antibiotic care A man in the UK has contracted a super-strength strand of gonorrhoea believed to be the first case globally to resist the main antibiotic treatment. Related: Calls to rein in antibiotic use after study shows 65% increase worldwide Continue reading...
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

Brain-wide tracing of single neurons reveals breadth of information transfer from visual cortexNew research demonstrates neural communication in visual cortex using a combination of methods for tracing the projections of individual neurons across the brain.
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Live Science

Telescope Spots Doomed Chinese Space Station (Photo)With just a few days left before China's Tiangong-1 space station is expected to come crashing down on Earth, astronomers captured this incredible view of the derelict craft zooming through space.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Samsung, Fujitsu pick France for new AI research centresSouth Korean giant Samsung said Wednesday it will set up its third-biggest research centre for artificial intelligence in France.
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NYT > Science

$9.5 Billion Purchase by Concho Is Latest Sign of West Texas Oil BoomThe acquisition will make Concho Resources the biggest producer in the oil-rich Permian Basin, where production risks overwhelming pipeline capacity.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Road gets tougher for electric car innovator TeslaTesla, which until recently had been seen as cruising to a bright future, has suddenly hit a rough stretch as fresh concerns over the future of autonomous vehicles have exacerbated worries over its ability to hit production targets.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

NASA finds Tropical Storm Jelawat strengtheningInfrared imagery from NASA's Aqua satellite revealed that Tropical Storm Jelawat was getting stronger as it moved through the Northwestern Pacific Ocean.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

West Greenland Ice Sheet melting at the fastest rate in centuriesThe West Greenland Ice Sheet melted at a dramatically higher rate over the last twenty years than at any other time in the modern record, according to a study led by Dartmouth College. The research, appearing in the journal Geophysical Research Letters, shows that melting in west Greenland since the early 1990s is at the highest levels in at least 450 years.
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Feed: All Latest

You'll See Right Through the New Genesis Essentia Concept CarThe new electric concept from Hyundai's upscale line, just unveiled at the New York Auto Show, has a transparent hood, but no engine to show off.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

A paperlike LCD—thin, flexible, tough and cheapOptoelectronic engineers in China and Hong Kong have manufactured a special type of liquid crystal display (LCD) that is paper-thin, flexible, light and tough. With this, a daily newspaper could be uploaded onto a flexible paperlike display that could be updated as fast as the news cycles. It sounds like something from the future, but scientists estimate it will be cheap to produce, perhaps only c
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

CaloriSMART test system succeeds in magnetocaloric coolingResearchers at the U.S. Department of Energy's Ames Laboratory have designed and built an advanced model system that successfully uses very small quantities of magnetocaloric materials to achieve refrigeration level cooling. The development marks an important step in creating new technologies to replace 100-year-old gas compression refrigeration with solid-state systems up to 30 percent more energ
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

Fleet of automated electric taxis could deliver environmental and energy benefitsIt may be only a matter of time before urban dwellers can hail a self-driving taxi, so researchers decided to analyze the cost, energy, and environmental implications of a fleet of self-driving electric vehicles operating in Manhattan. They found that shared automated electric vehicles, or SAEVs, could get the job done at a lower cost -- by an order of magnitude -- than present-day taxis while als
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News

A moveable feast: Antibiotics give C. diff a nutrient-rich environment, no competitionUsing a mouse model, researchers from North Carolina State University have found that antibiotic use creates a "banquet" for Clostridium difficile (C. diff), by altering the native gut bacteria that would normally compete with C. diff for nutrients.
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Stroke affects more than just the physicalA new study looks at what problems affect people most after a stroke and it provides a broader picture than what some may usually expect to see. Stroke affects more than just physical functioning, according to a study is published the March 28, 2018, online issue of Neurology®, the medical journal of the American Academy of Neurology.
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Taking a standard prostate cancer drug with food boosts impact, lowers costBy taking a high-cost drug with a low-fat meal -- instead of on an empty stomach, as prescribed -- prostate cancer patients could decrease their daily dose, prevent digestive issues and cut costs by 75 percent.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

Wider coverage of satellite data better detects magma supply to volcanoesUsing satellite imaging, researchers for the first time identified a major magma supply into a reservoir extending almost two miles from the crater of a volcano in Nicaragua.
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Big Think

Scientists discover a new human organ hiding in plain sightIt's been there the whole time, but researchers couldn't see it because they'd always cut through it. Read More
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TED Talks Daily (SD video)

My descent into America's neo-Nazi movement -- and how I got out | Christian PiccioliniAt 14, Christian Picciolini went from naïve teenager to white supremacist -- and soon, the leader of the first neo-Nazi skinhead gang in the United States. How was he radicalized, and how did he ultimately get out of the movement? In this courageous talk, Picciolini shares the surprising and counterintuitive solution to hate in all forms.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

Potential biomarkers in animals could signal Ebola virus infection before symptoms appearScientists have identified potential biomarkers in nonhuman primates exposed to Ebola virus (EBOV) that appeared up to four days before the onset of fever. The work could pave the way for developing diagnostic tools to identify EBOV infection in humans even before symptoms appear.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

Rapid pair production: Detection of a new reaction path in the atmosphereScientists have now observed a particularly rapid type of pair production in the laboratory: Hydrocarbons double when two peroxyl radicals react with each other. This means that stable products with the carbon skeleton of both peroxyl radicals are formed, which very likely will have a peroxide structure. Proof of this reaction path has now become possible with the aid of state-of-the-art measuring
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

Study changes long-held concepts of cell decodingScientists have uncovered evidence that shows a more complex and elaborate role for the body's hard-working G protein-coupled receptors than previously thought, suggesting a conceptual advance in the fields of biochemistry and pharmacology.
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The Atlantic

The Most Important Self-Driving Car Announcement YetOn Tuesday, Waymo announced they’d purchase 20,000 sporty, electric self-driving vehicles from Jaguar for the company’s forthcoming ride-hailing service. Waymo, Google’s sister company within Alphabet, held a press conference in New York for the unveiling of the vehicle , and most of the stories revolved around the luxury SUV’s look and feel. But the company embedded a much more significant miles
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Popular Science

The big bang got its name from a man who thought the theory was total nonsenseSpace The phrase originated 69 years ago today. The big bang is one of those theories that even the most casual student of science finds familiar and, at least at face value, fairly easy to understand. So it might…
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New Scientist - News

Autoimmune disorder lupus may be triggered by body’s bacteriaSome of the bacteria that live in our bodies seem to kick-start the autoimmune disorder lupus. In the future, targeted antibiotics might help treat the condition
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New Scientist - News

Earth had water even before the collision that made the moonComparing moon rocks to volcanic ones from the ocean floor shows that Earth’s water may have stuck around even through the giant impact that formed the moon
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New Scientist - News

Jupiter’s hefty twin found just 12 light years awayA Jupiter-like planet has been found orbiting a star just 12 light years from Earth, making it the closest confirmed gas giant found outside our solar system
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