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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

New math bridges holography and twistor theoryThe modern-day theoretical physicist faces a taxing uphill climb. "As we learn more, reality becomes ever more subtle; the absolute becomes relative, the fixed becomes dynamical, the definite is laden with uncertainty," writes physicist Yasha Neiman.
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Viden

Lyseslukker: Selv en smule lys i soveværelset kan føre til depressionDer kan være en sammenhæng mellem natlys og depression, viser undersøgelse. Vi ved ikke helt hvorfor, siger dansk forsker.
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Ingeniøren

Nordmænd vil tæmme orkaner med boblegardinerHvis temperaturen i havoverfladen bliver koldere, kan man muligvis forhindre orkaner. Forsøg i Caribien skal vise, om man er på sporet af noget brugbart.
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Can a Mediterranean diet pattern slow aging?A series of six articles appearing in the March issue of The Journals of Gerontology, Series A: Biological Sciences and Medical Sciences finds new correlations between a Mediterranean diet and healthy aging outcomes -- while also underscoring the need for careful approaches to the use of data in order to measure the diet's potential benefits.
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News

New study finds world's largest desert, the Sahara, has grown by 10 percent since 1920The Sahara Desert has expanded by about 10 percent since 1920, according to a new study by National Science Foundation (NSF)-funded scientists at the University of Maryland (UMD).
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The Atlantic

Donald Trump Doesn't Understand Community CollegesDuring a speech on Thursday, President Trump revealed a striking ignorance of one of the pillars of his country’s educational system. In the course of promoting his infrastructure plan, he, a bit perplexingly, dismissed the country’s community colleges, suggesting he doesn’t know what purpose they serve. “We do not know what a ‘community college’ means,” he told the crowd in an Ohio training faci
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Linking teen driving behaviors to ADHD, other mental health factorsTeen drivers are three times more likely to get into a fatal crash than their more-experienced, older counterparts. Research led by Catherine McDonald and Thomas Power of the University of Pennsylvania, found a link between mistakes these new drivers make and self-reported ADHD and other inattention disorders.
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Adult-onset neurodegeneration has roots in early developmentThe roots of a progressive degenerative disease begin much earlier than previously thought, according to a recent Northwestern Medicine study.
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Scientific American Content: Global

Greenland Is Melting Faster Than Any Time in the Last 400 YearsAnd the melt of the massive ice sheet is only picking up speed -- Read more on ScientificAmerican.com
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Science : NPR

The Pattern ProblemAre we destined to repeat our patterns, or do we generally stray in surprising directions?
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

Just one high-fat meal sets the perfect stage for heart diseaseA single high-fat milkshake, with a fat and calorie content similar to some enticing restaurant fare, can quickly transform our healthy red blood cells into small, spiky cells that wreak havoc inside our blood vessels and help set the perfect stage for cardiovascular disease, scientists report.
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Live Science

Doctors Don't Know Why This Synthetic Pot Is Making People's Eyes BleedHealth officials in Illinois are warning people that synthetic marijuana can cause bleeding from the ears and eyes, according to news reports.
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Popular Science

Six clouds you can use to predict the weatherEnvironment Get your head in the clouds. You don’t need a supercomputer to predict how the weather above your head is likely to change over the next few hours—this has been known across cultures for millennia.
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How I Fell For an Academic Vanity Honeypot Hacking SchemeWIRED Columnist Virginia Heffernan on how a hacker flattered his way into taking over her Twitter account.
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Science | The Guardian

China's Tiangong-1 space station will crash to Earth this weekendThe out-of-control spaceship will re-enter the atmosphere sometime between Saturday night and Sunday evening UK time It will all be over in a flash. At some point this weekend, a dazzling fireball will tear across the sky as China’s out-of-control space station tumbles back to Earth at 16,500mph and burns up in the atmosphere. The Tiangong-1, or “Heavenly Palace”, has been hopelessly adrift since
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Basking sharks gather in large groups off northeast US coastGroups of basking sharks ranging from as few as 30 to nearly 1,400 individual animals have been observed aggregating in waters from Nova Scotia to Long Island. While individual sightings are fairly common, seeing large groups is not. The reason why the animals congregate has not been clearly determined, and observations of these aggregation events are relatively rare.
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Computer searches telescope data for evidence of distant planetsMIT researchers have used physics principles to improve the performance of a machine-learning system, trained on data from a NASA crowdsourcing project, that searches astronomical data for evidence of debris disks around stars, which can indicate the presence of an exoplanet.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Walmart in talks to buy insurer Humana: reportUS retail behemoth Walmart is in preliminary talks to acquire health insurer Humana, the Wall Street Journal reported, the latest in the recent wave of health care mergers.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Facebook exec says he didn't agree with his provocative memoFacebook Mark ZuckerbergFacebook executive Andrew Bosworth says he didn't agree with a provocative memo leaked to Buzzfeed in which he describes the company's mentality to grow and connect people at all costs.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

SpaceX launches 10 Iridium satellites from CaliforniaA SpaceX Falcon 9 rocket carrying 10 satellites for Iridium Communications has blasted off from Vandenberg Air Force Base, California.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

China's Huawei sees profit rebound despite US setbacksChinese telecom giant Huawei saw it profits rebound in 2017, helped by strong smartphone sales as it ramps up R&D spending despite suffering setbacks in its US ambitions.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Facebook gets thumbs down for handling of data scandalFacebook Mark ZuckerbergWhen it comes to its handling of the scandal over how its users' data was harvested to help elect US President Donald Trump, Facebook gets an almighty thumbs down from crisis management experts.
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Futurity.org

Eating out boosts your exposure to this harmful chemicalPeople who eat more fast food are exposed to higher levels of potentially harmful chemicals known as phthalates than people who ate more home-cooked meals, a new study shows. “People who ate the most fast food had phthalate levels that were as much as 40 percent higher…” Researchers studied data from 10,253 participants in a national survey. They asked participants to recall what they ate and whe
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Live Science

Here's What a Single Milkshake Does to Your Blood VesselsA chocolate milkshake may be bliss for your taste buds, but it's not so good for your blood vessels.
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How Feminists in China Are Using Emoji to Avoid CensorshipThere are other ways to write #MeToo.
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The Atlantic

What Makes a Serial Bomber Tick?Austin, Texas, recently experienced 19 days of terror at the hands of an unknown figure, as hundreds of law-enforcement officers crisscrossed the Texas capital in a race to track down a shadow. We now know the “who”: The bombings were perpetrated by a 23-year-old, homegrown, unemployed community-college dropout named Mark Anthony Conditt. Investigators probably know the makeup of the mechanical s
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Rational protein engineering can improve effectiveness of mRNA therapiesmRNA drugs offer a promising new approach to deliver therapeutic replacement proteins, and novel strategies designed to engineer more stable and active proteins are further enhancing the potential of mRNA therapies.
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Futurity.org

Drug may dial down arthritis inflammationScientists have designed a new drug compound that dials down inflammation, suggesting possible future uses against autoimmune disorders such as rheumatoid arthritis. The new inhibitor is more selective than other compounds designed to target the same inflammatory pathway. Such precision, along with other beneficial characteristics of the new inhibitor, may improve upon some of the downsides of cu
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TED Talks Daily (SD video)

Our fight for disability rights -- and why we're not done yet | Judith HeumannFour decades ago, Judith Heumann helped to lead a groundbreaking protest called the Section 504 sit-in -- in which disabled-rights activists occupied a federal building for almost a month, demanding greater accessibility for all. In this personal, inspiring talk, Heumann tells the stories behind the protest -- and reminds us that, 40 years on, there's still work left to do.
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Big Think

The fifth leading cause of death in the US? Your job.In his new book, Dying For a Paycheck, Stanford professor Jeffrey Pfeffer says we have to change the workplace environment—now. Read More
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Popular Science

How to repair your phone in a pinchDIY Throw together a quick fix. Next time you drop, dunk, or otherwise damage your phone, don't panic. This basic advice will get your phone functioning again as quickly as possible.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

A century after WWI, munitions still making way onto beachesA century after World War I ended, discarded munitions from that and other wars continue to make their way onto beaches around the country.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Proposed border wall will harm Texas plants and animals, scientists sayIn the latest peer-reviewed publication on the potential impacts of a border wall on plants and animals, conservation biologists, led by a pair of scientists from The University of Texas at Austin, say that border walls threaten to harm endangered Texas plants and animals and cause trouble for the region's growing ecotourism industry.
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News

A synthetic chameleon has been developedAn international team of researchers including Dmitry Ivanov, the head of laboratory of functional soft-matter systems, MSU, announced the development of a synthetic chameleon skin. Similar to its biological analogue, the synthetic skin reacts to mechanical stimuli by changing its stiffness and color. The scientists see their development as quite promising. The work was published in the recent iss
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Strings of electron-carrying proteins may hold the secret to 'electric bacteria'Could a unique bacterium be nature's microscopic power plant? USC scientists who work with a species of bacteria that essentially 'breathe' rocks think it's possible.
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Colon signaling pathway key to inflammatory bowel diseaseInflammatory bowel disease (IBD) develops because of an uncontrolled immune response in the colon. Japanese research led by Tokyo Medical and Dental University (TMDU) showed that a signaling pathway underlies the differentiation of white blood cells into a population capable of inducing inflammation. This signaling pathway also enhanced the expression of genes encoding inflammatory mediators, open
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Inherent feminizing effect of germ cells: New insights into sex determinationGerm cells have long been recognized as the only cells that can transfer genetic materials to the next generation via the sperm or egg. However, recent analyses in medaka (teleost fish) revealed another essential role of germ cells -- feminizing the gonads. Researchers showed the feminizing effect of germ cells occurs in parallel with other reproductive elements. Germ cells in medaka may have a po
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Beams are back in the LHCThe Large Hadron Collider is back in business! On Friday 30 March, at 12:17 pm, protons circulated in the 27-km ring for the first time in 2018. The world's most powerful particle accelerator thus entered its seventh year of data taking and its fourth year at 13 TeV collision energy.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

What a meshA team of scientists from across the U.S. has found a new way to create molecular interconnections that can give a certain class of materials exciting new properties, including improving their ability to catalyze chemical reactions or harvest energy from light.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

The invisible power of 'flutter'—from plane crashes to snoring to free energyWith the car windows down on the first warm day of spring, the urge is unshakable. You extend your arm into the wind, tracing the city skyline in a natural motion somewhere between swimming and waving. As you move your hand, you alter the flow of the air. The redirected air in turn exerts a force on your hand.
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The SamSam Ransomware That Hit Atlanta Will Strike AgainAtlanta isn't the SamSam ransomware strain's first victim—and it won't be the last.
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Live Science

Despite Court Ruling, There's No Certain Science Linking Coffee to CancerAttention coffee drinkers: a judge in California has ruled that coffee companies in the Golden State must label each cup of joe with a cancer warning label.
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Inside Science

Telepathy Is RealTelepathy Is Real How do we transmit information from one person to another? Telepathy Is Real Video of Telepathy Is Real Human Friday, March 30, 2018 - 09:00 Alistair Jennings, Contributor (Inside Science) -- Now, I don’t want to alarm anyone, but telepathy, the act of transferring thoughts into someone else’s head is now real. As in, published-in-academic-papers real. People have now telepathic
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Proposed border wall will harm Texas plants and animals, scientists sayIn the latest peer-reviewed publication on the potential impacts of a border wall on plants and animals, conservation biologists, led by a pair of scientists from the University of Texas at Austin, say that border walls threaten to harm endangered Texas plants and animals and cause trouble for the region's growing ecotourism industry.
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News

A novel test bed for non-equilibrium many-body physicsThe behavior of electrons in a material is typically difficult to predict. Novel insight comes now from experiments and simulations performed by a team led by ETH physicists who have studied electronic transport properties in a one-dimensional quantum wire containing a mesoscopic lattice.
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Researchers find ways to impede progress of neurodegenerative diseasesAs the paper posits, there is currently no doubt that hyperpolarization of mitochondria and concomitant oxidative stress are associated with the development of serious pathologies, such as Parkinson's disease, Alzheimer's disease, autoimmune syndromes, some cancers, and other conditions. Hyperpolarized mitochondria have an elevated transmembrane potential because of the excess of H+ ions in the in
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Internet addiction in teenagers studied at Kazan UniversityThe authors found out that the majority of those questioned have predispositions for Internet addiction. This includes weak control over time spent online, over their own activity timelines and priority setting. However, they still can limit their online activities in favor of face-to-face communication with friends and other daily activities, such as studies.
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Calculating the impacts of natural events on wildlifeA new method could help scientists understand how wildlife populations are affected by major natural events, such as hurricanes, severe winters, and tsunamis.
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Pediatric cancer drug shows 93 percent response rateA first-of-its-kind drug targeting a fused gene found in many types of cancer was effective in 93 percent of pediatric patients tested, researchers at UT Southwestern's Simmons Cancer Center announced.
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News

What a meshA team of scientists from across the US has found a new way to create molecular interconnections that can give a certain class of materials exciting new properties, including improving their ability to catalyze chemical reactions or harvest energy from light.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Image: Egg Island, BahamasWhen it comes to eggs, most of us are probably thinking of the chocolate variety that we hope will pass our way this weekend, but they're difficult to spot from space. Instead, we can offer you this gorgeous Copernicus Sentinel-2B picture of Egg Island in the Bahamas.
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Science | The Guardian

It’s official! Coffee causes cancer (except when it doesn’t)Coffee shops in California may soon have to display cancer warnings. But don’t worry, because new evidence points to the drink’s health benefits Name Coffee. Appearance: Brown. Continue reading...
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Futurity.org

These things shape political views of biracial youthBiracial youth who identify with the races of both of their parents tend to be more socially progressive and liberal than young people with a single racial background. The multiracial population is one of the fastest-growing groups in the United States, says Lauren Davenport, an assistant professor of political science at Stanford University and author of a new book, Politics Beyond Black and Whi
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New Scientist - News

GM worms make a super-silk completely unknown in natureThanks to a spot of genetic hacking, silkworms can make a new form of silk not found in nature that includes a synthetic amino acid. It could be used in medicine
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Tech Tools to Help With Hand and Arm InjuriesFor those who have recently injured or lost their dominant hand, everything from apps to bungees exist to ease the frustration.
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This Week in the Future of Cars: Back to Normal?A ban for Uber, a challenge to Tesla, and Jaguars for Waymo.
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The Atlantic

In Defense of the 'Ugly' Facebook MemoOn Thursday, Buzzfeed published a controversial internal Facebook memo titled “The Ugly.” It features Facebook Vice President Andrew Bosworth’s 2016 reflections on the company’s aggressive efforts to connect people—and their fraught implications. So far, Facebook is standing by its VP, who said this about his intentions on Twitter: “I don’t agree with the post today and I didn’t agree with it eve
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Scientific American Content: Global

The Special Challenges of Being Both a Scientist and a MomI didn’t really understand how unjust the academic system was for career advancement for women until I had children -- Read more on ScientificAmerican.com
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Science | The Guardian

The week in wildlife – in picturesA family of brown bears, a whale shark and a new species of frog are among this week’s pick of images from the natural world Continue reading...
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

From infection-dodging stem cells, new tactics for research on viral diseaseFor a stem cell, the future is wide open. It can divide infinitely to create more stem cells, or it can grow up into other kinds of cells, taking its place in the heart, brain, or other organs. But the stem cell loses something during that maturation: its remarkable ability to fight off viruses.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

IBM scientists demo rocking Brownian motors for nanoparticlesToday, our IBM Research team published the first real world demonstration of a rocking Brownian motor for nanoparticles in the peer-review journal Science. The motors propel nanoscale particles along predefined racetracks to enable researchers to separate nanoparticle populations with unprecedented precision. The reported findings show great potential for lab-on-a-chip applications in material sci
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

A ban on captive animals could speed up extinctionThe recent death of the last male Northern white rhinoceros —and the imminent extinction of the vaquita porpoise —is a stark reminder we are not going to win every battle to save endangered species in the wild. We can rescue some from total extinction—and have already —but only with the help of zoos and aquariums.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Understanding how society will change as we move to renewable energy sourcesImagine waking up tomorrow in a world that doesn't depend on oil.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Why education is embracing Facebook-style personality profiling for schoolchildrenThe recent Cambridge Analytica scandal concerned the alleged psychographic profiling of millions of Facebook users without their knowledge. Its controversial actions reflect the wider aspirations of the data analytics industry to see into the hidden depths of people. But this focus on personality measurement is also being reflected in new trends in education.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

When men ask more questions—a glimpse of ordinary sexism in the academic worldIt's a man's world when it comes to work: women are paid 20% less than men; men with equivalent experience are promoted over women; women with children are hired less, while men with children are paid more; successful women are viewed as less likeable than successful men. Although conditions for women have improved compared to several decades ago, the rate of improvement has slowed in recent years
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Singapore says Uber-Grab deal may flout competition rulesThe sale of Uber's Southeast Asian business to Singapore-based rival Grab may have infringed competition rules, a Singapore watchdog said Friday, imposing restrictions on the deal while it carries out an investigation.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Coming down in flames: Fiery endings for spacecraftChina's defunct Tiangong-1 space lab is expected to make a fiery re-entry into the earth's atmosphere in the coming days and disintegrate in what Chinese authorities promise will be a "splendid" show.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Czechs extradite alleged Russian hacker to USThe Czech Republic extradited a Russian man to the U.S. to face charges of hacking computers at LinkedIn, Dropbox and other American companies, an official said Friday.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Inherent feminizing effect of germ cells—new insights into sex determinationNagoya University-led study shows for the first time germ cells have an inherent property to feminize the body in teleost fish, medaka.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Chaos that will keep you warm: Researchers improve heat insulation using deliberate chaosPowder is extremely well-suited for thermal insulation when there is a jumble of different sized nanoparticles in it. This was discovered by a research group at the University of Bayreuth led by Prof. Dr. Markus Retsch. The scientists were able to determine how the thermal conductivity of powder is influenced by order and chaos in its constituent parts. They have published their findings in the jo
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Popular Science

The physics behind a baseball bat's sweet spotScience It's actually more of a sweet zone . There’s a certain romance to wooden baseball bats that goes away the second you swing one. For those of us not trying to make it to the majors, using a wooden bat is…
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Live Science

Why Denmark Is the Happiest CountryThe new World Happiness Report again ranks Denmark among the top three happiest of 155 countries surveyed – a distinction that the country has earned for seven consecutive years.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Comet provides rare chance to study solar system's originsMore samples of comets are urgently required to better understand the early history of the solar system, say researchers analyzing comet dust brought back to Earth by NASA's Stardust mission in 2006.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Why you stink at fact-checkingHere's a quick quiz for you:
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Latest Headlines | Science News

A Chinese space station will fall to Earth this weekendThe Chinese space agency’s first space station is coming back to Earth this weekend. It probably won’t cause damage, but it will cause fireworks.
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The Atlantic

Enough With the Trolley ProblemYou know the drill by now: A runaway trolley is careening down a track. There are five workers ahead, sure to be killed if the trolley reaches them. You can throw a lever to switch the trolley to a neighboring track, but there’s a worker on that one as well who would likewise be doomed. Do you hit the switch and kill one person, or do nothing and kill five? That’s the most famous version of the t
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RSS Readers Are Due for a Comeback: Feedly, The Old Reader, InoreaderAfter years of letting algorithms make up our minds for us, the time is right to go back to basics.
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Feed: All Latest

Ocean Acidification Could Be a Net Positive for Some FishBaby herring adapt to extra carbon dioxide in the water; cod and clams, not so much.
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The Scientist RSS

Image of the Day: Pseudomonas AutophagyResearchers identify antibacterial functions of cell death in Arabidopsis when the plant is infected with Pseudomonas.
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Scientific American Content: Global

Quantum Leaps: Read the Winning Entry in a Physics-Inspired Fiction ContestThe Quantum Shorts competition invited stories incorporating the laws of quantum mechanics -- Read more on ScientificAmerican.com
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Scientists successfully print glass opticsFor the first time, researchers at Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL) have successfully 3-D-printed optical-quality glasses, on par with commercial glass products currently available on the market.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Phage-host interactions are more complicated than most laboratory studies suggestFor years, scientists have experimented with phages—the viruses that infect bacteria—to learn how they change their host. Because such studies are difficult to accomplish in the wild, most have focused on viruses and host cells tailored for laboratory experiments. Now a team of scientists departs from these "optimal" laboratory-suitable viruses to study the molecular response when bacteria and pha
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Land degradation pushing planet towards sixth mass extinctionMore than 100 experts from 45 countries have published a three-year study of the Earth's land degradation, calling the problem "critical" and saying that worsening land conditions undermine the well-being of 3.2 billion people.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Neutral news perceived as biased depending on who shares itResearchers at the University of Utah and Konkuk University found that news stories are perceived as biased based on who shares that story on social media, regardless if the actual story is biased. Published in Mass Communication & Society, "When social media become hostile media: An experimental examination of news sharing, partisanship and follower count," the study also examines how Republicans
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Scientists build army of metal-organic nanoflowers to treat cancerDoctors have been using radiation to treat cancer for more than a hundred years, but it's always been a delicate art to direct treatment while avoiding healthy tissue.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Orbital testing begins for advanced small spacecraft communicationsNASA Small Spacecraft Technology Program's Integrated Solar and Reflectarray Antenna, or ISARA, and Optical Communications and Sensor Demonstration, or OCSD, spacecraft recently completed systems checkout and have moved into the operational phase to demonstrate a number of technology firsts.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Image: Testing InSightTesting continued on NASA's Interior Exploration using Seismic Investigations, Geodesy and Heat Transport, or InSight, spacecraft on inside the Astrotech processing facility at Vandenberg Air Force Base in early March 2018.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

NASA ready to study heart of MarsNASA is about to go on a journey to study the interior of Mars. The space agency held a news conference today at its Jet Propulsion Laboratory (JPL) in Pasadena, California, detailing the next mission to the Red Planet.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

New study confirms racial disparities in Vermont traffic stops, searchesA 2017 study showing that Black and Hispanic drivers in Vermont were more likely than White drivers to be stopped and searched by state and local police, and less likely to be found with contraband, was welcomed by many in the state's law enforcement community for providing valuable feedback that could be put to good use in training programs.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Computer searches telescope data for evidence of distant planetsAs part of an effort to identify distant planets hospitable to life, NASA has established a crowdsourcing project in which volunteers search telescopic images for evidence of debris disks around stars, which are good indicators of exoplanets.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Scientists find different cell types contain the same enzyme ratiosBy studying bacteria and yeast, researchers at MIT have discovered that vastly different types of cells still share fundamental similarities, conserved across species and refined over time. More specifically, these cells contain the same proportion of specialized proteins, known as enzymes, which coordinate chemical reactions within the cell.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Soil bacterium tapped for penicillin guard dutyA common soil bacterium may hold the key to preserving the germ-killing power of penicillin. U.S. Department of Agriculture (USDA) scientists in Peoria, Illinois, helped mass produce the antibiotic during World War II to treat Allied soldiers and later civilians. But decades of widespread use has since enabled some germs to develop resistance to it.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

China tightens rules on transferring tech know-howChina has issued new guidelines on transferring intellectual property rights from Chinese firms or individuals to foreign investors, as global tensions rise over technology theft.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

New Patagonian predator sheds light on mysterious meat-eating dinosaur groupThe new predatory dinosaur Tratayenia rosalesi crosses a stream in what is now Patagonia, Argentina roughly 85 million years ago.
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Ingeniøren

Ny metode til 3D-printning sætter turbo på fremstilling af raketdyserNasa har udviklet og testet en ny 3D-print-metode, der kan reducere fremstillingstiden på raketdyser med adskillige uger. Metoden skal nu kommercialiseres og gøres tilgængelig i andre industrier.
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A Short History of Mark Zuckerberg's Privacy Gaffes at FacebookFacebook Mark ZuckerbergFacebook has been updating its privacy settings for more than a decade. Will this time be different?
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Crispr’d Food, Coming Soon to a Supermarket Near YouThis week the USDA announced it has no plans to regulate gene-editing technologies like Crispr, opening the door to a boom in designer foods.
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OK, We Need to Talk About 'Ready Player One'Was the movie everything we hoped it would be? Two WIRED editors (and proud ’80s kids) hash things out.
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Latest Headlines | Science News

Toxins from the world’s longest animal can kill cockroachesBootlace worms can stretch up to 55 meters long and ooze toxins that can kill cockroaches and green crabs.
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Scientific American Content: Global

Cambridge Analytica and Online ManipulationIt's not just about data protection; it's about strategies designed to induce addictive behavior, and thus to manipulate -- Read more on ScientificAmerican.com
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Science | The Guardian

London’s air pollution is criminal. That’s why at 71 I’m risking prison | Genny SchererI’m standing up with protesters to draw attention to this crisis – I can’t watch while fellow citizens die because of our filthy air For more than 50 years I have loved living in London: but I am now more and more worried about the pollution. I’m worried about the pollution in the water, the pollution in the ground, and the pollution in the air from the busy arterial roads and airports. It’s affec
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Learn How to Fold a World-Record-Setting Paper AirplaneJohn Collins shows you how to fold the innovative paper airplane design that earned him a spot in the Guinness Book of World Records.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Porous liquid discovery leads to new spin out companyScientists at Queen's University Belfast who invented a liquid that can dissolve remarkably large amounts of gas, have launched a new spin out company Porous Liquid Technologies Ltd.
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Scientific American Content: Global

"Bar Codes" Could Map Errant Brain Wiring in Autism and SchizophreniaA new, speedy technique affords scientists the ability to visualize the brain’s myriad connections at an unprecedented level of complexity -- Read more on ScientificAmerican.com
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Polymers that mimic chameleon skinBiological tissues have complex mechanical properties – soft-yet-strong, tough-yet-flexible – that are difficult to reproduce using synthetic materials. An international team has managed to produce a biocompatible synthetic material that replicates tissue mechanics and alters color when it changes shape, like chameleon skin. These results, to which researchers from CNRS, Université de Haute-Alsace
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Unprecedented contrast agent to measure the age of skin and blood vesselsWrinkled, sagging skin is probably the most visible sign of aging, but hidden within the body, blood vessel walls lose elasticity, too, becoming more vulnerable to hypertension. The two processes are partly due to decreases of the same protein as people and animals age. A team of researchers at the Institute for Basic Science (IBS) have synthesized the first contrast agent to observe and measure e
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Scientists found a new genus and species of frogsA team of scientists from MSU and their foreign colleagues have discovered a previously unknown species and genus of batrachians Siamophryne troglodytes. These frogs live in the only one place on Earth—a limestone cave in Thailand. The location of the cave is undisclosed to protect the animals. The results of the study will lead to the reconsideration of the evolutionary history of these amphibia
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Anthropogenic lead still present in European shelf seasOver many decades, human activities have release lead into the atmosphere, including combustion of leaded fuel. A group of researchers led by GEOMAR, Kiel, have now demonstrated that after the phase-out of leaded gasoline in Europe in recent decades, there has been a four-fold reduction in lead concentrations in the European shelf seas. Nevertheless, the legacy of the historical global lead pollut
5h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Scientists map important immune system enzyme for the first timeBiochemists from McGill University are getting a good look at just how a specific enzyme that is part of the human immune system interacts with a certain group of bacteria that are described as gram-negative.
5h
Live Science

This Elementary-School-Age T. Rex Is a '1 in 100 Million' DiscoveryThe little T. rex would have been just 6 or 7 years old when it died.
5h
Viden

Efter sne og frost: Skovflåterne er allerede dukket opForskere har fundet årets første skovflåter. Der er ikke mange, men du bør alligevel være opmærksom, lyder meldingen.
5h
The Atlantic

Gemini Is a Low-Key L.A. Murder MysteryGemini opens with an upside-down image of palm trees, silhouetted against the L.A. night sky and hanging from the top of the frame like portentous, spindly bats. A jazzy, synthy score kicks in, and the camera slowly swings around until things are right-side-up. Or are they? In Aaron Katz’s new thriller, something strange is afoot in La La Land, and soon enough there will be a murder plot to untan
6h
The Guardian's Science Weekly

The trouble with science - Science Weekly podcastScientists are tasked with helping us understand our world. When the science is right, they help move humanity forward. But what about when science is wrong?
6h
NYT > Science

The New Old Age: Many Americans Try Retirement, Then Change Their MindsMore and more older people have realized that not working just isn’t for them —and it’s not all economics.
6h
Live Science

April Fool's Crash: China's Space Station Will Most Likely Fall to Earth on SundayIt sure looks like the abandoned Chinese space station Tiangong-1 will put on its re-entry light show on April Fool's Day.
6h
Science | The Guardian

Super-gonorrhoea is here – that means the antibiotic crisis is too | Jeremy KnoxHighly drug-resistant bugs are no longer a future problem. After decades of complacency, urgency is needed The UK has achieved an unenviable world first with news that a British man has been diagnosed with a strain of gonorrhoea so far resistant to all antibiotics normally used to treat the disease. The sexually transmitted bacteria Neisseria gonorrhoeae, identified almost 140 years ago, causes un
6h
Science | The Guardian

Advice to revise 7 hours a day for GCSEs over Easter 'unbelievable'Ex-Harrow head Barnaby Lenon says 100 hours over fortnight ideal for GCSE and A-levels An expert recommendation that GCSE and A-level students should study for seven hours a day throughout the Easter holidays has been greeted with a variety of scepticism, concern and mild horror by psychologists, teachers and pupils. Barnaby Lenon, a former headteacher of Harrow, the prestigious independent board
6h
Science | The Guardian

The trouble with science - Science Weekly podcastScientists are tasked with helping us understand our world. When the science is right, they help move humanity forward. But what about when science is wrong? Subscribe and review on Acast , Apple Podcasts , Soundcloud , Audioboom and Mixcloud . Join the discussion on Facebook and Twitter Over the years, flawed scientific studies have been called out across the entire breadth of research. Dubious
6h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Chemical synthesis with artificial intelligence: Researchers develop new computer methodIn 1996, when a computer won a match against reigning world chess champion Garry Kasparov, it was nothing short of a sensation. After this breakthrough in the world of chess, the board game Go was long considered to be a bastion reserved for human players due to its complexity. But the world's best players cannot compete with the AlphaGo software. The recipe for the success of this computer progra
6h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Twisting graphene into spirals—researchers synthesize helical nanographeneIt's probably the smallest spring you've ever seen. Researchers from Kyoto University and Osaka University report for the first time in the Journal of the American Chemical Society the successful synthesis of hexa-peri-hexabenzo[7]helicene, or helical nanographene. These graphene constructs previously existed only in theory, so successful synthesis offers promising applications including nanoscale
6h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Scientists develop novel chip for fast and accurate disease detection at low costA novel invention by a team of researchers from the National University of Singapore (NUS) holds promise for a faster and cheaper way to diagnose diseases with high accuracy. Prof.essor Zhang Yong from the Department of Biomedical Engineering at the NUS Faculty of Engineering and his team have developed a tiny microfluidic chip that could effectively detect minute amounts of biomolecules without t
6h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Germanium promises better opto-electronic properties than tin for kesterite solar cellsSpecific changes in the composition of kesterite-type semiconductors make it possible to improve their suitability as absorber layers in solar cells. As a team at the Helmholtz-Zentrum Berlin showed, this is particularly true for kesterites in which tin was replaced by germanium. The scientists examined the samples using neutron diffraction at BER II and other methods. The work was selected for th
6h
The Atlantic

The Labour Party Was Once a Haven for British Jews—What Happened?For most of the 20th century, most British Jews voted for the Labour Party. It seemed like a natural fit. This was a party that championed religious minorities, emphasized workers’ rights, and condemned anti-Semitism—all stances that appealed to a Jewish population that grew along with immigration from Europe. Yet now, a spate of anti-Semitic scandals is plaguing the left-wing party, and many Bri
7h
Ingeniøren

Terapihunde afstresser universitetsstuderendeKlap en hund, bliv glad og få mere energi til studiet. Canadisk forskning har kigget på nordamerikanske universiteters brug af menneskets bedste ven.
7h
Viden

Ny forskning: Plastikdyr er bakteriebomber, der kan give infektioner i øjne og indvoldeIfølge et nyt studie indeholder fire ud fem plastikbadedyr sygdomsfremkaldende bakterier.
7h
BBC News - Science & Environment

Higgs factory a 'must for big physics'The head of America's leading particle physics lab says a "factory" to make the Higgs boson will speed up discoveries.
7h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Under Armour says 150 mn affected in data breachMyFitnessPal Under Armour DataSports gear maker Under Armour said Thursday a data breach of its fitness application was hacked, affecting some 150 million user accounts.
8h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

China says Earth-bound spacelab to offer 'splendid' showAn out-of-control space laboratory that will plunge back to Earth in the coming days is unlikely to cause any damage, Chinese authorities say, but will offer instead a "splendid" show akin to a meteor shower.
8h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Foreign companies in China brace for VPN crackdownChinese people and foreign firms are girding for a weekend deadline that will curb the use of unlicensed software to circumvent internet controls, as the government plugs holes in its "Great Firewall".
8h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Warts and all: Researchers reconstruct face of Cro-Magnon manCro-Magnon man had a face covered in lumps including a large one on his forehead—likely benign tumours caused by a genetic disease, according to a team of French researchers in new findings published Friday.
8h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Video games may help ageing pooches stay mentally nimbleAt first sight, enthusiastic Border Collies Miley and Tiara may not appear to be providing insights into the deeper workings of the canine mind.
8h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Out of this world: Inside Japan's space colony centreA newly created Space Colony Research centre led by Japan's first female astronaut is bringing cutting-edge technology to bear on one of mankind's greatest questions: Can we live in space?
8h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Power to the people: electricity finally reaches Indian landmarkDeepa Bhoir used to sit in darkness outside her island home and stare at Mumbai glowing in the distance. Now she stays up late watching soap operas—one of millions of Indians whose lives have been transformed by a drive to get power to every corner of the country.
8h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Regulation and apathy hit bitcoin marketWild fluctuations within the bitcoin market have once again sparked debate between investors who believe it is merely undergoing a "correction" and those who see it as a costly fad.
8h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Tesla recalls 123,000 cars for power steering fixTesla Model ProductionTesla on Thursday issued a voluntary recall of 123,000 Model S cars to replace a power steering bolt that could corrode due to salt used on winter roads.
8h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Hollywood's first blockchain movie: an end to piracy?A few years behind Wall Street, Hollywood is turning to the technology behind cryptocurrency bitcoin to distribute movies in a development hailed as the beginning of the end for piracy.
8h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Leaked Facebook memo questions cost of growthFacebook troubles worsened late Thursday with the leak of a two-year-old memo from a high-ranking executive hinting that the social network was determined to grow despite risks to users.
8h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

FACT CHECK: Science contradicts EPA warming memoClimate scientists say an internal U.S. Environmental Protection Agency memo on how officials should talk to the public about global warming doesn't reflect reality.
8h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Did highest known sea levels create the iconic shape of Mount Etna?The iconic cone-like structure of Mount Etna could have been created after water levels in the Mediterranean Sea rose following an extended period of deglaciation, according to new research.
8h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Did highest known sea levels create the iconic shape of Mount Etna?New research by Professor Iain Stewart from the University of Plymouth suggests the Mediterranean Sea may have played a major role in the development of its iconic shape tens of thousands of years ago.
9h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Using chosen names reduces odds of depression and suicide in transgender youthsIn one of the largest and most diverse studies of transgender youths to date, researchers led by a team at the University of Texas at Austin have found that when transgender youths are allowed to use their chosen name in places such as work, school and at home, their risk of depression and suicide drops.
9h
Science-Based Medicine

Macular Degeneration, Genes, and Grandma’s Vitamins: To test or not to test?Is genetic testing necessary to optimize treatment for patients with a potentially blinding eye disease? The stakes are high and the answer depends on which of the two feuding, financially-conflicted groups you believe. In the end, the best evidence wins!
9h
iBiology (uploads) on YouTube

Ruslan Medzhitov (Yale / HHMI) 2: Inflammation and Disease Tolerance: Surviving Acute IllnessRuslan Medzhitov provides an overview of the field of inflammation, outlines its role in pathology and homeostasis, and explains how Inflammation is generated. https://www.ibiology.org/immunology/inflammation/ Talk Overview: Dr. Ruslan Medzhitov provides an overview of the field of inflammation and outlines its role in pathology and homeostasis. Medzhitov explains how Inflammation is generated wh
9h
iBiology (uploads) on YouTube

Ruslan Medzhitov (Yale / HHMI) 1: Introduction to InflammationRuslan Medzhitov provides an overview of the field of inflammation, outlines its role in pathology and homeostasis, and explains how Inflammation is generated. https://www.ibiology.org/immunology/inflammation/ Talk Overview: Dr. Ruslan Medzhitov provides an overview of the field of inflammation and outlines its role in pathology and homeostasis. Medzhitov explains how Inflammation is generated wh
9h
Ingeniøren

Kryb i skjul for infrarøde kameraer med nyt materialeMed inspiration fra blæksprutter har forskere fremstillet et materiale, hvor udstrålingen kan ændres i det infrarøde område.
10h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Study finds children with autism and ADHD at higher rise for anxietyChildren with both autism spectrum disorder (ASD) and attention-deficit/hyperactivity disorder (ADHD) are at increased risk for being diagnosed with or treated for anxiety and mood disorders, according to a study published in Pediatrics today. The study, completed by the Interactive Autism Network (IAN), is one of the largest to compare comorbidities in individuals with ASD alone to individuals wi
11h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Declines in lung cancer death rates among US women have lagged in 2 hot spotsWhile lung cancer death rates among women in most of the United States have declined substantially in recent years, progress among women in a region covering central Appalachia and southern parts of the Midwest and in northern parts of the Midwest has lagged.
11h
The Atlantic

Radio Atlantic: King RememberedIn his last speech, known to history as “I’ve Been to the Mountaintop,” Martin Luther King Jr. began by remarking on the introduction he’d been given by his friend, Ralph Abernathy. “As I listened to ... his eloquent and generous introduction and then thought about myself,” King said modestly, “I wondered who he was talking about.” The facsimile of King that America would fashion after his assass
12h
Science | The Guardian

The Sydney vending machine selling Purpose and Spontaneity for $2 a popAn art installation designed to tap into common psychological needs is getting people talking In Sydney’s Martin Place, a vending machine selling various abstract concepts is running low on Imagination but has plenty of Structure. Related: Artist Tracey Emin sends in the bronze birds to slow Sydney down Continue reading...
12h
Live Science

Are Angels Real?About 70 percent of Americans believe in these messengers from God.
13h
NYT > Science

Court Dismisses Exxon’s Effort to Block Climate InvestigationA federal judge in New York called a lawsuit brought by Exxon Mobil against state attorneys general in New York and Massachusetts “implausible.”
14h
New Scientist - News

The frogs bouncing back after almost being wiped out by diseaseA few amphibian species in Panama are recovering from near-extinction, after apparently evolving resistance to the deadly chytrid fungus
16h
Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

Genome archaeologists uncover the origin of a plant hormoneIn their quest for the origin of the universal auxin hormone in plants, biochemists and bioinformaticists took on the mantle of archaeologists. Deep in the evolutionary history of plant life on earth, about a billion years ago, they came across the protein fragments that were already related to the plant hormone at that time. The journey of discovery reveals information that gives life scientists
16h
Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

Detecting volcanic eruptionsA case study of an eruption of Calbuco in Chile was used to evaluate data delivered by infrasound sensors.
16h
Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

Model to show how bacteria grow in plumbing systemsBacteria in tap water can multiply when a faucet isn't used for a few days, such as when a house is vacant over a week's vacation, a new study by engineers has found. The study suggests a new method to show how microbial communities, including those responsible for illnesses like Legionnaires' disease, may assemble inside the plumbing systems of homes and public buildings.
16h
Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

Opioid use prevalent among electronic dance music partygoersOne in 10 electronic dance music (EDM) party attendees have misused opioids in the past year, exceeding the national average, finds a new study.
16h
Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

Walleye fish populations are in declineWalleye, an iconic native fish species in Wisconsin, the upper Midwest and Canada, are in decline in northern Wisconsin lakes, according to a new study. It now takes 1.5 times longer to produce the same amount of walleye as it did in 1990.
16h
Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

Kesterite solar cells: Germanium promises better opto-electronic properties than tinSpecific changes in the composition of kesterite-type semiconductors make it possible to improve their suitability as absorber layers in solar cells. As a team has shown, this is particularly true for kesterites in which tin was replaced by germanium. The scientists examined the samples using neutron diffraction at BER II and other methods.
16h
Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

Hockey victories may increase heart attack risk in Canadian menThe thrill of a hockey victory may put younger men at an increased risk for heart attack. A new study found an increase in hospital admissions for men under 55 presenting with symptoms of ST-elevation myocardial infarction (STEMI) or heart attack the day after a Montreal Canadiens win. There was little evidence within the general population of a relationship between watching hockey games and the i
16h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News

New cancer drug shows promise in pediatric patients with tumor-specific gene mutationsA new cancer drug has proven safe and effective for pediatric patients with a rare tumor gene mutation. The study tested the safety and dose of larotrectinib (LOXO-195) in pediatric patients with a mutation known as tropomyosin receptor kinases (TRK) that can occur in a variety of tumor types.
16h
BBC News - Science & Environment

China's space lab set for fiery re-entryExperts say the defunct orbiting Tiangong-1 module should fall out of the sky this weekend.
16h
Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

Poor grades tied to class times that don't match our biological clocksIt may be time to tailor students' class schedules to their natural biological rhythms. A study shows that students whose circadian rhythms were out of sync with their class schedules received lower grades due to 'social jet lag,' a condition in which peak alertness times are at odds with work, school or other demands.
16h
Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

Anti-aging protein alpha Klotho's molecular structure revealedResearchers reveal the molecular structure of the so-called 'anti-aging' protein alpha Klotho (a-Klotho) and how it transmits a hormonal signal that controls a variety of biologic processes.
16h
Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

Child sexual abuse in US costs up to $1.5 million per child death, study findsChild sexual abuse in the United States is costly, with an average lifetime cost of $1.1 million per death of female victims and $1.5 million per death of male victims, according to a new study.
16h
Futurity.org

Here’s another reason to stop taking antibioticsMice are more susceptible to severe West Nile disease if they’ve recently taken antibiotics that change the makeup of their gut bacterial community, new research indicates. Doctors recommend against taking antibiotics for viral infections because antibiotics don’t kill viruses, but do promote antibiotic resistance. The findings suggest another reason not to take antibiotics: taking antibiotics fo
16h

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