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Udsigt til fugle løfter dit humør og gavner dit mentale helbredNaturen har en positiv virkning på vores humør. Forskning viser, at udsigt til fugle giver dig mentalt overskud og mindsker risikoen for at få depression, angst og stress.
14h
Ingeniøren

Veterinærøvelse: Danske svin får afrikansk svinepest i januar 2019Øvelse med fiktivt udbrud af frygtet husdyrsygdom skal sikre dansk svineeksport.
9h
Big Think

This is exactly how long it takes to build a friendshipThis study shows just how long it takes to make a good and lasting personal connection with someone. Read More
43min

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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

Inherent feminizing effect of germ cells: New insights into sex determinationA new study shows for the first time germ cells have an inherent property to feminize the body in teleost fish, medaka.
1h
Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

Chaos that will keep you warm: Researchers improve heat insulation using deliberate chaosPowder is extremely well-suited for thermal insulation when there is a jumble of different sized nanoparticles in it. The scientists were able to determine how the thermal conductivity of powder is influenced by order and chaos in its constituent parts.
2h
Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

Proposed border wall will harm Texas plants and animals, scientists sayIn the latest peer-reviewed publication on the potential impacts of a border wall on plants and animals, conservation biologists say that border walls threaten to harm endangered Texas plants and animals and cause trouble for the region's growing ecotourism industry.
2h
Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

Making a leap from high-ability high school to college of lesser academic status can be a real downerMaking the transition from high school to college may be stressful -- but it can be downright depressing for students who graduate from a school with peers of high academic ability and wind up at a college with students of lesser ability, according to a new study.
2h
The Scientist RSS

French Universities Cancel Subscriptions to Springer JournalsNegotiations between the publisher and a national consortium of academic institutions have reached a stalemate.
3h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Hundreds line Cambridge streets to honor Stephen HawkingThe life of renowned physicist and author Stephen Hawking was celebrated Saturday in English city of Cambridge, with hundreds of well-wishers lining the streets for a glimpse of the hearse carrying his remains to a private funeral.
4h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Denver Zoo celebrates birth of Sumatran orangutanThe Denver Zoo is welcoming a baby Sumatran orangutan who is named after an Indonesian word that means "bright" and is often used to refer to sunshine.
4h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Overlooked 'organ' could play role in cancer spreadThanks to a laser-equipped mini-microscope developed by a French start-up, scientists have discovered a previously undetected feature of the human anatomy that could help explain why some cancers spread so quickly.
4h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Trump targets Amazon again in new tweetsDonald Trump AmazonUS President Donald Trump on Saturday resumed his attacks against online retailing giant Amazon and accused The Washington Post, owned by Amazon's founder Jeff Bezos, of lobbying for the company.
4h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

China space lab may fall to Earth later: European Space AgencyChina's defunct space lab could hurtle back to Earth later than previously forecast, with the European Space Agency saying it may re-enter the atmosphere as late as Monday morning GMT.
4h
Scientific American Content: Global

A Few of My Favorite Spaces: The Pseudo-RhombicuboctahedronThe tortured psyche of a misunderstood solid -- Read more on ScientificAmerican.com
4h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Russian sent to US on charges he hacked Dropbox, othersA Russian man arrested over a year ago in the Czech Republic made his first appearance Friday in a U.S. courtroom, denying that he hacked computers at LinkedIn, Dropbox and other U.S. companies, compromising the personal information of millions of Americans.
4h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Tesla says autopilot was engaged during fatal crashElectric car maker Tesla has confirmed the autopilot was engaged during a fatal crash last week, a development set to exacerbate concerns over the safety of autonomous vehicles.
4h
BBC News - Science & Environment

Rhino census in India's Kaziranga park counts 12 moreA census suggests that one-horn rhino numbers have increased by 12 to 2,413 in the national park.
4h
The Atlantic

Unpacking the Fictional Japan of Isle of DogsOne of the best sequences in Wes Anderson’s new stop-motion film Isle of Dogs is of a sushi chef preparing a boxed lunch. In a bird’s-eye shot, we see the chef’s hands pin a still-living fish, chop off its head and tail, set it to the side in a shallow bowl, and fillet the carcass. A wriggling octopus leg is held deftly, cut into neat rectangles, and pressed onto handfuls of vinegar rice. The che
6h
Scientific American Content: Global

Book Review: God's Word or Human Reason? An Inside Perspective on CreationismThe claims of young-Earth creationists are easily checked and easily countered. And a new book—written by former creationists themselves—does this in substantive, compelling detail... -- Read more on ScientificAmerican.com
6h
Big Think

Does regular concert going increase your lifespan?A questionable new study paid for by the O2 concert venue finds that going to a concert every two weeks can add nine years to your life. Read More
6h
Popular Science

For the booze business, going green is a matter of survivalTechnology Sustainable rum? I’ll drink to that! Don Q, Patrón, and Castello Banfi wine are just a few of the alcoholic beverage brands committed to sustainable production.
6h
Science | The Guardian

Stephen Hawking: crowds line streets of Cambridge for physicist's funeral – videoThe funeral service of Prof Stephen Hawking took place at the University Church of St Mary the Great in Cambridge. Hundreds of people lined the streets before the service, and a round of applause broke out as six porters from the physicist’s former college, Gonville and Caius, carried his coffin from the hearse into the church. Stephen Hawking: crowds line streets of Cambridge for physicist's fun
7h
Science | The Guardian

Why two brains are better than oneA radical technique that makes mature cells act like stem cells is growing a mini brain from tissue I donated. One day it could produce whole organs for transplant Last week, I was told my other brain is fully grown. It doesn’t look like much. A blob of pale flesh about the size of a small pea, it floats in a bath of blood-red nutrient. It would fit into the cranium of a foetus barely a month old.
7h
cognitive science

Could fake news create fake memories?submitted by /u/TistDaniel [link] [comments]
7h
Live Science

What Is a Blue Moon, Anyway?Skywatchers tonight (March 31) will be treated to the second and final Blue Moon of 2018, just on the eve of Easter. What is this type of moon, and is it actually blue?
7h
Big Think

Did the Knights Templar invent modern banking?What’s the truth about one of history’s most mythologized order of knights? Read More
8h
Big Think

Why "social jet lag" may cause worse grades and poor work performanceA study finds the link between biological clocks and poor performance at school and work. Read More
8h
Scientific American Content: Global

I'm Here for the BallsResearchers use balls to study dog minds -- Read more on ScientificAmerican.com
8h
Popular Science

10 hiking apps and gadgets for hitting the trail this springDIY Prepare to face the great outdoors. A spring hike is a great way to appreciate the newly-warm weather. Before you head out, make sure to pack a few gadgets and download our recommended apps.
9h
Live Science

Why It's So Hard to #DeleteFacebookHere we go again: another Facebook controversy, yet again violating our sense of privacy by letting others harvest our personal information.
9h
Live Science

China's Falling Space Station Highlights the Problem of Space Junk Crashing to EarthAny day now, the Chinese space station Tiangong-1 is expected to fall back to Earth – but it's uncertain where it will crash land. We know that Australia is in the potential zone, and we have been hit before by a falling space station.
9h
Live Science

Africa Is Splitting in Two, and Here's the ProofA gaping gash just opened up in Africa's Rift Valley. Here's why.
9h
NYT > Science

Is This Tissue a New Organ? Maybe. A Conduit for Cancer? It Seems Likely.A new study reveals a network of tissue that acts as a “highway of moving fluid” but loses its shape when viewed.
10h
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The Politics of 'Black Panther' Are What Make It GreatThe superhero flick's strength lies in the fact that it didn't shy away from addressing issues of black identity.
10h
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Security News This Week: Julian Assange Has Lost His Internet PrivilegesAs always, we’ve rounded up all the news we didn’t break or cover in depth this week.
10h
Scientific American Content: Global

Shameless Bacterial Predator Remodels Its Own PreyBacterial big game hunters drill into victims, brace the hole, and then seal the wound behind them -- Read more on ScientificAmerican.com
10h
Scientific American Content: Global

How Does Insulin Work in Our Bodies?What is insulin and how do our bodies use it? -- Read more on ScientificAmerican.com
10h
Science : NPR

'The Neuroscientist Who Lost Her Mind' Returns From MadnessNeuroscientist Barbara Lipska describes in a new memoir surviving 20 brain tumors, and what the eight-week nightmare of psychological symptoms taught her about mental illnesses she's long studied. (Image credit: Courtesy of the author)
10h
The Atlantic

Edie Falco Anchors the Romantic Drama of Outside InLynn Shelton is a director whose films thrive in the quieter moments—an awkward glance shared between characters, or a casual, improvised conversation. From mumblecore-style low-budget comedies like Humpday to more mainstream efforts like Laggies , Shelton has always held on to a raggedy sort of realism, drawing out major story details from small personal interactions. Her new film Outside In , w
10h
The Atlantic

The Unfulfilled Promise of Fair HousingEditor’s Note: Read The Atlantic ’s special coverage of Martin Luther King Jr.’s legacy. “Kill him,” a white mob chanted as Martin Luther King Jr. marched across Marquette Park in the late summer of 1966. King had recently moved to Chicago, and on that August afternoon, he joined a Chicago Freedom Movement march to demand that realtors not discriminate against black residents seeking to live in w
10h
Big Think

Tara Westover – Nothing Final Can Be Known – Think Again - a Big Think Podcast #141There's got to be a thousand ways to reclaim the past, but for Tara Westover, story was the only one that could contain all of it. Read More
10h
New on MIT Technology Review

The Best of the Physics arXiv (week ending March 31, 2018)This week’s most thought-provoking papers from the Physics arXiv.
11h
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Use Science (Not Surgery) to Create Your Best Selfie42 percent of plastic surgeons have seen patients specifically looking to up their selfie game. You don't need surgery; you need math.
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20 Easter Tech Sales (2018): Nintendo, Apple, Dyson, LenovoWhen you're done painting eggs and munching on candy, check out these Easter tech deals.
11h
Scientific American Content: Global

Harnessing the Invisible Power of "Flutter"Understanding this type of instability can prevent catastrophic failures and help generate power -- Read more on ScientificAmerican.com
11h
The Atlantic

The Family WeeklyThe Family Weekly Welcome back to “The Family Weekly.” Every Saturday morning, we’ll send you a selection of our favorite stories from The Atlantic ’s Family section . We’re excited to have you join us as we explore questions about family life and human relationships. This Week in Family The movement that emerged in the wake of the school shooting in Parkland, Florida, has been driven by young pe
11h
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Why Uber’s Self-Driving Crash Is Confusing for HumansAutonomous vehicle crashes don't look like human driven ones.
12h
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Whisper From the First Stars Sets Off Loud Dark Matter DebateA surprise discovery announced a month ago suggested that the early universe looked very different than previously believed. Initial theories that the discrepancy was due to dark matter have come under fire.
12h
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Why Trump's Misguided China Tariffs Won't Help the USAmerican prosperity depends on what we will make in the future, not what we made in the past.
12h
BBC News - Science & Environment

Tesla in fatal California crash was on AutopilotThe company says a Model X vehicle involved in a fatal crash in the US was in Autopilot mode.
12h
Big Think

Elastic thinking: Help your brain excel in today's mentally tasking worldElastic thinking is what endows us with the ability to solve novel problems and to overcome the neural and psychological barriers that can impede us from looking beyond the existing order. Read More
12h
The Atlantic

How Home-State Pronunciations Can Shape ElectionsWoe to the politician who, while campaigning in a particular state, pronounces the state’s name differently from the local denizens. The latest casualty of this phonetic parochialism is Matt Rosendale, currently the frontrunner among Montana Republicans seeking to oppose the incumbent Jon Tester in this year’s U.S. Senate race. Democrats have already set their sights on Rosendale by issuing an on
12h
The Atlantic

Bitcoin's Biggest Winners—or Losers—Are Likely to Be MenAfter a long struggle for equality, it’s no longer controversial in the United States that women are owed equal rights, equal dignity, equal protection of the law, and the same economic opportunities as men. Yet disagreements remain about what that means in practice and how far Americans are from realizing that vision. Lately, I’ve been pondering cryptocurrencies as a case study. No one is quite
12h
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Emmanuel Macron Q&A: France's President Discusses Artificial Intelligence StrategyIn an interview with WIRED, French President Emmanuel Macron describes his plans to enhance the country's AI efforts—and differentiate them from those in the US.
13h
Ingeniøren

Spørg Scientariet: Hvor hurtigt sætter et måltid sig på sidebenene?En læser vil gerne vide, om det er sandt, at fedt sætter sig efter få timer. Og hvor hurtigt kan man få det væk igen? Det svarer ph.d. i idræt og ernæring på
13h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Japan whalers return from Antarctic hunt after killing 333 whalesJapanese whaling vessels returned to port on Saturday after catching more than 300 of the mammals in the Antarctic Ocean without facing any protests by anti-whaling groups, officials said.
13h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Stars turn out for Stephen Hawking's funeral (Update)Film stars, supermodels, comics and astronomers joined Stephen Hawking's family and friends for his funeral in Cambridge Saturday, the city where he dedicated his life's work to unravelling the mysteries of the universe.
13h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Researchers probe the complex nature of concussionIt seems simple enough: Taking a hard hit to the head can give you a concussion. But, Stanford researchers report March 30 in Physical Review Letters, in most cases, the connection is anything but simple.
13h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

To prevent collapse of tropical forests, protect their shape: studyTropical forests have been called the lungs of the planet. They soak up vast quantities of carbon dioxide, hold the world's greatest diversity of plants and animals, and employ millions of people. And these hot ecosystems—often a patchwork of trees and grasslands—are being deeply altered by logging and other land use change.
13h
The Atlantic

'The Ball Is Very Much in the Russian Court'On Thursday, it was Americans who learned they were being kicked out of Russia. On Friday, it was Europeans. Russia’s Foreign Ministry summoned the ambassadors of several European nations and ordered the expulsion of their diplomats; their number precisely mirrored the number of Russian diplomats expelled by Western nations on Monday. In all, 28 nations expelled 153 Russians over the past week in
13h
The Atlantic

The Americanization of an Ancient FaithOne day in the fall of 2010, Father Anthony Messeh, then a priest at the St. Mark Coptic Orthodox Church in Fairfax, Virginia, sat down with a list of names. There were 30 individuals—all American converts with no Egyptian heritage—who had been baptized at the church since his arrival in 2001. Of the group, only eight were still active members. “That just broke my heart,” Messeh told me one after
13h
The Atlantic

Immigrants Give America a Foreign-Policy AdvantageIt has often been thought that the composition of the American public, consisting as it does of immigrants from so many lands, is a vulnerability in foreign policy—that, for example, German immigrants would harbor affinities for their land of origin and become disloyal during the world wars. The argument was taken to a shameful extreme with the internment of Japanese Americans after Pearl Harbor.
14h
Viden

Ta' på alternativ påskejagt: 5 fede forårsoplevelser i naturenEnorme fugletræk, kvækkende tudser og sol-sultne hugorme. Natureksperter Morten DD og Vicky Knudsen guider dig til opdagelser i naturen, der endelig vågner fra sit vinterhi.
14h
Science | The Guardian

Locals share their memories at Stephen Hawking’s funeralHuge turnout at service, as those who knew him reminisce about the great physicist Rain had been promised but, as with many of the gloomiest predictions made for the young Stephen Hawking, the threatened deluge did not come. Indeed, despite the solemnity of the occasion, the Cambridge funeral of a man who throughout his life seemed to command as much admiration from the lay public as from his aca
15h
Viden

Forskere undersøger om prutter påvirker børns indlæringBørn er særlig udsatte for dårligt indeklima, når de sover, fordi deres hjerner ikke er fuldt udviklede.
15h
Ingeniøren

Metallisk-organisk komposit renser drikkevand for bly og kviksølvForskere har fundet ud af, hvordan man kan oprense vand med tungmetaller med et materiale, der både er billigt og miljøvenligt.
17h
Ingeniøren

DTU-projekt optimerer 3D-print i metal med digital tvillingVed at opbygge en virtuel og fysisk produktionslinje til 3D-print i metal vil forskere fra DTU og Teknologisk Institut optimere produktionen og hjælpe industrien med at skabe bedre 3D-printede metalemner.
17h
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China and the Children Will Save Electric Cars From the EPAThe EPA may be able to roll back regulations in the US, but other forces will push automakers to keep making electric cars.
19h
Live Science

Facts About HafniumProperties, sources and uses of the element hafnium.
19h
Live Science

Rachel Carson: Life, Discoveries and LegacyRachel Carson challenged the use of pesticides and sparked an environmental revolution.
20h
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Tesla's Self-Driving Autopilot Was Turned On In Deadly California CrashTesla Autopilot DriverThe self-driving system was engaged when a Model X SUV hit a highway barrier, killing the driver.
20h
BBC News - Science & Environment

Prof Stephen Hawking funeral: Legacy 'will live forever'Tributes led by actor Eddie Redmayne are paid at the funeral of the visionary scientist in Cambridge.
20h
NYT > Science

Automakers Sought Looser Rules but May Get More Than They Bargained forThe Trump administration's likely rollback of emissions and fuel economy rules for cars could trigger a major legal showdown with California.
21h
Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

Using chosen names reduces odds of depression and suicide in transgender youthsIn one of the largest and most diverse studies of transgender youths to date, researchers have found that when transgender youths are allowed to use their chosen name in places such as work, school and at home, their risk of depression and suicide drops.
21h
Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

Unprecedented contrast agent to measure the age of skin and blood vesselsScientists have synthesized the first contrast agent to observe and measure elastin, the protein that gives strength to blood vessel walls, and flexibility to skin. The dye could be useful to better understand the role of elastin in biological processes and to verify the health of blood vessels and organs.
21h
BBC News - Science & Environment

Vanishing lakeIt's been shrinking fast, but could a plan to divert water to one of Africa's largest lakes stop it disappearing?
21h
Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

Computer searches telescope data for evidence of distant planetsMIT researchers have used physics principles to improve the performance of a machine-learning system, trained on data from a NASA crowdsourcing project, that searches astronomical data for evidence of debris disks around stars, which can indicate the presence of an exoplanet.
21h
BBC News - Science & Environment

Shipping faces demands to cut CO2The industry could contribute almost a fifth of the global total of CO2 by 2050 but some nations resist targets.
23h
Live Science

Where Did the Easter Bunny Come From? Ask This Dead German ScientistThere are no egg-laying bunnies in the Bible. But there is one in this 1682 medical journal.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

Basking sharks gather in large groups off northeast US coastGroups of basking sharks ranging from as few as 30 to nearly 1,400 individual animals have been observed aggregating in waters from Nova Scotia to Long Island. While individual sightings are fairly common, seeing large groups is not. The reason why the animals congregate has not been clearly determined, and observations of these aggregation events are relatively rare.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

Patients who travel abroad for plastic surgery can bring home serious complicationsWith the promise of inexpensive procedures luring patients to travel abroad for plastic surgery, medical tourism has become an expanding, multi-billion-dollar industry. But while the initial procedure may be cheap, it can place a significant burden on US public health systems when patients return from abroad with complications. A new study describes the magnitude of medical complications that can
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Cloudflare's New Encryption Service Adds Privacy ProtectionInternet infrastructure company Cloudflare appears to be preparing to launch a service to encrypt traffic to the computers that look up web addresses.
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The Under Armour Hack Was Even Worse Than It Had To BeIf Under Armour had protected all passwords equally, its 150-million-user MyFitnessPal breach wouldn’t have been nearly as bad.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

Uncovering clue to disarm gonorrhea superbugResearchers have discovered a way the gonorrhea bacteria cleverly evade the immune system -- opening up the way for therapies that prevent this process, allowing the body's natural defenses to kill the bug.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

A novel test bed for non-equilibrium many-body physicsThe behavior of electrons in a material is typically difficult to predict. Novel insight comes now from experiments and simulations performed by physicists who have studied electronic transport properties in a one-dimensional quantum wire containing a mesoscopic lattice.
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Popular Science

What is a blue moon?Space What a strawberry moon? What is a worm moon? What is going on with my moon? Blue moons, strawberry moons, supermoons. For some reason your news aggregation algorithm of choice thinks you really really really want to know all about these moons.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

Probing the complex nature of concussionConcussion is a major public health problem, but not much is known about the impacts that cause concussion or how to prevent them. A new study suggests that the problem is more complicated than previously thought.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

To prevent collapse of tropical forests, protect their shapeScientists have made a fundamental discovery about how fires on the edges of tropical forests control their shape and stability. The study implies that when patches of tropical forest lose their natural shape it could contribute to the catastrophic transformation of that land from trees to grass.
1d
Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

Is there life adrift in the clouds of Venus?In the search for extraterrestrial life, scientists have turned over all sorts of rocks. Mars, for example, has geological features that suggest it once had -- and still has -- subsurface liquid water. Scientists have also eyed Saturn's moons as well as Jupiter's as possible havens for life in the oceans under their icy crusts. Now, however, scientists are dusting off an old idea that promises a n
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The Atlantic

The Atlantic Daily: Asking Moral QuestionsWhat We’re Following A Protest Turns Violent: The Palestinian health ministry says that at least 15 people were killed and more than 1,000 wounded when Israeli troops opened fire on protesters near the Gaza Strip’s border with Israel. The protest was the first day of a massive demonstration that’s expected to continue until May 15, and during that time, the clashes could get worse. Ethics by Boz:
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How to Fold 5 High-Flying Stunt Paper Airplanes"The Paper Airplane Guy" John Collins shows us how to fold planes that do loops, flap their wings, and fly world-record distances.
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The Atlantic

The Atlantic Politics & Policy Daily: A Room of His OwnToday in 5 Lines Environmental Protection Agency Administrator Scott Pruitt, who’s previously drawn criticism for his spending habits , came under scrutiny again Friday after details of his housing arrangement emerged: According to media reports , Pruitt leased an apartment linked to a Washington lobbyist for $50 a night. Noor Salman, the widow of the Pulse nightclub gunman, was found not guilty
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Inside Science

March's Stellar Space PhotosMarch's Stellar Space Photos Peer into the distant past this month with images of Scholz's star, the Crab Nebula and more. 2_image005_crop.jpg In this illustration, the artist imagines an ancient man gazing upon Scholz's star as it visited our solar system 70,000 years ago. Image credits: José A. Peñas/SINC Space Friday, March 30, 2018 - 17:00 Abigail Malate, Staff Illustrator (Inside Science) --
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Inside Science

How Far Can Laser Light Travel?How Far Can Laser Light Travel? We explore how powerful your laser needs to be to get noticed on Mars and beyond. laserpointerataliens_top.jpg Image credits: Abigail Malate, Staff Illustrator Rights information: Copyright American Institute of Physics ( reprinting information ) Space Friday, March 30, 2018 - 14:00 Yuen Yiu, Staff Writer (Inside Science) -- Have you ever played with a pocket-sized
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New on MIT Technology Review

Smart cryptography may help limit the damage from the MyFitnessPal megabreachThe fitness app uses a technology called bcrypt that will give the hackers a serious headache.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

Strings of electron-carrying proteins may hold the secret to 'electric bacteria'Could a unique bacterium be nature's microscopic power plant? Scientists who work with a species of bacteria that essentially 'breathe' rocks think it's possible.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

Calculating the impacts of natural events on wildlifeA new method could help scientists understand how wildlife populations are affected by major natural events, such as hurricanes, severe winters, and tsunamis.
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Latest Headlines | Science News

The science behind cancer warnings on coffee is murky at bestThe risks of acrylamide in coffee are not as clear as a California court ruling may suggest.
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Popular Science

2018 New York International Auto Show: Crossovers and driver-assist tech aboundCars Driver-helping technology reigns supreme on 2019 models. Cadillac, Hyundai, Subaru and others showed off their 2019 goods at the New York International Auto Show.
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Is there life adrift in the clouds of Venus?In the search for extraterrestrial life, scientists have turned over all sorts of rocks. Mars, for example, has geological features that suggest it once had -- and still has -- subsurface liquid water. Scientists have also eyed Saturn's moons as well as Jupiter's as possible havens for life in the oceans under their icy crusts. Now, however, scientists are dusting off an old idea that promises a n
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The Scientist RSS

CDC Director Delivers Passionate Speech to AgencyRobert Redfield emphasized the importance of science and data in meeting with employees.
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NYT > Science

Faced With Drought, the Pharaohs Tried (and Failed) to AdaptAncient Egyptian leaders increased their empire’s grain production and crossbred cattle for resilience in an early effort to ward off climate disaster, a study shows.
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NYT > Science

Global Health: Bologna Blamed in Worst Listeria Outbreak in HistoryIt took officials 12 months to identify the source of the outbreak, which has led to nearly 200 deaths in South Africa.
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NYT > Science

Q&A: Hanging Out the Wash in the Fresh, Clean AirWhat makes the laundry smell so good when it’s been outdoors?
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The Atlantic

Facebook's Ideological ImperialismIt’s mostly forgotten now, but for a time, expanding the reach of social networks—making Facebook, Twitter, and others like it as large as possible—was an avowed foreign-policy goal of the United States. That is, at least, what the secretary of state said in the early days of this decade, in a speech at the Newseum in Washington, D.C. “New technologies do not take sides in the struggle for freedo
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

Butterflies of the soul: Developmental origins of interneuronsA new study reveals how interneurons, dubbed 'the butterflies of the soul,' emerge and diversify in the brain. The findings may help inform the development of new classes of drugs for diseases such as autism, schizophrenia and Alzheimer's.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

Gut microbes could help better predict risk of hospitalization for patients with cirrhosisThe gut microbiome -- a collection of bacteria and other microbes in the gut -- could be a highly accurate predictor of hospitalizations for patients with cirrhosis, according to a recently published study.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

Is your Easter egg bad for the environment?A recent study has looked at the carbon footprint of chocolate and its other environmental impacts. It has done this by assessing the impacts of ingredients, manufacturing processes, packaging and waste.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

Pediatric cancer drug shows 93 percent response rateA first-of-its-kind drug targeting a fused gene found in many types of cancer was effective in 93 percent of pediatric patients tested, researchers say.
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New on MIT Technology Review

CRISPR may not cause hundreds of rogue mutations after allResearchers behind a controversial paper have admitted that their results may be wrong.
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Study: To prevent collapse of tropical forests, protect their shapeScientists have made a fundamental discovery about how fires on the edges of tropical forests control their shape and stability. The study implies that when patches of tropical forest lose their natural shape it could contribute to the catastrophic transformation of that land from trees to grass.
1d
EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Stanford researchers probe the complex nature of concussionConcussion is a major public health problem, but not much is known about the impacts that cause concussion or how to prevent them. A new study suggests that the problem is more complicated than previously thought.
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Live Science

Why Are People Freaking Out About These Boring SpaceX Satellites?SpaceX pulled off another successful launch today, lofting a set of new polar-orbiting satellites. By itself, this Falcon 9 launch isn't unique. So why did the new launch generate worldwide attention?
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The Atlantic

What Kim Jong Un's China Trip Means for TrumpFor a couple of weeks in March, after the announcement that Donald Trump had accepted an offer to meet with Kim Jong Un, the outcome of the crisis over North Korea’s nuclear weapons seemed to depend on whether two leaders who had steered their nations toward war could pump the brakes and broker peace. Then, this week, Kim boarded a train to Beijing and scrambled the whole map. The North Korean le
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Zuckerberg Finds It's Not Easy to Tame Facebook's Growth ObsessionPublication of a 2016 memo stating "maybe someone dies" in a terrorist attack coordinated on Facebook reveals just how thoroughly its quest for growth influenced the company.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

Can a Mediterranean diet pattern slow aging?A series of six articles finds new correlations between a Mediterranean diet and healthy aging outcomes -- while also underscoring the need for careful approaches to the use of data in order to measure the diet's potential benefits.
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Live Science

Arnold Schwarzenegger's Heart Surgery: Here's What We KnowArnold Schwarzenegger underwent heart surgery this week to replace a heart valve.
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The Atlantic

Couples Speak Honestly About Open RelationshipsPolyamory . Ethical non-monogamy . Open relationship . There are many ways to describe the consensual choice a couple can make to live a non-monogamous lifestyle—and ever more ways to navigate it. Maria Rosa Badia’s new short film Polyedric Love, premiering on The Atlantic today , features honest conversations with couples about the rewards and challenges of their unconventional relationships. “W
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Popular Science

A Chinese space station is probably falling out of the sky this weekend. Here's everything you need to know.Space Happy Easter! Tiangong-1 was once a space station, but now it’s basically just a bus-sized hunk of dead space junk. That means there’s no way to control its reentry or descent;…
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Is there life adrift in the clouds of Venus?In the search for extraterrestrial life, scientists have turned over all sorts of rocks.
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New on MIT Technology Review

DNA could arrange nanoparticles into materials that manipulate light in new waysAn emerging technology harnesses “DNA origami” in the service of plasmonics.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Grand Canyon tests change in water system serving visitors (Update)Crews are drilling at the bottom of the Grand Canyon to test the idea of shifting the area where water is drawn to serve millions of people at the national park's popular South Rim.
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Feed: All Latest

Tesla's Model S Recall Is Just Its Latest ProblemAutomakers recall cars all the time, but Tesla just doesn't need any more problems right now.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

Microengineered slippery rough surface for water harvesting from airA slippery rough surface (SRS) inspired by both pitcher plants and rice leaves outperforms state-of-the-art liquid-repellent surfaces in water harvesting applications, according to a team of researchers.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

Cracking eggshell nanostructure: Implications for food safetyHow is it that fertilized chicken eggs manage to resist fracture from the outside, while at the same time, are weak enough to break from the inside during chick hatching? It's all in the eggshell's nanostructure, according to a new study.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

Adult-onset neurodegeneration has roots in early developmentThe roots of a progressive degenerative disease begin much earlier than previously thought, according to a recent study.
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The Atlantic

'This Is Making a Lot of Christians in China Very Nervous'The Chinese government detained a beloved Catholic bishop earlier this week in an apparent attempt to keep him out of sight around the Easter holidays, just as an end to a decades-long split between Beijing and the Vatican may be in sight. The bishop, Guo Xijin, is recognized by the Vatican but not by the official Catholic Church in China, which is under government control. Such underground bisho
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Big Think

Cambridge Analytica used misleading presentations in meetings with potential clientsA new article published in Mother Jones shows how Cambridge Analytica positioned itself to potential clients after the election of Donald Trump. Read More
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New Scientist - News

Sticky yet slick material pulls water from foggy or humid airFog catchers can provide water for drinking or farming in rain-starved regions. A new material traps water with sticky lubricant to gather bigger drops faster
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

Engineers turn plastic insulator into heat conductorIs your laptop or phone overheating? Newly engineered plastic could lead to self-cooling casings for common electronics.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

Cat-like 'hearing' with device tens of trillions times smaller than human eardrumResearchers are developing atomically thin 'drumheads'-- tens of trillions of times thinner than the human eardrum -- able to receive and transmit signals across a radio frequency range far greater than what we can hear with the human ear. Their work will likely contribute to making the next generation of ultralow-power communications and sensory devices smaller and with greater detection and tuni
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Feed: All Latest

Gadget Lab Podcast: What the New iPad Means for Consumers, and for StudentsThis week, we ask: Can Apple re-win the hearts and minds of educators?
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The Atlantic

Why Is Trump Turning Against Russia Now?No single stand has hobbled Donald Trump’s presidency more than his attitude toward Russia. During the presidential campaign, he conspicuously praised Vladimir Putin, and refused to condemn his seizure of Crimea. Trump also publicly called for Russia to release emails hacked from Hillary Clinton, something his aides said was a joke. Trump’s perceived softness on Putin seems to have encouraged adv
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Gut microbes could help better predict risk of hospitalization for patients with cirrhosisThe gut microbiome -- a collection of bacteria and other microbes in the gut -- could be a highly accurate predictor of hospitalizations for patients with cirrhosis, according to a recently published study led by a researcher at Virginia Commonwealth University.
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Live Science

Here's How to Track the Chinese Space Station's Uncontrolled Plunge to EarthIt's time to grab the popcorn: The Chinese space station Tiangong-1 is plummeting back to Earth this weekend, and anyone with an internet connection can track the fiery demise live online.
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Cat-like 'hearing' with device tens of trillions times smaller than human eardrumResearchers at Case Western Reserve University in Cleveland, Ohio, are developing atomically thin 'drumheads'-- tens of trillions of times thinner than the human eardrum -- able to receive and transmit signals across a radio frequency range far greater than what we can hear with the human ear. Their work will likely contribute to making the next generation of ultralow-power communications and sens
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Bioinspired slick method improves water harvestingBy learning how water is collected by living organisms, including rice leaves and pitcher plants, scientists at The University of Texas at Dallas created and tested a combination of materials that can do the same thing, but faster.
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Engineers turn plastic insulator into heat conductorIs your laptop or phone overheating? New MIT-engineered plastic could lead to self-cooling casings for common electronics.
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Monash discovery uncovers clue to disarm gonorrhea superbugMonash University researchers have discovered a way the gonorrhea bacteria cleverly evade the immune system -- opening up the way for therapies that prevent this process, allowing the body's natural defenses to kill the bug.
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Microengineered slippery rough surface for water harvesting from airA slippery rough surface (SRS) inspired by both pitcher plants and rice leaves outperforms state-of-the-art liquid-repellent surfaces in water harvesting applications, according to a team of researchers at Penn State and the University of Texas at Dallas.
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Cracking eggshell nanostructureHow is it that fertilized chicken eggs manage to resist fracture from the outside, while at the same time, are weak enough to break from the inside during chick hatching? It's all in the eggshell's nanostructure, according to a new study led by McGill University scientists.
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New on MIT Technology Review

The gig economy keeps growing, but worker benefits aren’t
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The Atlantic

A Palestinian March Along Israel's Border Turns Fatal on Day OnePalestinians Israeli Gaza StripUpdated at 4:05 p.m. ET Israeli troops opened fire Friday at Palestinians near the Gaza Strip’s border with the Jewish state, killing at least 15 people and wounding many more. The numbers came from the Palestinian health ministry , which put the number of those injured at more than 1,000. The Palestinian demonstration at the border, dubbed the Great March of Return, was billed as peaceful and no
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The Atlantic

What Happens When a Space Station Falls Out of the SkySometime this weekend, an abandoned Chinese space station the size of a school bus will plummet back to Earth and mostly disintegrate in the atmosphere. Whatever chunks survive the intense heat of the journey will probably land in the ocean or a remote part of land, away from populated areas. It’ll be quick, and chances are nobody will witness the reentry from the ground. So what exactly will hap
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The Atlantic

Photos of the Week: Holy Week Rodeo, Volkswagen Graveyard, Soccer on an Ice FloeGigantic rice bowls in Hong Kong, a basketball-playing robot in Tokyo, a chocolate gorilla in Belgium, walled cats in China, considerate drum practice in Japan, the Museum of Selfies in California, the Naked Pig Skiing Carnival in China, and much more.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Cracking eggshell nanostructure: New discovery could have important implications for food safetyHow is it that fertilized chicken eggs manage to resist fracture from the outside, while at the same time, are weak enough to break from the inside during chick hatching? It's all in the eggshell's nanostructure, according to a new study led by McGill University scientists.
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Latest Headlines | Science News

Eggshell nanostructure protects a chick and helps it hatchThe nanoscale structure of a chicken eggshell changes to fulfill different functions as the egg incubates.
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Science | The Guardian

Scientists solve eggshell mystery of how chicks hatchProtein called osteopontin found to nanostructure of shell, making it much easier to break from the inside It’s been a tough one to crack, but scientists say they have zoomed in, to an unprecedented degree, on the structure of shells surrounding chicken embryos, revealing how they change to allow young birds to hatch. Before being laid, bird eggs form a hard calcium-rich shell with three main lay
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Discovery (uploads) on YouTube

Elephants on the Brink | Racing Extinction (360 Video)A herd of African elephants curiously investigates its surroundings in South Africa and happens to notice cameras filming their behavior. Among the smartest of all animals, elephants continue to be in grave danger from poachers fueling the ivory trade. Join a conservation biologist on an interactive mission to learn how animals critical to the world’s ecosystem thrive and survive in the wild. For
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Liquid-repellent surface maximizes water harvest and transportBy learning how water is collected by living organisms, including rice leaves and pitcher plants, scientists at The University of Texas at Dallas created and tested a combination of materials that can do the same thing, but faster.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Engineers turn plastic insulator into heat conductorPlastics are excellent insulators, meaning they can efficiently trap heat - a quality that can be an advantage in something like a coffee cup sleeve. But this insulating property is less desirable in products such as plastic casings for laptops and mobile phones, which can overheat, in part because the coverings trap the heat that the devices produce.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Promises, promises: Facebook's history with privacy"We've made a bunch of mistakes." ''Everyone needs complete control over who they share with at all times." ''Not one day goes by when I don't think about what it means for us to be the stewards of this community and their trust."
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cognitive science

Stellasers, neural networks, vr, and aliens. A time for intergalactic cognitive science?submitted by /u/wootcrisp [link] [comments]
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Butterflies of the soulA new study reveals how interneurons, dubbed 'the butterflies of the soul,' emerge and diversify in the brain. The findings may help inform the development of new classes of drugs for diseases such as autism, schizophrenia and Alzheimer's.
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News

NASA satellite gets an eye-opening look at Super Typhoon JelawatSatellite imagery showed that Tropical Cyclone Jelawat had developed an eye as it strengthened into a Super Typhoon.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Point Nemo, Earth's watery graveyard for spacecraftOne place China's Earth-bound and out-of-control spacelab, Tiangong-1, will probably not hit on Sunday is the forlorn spot in the southern Pacific Ocean where it was supposed to crash.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

NASA satellite gets an eye-opening look at Super Typhoon JelawatSatellite imagery showed that Tropical Cyclone Jelawat had developed an eye as it strengthened into a Super Typhoon.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

New EU rules let you watch Netflix, BBC abroadDon't leave your iPad at home this holiday. Starting Sunday, Europeans on vacation can enjoy their online entertainment such as Netflix or BBC iPlayer as if at home all across Europe.
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Live Science

Why the Fire that Incinerated a Tesla Was Such a Nightmare to Put OutA Tesla that crashed and caused a fiery inferno is raising questions about whether these cars are more dangerous if they catch fire.
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Feed: All Latest

Where China’s Tiangong-1 Won’t Land (And Where It Still Might)Large swaths of Earth are already safe from falling space debris.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Trump EPA expected to roll back auto gas mileage standardsThe Trump administration is expected to announce that it will roll back automobile gas mileage and pollution standards that were a pillar in the Obama administration's plans to combat climate change.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Cyberattacks wakeup call for local governments to prepareAtlanta police officers initially had to write reports by hand. Residents still can't pay water bills online. Municipal court dates are being reset. All are fallout from a ransomware attack last week that hobbled the city's invisible infrastructure.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Basking sharks gather in large groups off northeast US coastGroups of basking sharks ranging from as few as 30 to nearly 1,400 individual animals have been observed aggregating in waters from Nova Scotia to Long Island. While individual sightings are fairly common, seeing large groups is not.
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cognitive science

For the COGNEURO layman, here is a podcast about the neurochemicals involved in love!submitted by /u/Collette0gq2h [link] [comments]
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Popular Science

Five rad and random items for a fun night inGadgets The end-of-week dispatch from PopSci's commerce editor. Vol. 44. Throughout the week I spend hours scouring the web for things that are ingenious or clever or ridiculously cheap.
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Optimistic Latinos have healthier hearts, study findsLatinos who are the most optimistic are more likely to have healthy hearts, suggests a new study of more than 4,900 Latinos led by, Rosalba Hernandez. She is a professor of social work at the University of Illinois. The study was published in BMJ Open.
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Scientific American Content: Global

A Brain Deprived of MemoryMichael Lemonick, opinion editor at Scientific American, talks about his most recent book The Perpetual Now: A Story of Amnesia, Memory, and Love. About Lonni Sue Johnson, who suffered a specific... -- Read more on ScientificAmerican.com
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The Atlantic

Listening to M.I.A., FinallyBlack and white polka-dots covering her nine-months-pregnant belly, M.I.A. sauntered onto the Grammys stage in 2009 for a performance that would seem to announce the arrival of a supremely 21st-century sort of icon—artistically daring, unapologetically female, and from a part of the world the West has often ignored. But in retrospect now, the moment stands as the apex of her supposedly finished m
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Science | The Guardian

Elon Musk's SpaceX gains formal approval for satellite broadband networkLow-Earth orbiting ‘constellation’ of satellites will provide broadband to hard-to-reach areas in US Elon Musk’s SpaceX has been given formal approval by US telecoms regulators to build a global broadband network using satellites. “This is the first approval of a US-licensed satellite constellation to provide broadband services using a new generation of low-Earth orbit satellite technologies,” th
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Scientific American Content: Global

Neuroscience In the GalleryThe Netherlands Institute for Neuroscience is seeking entries for a competition that celebrates visual art inspired by the brain -- Read more on ScientificAmerican.com
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Federal officials urged to increase perinatal depression treatment in minority womenDespite increased risks of perinatal depression, research has shown that Latina and African-American women are significantly less likely to be screened or treated.In a new paper, researchers at the University of Illinois and Northwestern University are urging federal policymakers to appropriate funds to boost diagnosis and treatment rates among minority women, including increasing the number of me
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Popular Science

What are the smartest animals in the world and how do we know?Animals There are many members of the animal kingdom that rival our own wits. No other member of the animal kingdom can ace an algebra test or write an A+ essay. But that doesn’t mean other species aren’t highly intelligent. Several members of the…
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

Did highest known sea levels create the iconic shape of Mount Etna?New research suggests the Mediterranean Sea may have played a major role in the development of its iconic shape tens of thousands of years ago.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

Stroke affects more than just the physicalA new study looks at what problems affect people most after a stroke and it provides a broader picture than what some may usually expect to see. Stroke affects more than just physical functioning.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

A decade after housing bust, mortgage industry on shaky ground, experts warnNew regulations on banks fueled a boom in nonbank mortgage companies, a category of independent lenders that are more lightly regulated and more financially fragile than banks. These lenders now originate half of all US home mortgages yet have little capital of their own.
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Can a Mediterranean diet pattern slow aging?A series of six articles appearing in the March issue of The Journals of Gerontology, Series A: Biological Sciences and Medical Sciences finds new correlations between a Mediterranean diet and healthy aging outcomes -- while also underscoring the need for careful approaches to the use of data in order to measure the diet's potential benefits.
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News

New study finds world's largest desert, the Sahara, has grown by 10 percent since 1920The Sahara Desert has expanded by about 10 percent since 1920, according to a new study by National Science Foundation (NSF)-funded scientists at the University of Maryland (UMD).
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