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  1. page Nyheder2018juni21 edited Nyheder MOST POPULAR EurekAlert! - Breaking News 43 BCG vaccine leads to long-term blood sug…

    NyhederMOST POPULAR
    EurekAlert! - Breaking News
    43
    BCG vaccine leads to long-term blood sugar improvement in type 1 diabetes patientsLong-term follow-up of participants in Massachusetts General Hospital clinical trials of a generic vaccine to reverse advanced type 1 diabetes finds significant clinical benefits, including restoration of near-normal blood sugar levels.
    13h
    Science : NPR
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    Koko The Gorilla Dies; Redrew The Lines Of Animal-Human CommunicationKoko fascinated and elated millions of people with her facility
    for denne datolanguage and her ability to interact with humans. She also gave people a glimpse of her emotions. (Image credit: Bettmann Archive)
    11h
    Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
    1K
    Laser bursts generate electricity faster than any other methodTake a glass thread a thousand times thinner than a human hair. Use it as a wire between two metals. Hit it with a laser pulse that lasts a millionth of a billionth of a second.
    11h
    LATEST
    Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
    Chemists teach an enzyme a new trick, with potential for building new moleculesChemists have found a way to make a naturally occurring enzyme take on a new, artificial role, which has significant implications for modern chemistry, including pharmaceutical production.
    now
    Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
    Writing away the body image bluesBody dissatisfaction among women is widespread and can lead to a number of worrisome outcomes, including eating disorders, depression and anxiety. While researchers know a lot about what makes women's body image worse, they are still short on empirically supported interventions for improving women's body image. A psychology professor tested the effect of three specific writing exercises on college
    now
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    21
    Why the Supreme Court Sales Tax Ruling May Benefit AmazonSupreme Court OnlineStates can now require all online retailers to collect sales tax, even if the company does not have a physical presence in the state.
    19min
    Popular Science
    95
    Koko, the beloved gorilla who communicated through sign-language, dies at age 46Animals Remembering, as Koko once put it, a 'fine-gorilla-person.' One of the world's most beloved primates Koko, the gorilla famous for her ability to communicate using sign language, died in her sleep Tuesday morning at age 46.
    20min
    The Atlantic
    The Atlantic Daily: Between ParentsWhat We’re Following Border Politics: President Donald Trump’s executive order from Wednesday has—at least on paper—reversed his administration’s policy of separating families who enter the country illegally. Yet its political impact is still unfolding, and the public outrage over the policy may not bode well for Trump or the Republican Party. Democrats, for their part, could look to French Presi
    21min
    New Scientist - News
    2
    Mystery gibbon found buried in tomb of ancient Chinese royaltyThe skeleton of an entirely new - but now extinct - species of gibbon was found in the tomb of Lady Xia, grandmother of China’s first emperor, and was probably her pet
    22min
    New Scientist - News
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    Many psychiatric conditions have the same genes in commonSeveral conditions including anxiety, depression and anorexia all share a common set of genes, which could lead to better diagnoses
    22min
    New Scientist - News
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    We’ve just seen a huge space explosion and don’t know what it isThere’s an enormous, fast-moving explosion in space unlike anything we’ve seen before, and astronomers around the world are scrambling to figure out what it is
    22min
    Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
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    Antarctic ice sheet is melting, but rising bedrock below could slow it downAn international team of researchers has found that the bedrock below the remote West Antarctic Ice Sheet is rising much more rapidly than previously thought, in response to ongoing ice melt.
    23min
    Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
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    Psychiatric disorders share an underlying genetic basisResearchers explored the genetic connections between brain disorders at a scale far eclipsing previous work on the subject. The team determined that psychiatric disorders share many genetic variants, while neurological disorders (such as Parkinson's or Alzheimer's) appear more distinct. The results indicate that psychiatric disorders likely have important similarities at a molecular level, which c
    23min
    Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
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    California Aedes mosquitoes capable of spreading ZikaOver the last five years, Zika virus has emerged as a significant global human health threat following outbreaks in South and Central America. Now, researchers have shown that invasive mosquitoes in California -- where cases of Zika in travelers have been a regular occurrence in recent years -- are capable of transmitting Zika.
    23min
    Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
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    Caffeine from four cups of coffee protects the heart with the help of mitochondriaA new study shows that a caffeine concentration equivalent to four cups of coffee promotes the movement of a regulatory protein into mitochondria, enhancing their function and protecting cardiovascular cells from damage.
    23min
    Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
    4
    The psychobiology of online gamingWhen researchers looked at expression of a particular gene complex that is activated by chronic stress, they found differences depending on whether someone was positively engaging in video games or were problematic gamers.
    23min
    New on MIT Technology Review
    13
    Here’s how the proposed reorganization of the federal government could impact science and tech[no content]
    24min
    Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
    What's that extra in my online cart? Soon, maybe a sales taxAttention shoppers: You may soon be paying more taxes on what you put in your online cart.
    37min
    Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
    'Exam Roulette' could quell essay-induced anxietyFor many students, essay tests are a source of dread and anxiety. But for professors, these tests provide an excellent way to assess a student's depth of knowledge and critical-thinking skills. At the American Physiological Society's (APS's) Institute on Teaching and Learning in Madison, Wis., Andrew Petzold, Ph.D., of the University of Minnesota Rochester Center for Learning Innovation, will disc
    37min
    Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
    Online professional development boosts teachers' confidence, knowledgeMultiple factors go into making an effective professional development (PD) program for K-12 teachers. Focusing on content, active learning, collaboration and coaching support and using models of effective teaching can broaden the knowledge of science teachers. However, many teachers are short on the resources needed to attend one-time short-term PD programs. Additionally, there is little data on t
    37min
    Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
    Prop. 47 lessened racial disparities in drug arrestsIn 2014, California voters approved Proposition 47, which reclassified drug possession offenses from felonies or "wobblers"—which prosecutors can charge as either felonies or misdemeanors—to misdemeanors, and in the process reduced the state's prison and jail populations. Now, a study out of UC San Francisco has quantified the effects of the ballot measure, which was at the leading edge of a natio
    37min
    Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
    Study abroad for commuters: a case study at the University of New Hampshire at ManchesterStudying abroad can impart a number of valuable, lifelong skills in students, including improved foreign language skills, appreciation for other cultures and, importantly, access to unique learning opportunities only available in certain countries and settings. However, less than 10 percent of U.S. college students participate in study abroad experiences. The cost of these experiences remains a ma
    37min
    Popular Science
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    This new system could help air taxis and drone deliveries avoid crashingTechnology The program is focused on a 35-mile route in Ohio. A drone management network project underway in Ohio will help keeps all those aerial vehicles from colliding.
    49min
    Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
    1
    Template to create superatoms could make for better batteriesVirginia Commonwealth University researchers have discovered a novel strategy for creating superatoms—combinations of atoms that can mimic the properties of more than one group of elements of the periodic table. These superatoms could be used to create new materials, including more efficient batteries and better semiconductors; a core component of microchips, transistors and most computerized devi
    49min
    Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
    1
    Chemists teach an enzyme a new trick, with potential for building new moleculesPrinceton chemists have found a way to make a naturally occurring enzyme take on a new, artificial role, which has significant implications for modern chemistry, including pharmaceutical production. Their work appears in the journal Nature Chemistry.
    49min
    Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
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    Scientists discover how brain signals travel to drive language performanceUsing transcranial magnetic stimulation and network control theory, researchers have taken a novel approach to understanding how signals travel across the brain's highways and how stimulation can lead to better cognitive function.
    51min
    Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
    10
    'Antifreeze' molecules may stop and reverse damage from brain injuriesThe key to better treatments for brain injuries and disease may lie in the molecules charged with preventing the clumping of specific proteins associated with cognitive decline and other neurological problems, researchers report.
    51min
    Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
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    A mechanism behind choosing alcohol over healthy rewards is foundChanges in a brain signalling system contribute to the development of alcohol addiction-like behaviors in rats, according to a new study. The findings indicate a similar mechanism in humans.
    51min
    The Atlantic
    The Atlantic Politics & Policy Daily: Do U Care?-Written by Lena Felton ( @lenakfelton ) and Elaine Godfrey ( @elainejgodfrey ) Today in 5 Lines First lady Melania Trump made an unexpected visit to McAllen, Texas, to “see what’s real” on the U.S.-Mexico border, according to her spokeswoman. But it wasn’t just her surprise travel plans that generated buzz—photographers also captured her boarding the plane wearing a jacket that read, in white le
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    Latest Headlines | Science News
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    Koko the gorilla is gone, but she left a legacyAn ape that touched millions imparted some hard lessons about primate research.
    1h
    EurekAlert! - Breaking News
    1
    Princeton chemists teach an enzyme a new trick, with potential for building new moleculesPrinceton chemists led by Prof. Todd Hyster have found a way to make a naturally occurring enzyme take on a new, artificial role, which has significant implications for modern chemistry, including pharmaceutical production.
    1h
    EurekAlert! - Breaking News
    Online professional development boosts teachers' confidence, knowledgeMultiple factors make an effective professional development (PD) program for K-12 teachers. Focusing on content, active learning, collaboration and coaching support and using effective teaching models can broaden the knowledge of science teachers. However, many teachers are short on the resources needed to attend one-time short-term PD programs. The results of one online PD program for teachers wi
    1h
    EurekAlert! - Breaking News
    'Exam Roulette' could quell essay-induced anxietyFor many students, essay tests are a source of dread and anxiety. But for professors, these tests provide an excellent way to assess a student's depth of knowledge and critical-thinking skills. At the American Physiological Society's (APS's) Institute on Teaching and Learning in Madison, Wis., Andrew Petzold, PhD, of the University of Minnesota Rochester Center for Learning Innovation, will discus
    1h
    EurekAlert! - Breaking News
    Study abroad for commuters: a case study at the University of New Hampshire at ManchesterStudying abroad can impart valuable, lifelong skills, including foreign language skills, appreciation for other cultures and access to unique learning opportunities. However, the cost remains a major impediment to many students. A course at University of New Hampshire at Manchester offered a study abroad trip during spring break. The cost, a course fee, was potentially covered under financial aid
    1h
    EurekAlert! - Breaking News
    Medicaid Expansion increased low-income patient access to kidney transplantsStates that fully implemented Medicaid expansion under the Affordable Care Act saw significant increases for preemptive kidney transplant listings among black and Hispanic patients.
    1h
    EurekAlert! - Breaking News
    Reduction in protein in the urine is a treatment goal in children with kidney diseaseThe blood pressure-lowering medication ramipril reduced protein excretion -- or proteinuria -- in children with chronic kidney disease. Greater reductions in proteinuria during the first months of treatment were linked with a lower risk of kidney disease progression.
    1h
    EurekAlert! - Breaking News
    Medicaid expansion helps low-income patients get on transplant waitlist before dialysisIn states that expanded Medicaid under the Affordable Care Act to cover more low-income individuals, there was an increase in the number of Medicaid beneficiaries who were preemptively waitlisted to receive a kidney transplant. Medicaid expansion was associated with greater gains racial and ethnic minorities in being listed pre-emptively on the transplant waitlist compared with whites.
    1h
    The Atlantic
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    How Some Immigrant Families Are Avoiding SeparationMCALLEN, Tex.—Angel Bonilla spent eight days in an immigrant-detention facility with his five-month-old daughter, Selene Alanis, after trekking for nearly a month through Mexico from his home in Honduras. Like so many others, he was caught by the Border Patrol crossing the Rio Grande in a raft. Right now, they’re in McAllen. Soon, they’ll be on their way to Dallas, where Bonilla will stay with fr
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    EurekAlert! - Breaking News
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    Our intestinal microbiome influences metabolism -- through the immune systemThe innate immune system, our first line of defense against bacterial infection, has a side job that's equally important: fine-tuning our metabolism.
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    EurekAlert! - Breaking News
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    Anxious individuals are less risky, moderated by higher control when making decisionsNew research shows that highly anxious individuals exert more cognitive control when they make a risky decision compared with less anxious individuals. This in turn leads to less risky decisions.
    1h
    cognitive science
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    Koko The Gorilla Dies; Redrew The Lines Of Animal-Human Communicationsubmitted by /u/burtzev [link] [comments]
    1h
    Live Science
    9
    Physicists Just Found the Last Missing Protons and Neutrons In the Universehe universe's missing baryons have been found, and they're floating between the stars in the form of superhot oxygen.
    1h
    EurekAlert! - Breaking News
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    Ketamine acts fast to treat depression and its effects last -- but how?Researchers led by Mark Rasenick in the University of Illinois at Chicago College of Medicine, describe the molecular mechanisms behind ketamine's ability to squash depression and keep it at bay. They report their findings in the journal Molecular Psychiatry.
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    EurekAlert! - Breaking News
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    Deep data dive helps predict cerebral palsyA pioneering technique developed to analyze genetic activity of Antarctic worms is helping to predict cerebral palsy. The technique uses next-generation genetic sequencing data to measure how cells control the way genes are turned on or off, and can also be used in other human health care research.
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    EurekAlert! - Breaking News
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    Scientists solve the case of the missing subplate, with wide implications for brain scienceA new study shows that a group of neurons, previously thought to die in the course of development, in fact become incorporated into the brain's cortex. This research has implications for understanding -- and possibly treating --several brain disorders.
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    EurekAlert! - Breaking News
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    New cellular pathway helps explain how inflammation leads to artery diseaseInvestigators have identified a new cellular pathway that may help explain how arterial inflammation develops into atherosclerosis -- deposits of cholesterol, fats and other substances that create plaque, clog arteries and promote heart attacks and stroke. The findings could lead to improved therapies for atherosclerosis, a leading cause of death worldwide.
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    EurekAlert! - Breaking News
    3
    Template to create superatoms, created by VCU researchers, could make for better batteriesVirginia Commonwealth University researchers have discovered a novel strategy for creating superatoms -- combinations of atoms that can mimic the properties of more than one group of elements of the periodic table. These superatoms could be used to create new materials, including more efficient batteries and better semiconductors; a core component of microchips, transistors and most computerized d
    1h
    The Scientist RSS
    US Scientists Letter Calls for Transparency in Animal ResearchNearly 600 signatories, including four Nobel Prize winners, urge openness about animal experiments.
    1h
    The Scientist RSS
    Bones in Ancient Tomb Are of Newly Discovered Ape GenusThe now-extinct gibbon was buried with the grandmother of China's first emperor and her many pets.
    1h
    BBC News - Science & Environment
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    Mystery extinct ape found in ancient Chinese tombThe discovery of a prehistoric pet gibbon suggests humans pushed apes to extinction far back in history.
    2h
    Big Think
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    NASA unveils 3 ways it will defend Earth from catastrophic asteroidsThe chances of an asteroid large enough to be a threat to areas where human beings are concentrated are small. Still, it's what's known as a "high impact" result. Read More
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    EurekAlert! - Breaking News
    Prop. 47 lessened racial disparities in drug arrestsIn 2014, California voters approved Proposition 47, which reclassified drug possession offenses from felonies to misdemeanors, and in the process reduced the state's prison and jail populations. Now, a study out of UC San Francisco has quantified the effects of the ballot measure, which was at the leading edge of a national movement to reduce incarceration rates and change the criminal justice app
    2h
    Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
    12
    Fundamental rule of brain plasticityA series of complex experiments in the visual cortex of mice has yielded a simple rule about plasticity: When a synapse strengthens, others immediately nearby weaken.
    2h
    Big Think
    4
    The Dutch are closing even more prisons as crime continues to dropThe Netherlands is set to close four more prisons following some of the lowest crime rates the country's seen in decades—but do those statistics reflect the reality of Dutch crime? Read More
    2h
    New on MIT Technology Review
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    Alphabet is in talks to spin out its molten-salt storage playBill Gates’s Breakthrough Energy Ventures is involved in the deal.
    2h
    Popular Science
    33
    Massive atmospheric wave on Venus could explain the planet's weird rotationSpace More than a light Venusian breeze. Venus’ rotation has always been weird. Estimates of it have changed over time, much to the puzzlement of scientists.
    2h
    The Atlantic
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    The Outrage Cycle, Italian StylePARIS—What does Matteo Salvini, Italy’s new right-wing, hard-liner interior minister want? He’s called for a census of Roma who don’t have Italian citizenship then slightly backtracked because, well, it would likely be challenged in court, but anyway then he’s said he wants to turn “words into actions” and expel some of them because “unfortunately we have to keep the Italian Roma”—the ones that h
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    EurekAlert! - Breaking News
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    'Antifreeze' molecules may stop and reverse damage from brain injuriesThe key to better treatments for brain injuries and disease may lie in the molecules charged with preventing the clumping of specific proteins associated with cognitive decline and other neurological problems, researchers from Penn report in a new study published in Neurobiology of Disease.
    2h
    EurekAlert! - Breaking News
    1
    Scientists discover how brain signals travel to drive language performanceUsing transcranial magnetic stimulation and network control theory, researchers have taken a novel approach to understanding how signals travel across the brain's highways and how stimulation can lead to better cognitive function.
    2h
    EurekAlert! - Breaking News
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    VLT makes most precise test of Einstein's general relativity outside Milky WayAstronomers using the ESO Very Large Telescope, and the NASA/ESA Hubble Space Telescope, have made the most precise test yet of Einstein's general theory of relativity outside the Milky Way. The galaxy ESO 325-G004 distorts light from a galaxy behind it and creates an Einstein ring around its centre. By comparing the mass of ESO 325-G004 with the curvature of space around it, astronomers found tha
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    Live Science
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    Why Archaeologists Were Surprised to Find This Gibbon in a Royal Chinese TombAbout 2,300 years ago, the grandmother of China's first emperor received an elaborate burial outfitted with a macabre menagerie of buried animals — notably, the remains of an ancient, extinct gibbon that was previously unknown to science.
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    Batman Is Only Kinda Good at Crime Scene InvestigationBruce Wayne’s gumshoe techniques are alright, but how does he stack up against 'True Detective'?
    2h
    Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
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    Deutsche Telekom says will slash 10,000 jobs at subsidiaryDeutsche Telekom said Thursday it would slash 10,000 jobs worldwide at its loss-making IT services subsidiary in the next three years as it seeks 600 million euros ($696 million) in savings.
    2h
    Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
    Escaped lion shot dead at Belgium zoo, sparking criticismBelgian police have been criticised for shooting dead a young lioness at a zoo on Thursday after it escaped from its enclosure.
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    Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
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    Zebrafish's near 360 degree UV-vision knocks stripes off Google Street ViewA zebrafish view of the world has been forensically analyzed by researchers to reveal that how they see their surroundings changes hugely depending on what direction they are looking.
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    Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
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    Majority of US adults prescribed epinephrine report not using it in an emergencyA new study shows in an emergency, 52 percent of adults with potentially life-threatening allergies didn't use the epinephrine auto-injectors (EAI) they were prescribed.
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    Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
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    Waking up is hard to do: Prefrontal cortex implicated in consciousnessResearchers discover that stimulating the prefrontal cortex can induce wake-like behavior in anesthetized rats.
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    Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
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    Graphene assembled film shows higher thermal conductivity than graphite filmResearchers have developed a graphene assembled film that has over 60 percent higher thermal conductivity than graphite film -- despite the fact that graphite simply consists of many layers of graphene. The graphene film shows great potential as a novel heat spreading material for form-factor driven electronics and other high power-driven systems.
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    Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
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    Brain tingles: First study of its kind reveals physiological benefits of ASMRAutonomous Sensory Meridian Response (ASMR) - the relaxing 'brain tingles' experienced by some people in response to specific triggers, such as whispering, tapping and slow hand movements -- may have benefits for both mental and physical health, according to new research.
    2h
    TED Talks Daily (SD video)
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    Why you should love gross science | Anna RothschildWhat can we learn from the slimy, smelly side of life? In this playful talk, science journalist Anna Rothschild shows us the hidden wisdom of "gross stuff" and explains why avoiding the creepy underbelly of nature, medicine and technology closes us off to important sources of knowledge about our health and the world. "When we explore the gross side of life, we find insights that we never would hav
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    The Atlantic
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    Hats of the Royal AscotThe Royal Ascot is an annual five-day horse-race meeting held on a course outside of London, England, with racehorses competing for nearly $18 million in prizes. It is a major event for both racing and fashion fans, and is regularly attended by Queen Elizabeth II and other royalty. Parts of the racecourse maintain a “top hats and tails” rule for men, while many women dress in eye-catching outfits
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    EurekAlert! - Breaking News
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    Antidiabetic action of natural fatty acid derivatives not confirmedA team of researchers at Sanofi and Mainz University finds no positive action of isomers of the fatty acid derivatives 5- and 9-PAHSA in diabetes models.
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    EurekAlert! - Breaking News
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    Coining less expensive currency: bringing down the cost of making nickelsCashing in on materials science, NIST makes a new nickel for use in the U.S. Mint. The work might be useful for building durable high-tech devices like smartphones, too.
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    Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
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    New clues to improving chemotherapiesThe work has important implications for understanding how human cancer cells develop resistance to natural product-based chemotherapies.
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    Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
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    Researchers create matchmaking service, for peptides and antibioticsResearchers have matched small proteins, called peptides, with antibiotics so they can work together to combat hard-to-treat infections that don't respond well to drugs on their own.
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    Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
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    Fish's use of electricity might shed light on human illnessesAfrican weakly electric fish, commonly called baby whales, use incredibly brief electrical pulses to sense the world around them and communicate with other members of their species. Part of that electrical mechanism exists in humans -- and by studying these fish, scientists may unlock clues about conditions like epilepsy.
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    Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
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    First ancient syphilis genomes decodedAn international research team has recovered the first historic genomes from the bacterium Treponema pallidum, which causes syphilis. It was previously not thought possible to recover DNA of this bacterium from ancient samples. In the study, the researchers were able to distinguish genetically between the subspecies of the disease that cause syphilis and that cause yaws, which are not readily dist
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    Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
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    Garden seed diet for threatened turtle doves has negative impactNew research into Britain's fastest declining bird species has found that young turtle doves raised on a diet of seeds foraged from non-cultivated arable plants rather than food provided in people's gardens are more likely to survive after fledging. Ecologists investigated the dietary habits of European turtle doves using DNA analysis of faecal samples and found significant associations between th
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    Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
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    Probiotics can protect the skeletons of older womenResearchers have demonstrated that probiotics, dietary supplements with health-promoting bacteria, can be used to affect the human skeleton. Among older women who received probiotics, bone loss was halved compared to women who received only a placebo. The research opens the door to a new way to prevent fractures among the elderly.
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    New on MIT Technology Review
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    Over one-third of industrial robots purchased last year were installed in China[no content]
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    Live Science
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    Antarctica Is Getting Taller, and Here’s WhyThe ground under Antarctica's ice is on the move, rising more rapidly than ever recorded.
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    Popular Science
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    Instagram TV is pulling us ever closer to a future full of tall videosInstagram IGTV YouTubeTechnology Moving images have historically been wide, but smartphones are changing that. Instagram TV is bringing long-form content to vertical video.
    3h
    Inside Science
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    BRIEF: EPA May Have Underestimated Methane Leaks From Oil and GasBRIEF: EPA May Have Underestimated Methane Leaks From Oil and Gas Escaped methane likely warms the climate as much as all natural gas burned in the U.S. alvarez1HR_cropped.jpg Image credits: Environmental Defense Fund Earth Thursday, June 21, 2018 - 15:00 Nala Rogers, Staff Writer (Inside Science) -- Methane emissions from U.S. oil and gas operations are 63 percent higher than government estimate
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    EurekAlert! - Breaking News
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    Writing away the body image bluesBody dissatisfaction among women is widespread and can lead to a number of worrisome outcomes, including eating disorders, depression and anxiety. While researchers know a lot about what makes women's body image worse, they are still short on empirically supported interventions for improving women's body image. Northwestern psychology professor Renee Engeln tested the effect of three specific writ
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    EurekAlert! - Breaking News
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    Crisis can force re-evaluation and derail efforts to reach goalsSetbacks are to be expected when pursuing a goal, whether you are trying to lose weight or save money. The challenge is getting back on track and not giving up after a difficulty or crisis, says an Iowa State marketing professor working on practical ways to help people stick to health-related goals.
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    Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
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    Water can be very dead, electrically speakingWater is one of the most fascinating substances on Earth and at the heart of its many unusual properties is high polarizability, a strong response to an applied electric field. Now researchers have found that on a microscopic scale water behaves very differently and its thin layers lose any polarizability, becoming electrically dead.
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    Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
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    Einstein proved right in another galaxyAstronomers have made the most precise test of gravity outside our own solar system. By combining data taken with NASA's Hubble Space Telescope and the European Southern Observatory's Very Large Telescope, the researchers show that gravity in this galaxy behaves as predicted by Albert Einstein's general theory of relativity, confirming the theory's validity on galactic scales.
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    Scientific American Content: Global
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    Scientists Pinpoint Brain Region That May Be Center of Alcohol AddictionResearchers map out a cellular mechanism that offers a biological explanation for alcoholism, and could lead to treatments -- Read more on ScientificAmerican.com
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    Viden
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    Selvskade: Hjernen føler lykke, når du skærer i dig selvAt skade sig selv kan være lige så vanedannende som at være på stoffer, siger ekspert.
    3h
    Live Science
    9
    Don't Stare into a Laser Pointer Beam. You Could Burn a Hole in Your EyeA boy in Greece burned a hole in his retina after repeatedly staring into a laser-pointer beam, according to a new report.
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    cognitive science
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    Alexa Skill illustrates cognitive magic tricksubmitted by /u/brianfit [link] [comments]
    3h
    The Atlantic
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    Trump’s Katrina MomentSome years ago, I met via fellowship a group of journalists from countries where the fates of citizens hinge on choices out of Washington: Iraq, Iran, Afghanistan. The idea was to get to know one another and our worlds, and so one afternoon we heard from an expert on federalism. “Americans,” he told us, looking mostly at the foreigners, “don’t care about foreign policy. They care about domestic p
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    Science : NPR
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    Long-Extinct Gibbon Found Inside Tomb Of Chinese Emperor's GrandmotherA Chinese tomb has turned up evidence of a new species of long-extinct ape. The gibbon, called Junzi imperialis, lived and died alongside its imperial human caretaker. (Image credit: Joachim S. Müller/Flickr)
    3h
    Inside Science
    Shooing Birds Away With SoundShooing Birds Away With Sound A humane way to keep birds from gathering where they’re not wanted. Shooing Birds Away With Sound Video of Shooing Birds Away With Sound Creature Thursday, June 21, 2018 - 14:15 Nala Rogers, Staff Writer (Inside Science) -- Humans and birds don't always get along. We clash over resources like food and shelter, and sometimes we clash literally -- when birds collide wi
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    Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
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    How snowshoe hares evolved to stay seasonally camouflagedMany animals have evolved fur or feather colors to blend in with the environment and hide from predators. But how do animals stay camouflaged when their environment changes with each new season? For snowshoe hares, hybridization plays an important role in their ability to match their environment, new research shows.
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    Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
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    Unprecedented control of polymer grids achievedThe first examples of covalent organic frameworks (COFs) were discovered in 2005, but quality has been poor and preparation methods uncontrolled. Now researchers have produced high-quality versions of these materials, demonstrate their superior properties and control their growth. The team's two-step process produces organic polymers with crystalline, two-dimensional structures. The precision of t
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    Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
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    Brain's response to opioids: New research provides expanded insightsOpioids are powerful painkillers that act on the brain, but they have a range of harmful side effects including addiction. Researchers have developed a tool that gives deeper insights into the brain's response to opioids.
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    Live Science
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    Could Herpes Viruses Play a Role in Alzheimer's? New Study Backs TheoryAlzheimer's brains had up to twice as much of two common strains of herpes viruses than non-Alzheimer's brains.
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    Popular Science
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    Why our brains see the world as ‘us’ versus ‘them’—and what to do about itScience Our brains are wired to build walls, but we do our best work when we knock them down. Even within species, is there something in our neural circuits that leads us to find comfort in those like us and unease with those who may differ?
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    Scientific American Content: Global
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    The Healthy Addiction? Coffee Study Finds More Health BenefitsNew research in mice details the mechanism of how caffeine seems to help the heart -- Read more on ScientificAmerican.com
    3h
    The Scientist RSS
    Koko the Signing Gorilla Dies at 46The primate was famous for her ability to communicate with humans.
    3h
    The Scientist RSS
    Common Gene Variants Found Among Psychiatric DisordersIn the largest-ever study of its kind, researchers combined genomic data from nearly 900,000 patients and healthy individuals to identify commonalities among 10 mental illnesses.
    3h
    Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
    16
    Mice not only experience regret, but also learn to avoid it in the futureNew research has discovered that mice are capable of learning to plan ahead in order to avoid regret down the road even if there is no additional gain in rewards.
    4h
    Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
    14
    Old star clusters could have been the birthplace of supermassive starsAstrophysicists may have found a solution to a problem that has perplexed scientists for more than 50 years: why are the stars in globular clusters made of material different to other stars found in the Milky Way?
    4h
    Blog » Languages » English
    Eyewire Cup TriviaBefore the Cup begins, get in the competitive spirit with a friendly round of trivia! We’ll have some World Cup themed trivia along with your regular dose of science trivia. We’ll kick things off at 11:00 AM ET on 6/22 and continue until 11:00 AM ET on 6/24 , at which point things will finish with a power hour till noon. Submit your answers by typing them into the chat box. You may submit answers
    4h
    EurekAlert! - Breaking News
    2
    New study finds US oil & gas methane emissions 60 percent higher than estimatedThe US oil and gas industry emits 13 million metric tons of the potent greenhouse gas methane from its operations each year, 60 percent more than estimated by the US Environmental Protection Agency, according to a new study published today in the journal Science.
    4h
    EurekAlert! - Breaking News
    1
    Hundreds of thousands of genomes shed light on psychiatric disordersA massive undertaking by the Brainstorm Consortium to analyze the genomes of nearly 900,000 people has revealed important insights into the genetic overlap among some psychiatric diseases, as well as among personality traits.
    4h
    EurekAlert! - Breaking News
    1
    A quick rebound of Antarctic crust promotes ice-sheet stabilityThe unexpectedly rapid rebound of the Amundsen Sea Embayment (ASE) may help stabilize the West Antarctic Ice Sheet against catastrophic collapse, says a new study offering a rare silver-lining in glacier research.
    4h
    EurekAlert! - Breaking News
    1
    The lady's ape: Extinct gibbon discovered in royal ancient Chinese tombA new genus and species of gibbon has been identified in the most unexpected of places -- interred in the tomb of an ancient Chinese noble-woman.
    4h
    EurekAlert! - Breaking News
    2
    US methane emissions greater than thought, in recent years?Methane leakage from the US oil and natural gas supply chain is greater than previously estimated, researchers report. US oil and natural gas production has been growing steadily in the last decade.
    4h
    EurekAlert! - Breaking News
    Northwestern researchers achieve unprecedented control of polymer gridsThe first examples of covalent organic frameworks (COFs) were discovered in 2005, but quality has been poor and preparation methods uncontrolled. Now a Northwestern University research team is the first to produce high-quality versions of these materials, demonstrate their superior properties and control their growth. The team's two-step process produces organic polymers with crystalline, two-dime
    4h
    EurekAlert! - Breaking News
    New research provides expanded insights into the brain's response to opioidsOpioids are powerful painkillers that act on the brain, but they have a range of harmful side effects including addiction. Researchers from the Max Planck Institute of Biochemistry in collaboration with researchers from the Medical University of Innsbruck, Austria, University of Innsbruck, and the Lewis Katz School of Medicine at Temple University, have developed a tool that gives deeper insights
    4h
    EurekAlert! - Breaking News
    1
    Antarctic ice sheet is melting, but rising bedrock below could slow it downAn international team of researchers has found that the bedrock below the remote West Antarctic Ice Sheet is rising much more rapidly than previously thought, in response to ongoing ice melt.
    4h
    EurekAlert! - Breaking News
    UM research identifies how snowshoe hares evolved to stay seasonally camouflagedResearchers at the University of Montana recently discovered that hybridization played an important role in snowshoe hares' ability to match their environment.
    4h
    EurekAlert! - Breaking News
    UBC researchers create matchmaking serviceUBC researchers have matched small proteins, called peptides, with antibiotics so they can work together to combat hard-to-treat infections that don't respond well to drugs on their own.
    4h
    EurekAlert! - Breaking News
    Common psychiatric disorders share an overlapping genetic riskInvestigators found that many common psychiatric disorders are deeply connected on a genetic level, sharing specific genetic risk factors, underscoring the need to recognize shared dimensions of brain dysfunction, and develop new treatment strategies. Results of this investigation have been published in the June 22, 2018 issue of the journal, Science.
    4h
    EurekAlert! - Breaking News
    Mice not only experience regret, but also learn to avoid it in the futureNew research from the University of Minnesota publishing 21 June in the open access journal PLOS Biology from authors Brian M. Sweis, Mark J. Thomas, and A. David Redish has discovered that mice are capable of learning to plan ahead in order to avoid regret down the road even if there is no additional gain in rewards.
    4h
    EurekAlert! - Breaking News
    Water can be very dead, electrically speakingWater is one of the most fascinating substances on Earth and at the heart of its many unusual properties is high polarizability, a strong response to an applied electric field. Now researchers at the University of Manchester have found that on a microscopic scale water behaves very differently and its thin layers lose any polarizability, becoming electrically dead.
    4h
    EurekAlert! - Breaking News
    Psychiatric disorders share an underlying genetic basisIn a new international collaboration, researchers explored the genetic connections between brain disorders at a scale far eclipsing previous work on the subject. The team determined that psychiatric disorders share many genetic variants, while neurological disorders (such as Parkinson's or Alzheimer's) appear more distinct. The results indicate that psychiatric disorders likely have important simi
    4h
    EurekAlert! - Breaking News
    First ancient syphilis genomes decodedAn international research team has recovered the first historic genomes from the bacterium Treponema pallidum, which causes syphilis. It was previously not thought possible to recover DNA of this bacterium from ancient samples. In the study, published in PLOS Neglected Tropical Diseases, the researchers were able to distinguish genetically between the subspecies of the disease that cause syphilis
    4h
    EurekAlert! - Breaking News
    Einstein proved right in another galaxyAn international team of astronomers have made the most precise test of gravity outside our own solar system.
    4h
    EurekAlert! - Breaking News
    A mechanism behind choosing alcohol over healthy rewards is foundChanges in a brain signalling system contribute to the development of alcohol addiction-like behaviours in rats, according to a new study led by researchers at Linköping University, Sweden. The findings, to be published in Science, indicate a similar mechanism in humans.
    4h
    EurekAlert! - Breaking News
    Fast rising bedrock below West Antarctica reveals an extremely fluid Earth mantleAn international team of researchers, with a new study published in Science with DTU Space as lead author, finds that the bedrock below the West Antarctic Ice Sheet is rising much more rapidly than expected, revealing a very different Earth structure than previously believed. This discovery has important implications in understanding the present and future climate changes in Antarctica.
    4h
    EurekAlert! - Breaking News
    MIT scientists discover fundamental rule of brain plasticityA series of complex experiments in the visual cortex of mice has yielded a simple rule about plasticity: When a synapse strengthens, others immediately nearby weaken.
    4h
    EurekAlert! - Breaking News
    Bedrock in West Antarctica rising at surprisingly rapid rateThe earth is rising in one part of Antarctica at one of the fastest rates ever recorded, as ice rapidly disappears and weight is lifted off the bedrock, a new international study has found. The findings have surprising and positive implications for the survival of the West Antarctic Ice Sheet (WAIS), which scientists had previously thought could be doomed because of the effects of climate change.
    4h
    EurekAlert! - Breaking News
    Caffeine from four cups of coffee protects the heart with the help of mitochondriaA new study shows that a caffeine concentration equivalent to four cups of coffee promotes the movement of a regulatory protein into mitochondria, enhancing their function and protecting cardiovascular cells from damage. The work, by Judith Haendeler and Joachim Altschmied of the Medical Faculty, Heinrich-Heine-University and the IUF-Leibniz Research Institute for Environmental Medicine in Duessel
    4h
    EurekAlert! - Breaking News
    How competition and cooperation between bacteria shape antibiotic resistanceNew computational simulations suggest that the effects of antibiotics on a bacterial community depend on whether neighboring species have competitive or cooperative relationships, as well as their spatial arrangement. Sylvie Estrela of Yale University and Sam Brown of the Georgia Institute of Technology present these findings in PLOS Computational Biology.
    4h
    EurekAlert! - Breaking News
    Cross-species prion adaptation depends on prion replication environmentA hamster prion that replicated under conditions of low RNA levels in mouse brain material resulted in altered disease features when readapted and transmitted back to hamsters, according to new research presented in PLOS Pathogens by Elizaveta Katorcha of the University of Maryland School of Medicine, Baltimore, and colleagues.
    4h
    EurekAlert! - Breaking News
    Synthetic peptides enhance antibiotic attack of skin infections in miceShort, synthetic peptides that disrupt bacteria's response to antibiotics boost antibiotic activity against high-density skin infections in mice, according to new research presented by Daniel Pletzer and colleagues at the University of British Columbia in Vancouver, Canada.
    4h
    EurekAlert! - Breaking News
    California Aedes mosquitoes capable of spreading ZikaOver the last five years, Zika virus has emerged as a significant global human health threat following outbreaks in South and Central America. Now, researchers reporting in PLOS Neglected Tropical Diseases have shown that invasive mosquitoes in California -- where cases of Zika in travelers have been a regular occurrence in recent years -- are capable of transmitting Zika.
    4h
    EurekAlert! - Breaking News
    Ancient Treponema pallidum from human remains sheds light on its evolutionary historyThe evolutionary history and origin of syphilis, and other treponemal diseases, is a hotly debated topic by scholars. Scholars who theorize syphilis originated in the 'New World' and preceded the 15th century have been in fierce debate with scholars who theorize a multiregional origin followed by the 15th century pandemic spread. Both sides are supported by organic evidence found in contemporary g
    4h
    The Atlantic
    95
    The Power of Mo Salah’s Goal-Scoring RitualEgypt suffered a disappointing loss to Uruguay during its first World Cup match last week, and this week proved no better. In their second-match loss to Russia on Tuesday, the Pharaohs effectively bid farewell to any hopes of advancing to the tournament’s final knockout stage. But they didn’t leave the field completely empty-handed: Their beloved star player Mohamed “Mo” Salah had returned from a
    4h
    The Atlantic
    28
    Radio Atlantic: The View from the BorderSocial media is awash with images of undocumented migrants held in cages, sounds of children crying for their parents, and viral videos of a callous administration response. On Wednesday, President Trump caved to immense political pressure and signed an executive order meant to end family separation at the border. But what effect will it actually have? Video producer Jeremy Raff has been in McAll
    4h
    The Atlantic
    400+
    A Landmark Study on the Origins of AlcoholismFor Markus Heilig, the years of dead ends were starting to grate. A seasoned psychiatrist, Heilig joined the National Institutes of Health in 2004 with grand ambitions of finding new ways to treat addiction and alcoholism. “It was the age of the neuroscience revolution, and all this new tech gave us many ways of manipulating animal brains,” he recalls. By studying addictive behavior in laboratory
    4h
    The Atlantic
    42
    New Gibbon Species Discovered in a 2,200-Year-Old Royal Chinese TombWhen Samuel Turvey found a drawer labelled “gibbon,” he knew he had hit the jackpot. But what he found inside was better than he could have hoped for. Yes, it was a gibbon, or rather the remains of one—parts of its face, jaw, and arm. These fragments were enough for Turvey to show that the animal belonged to a new species of gibbon , distinct from the 20 that live today, and all the ones that we
    4h
    Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
    8
    Enhanced detection of nuclear events, thanks to deep learningA deep neural network running on an ordinary desktop computer is interpreting highly technical data related to national security as well as -- and sometimes better than -- today's best automated methods or even human experts. The research probes incredibly complex data sets filled with events called radioactive decays.
    4h
    Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
    12
    Buildings as power stations work: They generate more energy than they consume, data showsThe UK's first energy-positive classroom generated more than one and a half times the energy it consumed, according to data from its first year of operation, the team has revealed. The findings were announced as the researchers launched the next phase of their research, gathering data and evidence on an office building, constructed using similar methods.
    4h
    Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
    1
    Powerful new approach helps understand molecular alterations in neurological diseaseScientists have developed a high-throughput, multi-pronged approach that integrates laboratory experiments, data from published literature and network analysis of large datasets to identify genes that drive disease.
    4h
    NYT > Science
    31
    Trilobites: Extinct Gibbon Found in Tomb of Ancient Chinese Emperor’s GrandmotherThe remains appear to be a new species of gibbon, and it was perhaps a pet.
    4h
    NYT > Science
    23
    The Natural Gas Industry Has a Leak ProblemEmissions of methane, a powerful greenhouse gas, are 60 percent higher than government estimates. That’s bad news for climate change.
    4h
    Science current issue
    3
    Emerging stem cell ethics[no content]
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    U.S. center will fight infections with viruses[no content]
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    Science current issue
    Rising bedrock may delay ice sheet collapse[no content]
    4h
    Science current issue
    42
    Neanderthal brain organoids come to life[no content]
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    Chinese grave reveals vanished gibbon genus[no content]
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    19
    Feeding the gods[no content]
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    4h
    Science current issue
    65
    How did Homo sapiens evolve?[no content]
    4h
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    Aberrant choice behavior in alcoholism[no content]
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    Feel the dielectric force[no content]
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    Combating deforestation: From satellite to intervention[no content]
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    Hard feelings[no content]
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    Response--Evaluating human trials: FDA's role[no content]
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    Casualties of human-wildlife conflict[no content]
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    Hybrid camouflage variation[no content]
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    China's plastic waste import ban[no content]
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    The noblewoman's ape[no content]
    4h
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    4h
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    Fingers on the trigger[no content]
    4h
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    A nanostructure quantum simulator[no content]
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    A quick rebound for Antarctic crust[no content]
    4h
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    Testing General Relativity on galaxy scales[no content]
    4h
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    Rebalancing strength between synapses[no content]
    4h
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    Where have all the monarchs gone?[no content]
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    Out of Africa, with a difference[no content]
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    Networks in plant immunity[no content]
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    Brainstorming diseases[no content]
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    Science current issue
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    Finding the vulnerable minority[no content]
    4h
    Science current issue
    Time and place of electron exit[no content]
    4h
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    Taking enantiomers for a spin[no content]
    4h
    Science current issue
    Water's surface dielectric[no content]
    4h
    Science current issue
    Disjointed no more[no content]
    4h
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    Surface antibody maturation[no content]
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    Science current issue
    Benzene ice clouds in Titan's atmosphere[no content]
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    Making a triple negative[no content]
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    Paired photoreceptors function as an oceanic depth gauge[no content]
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    A ray of hope for advanced breast cancer[no content]
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    Science current issue
    Tunable quantum criticality and super-ballistic transport in a "charge" Kondo circuitQuantum phase transitions (QPTs) are ubiquitous in strongly correlated materials. However, the microscopic complexity of these systems impedes the quantitative understanding of QPTs. We observed and thoroughly analyzed the rich strongly correlated physics in two profoundly dissimilar regimes of quantum criticality. With a circuit implementing a quantum simulator for the three-channel Kondo model,
    4h
    Science current issue
    A molecular mechanism for choosing alcohol over an alternative rewardAlcohol addiction leads to increased choice of alcohol over healthy rewards. We established an exclusive choice procedure in which ~15% of outbred rats chose alcohol over a high-value reward. These animals displayed addiction-like traits, including high motivation to obtain alcohol and pursuit of this drug despite adverse consequences. Expression of the -aminobutyric acid (GABA) transporter GAT-3
    4h
    Science current issue
    Orientation-dependent stereo Wigner time delay and electron localization in a small moleculeAttosecond metrology of atoms has accessed the time scale of the most fundamental processes in quantum mechanics. Transferring the time-resolved photoelectric effect from atoms to molecules considerably increases experimental and theoretical challenges. Here we show that orientation- and energy-resolved measurements characterize the molecular stereo Wigner time delay. This observable provides dir
    4h
    Science current issue
    Separation of enantiomers by their enantiospecific interaction with achiral magnetic substratesIt is commonly assumed that recognition and discrimination of chirality, both in nature and in artificial systems, depend solely on spatial effects. However, recent studies have suggested that charge redistribution in chiral molecules manifests an enantiospecific preference in electron spin orientation. We therefore reasoned that the induced spin polarization may affect enantiorecognition through
    4h
    Science current issue
    1
    Observed rapid bedrock uplift in Amundsen Sea Embayment promotes ice-sheet stabilityThe marine portion of the West Antarctic Ice Sheet (WAIS) in the Amundsen Sea Embayment (ASE) accounts for one-fourth of the cryospheric contribution to global sea-level rise and is vulnerable to catastrophic collapse. The bedrock response to ice mass loss, glacial isostatic adjustment (GIA), was thought to occur on a time scale of 10,000 years. We used new GPS measurements, which show a rapid (4
    4h
    Science current issue
    Anomalously low dielectric constant of confined waterThe dielectric constant of interfacial water has been predicted to be smaller than that of bulk water ( 80) because the rotational freedom of water dipoles is expected to decrease near surfaces, yet experimental evidence is lacking. We report local capacitance measurements for water confined between two atomically flat walls separated by various distances down to 1 nanometer. Our experiments reve
    4h
    Science current issue
    A precise extragalactic test of General RelativityEinstein’s theory of gravity, General Relativity, has been precisely tested on Solar System scales, but the long-range nature of gravity is still poorly constrained. The nearby strong gravitational lens ESO 325-G004 provides a laboratory to probe the weak-field regime of gravity and measure the spatial curvature generated per unit mass, . By reconstructing the observed light profile of the lensed
    4h
    Science current issue
    New genus of extinct Holocene gibbon associated with humans in Imperial ChinaAlthough all extant apes are threatened with extinction, there is no evidence for human-caused extinctions of apes or other primates in postglacial continental ecosystems, despite intensive anthropogenic pressures associated with biodiversity loss for millennia in many regions. Here, we report a new, globally extinct genus and species of gibbon, Junzi imperialis , described from a partial cranium
    4h
    Science current issue
    Locally coordinated synaptic plasticity of visual cortex neurons in vivoPlasticity of cortical responses in vivo involves activity-dependent changes at synapses, but the manner in which different forms of synaptic plasticity act together to create functional changes in neurons remains unknown. We found that spike timing–induced receptive field plasticity of visual cortex neurons in mice is anchored by increases in the synaptic strength of identified spines. This is a
    4h
    Science current issue
    Adaptive introgression underlies polymorphic seasonal camouflage in snowshoe haresSnowshoe hares ( Lepus americanus ) maintain seasonal camouflage by molting to a white winter coat, but some hares remain brown during the winter in regions with low snow cover. We show that cis-regulatory variation controlling seasonal expression of the Agouti gene underlies this adaptive winter camouflage polymorphism. Genetic variation at Agouti clustered by winter coat color across multiple h
    4h
    Science current issue
    Antihomotypic affinity maturation improves human B cell responses against a repetitive epitopeAffinity maturation selects B cells expressing somatically mutated antibody variants with improved antigen-binding properties to protect from invading pathogens. We determined the molecular mechanism underlying the clonal selection and affinity maturation of human B cells expressing protective antibodies against the circumsporozoite protein of the malaria parasite Plasmodium falciparum (PfCSP). W
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    Science current issue
    New Products[no content]
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    Science current issue
    Dinner without reservations[no content]
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    Science current issue
    8
    In vivo brain GPCR signaling elucidated by phosphoproteomicsA systems view of G protein–coupled receptor (GPCR) signaling in its native environment is central to the development of GPCR therapeutics with fewer side effects. Using the kappa opioid receptor (KOR) as a model, we employed high-throughput phosphoproteomics to investigate signaling induced by structurally diverse agonists in five mouse brain regions. Quantification of 50,000 different phosphosi
    4h
    Science current issue
    Comment on "Sterilizing immunity in the lung relies on targeting fungal apoptosis-like programmed cell death"Shlezinger et al . (Reports, 8 September 2017, p. 1037) report that the common fungus Aspergillus fumigatus , a cause of aspergillosis, undergoes caspase-dependent apoptosis-like cell death triggered by lung neutrophils. However, the technologies they used do not provide reliable evidence that fungal cells die via a protease signaling cascade thwarted by a fungal caspase inhibitor homologous to h
    4h
    Science current issue
    Analysis of shared heritability in common disorders of the brainDisorders of the brain can exhibit considerable epidemiological comorbidity and often share symptoms, provoking debate about their etiologic overlap. We quantified the genetic sharing of 25 brain disorders from genome-wide association studies of 265,218 patients and 784,643 control participants and assessed their relationship to 17 phenotypes from 1,191,588 individuals. Psychiatric disorders shar
    4h
    Science current issue
    Response to Comment on "Sterilizing immunity in the lung relies on targeting fungal apoptosis-like programmed cell death"Aouacheria et al . question the interpretation of contemporary assays to monitor programmed cell death with apoptosis-like features (A-PCD) in Aspergillus fumigatus . Although our study focuses on fungal A-PCD for host immune surveillance and infectious outcomes, the experimental approach incorporates multiple independent A-PCD markers and genetic manipulations based on fungal rather than mammali
    4h
    Viden
    29
    Kritikere: Nyt EU-forslag vil smadre internettetNye internetregler får en hård medfart af kritikere - og lovgiverne bør lytte til kritikken, siger en ekspert.
    4h
    Latest Headlines | Science News
    63
    Here’s how drinking coffee could protect your heartCoffee’s heart-healthy effects rely on boosting cells’ energy production, a study in mice suggests.
    4h
    Latest Headlines | Science News
    35
    Einstein’s general relativity reigns supreme, even on a galactic scaleScientists have made the most precise test of Einstein’s theory of gravity at great distances.
    4h
    Latest Headlines | Science News
    6
    It may take a village (of proteins) to turn on genesClusters of proteins transiently work together to turn on genes, new microscopy studies of live cells suggest.
    4h
    Latest Headlines | Science News
    8
    A 2,200-year-old Chinese tomb held a new gibbon species, now extinctResearchers have discovered a new gibbon species in an ancient royal Chinese tomb. It's already extinct.
    4h
    Ingeniøren
    DTU-forskere gør chokopdagelse: Landhævning kan stabilisere iskappen på VestantarktisJordens kappe under et område ud for Vestantarktis
    er endnuså flydende og elastisk, at området hæver sig med rekordfart. Det kan muligvis stabilisere hele iskappen på Vestantarktis.
    4h
    Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
    100+
    Bedrock in West Antarctica rising at surprisingly rapid rateThe earth is rising in one part of Antarctica at one of the fastest rates ever recorded, as ice rapidly disappears and weight is lifted off the bedrock, a new international study has found.
    4h
    Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
    2
    Research identifies how snowshoe hares evolved to stay seasonally camouflagedMany animals have evolved fur or feather colors to blend in with the environment and hide from predators. But how do animals stay camouflaged when their environment changes with each new season? Researchers at the University of Montana recently discovered that hybridization played an important role in snowshoe hares' ability to match their environment.
    4h
    Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
    Researchers create matchmaking service for peptides and antibioticsUBC researchers have matched small proteins, called peptides, with antibiotics so they can work together to combat hard-to-treat infections that don't respond well to drugs on their own.
    4h
    Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
    43
    Mice not only experience regret, but also learn to avoid it in the futureExperiencing regret can leave a "bad taste" in one's mouth and drive an individual to compensate for one's losses. This immediate post-regret phenomenon was once thought to be unique to humans, but it has been recently demonstrated in other species. However, it was previously unknown if other species are capable of learning from these mistakes over time. New research from the University of Minneso
    4h
    Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
    94
    Water can be very dead, electrically speakingIn a study published in Science this week, the researchers describe the dielectric properties of water that is only a few molecules thick. Such water was previously predicted to exhibit a reduced electric response but it remained unknown by how much. The new study shows that atomically thin layers of water near solid surfaces do not respond to an electric field, a finding that has very important i
    4h
    Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
    85
    New study finds US oil and gas methane emissions 60 percent higher than estimatedThe U.S. oil and gas industry emits 13 million metric tons of the potent greenhouse gas methane from its operations each year, 60 percent more than estimated by the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency, according to a new study published today in the journal Science.
    4h
    Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
    200+
    Einstein proved right in another galaxyAn international team of astronomers have made the most precise test of gravity outside our own solar system.
    4h
    Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
    1
    New research provides expanded insights into the brain's response to opioidsOpioids are powerful painkillers that act on the brain, but they have a range of harmful side effects including addiction. Researchers from the Max Planck Institute of Biochemistry (MPIB) in collaboration with researchers from the Medical University of Innsbruck, Austria, University of Innsbruck, and the Lewis Katz School of Medicine at Temple University (LKSOM), have developed a tool that gives d
    4h
    Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
    40
    Researchers achieve unprecedented control of polymer gridsSynthetic polymers are ubiquitous—nylon, polyester, Teflon and epoxy, to name just a few—and these polymers are all long, linear structures that tangle into imprecise structures. Chemists have long dreamed of making polymers with two-dimensional, grid-like structures, but this goal has proven challenging.
    4h
    Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
    1
    How competition and cooperation between bacteria shape antibiotic resistanceNew computational simulations suggest that the effects of antibiotics on a bacterial community depend on whether neighboring species have competitive or cooperative relationships, as well as their spatial arrangement. Sylvie Estrela of Yale University and Sam Brown of the Georgia Institute of Technology present these findings in PLOS Computational Biology.
    4h
    New Scientist - News
    9
    More penalty shoot-outs needed to make future World Cups fairerBad news for England: only extra penalty shoot-outs plus a new points system will discourage collusion in future football World Cups, says Ignacio Palacios-Huerta
    4h
    Big Think
    89
    Firefox's new privacy feature stops Facebook seeing what else you do onlineAfter more than a decade since launching its first Firefox browser, Mozilla has been steadily earning web browser converts with its newest browser Firefox Quantum. Read More
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    Scientific American Content: Global
    9
    Massive Dust Storm Engulfs MarsThe sunlight-sapping global storm has taken NASA’s Opportunity rover offline, perhaps forever -- Read more on ScientificAmerican.com
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    NYT > Science
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    Koko the Gorilla, Who Used Sign Language and Befriended Mr. Rogers, Dies at 46Koko Gorilla Sign LanguageKoko became an instant celebrity in her youth and charmed entertainers like Fred Rogers and Robin Williams, as well as their audiences.
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    The Scientist RSS
    Herpes Viruses Implicated in Alzheimers DiseaseA new study shows that the brains of Alzheimer's disease patients have a greater viral load, while another study in mice finds infection leads to amyloid-β build up.
    5h
    Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
    First music festival turns to blockchainA music festival will for the first time run on blockchain, tapping the fast-growing technology as an innovative way to address longstanding issues such as ticket scalping and fan engagement.
    5h
    Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
    10
    Electric scooters launch in Paris, to spread in EuropeThe boulevards of Paris, already bustling with a dizzying range of transport devices, are set to feature a new shared electric scooter system that has swept the US and is now heading for Europe.
    5h
    Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
    7
    Using fragment-based approaches to discover new antibioticsA new review article summarizes new methods of fragment-based lead discovery (FBLD) to identify new compounds as potential antibiotics. It explains how FBLD works and illustrates its advantages over conventional high-throughput screening.
    5h
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    Exposure to fracking chemicals and wastewater spurs fat cell developmentExposure to fracking chemicals and wastewater promotes fat cell development, or adipogenesis, in laboratory cell models, a new study finds. Researchers observed increases in the size and number of fat cells after exposing the models to a mixture of 23 common fracking chemicals or to wastewater or surface-water samples containing them, even at diluted concentrations. Adipogenesis occurred through P
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    Human immune 'trigger' map paves way for better treatmentsA discovery about how human cells are 'triggered' to undergo an inflammatory type of cell death could have implications for treating cancer, stroke and tissue injury, and immune disorders. A research team has identified the molecular trigger in human cells that drives necroptosis, and implicated defects in this molecular trigger as potentially playing a role in cancer development.
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    Ratchet up the pressure: Molecular machine exploits motion in a single directionA research team developed a 'ratchet-like molecular machine,' which promotes uni-directional molecular motion during reactions. Inspired by dumbbell-shaped rotaxanes, their molecular machine contains two rings (stations) connected by spacers.
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    Dead plankton, stunned fish: the harms of man-made ocean noiseHuman-caused ocean noise and its dangers to marine life are the focus of meetings at the United Nations this week, a victory for advocacy groups that have long warned of this problem.
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    Will a New Supreme Court Decision Change Online Shopping?As consumers shop more and more online, they’ve often stumbled across a delightful fact: Many online purchases are tax-free. This can mean consumers save a few dollars on small purchases, and even more money on big-ticket items, making it even more difficult for physical stores to lure in buyers. It’s a boon for shoppers in the states that don’t collect sales tax for online purchases, but has sev
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    NASA Offers New Plan to Detect and Destroy Dangerous AsteroidsThe federal government's five-point strategy is a roadmap for dealing with threatening near-Earth objects -- Read more on ScientificAmerican.com
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    DNA enzyme shuffles cell membranes a thousand times faster than its natural counterpartA new synthetic enzyme, crafted from DNA rather than protein, flips lipid molecules within the cell membrane, triggering a signal pathway that could be harnessed to induce cell death in cancer cells. This is the first such synthetic enzyme to outperform its natural counterpart -- and it does so by three orders of magnitude.
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    Changes in stress after meditationor a thousand years, people have reported feeling better by meditating but there are few systematic studies that quantified stress and how much stress changes as a direct result of meditation, until now.
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    The Mysterious ‘Jumping Gene’ That Appears 500,000 Times in Human DNAFor years, Miguel Ramalho-Santos tried to convince researchers in his lab to study a segment of DNA he personally thought was quite extraordinary: LINE1. It’s repeated half a million times in the human genome, making up nearly a fifth of the DNA in every cell. But nobody in his lab wanted to study it. “It was sort of a running joke in the lab,” says Ramalho-Santos, a developmental biologist at th
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    Nearly 80 exoplanet candidates identified in record timeScientists have analyzed data from K2, the follow-up mission to NASA's Kepler Space Telescope, and have discovered a trove of possible exoplanets amid some 50,000 stars. The scientists report the discovery of nearly 80 new planetary candidates, including a particular standout: a likely planet that orbits the star HD 73344, which would be the brightest planet host ever discovered by the K2 mission.
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    Engineering bacteria to exhibit stochastic Turing patternsA new study has brought science one step closer to a molecular-level understanding of how patterns form in living tissue. The researchers engineered bacteria that, when incubated and grown, exhibited stochastic Turing patterns: a 'lawn' of synthesized bacteria in a petri dish fluoresced an irregular pattern of red polka dots on a field of green.
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    Major challenge in mass production of low-cost solar cells solvedA team has solved a major fabrication challenge for perovskite cells -- the intriguing potential challengers to silicon-based solar cells. The team reveals a new scalable means of applying the compound PCBM, a critical component, to perovskite cells.
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    'Flamingo:' High-powered microscopy coming to a scientist near youScientists have developed a portable, shareable light sheet microscope. The project can be mailed to a lab anywhere in the world, configured remotely by engineers, and run one to three months of experiments.
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    Mindful movement may help lower stress, anxietyTaking a walk may be a good opportunity to mentally review your to-do list, but using the time to instead be more mindful of your breathing and surroundings may help boost your wellbeing, according to researchers who found that while students reported being less stressed while they were on their feet and moving, they received an even greater benefit when they reported also being more mindful.
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    What's in the House Bills to Address the Opioid Crisis--and What's NotLawmakers are considering 57 separate pieces of legislation -- Read more on ScientificAmerican.com
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    High Court: Online shoppers can be forced to pay sales taxSupreme Court OnlineStates will be able to force more people to pay sales tax when they make online purchases under a Supreme Court decision Thursday that will leave shoppers with lighter wallets but is a big financial win for states.
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    'Red nuggets' are galactic gold for astronomersAbout a decade ago, astronomers discovered a population of small, but massive galaxies called "red nuggets." A new study using NASA's Chandra X-ray Observatory indicates that black holes have squelched star formation in these galaxies and may have used some of the untapped stellar fuel to grow to unusually massive proportions.
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    More evidence for controversial theory that herpesviruses play role in Alzheimer's diseaseIn a large-scale analysis, researchers use data from three different brain banks to suggest that human herpesviruses are more abundant in the brains of Alzheimer's patients and may play a role in regulatory genetic networks that are believed to lead to the disease. This work lends support to the controversial hypothesis that viruses are involved in Alzheimer's disease and offers potential new path
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    Research team reverse way potassium channels work from bacteria to humanFor the first time ever, researchers at the Texas Tech University Health Sciences Center (TTUHSC) have identified a specific amino acid residue that is responsible for inverting the communication between the opening of the activation gate and the inactivation of a potassium channel's selectivity filter. The study was published in the Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences (PNAS) April iss
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    Update to Eyewire Cup Qualifiers ScoringDuring the Eyewire Cup Qualifiers you will be able to switch countries by adjusting the flag in your profile. Points earned will stay with the team you were on when you earned them. Make sure to check your flag in Eyewire. You can change teams during the Qualifiers but not during the Quarterfinals, Semifinals, or Finals.
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    Researchers engineer bacteria to exhibit stochastic Turing patternsHow did the zebra get its stripes, or the leopard its spots? Mankind has been trying to answer such questions since our earliest recorded days, and they resonate throughout the extant mythologies and folklores of an earlier world. In modern times, we've looked to mathematical models and most recently to genomic science to uncover the explanation of how patterns form in living tissues, but a full a
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    'Flamingo:' High-powered microscopy coming to a scientist near youThe Morgridge Institute for Research has developed a portable, shareable light sheet microscope. The project can be mailed to a lab anywhere in the world, configured remotely by Morgridge engineers, and run one to three months of experiments.
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    Higher body fat linked to lower breast cancer risk in younger womenAn analysis co-led led by a UNC Lineberger Comprehensive Cancer Center researcher linked higher body mass index, or BMI, to lower breast cancer risk for younger women, even for women within a normal weight range.
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    Researchers solve major challenge in mass production of low-cost solar cellsA team led by led by André D. Taylor of NYU Tandon School of Engineering and Yifan Zheng of Peking University solved a major fabrication challenge for perovskite cells -- the intriguing potential challengers to silicon-based solar cells. In a cover article in the June 28, 2018 issue of Nanoscale, a publication of the Royal Society of Chemistry, the team reveals a new scalable means of applying the
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    Moths fly 1000 kilometres with Earth’s magnetic field as a guideBogong moths are the first insects found to use Earth’s magnetic field to navigate long distances, during their epic migrations across Australia
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    Herpes viruses in the brain linked to Alzheimer’s diseaseA detailed molecular analysis of hundreds of post-mortem brains supports the controversial theory that viruses contribute to Alzheimer’s disease
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    A Dead Great White Shark on Santa Cruz Beach Leads to a Criminal InvestigationA dead great white shark is now the subject of a criminal investigation in California.
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    New World Atlas of Desertification shows unprecedented pressure on planet's resourcesOn 21 June 2018, the Joint Research Centre of the European Commission published a new edition of the World Atlas of Desertification, offering a tool for decision makers to improve local responses to soil loss and land degradation.
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    Zebrafish's near 360 degree UV-vision knocks stripes off Google Street ViewTiny freshwater fish have a view of the world that blows Google Street View out of the water—using different parts of their eyes to deliver optimum uses of colour, black-and-white and ultraviolet.
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    Trilobites: Magnetic Sense Helps Billions of Moths on an Australian MigrationResearchers say this is the first reliable evidence that insects can use Earth’s magnetic field for navigation.
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    Cells stop dividing when this gene kicks into high gear, study findsScientists seeking to unlock the secrets of cellular aging have identified a gene that triggers senescence, a phenomenon in which cells stop dividing.
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    Repellent research: Navy developing ship coatings to reduce fuel, energy costsIt can repel water, oil, alcohol and even peanut butter. And it might save the U.S. Navy millions of dollars in ship fuel costs, reduce the amount of energy that vessels consume and improve operational efficiency.
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    Finally, a Problem That Only Quantum Computers Will Ever Be Able to SolveEarly on in the study of quantum computers, computer scientists posed a question whose answer, they knew, would reveal something deep about the power of these futuristic machines. Twenty-five years later, it’s been all but solved. In a paper posted online at the end of May , computer scientists Ran Raz and Avishay Tal provide strong evidence that quantum computers possess a computing capacity bey
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    Screen time harm to children is unproven, say expertsResearchers say World Health Organisation’s warnings over ‘gaming disorder’ are premature and say other factors affect child wellbeing There is no strong evidence to support fears that screen time is inherently bad for children, experts have warned, adding that the recognition of so-called gaming disorder by the World Health Organisation is premature. Time spent using devices ranging from compute
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    Cocaine in rivers harming endangered eels, study findsTests show drug causes eels to become hyperactive and damages their muscles, possibly hindering their ability to migrate Tiny amounts of cocaine flushed into rivers cause eels to become not only hyperactive but to suffer from muscle wastage, impaired gills and hormonal changes, a study has found. The impact of traces of cocaine on the physiology of European eels could be hindering their epic migr
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    Researchers engineer bacteria to exhibit stochastic Turing patternsA new study by researchers at the University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign, the Massachusetts Institute of Technology, and the Applied Physics Laboratory, Johns Hopkins University has brought science one step closer to a molecular-level understanding of how patterns form in living tissue. The researchers engineered bacteria that, when incubated and grown, exhibited stochastic Turing patterns: a
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    Nearly 80 exoplanet candidates identified in record timeScientists at MIT and elsewhere have analyzed data from K2, the follow-up mission to NASA's Kepler Space Telescope, and have discovered a trove of possible exoplanets amid some 50,000 stars. In a paper that appears online today in The Astronomical Journal, the scientists report the discovery of nearly 80 new planetary candidates, including a particular standout: a likely planet that orbits the sta
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    Research team reverse way potassium channels work from bacteria to humanResearch develops a better understanding of and exerts an unparalleled control of protein molecules.
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    One year of school comes with an IQ bump, meta-analysis showsA year of schooling leaves students with new knowledge, and it also equates with a small but noticeable increase to students' IQ, according to a systematic meta-analysis.
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    New World Atlas of Desertification shows unprecedented pressure on planet's resourcesThe World Desertification Atlas by the European Commission's Joint Research Centre provides the first comprehensive, evidence-based assessment of land degradation at a global level and highlights the urgency to adopt corrective measures.
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    Alzheimer's breakthrough: Brain metals that may drive disease progression revealedAlzheimer's disease could be better treated, thanks to a breakthrough discovery of the properties of the metals in the brain involved in the progression of the neurodegenerative condition.
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    Scientists print sensors on gummi candyMicroelectrodes can be used for direct measurement of electrical signals in the brain or heart. These applications require soft materials, however. With existing methods, attaching electrodes to such materials poses significant challenges. A team has now succeeded in printing electrodes directly onto several soft substrates.
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    How do horses read human emotional cues?Scientists demonstrated for the first time that horses integrate human facial expressions and voice tones to perceive human emotion, regardless of whether the person is familiar or not.
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    Meet the menagerie of parasites that can live in human eyesAnimals Some are accidental guests. For others, our peepers are prime real estate. Some gnarly eye parasites are accidental guests in the human body. For others, our peepers are prime real estate.
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    Army study quantifies changes in stress after meditationor a thousand years, people have reported feeling better by meditating but there has never been a systematic study that quantified stress and how much stress changes as a direct result of meditation until now.
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    Cells stop dividing when this gene kicks into high gear, study findsScientists seeking to unlock secrets of cellular aging have identified a gene that triggers senescence, a phenomenon in which cells stop dividing. The gene, called CD36, is unusually active in older, senescent cells. Heightening CD36 activity also caused young, healthy cells to stop dividing, with the effect also spreading to nearby cells in the same petri dish.
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    New guide for using mechanical stimulation to improve tissue-engineered cartilageTissue-engineered articular cartilage (AC) for repairing cartilage damaged by trauma or disease can be made to more closely mimic natural AC if mechanical stimulation of particular magnitude and duration is applied during the development process.
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    Not junk: 'Jumping gene' is critical for early embryoA so-called 'jumping gene' that researchers long considered either genetic junk or a pernicious parasite is actually a critical regulator of the first stages of embryonic development, according to a new study in mice led by UC San Francisco scientists and published June 21, 2018 in Cell.
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    Watch: Insects also migrate using the Earth's magnetic fieldA major international study led by researchers from Lund University in Sweden has proven for the first time that certain nocturnally migrating insects can explore and navigate using the Earth's magnetic field. Until now, the ability to steer flight using an internal magnetic compass was only known in nocturnally migrating birds.
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    Zebrafish's near 360 degree UV-vision knocks stripes off Google Street ViewA zebrafish view of the world has been forensically analysed by researchers at the University of Sussex to reveal that how they see their surroundings changes hugely depending on what direction they are looking.
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    Scientists discover new gene expression mechanism with possible role in human diseaseWhen cells grow and divide to ensure a biological function, DNA must be unwound from its typical tightly packed form and copied into RNA to create proteins. When this process goes awry, the result could be diseases such as cancers. University of North Carolina School of Medicine researchers have discovered that a protein called Spt6 facilitates RNA degradation so that cells have just the right amo
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    NIH-funded study finds new evidence that viruses may play a role in Alzheimer’s diseaseAnalysis of large data sets from post-mortem brain samples of people with and without Alzheimer's disease has revealed new evidence linking viruses to Alzheimer's clinical traits and genetic factors. Researchers funded by the National Institute on Aging (NIA), part of the National Institutes of Health, made the discovery by harnessing data from brain banks and cohort studies participating in the A
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    Dying cancer cells make remaining glioblastoma cells more aggressive and therapy-resistantA surprising form of cell-to-cell communication in glioblastoma promotes global changes in recipient cells, including aggressiveness, motility, and resistance to radiation or chemotherapy. Paradoxically, the sending cells in this signaling are glioblastoma cells undergoing programmed cell death. The apoptotic cancer cells release extracellular vesicles. These vesicle, or exosomes, carry components
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    Fish's use of electricity might shed light on human illnessesAfrican weakly electric fish, commonly called baby whales, use incredibly brief electrical pulses to sense the world around them and communicate with other members of their species. Part of that electrical mechanism exists in humans -- and by studying these fish, scientists may unlock clues about conditions like epilepsy.
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    New study suggests viral connection to Alzheimer's diseaseA first-of-its kind study, next generation sequencing is brought to bear to investigate a culprit in the path to Alzheimer's disease: the presence of viruses in the brain.
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    More evidence for controversial theory that herpesviruses play role in Alzheimer's diseaseIn a large-scale analysis published in the journal Neuron, researchers use data from three different brain banks to suggest that human herpesviruses are more abundant in the brains of Alzheimer's patients and may play a role in regulatory genetic networks that are believed to lead to the disease. This work lends support to the controversial hypothesis that viruses are involved in Alzheimer's disea
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    Genetic variation in progesterone receptor tied to prematurity risk, study findsHumans have unexpectedly high genetic variation in the receptor for a key pregnancy-maintaining hormone, according to research led by scientists at the Stanford University School of Medicine. The finding may help explain why some populations of pregnant women have an elevated risk of premature birth.
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    Bogong moths first insect known to use magnetic sense in long-distance nocturnal migrationResearchers reporting in Current Biology on June 21 have found that nocturnal Bogong moths, like migratory birds, depend on the Earth's magnetic field to guide them on their way. The discovery offers the first reliable evidence that nocturnal insects can use the Earth's magnetic field to steer flight during migration, the researchers say.
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    Unusually high levels of herpesviruses found in the Alzheimer's disease brainTwo strains of human herpesvirus -- human herpesvirus 6A (HHV-6A) and human herpesvirus 7 (HHV-7) -- are found in the brains of people with Alzheimer's disease at levels up to twice as high as in those without Alzheimer's, researchers from the Icahn School of Medicine at Mount Sinai report.
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    Six new species of goblin spiders named after famous goblins and browniesA remarkably high diversity of goblin spiders is reported from the Sri Lankan forests by two researchers from the National Institute of Fundamental Studies, Kandy, Sri Lanka. Nine new species are described in a recent paper in the open-access journal Evolutionary Systematics, where six are named after goblins and brownies from Enid Blyton's children's books. There are now 45 goblin spider species
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    Melania Trump Plays the Role of Medieval QueenOn June 17, First Lady Melania Trump issued a rare statement on current policy through her spokesperson. That statement lamented the separation of refugee children from their parents by the Department of Homeland Security and declared that America should be “a country that governs with heart.” And when, on Wednesday, her husband reversed his policy, White House aides rushed to credit her interven
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    Alzheimer's link to herpes virus in brain, say scientistsResearch reveals strains of virus more abundant in brains with early stage of disease, though uncertainly whether virus is a trigger or a symptom The presence of viruses in the brain has been linked to Alzheimer’s disease in research that challenges conventional theories about the onset of dementia. The results, based on tests of brain tissue from nearly 1,000 people, found that two strains of he
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    Science : NPR
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    Some DNA Dismissed As 'Junk' Is Crucial To Embryo DevelopmentFormerly considered useless, or maybe a parasite, the stretch of DNA known as LINE-1 actually plays "a key role" in creating an embryo and embryonic stem cells, research shows. (Image credit: Ramalho-Santos lab/UCSF)
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    New World Atlas of Desertification shows unprecedented pressure on planet's resourcesThe World Desertification Atlas by the European Commission's Joint Research Centre provides the first comprehensive, evidence-based assessment of land degradation at a global level and highlights the urgency to adopt corrective measures.
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    Harder Evidence Builds That Viruses Play a Role in Alzheimer'sA study seeking new drug targets for the disease unexpectedly implicates two types of herpes -- Read more on ScientificAmerican.com
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    Crowding inside cells may influence many functions and major diseasesAmong the most studied protein machines in history, mTORC1 has long been known to sense whether a cell has enough energy to build the proteins it needs to multiply as part of growth. Because faulty versions of mTORC1 contribute to the abnormal growth seen in cancer, drugs targeting the complex have been the subject of 1,300 clinical trials since 1970.
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    Scientists discover new gene expression mechanism with possible role in human diseaseWhen cells grow and divide to ensure a biological function—such as a properly working organ—DNA must be unwound from its typical tightly packed form and copied into RNA to create proteins. When this process goes awry—if too little or too much RNA is produced—then the result could be diseases such as cancers. UNC School of Medicine researchers have discovered that a protein called Spt6, previously
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    Bogong moths first insect known to use magnetic sense in long-distance nocturnal migrationEach spring, millions of nocturnal Bogong moths hatch across breeding grounds throughout southeastern Australia before flying over 1,000 kilometers through the dark night to reach a limited number of high alpine caves in the Australian Alps. After a few months of summer dormancy in those cool mountain caves, the moths fly right back to the breeding grounds where they were born. Now, researchers re
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    Six new species of goblin spiders named after famous goblins and browniesFictional characters originally 'described' by famous English children's writer Enid Blyton have given their names to six new species of minute goblin spiders discovered in the diminishing forests of Sri Lanka.
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    Fish's use of electricity might shed light on human illnessesDeep in the night in muddy African rivers, a fish uses electrical charges to sense the world around it and communicate with other members of its species. Signaling in electrical spurts that last only a few tenths of a thousandth of a second allows the fish to navigate without letting predators know it is there. Now scientists have found that the evolutionary trick these fish use to make such brief
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    How Will Detained Children Find Their Parents?More than 2,000 children have been separated from their families at the U.S.-Mexico border in the five weeks since the Trump administration announced it was implementing a “zero tolerance” immigration policy—and it’s still not clear how, or when, those children might be reunited with their parents. On Wednesday, amid mounting pressure to end the policy, President Donald Trump signed an executive
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    The Rosetta stone of active galactic nuclei decipheredA galaxy with at least one active supermassive black hole – named OJ 287 – has caused many irritations and questions in the past. The emitted radiation of this object spans a wide range – from the radio up to the highest energies in the TeV regime. The potential periodicity in the variable optical emission made this galaxy a candidate for hosting a supermassive binary black hole in its centre. The
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    End of driving ban to boost Saudi women's economic roleThe end of a decades-old female driving ban is expected to bring an economic windfall for millions of Saudi women, making it easier for them to work and do business.
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    Mike Shinoda Asks Not to Be Defined by LossThe rule of threes feels a distant memory, doesn’t it? The past few years’ steady procession of famous people killed by illness (David Bowie and the slew of Baby Boomer icons to fall), suicide ( too many examples this spring alone), or shocking calamity (the 20-year-old rapper XXXTentacion was shot dead Monday) has rendered popular culture an endless overlapping of public grief. This has many ter
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    Mindful movement may help lower stress, anxietyTaking a walk may be a good opportunity to mentally review your to-do list, but using the time to instead be more mindful of your breathing and surroundings may help boost your wellbeing, according to researchers who found that while students reported being less stressed while they were on their feet and moving, they received an even greater benefit when they reported also being more mindful.
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    One year of school comes with an IQ bump, meta-analysis showsA year of schooling leaves students with new knowledge, and it also equates with a small but noticeable increase to students' IQ, according to a systematic meta-analysis published in Psychological Science, a journal of the Association for Psychological Science.
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    Scientists print sensors on gummi candyMicroelectrodes can be used for direct measurement of electrical signals in the brain or heart. These applications require soft materials, however. With existing methods, attaching electrodes to such materials poses significant challenges. A team at the Technical University of Munich (TUM) has now succeeded in printing electrodes directly onto several soft substrates.
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    Beyond conventional solution-process for 2-D heterostructureChinese researchers demonstrated a facile wet-chemical method to directly grow organic-inorganic hybrid perovskite (MAPbBr3, MA = CH3NH3+) NCs on surfaces of dispersible MoS2 nanosheets.
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    Sticklebacks infected with parasites influence behavior of healthy fishCertain types of tapeworm make sticklebacks behave carelessly and thus become easier prey for birds. A team of biologists have now demonstrated for the first time that the tapeworm not only influences the behavior of the infected fish -- indirectly, it can also induce risky behaviour in other fish in the group.
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    IASLC issues statement paper on liquid biopsy for lung cancerThe lungs can be a difficult organ to biopsy with a needle, so identifying lung cancer through a blood-based biopsy has lung cancer experts and patients optimistic. Knowing how and when to use a liquid biopsy is critically important and led global experts at the International Association for the Study of Lung Cancer (IASLC) to issue 'The IASLC Statement Paper: Liquid Biopsy for Advanced Non-Small
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    Tysk politi: Anholdt ville producere biologisk våben af bønnerEn mand af tunesisk afstamning er
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    Image: Through the heat barrierESA's next CubeSat mission seen enduring the scorching heat of simulated atmospheric reentry inside the world's largest plasma wind tunnel.
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    How refugee children make American education strongerIn recent years, there has been a great deal of public angst about refugee resettlement in the U.S. and Europe. Americans are deeply divided on the issue. For instance, a Pew Research Center study published in May of this year found that only a quarter of Republicans and right-leaning independents say the U.S. "has a responsibility to accept more refugees," compared with almost three-quarters of D
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    Journalister bag signal-sagen: »En vred minister var drivkraft«Overstregede dokumenter, stumme embedsmænd og en vred, vred minister hører med til historien om det skandaleramte signalprogram.
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    Genetics research verifies purity of the Mexican wolfIn October 2015, two small minnows in the Lower Colorado River Basin—the headwater chub and the roundtail chub—were proposed for listing as threatened species under the Endangered Species Act of 1973. In April 2017, that proposal was withdrawn after new science identified the two small fish as members of the same species.
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    How fledglings and their parents negotiate the best time for young birds to leave the nestA team of researchers at the University of Montana has found that fledglings and their parents must negotiate to find the right time for the young birds to leave their nest. In their paper published on the open access site Science Advances, the group describes their study of many types of birds and how they figured out when fledglings should leave the nest.
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    Climate change may soon hit billions of people—many cities already taking actionBillions of people in thousands of cities around the world will soon be at risk from climate-related heat waves, droughts, flooding, food shortages and energy blackouts by mid-century, but many cities are already taking action to blunt such effects, says a new report from a consortium of international organizations.
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    Forecast predicts below-average hurricane activityHurricane season didn't officially start until June 1, but Subtropical Storm Alberto made an appearance early, causing more than $50 million in damage as it made its way inland and up the coast in late May. Twelve people—seven in Cuba and five in the U.S.—died as Alberto's fallout included flooding, landslides, tornados and mudslides.
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    India's colonial legacy almost caused Bangalore to run out of waterOn hot summer days in Bangalore, India, it is common to see public water taps on roadsides hissing and spurting as water struggles to come out. People crowd around the tap with pots of brightly coloured plastic, burnished brass or steel, waiting for their turn. Many of these people have come from homes without such luxuries as indoor plumbing and will return carrying enough water to last several d
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    Realistic avatars for the virtual zooFilmmakers and developers of computer games will have a new way of animating animals in the future. A team led by researchers at the Max Planck Institute for Intelligent Systems in Tübingen, Germany, has developed a technique that uses photographs alone to create lifelike 3-D models of almost all quadrupeds. Animations of these avatars can realistically imitate the movements of animals. But the si
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    The Atlantic
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    An Extraordinarily Expensive Way to Fight ISISI. Target The B-2 stealth bomber is the world’s most exotic strategic aircraft, a subsonic flying wing meant to be difficult for air defenses to detect—whether by radar or other means—yet capable of carrying nearly the same payload as the massive B-52. It came into service in the late 1990s primarily for use in a potential nuclear war with the Soviet Union, and clearly as a first-strike weapon ra
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    18 Best Nintendo Switch Accessories (2018): Controllers, Cases, Screen Protectors, BatteryHave a Nintendo Switch? You really should get some of these accoutrements.
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    How scientists discovered a new way to produce actinium-225, a rare medical radioisotopeInside a narrow glass tube sits a substance that can harm or cure, depending on how you use it. It gives off a faint blue glow, a sign of its radioactivity. While the energy and subatomic particles it emits can damage human cells, they can also kill some of our most stubborn cancers. This substance is actinium-225.
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    Just four tweets can reveal the identity of an anonymous trollRemaining anonymous online is an increasingly difficult task. Just four geotagged posts is enough to identify trolls from a phone company’s database
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    We don't own data like we own a car – which is why we find data harder to protectIt's known as the "privacy paradox": people say they want to protect their data privacy online, but often do little to keep it safe.
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    Modelling volcanoes that 'collapse without warning'A new joint research project from Massey University, University of Canterbury and GNS Science is looking to forecast, for the first time, the hazards associated with collapsing volcanoes, that could save infrastructure and lives.
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    Teaching a machine to spot a crystalProtein crystals don't usually display the glitz and glam of gemstones. But no matter their looks, each and every one is precious to scientists.
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    Can Netflix’s Set It Up Help Revive the Romantic Comedy?At the start of 2018, Netflix’s original-film department seemed to swerve in terms of tone. No longer was the company focusing on the sorts of award-friendly prestige projects that had defined its entrance into the market (titles like Beasts of No Nation, First They Killed My Father, and Mudbound ). Instead , it started buying the rights to mid-budget sci-fi and horror movies like The Cloverfield
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    The GOP’s ‘Utterly Dysfunctional’ Strategy of Babying Its BaseWith his policy of systematically separating children from their parents at the U.S.-Mexico border, Donald Trump finally extended his racially infused economic nationalism to a point that a critical mass of elected Republicans could not follow. But the fact that many Republicans drew the line only at a policy that experts have likened to child abuse is a powerful measure of how far Trump has alre
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    Team moon vs team Mars: the battle over the future of NASADecades of infighting and political interference have got NASA no closer to landing astronauts on the moon or Mars. Can its new leader spark a relaunch?
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    Colorado Joins California in the Fight for Cleaner CarsWhile the EPA moves to roll back vehicle emissions standards, Colorado's using a legal loophole to follow California's much stricter rules.
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    How ‘Self-Limiting’ Mosquitos Can Help Eradicate MalariaWith help from the Gates Foundation, Oxitec aims to release genetically engineered mosquitoes in the Western Hemisphere by 2020.
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    Obama's Ears Inspired the Name of this 550-Million-Year-Old CritterThe ears of former U.S. President Barack Obama are so distinct, they inspired the scientific name of a newly identified 550-million-year-old critter: Obamus coronatus.
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    How Does the Summer Solstice Affect Animals?Even if humans have trouble telling time in the "land of the midnight sun," many animals can adjust their schedules to the summer solstice.
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    Biases may stoke victim blaming, or reduce it, no matter what the crimeGeneral biases may be at work when people blame or criticize victims of crimes, including rape and robbery victims, according to criminologists. These biases may lead them to criticize, or avoid the criticism of victims of rape and other crimes, they added.
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    What makes volcanoes dangerous?Fountains of lava, whiffs of toxic gases, acidic plumes of vaporized seawater and blankets of ash: those are just a few of the dangers that volcanoes have delivered in recent weeks, with Guatemala's Fuego Volcano and Hawaii's Kilauea Volcano each producing its most powerful eruption in decades.
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    Climate Change Brought a Lobster Boom. Now It Could Cause a Bust.Warming waters in the Gulf of Maine have benefited lobsters and the lobstermen who trap them. But as temperatures rise further, will the industry reach a tipping point?
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    Image: Fireball moon VenusSometimes, nature is the best art director!
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    Space objects will still be hard to protect despite new policyA new space traffic management policy signed by President Donald Trump could help prevent thousands of space objects from colliding, but sufficient technical solutions are lacking, says Carolin Frueh, Purdue assistant professor of aeronautics and astronautics.
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    Envisioning a future where all the trees in Europe disappearVegetation plays an important role in shaping local climate—just think of the cool shade provided by a forest or the grinding heat of the open desert.
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    Two plant cell 'hotspots' tell the cell where to import its resourcesScientists in the Brandizzi lab are increasing our understanding of expand iconendocytosis, how plant cells import molecules from their surroundings.
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    The Atlantic
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    How America Treats Its Own ChildrenHow could the United States do this? How could it separate 2,000 children from their parents, perhaps never to be reunited? How could it lose track of thousands more? How could it keep children in cages, in tents, in camps? This is a country that has assimilated wave after wave of immigrants and refugees, so that children might have a better life than their parents. This is the wealthiest civiliz
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    Forskere 3D-printer vindmøllevinge med cellulose fra svampeCellulose kan erstatte plast i 3D-print, mener et forskerhold. De har udviklet et cellulosebaseret materiale, der ikke kræver forurenende kemikalier i produktionen.
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    Dine data bliver dine - men vil du sælge dem?Vi har fået vores data-frihed tilbage, og det åbner op for et væld af nye muligheder som ikke mindst kan fravriste de gamle tech-giganter en del af kagen, er privcy-forkæmpere og datamæglere enige om.
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    Quantum non-locality in ultra-cold atomic gasesNon-locality, Einstein's ''spooky action at a distance," has been observed between quantum objects separated by more than one kilometer. Recent years have seen a major advancement in the quest for non-local systems. Researchers from the Faculty of Physics, University of Warsaw, present a novel and versatile method for creating and detecting such correlations in a many-body system of ultra-cold ato
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    A lightweight carbon nanofiber-based collectorQuan-Hong Yang from Tianjin University and Wei Lv from Graduate School at Shenzhen, Tsinghua University with their co-workers reported a lightweight, high-level nitrogen-doping carbon nanofiber framework as the current collector for lithium metal anodes, which could restrain the dendrite growth and achieve the uniform lithium deposition. This work was recently published in Science China Materials.
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    Tourism preventing Kenya's cheetahs from raising young, study findsResearch in Maasai Mara linked areas with high density of vehicles to lower numbers of cubs raised to independence High levels of tourism can lead to a dramatic reduction in the number of cheetahs able to raise their young to independence, new research has found. A study in Kenya’s Maasai Mara savannah found that in areas with a high density of tourist vehicles, the average number of cubs a mothe
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    Swedes have been brewing beer since the Iron Age, new evidence confirmsArchaeologists at Lund University in Sweden have found carbonised germinated grains showing that malt was produced for beer brewing as early as the Iron Age in the Nordic region. The findings made in Uppåkra in southern Sweden indicate a large-scale production of beer, possibly for feasting and trade.
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    The deformation and mechanics of one-atom thin layer materialsIn terms of the attention that graphene has been received in the past decade, no single material is comparable. As the interest and enthusiasm in graphene research continue, it calls for critical examination on the reliability and durability of graphene-enabled applications; the mechanics of graphene hence becomes essential to address related issues.
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    Miniaturized infrared cameras take colored photos of the eyeLook into one's eye and you might be able to see their soul—or at least you can see signs of a stroke or diabetes. By looking at the blood vessels in the eyes, doctors can tell a lot about a person's health. This can be done using fundus photography, which has been around for almost two centuries and is the standard imaging tool used by ophthalmologists. However, for many, especially the poor, tra
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    Encrypted messages in biological processesRNA modifications can encrypt the RNA code and are responsible for a very sophisticated control of RNA function. A Danish-German research team has shown that modified RNA bases have a great impact on the dynamics of gene expression from DNA to functional RNA. The study yields important new insight into how the basis of RNA modifications can affect the function of mature RNA molecules.The genetic m
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    The Atlantic
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    How Nietzsche Explains TurkeyIn 1989, a small Islamist party called Refah, or “Welfare,” holds a conference titled “National Consciousness.” In the crowd are mustached men with lean faces; many of them are old, wearing skullcaps Muslims use during prayer. Soon, a tall, thin young man dressed in a well-tailored suit rises to speak. “May the peace of God be upon all believers,” he says. His polite bearing, however, belies his
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    Usikkert om DTU får udbetalt 80 millioner til veterinærbyggeriFor et år siden droppede DTU et staldbyggeri i Lyngby. Det kan betyde, at universitetet mister penge fra ’laboratoriepuljen’, viser en beretning fra Statsrevisorerne. DTU mener dog at have fulgt kutymen for universitetsbyggeri.
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    Could Multiple Personality Disorder Explain Life, the Universe and Everything?submitted by /u/parrishthethought [link] [comments]
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    Listen and weep: 'Audiobooks outdo films in emotional engagement'UCL study backed by Audible finds unconscious responses to the same book scenes, witnessed in adaptations across different media, are strongest in the auditory format As Arya Stark watches from the crowd, tears streaming, King Joffrey toys with her father Ned Stark before executing him in front of a baying crowd. This scene from Game of Thrones is harrowing in any medium – but a new University Co
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    The 'Baby' that ushered in modern computer ageScientists are celebrating the birth 70 years ago of a machine that kick-started the modern computer age.
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    Skudt, kvalt eller stukket: Sådan redder lægerne dit livFor 15 år siden gik lægerne i gang med den helt store operation, når de fik traumepatienter ind. I dag stabiliserer de først med et kort indgreb og fuldfører operationen senere.
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    Monsanto faces first US trial over Roundup cancer linkIn the first trial of its kind, a Californian dying of cancer is suing US agrochemical giant Monsanto, claiming its popular herbicide Roundup caused his disease—a case that could have sweeping ramifications.
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    Antarctic researchers mark winter solstice with icy plungeScientists based in Antarctica welcomed the winter solstice by plunging into icy waters Thursday as part of a "mad tradition" heralding the return of brighter days after weeks of darkness.
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    Device may detect heart dysfunction in childhood cancer survivors treated with chemoA wireless device designed for detection of heart dysfunction in childhood cancer survivors treated with anthracycline chemotherapy was accurate and displayed a low false-negative rate as compared to cardiac magnetic resonance (CMR) imaging.
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    Xiaomi: A Chinese startup out to challenge Google, AmazonXiaomi, a Chinese startup that helped pioneer the trend toward ultra-low-priced smartphones, is preparing for what would be the biggest initial public offering since e-commerce giant Alibaba's in 2014.
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    Daimler cuts profit forecast, blaming US-China tariffsGerman luxury carmaker Daimler on Wednesday cut its profit forecast for 2018, blaming new tariffs on cars exported from the United States to China, amid lingering fears of a trade war between the world's biggest economies.
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    Dig it: Archaeologists scour Woodstock '69 concert fieldArchaeologists scouring the grassy hillside famously trampled during the 1969 Woodstock music festival carefully sifted through the dirt from a time of peace, love, protest and good vibes.
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    GPM satellite probes soaking storms in Southern Texas and the GulfSouthern Texas and the western Gulf of Mexico is getting a soaking because of a low pressure system. The Global Precipitation Measurement mission or GPM core satellite passed over the western Gulf of Mexico and measured the rainfall from the system.
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    Using fragment-based approaches to discover new antibioticsIn the July 2018 issue of SLAS Discovery, a review article summarizes new methods of fragment-based lead discovery (FBLD) to identify new compounds as potential antibiotics.
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    Democracy in decline for one-third of the world2.6 billion people—a third of the world's population—live in countries where democracy is in retreat, according to a new study based on the largest dataset on democracy, published today in Democratization. The research also found that only 15 per cent of people globally live in places where women and lower income groups have at least somewhat equal access to power.
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    When cozying up with would-be predators, cleaner shrimp follow a dependable scriptIt's a mystery how cleaner shrimp partner with would-be fish predators—sometimes even climbing in their mouths—without getting eaten. A new study reveals how the shrimp convinces fish not to eat them, and the fish conveys that it's a friend and not a foe.
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    Many wildlife-vehicle collisions preventableA new study from the University of Waterloo has found that Ontario could save millions by implementing simple measures to help prevent vehicle accidents involving wildlife.
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    Enhanced detection of nuclear events, thanks to deep learningA deep neural network running on an ordinary desktop computer is interpreting highly technical data related to national security as well as—and sometimes better than—today's best automated methods or even human experts.
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    DNA barcodes that reliably work: A game-changer for biomedical researchIn the same way that barcodes on your groceries help stores know what's in your cart, DNA barcodes help biologists attach genetic labels to biological molecules to do their own tracking during research, including of how a cancerous tumor evolves, how organs develop or which drug candidates actually work. Unfortunately with current methods, many DNA barcodes have a reliability problem much worse th
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    Buildings as power stations—they generate more energy than they consumeThe UK's first energy-positive classroom, designed with research expertise from Swansea University, generated more than one and a half times the energy it consumed, according to data from its first year of operation, the team has revealed.
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    Do dolphins feel grief?submitted by /u/burtzev [link] [comments]
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    Forsvindende lidt mikroplast i norsk drikkevandMens Danmark er på vej med sin undersøgelse af plast i drikkevandet, er Norge færdig med sin. Og den beroliger DTU-professor.
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    Mens Region H overvejer it-outsourcing: Drama i Norge om alvorligt persondatalækSygehusregion i Norge annullerer it-outsourcingkontrakt på fem milliarder norske kroner med DXC efter afsløring af alvorlige persondatalæk til it-ansatte i Fjernøsten.
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    Afgående Region H-direktør: Vi undervurderede SundhedsplatformenVi har indført en ny patientjournal på alle vores hospitaler til tiden og til prisen – vi har fået et stabilt og sammenhængende it-system, anfører regionsrådsformanden fra Region H som svar på skarp kritik fra Statsrevisorerne.
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    Using fragment-based approaches to discover new antibioticsA new SLAS Discovery review article summarizes new methods of fragment-based lead discovery (FBLD) to identify new compounds as potential antibiotics. It explains how FBLD works and illustrates its advantages over conventional high-throughput screening.
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    Existing treatment could be used for 'untreatable' form of lung cancerFindings raise hopes many patients could benefit in the near future, given it is already approved for other cancers An existing cancer treatment could be used for a common form of lung cancer for which there is currently no specific treatment available, new research suggests. Scientists found the treatment blocked cell growth in a subtype of lung cancer. The new findings, led by the University of
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    Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
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    New study debunks Dale Carnegie advice to 'put yourself in their shoes'The researchers debunk the theories canonized in Dale Carnegie's How to Win Friends and Influence People that assuming you understand someone else's thoughts, feelings, attitude, or mental state is a correct approach to interpersonal insight.
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    Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
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    Many wildlife-vehicle collisions preventableA new study has found that Ontario could save millions by implementing simple measures to help prevent vehicle accidents involving wildlife.
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    18h
    EurekAlert! - Breaking News
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    Many wildlife-vehicle collisions preventableA new study from the University of Waterloo has found that Ontario could save millions by implementing simple measures to help prevent vehicle accidents involving wildlife.
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    EurekAlert! - Breaking News
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    New study debunks Dale Carnegie advice to 'put yourself in their shoes'The researchers debunk the theories canonized in Dale Carnegie's How to Win Friends and Influence People that assuming you understand someone else's thoughts, feelings, attitude, or mental state is a correct approach to interpersonal insight.
    18h
    EurekAlert! - Breaking News
    1
    Novel therapy makes oxidative stress deadly to cancerOxidative stress can help tumors thrive, but one way novel cancer treatments work is by pushing levels to the point where it instead helps them die, scientists report.
    18h
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    Envisioning a future where all the trees in Europe disappearGlobal climate change is already affecting the planet, as demonstrated by the shrinking polar ice cap, melting glaciers and cities in the grips of longer, more intense heat waves. Now a team of researchers has conducted a radical thought experiment on how extreme land use changes could influence future climate.
    18h
    EurekAlert! - Breaking News
    1
    Old star clusters could have been the birthplace of supermassive starsA team of international astrophysicists may have found a solution to a problem that has perplexed scientists for more than 50 years: why are the stars in globular clusters made of material different to other stars found in the Milky Way?
    18h
    EurekAlert! - Breaking News
    1
    Exposure to fracking chemicals and wastewater spurs fat cell developmentExposure to fracking chemicals and wastewater promotes fat cell development, or adipogenesis, in laboratory cell models, a Duke-led study finds. Researchers observed increases in the size and number of fat cells after exposing the models to a mixture of 23 common fracking chemicals or to wastewater or surface-water samples containing them, even at diluted concentrations. Adipogenesis occurred thro
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    No evidence that vitamin D protects against high blood pressure in pregnancyThere is no strong evidence that vitamin D protects against pregnancy-induced high blood pressure (hypertension) or pre-eclampsia, conclude researchers today.
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    Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
    8
    New medicare model produces expert nurses to address shortage of primary careResearchers call for modernizing the way Medicare pays for training nurses, and highlight a successful new model of cost-effectively training more advanced practice nurses to practice community-based primary care.
    18h
    Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
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    Rewiring plant defense genes to reduce crop wastePlants could be genetically rewired to better resist disease, helping safeguard crop yields worldwide according to new research. Defensive feedback control system developed enables plants to strengthen their defenses to withstand attack by re-wiring existing gene connections. The system uses same approach as aircraft autopilots use to counteract turbulence.
    18h
    Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
    23
    Half of those on Parkinson's drugs may develop impulse control problemsOver time, half of the people taking certain drugs for Parkinson's disease may develop impulse control disorders such as compulsive gambling, shopping or eating, according to a new study.
    18h
    Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
    74
    Fossils show ancient primates had grooming claws as well as nailsHumans and other primates are outliers among mammals for having nails instead of claws. But how, when and why we transitioned from claws to nails has been an evolutionary head-scratcher.
    18h
    Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
    5
    A case of 'kiss and tell': Chromosomal kissing gets less elusiveChromosomes occupy different territories in the nucleus; their arrangement and communication with each other is still poorly understood. Scientists publish findings about structural chromosomal aberrations which have an effect on genome organization (chromosomal kissing) and disease progression.
    18h
    Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
    27
    Crumple up this keyboard and stick it in your pocketBendable portable keyboards for use with computers and other electronic devices are already on the market, but they have limited flexibility, and they're fairly sizable when rolled up for transport. Now researchers have crafted an inexpensive keyboard that is so tough, flexible and thin that it can be crumpled up and tucked in a pocket without damaging it.
    18h
    Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
    24
    Robot bloodhound tracks odors on the groundBloodhounds are famous for their ability to track scents over great distances. Now researchers have developed a modern-day bloodhound -- a robot that can rapidly detect odors from sources on the ground, such as footprints. The robot could even read a message written on the ground using odors as a barcode.
    18h
    Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
    92
    Old star clusters could have been the birthplace of supermassive starsA team of international astrophysicists may have found a solution to a problem that has perplexed scientists for more than 50 years: why are the stars in globular clusters made of material different to other stars found in the Milky Way?
    18h
    Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
    92
    Exposure to fracking chemicals and wastewater spurs fat cell developmentExposure to fracking chemicals and wastewater promotes fat cell development, or adipogenesis, in living cells in a laboratory, according to a new Duke University-led study.
    18h
    Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
    12
    Modern laser science brightened by 2,300-year-old technologyScientists have harnessed a 2,300-year-old water displacement technology to develop a novel laser beam that traps and moves particles in specific directions. It is a significant contribution to the future of both basic and applied science.
    18h
    Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
    7
    Scientists unravel DNA code behind rare neurologic diseaseScientists conducting one of the largest full DNA analyses of a rare disease have identified a gene mutation associated with a perplexing brain condition that blinds and paralyzes patients.
    18h
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    Short-term responses to climate change-mediated disasters can be maladaptive in long-termShort-term management responses to climate change-mediated disasters can be maladaptive in the long-term.
    18h
    Feed: All Latest
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    California Net Neutrality Bill Was 'Hijacked,' Lawmaker SaysBackers of a bill that would have created the nation's strongest net neutrality protections criticize changes to the proposal.
    21h
    Feed: All Latest
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    How a Child Moves Through a Broken Immigration SystemTrump's new executive order ends family separation, but detainee advocates say there is no clear process for reuniting those who have already been torn apart.
    22h
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    11
    Learning about the Himalayas using Mars technologyhe Himalayan Range includes some of the youngest and most spectacular mountains on Earth, but the rugged landscape that lends it the striking beauty for which it is known can also keep scientists from fully understanding how these mountains formed.
    22h
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    17
    Scientists calculate impact of China's ban on plastic waste importsScientists have calculated the potential global impact of China's ban on plastic waste imports and how this policy might affect efforts to reduce the amount of plastic waste entering the world's landfills and natural environment.
    22h
    Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
    12
    New drug halves hearing loss in children following cancer treatmentGiving the drug sodium thiosulphate after chemotherapy reduces hearing loss in children treated for liver cancer, according to new findings.
    23h
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    22
    How physics explains the evolution of social organizationA scientist says the natural evolution of social organizations into larger and more complex communities exhibiting distinct hierarchies can be predicted from the same law of physics that gives rise to tree branches and river deltas -- a concept called the constructal law.
    23h
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    8
    DNA barcodes that reliably work: A game-changer for biomedical researchResearchers have developed a new method for correcting the errors that creep into DNA barcodes -- labels used in a wide range of biological experiments -- yielding far more accurate results and paving the way for more ambitious medical research in the future.
    23h
    Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
    2
    Planned movements and spontaneous reactions are processed differently in the brainScientists have been able to show in their recently published study of two rhesus monkeys that planned and spontaneous gripping movements have the same brain activity during the movement but that the preceded brain activity differs.
    23h
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    2
    Fetal T cells are first responders to infection in adultsResearchers have discovered there is a division of labor among immune cells that fight invading pathogens in the body.
    23h
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    23
    Cooler computing through statistical physics?Recent breakthroughs in nonequilibrium statistical physics have revealed opportunities to advance the 'thermodynamics of computation,' a field that could have far-reaching consequences for how we understand, and engineer, our computers.
    23h
    Futurity.org
    2
    Enzyme from our bodies could spawn Zika drugNew research suggests future antiviral drugs could take advantage of viperin, a naturally occurring enzyme in humans and other mammals that has antiviral effects on a wide variety of viruses, including West Nile, hepatitis C, rabies, and HIV. The enzyme facilitates a reaction that produces the molecule ddhCTP, which prevents viruses from copying their genetic material and thus from multiplying. T
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    300+
    Putting the brakes on metastatic cancerA groundbreaking discovery has identified previously unknown therapeutic targets that could be key to preventing the spread of cancer. Researchers found that by inhibiting several newly identified gene targets they could block more than 99.5 per cent of cancer metastasis in living cells.
    23h
    Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
    500+
    Possible link found between diabetes and common white pigmentIn a pilot study, crystalline particles of titanium dioxide -- the most common white pigment in everyday products ranging from paint to candies -- were found in pancreas specimens with Type 2 diabetes, suggesting that exposure to the white pigment is associated with the disease.
    23h
    EurekAlert! - Breaking News
    3
    Buildings as power stations -- data shows they work: They generate more energy than they consumeThe UK's first energy-positive classroom, designed with research expertise from Swansea University, generated more than one and a half times the energy it consumed, according to data from its first year of operation, the team has revealed.The findings were announced as the researchers launched the next phase of their research, gathering data and evidence on an office building, constructed using si
    23h
    EurekAlert! - Breaking News
    No evidence that vitamin D protects against high blood pressure in pregnancyThere is no strong evidence that vitamin D protects against pregnancy-induced high blood pressure (hypertension) or pre-eclampsia, conclude researchers in The BMJ today.
    23h
    Futurity.org
    10
    Just 1 missing atom may lead to colon cancerThe development of an aggressive, early-onset form of colon cancer may come down to a single missing iron atom in a key DNA repair protein, according to new research. The findings, which will appear in Nature Chemistry , reveal how a mutation in the MUTYH protein prevents it from doing its job repairing damaged DNA. The study also shows for the first time in humans that our DNA can function like
    23h
    Futurity.org
    6
    Warming oceans may spark international ‘fish wars’Climate change is forcing fish species to shift their habitats faster than the world’s system for allocating fish stocks, a situation that could exacerbate international fishing conflicts, researchers say. The study shows for the first time that new fisheries are likely to appear in more than 70 countries all over the world. Past studies show that newly shared fisheries often spark conflict among
    23h
    Futurity.org
    3
    3D printing makes flexible bone graftsResearchers have created a new way to make flexible bone grafts using 3D-printed materials. The transplantation of bone tissue, known as bone grafting, typically involves allograft, which is bone from a deceased donor, or autograft, which comes from the patient’s own body. Ramille Shah, a materials scientist from Northwestern University, along with materials engineer Adam Jakus, validated the com
    23h
    New on MIT Technology Review
    93
    A freshly funded battery startup aims to ease the cobalt crunch[no content]
    23h
    Futurity.org
    26
    How underground groups use psychedelic drugs for healingFor a new study, researchers interviewed 15 individuals who have facilitated plant medicine ceremonies for thousands of people. In guided sessions or ceremonies, facilitators administer drugs like ayahuasca or psilocybin to people looking to alter their consciousness and improve their mental health. Little research exists on how people in this underground world are using hallucinogens—which pique
    23h
    Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
    100+
    Martian dust storm grows global: Curiosity captures photos of thickening hazeA storm of tiny dust particles has engulfed much of Mars over the last two weeks and prompted NASA's Opportunity rover to suspend science operations. But across the planet, NASA's Curiosity rover, which has been studying Martian soil at Gale Crater, is expected to remain largely unaffected by the dust. The Martian dust storm has grown in size and is now officially a 'planet-encircling' (or 'global
    23h
    Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
    56
    The world's tiniest first respondersAmid the rise of CRISPR and genome editing, scientists are still learning more about DNA repair and its significance in aging and diseases such as cancer.
    23h
    Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
    1
    Simple sugar delays neurodegeneration caused by enzyme deficiencyThe sugar trehalose increases cellular waste disposal and improves the neurological symptoms in a mouse model of mucopolysaccharidoses IIIB.
    23h
    Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
    60
    New tissue-imaging technology could enable real-time diagnostics, map cancer progressionA new microscope system can image living tissue in real time and in molecular detail, without any chemicals or dyes. It enables researchers to study concurrent processes within cells and tissue, and could give cancer researchers a new tool for tracking tumor progression and physicians new technology for tissue pathology and diagnostics.
    23h
    Popular Science
    100+
    Your efforts to save water are actually making a differenceEnvironment Finally, a bit of good news. A new study from the United States Geological Survey shows water use across the country dropped between 2010 and 2015.
    1d
    Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
    30
    A mix of in-person and online learning may boost student performance, reduce anxietyBefore online learning existed, the traditional lecture was the only option for college courses. Students who skipped class risked missing valuable information. Researchers found that online content accompanied by weekly class meetings -- a 'blended' course format -- may improve performance in students at risk for failing. In addition, fewer students withdrew from the blended format class.
    1d
    Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
    11
    Rhesus macaque model offers route to study Zika brain pathologyRhesus macaque monkeys infected in utero with Zika virus develop similar brain pathology to human infants. The findings may open up new ways to study the infection in an animal model.
    1d
    Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
    10
    Boring barnacles prefer the shallow life on coral reefsScientists have quantified how barnacles infest stony coral over a variety of conditions and reduce calcium carbonate on reefs. Coral reefs harbor diverse marine life and help prevent coastal erosion.
    1d
    Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
    16
    When cozying up with would-be predators, cleaner shrimp follow a dependable scriptIt's a mystery how cleaner shrimp partner with would-be fish predators -- sometimes even climbing in their mouths -- without getting eaten. A new study reveals how the shrimp convinces fish not to eat them, and the fish conveys that it's a friend and not a foe.
    1d
    Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
    10
    Discovery of 12-sided silica cagesScientists report the discovery of 10-nanometer, individual, self-assembled dodecahedral structures -- 12-sided silica cages that could have applications in mesoscale material assembly, as well as medical diagnosis and therapeutics.
    1d
    Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
    300+
    New 'e-dermis' brings sense of touch, pain to prosthetic handsEngineers have created an electronic 'skin' in an effort to restore a real sense of touch for amputees using prosthetics.
    1d
    Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
    11
    Cell-free DNA profiling informative way to monitor urinary tract infectionsUsing shotgun DNA sequencing, researchers have demonstrated a new method for monitoring urinary tract infections (UTIs) that surpasses traditional methods in providing valuable information about the dynamics of the infection as well as the patient's biological response.
    1d
    Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
    23
    Quantum step forward in protecting communications from hackersResearchers have shown that a new quantum-based procedure for distributing secure information along communication lines could be successful in preventing serious security breaches.
    1d
    Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
    9
    Using gene silencing to alleviate common ataxiaIn what researchers are calling a game changer for future ataxia treatments, a new study showed the ability to turn down the disease progression of the most common dominantly inherited ataxia, Spinocerebellar ataxia type 3 (SCA3), also known as Machado-Joseph disease.
    1d
    The Atlantic
    44
    The Atlantic Daily: The Dedication of the LivingWhat We’re Following Policy Shift: President Trump signed a new executive order on immigration that, while preserving the “zero tolerance” policy that has resulted in the separation of hundreds of families who entered the United States illegally, calls for parents to be detained together with their children. What exactly the order will change is not yet clear. It may violate an existing agreement
    1d
    NYT > Science
    2K
    Summer Solstice 2018: The Search for Life in the GalaxyAs you mark the longest day of the year, consider the debate among astronomers over whether Earth’s tilt toward the sun helps make life on our world and others possible.
    1d
    Live Science
    200+
    T. Rex Couldn't Stick Out Its TongueT. rex would have been terrible at licking stamps, lollipops or popsicles.
    1d
    Popular Science
    93
    Our brains can't quit our gadgets—that didn't happen by accidentTechnology These are some of the design tricks that keep us hooked. Your obsession with your smartphone isn’t an accident. The devices—and apps inside them—are entrancing by design, earning them comparisons to gambling, sugar, and…
    1d
    Latest Headlines | Science News
    300+
    Splitting families may end, but migrant kids’ trauma needs to be studiedThe long-term effects of separating children from their parents at the U.S. border need to be studied, scientists say.
    1d
    EurekAlert! - Breaking News
    1
    When cozying up with would-be predators, cleaner shrimp follow a dependable scriptIt's a mystery how cleaner shrimp partner with would-be fish predators -- sometimes even climbing in their mouths -- without getting eaten. A new study reveals how the shrimp convinces fish not to eat them, and the fish conveys that it's a friend and not a foe.
    1d
    The Atlantic
    100+
    The Meaninglessness of the Stock Market Index in a Digital WorldGeneral Electric, which has been a component of the Dow Jones Industrial Average since Teddy Roosevelt was president in 1907, will be pulled out of the basket of 30 stocks next week . It’ll be replaced by ... Walgreens . Why’d GE get bounced? It probably has something to do with the company’s fortunes. While it still generates a tremendous amount of revenue—$120 billion in 2017—its margins have f
    1d
    The Atlantic
    12
    The Atlantic Politics & Policy Daily: A Sign of the Times-Written by Lena Felton ( @lenakfelton ) and Elaine Godfrey ( @elainejgodfrey ) Today in 5 Lines President Trump signed an executive order he said would end his administration’s policy of separating families at the border, but it could face court challenges over portions that direct the Department of Homeland Security to hold families indefinitely. Republican lawmakers still plan to vote on two i
    1d
    Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
    11
    Towards personalised medicine: One type of data is not enoughTo understand the biology of diseased organs researchers can use different types of molecular data. One of the biggest computational challenges at the moment is integrating these multiple data types. A new computational method jointly analyses different types of molecular data and disentangles the sources of disease variability to guide personalised treatment.
    1d
    Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
    39
    What a pain: The iPad neck plagues women moreGender and posture -- not screen time -- are biggest factors behind developing 'iPad neck' and shoulder pain, new study finds.
    1d
    Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
    55
    Forgetting may help improve memory and learningForgetting names, skills or information learned in class is often thought of as purely negative. However unintuitive it may seem, research suggests that forgetting plays a positive role in learning: It can actually increase long-term retention, information retrieval and performance.
    1d
    Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
    36
    People who feel threatened by vegetarianism more likely to care less about animalsNew research suggests that if people perceive the rise of vegetarianism as a threat to their way of life they are more likely to care less for some animals.
    1d
    Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
    3
    Miniaturized infrared cameras take colored photos of the eyeResearchers report a new miniaturized camera module that can be used to diagnose the eye. The module uses three wavelengths of near infrared light to give a clear image of the fundus that matches the performance of cameras in the clinic, but is small enough to mount on top a smartphone.
    1d
    Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
    9
    New piece in the Huntington's disease puzzleResearchers have discovered a previously unknown error in the transport of glutamine between astrocytes and neurons in the brain of mice with Huntington's disease. At the same time, it is a relevant area on which to focus the effort of developing a future treatment for the disease, the researchers believe.
    1d
    Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
    14
    Lyme disease cases among children are on the rise in western PennsylvaniaDoctors found that cases of Lyme disease in children have increased exponentially in western Pennsylvania.
    1d
    Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
    57
    Reading risk behavior in the brainAnxious people take fewer risks -- in itself this is not a surprising observation. However, psychologists have succeeded in making this decision process visible in the brain, allowing them to predict the behavior of individuals.
    1d
    EurekAlert! - Breaking News
    1
    Boring barnacles prefer the shallow life on coral reefsScientists at Rice University, the University of the Virgin Islands and the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration combine efforts to quantify how barnacles infest stony coral over a variety of conditions and reduce calcium carbonate on reefs. Coral reefs harbor diverse marine life and help prevent coastal erosion.
    1d
    EurekAlert! - Breaking News
    1
    Rhesus macaque model offers route to study Zika brain pathologyRhesus macaque monkeys infected in utero with Zika virus develop similar brain pathology to human infants, according to a report by researchers at the California National Primate Research Center and School of Veterinary Medicine at UC Davis. The findings may open up new ways to study the infection in an animal model.
    1d
    EurekAlert! - Breaking News
    1
    GPM satellite probes soaking storms in Southern Texas and the GulfSouthern Texas and the western Gulf of Mexico is getting a soaking because of a low pressure system. The Global Precipitation Measurement mission or GPM core satellite passed over the western Gulf of Mexico and measured the rainfall from the system.
    1d
    EurekAlert! - Breaking News
    1
    DNA barcodes that reliably work: A game-changer for biomedical researchResearchers have developed a new method for correcting the errors that creep into DNA barcodes -- labels used in a wide range of biological experiments -- yielding far more accurate results and paving the way for more ambitious medical research in the future.
    1d
    EurekAlert! - Breaking News
    1
    Martian dust storm grows global: Curiosity captures photos of thickening hazeA storm of tiny dust particles has engulfed much of Mars over the last two weeks and prompted NASA's Opportunity rover to suspend science operations. But across the planet, NASA's Curiosity rover, which has been studying Martian soil at Gale Crater, is expected to remain largely unaffected by the dust. The Martian dust storm has grown in size and is now officially a 'planet-encircling' (or 'global
    1d
    EurekAlert! - Breaking News
    A mix of in-person and online learning may boost student performance, reduce anxietyBefore online learning existed, the traditional lecture was the only option for college courses. Students who skipped class risked missing valuable information. Researchers found that online content accompanied by weekly class meetings -- a 'blended' course format -- may improve performance in students at risk for failing. In addition, fewer students withdrew from the blended format class. The fin
    1d
    EurekAlert! - Breaking News
    New medicare model produces expert nurses to address shortage of primary careIn an article published today in the New England Journal of Medicine, University of Pennsylvania researchers call for modernizing the way Medicare pays for training nurses, and highlight a successful new model of cost-effectively training more advanced practice nurses to practice community-based primary care.
    1d
    Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
    13
    The sounds of climate changeResearchers describe a way to quickly sift through thousands of hours of field recordings to estimate when songbirds arrive at their Arctic breeding grounds. Their research could be applied to any dataset of animal vocalizations to understand how migratory animals are responding to climate change.
    1d
    Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
    31
    Zero proof probiotics can ease your anxietyA study found evidence that probiotics can reduce anxiety in rodents, but not in humans.
    1d
    Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
    11
    How pancreatic tumors lead to weight lossA study offers insight into the weight loss seen in pancreatic cancer patients, and suggests that weight loss may not necessarily affect patients' survival.
    1d
    Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
    400+
    Compound made inside human body stops viruses from replicatingA team of researchers has identified the mode of action of viperin, a naturally occurring enzyme in humans and other mammals that is known to have antiviral effects on viruses such as West Nile, hepatitis C, rabies, and HIV. This discovery could allow researchers to develop a drug that could act as a broad-spectrum therapy for a range of viruses, including Zika.
    1d
    Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
    48
    Gene-edited pigs are resistant to billion-dollar virusScientists have produced pigs that can resist one of the world's most costly animal diseases, by changing their genetic code. Tests with the virus -- called Porcine Reproductive and Respiratory Syndrome, or PRRS -- found the pigs do not become infected at all. The animals show no signs that the change in their DNA has had any other impact on their health or wellbeing.
    1d
    Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
    15
    Why 9 to 5 isn't the only shift that can work for busy familiesA new study finds that the impacts of parent work schedules on children vary by age and gender, and often reflect which shift a parent works. Rotating shifts -- a schedule that varies day by day or week by week -- can be most problematic for children.
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    Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
    11
    Rare in-vivo study shows weak brain nodes have strong influence on memory networkThe majority of existing simulation studies show that the parts of the brain with high connectivity, the so-called 'hubs', are most important when it comes to several different cognitive tasks. But the results of a rare in-vivo study demonstrates that the nucleus accumbens (NAc) -- a part of the brain with weak connections -- plays an unexpectedly influential role in enhancing the memory network.
    1d
    Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
    27
    Coconut oil prolongs life in peroxisomal disorders: fruit fly study'Lorenzo's Oil' was to help a seriously ill boy suffering from a peroxisomal disorder (adrenoleukodystrophy/ALD). The true story was turned into a film which made the rare disease well known. Scientists investigated such peroxisomal diseases on fruit flies. They were able to prove that a coconut oil diet significantly increases the vitality and lifespan of the flies.
    1d
    Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
    7
    Dry landscapes can increase disease transmissionIn water-limited landscapes sick animals can have increased contact with healthy individuals, which can facilitate disease transmission.
    1d
    Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
    5
    Beetles exploit warm winters to expand range, study confirmsA new study confirms that increasing minimum winter temperatures allow beetles to expand their range but reveals that overcrowding can put the brakes on population growth.
    1d
    Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
    2
    When you're a sitting duck, you learn to adaptFor common loons, black flies are a common blood-feeding pest and can cause nest abandonment and decreased fledging rates. A new study presents some of the best data to date supporting hypotheses about the effects that black flies have on common loon nesting behavior and success.
    1d

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  1. page Nyheder2018juni20 edited ... 8h Dagens Medicin ... og gynækologi 8h Phys.org - latest science and technology news …
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    8h
    Dagens Medicin
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    og gynækologi
    8h
    Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
    ...
    Mountain lion kittens found living in US caveMeet the new residents of a cave in California.
    23h
    Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
    46
    How a single binge drinking episode affects gene that regulates sleepNew findings explain how a single episode of binge drinking can affect the gene that regulates sleep, leading to sleep disruption in mice. The finding may shed light on how sleep problems can contribute to alcoholism in humans.
    23h
    Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
    14
    Liberals do drink more lattes, but maybe not for the reasons you thinkDo liberals really drink more lattes? According to a new study, liberals in America are indeed more likely than conservatives to drink lattes. The researchers believe this is because liberals are more open to globalization and products associated with other countries.
    23h
    Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
    8
    An unlikely marriage among oxidesSebastian Siol is looking for new materials with unusual properties that were so far not accessible in experiments. To do this, he connects partners who don't really fit together: One partner forces the other into a state that would not be possible without the unlikely pairing. Siol also makes sure that the crystal bonds last in everyday life. Only then are they interesting for industrial applicat
    23h
    Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
    63
    Insight into infant handling by young bonobosDrawn to a behavior she didn't understand, a researcher watching bonobos in a zoo has revealed how young female bonobos prepare for motherhood.
    23h
    EurekAlert! - Breaking News
    1
    Chip upgrade helps miniature drones navigateResearchers at MIT, who last year designed a tiny computer chip tailored to help honeybee-sized drones navigate, have now shrunk their chip design even further, in both size and power consumption.
    23h
    cognitive science
    1
    Tackling bullying could help reduce depression in autistic teenssubmitted by /u/davyeminy [link] [comments]
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    Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
    7
    Could this material enable autonomous vehicles to come to market sooner?A new material might show promise for such infrared detection applications as autonomous vehicles, emergency services and even manufacturing.
    23h
    Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
    2
    Keyhole may trump robotic surgery for mitral valve repairKeyhole surgery for heart valve repair may trump robotic surgery, because it is associated with lower rates of subsequent heart flutter and blood transfusions, and a shorter hospital stay, reveals research looking at the pros and cons of different surgical approaches.
    23h
    The Atlantic
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    The Atlantic Politics & Policy Daily: Hagin Out-Written by Elaine Godfrey ( @elainejgodfrey ) Today in 5 Lines President Trump again defended his administration’s “zero tolerance” policy ahead of a meeting with Republicans on Capitol Hill Tuesday evening to discuss immigration. Senate Majority Leader Mitch McConnell told reporters that his Republican colleagues support legislation to end the practice of separating families at the border, addi
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    EurekAlert! - Breaking News
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    Floppy eyelids may be sign of sleep apnea, Loyola study findsA Loyola Medicine study is providing further evidence that floppy eyelids may be a sign of sleep apnea. The study, published in the journal The Ocular Surface, found that 53 percent of sleep apnea patients had upper eyelids that were lax and rubbery.
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    EurekAlert! - Breaking News
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    Machine learning may be a game-changer for climate predictionNew research from Columbia Engineering Professor Pierre Gentine demonstrates that machine-learning techniques can be used to accurately represent clouds and their atmospheric heating and moistening, and better represent clouds in coarse resolution climate models, with the potential to narrow the range of climate prediction. This could be a major advance in accurate predictions of global warming in
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    EurekAlert! - Breaking News
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    Long-term estrogen therapy changes microbial activity in the gut, study findsLong-term therapy with estrogen and bazedoxifene alters the microbial composition and activity in the gut, affecting how estrogen is metabolized, a new study in mice found.The research team was led by University of Illinois food science and human nutrition professor Zeynep Madak-Erdogan.
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    EurekAlert! - Breaking News
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    FSU researchers find religious involvement deters recreational and medical marijuana useFSU Associate Professor Amy Burdette and her team found that individuals who regularly attend church and report that religion is very important in their daily decision making are less likely to use marijuana recreationally and medically. The study was recently published in the Journal of Drug Issues.
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    EurekAlert! - Breaking News
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    Political leaning influences city water policies as strongly as climateResearchers examined city water policies over the course of four years to create a database of water conservation policies. They also developed an associated index of the number of different categories of policies each city adopted and gathered data on the climate, water sources, population, economy and political leanings of each city and its surrounding metropolitan statistical area -- as reflect
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    EurekAlert! - Breaking News
    Flexible content delivery, student-faculty interaction frees time without hurting gradesMedical students face an intense workload and often struggle to juggle priorities. Similarly, medical school faculty must find time in their schedules to prepare lectures and for face-to-face interaction with students. To optimize student and faculty time and increase engagement between them, researchers from Texas Tech University Health Sciences Center 'flipped' their content delivery strategy up
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    EurekAlert! - Breaking News
    Does good attendance equal good grades?Studies of classroom attendance patterns in undergraduate students have shown that attendance and performance go hand in hand--attending class is the key to reaping the rewards of academic achievement. However, many of these studies were completed before the explosion of online learning. Researchers will discuss the changing nature of medical student engagement in the physical classroom and effect
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    WHO Calls Gaming Disorder an Illness. Experts Say Not So FastSome mental health experts have reservations about the change in the WHO’s International Classification of Diseases.
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    Why Are the Velociraptors in 'Jurassic World' So Big?In reality, they were about the size of a large turkey. On the big screen? Not so much.
    23h
    The Atlantic
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    All Cats Go to HeavenCats are like potato chips , reads a sign in Bruce and Terry Jenkins’s home. You can’t just have one! In fact, the Jenkinses have 30. They have devoted their retirement to caring for this plethora of elderly cats, transforming their home over the years into a makeshift feline senior center. “It’s kind of a big family,” says Terry Jenkins in Jonathan Napolitano’s short documentary, Cats Cradle . “
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    Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
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    Good relationships with siblings may buffer the effects of family conflictA new longitudinal study finds that having a good relationship with a sibling may help buffer the distress of ongoing hostility between parents.
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    Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
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    Ground-breaking discoveries could create superior alloys with many applicationsMany current and future technologies require alloys that can withstand high temperatures without corroding. Now, researchers have hailed a major breakthrough in understanding how alloys behave at high temperatures, pointing the way to significant improvements in many technologies.
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    Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
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    Deep-sea marine sponges may hold key to antibiotic drug resistanceFAU's Harbor Branch houses more than 1,000 strains of actinobacteria, one of the most prolific microbial groups for the production of natural products. Derived from sea sponges and other macro-organisms, several strains were identified for their potent antifungal activity, for anti-MRSA activity, and for both antifungal and antibacterial activities. A key finding was the identification of a strain
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    Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
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    Beware of getting a tattoo if your immune system isn't up to scratch, doctors warnGetting a tattoo may have some unexpected complications if your immune system isn't up to scratch, warn doctors in a new article.
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    Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
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    Marriage may protect against heart disease/stroke and associated risk of deathMarriage may protect against the development of heart disease/stroke as well as influencing who is more likely to die of it, suggests a new analysis.
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    EurekAlert! - Breaking News
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    Absence epilepsy -- When the brain is like 'an orchestra without a conductor'New contributions to the field of epilepsy have opened a window into the cellular events that occur in the brain during absence seizures.
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    EurekAlert! - Breaking News
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    FSU study finds religious involvement does little to prevent opioid abuseIn a new study published in the Journal for the Scientific Study of Religion, a team of researchers led by FSU Associate Professor Amy Burdette examined the correlation -- or lack thereof -- between drug use and church attendance for women who are mothers.
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    Millions of Google, Roku, and Sonos Devices Are Vulnerable to a Web AttackUsing a technique called DNS rebinding, one amateur hacker found vulnerabilities in devices from Google, Roku, Sonos, and more.
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    Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
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    Facebook to offer interactive game shows on video platformFacebook said Tuesday it is offering a series of new formats for its online video platform including interactive game shows, quizzes and polls.
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    The Atlantic
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    How Will XXXTentacion Be Remembered?Nearly six months before his death, the embattled 20-year-old rapper XXXTentacion shared an urgent manifesto via Instagram Live. Eerily prescient, his words belied a sense of macabre resignation. “If I’m gonna die or ever be a sacrifice, I wanna make sure that my life made at least 5 million kids happy or they found some sort of answers or resolve in my life,” said the rapper, born Jahseh Onfroy.
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    New on MIT Technology Review
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    The US Supreme Court is taking a hard look at Apple’s app store monopoly[no content]
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    Science | The Guardian
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    The surge in hay fever is rooted in our modern lifestylesObsessive hygiene, antibiotics and car exhausts are blamed for hay fever now affecting 20% of Britain’s population This has been the worst month for hay fever for 12 years. Grasses had perfect growing conditions over late April and in May with warm sunshine and showers. That was followed in June by hot dry conditions when the grass flowers matured and shed clouds of pollen on light breezes and up
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    Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
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    Age limit for federal food assistance program impacts reading scores, learningNearly 1 million children face food insecurity simply because they were born late in the year. No safety net coverage exists for these children when they age out of the Special Supplemental Nutrition Program for Women, Infants and Children (WIC) and they are not yet eligible to attend kindergarten. Irma Arteaga, assistant professor in the Truman School of Public Affairs at the University of Missou
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    Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
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    Popular streaming playlists can boost a song's revenue by up to $163kArtists lucky enough to find their song on 'Today's Top Hits', a Spotify playlist with over 20 million followers, could see a boost in popularity worth between $116k and $163k in additional streaming revenue.
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    Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
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    Site of the next major earthquake on the San Andreas Fault?Many researchers hypothesize that the southern tip of the 1300-km-long San Andreas fault zone (SAFZ) could be the nucleation site of the next major earthquake on the fault, yet geoscientists cannot evaluate this hazard until the location and geometry of the fault zone is documented.
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    Ingeniøren
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    A.P. Møller vil bore efter grøn fjernvarmeSelskabet ser stort potentiale i geotermi og vil tilbyde kommuner med egnet undergrund geotermisk varme til en fast lav pris, der kan konkurrere med prisen på varme fra afgiftsfri biomasse.
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    EurekAlert! - Breaking News
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    Popular streaming playlists can boost a song's revenue by up to $163kArtists lucky enough to find their song on Spotify's most popular playlists could see could see considerable increases in streams and revenue.
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    Big Think
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    Fundraiser to reunite families separated at U.S. border raises $5.4 million in four daysThe fundraiser started on Saturday morning with a goal of $1,500, but at one point on Monday the campaign was earning $4,000 every minute. Read More
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    Beyoncé and Jay-Z's 'Everything Is Love' Marks a New Step in the Album's EvolutionThe format is constantly changing in the era of streaming.
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    EurekAlert! - Breaking News
    3
    Site of the next major earthquake on the San Andreas Fault?Many researchers hypothesize that the southern tip of the 1300-km-long San Andreas fault zone (SAFZ) could be the nucleation site of the next major earthquake on the fault, yet geoscientists cannot evaluate this hazard until the location and geometry of the fault zone is documented.
    1d
    EurekAlert! - Breaking News
    2
    Age limit for federal food assistance program impacts reading scores, learningNearly 1 million children face food insecurity simply because they were born late in the year. No safety net coverage exists for these children when they age out of the Special Supplemental Nutrition Program for Women, Infants and Children (WIC) and they are not yet eligible to attend kindergarten. Irma Arteaga, assistant professor in the Truman School of Public Affairs at the University of Missou
    1d
    The Atlantic
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    Elon Musk’s Long Obsession With SabotageIn October 2008, the news outlet Valleywag published a letter from an employee at Tesla. The company, just five years old then, had called employees into a meeting and revealed some troubling news, the writer said. Tesla had only $9 million in the bank. Meanwhile, the letter writer claimed, the company had taken more than 1,200 preorders for its electric cars—thousands of dollars in deposits—but
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    Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences current issue
    Reply to Vickers: Pharmacogenetics and progression to neovascular age-related macular degeneration—Evidence supporting practice change [Biological Sciences]Vickers (1) offers little substantive criticism, but we address three items he mentions: (i) our choice of clinical endpoint, (ii) the potential for multiple-testing false positives, and (iii) the need for additional study. An important distinction of our study (2) is the use of neovascular AMD (nvAMD) as the endpoint....
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    Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences current issue
    Morality traits still dominate in forming impressions of others [Social Sciences]Melnikoff and Bailey (M a...
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    Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences current issue
    Reply to Landy et al.: Terms and conditions may apply [Social Sciences]Landy, Piazza, and Goodwin (LP&G) have codeveloped a seminal and indispensable new model of person perception (1, 2). While endorsing LP&G’s model, we recently challenged one of its auxiliary hypotheses: the morality dominance hypothesis (MDH) (3). LP&G critiqued our studies, arguing that they merely qualify the MDH (4). We concur...
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    Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences current issue
    Pharmacogenomics of antioxidant supplementation to prevent age-related macular degeneration [Biological Sciences]Casual readers of Vavvas et al.’s recent paper in PNAS (1) on the pharmacogenomics of age-related macular degeneration (AMD) may get the impression that the authors have made an important incremental advance based on a logical series of studies, each of which has been moving the science in the same...
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    Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences current issue
    Water agglomerates on Fe3O4(001) [Chemistry]Determining the structure of water adsorbed on solid surfaces is a notoriously difficult task and pushes the limits of experimental and theoretical techniques. Here, we follow the evolution of water agglomerates on Fe3O4(001); a complex mineral surface relevant in both modern technology and the natural environment. Strong OH–H2O bonds drive...
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    Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences current issue
    Simultaneous cancer and tumor microenvironment subtyping using confocal infrared microscopy for all-digital molecular histopathology [Chemistry]Histopathology based on spatial patterns of epithelial cells is the gold standard for clinical diagnoses and research in carcinomas; although known to be important, the tissue microenvironment is not readily used due to complex and subjective interpretation with existing tools. Here, we demonstrate accurate subtyping from molecular properties of epithelial...
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    Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences current issue
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    Exceptionally high levels of lead pollution in the Balkans from the Early Bronze Age to the Industrial Revolution [Earth, Atmospheric, and Planetary Sciences]The Balkans are considered the birthplace of mineral resource exploitation and metalworking in Europe. However, since knowledge of the timing and extent of metallurgy in southeastern Europe is largely constrained by discontinuous archaeological findings, the long-term environmental impact of past mineral resource exploitation is not fully understood. Here, we present...
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    Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences current issue
    Targeting the potent Beclin 1-UVRAG coiled-coil interaction with designed peptides enhances autophagy and endolysosomal trafficking [Biochemistry]The Beclin 1–Vps34 complex, known as “mammalian class III PI3K,” plays essential roles in membrane-mediated transport processes including autophagy and endosomal trafficking. Beclin 1 acts as a scaffolding molecule for the complex and readily transits from its metastable homodimeric state to interact with key modulators such as Atg14L or UVRAG...
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    Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences current issue
    Individuality and slow dynamics in bacterial growth homeostasis [Biophysics and Computational Biology]Microbial growth and division are fundamental processes relevant to many areas of life science. Of particular interest are homeostasis mechanisms, which buffer growth and division from accumulating fluctuations over multiple cycles. These mechanisms operate within single cells, possibly extending over several division cycles. However, all experimental studies to date have...
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    Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences current issue
    In vitro biomimetic engineering of a human hematopoietic niche with functional properties [Cell Biology]In adults, human hematopoietic stem and progenitor cells (HSPCs) reside in the bone marrow (BM) microenvironment. Our understanding of human hematopoiesis and the associated niche biology remains limited, due to human material accessibility and limits of existing in vitro culture models. The establishment of an in vitro BM system would...
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    Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences current issue
    Spatially modulated ephrinA1:EphA2 signaling increases local contractility and global focal adhesion dynamics to promote cell motility [Cell Biology]Recent studies have revealed pronounced effects of the spatial distribution of EphA2 receptors on cellular response to receptor activation. However, little is known about molecular mechanisms underlying this spatial sensitivity, in part due to lack of experimental systems. Here, we introduce a hybrid live-cell patterned supported lipid bilayer experimental platform...
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    Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences current issue
    Minimizing ATP depletion by oxygen scavengers for single-molecule fluorescence imaging in live cells [Cell Biology]The stability of organic dyes against photobleaching is critical in single-molecule tracking and localization microscopy. Since oxygen accelerates photobleaching of most organic dyes, glucose oxidase is commonly used to slow dye photobleaching by depleting oxygen. As demonstrated here, pyranose-2-oxidase slows bleaching of Alexa647 dye by ∼20-fold. However, oxygen deprivation may...
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    Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences current issue
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    Automatically identifying, counting, and describing wild animals in camera-trap images with deep learning [Ecology]Having accurate, detailed, and up-to-date information about the location and behavior of animals in the wild would improve our ability to study and conserve ecosystems. We investigate the ability to automatically, accurately, and inexpensively collect such data, which could help catalyze the transformation of many fields of ecology, wildlife biology,...
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    Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences current issue
    Directed evolution of multiple genomic loci allows the prediction of antibiotic resistance [Evolution]Antibiotic development is frequently plagued by the rapid emergence of drug resistance. However, assessing the risk of resistance development in the preclinical stage is difficult. Standard laboratory evolution approaches explore only a small fraction of the sequence space and fail to identify exceedingly rare resistance mutations and combinations thereof. Therefore,...
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    Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences current issue
    Cell-intrinsic regulation of murine epidermal Langerhans cells by protein S [Immunology and Inflammation]AXL, a member of the TYRO3, AXL, and MERTK (TAM) receptor tyrosine kinase family, has been shown to play a role in the differentiation and activation of epidermal Langerhans cells (LCs). Here, we demonstrate that growth arrest-specific 6 (GAS6) protein, the predominant ligand of AXL, has no impact on LC...
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    Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences current issue
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    Gastrointestinal stromal tumor enhancers support a transcription factor network predictive of clinical outcome [Medical Sciences]Activating mutations in the KIT or PDGFRA receptor tyrosine kinases are hallmarks of gastrointestinal stromal tumor (GIST). The biological underpinnings of recurrence following resection or disease progression beyond kinase mutation are poorly understood. Utilizing chromatin immunoprecipitation with sequencing of tumor samples and cell lines, we describe the enhancer landscape of...
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    Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences current issue
    A stress-induced response complex (SIRC) shuttles miRNAs, siRNAs, and oligonucleotides to the nucleus [Medical Sciences]Although some information is available for specific subsets of miRNAs and several factors have been shown to bind oligonucleotides (ONs), no general transport mechanism for these molecules has been identified to date. In this work, we demonstrate that the nuclear transport of ONs, siRNAs, and miRNAs responds to cellular stress....
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    Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences current issue
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    PHIP as a therapeutic target for driver-negative subtypes of melanoma, breast, and lung cancer [Medical Sciences]The identification and targeting of key molecular drivers of melanoma and breast and lung cancer have substantially improved their therapy. However, subtypes of each of these three common, lethal solid tumors lack identified molecular drivers, and are thus not amenable to targeted therapies. Here we show that pleckstrin homology domain-interacting...
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    Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences current issue
    ABC transporter content diversity in Streptococcus pneumoniae impacts competence regulation and bacteriocin production [Microbiology]The opportunistic pathogen Streptococcus pneumoniae (pneumococcus) uses natural genetic competence to increase its adaptability through horizontal gene transfer. One method of acquiring DNA is through predation of neighboring strains with antimicrobial peptides called “bacteriocins.” Competence and production of the major family of pneumococcal bacteriocins, pneumocins, are regulated by the quorum
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    Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences current issue
    Comprehensive skin microbiome analysis reveals the uniqueness of human skin and evidence for phylosymbiosis within the class Mammalia [Microbiology]Skin is the largest organ of the body and represents the primary physical barrier between mammals and their external environment, yet the factors that govern skin microbial community composition among mammals are poorly understood. The objective of this research was to generate a skin microbiota baseline for members of the...
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    Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences current issue
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    Stimulation-induced increases in cerebral blood flow and local capillary vasoconstriction depend on conducted vascular responses [Neuroscience]Functional neuroimaging, such as fMRI, is based on coupling neuronal activity and accompanying changes in cerebral blood flow (CBF) and metabolism. However, the relationship between CBF and events at the level of the penetrating arterioles and capillaries is not well established. Recent findings suggest an active role of capillaries in...
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    Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences current issue
    Rapid, experience-dependent translation of neurogranin enables memory encoding [Neuroscience]Experience induces de novo protein synthesis in the brain and protein synthesis is required for long-term memory. It is important to define the critical temporal window of protein synthesis and identify newly synthesized proteins required for memory formation. Using a behavioral paradigm that temporally separates the contextual exposure from the...
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    Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences current issue
    Soluble epoxide hydrolase plays a key role in the pathogenesis of Parkinson’s disease [Neuroscience]Parkinson’s disease (PD) is characterized as a chronic and progressive neurodegenerative disorder, and the deposition of specific protein aggregates of α-synuclein, termed Lewy bodies, is evident in multiple brain regions of PD patients. Although there are several available medications to treat PD symptoms, these medications do not prevent the progression...
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    Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences current issue
    A shared cis-regulatory module activates transcription in the suspensor of plant embryos [Plant Biology]The mechanisms controlling the transcription of gene sets in specific regions of a plant embryo shortly after fertilization remain unknown. Previously, we showed that G564 mRNA, encoding a protein of unknown function, accumulates to high levels in the giant suspensor of both Scarlet Runner Bean (SRB) and Common Bean embryos,...
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    Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences current issue
    Evolutionary convergence in lignin-degrading enzymes [Evolution]The resurrection of ancestral enzymes of now-extinct organisms (paleogenetics) is a developing field that allows the study of evolutionary hypotheses otherwise impossible to be tested. In the present study, we target fungal peroxidases that play a key role in lignin degradation, an essential process in the carbon cycle and often...
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    Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences current issue
    BP180 dysfunction triggers spontaneous skin inflammation in mice [Immunology and Inflammation]BP180, also known as collagen XVII, is a hemidesmosomal component and plays a key role in maintaining skin dermal/epidermal adhesion. Dysfunction of BP180, either through genetic mutations in junctional epidermolysis bullosa (JEB) or autoantibody insult in bullous pemphigoid (BP), leads to subepidermal blistering accompanied by skin inflammation. However, whether BP180...
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    Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences current issue
    Regulation of stringent factor by branched-chain amino acids [Microbiology]When faced with amino acid starvation, prokaryotic cells induce a stringent response that modulates their physiology. The stringent response is manifested by production of signaling molecules guanosine 5′-diphosphate,3′-diphosphate (ppGpp) and guanosine 5′-triphosphate,3′-diphosphate (pppGpp) that are also called alarmones. In many species, alarmone levels are regulated by a multidomain bifunction
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    Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences current issue
    Synthetic bottom-up approach reveals the complex interplay of Shigella effectors in regulation of epithelial cell death [Microbiology]Over the course of an infection, many Gram-negative bacterial pathogens use complex nanomachines to directly inject tens to hundreds of proteins (effectors) into the cytosol of infected host cells. These effectors rewire processes to promote bacterial replication and spread. The roles of effectors in pathogenesis have traditionally been investigated by...
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    Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences current issue
    Gut microbiota regulates maturation of the adult enteric nervous system via enteric serotonin networks [Microbiology]The enteric nervous system (ENS) is crucial for essential gastrointestinal physiologic functions such as motility, fluid secretion, and blood flow. The gut is colonized by trillions of bacteria that regulate host production of several signaling molecules including serotonin (5-HT) and other hormones and neurotransmitters. Approximately 90% of 5-HT originates from...
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    Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences current issue
    Small RNA profiling in Mycobacterium tuberculosis identifies MrsI as necessary for an anticipatory iron sparing response [Microbiology]One key to the success of Mycobacterium tuberculosis as a pathogen is its ability to reside in the hostile environment of the human macrophage. Bacteria adapt to stress through a variety of mechanisms, including the use of small regulatory RNAs (sRNAs), which posttranscriptionally regulate bacterial gene expression. However, very little...
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    Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences current issue
    Transdifferentiation of human adult peripheral blood T cells into neurons [Neuroscience]Human cell models for disease based on induced pluripotent stem (iPS) cells have proven to be powerful new assets for investigating disease mechanisms. New insights have been obtained studying single mutations using isogenic controls generated by gene targeting. Modeling complex, multigenetic traits using patient-derived iPS cells is much more challenging...
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    Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences current issue
    TMS-induced neuronal plasticity enables targeted remodeling of visual cortical maps [Neuroscience]Transcranial magnetic stimulation (TMS) has become a popular clinical method to modify cortical processing. The events underlying TMS-induced functional changes remain, however, largely unknown because current noninvasive recording methods lack spatiotemporal resolution or are incompatible with the strong TMS-associated electrical field. In particular, an answer to the question of how...
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    Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences current issue
    Genome-wide regulation of light-controlled seedling morphogenesis by three families of transcription factors [Plant Biology]Three families of transcription factors have been reported to play key roles in light control of Arabidopsis seedling morphogenesis. Among them, bHLH protein PIFs and plant-specific protein EIN3/EIN3-LIKE 1 (EIN3/EIL1) accumulate in the dark to maintain skotomorphogenesis. On the other hand, HY5 and HY5 HOMOLOG (HYH), two related bZIP proteins,...
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    Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences current issue
    Uncovering pH at both sides of the root plasma membrane interface using noninvasive imaging [Plant Biology]Building a proton gradient across a biological membrane and between different tissues is a matter of great importance for plant development and nutrition. To gain a better understanding of proton distribution in the plant root apoplast as well as across the plasma membrane, we generated Arabidopsis plants expressing stable membrane-anchored...
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    Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences current issue
    Temporal transcriptional logic of dynamic regulatory networks underlying nitrogen signaling and use in plants [Plant Biology]This study exploits time, the relatively unexplored fourth dimension of gene regulatory networks (GRNs), to learn the temporal transcriptional logic underlying dynamic nitrogen (N) signaling in plants. Our “just-in-time” analysis of time-series transcriptome data uncovered a temporal cascade of cis elements underlying dynamic N signaling. To infer transcription factor (TF)-target...
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    Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences current issue
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    Memory-related hippocampal activation in the sleeping toddler [Psychological and Cognitive Sciences]Nonhuman research has implicated developmental processes within the hippocampus in the emergence and early development of episodic memory, but methodological challenges have hindered assessments of this possibility in humans. Here, we delivered a previously learned song and a novel song to 2-year-old toddlers during natural nocturnal sleep and, using functional...
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    Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences current issue
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    Trends in health inequalities in 27 European countries [Social Sciences]Unfavorable health trends among the lowly educated have recently been reported from the United States. We analyzed health trends by education in European countries, paying particular attention to the possibility of recent trend interruptions, including interruptions related to the impact of the 2008 financial crisis. We collected and harmonized data...
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    Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences current issue
    The biomass distribution on Earth [Systems Biology]A census of the biomass on Earth is key for understanding the structure and dynamics of the biosphere. However, a global, quantitative view of how the biomass of different taxa compare with one another is still lacking. Here, we assemble the overall biomass composition of the biosphere, establishing a census...
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    Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences current issue
    Correction for Zahran et al., Assessment of the Legionnaires’ disease outbreak in Flint, Michigan [Correction]ENVIRONMENTAL SCIENCES Correction for “Assessment of the Legionnaires’ disease outbreak in Flint, Michigan,” by Sammy Zahran, Shawn P. McElmurry, Paul E. Kilgore, David Mushinski, Jack Press, Nancy G. Love, Richard C. Sadler, and Michele S. Swanson, which was first published February 5, 2018; 10.1073/pnas.1718679115 (Proc Natl Acad Sci USA 115:E1730–E1739)....
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    Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences current issue
    Correction for Adam et al., Evolutionary history of carbon monoxide dehydrogenase/acetyl-CoA synthase, one of the oldest enzymatic complexes [Correction]EVOLUTION Correction for “Evolutionary history of carbon monoxide dehydrogenase/acetyl-CoA synthase, one of the oldest enzymatic complexes,” by Panagiotis S. Adam, Guillaume Borrel, and Simonetta Gribaldo, which was first published January 22, 2018; 10.1073/pnas.1716667115 (Proc Natl Acad Sci USA 115:E1166–E1173). The authors wish to note the following: “We would like to...
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    Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences current issue
    Correction for Oyen et al., Structural basis for antibody recognition of the NANP repeats in Plasmodium falciparum circumsporozoite protein [Correction]MICROBIOLOGY, BIOPHYSICS AND COMPUTATIONAL BIOLOGY Correction for “Structural basis for antibody recognition of the NANP repeats in Plasmodium falciparum circumsporozoite protein,” by David Oyen, Jonathan L. Torres, Ulrike Wille-Reece, Christian F. Ockenhouse, Daniel Emerling, Jacob Glanville, Wayne Volkmuth, Yevel Flores-Garcia, Fidel Zavala, Andrew B. Ward, C. Richter King, and Ian...
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    Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences current issue
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    In This Issue [This Week in PNAS]Commensal rats record shifts in Polynesian resources View of Tikopia Island with its crater lake from the peak of Mt Reani. Although little direct archaeological evidence exists to quantify the impacts of human colonization on local ecosystems, commensal animals, which accompany human habitation but are not domesticated, can preserve a...
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    Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences current issue
    Fatty acid chemical mediator provides insights into the pathology and treatment of Parkinson’s disease [Neuroscience]Parkinson’s disease (PD) ranks as the second-most prevalent neurodegenerative disorder that afflicts the aging population (1). Hallmark neuropathological features of PD consist of dopaminergic cell loss in the substantia nigra, striatal dopamine deficiency, and formation of intracellular inclusions, called Lewy bodies, marked by α-synuclein aggregates (2). Although the primary brain...
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    Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences current issue
    Time to build on good design: Resolving the temporal dynamics of gene regulatory networks [Plant Biology]The increasing availability of -omics data is driving the development of computational methods for integrating these datasets to connect the underlying molecular mechanisms to phenotypes. Building gene regulatory networks (GRNs) from transcriptomic studies often results in a static view of gene expression, which can make it difficult to disentangle pathway...
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    Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences current issue
    The scale of life and its lessons for humanity [Systems Biology]The scale of life on Earth is shaped by a confluence of biophysical, evolutionary, ecological, and, recently, human forces. Measuring the scale of life offers insights about these forces and raises many more questions. In PNAS, Bar-On et al. (1) offer the most comprehensive quantification to date of the biomass...
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    Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences current issue
    Restructuring of nutrient flows in island ecosystems following human colonization evidenced by isotopic analysis of commensal rats [Anthropology]The role of humans in shaping local ecosystems is an increasing focus of archaeological research, yet researchers often lack an appropriate means of measuring past anthropogenic effects on local food webs and nutrient cycling. Stable isotope analysis of commensal animals provides an effective proxy for local human environments because these...
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    Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences current issue
    Modulating cell state to enhance suspension expansion of human pluripotent stem cells [Applied Biological Sciences]The development of cell-based therapies to replace missing or damaged tissues within the body or generate cells with a unique biological activity requires a reliable and accessible source of cells. Human pluripotent stem cells (hPSC) have emerged as a strong candidate cell source capable of extended propagation in vitro and...
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    Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences current issue
    High-resolution {mu}CT of a mouse embryo using a compact laser-driven X-ray betatron source [Applied Physical Sciences]In the field of X-ray microcomputed tomography (μCT) there is a growing need to reduce acquisition times at high spatial resolution (approximate micrometers) to facilitate in vivo and high-throughput operations. The state of the art represented by synchrotron light sources is not practical for certain applications, and therefore the development...
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    Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences current issue
    1
    A folded viral noncoding RNA blocks host cell exoribonucleases through a conformationally dynamic RNA structure [Biochemistry]Folded RNA elements that block processive 5′ → 3′ cellular exoribonucleases (xrRNAs) to produce biologically active viral noncoding RNAs have been discovered in flaviviruses, potentially revealing a new mode of RNA maturation. However, whether this RNA structure-dependent mechanism exists elsewhere and, if so, whether a singular RNA fold is required,...
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    Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences current issue
    6
    Robust nonequilibrium pathways to microcompartment assembly [Biophysics and Computational Biology]Cyanobacteria sequester photosynthetic enzymes into microcompartments which facilitate the conversion of carbon dioxide into sugars. Geometric similarities between these structures and self-assembling viral capsids have inspired models that posit microcompartments as stable equilibrium arrangements of the constituent proteins. Here we describe a different mechanism for microcompartment assembly, o
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    Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences current issue
    Altered p53 functionality in cancer-associated fibroblasts contributes to their cancer-supporting features [Cell Biology]Within the tumor microenvironment, cancer cells coexist with noncancerous adjacent cells that constitute the tumor microenvironment and impact tumor growth through diverse mechanisms. In particular, cancer-associated fibroblasts (CAFs) promote tumor progression in multiple ways. Earlier studies have revealed that in normal fibroblasts (NFs), p53 plays a cell nonautonomous tumor-suppressive role...
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    Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences current issue
    Distinguishing malignant from benign microscopic skin lesions using desorption electrospray ionization mass spectrometry imaging [Chemistry]Detection of microscopic skin lesions presents a considerable challenge in diagnosing early-stage malignancies as well as in residual tumor interrogation after surgical intervention. In this study, we established the capability of desorption electrospray ionization mass spectrometry imaging (DESI-MSI) to distinguish between micrometer-sized tumor aggregates of basal cell carcinoma (BCC), a...
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    Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences current issue
    6
    Opinion: Medical misinformation in the era of Google: Computational approaches to a pervasive problem [Computer Sciences]On December 28, 1917, a fascinating article appeared in the pages of the New York Evening Mail. The article, titled “A Neglected History,” written by H.L. Mencken, laments the fact that the 75th anniversary of the introduction of the bathtub to the United States had passed without the slightest public...
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    Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences current issue
    Potassic, high-silica Hadean crust [Earth, Atmospheric, and Planetary Sciences]Understanding Hadean (>4 Ga) Earth requires knowledge of its crust. The composition of the crust and volatiles migrating through it directly influence the makeup of the atmosphere, the composition of seawater, and nutrient availability. Despite its importance, there is little known and less agreed upon regarding the nature of the...
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    Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences current issue
    1
    Pronounced summer warming in northwest Greenland during the Holocene and Last Interglacial [Earth, Atmospheric, and Planetary Sciences]Projections of future rates of mass loss from the Greenland Ice Sheet are highly uncertain because its sensitivity to warming is unclear. Geologic reconstructions of Quaternary interglacials can illustrate how the ice sheet responded during past warm periods, providing insights into ice sheet behavior and important tests for data-model comparisons....
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    Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences current issue
    1
    Proterozoic Milankovitch cycles and the history of the solar system [Earth, Atmospheric, and Planetary Sciences]The geologic record of Milankovitch climate cycles provides a rich conceptual and temporal framework for evaluating Earth system evolution, bestowing a sharp lens through which to view our planet’s history. However, the utility of these cycles for constraining the early Earth system is hindered by seemingly insurmountable uncertainties in our...
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    Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences current issue
    Distance-dependent defensive coloration in the poison frog Dendrobates tinctorius, Dendrobatidae [Ecology]Poison dart frogs provide classic examples of warning signals: potent toxins signaled by distinctive, conspicuous coloration. We show that, counterintuitively, the bright yellow and blue-black color of Dendrobates tinctorius (Dendrobatidae) also provides camouflage. Through computational modeling of predator vision, and a screen-based detection experiment presenting frogs at different spatial reso
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    Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences current issue
    Exploitation drives an ontogenetic-like deepening in marine fish [Ecology]Virtually all studies reporting deepening with increasing size or age by fishes involve commercially harvested species. Studies of North Sea plaice in the early 1900s first documented this phenomenon (named Heincke’s law); it occurred at a time of intensive harvesting and rapid technological changes in fishing methods. The possibility that...
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    Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences current issue
    Human midcingulate cortex encodes distributed representations of task progress [Neuroscience]The function of midcingulate cortex (MCC) remains elusive despite decades of investigation and debate. Complicating matters, individual MCC neurons respond to highly diverse task-related events, and MCC activation is reported in most human neuroimaging studies employing a wide variety of task manipulations. Here we investigate this issue by applying a...
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    Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences current issue
    1
    Configuration correlation governs slow dynamics of supercooled metallic liquids [Physics]The origin of dramatic slowing down of dynamics in metallic glass-forming liquids toward their glass transition temperatures is a fundamental but unresolved issue. Through extensive molecular dynamics simulations, here we show that, contrary to the previous beliefs, it is not local geometrical orderings extracted from instantaneous configurations but the intrinsic...
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    Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences current issue
    Beating the classical precision limit with spin-1 Dicke states of more than 10,000 atoms [Physics]Interferometry is a paradigm for most precision measurements. Using N uncorrelated particles, the achievable precision for a two-mode (two-path) interferometer is bounded by the standard quantum limit (SQL), 1/N, due to the discrete (quanta) nature of individual measurements. Despite being a challenging benchmark, the two-mode SQL has been approached in...
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    Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences current issue
    Reciprocal space tomography of 3D skyrmion lattice order in a chiral magnet [Physics]It is commonly assumed that surfaces modify the properties of stable materials within the top few atomic layers of a bulk specimen only. Exploiting the polarization dependence of resonant elastic X-ray scattering to go beyond conventional diffraction and imaging techniques, we have determined the depth dependence of the full 3D...
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    Popular Science
    54
    Carbon dioxide injections might seem better than liposuction—but there's a catchHealth The results don't last. A group of plastic surgeons set out to see if injecting carbon dioxide into your skin, a cosmetic treatment known as carboxytherapy, actually works.
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    Live Science
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    Donald Trump Wants a 'Space Force,' But America Already Has OneTrump's proposed Space Force would basically be doing things the Air Force already does.
    1d
    The Atlantic
    93
    Harvard's Impossible Personality TestEvery year, Harvard’s admissions officers are charged with whittling a batch of 40,000 applicants down to a bare-bones selection to fill the institution’s roughly 1,600 freshman seats. Those officers can’t just set a high bar for test scores and GPAs to arrive at that selection; far too many candidates boast those qualifications . Plus, even if that arithmetic were possible, Harvard prides itself
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    Feed: All Latest
    100+
    Google Podcasts Hands On: It's About TimeAfter years of mostly ignoring the podcast world, Google now makes a dedicated Android app for listening. And it's pretty good!
    1d
    The Atlantic
    500+
    Celebrating Juneteenth in a Moment of PerilAcross most of the reaches of the United States, the originally Texan holiday of Juneteenth is ascending in importance as a national commemoration of the emancipation of American slaves . The practices are fittingly patchwork. There are parades, symbolic baptisms, cookouts, family reunions, spades games, durag festivals , and nighttime vigils at churches. Different communities’ celebrations of em
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    The Atlantic
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    Here’s What Trump Actually Achieved With North KoreaDonald Trump didn’t get much in the way of North Korean denuclearization in Singapore. And that’s not necessarily a bad thing. In the days since the summit with Kim Jong Un, critics— including me —have pointed out how little the U.S. president got from North Korea’s leader during their much-hyped meeting. And it’s true that Trump fell far short in that meeting of his stated goal to fully dismantl
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    Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
    15
    Genes associated with infantile forms of schizophrenia identifiedScientists have identified novel genes associated with a specific form of schizophrenia.
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    Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
    23
    Breast cancer could be prevented by targeting epigenetic proteins, study suggestsResearchers have discovered that epigenetic proteins promote the proliferation of mammary gland stem cells in response to the sex hormone progesterone. The study suggests that inhibiting these proteins with drugs could prevent the development of breast cancer in women at high risk of the disease.
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    Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
    8
    Human immune response in the fruit flyResearchers have seen how both humans and fruit flies deploy a protein that a plays a critical role in their immune responses to invading bacteria. The discovery gives scientists evolutionary insight and a model organism with which to explore ways to boost the human immune system and create infection-fighting medicines.
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    Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
    12
    Cells can trap viruses in protein cage to stop their spread, study revealsResearchers have discovered that cells can trap viruses in a protein cage to stop them from spreading to neighboring cells. The study reveals that the vaccinia virus can escape this trap by recruiting additional proteins to dismantle the cage and propel the virus out of the cell.
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    Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
    7
    Mysterious event may be caused by a tau neutrinoTheoretical physicists calculate the origin of a high-energy particle track captured by the IceCube Neutrino Observatory.
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    EurekAlert! - Breaking News
    1
    Can psychological stress cause vision loss?Persistent psychological stress, which is widely recognized as a consequence of vision loss, is also a major contributor to its development and progression, according to a study now published in the EPMA Journal, the official journal of the European Association for Predictive, Preventive, and Personalized Medicine. Clinical practice implications of this finding include a recommendation to improve
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    Latest Headlines | Science News
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    To combat an expanding universe, aliens could hoard starsAn advanced alien civilization might combat the impact of dark energy by harvesting stars.
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    Big Think
    200+
    19 dog gestures and what they mean, according to scienceA new study analyzes dog-owner videos and discovers the meanings behind 19 things a dog does. Read More
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    Big Think
    4
    People with a keener sense of smell find sex more pleasant and, if they are female, have more orgasms during sexIn a new study, people with a keener sense of smell reported finding their sexual activities more “pleasant”, and women with a greater sensitivity to odours had more orgasms during sex. Read More
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    Big Think
    200+
    Trump orders creation of new military branch: ‘Space Force’President Donald Trump wants to create Space Force, a sixth branch of the military that would likely boost U.S. military capabilities and weaponry in space—if congress approves it. Read More
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    Big Think
    100+
    Scientists create an avocado that lasts 4 times longerTired of your avocados going bad? This company has developed a way to keep them fresh for four times longer. Read More
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    Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
    11
    Warnings to texting pedestrians may not eliminate risks, but they can helpHuman factors researchers have been looking at ways to harness technology to prevent fatalities among pedestrians who are struck by vehicles while texting. In their latest study, researchers simulated a busy roadway to determine whether sending loud warning sounds to cell phones when texting pedestrians attempted to cross an unsafe gap would result in safer crossing behavior.
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    Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
    42
    Toothpaste and hand wash are causing antibiotic resistanceA common ingredient in toothpaste and hand wash could be contributing to antibiotic resistance, according to new research. The study focused on triclosan, a compound used in more than 2000 personal care products.
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    Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
    15
    D for danger! Speech sounds convey emotionsIndividual speech sounds -- phonemes -- are statistically associated with negative or positive emotions in several languages, new research shows. These associations help us quickly avoid dangers, because the phoneme-emotion associations are strongest at the beginning of the word and the phonemes that are spoken fastest tend to have a negative association
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    Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
    6
    The first experimental discovery of the propagation of plasma turbulenceScientists applied the 'heat pulse modulation method' in the magnetic island produced intentionally in the tokamak 'Doublet III-D.' Temperature gradient inherent in the magnetically confined plasma causes turbulence while there is no turbulence in the magnetic island because of the absence of the gradient. That the turbulence propagates has now been demonstrated for the first time by investigating
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    Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
    9
    Good primary care lowers emergency department use for those with intellectual and developmental disabilitiesOne in three adults with intellectual and developmental disabilities visit the emergency department annually but effective primary care could reduce these numbers, suggests a new study.
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    Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
    100+
    Mechanism controlling multiple sclerosis risk identifiedWhile the DNA sequence remains the same throughout a person's life, the expression of the encoded genes may change with time and contribute to disease development in genetically predisposed individuals. Researchers have now discovered a new mechanism of a major risk gene for multiple sclerosis (MS) that triggers disease through epigenetic regulation. They also found a protective genetic variant th
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    Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
    6
    Is the sky the limit? On the expansion threshold of a species' rangeWhat stops a species adapting to an ever-wider range of conditions, continuously expanding its geographic range? A biomathematician now explains the formation of species' range margins. The theory shows that just two compound parameters, important for both ecology and evolution of species, are fundamental to the stability of their range: the environmental heterogeneity and the size of the local po
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    Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
    11
    Scientists reveal how gut microbes 'recover' after antibiotic treatmentNew insight on how antibiotics affect the gut microbiome -- the community of microbes that live inside us -- has been published.
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    Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
    9
    Kids grasp that you get what you pay forFrom a young age, children have a nuanced understanding of fairness.
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    Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
    21
    Light pollution a reason for insect declineClimate change, pesticides and land use changes alone cannot fully explain the decline in insect populations in Germany. Scientists have now discovered that regions that have experienced a sharp decline in flying insects also have high levels of light pollution. Many studies already suggest that artificial light at night has negative impacts on insects, and scientists should pay greater attention
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    Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
    63
    Clovis site: Montana burial site answers questions about early humansScientists have shown that at the Anzick site in Montana - the only known Clovis burial site - the skeletal remains of a young child and the antler and stone artifacts found there were buried at the same time, raising new questions about the early inhabitants of North America.
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    Popular Science
    79
    If you're scared of artificial intelligence, you should know it's already everywhereTechnology From sandwich pics to real estate. You're using AI even when you don't know it.
    1d
    New on MIT Technology Review
    71
    Five ways you can already become a cyborg, one body part at a timeWant to use your hand to prove your identity? Become a better skier without any work? Try this.
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    Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
    15
    Ocean's heat cycle shows that atmospheric carbon may be headed elsewhereA new study examined the global carbon cycle and suggests that scientists may have misgauged how carbon is distributed around the world, particularly between the northern and southern hemispheres. The results could change projections of how, when and where the currently massive levels of atmospheric carbon will result in environmental changes such as ocean acidification.
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    Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
    18
    New material for splitting waterSolar energy is clean and abundant, but when the sun isn't shining, you must store the energy in batteries or through a process called photocatalysis. In photocatalytic water splitting, sunlight separates water into hydrogen and oxygen, which can then be recombined in a fuel cell to release energy. Now, a new class of materials -- halide double perovskites -- may have just the right properties to
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    Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
    34
    World's first known manta ray nurseryLocated in the Gulf of Mexico off the coast of Texas at NOAA's Flower Garden Banks National Marine Sanctuary, the juvenile manta ray habitat is the first of its kind to be described in a scientific study.
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    Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
    48
    Everything big data claims to know about you could be wrongWhen it comes to understanding what makes people tick -- and get sick -- medical science has long assumed that the bigger the sample of human subjects, the better. But new research suggests this big-data approach may be wildly off the mark.
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    Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
    13
    Bees love blue fluorescent light, and not just any wavelength will doResearchers have learned that a specific wavelength range of blue fluorescent light set bees abuzz.
    1d
    Live Science
    200+
    Here's the Latest Study on the Links Between Alcohol and CancerHow much alcohol is linked to a lower risk of cancer?
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    New on MIT Technology Review
    39
    School lockdowns are so prevalent that companies are making apps to help teachers manage them[no content]
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    EurekAlert! - Breaking News
    'Kiss of death' cancerMonash researchers have developed a computer program which has revealed a previously unknown combination of drugs that may be the answer to Triple Negative Breast Cancer (TNBC), using genetic and treatment data from TNBC cells grown in labs and from hundreds of patients world-wide. Importantly researchers can tell, by inputting patients' genomic and proteomic information into their computer model,
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    EurekAlert! - Breaking News
    Binge drinking during youth may impact future offspringA rat model found preconception binge drinking may have negative consequences on future offspring's growth, social interactions and pubertal development, according to a new study published in the Endocrine Society's Journal of the Endocrine Society.
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    EurekAlert! - Breaking News
    1
    Risks of cancer and mortality by average lifetime alcohol intakeThe risk of mortality, and of developing a number of cancers, is lowest in light drinkers consuming an average of less than one drink per day across their lifetime, and the risk of some cancers increases with each additional drink per week, according to a new study, published this week in PLOS Medicine by Andrew Kunzmann of Queen's University Belfast, and colleagues.
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    EurekAlert! - Breaking News
    Researchers map cardiovascular disease risk across IndiaThe average 10-year risk of developing cardiovascular disease varies widely among India's states, ranging from 13.2 percent to 19.5 percent, with substantial variation across socio-demographic groups according to a study published this week in PLOS Medicine by Pascal Geldsetzer and Rifat Atun of Harvard University, and colleagues.
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    cognitive science
    1
    A new paper in Psychological Science explores how mere group membership affects kids' self-control in the marshmallow task.submitted by /u/markmana [link] [comments]
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    Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
    22
    Allergies, glaciers, and pikas: climate change in actionYou don't just feel the heat of global warming, you can see it in action all around.
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    Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
    11
    New model for gauging ice sheet movement may improve sea-level-rise predictionsResearchers discovered friction -- or 'basal drag' -- between ice sheets and the hard bed underneath has no influence on how fast glaciers flow.
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    Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
    19
    Mild problem-solving task improves brain function after a concussion, new study suggestsA mild problem-solving task improves brain functioning after a concussion, according to a new study. Currently there are many questions about rehabilitation and treatment options, with absolute rest often the go-to treatment. But the new study suggests that a simple cognitive task as early as four days after a brain injury activates the region that improves memory function, and may guard against d
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    Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
    27
    Tackling bullying could help reduce depression in autistic teensTeenagers with difficulties in social communication, including autism, have higher rates of depressive symptoms, especially if they are being bullied.
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    Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
    12
    Nuclear power shutdowns won't spike power pricesDespite economic woes that could shutter two of Pennsylvania's nuclear power plants -- which generate 6 percent of the state's power -- power prices will remain steady due to low natural gas prices, according to an associate professor of energy policy and economics.
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    Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
    13
    Spintronics: Controlling magnetic spin with electric fieldsPhysicists have found a way to reverse electron spins using electric fields for the first time, paving the way for programmable spintronics technologies.
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    Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
    100+
    Interaction of paired and lined-up electrons can be manipulated in semiconductorsThe way that electrons paired as composite particles or arranged in lines interact with each other within a semiconductor provides new design opportunities for electronics, according to recent findings in Nature Communications.
    1d
    Big Think
    200+
    Listen: Stephen Hawking's final message to humankindThis piece of music was beamed into back hole 1A 0620-00, about 3,457 light years away. You can listen to the six-minute song, with spoken word by Stephen Hawking, right here. Read More
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    Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
    2
    Ford celebrates purchase of iconic Detroit train stationFord Motor Co. is celebrating its purchase of Detroit's long vacant train depot that the company plans to redevelop for research and development of self-driving vehicles.
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    Big Think
    200+
    Artificial intelligence wins a debate against a human—twicePlease tell me that Internet trolls didn't just get a huge leg up. Read More
    1d
    The Atlantic
    500+
    85 Immigrants Sentenced Together Before One JudgeMCALLEN, Tex.—There wasn’t a single empty seat among the six rows of wooden pews in Magistrate Judge J. Scott Hacker’s courtroom on Monday afternoon. The gallery was packed, its visitors jammed shoulder to shoulder, as if the public had crowded in to witness a momentous ruling or, perhaps, a celebrity trial. But the people who occupied these seats in the back of the courtroom were no mere observe
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    Popular Science
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    Meet the yogis who hang out in cadaver labsScience You can hone your corpse pose by hanging out with actual corpses. In the basement of a funeral home in Colorado, yogis—and acupuncturists, massage therapists, and anyone else looking for a better understanding of human flesh—can sign…
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    Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
    Four new mountain lions kittens found in California mountainsFour new mountain lion kittens have been found by researchers studying the wild cats living in Southern California's Santa Monica Mountains, wildlife officials announced in video posts Tuesday showing the blue-eyed babies meowing and one feisty one hissing and even taking a swipe at the person filming her.
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    cognitive science
    1
    Thinking like a Physicist to Solve Neuroscience Problemssubmitted by /u/NaiveSkeptic [link] [comments]
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    Scientific American Content: Global
    70
    7 Questions to Watch in the Theranos SagaSince criminal charges were filed, these may be the most pressing issues -- Read more on ScientificAmerican.com
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    Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
    1
    Audi names interim CEO after boss arrested in diesel probeGerman carmaker Audi said Tuesday it had named a new interim chief, a day after prosecutors arrested boss Rupert Stadler in connection with parent company Volkswagen's "dieselgate" scandal.
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    Quanta Magazine
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    Her Key to Modeling Brains: Ignore the Right DetailsIn May 2013, the mathematician Carina Curto attended a workshop in Arlington, Virginia, on “ Physical and Mathematical Principles of Brain Structure and Function ” — a brainstorming session about the brain, essentially. The month before, President Obama had issued one of his “Grand Challenges” to the scientific community in announcing the BRAIN Initiative (Brain Research through Advancing Innovat
    1d
    New Scientist - News
    100+
    A huge number of mystery microbes are living on your skinWe thought we knew about most of the species in our bodies’ microbiomes, but a study has revealed a large number of previously-unidentified organisms
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    Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
    Visa says over 5 million payments affected by June outagePayment systems giant Visa said Tuesday that a massive technical glitch earlier this month had affected 5.2 million card transactions, almost half of which were in Britain.
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    Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
    Foxconn investing in $30 million water recycling systemFoxconn Technology Group plans to invest in a $30 million recycling system that will significantly reduce the amount of water it has to draw from Lake Michigan for its proposed manufacturing complex in southeast Wisconsin, the company said Tuesday.
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    cognitive science
    1
    Out of their minds: wild ideas at the ‘Coachella of consciousness’submitted by /u/The_Ebb_and_Flow [link] [comments]
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    Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
    100+
    Ocean's heat cycle shows that atmospheric carbon may be headed elsewhereAs humans continue to pump the atmosphere with carbon, it's crucial for scientists to understand how and where the planet absorbs and naturally emits carbon.
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    Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
    9
    Liberals do drink more lattes, but maybe not for the reasons you thinkThe term "latte liberal" has been a popular way to disparage American progressives as uppity and out of touch, but does a person's coffee preference really say something about his or her political ideology?
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    Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
    24
    NASA examined Tropical Cyclone Bud's rains in the US southwestBeneficial rainfall from hurricane Bud's remnants has spread into the U.S. Desert Southwest after making landfall in western Mexico and moving north. NASA added up the rainfall using satellite data to provide a full picture of the rainfall.
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    Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
    6
    Nuclear power shutdowns won't spike power pricesDespite economic woes that could shutter two of Pennsylvania's nuclear power plants—which generate 6 percent of the state's power—power prices will remain steady due to low natural gas prices, according to Seth Blumsack, associate professor of energy policy and economics, Penn State.
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    NYT > Science
    500+
    Dr. Adel Mahmoud, Who Was Credited With HPV and Rotavirus Vaccines, Dies at 76As president of Merck Vaccines, Dr. Mahmoud overcame doubts in developing vaccines against two threats to women and babies: HPV and rotavirus.
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    Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
    17
    New model for gauging ice sheet movement may improve sea-level-rise predictionsA just-published paper in Science changes the formula scientists should use when estimating the speed of huge ice sheets in Greenland and Antarctica that flow into the ocean and drive mounting sea levels around the globe.
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    Scientific American Content: Global
    100+
    New Human Gene Tally Reignites DebateThe controversy over how many genes are contained in the human genome continues to simmer -- Read more on ScientificAmerican.com
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    BBC News - Science & Environment
    500+
    Hot airAs demand for air conditioning goes through the roof, what are the implications for our planet?
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    Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
    2
    Study shows approach can help English learners improve at math word problemsEnglish learners are the fastest-growing minority in U.S. schools. While they face many of the same challenges as their peers, when it comes to mathematics, they are not only learning to work with numbers but doing so through the dynamic of a second language that presents new difficulties, especially with word problems. University of Kansas researchers have published a study that shows how an evid
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    The Atlantic
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    Purgatory at the BorderMATAMOROS, Mexico—When drug traffickers shot Wayner Berduo seven times last year, they didn’t stop there. The men nearly beat him to death with their pistol grips, police reports say. One bullet pierced Berduo’s eye socket, so after the attack, surgeons removed his left eye and stitched back together his face and his right arm, which now hangs limply by his side. For days, Berduo has waited hours
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  2. page Nyheder2018juni20 edited Nyheder MOST POPULAR EurekAlert! - Breaking News 68 Swedes have been brewing beer since the …

    NyhederMOST POPULAR
    EurekAlert! - Breaking News
    68
    Swedes have been brewing beer since the Iron Age, new evidence confirmsArchaeologists at Lund University in Sweden have found carbonised germinated grains showing that malt was produced
    for denne datobeer brewing as early as the Iron Age in the Nordic region. The findings made in Uppåkra in southern Sweden indicate a large-scale production of beer, possibly for feasting and trade.
    7h
    Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
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    Researchers find last of universe's missing ordinary matterResearchers at the University of Colorado Boulder have helped to find the last reservoir of ordinary matter hiding in the universe.
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    Big Think
    200+
    Trump signs executive order ending child separation at U.S. borderIn a stark reversal on immigration policy, President Donald Trump signed an order on Wednesday that ends the controversial practice of separation immigrant children from families at the border. Read More
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    3
    A Weird Lump on a Woman's Face Turned Out to Be a Worm Crawling Under Her SkinWhen a woman in Russia noticed a small lump under her left eye, she snapped a selfie. Then, the lump moved.
    2min
    NYT > Science
    48
    Is There a Smarter Path to Artificial Intelligence? Some Experts Hope SoA branch of A.I. called deep learning has transformed computer performance in tasks like vision and speech. But meaning, reasoning and common sense remain elusive.
    2min
    Live Science
    Separated Migrant Children Face Lasting Psychological TraumaHow can the absence of hugs and comforting from their parents affect children?
    7min
    EurekAlert! - Breaking News
    1
    Researchers identify method to diagnose cancer in patients with early onset diabetesPatients diagnosed with pancreatic cancer can develop elevated blood sugar levels up to three years before their cancer diagnosis, according to the results of a study by Mayo Clinic researchers published the journal Gastroenterology.
    7min
    New on MIT Technology Review
    13
    The US Federal Trade Commission wants your ideas for how to better police Big Tech[no content]
    16min
    Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
    How physics explains the evolution of social organizationA scientist at Duke University says the natural evolution of social organizations into larger and more complex communities that exhibit distinct hierarchies can be predicted from the same law of physics that gives rise to tree branches and river deltas.
    17min
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    Better model of water under extreme conditions could aid understanding of Earth's mantleDeep inside the Earth exist pockets of water, but the liquid there isn't like the water on the surface.
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    Game-changing finding pushes 3D-printing to the molecular limitNew research proves that advanced materials containing molecules that switch states in response to environmental stimuli such as light can be fabricated using 3D printing. The study findings have the potential to vastly increase the functional capabilities of 3D-printed devices for industries such as electronics, healthcare and quantum computing.
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    Better model of water under extreme conditions could aid understanding of Earth's mantleA team of scientists ran quantum simulations to develop a new model of the behavior of water at extremely high temperatures and pressures. The computational measurements should help scientists understand water's role in the makeup of the mantle and potentially in other planets.
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    Neonics are being ingested by free-ranging animalsUniversity of Guelph researchers found residues of the insecticides in the livers of wild turkeys, providing evidence that this common agrochemical is being ingested by free-ranging animals.
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    Scientists find evidence of 27 new viruses in beesAn international team of researchers has discovered evidence of 27 previously unknown viruses in bees. The finding could help scientists design strategies to prevent the spread of viral pathogens among these important pollinators.
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    The seed that could bring clean water to millionsScientist are refining a process that could soon help provide clean water to many in water-scarce regions. The process uses sand and plant materials readily available in many developing nations.
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    Competition for space: Oncogenic mutant cells vs normal cellsResearchers discovered how oncogenic mutant cells selectively expand into surrounding normal tissues and occupy them based on prediction by computer simulation and experimental verification.
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    Stone tools from ancient mummy reveal how Copper Age mountain people livedStone tools found with a 5,300-year-old frozen mummy from Northern Italy reveal how alpine Copper Age communities lived.
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    Chemical 'caryatids' improve the stability of metal-organic frameworksMetal-organic frameworks (MOFs) are porous materials that can change the way we capture carbon, filter water, and an array of other applications. Chemists have now found the link between mechanical stability and structure, thus overcoming a significant obstacle in optimizing MOFs.
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    Whether wheat weathers heat wavesUnlike humans, crops in a field can't move to air conditioning to endure a heat wave. Scientists in Australia are working to understand how heat waves impact wheat.
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    1
    Around the world, people have surprisingly modest notions of the 'ideal' lifeIt seems reasonable that people would want to maximize various aspects of life if they were given the opportunity to do so, whether it's the pleasure they feel, how intelligent they are, or how much personal freedom they have. In actuality, people around the world seem to aspire for more moderate levels of these and other traits, according a new study.
    20min
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    52
    With IGTV, Instagram Takes Aim at YouTubeThe new app for long-form video will exist within Instagram’s existing app, which now has more than 1 billion monthly active users.
    23min
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    Neonics are being ingested by free-ranging animals, study findsHealth impacts of neonicotinoids may go well beyond bees, according to a new University of Guelph study.
    23min
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    Collaboration yields discovery of 12-sided silica cagesWhat do you call a materials science discovery that was given a major boost by a lecture from a Nobel laureate in chemistry, used cryogenic electron microscopy (cryo-EM), and was pushed further along by a doctoral student's thesis on machine learning?
    23min
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    36
    Your risk of cancer likely increases with each additional drink of alcoholHealth Light drinking may prolong your life—but it's more complicated than that. Despite the ubiquity of alcohol consumption, epidemiologists and other health researchers still haven’t figured out how alcohol and overall health mix.
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    Learning about the Himalayas using Mars technologyhe Himalayan Range includes some of the youngest and most spectacular mountains on Earth, but the rugged landscape that lends it the striking beauty for which it is known can also keep scientists from fully understanding how these mountains formed. 'We know more about the rocks on parts of Mars than we do about some of the areas in the Himalaya,' said Dr. Alka Tripathy-Lang.
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    In mice, stem cells seem to work in fighting obesity! What about stem cells in humans?This release aims to summarize the available literature in regard to the effect of Mesenchymal Stem Cells transplantation on obesity and related comorbidities from the animal model. This helpful to justify going forward with clinical trials for stem cell regimens for a possible future application in humans.
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    Collaboration yields discovery of 12-sided silica cagesIn a paper published in Nature, a team led by Uli Wiesner, the Spencer T. Olin Professor of Engineering in the Department of Materials Science and Engineering at Cornell University, reports discovery of 10-nanometer, individual, self-assembled dodecahedral structures -- 12-sided silica cages that could have applications in mesoscale material assembly, as well as medical diagnosis and therapeutics.
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    How physics explains the evolution of social organizationA scientist at Duke University says the natural evolution of social organizations into larger and more complex communities exhibiting distinct hierarchies can be predicted from the same law of physics that gives rise to tree branches and river deltas -- a concept called the constructal law.
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    Live Science
    100+
    These Bizarre Sea Monsters Once Ruled the OceanThe Cambrian explosion, when simple life forms rapidly evolved to more complex creatures, produced some beautiful, bizarre, and mysterious animals
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    Gas flow through tiny atonically flat walls: Atomic-scale ping-pongNew experiments have shed more light on the gas flow through tiny, angstrom-sized channels with atomically flat walls.
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    New therapeutic opportunity for the treatment of resistant malignant melanomaResearchers have revealed that malignant melanoma can reprogram their protein synthesis machinery and become addicted to a new family of enzymes that modify transfer RNAs during acquired resistance. The inhibition of these molecules synergies with targeted therapies to produce a strong anti-tumoral effect. These new findings will be key in the development of improved diagnostic tools and melanoma
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    Last of universe's missing ordinary matterResearchers have helped to find the last reservoir of ordinary matter hiding in the universe.
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    Chameleon-inspired nanolaser changes colorsChameleons change color by controlling the spacing among nanocrystals on their skin. The nanolaser changes color similarly -- by controlling the spacing among metal nanoparticles.
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    Better model of water under extreme conditions could aid understanding of Earth's mantleA team of University of Chicago scientists ran quantum simulations to develop a new model of the behavior of water at extremely high temperatures and pressures. The computational measurements, published June 18 in the Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences, should help scientists understand water's role in the makeup of the mantle and potentially in other planets.
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    Cell-free DNA profiling informative way to monitor urinary tract infectionsUsing shotgun DNA sequencing, Cornell University researchers have demonstrated a new method for monitoring urinary tract infections (UTIs) that surpasses traditional methods in providing valuable information about the dynamics of the infection as well as the patient's biological response.
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    Emergency department patients want to be invited to share in medical decision-makingMost emergency department patients want to be involved in some aspects of medical decision-making, but they need to be invited.
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    Medicaid work requirements and health savings accounts may impact people's coverageCurrent experimental approaches in Medicaid programs -- including requirements to pay premiums, contribute to health savings accounts, or to work -- may lead to unintended consequences for patient coverage and access, such as confusing beneficiaries or dissuading some people from enrolling, according to a new study from Harvard T.H. Chan School of Public Health.
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    In Vino Veritas, Sort OfIn Vino Veritas, Sort Of Growing interest in minimally processed wines is shaking up the wine industry. WineGlasses.jpg Image credits: Africa Studio/ Shutterstock Culture Wednesday, June 20, 2018 - 15:45 Joel Shurkin, Contributor (Inside Science) -- About 10,000 years ago, a farmer in Asia noticed that some of his grapes had naturally fermented and liquid was forming around them. He took a taste
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    7
    NASA outlines its plans to deal with a large asteroid impactNASA is designing and testing missions to deflect a potential asteroid from hitting Earth, and working with emergency responders to plan for a day when one does
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    Big Think
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    Study of 20,000 finds an income advantage for those judged to be very unattractiveA longitudinal study of 20,000 young Americans found a strong correlation between extreme unattractiveness and higher pay. Read More
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    Should the US Have a Military Presence in Space?President Donald Trump's call this week that to create a sixth branch of the U.S. military — which he called the "Space Force" — has reopened a wider debate on the military's role in space.
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    Neonics are being ingested by free-ranging animals, U of G study findsUniversity of Guelph researchers found residues of the insecticides in the livers of wild turkeys, providing evidence that this common agrochemical is being ingested by free-ranging animals.
    1h
    Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
    2
    US stepping up Earth's protection from asteroids, cometsThe U.S. government is stepping up efforts to protect the planet from incoming asteroids that could wipe out entire regions or even continents.
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    55
    Martian dust storm grows global; Curiosity captures photos of thickening hazeA storm of tiny dust particles has engulfed much of Mars over the last two weeks and prompted NASA's Opportunity rover to suspend science operations. But across the planet, NASA's Curiosity rover, which has been studying Martian soil at Gale Crater, is expected to remain largely unaffected by the dust. While Opportunity is powered by sunlight, which is blotted out by dust at its current location,
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    Scientists find evidence of 27 new viruses in beesAn international team of researchers has discovered evidence of 27 previously unknown viruses in bees. The finding could help scientists design strategies to prevent the spread of viral pathogens among these important pollinators.
    1h
    Big Think
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    Where’s your flying car? Here’s your flying car.The GoFly challenge has just announced 10 winning flying-car designs. It’s the first phase of a three-part contest, and they’re very cool. Read More
    1h
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    48
    AMC's Latest Move Proves MoviePass Changed Moviegoing for GoodAMC MoviePass S. A-ListNow that even AMC has gotten in on the subscription game, there's no going back.
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    28
    The cells that control the formation of fatA study has revealed a new cell type that resides in the body's fat depots where it can actively suppress fat cell formation. This discovery was made using single-cell transcriptomics and opens entirely new avenues to combat obesity and related diseases such as diabetes.
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    29
    T. Rex couldn't stick out its tongueDinosaurs are often depicted as fierce creatures, baring their teeth, with tongues wildly stretching from their mouths like giant, deranged lizards. But new research reveals a major problem with this classic image: Dinosaurs couldn't stick out their tongues like lizards. Instead, their tongues were probably rooted to the bottoms of their mouths in a manner akin to alligators.
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    Big Think
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    Waking up early linked to a reduction in depressionEvery month new research is showing how essential sleep is for optimal health. Here are two more. Read More
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    NYT > Science
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    Newly Discovered ‘Limb Pit’ Reveals Civil War Surgeons’ Bitter ChoicesTwo skeletons and the remains of 11 amputated limbs are leading to new knowledge of combat injuries and medical practices on long-ago battlefields.
    1h
    The Atlantic
    49
    On the Border With the Photographer John MooreThe Getty Images photographer John Moore has won many photojournalism awards throughout his career, bringing a high level of skill, empathy, professionalism, perseverance, and an amazing eye for beauty and color to all of his work. Moore has spent years working along the U.S.-Mexico border, and regularly travels to Mexico and Central America, covering the many issues that surround the ongoing imm
    1h
    New Scientist - News
    2
    Ötzi the Iceman ran out of rock to make his tools before he diedÖtzi the Iceman, a prehistoric man found mummified in a mountain glacier, was short of crucial supplies in the days and weeks before his violent death
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    Facebook's Instagram has more than a billion usersInstagram IGTV YouTubeInstagram said Wednesday it now has more than one billion active users, highlighting surging growth at the Facebook-owned social network focused on photo and video sharing.
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    Why 9 to 5 isn't the only shift that can work for busy familiesFor the millions of Americans who work "nonstandard" shifts—evenings, nights or with rotating days off—the schedule can be especially challenging with children at home.
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    The seed that could bring clean water to millionsCarnegie Mellon University's Biomedical Engineering and Chemical Engineering Professors Bob Tilton and Todd Przybycien recently co-authored a paper with Ph.D. students Brittany Nordmark and Toni Bechtel, and alumnus John Riley, further refining a process that could soon help provide clean water to many in water-scarce regions. The process, created by Tilton's former student and co-author Stephanie
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    Viden
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    I fremtiden skal du måske smile i dit pasNy forskning viser, at vi har lettere ved at genkende hinanden på billeder, når vi finder det store colgate-smil frem. Det kan hjælpe paskontrollører.
    2h
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    79
    China Won’t Solve the World’s Plastics Problem Any MoreChina stopped taking in most of the world’s recycling. Where does it go now?
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    BBC News - Science & Environment
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    The gene-edited pigs immune to lung diseasePigs in Scotland have had their genes altered so they are now immune to a deadly respiratory disease.
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    Live Science
    47
    Ötzi the Iceman Had Just Sharpened His Tools Days Before His MurderDays before his violent murder in the Italian Alps about 5,300 years ago, Ötzi the iceman re-sharpened his tools, likely with his right hand, according to a new analysis of the cut marks on his belongings.
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    Popular Science
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    The proposed Space Force isn’t the first time the United States has tried to militarize spaceSpace In 1966, the Air Force sent an uncrewed space station into orbit If President Donald Trump’s Space Force idea actually comes to fruition, it won’t be the first military force aiming for space. Not by a long shot. In fact, the idea of…
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    1
    Rare in-vivo study shows weak brain nodes have strong influence on memory networkThe majority of existing simulation studies show that the parts of the brain with high connectivity, the so-called 'hubs', are most important when it comes to several different cognitive tasks. But the results of a rare in-vivo study by Gino Del Ferraro of The City College of New York recently published in Nature demonstrates that the nucleus accumbens (NAc) -- a part of the brain with weak connec
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    Why 9 to 5 isn't the only shift that can work for busy familiesA new study from the University of Washington finds that the impacts of parent work schedules on children vary by age and gender, and often reflect which shift a parent works. Rotating shifts -- a schedule that varies day by day or week by week -- can be most problematic for children.
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    Chameleon-inspired nanolaser changes colorsChameleons change color by controlling the spacing among nanocrystals on their skin. Northwestern University's nanolaser changes color similarly -- by controlling the spacing among metal nanoparticles.
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    The Atlantic
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    Trump Says He Will End the Family Separations He ImposedUpdated on June 20 at 4:18 p.m. Seeking to quell one of the most volatile political tempests of his stormy presidency, Donald Trump on Wednesday signed an executive order he said was intended to end the separation of children from parents arrested illegally entering the United States by directing that youths be held with adults. “We’re going to have strong borders but we’re going to keep the fami
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    NYT > Science
    20
    After Volcano Eruption in Guatemala, Re-creating a Truck Covered in AshHow 727 photos taken in 29 minutes became an immersive 3D experience.
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    Study: Ecstasy could be far less dangerous than past research suggestsA new paper suggests past research on MDMA often overestimated the dangers of the drug because the studies examined heavy users, not average ones. Read More
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    Instagram unveils new video service in challenge to YouTubeInstagram IGTV YouTubeFacebook's Instagram service is loosening its restraints on video in an attempt to lure younger viewers away from YouTube when they're looking for something to watch on their smartphones.
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    Technology enables soft contact lenses to monitor glucose, medical conditions and deliver medicationsPurdue University researchers have developed soft contact lenses that not only correct vision but also can monitor glucose and medical conditions and be used for ocular pain relief or drug delivery.
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    9
    There's No Way World Cup Soccer Fans Caused an Earthquake in Mexico, Seismic Expert SaysThe soccer earthquake that wasn't.
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    Researchers find last of universe's missing ordinary matterResearchers at the University of Colorado Boulder have helped to find the last reservoir of ordinary matter hiding in the universe.
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    Potential to replace race as a risk factor for kidney-transplant failureMarva Moxey-Mims, M.D., FASN, says APOLLO study researchers hope that clarifying the role of the APOL1 gene in kidney-transplant failure could lead to fewer discarded kidneys, which could boost the number of available kidneys for patients awaiting transplants.
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    1
    T. Rex couldn't stick out its tongue, new research showsDinosaurs are often depicted as fierce creatures, baring their teeth, with tongues wildly stretching from their mouths like giant, deranged lizards. But new research reveals a major problem with this classic image: Dinosaurs couldn't stick out their tongues like lizards. Instead, their tongues were probably rooted to the bottoms of their mouths in a manner akin to alligators.
    2h
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    No, asylum seekers are not a 'burden' for European economiesDoes the arrival of asylum seekers lead to a deterioration in the economic performance and public finances of the European countries that host them? The answer is no, according to economists from the CNRS, Clermont-Auvergne and Paris-Nanterre universities, who have estimated a dynamic statistical model based on thirty years of data from fifteen countries in Western Europe. On the contrary, the eco
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    Established medications combat lung cancer tumor growthTwo research groups have discovered that the growth of an intractable type of lung cancer in mouse models can be restrained with a class of drug known as kinase inhibitors.
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    Research reveals zero proof probiotics can ease your anxietyA study from the University of Kansas appearing Wednesday in PLOS ONE found evidence that probiotics can reduce anxiety in rodents, but not in humans.
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    Asylum seekers positively affect host countries' economy, though on slower timescaleAsylum seekers fleeing to Western European countries to escape war-ridden areas positively affect a host countries' economy, according to a new report that analyzes 30 years' worth of economic and migration data.
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    The sounds of climate changeIn a new study in Science Advances, researchers describe a way to quickly sift through thousands of hours of field recordings to estimate when songbirds arrive at their Arctic breeding grounds. Their research could be applied to any dataset of animal vocalizations to understand how migratory animals are responding to climate change.
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    Scientists calculate impact of China's ban on plastic waste importsScientists from the University of Georgia have calculated the potential global impact of China's ban on plastic waste imports and how this policy might affect efforts to reduce the amount of plastic waste entering the world's landfills and natural environment.
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    Joint venture: Breakthrough treatment for crippling jaw disease created by UCI, othersA first-ever tissue implant to safely treat a common jaw defect, known as temporomandibular joint dysfunction, has been successfully tested by UCI-led researchers in a large animal model, according to new findings.
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    Study of 800 million tweets finds distinct daily cycles in our thinking patternsOur mode of thinking changes at different times of the day and follows a 24-hour pattern, according to new findings published in PLOS ONE. University of Bristol researchers were able to study our thinking behavior by analyzing seven billion words used in 800 million tweets.
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    The Atlantic
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    The UN Human Rights Council Is a Deeply Flawed BodyThe United Nations cares about human rights so much that i t has ten organizations working on human-rights-related issues. One of these is the UN Human Rights Council, the organization from which the U.S. withdrew Tuesday because of, among other things, its “chronic bias against Israel,” to quote Nikki Haley, the U.S. envoy to the UN. Haley has a point. The Council’s rules single out Israel for s
    2h
    The Atlantic
    300+
    How to Look Away“These child actors weeping and crying on all the other networks 24/7 right now; do not fall for it, Mr. President.” Ann Coulter, on Sunday, was speaking to that famed audience of one—Donald Trump—in the language whose grammar and idioms both of them understand intuitively: that of the Fox News Channel. But the pundit wasn’t speaking to the world leader so much as she was warning him. And she was
    2h
    The Atlantic
    Why Would You Want a Prosthetic Hand That Feels Pain?At a lab at Johns Hopkins University, researchers are building a prosthetic hand unlike any other: It can sense pain. It’s easy to understand why you might want a prosthesis that can feel the squishiness of a grape or the warmth of another person’s hand. But pain? Well, pain could be useful, too. “If you think about how we humans use pain, it’s to protect our bodies, to prevent damage,” says Luke
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    12
    Chameleon-inspired nanolaser changes colorsAs a chameleon shifts its color from turquoise to pink to orange to green, nature's design principles are at play. Complex nano-mechanics are quietly and effortlessly working to camouflage the lizard's skin to match its environment.
    2h
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    1
    Boring barnacles prefer the shallow life on coral reefsIf you want to know about the future of coral reefs that harbor marine life and protect coastlines, sometimes that means you have to go there and count barnacles.
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    4
    Scientists find evidence of 27 new viruses in beesAn international team of researchers has discovered evidence of 27 previously unknown viruses in bees. The finding could help scientists design strategies to prevent the spread of viral pathogens among these important pollinators.
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    No clear evidence probiotics can help with human anxiety, study findsBut beneficial bacteria do appear to reduce anxiety in rodents with various problems There is no clear sign that taking probiotics can help dampen feelings of anxiety in humans, according to new research, despite evidence that it works for rodents. A wide range of conditions, from obesity to asthma, have been linked to the microbes living in our guts , with a number of studies suggesting a link t
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    2
    Tongue-tied: T rex couldn't stick out its tongueResearchers say many dinosaurs’ tongues were anchored to the floors of their mouths and unable to waggle The fearsome creatures of Jurassic World might chase you, kill you and rip you limb from limb, but there is one thing a T rex couldn’t do: stick out its tongue. While Hollywood depictions of dinosaurs often show the creatures open-mouthed with tongues waving, researchers have discovered that m
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    Live Science
    9
    Idaho Was Once Swarming with Ancient Buzz-Saw-Faced Sharkshis bizarre shark was 25 feet long and had teeth that looked like a buzz saw.
    3h
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    28
    Stone tools from ancient mummy reveal how Copper Age mountain people livedStone tools found with a 5,300-year-old frozen mummy from Northern Italy reveal how alpine Copper Age communities lived, according to a study published June 20, 2018 in the open-access journal PLOS ONE by Ursula Wierer from the Soprintendenza Archeologia, Florence, Italy, and colleagues.
    3h
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    53
    Scientists calculate impact of China's ban on plastic waste importsWhile recycling is often touted as the solution to the large-scale production of plastic waste, upwards of half of the plastic waste intended for recycling is exported from higher income countries to other nations, with China historically taking the largest share.
    3h
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    4
    The sounds of climate change—Researchers develop an AI to analyze field recordings and estimate songbird arrivalsSpring is coming earlier to parts of the Arctic, and so are some migratory birds. But researchers have yet to get a clear picture of how climate change is transforming tundra life. That's starting to change as automated tools for tracking birds and other animals in remote places come online, giving researchers an earful of clues about how wildlife is adapting to hotter temperatures and more errati
    3h
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    6
    No, asylum seekers are not a 'burden' for European economies: studyDoes the arrival of asylum seekers lead to a deterioration in the economic performance and public finances of the European countries that host them? The answer is no, according to economists from the CNRS, Clermont-Auvergne University, and Paris-Nanterre University, who have estimated a dynamic statistical model based on 30 years of data from 15 countries in Western Europe. On the contrary, the ec
    3h
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    100+
    T. Rex couldn't stick out its tongue, new research showsDinosaurs are often depicted as fierce creatures, baring their teeth, with tongues wildly stretching from their mouths like giant, deranged lizards. But new research reveals a major problem with this classic image: Dinosaurs couldn't stick out their tongues like lizards. Instead, their tongues were probably rooted to the bottoms of their mouths in a manner akin to alligators.
    3h
    New on MIT Technology Review
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    Tesla files a lawsuit against a former employee for allegedly leaking confidential IP[no content]
    3h
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    Tesla sues ex-employee alleging data theft, leaks to mediaA former employee hacked into computers at Tesla's Nevada battery factory, stole confidential information and combined it with falsehoods in leaks to the media, the electric car maker alleged in a federal lawsuit.
    3h
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    4
    Sweden starts construction on fossil fuel-free steel plantSweden has started construction on a factory that will test whether it's feasible to make steel without burning fossil fuels.
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    32
    Mega-cruises are becoming copies of the great Las Vegas resortsThe productive improvements and innovations in the shipyards, which have made the mega ships possible, have made the cruise ship operators look for a leisure model that fills the abundant space that these new floating cities offer. In many of these ships, the classic model of luxury has been abandoned to copy, with great precision, the theme parks of the great casino resorts of Las Vegas.
    3h
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    12
    New screening tool could help diagnose early cognitive decline in dementia from homeAn international team of scientists have developed a new way to screen for age-related cognitive decline at home using a test which asks people to detect sounds and flashes on their laptop or phone.
    3h
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    1
    Fossils show ancient primates had grooming claws as well as nailsHumans and other primates are outliers among mammals for having nails instead of claws. But how, when and why we transitioned from claws to nails has been an evolutionary head-scratcher.
    3h
    Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
    29
    Fossils show ancient primates had grooming claws as well as nailsHumans and other primates are outliers among mammals for having nails instead of claws. But how, when and why we transitioned from claws to nails has been an evolutionary head-scratcher.
    3h
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    Double jeopardy: The high costs of living in Nairobi's slumsTenants in the slums of Nairobi, Kenya, receive drastically inferior household services and pay more rent compared to those in its formal settlements, according to new research from the University at Buffalo School of Management.
    3h
    Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
    1
    Cooler computing through statistical physics?In the space inside a computer chip, where electricity becomes information, there's a scientific frontier. The same frontier can be found inside a cell, where information instead takes the form of chemical concentrations. Recent breakthroughs in the field of nonequilibrium statistical physics have revealed vast areas of research lying hidden within the "thermodynamics of computation." Advances in
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    Separating Families May Cause Lifelong Health DamageA noted pediatrician and advocate for immigrant children says the effects will last well beyond the separation -- Read more on ScientificAmerican.com
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    8
    Encrypted messages in biological processesRNA modifications can encrypt the RNA code and are responsible for a very sophisticated control of RNA function. A research team has shown that modified RNA bases have a great impact on the dynamics of gene expression from DNA to functional RNA. The study yields important new insight into how the basis of RNA modifications can affect the function of mature RNA molecules.
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    Dogs understand what's written all over your faceDogs are capable of understanding the emotions behind an expression on a human face. This study is the latest to reveal just how connected dogs are with people. The research also provides evidence that dogs use different parts of their brains to process human emotions.
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    Interaction of paired and lined-up electrons can be manipulated in semiconductorsThe way that electrons paired as composite particles or arranged in lines interact with each other within a semiconductor provides new design opportunities for electronics, according to recent findings.
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    Key molecule of aging discoveredEvery cell and every organism ages sooner or later. But why is this so? Scientists have now discovered for the first time a protein that represents a central switching point in the aging process. It controls the life span of an individual -- from the fly to the human being. This opens up new possibilities for developing therapies against age-related diseases.
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    Europe Considers a New Copyright Law. Here's Why That MattersCritics say a proposal in the European Parliament would lead to legal content being blocked, even outside the EU.
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    Trump Stokes Outrage in Silicon Valley—But It's SelectiveGovernment contracts have sparked protests among tech employees, but a larger reflection on the role of technology is needed in Silicon Valley.
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    New therapeutic opportunity for the treatment of resistant malignant melanomaResearchers have revealed that malignant melanoma can reprogram their protein synthesis machinery and become addicted to a new family of enzymes that modify transfer RNAs during acquired resistance. The inhibition of these molecules synergies with targeted therapies to produce a strong anti-tumoral effect. These new findings will be key in the development of improved diagnostic tools and melanoma
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    Gene-edited pigs are resistant to billion dollar virus, study findsScientists at the University of Edinburgh have produced pigs that can resist one of the world's most costly animal diseases, by changing their genetic code. Tests with the virus -- called Porcine Reproductive and Respiratory Syndrome, or PRRS -- found the pigs do not become infected at all. The animals show no signs that the change in their DNA has had any other impact on their health or wellbeing
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    The best vacuums for any kind of messGadgets Pet-hair-sucking robots, at your service. Pet-hair-sucking robots, at your service. These vacuums will keep your dwelling's floors dust-mite and crumb-free.
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    Scientists genetically engineer pigs immune to costly diseaseGene-editing technology could be propelled into commercial farms within five years Scientists have genetically engineered pigs to be immune to one of the world’s most costly animal diseases, in an advance that could propel gene-editing technology into commercial farms within five years. The trial, led by the University of Edinburgh’s Roslin Institute, showed that the pigs were completely immune t
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    You Can Now Live Out 'Westworld' With Your Amazon EchoNope, that's not scary at all.
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    Gene-edited farm animals are on their wayScientists create pigs that are immune to one of the world's costliest livestock diseases.
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    What a pain: The iPad neck plagues women moreGender and posture -- not screen time -- are biggest factors behind developing 'iPad neck' and shoulder pain, UNLV study finds.
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    Double jeopardy: The high costs of living in Nairobi's slumsTenants in the slums of Nairobi, Kenya, receive drastically inferior household services and pay more rent compared to those in its formal settlements, according to new research from the University at Buffalo School of Management.
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    Cooler computing through statistical physics?Recent breakthroughs in nonequilibrium statistical physics have revealed opportunities to advance the 'thermodynamics of computation,' a field that could have far-reaching consequences for how we understand, and engineer, our computers.
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    46
    Atomic-scale ping-pongNew experiments by researchers at the National Graphene Institute at the University of Manchester have shed more light on the gas flow through tiny, angstrom-sized channels with atomically flat walls.
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    The cells that control the formation of fatFat cells, or adipocytes, are at the center of nutritional and metabolic balance. Adipogenesis—the formation of mature fat cells from their precursor cells—has been linked to obesity and related health problems such as cardiovascular disease and type 2 diabetes.
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    Gene-edited pigs are resistant to billion dollar virus, study findsScientists have produced pigs that can resist one of the world's most costly animal diseases, by changing their genetic code.
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    High time that we relaxed the rules on cannabis use | LettersMargaret Gibbs calls for more medical testing, while Douglas Moffat wants an odourless weed before legalisation One of the wisdoms of our healthcare system is its evidence-based approach to the use of medicines, which also helps make rational decisions on health economics ( Javid announces review into use of medicinal cannabis , 20 June). However, the evidence we aspire to is high-quality, random
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    The Atlantic
    97
    How the Carmakers Trumped ThemselvesThese are strange times for America’s car industry. This month, the White House will decide the fate of a set of federal rules called the Corporate Average Fuel Economy standards, or CAFE standards. These laws regulate the miles-per-gallon number of “light-duty vehicles”—that is, sedans, minivans, Ford F-150s, and anything else that’s street-legal and weighs less than 10,000 pounds. The rules wor
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    The Exceptional Cruelty of a No-Hugging PolicyOn Monday, when ProPublica released the now infamous seven-and-a-half minutes of audiotape recorded inside a U.S. Customs and Border Protection facility, in which several wailing kids can be heard crying out for their moms and dads, Darcia Narvaez clicked the link and told herself she’d do her best to listen to the whole thing. Within seconds, however, Narvaez, a professor of psychology at the Un
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    Eating less red meat protects against endometriosisMinimising red meat consumption seems to protect against endometriosis, according to a study of more than 80,000 women who were followed for two decades
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    Using bloodstains at crime scenes to determine age of a suspect or victimFrom the spatter analysis made famous in the TV show Dexter to the frequent DNA profiling of CSI and the real cases covered in the FBI Files, blood tests are ubiquitous in forensic science. Now, researchers report that a new blood test, which could be performed at a crime scene, could help determine the age of a suspect or victim within just an hour.
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    Electron sandwich doubles thermoelectric performanceResearchers more than doubled the ability of a material to convert heat into electricity, which could help reduce the amount of wasted heat, and thus wasted fossil fuel, in daily activities and industries.
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    'Green'-feed: Industrial microbes could feed cattle, pigs, chickenToday, producing feed for pigs, cattle and chicken causes immense impacts for the climate and the environment. In the future, animal feed production is likely to be shifted from croplands to large-scale industrial facilities as it could bring both financial and environmental benefits. Replacing 2 percent feed with protein-rich microbes could decrease agricultural greenhouse gas emissions, global c
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    FTC puts data, privacy under spotlight with new hearingsThe Federal Trade Commission says it plans to hold hearings about technology, competition and privacy of a kind it hasn't held in more than 20 years.
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    Possible link found between diabetes and common white pigmentIn a pilot study by a team of researchers at The University of Texas at Austin, crystalline particles of titanium dioxide -- the most common white pigment in everyday products ranging from paint to candies -- were found in pancreas specimens with Type 2 diabetes, suggesting that exposure to the white pigment is associated with the disease.
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    Daily cannabis use is on the rise in American adultsCannabis use may be decreasing among teens, but a new study showed that American adults have increasingly used cannabis daily since 2007. The study found that nondaily cannabis use decreased among those aged 12 to 25 and 35 to 49 before 2007, and increased among all adults after 2007, particularly among adults 26 to 34.
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    Putting the brakes on metastatic cancerA groundbreaking discovery by University of Alberta researchers has identified previously-unknown therapeutic targets that could be key to preventing the spread of cancer. In a study published in Nature Communications, the team found that by inhibiting several newly identified gene targets they could block more than 99.5 per cent of cancer metastasis in living cells.
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    The Atlantic
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    Republicans Are Lost on Family SeparationIn a press conference on Wednesday, the morning after President Donald Trump addressed House Republicans on immigration, Speaker Paul Ryan offered little clarity on the lower chamber’s path forward on family separations at the border. Members are scheduled to vote on two pieces of immigration reform on Thursday, a development sparked in large part by moderate Republicans frustrated by their leade
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    Earth's intact forests vanishing at accelerating pace: scientists (Update)Earth's intact forests shrank by an area larger than Austria every year from 2014 to 2016 at a 20 percent faster rate than during the previous decade, scientists said Wednesday as the UN unveiled an initiative to harness the "untapped potential" of the land sector to fight climate change.
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    Deutsche Bank fined $205 mn in US for forex manipulationUS officials fined embattled German banking giant Deutsche Bank $205 million in a settlement to resolve foreign exchange market manipulation violations, New York's top banking regulator announced Wednesday.
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    Birds have time-honored traditions, tooBy faithfully copying the most popular songs, swamp sparrows create time-honored song traditions that can be just as long-lasting as human traditions, finds a new study. The results show that creating traditions that pass the test of time doesn't necessarily require exceptional smarts.
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    Parent-child therapy helps young children with depressionNew research demonstrates that an interactive therapy involving parents and their depressed preschoolers can reduce rates of depression and lower the severity of children's symptoms.
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    A dual-therapy approach to boost motor recovery after a strokeScientists have shown that combining a brain-computer interface (BCI) with functional electrical stimulation (FES) can help stroke victims recover greater use of their paralyzed arm -- even years after the stroke.
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    Surgery in spaceWith renewed public interest in manned space exploration comes the potential need to diagnose and treat medical issues encountered by future space travelers.
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    Researchers say short-term management responses to climate change-mediated disasters can be maladaptive in the long-termAs hurricane season commences on the East Coast and the West Coast heads into fire season, there's no time like the present to consider the short- and long-term effects of responses to disasters being shaped by the climate of a warming Earth. Are we doing enough to ensure our future well-being in the face of climate change, or are we too distracted by intense but relatively infrequent disasters su
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    13
    New theory deepens understanding of Turing patterns in biologyA team of researchers have expanded Alan Turing's seminal theory on how patterns are created in biological systems. This work may answer whether nature's patterns are governed by Turing's mathematical model and could have applications in tissue engineering.
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    Heated dilemmasShort-term management responses to climate change-mediated disasters can be maladaptive in the long-term.
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    Workplace health clinics can lower health care spendingThe largest study about the benefits of workplace health clinics finds that such an effort can substantially lower worker health care spending. Studying clinics opened in a large urban school district to serve teachers and their families, researchers found that workers who used the health clinics cut health care costs by about 15 percent and were significantly less likely to be admitted to the hos
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    Colorful images reveal how crop genes result in traitsResearchers have devised a new way to automatically and efficiently gather data about a plant’s phenotype: the physical traits that emerge from its genetic code. Each rendering and its associated data come courtesy of LiDAR, a technology that fires pulsed laser light at a surface and measures the time it takes for those pulses to reflect back—the greater the delay, the greater the distance. By sc
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    Adapting to Climate Change Will Take More than Just Sea Walls and LeveesOur government’s unconscionable policies are a scary precedent -- Read more on ScientificAmerican.com
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    New tissue-imaging technology could enable real-time diagnostics, map cancer progressionA new microscope system can image living tissue in real time and in molecular detail, without any chemicals or dyes, report researchers at the University of Illinois.
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    Archimedes' screw inspires researchers to devise a novel particle-trapping laser beamAn active field of research, laser optical trapping works to control the movement and position of particles of different sizes and shapes. The ability to move small particles in a precise and controlled manner is important to both basic and applied science. For example, the ability to control the movement of single atoms can be used to realize quantum computing, and the research also contributes t
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    Robot bloodhound tracks odors on the groundBloodhounds are famous for their ability to track scents over great distances. Now researchers have developed a modern-day bloodhound—a robot that can rapidly detect odors from sources on the ground, such as footprints. The robot, reported in ACS Sensors, could even read a message written on the ground using odors as a barcode.
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    Moonlit Photographs of Detroit's ResilienceThese mom-and-pop stores have persisted even as the Motor City has declined.
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    Scientists unravel DNA code behind rare neurologic diseaseScientists conducting one of the largest full DNA analyses of a rare disease have identified a gene mutation associated with a perplexing brain condition that blinds and paralyzes patients.
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    Facebook Redirects Users Searching for Opioids to Federal Crisis Help LineTech giants are grappling with questions about illicit sales on their platforms -- Read more on ScientificAmerican.com
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    Trumpism, RealizedAt least 2,000 children have now been forcibly separated from their parents by the United States government. Their stories are wrenching. Antar Davidson , a former youth-care worker at an Arizona shelter, described to the Los Angeles Times children “huddled together, tears streaming down their faces,” because they believed that their parents were dead. Natalia Cornelio, an attorney with the Texas
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    Theory Suggests That All Genes Affect Every Complex TraitThe question most of genetics tries to answer is how genes connect to the traits we see. One person has red hair, another blonde hair; one dies at age 30 of Huntington’s disease, another lives to celebrate a 102nd birthday. Knowing what in the vast expanse of the genetic code is behind traits can fuel better treatments and information about future risks and illuminate how biology and evolution wo
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    Live Science
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    The 10 Weirdest Medical Cases in the Animal KingdomA deer with two heads found near the Mississippi River and a mountain lion with teeth and hair growing from its forehead are just two such oddball cases in the animal kingdom.
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    Modern laser science brightened by 2,300-year-old technologyScientists at Tel Aviv University have harnessed a 2,300-year-old water displacement technology to develop a novel laser beam that traps and moves particles in specific directions. It is a significant contribution to the future of both basic and applied science.
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    Fetal T cells are first responders to infection in adultsCornell University researchers have discovered there is a division of labor among immune cells that fight invading pathogens in the body.
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    New study sheds light on the growing phenomenon of radicalized European youthsA study published in European Psychiatry reports on factors underlying the current rise in radical conversions among European youth. Compared to previous groups such as Al-Qaïda, ETA, or Hamas, today's radical groups are smaller, less hierarchical, and are mainly composed of young, homegrown individuals. This review delves into the profiles of today's European adolescents and young adults who have
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    Life-saving stroke educational program goes globalIn an effort to improve stroke recognition and reduce life-threatening pre-hospital delays worldwide, researchers at Penn Medicine created a universal stroke awareness program, Stroke 112.
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    1
    Robot bloodhound tracks odors on the groundBloodhounds are famous for their ability to track scents over great distances. Now researchers have developed a modern-day bloodhound -- a robot that can rapidly detect odors from sources on the ground, such as footprints. The robot, reported in ACS Sensors, could even read a message written on the ground using odors as a barcode.
    5h
    The Atlantic
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    The Clinical Case for Keeping Families TogetherIn April, the Trump administration announced that anyone caught crossing into the United States illegally at the southwestern border would be referred for criminal prosecution. When adults are detained, their children are separated from them and sent into government custody or foster care. Since then, over 2,000 children have been separated from their parents in this way. What happens to the chil
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    The Atlantic
    48
    The Brazilian Spring That Never ArrivedWhen Brazilians of all stripes took to the streets five years ago, the whole country seemed united in its demand for more from their government. Instead, they wound up with much less. On June 13, 2013, the Movimento Passe Livre (MPL), a radical group demanding free public transportation, brought several thousand people into the streets of São Paulo to protest a 20-centavo increase in the bus fare
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    29
    Beluga whales have sensitive hearing, little age-related lossScientists published the first hearing tests on a wild population of healthy marine mammals. The tests on beluga whales in Bristol Bay, Alaska, revealed that the whales have sensitive hearing abilities and the number of animals that experienced extensive hearing losses was far less than what scientists had anticipated.
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    Atrial fibrillation: Weight loss reverses heart condition in obesity sufferersAustralian research shows for the first time that obese people who are suffering from atrial fibrillation can reduce or reverse the effects of the condition by losing weight.
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    Evaluation method for the impact of wind power fluctuation on power system qualityAbrupt changes of wind power generation output are a source of severe damage to power systems. Researchers have developed a stochastic modeling method that enables to evaluate the impact of such phenomena.
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    er endnudum«Tidligere astronaut Mark Kelly mener, at Trumps idé om at oprette en militær rumenhed er direkte dum, da området allerede er dækket af flyvevåbnet.
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    The weirdest things we learned this week: biblical rhabdo, corpse adventures, and socks from the world’s loneliest islandScience Our editors scrounged up some truly bizarre facts. What’s the weirdest thing you learned this week? Well, whatever it is, we promise you’ll have an even weirder answer if you listen to PopSci’s newest podcast.
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    Key molecule of aging discoveredEvery cell and every organism ages sooner or later. But why is this so? Scientists at the German Cancer Research Center in Heidelberg have now discovered for the first time a protein that represents a central switching point in the aging process. It controls the life span of an individual -- from the fly to the human being. This opens up new possibilities for developing therapies against age-relat
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    1
    Interaction of paired and lined-up electrons can be manipulated in semiconductorsThe way that electrons paired as composite particles or arranged in lines interact with each other within a semiconductor provides new design opportunities for electronics, according to recent findings in Nature Communications.
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    New tissue-imaging technology could enable real-time diagnostics, map cancer progressionA new microscope system can image living tissue in real time and in molecular detail, without any chemicals or dyes, report researchers at the University of Illinois. It enables researchers to study concurrent processes within cells and tissue, and could give cancer researchers a new tool for tracking tumor progression and physicians new technology for tissue pathology and diagnostics.
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    Simple sugar delays neurodegeneration caused by enzyme deficiencyThe sugar trehalose increases cellular waste disposal and improves the neurological symptoms in a mouse model of mucopolysaccharidoses IIIB .
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    News from Molecular & Cellular ProteomicsIn recent articles, scientists optimize experimental design for understanding potential chemotherapeutic agents, delve into crop responses to salt-water stress, and present a better way to ensure consistency in long-term proteomics studies.
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    Study explores satisfaction, quality of life after breast reconstructionIn a new study, researchers from Brigham and Women's Hospital evaluated patient-reported satisfaction and well-being outcomes prior to, and two years after their initial surgery for more than 2,000 women across the United States. Researchers found that patients who underwent autologous reconstruction had greater satisfaction with their breasts, as well as a greater psychosocial and sexual well-bei
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    Opioid overdose survivors face continued health challenges, higher death rateSurvivors of opioid overdose are at great risk of dying in the year after overdose, but the deaths are not always caused by drug use, a new study reveals. In addition to succumbing to drug use, survivors were much more likely to die from respiratory diseases, viral hepatitis, and suicide.
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    Patient outcomes, complication rates of postmastectomy breast reconstructionTwo studies, a commentary and podcast focus on patient outcomes after breast reconstruction surgery following mastectomy. One studied compared satisfaction and quality of life between patients who had breast reconstruction using implants or their own tissue, and a second study compared two-year complication rates across common breast reconstruction techniques.
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    Causes of subsequent death for patients after nonfatal opioid overdoseAdults who survive an opioid overdose are at high risk of dying during the year after the incident of substance use-associated diseases, suicide and other medical conditions.
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    Powerful new approach helps understand molecular alterations in neurological diseaseScientists have developed a high-throughput, multi-pronged approach that integrates laboratory experiments, data from published literature and network analysis of large datasets to identify genes that drive disease.
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    Computational method puts finer point on multispecies genomic comparisonsA new computational tool will potentially help geneticists to better understand what makes a human a human, or how to differentiate species in general, by providing more detailed comparative information about genome function.
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    Electric Car Advocates Want to Expand Access to Low-Income CommunitiesThose most impacted by air pollution should be able to more easily use cleaner vehicles, environmentalists argue -- Read more on ScientificAmerican.com
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    Fixing a massive NYC plumbing leak, 55 stories undergroundNew York City is in the midst of a plumbing repair job of monumental proportions.
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    1
    PayPal move blocks sales of school shooting video gameThe developer of a school shooting video game condemned by parents of slain children has lost the ability to sell the game online after being dumped by PayPal.
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    11
    Encrypted messages in biological processesRNA modifications can encrypt the RNA code and are responsible for a very sophisticated control of RNA function. A new study shows that modified RNA bases have a great impact on the dynamics of gene expression from DNA to functional RNA.
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    10
    Is it their own fault?! How people judge the exclusion of othersThe way people view the social exclusion of others varies -- depending on how much they think the excluded person is to blame. However, this is heavily influenced by how similar the group members are to each other, researchers report.
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    8
    Having a meal activates the functioning of human brown fatThe importance of the human brown adipose tissue (BAT) has become clearer during the past ten years. Using positron emission tomography, PET, it was shown that adult humans have functional BAT. Coldness is an effective activator of the BAT metabolic function but, in rodents, eating has the same effect. Now, researchers have shown that having a meal increases oxygen consumption in human BAT as much
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    16
    Lonely and prolonged struggle for people with severe obesityThe majority of people with severe obesity have a lonely and prolonged struggle with their weight. In one study spanning more than 10 years, 83 percent report that they constantly strive to lose weight or prevent weight gain.
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    Children seized at US border will face lasting health effectsThe psychological and physical effects of serious trauma are likely to impact the children being separated from their families at the US border for years
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    1
    TravelLab: In a forest on the trail of synchronous fireflies (Update)Picture a moonless June evening, shortly after midnight, deep in a northwestern Pennsylvania forest. Wild sounds echo gently. Stars glow far above through the canopy of trees. Otherwise it is dark—so very dark.
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    Disney ups its bid for Fox to counter ComcastDisney 21st Century FoxDisney sweetened its bid for key assets of 21st Century Fox Wednesday, raising its offer to $71.3 billion in cash and stock to counter a rival bid from Comcast.
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    4
    Crumple up this keyboard and stick it in your pocketBendable portable keyboards for use with computers and other electronic devices are already on the market, but they have limited flexibility, and they're fairly sizable when rolled up for transport. Now researchers have crafted an inexpensive keyboard that is so tough, flexible and thin that it can be crumpled up and tucked in a pocket without damaging it. The study appears in the journal ACS Appl
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    Teaching robots to sort out their issuesRobots can help do a lot of things—assemble cars, search for explosives, cook a meal or aid in surgery. But one thing they can't do is tell you how they're doing—yet.
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    15
    Dogs understand what's written all over your faceDogs are capable of understanding the emotions behind an expression on a human face. For example, if a dog turns its head to the left, it could be picking up that someone is angry, fearful or happy. If there is a look of surprise on a person's face, dogs tend to turn their head to the right. The heart rates of dogs also go up when they see someone who is having a bad day, say Marcello Siniscalchi,
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    ikke blevet noterettilstrækkeligt gennemtestet.
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    Planned movements and spontaneous reactions are processed differently in the brainScientists from the German Primate Center - Leibniz Institute for Primate Research (DPZ) have been able to show in their recently published study of two rhesus monkeys that planned and spontaneous gripping movements have the same brain activity during the movement but that the preceded brain activity differs.
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    University of Michigan researchers use gene silencing to alleviate common ataxiaIn what researchers are calling a game changer for future ataxia treatments, a new study showed the ability to turn down the disease progression of the most common dominantly inherited ataxia, Spinocerebellar ataxia type 3 (SCA3), also known as Machado-Joseph disease. A single gene mutation causes this neurodegenerative disease, making it an ideal target for researchers.
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    2
    Crumple up this keyboard and stick it in your pocketBendable portable keyboards for use with computers and other electronic devices are already on the market, but they have limited flexibility, and they're fairly sizable when rolled up for transport. Now researchers have crafted an inexpensive keyboard that is so tough, flexible and thin that it can be crumpled up and tucked in a pocket without damaging it. The study appears in the journal ACS Appl
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    How we can bring mental health support to refugees | Essam DaodThe global refugee crisis is a mental health catastrophe, leaving millions in need of psychological support to overcome the traumas of dislocation and conflict. To undo the damage, child psychiatrist and TED Fellow Essam Daod has been working in camps, rescue boats and the shorelines of Greece and the Mediterranean Sea to help refugees (a quarter of which are children) reframe their experiences th
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    Computational method puts finer point on multispecies genomic comparisonsA new computational tool will potentially help geneticists to better understand what makes a human a human, or how to differentiate species in general, by providing more detailed comparative information about genome function.
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    Energiprofessor: Storskala geotermi giver kun mening, hvis det kan udnytte billig vindstrømBrian Vad Mathiesen fra Aalborg Universitet kalder det virkelig positivt, at store spillere som A. P Møller går ind i geotermisk varme, men advarer mod at man skaber et konstant elforbrug
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    A case of 'kiss and tell': Chromosomal kissing gets less elusiveHow are chromosomes arranged in the cell nucleus? Is it possible that they communicate with one another by "touching" each other? To answer this question and to shed more light on the fundamental properties of the communication between different chromosomes, Philipp Maass from Friedrich Luft's lab at the Max Delbrück Center for Molecular Medicine in the Helmholtz Association (MDC) and Experimental
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    New screening tool could help diagnose early cognitive decline in dementia from homeAn international team of scientists have developed a new way to screen for age-related cognitive decline at home using a test which asks people to detect sounds and flashes on their laptop or phone.
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    Towards personalised medicine: One type of data is not enoughTo understand the biology of diseased organs researchers can use different types of molecular data.One of the biggest computational challenges at the moment is integrating these multiple data types.A new computational method jointly analyses different types of molecular data and disentangles the sources of disease variability to guide personalised treatment.
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    1
    A case of 'kiss and tell': Chromosomal kissing gets less elusiveChromosomes occupy different territories in the nucleus; their arrangement and communication with each other is still poorly understood. Scientists from Berlin and Jena published in EMBO Journal findings about structural chromosomal aberrations which have an effect on genome organization (chromosomal kissing) and disease progression.
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    1
    Finnish scientists analyzed the proteome of T helper 17 cellsT helper 17 (Th17) cells belong to a group of T cells with essential functions in autoimmune diseases and inflammation. Regulatory T cells (iTregs) are T cells with a suppressive function to maintain self-tolerance and prevent autoimmune responses. Researchers from Turku Centre for Biotechnology and Aalto University together utilised the advanced technology called label-free quantitative proteomic
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    1
    Quantum step forward in protecting communications from hackersResearchers at the University of York have shown that a new quantum-based procedure for distributing secure information along communication lines could be successful in preventing serious security breaches.
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    2
    People who feel threatened by vegetarianism more likely to care less about animalsNew research suggests that if people perceive the rise of vegetarianism as a threat to their way of life they are more likely to care less for some animals.
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    6
    Dogs understand what's written all over your faceDogs are capable of understanding the emotions behind an expression on a human face. The study in Springer's journal Learning & Behavior is the latest to reveal just how connected dogs are with people. The research also provides evidence that dogs use different parts of their brains to process human emotions.
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    1
    Mega-cruises are becoming copies of the great Las Vegas resortsThe productive improvements and innovations in the shipyards, which have made the mega ships possible, have made the cruise ship operators look for a leisure model that fills the abundant space that these new floating cities offer. In many of these ships, the classic model of luxury has been abandoned to copy, with great precision, the theme parks of the great casino resorts of Las Vegas.
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    57
    Strange sponge-like fossil creature from half a billion years agoA discovery of a new species of sponge-like fossil from the Cambrian Period sheds light on early animal evolution.
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    1
    Augmented reality helps build aircraft tanksWalking through an unfamiliar city, getting directions or simulations of buildings that no longer exist – augmented reality is where virtual content and the real world come together. Scientists at Karlsruhe Institute of Technology (KIT) are developing an assistance system based on this technology which supports engineers in building and maintaining aircraft tanks. The system is currently being tes
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    22
    South Asian monsoon efficiently purifies the air of pollutants, but also distributes them across the globeThe same phenomenon recurs every year. During the dry season, in winter, burning fossil fuels and biomass in South Asia creates a huge pollution haze: the Atmospheric Brown Cloud. How and why it disappears as soon as the rainy season starts in spring has now been clarified by an international team of scientists led by the Max Planck Institute for Chemistry. The result is that thunderstorm updrafts
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    6
    On the path to an artificial cellIt is hoped that cells created in a test tube can answer some of the major questions in biology. What is the minimum that a cell needs in order to live? And how did life on Earth begin? Researchers from the Max Planck Institute for Dynamics of Complex Technical Systems in Magdeburg and the Paul Pascal Research Center at the CNRS and University of Bordeaux are now presenting the forerunners of an a
    6h
    Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
    79
    Quantum step forward in protecting communications from hackersResearchers at the University of York have shown that a new quantum-based procedure for distributing secure information along communication lines could be successful in preventing serious security breaches.
    6h
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    3
    In praise of the midges pestering footballers in the World CupEngland's opening match in World Cup 2018 was a dramatic clash between Gareth Southgate's Young Lions and several million gnats, not to mention Tunisia's wrestling footballers. England pulled a win out of the bag at the last minute – but only after a gruelling fight with some determined insects. Those plucky gnats also had to fight off the insecticide treatments of nearby swamps and insect repelle
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    Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
    2
    Thousands of Swedes are inserting microchips into themselves – here's whyThousands of people in Sweden have inserted microchips, which can function as contactless credit cards, key cards and even rail cards, into their bodies. Once the chip is underneath your skin, there is no longer any need to worry about misplacing a card or carrying a heavy wallet. But for many people, the idea of carrying a microchip in their body feels more dystopian than practical.
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    6
    Do bats adapt to gates at abandoned mines?Abandoned mines can serve as roost sites for bats, but because the mines pose serious risks to humans, officials often install gates at their entrances.
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    7
    Can evolution explain why the young are often more susceptible than adults to infection?In many species, including humans, the young are often more susceptible to infection than adults, even after accounting for prior exposure to infection. New research suggests that many species may have evolved to prioritize growth over immunity while maturing.
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    21
    Climate change to overtake land use as major threat to global biodiversityClimate change will have a rapidly increasing effect on the structure of global ecological communities over the next few decades, with amphibians and reptiles being significantly more affected than birds and mammals, a new report finds.
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    84
    Chip upgrade helps bee-size drones navigateThe same researchers, who last year designed a tiny computer chip tailored to help honeybee-sized drones navigate, have now shrunk their chip design even further, in both size and power consumption.
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    9
    Living the high life: How altitude influences bone growthA study of modern Himalayan populations shows that living at high altitude affects the length of lower arm bones, a possible indicator of differential growth of certain limb segments under high altitude stress.
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    2
    Why homosexual behaviour in insects may be a case of mistaken identitySex is costly for insects. It uses up resources such as water, energy and time. Some species, like bush crickets, can ejaculate as much as a quarter of their body weight. In others, like one species of fruit fly, their sperm is actually longer than their body.
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    Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
    2
    Dry landscapes can increase disease transmissionIn water-limited landscapes sick animals can have increased contact with healthy individuals, which can facilitate disease transmission. Scientists from the German Leibniz Institute for Zoo and Wildlife Research (Leibniz-IZW) present these findings in the British Ecological Society journal Functional Ecology.
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    4
    China and the US are racing to develop AI weaponsWhen Google's AlphaGo defeated the Chinese grandmaster at a game of Go in 2017, China was confronted with its own "Sputnik moment": a prompt to up its game on the development of artifical intelligence (AI). Sure enough, Beijing is pursuing launch a national-level AI innovation agenda for "civil-military fusion". It's part of China's ambitious quest to become a "science and technology superpower" –
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    Miljøstyrelsen flår legetøj af hylderne: 100 pct. af de testede er ulovligeTo forskellige test-scenarier med legetøjsproduktet squishies har vist, at legetøjet indeholder stoffer, der kan være både skadelige for leveren, irritere øjnene og genere lungerne hos børn.
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    3
    Protected bike lanes reduce stress, travel time for riders: studyEdmonton's contentious 7.8-kilometre stretch of protected bike lanes and shared-use paths that were built last summer have led to a sixfold increase in the number of stress-free connections made in the city, according to student-led research from the University of Alberta.
    6h
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    2
    People feeling threatened by vegetarianism care less about animalsNew research suggests that if people perceive the rise of vegetarianism as a threat to their way of life they are more likely to care less for some animals.
    6h
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    3
    Hearing tests on wild whalesScientists published the first hearing tests on a wild population of healthy marine mammals. The tests on beluga whales in Bristol Bay, AK, revealed that the whales have sensitive hearing abilities and the number of animals that experienced extensive hearing losses was far less than what scientists had anticipated.
    6h
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    4
    Researchers develop a better method to compare gene expression in single cellsEfforts to capitalize on next-generation sequencing to compare gene expression in individual cells for clues about cancer's origins, progression or relapse just got a boost. St. Jude Children's Research Hospital researchers have developed an algorithm that provides a more accurate and sensitive method of identifying differences in gene expression in individual cells.
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    1
    New tool using Facebook data shows worldwide gender gapAn international group of researchers, involving scientists from Universidad Carlos III de Madrid (UC3M) and the Complexity Science Hub Vienna, developed a tool to track and analyze gender inequality through Facebook usage data. Their results, published in an article in the latest issue of Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences (PNAS), show that gender inequality online is related to gend
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    1
    Quantum non-locality in ultra-cold atomic gasesNon-locality, Einstein's 'spooky action at a distance', has already been observed between quantum objects separated by more than one kilometer. This achievement is not a surprise -- recent years have seen a major advancement in the quest for non-local systems. In their ''Physical Review Letters'' publication, researchers from the Faculty of Physics, University of Warsaw present a novel and versati
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    1
    Coconut oil prolongs life in peroxisomal disorders'Lorenzo's Oil' was to help a seriously ill boy suffering from a peroxisomal disorder (adrenoleukodystrophy/ALD). The true story was turned into a film which made the rare disease well known. Scientists from the University of Bonn, the German Center for Neurodegenerative Diseases and the German Cancer Research Center investigated such peroxisomal diseases on fruit flies. They were able to prove th
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    1
    A lightweight carbon nanofiber-based collectorLithium metal is considered to be the most promising anode material for the next-generation rechargeable batteries. However, the growth of lithium dendrite and the resulted poor cyclic stability and safety issues greatly hinder the practical application. This work shows a lightweight three-dimensional carbon nanofiber framework with high nitrogen-doping level as current collector, which effectivel
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    1
    Dry landscapes can increase disease transmissionIn water-limited landscapes sick animals can have increased contact with healthy individuals, which can facilitate disease transmission. Scientists from the German Leibniz Institute for Zoo and Wildlife Research (Leibniz-IZW) present these findings in the British Ecological Society journal Functional Ecology.
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    1
    Forgetting may help improve memory and learningForgetting names, skills or information learned in class is often thought of as purely negative. However unintuitive it may seem, research suggests that forgetting plays a positive role in learning: It can actually increase long-term retention, information retrieval and performance. The findings will be presented today at the American Physiological Society's (APS's) Institute on Teaching and Learn
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    EurekAlert! - Breaking News
    2
    Hearing tests on wild whalesScientists published the first hearing tests on a wild population of healthy marine mammals. The tests on beluga whales in Bristol Bay, AK, revealed that the whales have sensitive hearing abilities and the number of animals that experienced extensive hearing losses was far less than what scientists had anticipated.
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    1
    New theory deepens understanding of Turing patterns in biologyA team of researchers at EMBL have expanded Alan Turing's seminal theory on how patterns are created in biological systems. This work, which was partly done at the Centre for Genomic Regulation (CRG), may answer whether nature's patterns are governed by Turing's mathematical model and could have applications in tissue engineering. Their results have been published on June 20 in Physical Review X.
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    Focusing on next 10 years could lead to better use of recommendations for cancer screeningIn a recent study, asking participants to decide on a screening schedule for the next 10 years, instead of just making a single decision for an upcoming appointment, nearly doubled the number of participants who followed evidence-based recommendations for cervical cancer screening.
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    Competition for space: Oncogenic mutant cells vs normal cellsOsaka University-led researchers discovered how oncogenic mutant cells selectively expand into surrounding normal tissues and occupy them based on prediction by computer simulation and experimental verification.
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    1
    Miniaturized infrared cameras take colored photos of the eyeResearchers at the Nara Institute of Science and Technology (NAIST), in partnership with scientists at the University of Tokyo, report a new miniaturized camera module that can be used to diagnose the eye. The module uses three wavelengths of near infrared light to give a clear image of the fundus that matches the performance of cameras in the clinic, but is small enough to mount on top a smartpho
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    The Atlantic
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    What Incredibles 2 Says About Hero WorshipThis article contains major spoilers for the plot of Incredibles 2. “Politicians don’t understand people who do good things. That makes them nervous,” Rick Dicker, the rheumy-eyed secret agent assigned to the world of superheroes, tells the Parr family as they go into hiding at the start of Incredibles 2 . Delivered with a melancholy shrug, it’s an unusually charged line for a children’s film, an
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    The Atlantic
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    Enforce the Border—HumanelyFrom Laura Bush to Rosalyn Carter, from elected representatives to past high government officials, outrage is the mood of the moment, perhaps more than at any time since the immediate aftermath of the 2016 election. The Trump administration’s border policies and his dehumanizing rhetoric about immigrants, whether illegal or not, have triggered this incandescent reaction. Concentration-camp compar
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    The Atlantic
    19
    Brexit Could Cripple Britain’s PortsI arrive in Dover, England, on a Thursday evening in late spring, a few hours before sundown. On my left as I emerge from the railway station is a pale cliff face with a castle on top. I go right up Folkestone Road, passing a flurry of guesthouses and allotments. It is golden hour and, apart from some furious seagulls, peaceful and quiet. You wouldn’t know it from where I’m standing, but Dover is
    6h
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    1
    What will freight and supply chains look like 20 years from now? Experts ponder the scenariosThe Australian government is developing a national freight and supply chain strategy. As part of that effort, we created a set of scenarios describing what Australia's future might look like 20 years from now. In evaluations by a large number of experts of all the future drivers of change we identified, two emerged as the most powerful and uncertain: widespread use of automation, and increased pre
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    78
    Swedes have been brewing beer since the Iron Age, new evidence confirmsArchaeologists have found carbonized germinated grains showing that malt was produced for beer brewing as early as the Iron Age in the Nordic region. The findings made in Uppåkra in southern Sweden indicate a large-scale production of beer, possibly for feasting and trade.
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    80
    Controlling robots with brainwaves and hand gesturesSystem enables people to correct robot mistakes on multi-choice problems.
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    Novel genetic method improves efficiency of enzymeResearchers at the U.S. Department of Energy's (DOE's) National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL) and the University of Georgia developed a new genetic engineering technique to dramatically improve an enzyme's ability to break down biomass.
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    Popular Science
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    A smartphone camera is the most boring device for documenting your lifeTechnology These three cameras are interesting alternatives to the ubiquitous smartphone shooters. A stand-alone camera—from any generation—can capture distinctive memories worth keeping. These three cameras are interesting alternatives to the ubiquitous smartphone…
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    How to help your toddler be helpful (with caveats)Even very young toddlers like to help, a social skill that’s linked to later success in school and life.
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    10
    Scientists create new building material out of fungus, rice and glassWould you live in a house made of fungus? It's not just a rhetorical question: fungi are the key to a new low-carbon, fire-resistant and termite-deterring building material.
    7h
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    6
    New theory deepens understanding of Turing patterns in biologyA team of researchers at EMBL have expanded Alan Turing's seminal theory on how patterns are created in biological systems. This work, which was partly done at the Centre for Genomic Regulation (CRG), may answer whether nature's patterns are governed by Turing's mathematical model and could have applications in tissue engineering. Their results have been published on 20 June in Physical Review X.
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    1
    Researchers find important new piece in the Huntington's disease puzzleIn a new study, researchers from the University of Copenhagen have discovered a hitherto unknown error in the transport of glutamine between astrocytes and neurons in the brain of mice with Huntington's disease. At the same time, it is a relevant area on which to focus the effort of developing a future treatment for the disease, the researchers believe.
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    Self-care and social ties can help men recover from the suicide of a loved oneNew UBC research suggests that male values like self-care and protecting family and friends can help men deal with the emotional trauma of losing a friend or family member to suicide.
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    Brainhealth: Financial decision-making capacity need not decline in healthy advanced agingNew research from The Center for BrainHealth® at The University of Texas at Dallas shows that advancing age alone is not the defining factor in impaired financial decision-making.
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    New beacons light up the interiorLMU's Ralf Jungmann develops modes of microscopy that can resolve cellular structures with dimensions on the order of nanometers. He has now succeeded in imaging actin networks in cells in greater detail than before.
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    5
    Stereo vision using computing architecture inspired by the brainThe Brain-Inspired Computing group at IBM Research-Almaden will be presenting at the 2018 IEEE Conference on Computer Vision and Pattern Recognition (CVPR 2018) our most recent paper titled "A Low Power, High Throughput, Fully Event-Based Stereo System." The paper describes an end-to-end stereo vision system that uses exclusively spiking neural network computation and can run on neuromorphic hardw
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    Futurity.org
    1
    Kids know what you get depends on what you giveChildren as young as 5 have a nuanced understanding of fairness, according to a new study. The research shows they incorporate market concerns—the idea that what you get is in line with what you give or offer—into their decision making and increasingly do so as they get older. Some people think children are innately selfish—they want to get goodies for themselves. Other people think children are
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    5
    How to print a building—the science behind 3-D printing in constructionIt's often claimed that 3-D printing – known in the trade as "additive manufacturing" – will change the way we live. Most recently, a team from Eindhoven University of Technology announced plans to build the "world's first" habitable 3-D printed houses. But it's one thing to build small, prototype homes in a park – it's quite another to successfully use additive manufacturing for large scale proje
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    1
    Study confirms beetles exploit warm winters to expand rangeA new study by Los Alamos National Laboratory scientists and colleagues confirms that increasing minimum winter temperatures allow beetles to expand their range but reveals that overcrowding can put the brakes on population growth.
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    Live Science
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    Mystery 'Dogman' Beast Shot in Montana Was Just a Gray Wolf, DNA ShowsWhen the beast was found, its features led to some pretty wild speculation about whether it was a dire wolf, a dog-wolf hybrid or perhaps a dog-human hybrid (seriously, people?).
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    Big Think
    17
    Billion-dollar acquisitions: Where tech giants buy some of their best ideasThe top 10 tech companies spend big bucks acquiring innovative startups and their brilliant technologies. Read More
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    The deformation and mechanics of one-atom thin layer materialsHigh strength and ultra-low bending rigidity brings in uniqueness of graphene in contrast to other carbon allotropes. The out-of-plane deformation is of soft nature, which gives rise to rich morphology and is crucial for morphology control. Constructing the structure - mechanical property relationship of graphene is of compelling need for the reliability and durability of graphene-based applicatio
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    1
    Lonely and prolonged struggle for people with severe obesityThe majority of people with severe obesity have a lonely and prolonged struggle with their weight. In one study spanning more than 10 years, 83 percent report that they constantly strive to lose weight or prevent weight gain.
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    1
    Reading risk behavior in the brainAnxious people take fewer risks -- in itself this is not a surprising observation. However, a team of psychologists from the University of Jena, together with partners from Würzburg (Gerrmany) and Victoria (Canada) have succeeded in making this decision process visible in the brain, allowing them to predict the behaviour of individuals. To this end, they conducted an experiment to measure the risk
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    2
    Encrypted messages in biological processesRNA modifications can encrypt the RNA code and are responsible for a very sophisticated control of RNA function. A Danish-German research team has shown that modified RNA bases have a great impact on the dynamics of gene expression from DNA to functional RNA. The study yields important new insight into how the basis of RNA modifications can affect the function of mature RNA molecules.
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    1
    Weight loss reverses heart condition in obesity sufferersAustralian research shows for the first time that obese people who are suffering from atrial fibrillation can reduce or reverse the effects of the condition by losing weight.
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    2
    Review of the synthetic techniques and applications of QDs/GR compositesRecent research published in a paper in NANO by a group of researchers from Yunnan University investigates the recent research progress on QDs/GR composites with focus on their industrial preparation and commercial applications. The selection of the appropriate synthetic method is highly dependent on the applying requirements of QDs/GR composites.
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    Study confirms beetles exploit warm winters to expand rangeA new study by Los Alamos National Laboratory scientists and colleagues confirms that increasing minimum winter temperatures allow beetles to expand their range but reveals that overcrowding can put the brakes on population growth.
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    Lyme disease cases among children are on the rise in western PennsylvaniaDoctors found that cases of Lyme disease in children have increased exponentially in western Pennsylvania.
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    Scientific American Content: Global
    19
    Dogs Have a Lot More Neurons Than CatsDogs beat their domesticated rivals, cats, in a new attempt to measure cognitive power -- Read more on ScientificAmerican.com
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    49
    A possible explanation for varying measurements of Venus's rotation rateA trio of researchers with the University of California and Sorbonne Universités has found a possible explanation for why Venus probes have found different day lengths for the planet. In their paper published in the journal Nature Geoscience, T. Navarro, G. Schubert and S. Lebonnois describe a theory they have developed based on observational data.
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    Dagens Medicin
    Region Hovedstaden skal spare 198 mio. kr. i 2019Region Hovedstadens hospitaler, Akutberedskabet og Region Hovedstadens Apotek skal finde besparelser for 198 mio. kr. i 2019. Psykiatriområdet undgår sparekniven.
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    7
    Misinformation and biases infect social media, both intentionally and accidentallySocial media are among the primary sources of news in the U.S. and across the world. Yet users are exposed to content of questionable accuracy, including conspiracy theories, clickbait, hyperpartisan content, pseudo science and even fabricated "fake news" reports.
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    EU tells Luxembourg to recover 120 mn euros from French energy giantThe EU on Wednesday ruled that Luxembourg had given illegal tax breaks to energy giant Engie and ordered it to recover 120 million euros from the company, whose biggest shareholder is the French state.
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    1
    Report provides 24-hour view of cyberattacks in Florida, USThe Internet of things (IoT) - smartphones, vehicles, smart buildings, home appliances and other devices that use electronics, software and sensors—have transformed the way people around the world live and work. But not without risks. Data breaches and cyberattacks affect millions of businesses and households each year, hindering the integrity of critical systems, leaking private information and p
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    Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
    91
    Braiding may be key to using time crystals in quantum computingOver the past few years, physicists have predicted that a new form of matter called time crystals may have potential applications in quantum computing. Now in a new study, physicists Raditya Weda Bomantara and Jiangbin Gong at the National University of Singapore have taken some of the first steps toward showing exactly how that might be done. They theoretically demonstrate that, by braiding two d
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    Viden
    Skjult kamera gør nye smartphones til én stor skærmFlere kinesiske smartphone-producenter fremviser telefonener som nærmest rammeløse. Kameraet skyder frem fra skjul når det skal i brug.
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    1
    Having a meal activates the functioning of human brown fatThe importance of the human brown adipose tissue (BAT) has become clearer during the past ten years. Using positron emission tomography, PET, it was shown that adult humans have functional BAT. Coldness is an effective activator of the BAT metabolic function but, in rodents, eating has the same effect. Now, the researchers at Turku PET Centre in Finland have proven that having a meal increases oxy
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    EurekAlert! - Breaking News
    1
    Is it their own fault?! How people judge the exclusion of othersThe way people view the social exclusion of others varies -- depending on how much they think the excluded person is to blame. However, this is heavily influenced by how similar the group members are to each other, as a research team from the University of Basel writes in the Journal of Personality and Social Psychology.
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    EurekAlert! - Breaking News
    2
    Evaluation method for the impact of wind power fluctuation on power system qualityAbrupt changes of wind power generation output are a source of severe damage to power systems. Researchers at Kyoto University developed a stochastic modeling method that enables to evaluate the impact of such phenomena. The feature of the method lies in its significant computational effectiveness in comparison to standard Monte Carlo simulation, and its applicability to analysis and synthesis of
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    EurekAlert! - Breaking News
    When you're a sitting duck, you learn to adaptWhen sitting on a nest to incubate eggs, a bird is physically stuck and most vulnerable to attacks of any kind, so coping without stress and other significant costs is important. For common loons, black flies are a common blood-feeding pest and can cause nest abandonment and decreased fledging rates. A new study from The Auk: Ornithological Advances presents some of the best data to date supportin
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    New Scientist - News
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    Cocaine in the water makes eels hyperactive and damages musclesThere are low levels of cocaine and other drugs in many rivers, and lab studies suggest that European eels are suffering muscle damage as a result
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    Dagens Medicin
    Ny forskningschef ansat på Nordsjællands HospitalOverlæge Thea Kølsen Fischer bliver fra 1. september ny forskningschef på Nordsjællands Hospital. Hun kommer fra en stilling som forskningsleder på Statens Serum Institut.
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    12
    EU copyright law passes key hurdleEU Copyright InternetA highly disputed European copyright law that could force online platforms such as Google and Facebook to pay for links to news content passed a key hurdle in the European Parliament on Wednesday.
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    Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
    12
    Hyundai Motor, Audi join hands for fuel cell technologyHyundai Motor Group said Wednesday it signed an agreement with Audi AG to jointly develop electronics vehicles powered by fuel cell.
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    5
    Electric promise: Volvo Cars opens first US factoryVolvo Cars, the first major automaker to abandon cars powered solely by internal combustion engines, is officially opening its first plant in the United States.
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    Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
    6
    Using bloodstains at crime scenes to determine age of a suspect or victimFrom the spatter analysis made famous in the TV show Dexter to the frequent DNA profiling of CSI and the real cases covered in the FBI Files, blood tests are ubiquitous in forensic science. Now, researchers report in ACS Central Science that a new blood test, which could be performed at a crime scene, could help determine the age of a suspect or victim within just an hour.
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    Feed: All Latest
    48
    Sennheiser CX Sport Review: Can’t Shake ’EmSenny’s latest buds lack bass but stay put during the most strenuous workouts.
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    Tucker Carlson Is Hurting America AgainLast week, Fox News Channel’s Tucker Carlson, or else the eponymous populist demagogue that he plays on TV, declared on Tucker Carlson Tonight, “ If you’re looking to understand what’s actually happening in this country, always assume the opposite of whatever they’re telling you on the big news stations.” He has previously hosted TV shows on CNN, MSNBC, and PBS. While not uncharacteristic of the
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    When you're a sitting duck, you learn to adaptWhen sitting on a nest to incubate eggs, a bird is physically stuck and most vulnerable to attacks of any kind, so coping without stress and other significant costs is important. For Common Loons, black flies are a common blood-feeding pest and can cause nest abandonment and decreased fledging rates. This has impacts on not only individual pair success, but on population dynamics as well. A new st
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    Monza | Street Outlaws: Crash CourseThe 405 List wouldn't be the same without the silent street killer, Monza and his Sinister Split Bumper. See how he's grown to be one of the OKC's most consistent competitors. Full episodes streaming now on DiscoveryGO: https://discovery.com/tv-shows/street-outlaws/ Binge watch all Street Outlaws: Crash Course now! https://www.discovery.com/tv-shows/street-outlaws-crash-course/ Subscribe to Disco
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    Dansk algoritme skal forhindre madspild til havsAalborg Universitet og en sønderjysk elektronikvirksomhed har udviklet et varslingssystem, som kan forudsige nedbrud på køle­containere til havs. Bag de smarte algoritmer ligger mange timers tungt manuelt arbejde.
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    As future batteries, hybrid supercapacitors are super-chargedA newly discovered supercapacitor has the highest energy density of any comparable system as demonstrated by a team of Molecular Foundry users and staff. These ultracapacitors can be charged and discharged repeatedly. The team's new design approach also makes them very stable.
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    Could aliens harness stars to keep ahead of expanding universe?Dan Hooper, a senior scientist with Fermi National Accelerator Laboratory has written a paper outlining a way future aliens could keep their civilizations alive in spite of the isolation due to an expanding universe. In his paper uploaded to the arXiv preprint server, he suggests they might consider collecting and storing stars.
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    72
    Why We Procrastinate and 5 Ways to StopWe all procrastinate, even at times we know better -- Read more on ScientificAmerican.com
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    Everything you think you know about bald eagles is wrongAnimals They’re whiney moochers, for starters. Bald eagles look awesome. Heck, all eagles look awesome. It’s why they’re a good national symbol—they seem so fearsome and regal. But despite their image being…
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    New research shows why nutrition should be back on the table for surgical patientsImplementing a nutrition care program for malnourished surgical patients showed a nearly 50 percent reduction in readmission rates, according to new data from Advocate Health Care and Abbott. New guidelines call for hospital reform on improving nutrition before and after surgery for better patient outcomes.
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    Chemical 'caryatids' improve the stability of metal-organic frameworksMetal-organic frameworks (MOFs) are porous materials that can change the way we capture carbon, filter water, and an array of other applications. EPFL chemists have now found the link between mechanical stability and structure, thus overcoming a significant obstacle in optimizing MOFs.
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    Spacefood for cowsToday, producing feed for pigs, cattle and chicken causes immense impacts for the climate and the environment.In the future, animal feed production is likely to be shifted from croplands to large-scale industrial facilities as it could bring both financial and environmental benefits.Replacing 2 percent feed with protein-rich microbes could decrease agricultural greenhouse gas emissions, global cro
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    Microbial proteins could supplement animal feed, reduce land use and pollutionAs the world's population swells, humans will have to figure out how to keep feeding livestock without using even larger tracts of land to grow food for them or causing more harm to the environment. Scientists report in a study appearing in Environmental Science & Technology that the key could be bacteria that can efficiently produce large amounts of microbial proteins. These proteins could replac
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    Using bloodstains at crime scenes to determine age of a suspect or victimFrom the spatter analysis made famous in the TV show Dexter to the frequent DNA profiling of CSI and the real cases covered in the FBI Files, blood tests are ubiquitous in forensic science. Now, researchers report in ACS Central Science that a new blood test, which could be performed at a crime scene, could help determine the age of a suspect or victim within just an hour.
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    6
    Evaluation method for the impact of wind power fluctuation on power system qualityAbrupt changes of wind power generation output are a source of severe damage to power systems. Researchers at Kyoto University developed a stochastic modeling method that enables to evaluate the impact of such phenomena. The feature of the method lies in its significant computational effectiveness in comparison to standard Monte Carlo simulation, and its applicability to analysis and synthesis of
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    Gilead in AmericaThis article contains spoilers through the 10th episode of Season 2 of The Handmaid’s Tale. The aura of timeliness that hovers around The Handmaid’s Tale has, for the last two seasons, charged Hulu’s television adaptation of the novel. Margaret Atwood’s 1985 work of speculative fiction imagines a repressive theocratic regime staging a coup in America and forcing fertile women into sexual and repr
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    Trump’s Insidious Reason for Leaving the UN Human Rights CouncilWhen the Trump administration commits to a decision, it goes full throttle—and often with little regard for the consequences. One such decision was announced Tuesday evening: The United States is withdrawing its membership from the UN Human Rights Council, which it joined in 2008, two years after its creation. The stated reasons for withdrawal ranged from what the Trump administration regards as
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    The Atlantic
    54
    Dear Therapist: I'm Turning 50 and Panicking About My AppearanceEditor’s Note: Every Wednesday, Lori Gottlieb answers questions from readers about their problems, big and small. Have a question? Email her at dear.therapist@theatlantic.com . Dear Therapist, I’ll be turning 50 later this year and I’m having a very difficult time with my current stage in the aging process. I’m not so much worried about the number itself but about the changes in my body and espec
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    What Petty Nextdoor Posts Reveal About AmericaJosh Cochran Here are some of the things I heard about in my neighborhood over the past year: A thunderstorm downed a tree, blocking a central road; a shadowy agent called “the night clipper” arose, surreptitiously cutting overhanging bushes while unsuspecting property owners slept; several dogs and cats were lost, found, or “on the loose,” whatever that means for a cat; a federal-grand-jury-summ
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    Astronauts eject UK-led space junk demo missionThe RemoveDebris satellite will trial technologies for snaring broken hardware drifting in orbit.
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    Self-heating drinks cans set for a relaunch—here's how they workA US technology firm is hoping to make a very old idea finally work by launching self-heating drinks cans. HeatGenie recently received US$6m to bring their can design to market in 2018, more than 15 years after Nestle abandoned a similar idea. Yet the principles behind the technology go back much further to 1897, when Russian engineer Yevgeny Fedorov invented the first self-heating can. So how do
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    Cheating on your diet? A blood test can tellAnalyzing metabolites in a blood sample can reveal if you’re following your prescribed diet or cheating, researchers report. Clinical trials are often plagued by participants’ poor adherence to assigned diets, which can make it difficult to detect the diets’ true effectiveness. The new approach, described in the American Journal of Clinical Nutrition , could provide an objective and relatively ea
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    Competition for space—oncogenic mutant cells vs normal cellsCells in multicellular tissues adhere to each other. Epithelial tissues on the surface layer of the intestines and skin pack cells into a hexagonal (honeycomb) pattern, with cells adhering tightly to the six cells adjacent to them (Fig. 1). The whole tissue can be represented as a network, and body function is maintained by keeping this basic adhesion network intact.
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    Political leanings shape city water laws as much as climateA city’s water ordinances can be as much related to whether it leans left or right politically as they are to whether the climate is wet or dry, according to a new report. Researchers found Los Angeles ranks No. 1 for number and strength of policies, followed by six other left-leaning California cities along with Austin, Texas. “We had expected that water conservation would be a more neutral issu
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    New AI method increases the power of artificial neural networksAn international team of scientists from Eindhoven University of Technology, University of Texas at Austin, and University of Derby, has developed a revolutionary method that quadratically accelerates artificial intelligence (AI) training algorithms. This gives full AI capability to inexpensive computers, and would make it possible in one to two years for supercomputers to utilize Artificial Neura
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    Turbulence isn't just a science problemMost of us have an understanding of what atmospheric turbulence is – nauseating plane movement is hard to forget.
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    Industrial microbes could feed cattle, pigs and chicken with less damage to the environmentToday's agricultural feed cultivation for cattle, pigs and chicken comes with tremendous impacts for the environment and climate, including deforestation, greenhouse gas emissions, biodiversity loss and nitrogen pollution. Cultivating feed in industrial facilities instead of on croplands might help to alleviate the critical implications in the agricultural food supply chain. Protein-rich microbes,
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    Chemical 'caryatids' improve the stability of metal-organic frameworksMetal-organic frameworks (MOFs) are materials with nano-sized pores in their crystal structures. These pores allow MOFs to capture molecules so efficiently that they are now prime candidates in applications like carbon capture and water filtering.
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    El-scootere med bytte-batteri myldrer fremOvergangen fra små larmende to- og firetaktere til lydløse elektriske scootere er godt i gang. Nu får den første taiwanesiske model med udskiftelige batterier konkurrence fra en af verdens scootergiganter.
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    Within 10 years, a high-luminosity LHC at CERNA new site opened on Friday, June 15, 2018, at the LHC, the Large Hadron Collider. Begun in 2011, this project aims to commission a high-luminosity LHC (HL-LHC) by 2026 that will increase the number of proton-proton collisions and gather more data. France is contributing substantially to this project (to the tune of 180 million euros, including salaries). Teams at CNRS and CEA are participating in
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    41
    Not always bad—MXenes' spontaneous oxidation harnessed to create 2-D nanocompositesResearchers at Missouri S&T have discovered a new way to harness the potential of a type of spontaneously oxidized MXene thin films, to create nanocomposites that could sense both light and the environment. Previously, such spontaneous oxidation was considered detrimental because it degrades the MXene structure. The research is published in the June 2018 issue of ACS Nano, one of Google Scholar's
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    Smashing avocado disease threatsResearchers are working with the Australian avocado industry to safeguard one of the nation's favourite fruits from the threat of existing and emerging disease.
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    Aging out of WIC leaves some kids hungryNo safety net exists for children who age out of the Special Supplemental Nutrition Program for Women, Infants and Children (WIC) before they become eligible to attend kindergarten, a new study shows. Not only does the coverage gap affect overall food insecurity, but it also reduces reading scores at kindergarten entry, a time when children are often placed on learning trajectories, says Irma Art
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    How wildfires contaminate drinking water sourcesWildfires can contaminate nearby streams and watersheds through mobilization of sediments, nutrients and dissolved organic matter, straining the capabilities of downstream municipal treatment facilities, a new report co-authored by CU Boulder researchers shows.
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    The Immigrants Fueling the Gig EconomyEditor’s Note: This article is the third in a series about how the gig economy is shaping the future of labor and what that means for workers. Sakhr Sharafadin was making $8 an hour in the kitchen at a Little Caesars, during his senior year of high school, when friends started telling him about their work as Uber drivers and food deliverers for an app called Caviar. Though he’d been promoted to n
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    Styrelsen for Patientsikkerhed rækker hånden ud til praktiserende lægerEn debat på Folkemødet lørdag tog en uventet drejning, da Styrelsen for Patientsikkerhed opfordrede PLO til at komme med et udspil til, hvilke punkter patientsikkerheden i almen praksis skal måles på fremadrettet. Parterne vil nu sætte sig sammen og drøfte sagen nærmere.
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    New NASA mission to detect plant water use from spaceDoctors learn a lot about their patients' health by taking their temperature. An elevated temperature, or fever, can be a sign of illness. The same goes for plants, but their temperatures on a global scale are harder to measure than the temperatures of individual people.
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    Charting a path to better cell models of the intestineFor many years, drug development has relied on simplified and scalable cell culture models to find and test new drugs for a wide variety of diseases. However, cells grown in a dish are often a feint representation of healthy and diseased cell types in vivo. This limitation has serious consequences: Many potential medicines that originally appear promising in cell cultures often fail to work when t
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    15
    Helping visually impaired children to 'feel' the universeA University of Portsmouth project is helping blind and visually impaired children to 'feel' the universe.
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    Friends in high places can lead to questionable spendingHaving friends in high places such as the U.S. Congress can lead to reckless behavior at the local government level, according to a new study.
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    The Milky Way has devoured 15 other galaxies since it formedOur galaxy formed fast, and with an appetite. It’s devoured 15 other galaxies, including a big one nicknamed Kraken that we didn’t know existed until now
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    Robo bomb squads compete to gather evidence after a drone attackObstacle courses, simulated chemical spills, and IEDs are just some of the challenges bomb squads tackle with ground robots and drones at the Robot Rodeo competition
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    Parasites Can Mind-Control Animals Without Infecting ThemA tapeworm is essentially a very long, parasitic towel with a grappling hook for a head. It attaches itself to the internal organs of its host with its fiendish head spines, and it absorbs nutrients through its tagliatelle-shaped body. Once fastened, it does very little. It has no mouth or gut, no circulatory or respiratory systems. Its sparse nerves culminate in a cluster that could barely be ca
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    The Atlantic
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    Exit InterviewFor years, Edith Gondwe, a lawyer and human-resources manager, clocked in 12 to 14 hours a day at top-tier law firms. She shattered records recruiting talent and developing firm leadership—but she also had to terminate countless employees. “I understood that these people had invested so much of themselves into their careers,” Gondwe told me, and that losing those careers “felt like a failure.” Ev
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    The Atlantic
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    The Subtle and Not-So-Subtle Force of AgeismEditor’s Note: This article is part of Exit Interview , a series of conversations about leaving one’s career. In 2014, Gordon Rothman, a multimedia producer who worked in TV news, lost his job at CBS in a mass layoff. He didn’t sit idle. Rothman had already been volunteering for Gatewave, a radio reading service for the blind, and became the nonprofit’s executive director. He saved the group from
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    The Atlantic
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    When a Job Is Just Too MuchEditor’s Note: This article is part of Exit Interview , a series of conversations about leaving one’s career. James T. Green landed the job of his dreams fresh out of the University of St. Francis in Joliet, Illinois. At just 23 years old, he had a senior graphic-design position in advertising at a major media organization. But after landing in the hospital, not once but twice, he worried that st
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    The Atlantic
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    When Changing Your Career Means Changing Your IdentityEditor’s Note: This article is part of Exit Interview , a series of conversations about leaving one’s career. In 1966, Nancy Bancroft changed not just her career, but her name. After joining a convent, “I went from Nancy to Sister Dorothy, which was my mother’s name. Dorothy means ‘gift of God.’” While there, she wanted to continue to pursue a meaningful career, but was also curious about what it
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    The Atlantic
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    The Never-Ending Struggle to Sustain a Small BusinessEditor’s Note: This article is part of Exit Interview , a series of conversations about leaving one’s career. Like many theater rats, the actress Delissa Reynolds had juggled auditions with an on-and-off office job, “daylighting” as a temp at Citibank. She had some success as an actor, even landing two roles on Law and Order . But by 2002, Reynolds faced a reckoning in a field notoriously challen
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    The Atlantic
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    The ‘Disenfranchised Grief’ of Losing Your JobEditor’s Note: This article is part of Exit Interview , a series of conversations about leaving one’s career. It’s comforting to know people like Meg Spinella, a hospice chaplain, exist. Spinella radiates empathy, even as she jokingly describes herself as “more of a ‘shit happens’” than “an ‘everything happens for a reason’ person.” It certainly felt more like the former when, in 2007, budget cut
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    Autonomous Vehicles Might Drive Cities to Financial RuinAmerican cities rely on car-related fees to fund public transit. But driverless cars might not need to park or fill up on gas—causing the system to collapse.
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    Why Lyft Is Trying to Become the Next Subscription BusinessAfter months of testing its fledgling membership program, Lyft is betting that the model that built loyal followings for Netflix and Spotify can also work for transit
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    Each year painted lady butterflies cross the Sahara — and then go back againPainted ladies migrate the farthest of any butterfly.
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    SpongeBob NoPants? Bizarre 'Nude' Sea Creature May Be a Sponge Relative After AllA "nude" sponge-like animal that lived 500,000 years ago is offering compelling new clues about early animal evolution.
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    Photos: Ancient Shrimp-Like Critter Was Tiny But FierceAbout 508 million years ago, a fierce water beastie with paddles and a shrimp-like tail sped through the water, hunting for prey.
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    First Known Nursery for Baby Manta Rays Discovered Off the Texas CoastThe little rays use the shallow reefs as hiding spots to avoid big sharks in the area.
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    Ancient, Mustached Sea Creature Used Spiny Limbs to Disembody PreyIt took more than 100 years, but researchers have finally come up with a scientific description for a weird, thumb-size sea creature with large eyes, a "mustache" and fringed paddles for zipping through the ocean during the Cambrian period.
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    Colorectal Cancer Is on the Rise in Young AdultsThey're reluctant to have invasive colonoscopies, but a simple blood test could improve compliance -- Read more on ScientificAmerican.com
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    Electron sandwich doubles thermoelectric performanceResearchers more than doubled the ability of a material to convert heat into electricity, which could help reduce the amount of wasted heat, and thus wasted fossil fuel, in daily activities and industries.
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    38
    Fossil fish with platypus-like snout shows that coral reefs have long been evolution hotspotsCoral reefs are well known today for their incredibly diverse and abundant marine life, including fish species ranging from delicate butterflyfish to huge humphead wrasse and ornate lionfish.
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    Image: Dark and stormy JupiterThis image captures the intensity of the jets and vortices in Jupiter's North North Temperate Belt.
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    Sentinel-3 flies tandemThe key to monitoring Earth's changing environment and to guaranteeing a consistent stream of satellite data to improve our daily lives is to take the same measurements over the course of decades. But how do you know that measurements from successive satellites, even though identical in build, are like for like?
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    Big Data exploration in the era of GaiaTwo astronomers from the University of Groningen (The Netherlands) have developed a software library that can effortlessly generate visualisations based on hundreds of millions of data points. Maarten Breddels and Jovan Veljanoski initially developed their software to handle the enormous quantity of data from the Gaia mission. However, the software can also show patterns in other large data files.
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    Babysitting Mammals Keep It in the FamilyBlood relations may be the key factor for mole rats, meerkats and others. But how do humans fit in? -- Read more on ScientificAmerican.com
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    64
    New tool using Facebook data shows worldwide gender gapAn international group of researchers, involving scientists from the Complexity Science Hub Vienna & Medical University of Vienna and Universidad Carlos III de Madrid, developed a tool to track and analyse gender inequality through Facebook usage data. Their results, published in the latest issue of Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences (PNAS), show that gender inequality online is relat
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    Detecting the fingerprints of harmful molecules noninvasively via black siliconScientists of the Far Eastern Federal University (FEFU) in cooperation with colleagues from the Russian Academy of Sciences (RAS), Australian and Lithuanian Universities have improved the technique of ultrasensitive nonperturbing spectroscopic identification of molecular fingerprints.
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    Creating a new composite fuel for next-generation fast reactorsJoint research efforts of a team of scientists at Lobachevsky University of Nizhny Novgorod (UNN) comprising chemists, physicists and engineers are currently focused on solving the problems of handling plutonium and minor actinides (MA) accumulated over many years. To this end, they are studying composite ceramics-ceramics (Cer-Cer) and ceramics-metal (CerMet) materials on the basis of mineral-lik
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    Moderne sololæge: Regeringen glemmer osI 2030 skal ni ud af ti praktiserende læger sidde i en flermandspraksis, lyder et af udviklingsmålene i regeringens udspil for fremtidens almen praksis. Det får sololæge Jette Willendrup til at føle sig overset og misforstået. »Udfordringen består i at forbedre rammerne, ikke ændre måden vi driver praksis på‚« siger hun.
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    Nyborg og Svendborg får bedre lægedækningRegion Syddanmark sælger to ekstra ydernumre i Nyborg og Svendborg. Rettidig omhu, siger udvalgsformand.
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    An unlikely marriage among oxidesThe term alloy usually refers to a mixture of several metals. However, other materials can also be alloyed. In the semiconductor industry, for instance, oxide and nitride alloys have long been used successfully to tune the material's functional properties. Usually, these changes occur gradually and the properties of the base materials are still easy to recognize.
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    Light pollution a reason for insect declineClimate change, pesticides and land use changes alone cannot fully explain the decline in insect populations in Germany. Scientists from the Leibniz-Institute of Freshwater Ecology and Inland Fisheries (IGB) have now discovered that regions that have experienced a sharp decline in flying insects also have high levels of light pollution. Many studies have suggested that artificial light at night ha
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    3
    Responses of the tropical atmospheric circulation to climate changeThe tropical circulation change under global warming has been a growing subject of research in recent decades. It has a close relationship with the tropical precipitation change, and the uncertainty in making projections is one of the difficulties in climate science.
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    1
    The first experimental proof of the propagation of plasma turbulenceIn seeking to achieve fusion energy, research on magnetic field confinement of high-temperature plasma is being conducted around the world. In a high-temperature plasma, there is a temperature gradient. When the temperature gradient becomes steep, turbulence is generated. Because the high-temperature regions and the low temperature areas are mixed due to the turbulence, the core temperature cannot
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    Lange vindmøllevinger skal bygges i kompositmaterialerTendensen mod stadigt længere vinger får DTU og vingeproducenten LM Wind Power til at arbejde tæt sammen om nye kompositmaterialer, der er lettere, stivere og bedre kan modstå revner.
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    Yousee: It-fejl sendte tusinder af hemmelige numre til åben nummeroplysningDirektør for bredbånd og tv i YouSee, Jacob Mortensen, oplyser, at datalækket er anmeldt til Erhvervsstyrelsen.
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    Efter Fukushima: Radioaktive mikropartikler findes 40 km vækEn ny målemetode viser, at radioaktive, cæsiumholdige mikropartikler i stort antal findes i jorden op til 40 km fra atomkraftværkerne. Det overrasker forskerne.
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    The New York bird with a song that may be a thousand years oldA walk in the Hudson Valley 1000 years ago may have sounded similar to today. A simulation shows the songs passed down by swamp sparrows can last a millennium
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    Kommune afviser penge til nyt sundhedscenterVordingborg Kommune har takket nej til sundhedsministeriets penge til et nye læge- og sundhedshus. »Vi har ingen mulighed for at finde over fem millioner kroner fra egen kasse til projektet,« siger sundhedsformand.
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    Ny formand for reumatologer indleder forsøg med cannabisOliver Hendricks er ny formand for Reumatologisk Selskab. Han går fra august i gang med et større forsøg med medicinsk cannabis.
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    Malerier forsimpler lynets forgreningerPå malerier ser man ikke lyn med flere end 11 forgreninger, i den virkelige verden kan lyn have mere end 50 forgreninger. Digitale fotos har været med til at mindske fejlene.
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    A dual-therapy approach to boost motor recovery after a strokeEPFL scientists have shown that combining a brain-computer interface (BCI) with functional electrical stimulation (FES) can help stroke victims recover greater use of their paralyzed arm -- even years after the stroke.
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    Birds have time-honored traditions, tooBy faithfully copying the most popular songs, swamp sparrows create time-honored song traditions that can be just as long-lasting as human traditions, finds a new study. The results show that creating traditions that pass the test of time doesn't necessarily require exceptional smarts.
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    American swamp sparrows have sung the same songs for more than 1,000 yearsAmerican swamp sparrows may have sung the same songs for more than 1,000 years and passed them on through generations by learning, according to researchers at Queen Mary University of London, Imperial College London and Duke University.
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    Electron sandwich doubles thermoelectric performanceResearchers more than doubled the ability of a material to convert heat into electricity, which could help reduce the amount of wasted heat, and thus wasted fossil fuel, in daily activities and industries.
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    Stealth sheets can make you appear invisible to infrared camerasA cloaking material renders objects almost completely invisible in infrared light and could have military applications
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    Birds have time-honored traditions, tooWhat makes human cultural traditions unique? One common answer is that we are better copycats than other species, which allows us to pass our habits and ways of life down through the generations without losing or forgetting them.
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    Giant operation against wildlife crime in 93 countriesInternational police agency Interpol says a giant operation against illegal trade in wildlife and timber has resulted in millions of dollars' worth of seizures and the identification of 1,400 suspects across the world.
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    The Science Behind The World Cup BallFor every World Cup, there's a custom official ball. But how does the Telstar 18 actually stack up? To find out, scientists stuck it in a wind tunnel with a bunch of sensors. (Image credit: Mladen Antonov/AFP/Getty Images)
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    Dexter, Broen og CSI tager fejl: Sådan opklares et mord i virkelighedenBlodstænk, blåt lys der afslører usynlige blodpletter og lynhurtige DNA-maskiner. Politiets metoder på tv er ikke helt så fancy i virkeligheden.
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    New Scientist - News
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    Black men are left out of cancer trials because of their biologyProstate cancer is more common in African Americans, but they are less likely to be included in drug trials. Unintended biological biases are partly to blame
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    Hackers steal $30m from top Seoul bitcoin exchangeHackers stole more than $30 million worth of cryptocurrencies from South Korea's top bitcoin exchange, sending the unit's price falling around the world on Wednesday.
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    Pilot whale meat poses health hazard, Faroese warnedThe Faroe Islands' ritual pilot whale hunt is not only highly controversial, eating the whale meat also poses a health hazard, public health authorities in Denmark's autonomous North Atlantic territory warn, advising against eating it.
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    Noble Group shares soar after deal with key investorNoble Group shares surged more than 50 percent Wednesday after the embattled commodities trader sealed a deal with a major investor, paving the way for a debt restructuring.
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    General Electric dropped from Dow Jones stock indexSlumping US industrial giant General Electric will be booted from the prestigious Dow Jones stock index next week, S&P Dow Jones Indices announced Tuesday.
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    1
    Australia telecom giant Telstra to axe 8,000 jobsAustralia's dominant telecommunications company Telstra Wednesday announced plans to axe 8,000 jobs—a quarter of its workforce—as part of a drastic new strategy to cope with an increasingly competitive industry.
    13h
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    Oil in the Faroe Islands: mirage or miracle ?After fuelling hopes of independence from Denmark at the turn of the millennium, the Faroe Islands' dreams of an oil bonanza have turned out to be more of a mirage than a miracle.
    13h
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    Multiracial congregations have nearly doubled in the United StatesThe percentage of multiracial congregations in the United States has nearly doubled, with about one in five American congregants attending a place of worship that is racially mixed, according to a Baylor University study.
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    Flexible content delivery, student-faculty interaction frees time without hurting gradesMedical students face an intense schedule and workload and often struggle to juggle their priorities. Similarly, medical school faculty must find time in their busy schedules to prepare lectures and for face-to-face interaction with their students. In an effort to optimize student and faculty time and increase engagement between them, researchers from Texas Tech University Health Sciences Center "
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    No, these pterosaurs were not Jurassic puffins | Elsa PanciroliNew research into pterosaur diets is overturning assumptions based on qualitative assertions made decades ago What did it eat ? This is one of the first questions the general public – and especially kids – ask about extinct animals. It may surprise you to know that palaeontologists sometimes struggle to work out the answer. They may look at living relatives for clues, but for long-gone animals wi
    13h
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    Survey: Companies in China feel pressure to give up techOne in five foreign companies in China feels compelled to hand over technology for market access, a business group said Wednesday, highlighting a key irritant in an escalating U.S.-Chinese trade dispute.
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    1
    Does good attendance equal good grades?Studies of classroom attendance patterns in undergraduate students have shown that attendance and performance go hand in hand—attending class is the key to reaping the rewards of academic achievement. However, many of these studies were completed before the advent of the internet and the explosion of online learning. Researchers will discuss the changing nature of medical student engagement in the
    13h
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    6
    Political leaning influences city water policies as strongly as climateUrban water conservation policies are reflecting the nation's political polarization, with a new report demonstrating that a city's water ordinances can be as much related to whether it leans left or right as to whether the climate is wet or dry.
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    Machine learning may be a game-changer for climate predictionA major challenge in current climate prediction models is how to accurately represent clouds and their atmospheric heating and moistening. This challenge is behind the wide spread in climate prediction. Yet accurate predictions of global warming in response to increased greenhouse gas concentrations are essential for policy-makers (e.g. the Paris climate agreement).
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    1
    Whether wheat weathers heat wavesA heat wave sweeps through a city and people swelter, running indoors to find air conditioning. But crops out in a field aren't so lucky. For them, there is no escape.
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    Innovative autonomous system for identifying schools of fishEU Europe CopyrightThe University of Haifa (Israel) and two teams from the IMDEA Networks Institute have developed an innovative autonomous system, SYMBIOSIS, to monitor real-time schools of fish. This system, which combines optical and acoustic technologies, will be environmentally friendly and will provide reliable information about the condition of marine fish stocks, something that at the moment is practically i
    14h
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    Banking by smart speaker arrives, but security issues existHey Alexa, what's my bank account balance?
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    Intervention shows promise for treating depression in preschool-aged childrenChildren as young as 3-years-old can be diagnosed with clinical depression. Although young children are sometimes prescribed antidepressants, a psychotherapeutic intervention is needed. Researchers adapted Parent-Child Interaction Therapy (PCIT), (a validated treatment for disruptive behavioral disorders in children), by adding new emotional development content. PCIT-ED treatment resulted in signi
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    Don’t deny my daughter the cannabis that could save her | Memuna FornaLike Billy Caldwell’s mother, I want to try anything that might help stop my child’s seizures. At the moment, I can’t Billy Caldwell is a 12-year-old boy with severe epilepsy. Last week, British airport officials confiscated the cannabis oil his mother was using to treat his condition, because the tetrahydrocannabinol (THC) it contains is illegal in the UK. He ended up in hospital after his seizu
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    Political leaning influences city water policies as strongly as climateResearchers examined city water policies over the course of four years to create a database of water conservation policies. They also developed an associated index of the number of different categories of policies each city adopted and gathered data on the climate, water sources, population, economy and political leanings of each city and its surrounding metropolitan statistical area -- as reflect
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    When muscles weaken with ageAge-related changes in the peripheral nerves can drastically reduce the quality of life. Scientists have now identified what triggers such changes.
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    Whether wheat weathers heat wavesUnlike humans, crops in a field can't move to air conditioning to endure a heat wave. Scientists in Australia are working to understand how heat waves impact wheat.
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    Around the world, people have surprisingly modest notions of the 'ideal' lifeIt seems reasonable that people would want to maximize various aspects of life if they were given the opportunity to do so, whether it's the pleasure they feel, how intelligent they are, or how much personal freedom they have. In actuality, people around the world seem to aspire for more moderate levels of these and other traits, according to findings published in Psychological Science , a journal
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    Innovative autonomous system for identifying schools of fishThe University of Haifa (Israel) and two teams from the IMDEA Networks Institute have developed an innovative autonomous system, SYMBIOSIS, to monitor real-time schools of fish. This system, which combines optical and acoustic technologies, will be environmentally friendly and will provide reliable information about the condition of marine fish stocks, something that at the moment is practically i
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    Do bats adapt to gates at abandoned mines?Abandoned mines can serve as roost sites for bats, but because the mines pose serious risks to humans, officials often install gates at their entrances.
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    Why isn't anyone talking about vaginal dryness (or doing anything about it)?It's a common problem that only gets worse during the menopause transition; yet, no one wants to talk about it, and even fewer women are doing anything to correct it. A new study identifies those factors that contribute to the taboo problem of vaginal dryness. Study results are published online today in Menopause, the journal of The North American Menopause Society (NAMS).
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    Annual southeast Asia haze linked to increased respiratory problemsFor more than a decade, Southeast Asia has faced annual haze due to a combination of human activity, natural fires, and climatic factors.
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    Do circulating bone turnover markers indicate hip fracture risk?The evidence that circulating levels of markers of bone turnover correlate with hip fracture risk among postmenopausal women is limited.
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    Substance in hair may be a marker for alcohol consumptionA new Drug Testing & Analysis study reveals that measuring levels of ethyl sulfate (EtS), a metabolite of ethanol, in the hair can be used to assess alcohol consumption.
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    Controlling robots with brainwaves and hand gesturesSystem enables people to correct robot mistakes on multi-choice problems.
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    Parent-child therapy helps young children with depressionNew research from Washington University School of Medicine in St. Louis demonstrates that an interactive therapy involving parents and their depressed preschoolers can reduce rates of depression and lower the severity of children's symptoms.
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    Can older adults safely donate kidneys?With increasing organ demand, living kidney donation from older donors has become more common.
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    Alcohol and marijuana use may increase risk of condomless sex in young adultsYoung persons who use alcohol and/or marijuana experience heightened likelihood of condomless sex, according to a new study published in The American Journal on Addictions.
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    Flexible content delivery, student-faculty interaction frees time without hurting gradesMedical students face an intense workload and often struggle to juggle priorities. Similarly, medical school faculty must find time in their schedules to prepare lectures and for face-to-face interaction with students. To optimize student and faculty time and increase engagement between them, researchers 'flipped' their content delivery strategy upside down.
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    Long-term estrogen therapy changes microbial activity in the gutLong-term therapy with estrogen and bazedoxifene alters the microbial composition and activity in the gut, affecting how estrogen is metabolized, a new study in mice found.
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    Absence epilepsy: When the brain is like 'an orchestra without a conductor'New contributions to the field of epilepsy have opened a window into the cellular events that occur in the brain during absence seizures.
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    Religious involvement deters recreational and medical marijuana use, researchers findResearchers have found that individuals who regularly attend church and report that religion is very important in their daily decision making are less likely to use marijuana recreationally and medically.
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    Floppy eyelids may be sign of sleep apneaA new study is providing further evidence that floppy eyelids may be a sign of sleep apnea. The study found that 53 percent of sleep apnea patients had upper eyelids that were lax and rubbery.
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    Blue gene regulation helps plants respond properly to lightResearchers have discovered a process through which gene expression in plants is regulated by light. The study found that blue light triggers a shift in which portion of a gene is ultimately expressed.
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    Age limit for federal food assistance program impacts reading scores, learningNearly 1 million children face food insecurity simply because they were born late in the year. No safety net coverage exists for these children when they age out of the Special Supplemental Nutrition Program for Women, Infants and Children (WIC) and they are not yet eligible to attend kindergarten. A researcher has found that not only does the coverage gap impact overall food insecurity, it reduce
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    11
    Site of the next major earthquake on the San Andreas Fault?Many researchers hypothesize that the southern tip of the 1300-km-long San Andreas fault zone (SAFZ) could be the nucleation site of the next major earthquake on the fault, yet geoscientists cannot evaluate this hazard until the location and geometry of the fault zone is documented.
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    Civil War Battlefield 'Limb Pit' Reveals Work Of Combat SurgeonsScientists have been analyzing bones first uncovered by a utility crew digging at the Manassas National Battlefield Park in Virginia. The remains provide insights into surgery during the Civil War. (Image credit: Meredith Rizzo/NPR)
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    86
    With this new system, robots can ‘read’ your mindGiving robots instructions via brain waves and hand gestures could help the machines operate more safely and efficiently.
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    Do bats adapt to gates at abandoned mines?Abandoned mines can serve as roost sites for bats, but because the mines pose serious risks to humans, officials often install gates at their entrances. With more than 80,000 abandoned mines in the southwestern United States, these subterranean habitats are important to bat survival as human disturbances from recreation and other activities at natural caves are affecting their use by bats.
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    Say cheese! Why a toothy smile makes it easier for you to be identifiedA fulsome smile in a photo makes it easier for people to identify the individual, say researchers.
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    Exercise makes the blood of obese people healthierExercise can reduce inflammation in obese people by changing the characteristics of their blood, according to new research.
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    The answer to triple-negative breast cancer?Researchers have developed a computer program which has revealed a previously unknown combination of drugs that may be the answer to Triple Negative Breast Cancer (TNBC), using genetic and treatment data from TNBC cells grown in labs and from hundreds of patients world-wide. Importantly researchers can tell, by inputting patients' genomic and proteomic information into their computer model, who ma
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    Binge drinking during youth may impact future offspringA rat model found preconception binge drinking may have negative consequences on future offspring's growth, social interactions and pubertal development, according to a new study.
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    Risks of cancer and mortality by average lifetime alcohol intakeThe risk of mortality, and of developing a number of cancers, is lowest in light drinkers consuming an average of less than one drink per day across their lifetime, and the risk of some cancers increases with each additional drink per week, according to a new study.
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    RFK's assassination: A medical analysis of his injuries and neurosurgical careAlthough much has been written about Robert F. Kennedy's assassination, to date there has been no detailed medical discussion of Kennedy's injuries and treatment. A new article addresses this subject.
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    Twenty-five per cent of seafood sold in Metro Vancouver is mislabelledA new study used DNA barcoding to determine that 70 of 281 seafood samples collected in Metro Vancouver between September 2017 and February 2018 were mislabelled.
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    When photons spice up the energy levels of quantum particlesFor the first time, a team of mathematical physicists, call upon supersymmetry to explain the behavior of particles that have received a photon and are subjected to particular potential energies known as shape-invariant potentials.
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    Future ultrahigh density data storageThe development of high-density data storage devices requires the highest possible density of elements in an array made up of individual nanomagnets. The closer they are together, the greater the magnetic interactions between them.
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    Rush hour metro crowd governed by people's eagerness to go homeEver feared rush hours in a metro station? Engineering researchers have developed a new model to study the movement of crowds exiting a metro station. In a recent study, they have for the first time employed models typically used to observe the interactions of gas molecules to assess the consequences of interactions between pedestrians in a crowd.
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    Approach can help English learners improve at math word problemsEducation professors have shown that a comprehension-based strategy can help English learners improve their math word-problem solving abilities. The approach boosts reading comprehension and problem solving as well.
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    Success of blood test for autism affirmedOne year after researchers published their work on a physiological test for autism, a follow-up study confirms its exceptional success in assessing whether a child is on the autism spectrum.
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    Bad habits that lead to cancer, chronic disease corrected by simple lifestyle interventionFour of the most common bad habits -- too much screen time, too little exercise and high fat and low fruit and vegetable intake -- can lead to heart disease and cancer, but a simple intervention using mobile health tools and coaching normalized these behaviors, and improvements were sustained.
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    Fat-Carb Combo Is A Potent One-Two PunchFoods high in both carbs and fats tickle the brain’s reward circuits more so than snacks that showcase just one or the other. Karen Hopkin reports. -- Read more on ScientificAmerican.com
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    Novel Method Could Accelerate DNA SynthesisThe new technique uses an enzyme found in vertebrate immune systems to attach nucleotides to a growing strand.
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    New Database Expands Number of Estimated Human Protein-Coding GenesSome scientists are not yet convinced that the list is accurate.
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    Deadly Wasting Syndrome Genetically Altered Sea Stars: StudyThe surviving animals may have evolved genes that provided an advantage in fighting the disease.
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    The National Outrage Over Immigration Is Beginning to Get to TrumpPresident Donald Trump on Tuesday evening addressed House Republican lawmakers on immigration, only to leave the conference with members grappling with the same issues as before. For House GOP leadership, it was nothing short of a victory. Speaker Paul Ryan had invited Trump to meet with the conference in the hopes the president would rally skeptics behind the leadership’s so-called “compromise”
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    Nursery For Giant Manta Rays Discovered In Gulf Of MexicoSightings of baby mantas are rare, but the Flower Garden Banks Marine Sanctuary appears to be a safe playground for newborns to adolescents. (Image credit: G.P. Schmahl/FGBNMS)
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    How vaping helps even hardened smokers quitVaping helps people stop smoking -- even when they don't want to, according to new research from the University of East Anglia.A study published today shows that smokers who switch to vaping may be better able to stay smoke-free in the long term.And that even people who didn't want to stop smoking, have eventually quit because they found vaping more enjoyable.
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    Why Ford Is Buying Detroit’s Derelict Central DepotIt’s a savvy PR move, but it also sends a big message. The carmaker wants to show it can compete with Uber and Waymo and all the Silicon Valley tech giants.
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    Just 4 drinks can change sleep geneA single episode of binge drinking can affect the gene that regulates sleep, leading to sleep disruption, a new study with mice shows. The findings may shed light on how sleep problems can contribute to alcoholism in humans. One in six adults in the United States binge drinks at least four times a month, according to the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention. “Sleep is a serious problem for
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    Can evolution explain why the young are often more susceptible than adults to infection?In many species, including humans, the young are often more susceptible to infection than adults, even after accounting for prior exposure to infection. From an evolutionary perspective this may seem puzzling, as dying young or becoming infertile due to infection means organisms will be unable to reproduce. However, new research from the University of Bath suggests that many species may have evolv
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    Climate change to overtake land use as major threat to global biodiversityClimate change will have a rapidly increasing effect on the structure of global ecological communities over the next few decades, with amphibians and reptiles being significantly more affected than birds and mammals, a new report by UCL finds.
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    Strange 'nude' fossil creature from half a billion years agoA discovery of a new species of sponge-like fossil from the Cambrian Period sheds light on early animal evolution.
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    Living the high life: How altitude influences bone growthStudy of modern Himalayan populations shows that living at high altitude affects the length of lower arm bones, a possible indicator of differential growth of certain limb segments under high altitude stress.
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    Say cheese! Why a toothy smile makes it easier for you to be identifiedA fulsome smile in a photo makes it easier for people to identify the individual, say researchers at the University of York.
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    Wolves in France: Farmers fear attacksOne mayor says children under 10 years old should not walk alone, in case of an attack.
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    New Group, With Conservative Credentials, Plans Push for a Carbon TaxA new lobbying group is hoping to build support for a “climate dividend” plan. Its members include Trent Lott, Janet L. Yellen and Ben S. Bernanke.
    22h
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    4
    Watch: Robotics offer clues to fixing gait after strokeA major issue in rehabilitation robotics is that devices such as exoskeletons and treadmills correct patients’ movements only while they are using the device. Ongoing research aims to change that. Gelsy Torres-Oviedo, director of the Sensorimotor Learning Lab at the University of Pittsburgh, leads a research team that uses rehabilitation robotics and motion capture cameras to study “locomotor lea
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    Why adult bodies still rely on fetal T cellsFetal immune cells are present in adults and have specialized roles during infections, according to new research. “…we might be able to predict how individuals will respond to infection based on how many fetal cells are present in the adult pool…” In fact, the first immune cells made in early life are fast-acting first responders to microbes in adulthood. These immune cells—called CD8+ T cells—co
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    5
    iPad overlay makes reading easier for blind usersResearchers have developed an e-reader that enables people with visual impairments to read the same text sighted readers do. The system, called STAAR (Situated Touch Audio Annotator And Reader) allows the user to scan the text with their fingers to hear the words, control the pace of their reading, bookmark a page, and highlight important information. An embossed plastic overlay sits on top of an
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    Strange 'nude' fossil creature from half a billion years agoScientists have discovered the fossil of an unusual large-bodied 'nude' sea-creature from half a billion years ago.
    22h
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    100+
    Climate change to overtake land use as major threat to global biodiversityClimate change will have a rapidly increasing effect on the structure of global ecological communities over the next few decades, with amphibians and reptiles being significantly more affected than birds and mammals, a new report by UCL finds.
    22h
    Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
    62
    Can evolution explain why the young are often more susceptible than adults to infection?In many species, including humans, the young are often more susceptible to infection than adults, even after accounting for prior exposure to infection. From an evolutionary perspective this may seem puzzling, as dying young or becoming infertile due to infection means organisms will be unable to reproduce. However, new research from the University of Bath suggests that many species may have evolv
    22h
    Futurity.org
    1
    How calling video game addiction a disorder will help addictsThe World Health Organization’s classification of video game addiction as a mental health disorder is a significant step toward getting people the help they need, argues Douglas Gentile, professor of psychology at Iowa State University and an expert on video games and addiction. In a 2011 study published in Pediatrics , Gentile and his colleagues found gaming addiction is comorbid with other ment
    22h
    Futurity.org
    3
    Machine makes squishy 3D stuff from graphene foamScientists have developed a simple way to produce conductive, three-dimensional objects from graphene foam. The squishy solids look and feel something like a child’s toy but offer new possibilities for energy storage and flexible electronic sensor applications, according to James Tour, a chemist at Rice University, whose lab developed the method. The technique, detailed in Advanced Materials , is
    22h
    Futurity.org
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    Genetic ‘control system’ beefs up crop defensesResearchers have developed a genetic control system that would enable plants to strengthen their defense response against deadly pathogens. When pathogens attack crop plants, they obtain energy and nutrients from the plant but also target the plant’s immune response, weakening defense, and making the plants more vulnerable. “Minimizing crop waste is obviously an essential part of creating a more
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    Verizon, AT&T, Sprint, and T-Mobile will stop selling your location information to data brokers[no content]
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    Lion conservation research can be bolstered by input from a wide-range of professionalsTo tackle the sharp decline in lion numbers, conservation research should consider wild prey, livestock and the environment, not just human-lion interaction, a new review suggests.
    22h
    Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
    4
    Tax havens and limited regulation increase risk for shareholders, study showsSome large, publicly held companies are incorporated in tax haven countries, ostensibly to increase value for shareholders. But new research finds that many such companies -- particularly those headquartered in countries with limited shareholder protections -- are more likely to engage in practices that benefit executives at the cost of their shareholders.
    22h
    Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
    25
    Are you sticking to your diet? Scientists may be able to tell from a blood sampleAn analysis of small molecules called 'metabolites' in a blood sample may be used to determine whether a person is following a prescribed diet, scientists show in a new study.
    22h
    Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
    5
    Climate action can limit Asia's growing water shortagesEven 'modest' action to limit climate change could help prevent the most extreme water-shortage scenarios facing Asia by the year 2050, according to a new study.
    22h
    Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
    20
    Deep Brain Stimulation showing promise for patients with mild Alzheimer's disease over 65An age group analysis of data from the ADvance trial has shown that participants over the age of 65 continue to derive the most benefit from Deep Brain Stimulation of the fornix (DBS-f), as observed in the data from the phase 2 findings (12 - 24 months) of the Phase II trial.
    22h
    Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
    6
    Drones could be used to detect dangerous 'butterfly' landmines in post-conflict regionsDrones could be used to detect dangerous "butterfly" landmines in remote regions of post-conflict countries.
    22h
    Live Science
    100+
    There Are More 'Pet' Tigers Than There Are in the Wild. How Did That Happen?How did we get into this situation?
    22h
    Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
    18
    Museum collection reveals distribution of Carolina parakeet 100 years after its extinctionWhile 2018 marks the centenary of the death of the last captive Carolina parakeet -- North America's only native parrot, a team of researchers have shed new light on the previously known geographical range of the species.
    22h
    Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
    10
    Diabetes may be an early manifestation of pancreatic cancerA new study indicates that recent-onset type 2 diabetes may be early expression of pancreatic cancer. Diabetes was associated with a more than twofold higher risk of pancreatic cancer in African-Americans and Latinos, but recent-onset diabetes was associated with a 2.3-fold greater increase in risk of pancreatic cancer than long-standing diabetes.
    22h
    Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
    24
    Sodium- and potassium-based batteries hold promise for cheap energy storageResearchers have found new evidence suggesting that batteries based on sodium and potassium hold promise as a potential alternative to lithium-based batteries.
    22h
    Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
    6
    Blood signature could improve early TB diagnosisA gene signature in the bloodstream can reveal whether someone is going to develop active tuberculosis (TB) disease months before symptoms begin. This offers the prospect of intervening before individuals pose a risk of transmitting the infection to others.
    22h
    Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
    36
    Diagnostics of genetic cardiac diseases using stem cell-derived cardiomyocytesA new study demonstrates that with the use of artificial intelligence and machine learning, it is possible not only to accurately sort sick cardiac cell cultures from healthy ones, but also to differentiate between genetic cardiac diseases.
    22h
    Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
    23
    World's first intra-operative MRI-guided robot for bilateral stereotactic neurosurgeryScientists have recently designed the first neurosurgical robotic system capable of performing bilateral stereotactic neurosurgery inside a magnetic resonance imaging ('MRI') scanner.
    22h
    Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
    15
    Hypnosis may help reduce fear of cancer treatment in childrenHypnosis could help to reduce the fear of medical procedures in children and young people with cancer.
    22h
    Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
    4
    Cell type and environment influence protein turnover in the brainScientists have revealed that protein molecules in the brain are broken down and replaced at different rates, depending on where in the brain they are.
    22h
    The Atlantic
    21
    The Atlantic Daily: Mark the FragilityWhat We’re Following On the Border: The Trump administration’s “zero-tolerance” policy for illegal immigration is straining federal courts. Russell Berman reports from a mass criminal hearing in McAllen, Texas, where lawyers say that “adults who cross the border with children now seem to be priorities for prosecution.” See photos of a tent city where detained parents’ children are being held. Oth
    22h
    iBiology (uploads) on YouTube
    1
    John Schiller (NCI at NIH) 2: Why Do HPV Virus-Like Particle Vaccines Work So Well?John Schiller provides an overview of HPV virus and infection, compares the three FDA approved vaccines against HPV, and explains the endpoints used in the clinical trials to prove vaccine efficacy. https://www.ibiology.org/human-disease/hpv Talk Overview: Human Papillomavirus (HPV) causes 5% of all cancers worldwide, and the first vaccine against HPV was approved in 2006. In this seminar, Dr. Jo
    22h
    iBiology (uploads) on YouTube
    1
    John Schiller (NCI at NIH) 1: Human Papillomavirus (HPV) Vaccines to Prevent CancerJohn Schiller provides an overview of HPV virus and infection, compares the three FDA approved vaccines against HPV, and explains the endpoints used in the clinical trials to prove vaccine efficacy. https://www.ibiology.org/human-disease/hpv Talk Overview: Human Papillomavirus (HPV) causes 5% of all cancers worldwide, and the first vaccine against HPV was approved in 2006. In this seminar, Dr. Jo
    22h
    EurekAlert! - Breaking News
    Walking is more efficient than thought for threatened polar bearsPolar bears are under increasing risk and one of the threats was thought to be an inefficient walking style, which could drive them to starvation as they are forced to walk further to find food as the summer sea ice retreats. However, new measurements of the metabolic rates of captive polar and grizzly bears suggests that their walking style is as efficient as that of other large mammals.
    22h
    Popular Science
    83
    Facebook is working on AI tools to fix photos ruined by blinkingTechnology It could open closed eyes with surprising accuracy. Facebook's AI tools can help open closed eyes and do a lot more down the road.
    23h
    Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
    34
    Machine learning may be a game-changer for climate predictionNew research demonstrates that machine-learning techniques can be used to accurately represent clouds and their atmospheric heating and moistening, and better represent clouds in coarse resolution climate models, with the potential to narrow the range of climate prediction. This could be a major advance in accurate predictions of global warming in response to increased greenhouse gas concentration
    23h
    Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
    24
    Does good attendance equal good grades?Studies of classroom attendance patterns in undergraduate students have shown that attendance and performance go hand in hand -- attending class is the key to reaping the rewards of academic achievement. However, many of these studies were completed before the explosion of online learning.
    23h
    Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
    16
    Parents' explanations of peer interactions affect how children interpret peers' behaviorNew research shows that parents can help their children perceive less hostility in their social world by framing social situations in a positive way, and thus, reduce their likelihood of behaving aggressively.
    23h
    Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
    6
    Children's immune system could hold the key to preventing sepsisScientists have identified the key response that children use to control infections.
    23h
    Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
    9
    Combining different malaria vaccines could reduce cases by 91 percentUsing two experimental anti-malarial vaccines, which work in different ways, can greatly reduce the number of malaria infections in animal studies.
    23h
    Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
    17
    Palm oil: The carbon cost of deforestationPalm oil has become part of our daily lives, but a recent study serves as a reminder that intensive farming of this crop has a major impact on the environment. Both short- and long-term solutions exist, however. The article analyzed the carbon costs and benefits of converting rainforests into oil palm plantations.
    23h
    Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
    24
    Low vitamin D levels associated with scarring lung diseaseReviewing medical information gathered on more than 6,000 adults over a 10-year period, researchers have found that lower than normal blood levels of vitamin D were linked to increased risk of early signs of interstitial lung disease (ILD).
    23h
    Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
    7
    Methadone and buprenorphine reduce risk of death after opioid overdose, study suggestsA new study found that treatment of opioid use disorder with either methadone or buprenorphine following a nonfatal opioid overdose is associated with significant reductions in opioid related mortality.
    23h
    Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
    7
    Gene mutations linked to pancreatic cancerSix genes contain mutations that may be passed down in families, substantially increasing a person's risk for pancreatic cancer. However, because researchers found these genetic mutations in patients with no family history of pancreatic cancer, they are recommending genetic testing for all pancreatic cancer patients as the new standard of care.
    23h
    Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
    20
    'Smart stent' detects narrowing of arteriesResearchers have developed a type of 'smart stent' that monitors even subtle changes in the flow of blood through the artery, detecting the narrowing in its earliest stages and making early diagnosis and treatment possible.
    23h
    Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
    11
    Why older people respond poorly to cancer treatmentResearchers may have found a group of immune cells that increase in number with age but are too worn out to fight diseases. The accumulation of dysfunctional virtual memory T cells, in addition to the loss of true naïve T cells, may explain why older people have reduced immune responses to cancer and vaccines, why cancer immunotherapy is less successful in the elderly, and may help to tailor cance
    23h
    Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
    9
    Walking is more efficient than thought for threatened polar bearsA polar bear plunges into the icy Arctic waters in search of firmer ice; its world, which was once a sea of white, is melting beneath its paws. 'Research has documented declines in polar bear populations in some regions of the Arctic', says Anthony Pagano from the US Geological Survey, explaining that the bears now have to roam further on the receding ice to locate the seals upon which they dine.
    23h
    BBC News - Science & Environment
    19
    Mountain lion kittens found living in US caveMeet the new residents of a cave in California.
    23h

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Tuesday, June 19

  1. page Nyheder2018juni19 edited Nyheder MOST POPULAR The Atlantic 12K The Outrage Over Family Separation Is Exactly What Ste…

    NyhederMOST POPULAR
    The Atlantic
    12K
    The Outrage Over Family Separation Is Exactly What Stephen Miller WantsWhen the news stories began to surface last month of sobbing young migrant children being forcibly removed from their parents at the border, many close White House watchers instantly suspected Stephen Miller was behind it. Though he keeps a relatively low profile compared to the cast of camera-muggers and Twitter warriors in President Donald Trump’s orbit, the 32-year-old speechwriter and senior
    4h
    Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
    100+
    Controlling magnetic spin with electric fieldsEPFL physicists have found a way to reverse electron spins using electric fields
    for denne datothe first time, paving the way for programmable spintronics technologies.
    2h
    Ingeniøren
    35
    Kognitiv teknologi kårer Spanien som fodboldmestreTakket være machine learning og 100.000 simulationer af verdensmesterskabet tør tyske forskere godt sætte nogle af deres sparepenge på udfaldet af alle kampene på grønsværen.
    6h
    LATEST
    Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
    Teachers view immigrant, minority parents as less involved in their children's educationTeachers view parental involvement differently for different students, believing that mothers and fathers of immigrant or minority students are less involved in their children's education, according to research from the University of Pennsylvania and New York University published in Social Science Research. Such perspectives hamper the academic trajectory of those students, leading to lower grades
    now
    Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
    When photons spice up the energy levels of quantum particlesQuantum particles behave in mysterious ways. They are governed by laws of physics designed to reflect what is happening at smaller scales through quantum mechanics. Quantum state properties are generally very different to those of classical states. However, particles finding themselves in a coherent state are in a kind of quantum state which behaves like a classical state. Since their introduction
    now
    Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
    1
    Climate action can limit Asia's growing water shortagesEven "modest" action to limit climate change could help prevent the most extreme water-shortage scenarios facing Asia by the year 2050, according to a new study led by MIT researchers.
    6min
    Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
    Study: Tax havens and limited regulation increase risk for shareholdersSome large, publicly held companies are incorporated in tax haven countries, ostensibly to increase value for shareholders. But new research from North Carolina State University and the University of Arkansas finds that many such companies—particularly those headquartered in countries with limited shareholder protections—are more likely to engage in practices that benefit executives at the cost of
    6min
    New on MIT Technology Review
    16
    Muscular dystrophy could be the next disease to get whacked by gene therapy[no content]
    6min
    EurekAlert! - Breaking News
    1
    Ocean's heat cycle shows that atmospheric carbon may be headed elsewhereA Princeton University-led study in the journal Nature Geosciences examined the global carbon cycle and suggests that scientists may have misgauged how carbon is distributed around the world, particularly between the northern and southern hemispheres. The results could change projections of how, when and where the currently massive levels of atmospheric carbon will result in environmental changes
    9min
    EurekAlert! - Breaking News
    1
    Genes associated with infantile forms of schizophrenia identifiedScientists at the Montreal Neurological Institute and Hospital (The Neuro) and McGill University have identified novel genes associated with a specific form of schizophrenia.
    9min
    Science | The Guardian
    Urgent need to prepare for manmade virus attacks, says US government reportReport warns that swift progress in our ability to manufacture viruses is making us vulnerable to biological attacks The rapid rise of synthetic biology, a futuristic field of science that seeks to master the machinery of life, has raised the risk of a new generation of bioweapons, according a major US report into the state of the art. Advances in the area mean that scientists now have the capabi
    9min
    Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
    6
    360 degrees, 180 seconds: Technique speeds analysis of crop traitsResearchers have devised a new LiDAR-based approach for automatically and efficiently gathering data about a plant's phenotype: the physical traits that emerge from its genetic code. The approach could allow researchers to better compare crops that have been bred or genetically engineered for specific traits - ideally those that help produce more food.
    11min
    Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
    Scientists reveal how gut microbes 'recover' after antibiotic treatmentNew insight on how antibiotics affect the gut microbiome—the community of microbes that live inside us—has been published in the journal eLife.
    12min
    Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
    Futuristic data storage based on controlling the interactions between nanodots magnetic 'mood' twirlsThe magnetisation of nanometric square material is not fixed. It moves around in a helical motion. This is caused by the electron whose degree of freedom, referred to as spin, which follows a precession motion centred on the middle of a square nano-magnet. To study the magnetisation of such material, physicists can rely on two-dimensional arrays of square nanomagnets.
    12min
    Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
    Drones could be used to detect dangerous 'butterfly' landmines in post-conflict regionsDrones could be used to detect dangerous "butterfly" landmines in remote regions of post-conflict countries, according to new research from Binghamton University, State University at New York.
    12min
    Scientific American Content: Global
    4
    Gravitational "Echoes" Could Reveal Colliding WormholesA unique signature in gravitational wave observations could show that hypothetical tunnels through space-time actually exist -- Read more on ScientificAmerican.com
    12min
    New on MIT Technology Review
    13
    Congress to Trump: Don’t go soft on China’s ZTEZTE Senate Trump US[no content]
    13min
    EurekAlert! - Breaking News
    1
    The fingerprints of harmful molecules could be detected noninvasively via black silicon.A group of physicists experimentally confirmed that molecular fingerprints of toxic, explosive, polluting and other dangerous substances could be reliably detected and identified by surface-enhanced Raman spectroscopy (SERS) using black silicon (b-Si) substrate.
    23min
    EurekAlert! - Breaking News
    1
    Nuclear power shutdowns won't spike power pricesDespite economic woes that could shutter two of Pennsylvania's nuclear power plants -- which generate 6 percent of the state's power -- power prices will remain steady due to low natural gas prices, according to Seth Blumsack, associate professor of energy policy and economics, Penn State.
    23min
    EurekAlert! - Breaking News
    1
    Mild problem-solving task improves brain function after a concussion, new study suggestsA mild problem-solving task improves brain functioning after a concussion, according to a new study conducted at Southern Methodist University, Dallas. Currently there are many questions about rehabilitation and treatment options, with absolute rest often the go-to treatment. But the new study suggests that a simple cognitive task as early as four days after a brain injury activates the region tha
    23min
    EurekAlert! - Breaking News
    1
    NASA examined Tropical Cyclone Bud's rains in the US southwestBeneficial rainfall from hurricane Bud's remnants has spread into the US Desert Southwest after making landfall in western Mexico and moving north. NASA added up the rainfall using satellite data to provide a full picture of the rainfall.
    23min
    EurekAlert! - Breaking News
    1
    Liberals do drink more lattes, but maybe not for the reasons you thinkDo liberals really drink more lattes? According to a new study from the Annenberg School for Communication at the University of Pennsylvania, liberals in America are indeed more likely than conservatives to drink lattes. The researchers believe this is because liberals are more open to globalization and products associated with other countries.
    23min
    EurekAlert! - Breaking News
    1
    Researchers gain insight into infant handling by young bonobosUniversity of Oregon anthropologist Klaree Boose followed her intuition about her observations of bonobos at a US zoo. She now theorizes that young females of the endangered ape species prepare for motherhood and form social bonds by helping mothers take care of infants.
    23min
    EurekAlert! - Breaking News
    1
    Success of blood test for autism affirmedOne year after researchers published their work on a physiological test for autism, a follow-up study confirms its exceptional success in assessing whether a child is on the autism spectrum.
    23min
    Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
    Army plans to license nanogalvanic aluminum powder discoveryThe U.S. Army Research Laboratory plans to license its discovery of a nanogalvanic aluminum powder for hydrogen generation.
    24min
    Viden
    Fyldt med gode argumenter og masser af viden: Ny computer kan slå os i debatterIBM har præsenteret en computer, der kan debattere komplekse emner på overbevisende maner.
    25min
    Live Science
    3
    7 Plants You Can Eat If You're Stranded in the WildOn the off chance that you find yourself stranded in the wilderness on your next camping trip or hike, don’t panic — there are plenty of things to eat once you’ve run out of trail mix.
    25min
    Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
    Rush hour metro crowd governed by people's eagerness to go homeEver found yourself crushed in a metro station at rush hour? The mathematician Carlo Bianca and physicist Caterina Mogno, both from the engineering research lab ECAM-EPMI in Cergy-Pontoise, France, have developed a new model to study the movement of crowds exiting a metro station. In a recent study published in EPJ Plus, they have for the first time employed models typically used to study gases co
    30min
    New Scientist - News
    77
    Special cells could let you control your diabetes with coffeeA cup of coffee after a meal might be enough to keep diabetes under control, thanks to caffeine-triggered cells that have been engineered to release insulin
    33min
    New Scientist - News
    23
    IBM’s debating robot argues it out with human for first timeIBM's AI has taken on humans in a public debate. Though it made some very robot-like errors, the AI won one debate and lost the other, based on a crowd vote
    33min
    Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
    1
    Terra satellite sees Tropical Depression Carlotta weakening over MexicoNASA Terra satellite captured an image of Tropical Depression Carlotta as it was making landfall in southwestern Mexico where it weakened into a remnant low pressure area.
    36min
    The Atlantic
    1K
    Trump Says Immigrants Are Trying to ‘Infest’ GermanyOne of the paradoxes of modern-day American politics is that white identity politics can be a potent political platform, as long as you don’t call it that. Policies with racist effects are often popular; explicit racism is verboten. Thus Donald Trump can win the presidency while running, as my colleague Adam Serwer documented , on a program of discrimination, but when Corey Stewart, a Republican
    37min
    EurekAlert! - Breaking News
    1
    NASA's Terra satellite sees Tropical Depression Carlotta weakening over MexicoNASA Terra satellite captured an image of Tropical Depression Carlotta as it was making landfall in southwestern Mexico where it weakened into a remnant low pressure area.
    45min
    EurekAlert! - Breaking News
    1
    An unlikely marriage among oxidesSebastian Siol is looking for new materials with unusual properties that were so far not accessible in experiments. To do this, he connects partners who don't really fit together: One partner forces the other into a state that would not be possible without the unlikely pairing. Siol also makes sure that the crystal bonds last in everyday life. Only then are they interesting for industrial applicat
    45min
    EurekAlert! - Breaking News
    1
    Tackling bullying could help reduce depression in autistic teensTeenagers with difficulties in social communication, including autism, have higher rates of depressive symptoms, especially if they are being bullied.
    45min
    EurekAlert! - Breaking News
    1
    Could this material enable autonomous vehicles to come to market sooner?A new material developed by scientists at the USC Viterbi School of Engineering and the University of Wisconsin along with researchers from Air Force Research Laboratories, University of Missouri, and J.A. Woollam Co. Inc, might show promise for such infrared detection applications as autonomous vehicles, emergency services and even manufacturing.
    45min
    EurekAlert! - Breaking News
    1
    New model for gauging ice sheet movement may improve sea-level-rise predictionsUniversity of Kansas researchers discovered friction -- or 'basal drag' -- between ice sheets and the hard bed underneath has no influence on how fast glaciers flow.
    45min
    EurekAlert! - Breaking News
    1
    Study shows approach can help English learners improve at math word problemsUniversity of Kansas education professors have published a study showing that a comprehension-based strategy can help English learners improve their math word-problem solving abilities. The approach boosts reading comprehension and problem solving as well.
    45min
    Latest Headlines | Science News
    18
    On Jupiter, lightning flashes from storms swirling at the polesAfter almost 40 years, scientists have discovered that Jupiter has lightning that is similar to lightning on Earth — it just happens in a different place.
    46min
    Scientific American Content: Global
    4
    Trump Orders "Space Force," Signs Space-Traffic PolicyThe President’s proposal could create a new branch of the armed services meant to assure “American dominance” in space -- Read more on ScientificAmerican.com
    49min
    Live Science
    4
    This Speedy Genetic Tool Might Soon Let Scientists Create New Genes 'Overnight'Two graduate students developed a method for synthesizing DNA that could make it much faster, cheaper and easier for biologists to create synthetic DNA sequences.
    50min
    EurekAlert! - Breaking News
    1
    Rush hour metro crowd governed by people's eagerness to go homeEver feared rush hours in a metro station? Carlo Bianca and Caterina Mogno from the French engineering research lab ECAM-EPMI have developed a new model to study the movement of crowds exiting a metro station. In a recent study published in EPJ Plus, they have for the first time employed models typically used to observe the interactions of gas molecules to assess the consequences of interactions b
    1h
    EurekAlert! - Breaking News
    1
    Teachers view immigrant, minority parents as less involved in their children's educationA study from the University of Pennsylvania revealed that such perspectives from educators can end up hampering the academic trajectory of the students involved.
    1h
    EurekAlert! - Breaking News
    1
    When photons spice up the energy levels of quantum particlesFor the first time, a team of mathematical physicists from Togo and Benin, call upon supersymmetry to explain the behaviour of particles that have received a photon and are subjected to particular potential energies known as shape-invariant potentials. In a paper published in EPJD, Komi Sodoga and colleagues affiliated with both the University of Lomé, Togo, and the University of Abomey-Calavi, in
    1h
    EurekAlert! - Breaking News
    1
    Montana burial site answers questions about early humansScientists have shown that at the Anzick site in Montana - the only known Clovis burial site - the skeletal remains of a young child and the antler and stone artifacts found there were buried at the same time, raising new questions about the early inhabitants of North America, says a Texas A&M University professor involved in the research.
    1h
    EurekAlert! - Breaking News
    1
    Futuristic data storageThe development of high-density data storage devices requires the highest possible density of elements in an array made up of individual nanomagnets. The closer they are together, the greater the magnetic interactions between them. In a paper published in EPJ B, P. Kim from the Kirensky Institute of Physics, associated with the Russian Academy of Sciences, Russia, and colleagues have devised a new
    1h
    EurekAlert! - Breaking News
    1
    Drones could be used to detect dangerous 'butterfly' landmines in post-conflict regionsDrones could be used to detect dangerous 'butterfly' landmines in remote regions of post-conflict countries, according to new research from Binghamton University, State University at New York.
    1h
    EurekAlert! - Breaking News
    1
    Deep Brain Stimulation showing promise for patients with mild Alzheimer's disease over 65An age group analysis of data from the ADvance trial has shown that participants over the age of 65 continue to derive the most benefit from Deep Brain Stimulation of the fornix (DBS-f), as observed in the data from the phase 2 findings (12 - 24 months) of the Phase II trial.
    1h
    EurekAlert! - Breaking News
    1
    Creating a new composite fuel for new-generation fast reactorsJoint research efforts of a team of scientists at Lobachevsky University of Nizhny Novgorod (UNN) comprising chemists, physicists and engineers are currently focused on solving the problems of handling plutonium and minor actinides (MA) accumulated over many years. To this end, they are studying composite ceramics-ceramics (Cer-Cer) and ceramics-metal (CerMet) materials on the basis of mineral-lik
    1h
    EurekAlert! - Breaking News
    1
    Study: Climate action can limit Asia's growing water shortagesEven 'modest' action to limit climate change could help prevent the most extreme water-shortage scenarios facing Asia by the year 2050, according to a new study led by MIT researchers.
    1h
    Live Science
    100+
    How a Python Ate a Woman Whole and Left Hardly a Trace of the Fierce AttackNews of a pickup-truck-size reticulated python killing and swallowing a woman whole in central Indonesia, eating even her clothes, has made headlines around the world. But how often do these snakes eat people?
    1h
    Viden
    Besat af Counter-Strike? Få en diagnose på din gaming-afhængighedWHO har sat afhængighed af computerspil på listen over verdens diagnoser. Spilforsker
    er endnu ikke blevet noteretkritisk.
    1h
    EurekAlert! - Breaking News
    1
    Light pollution a reason for insect declineClimate change, pesticides and land use changes alone cannot fully explain the decline in insect populations in Germany. Scientists from the Leibniz-Institute of Freshwater Ecology and Inland Fisheries (IGB) have now discovered that regions that have experienced a sharp decline in flying insects also have high levels of light pollution. Many studies already suggest that artificial light at night h
    1h
    EurekAlert! - Breaking News
    1
    New study shows how a single binge drinking episode affects gene that regulates sleepNew findings from the University of Missouri School of Medicine explain how a single episode of binge drinking can affect the gene that regulates sleep, leading to sleep disruption in mice. The finding may shed light on how sleep problems can contribute to alcoholism in humans.
    1h
    EurekAlert! - Breaking News
    1
    Kids grasp that you get what you pay forFrom a young age, children have a nuanced understanding of fairness.
    1h
    EurekAlert! - Breaking News
    1
    Scientists reveal how gut microbes 'recover' after antibiotic treatmentNew insight on how antibiotics affect the gut microbiome -- the community of microbes that live inside us -- has been published in the journal eLife.
    1h
    EurekAlert! - Breaking News
    1
    Are you sticking to your diet? Scientists may be able to tell from a blood sampleAn analysis of small molecules called 'metabolites' in a blood sample may be used to determine whether a person is following a prescribed diet, scientists at Johns Hopkins Bloomberg School of Public Health have shown.
    1h
    EurekAlert! - Breaking News
    Study: Tax havens and limited regulation increase risk for shareholdersSome large, publicly held companies are incorporated in tax haven countries, ostensibly to increase value for shareholders. But new research finds that many such companies -- particularly those headquartered in countries with limited shareholder protections -- are more likely to engage in practices that benefit executives at the cost of their shareholders.
    1h
    EurekAlert! - Breaking News
    Cell type and environment influence protein turnover in the brainScientists have revealed that protein molecules in the brain are broken down and replaced at different rates, depending on where in the brain they are.
    1h
    EurekAlert! - Breaking News
    Mayo Clinic discovers gene mutations linked to pancreatic cancerSix genes contain mutations that may be passed down in families, substantially increasing a person's risk for pancreatic cancer. That's according to Mayo Clinic research published in the June 19 edition of the JAMA. However, because researchers found these genetic mutations in patients with no family history of pancreatic cancer, they are recommending genetic testing for all pancreatic cancer pati
    1h
    EurekAlert! - Breaking News
    Monash research provides insights into why older people respond poorly to cancer treatmentResearchers may have found a group of immune cells that increase in number with age but are too worn out to fight diseases. The accumulation of dysfunctional virtual memory T cells, in addition to the loss of true naïve T cells, may explain why older people have reduced immune responses to cancer and vaccines, why cancer immunotherapy is less successful in the elderly, and may help to tailor cance
    1h
    EurekAlert! - Breaking News
    Sodium- and potassium-based batteries hold promise for cheap energy storageResearchers at the Georgia Institute of Technology have found new evidence suggesting that batteries based on sodium and potassium hold promise as a potential alternative to lithium-based batteries.
    1h
    EurekAlert! - Breaking News
    Article examines guideline for glycemic control in adults with type 2 diabetesA JAMA Clinical Guidelines Synopsis article examines the American College of Physicians' (ACP's) 2018 guidance statement on HbA1c goals in nonpregnant adults with type 2 diabetes, including the possible effect of a recommended HbA1c level between 7 percent and 8 percent for most patients with type 2 diabetes, a range that is higher than other guidelines.
    1h
    EurekAlert! - Breaking News
    Having stress-related disorder associated with increased risk of developing autoimmune diseaseStress-related disorders brought on by traumatic or stressful life events were associated with increased risk of developing an autoimmune disease.
    1h
    EurekAlert! - Breaking News
    Studies examine differences in demographics, urban vs. rural rates of obesity in USTwo studies used national survey data to examine differences in rates of obesity and severe obesity among children, teens and adults based on demographic factors (including sex, age, race, education) and whether people lived in urban or rural areas of the United States.
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    WSU researchers see human immune response in the fruit flyWashington State University researchers have seen how both humans and fruit flies deploy a protein that a plays a critical role in their immune responses to invading bacteria. The discovery gives scientists evolutionary insight and a model organism with which to explore ways to boost the human immune system and create infection-fighting medicines.
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    Ingeniøren
    Fodboldkampe forhaler forskning med radioaktive stofferRussiske biokemikere og Crispr-forskere er frustrerede over, at de under verdensmesterskaberne i fodbold er tvunget til at annullere forsøg på grund af et omfattende forbud imod salg og transport af farlige kemiske eller biologiske stoffer.
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    Verizon to end location data sales to brokersVerizon is pledging to stop sales through intermediaries of data that pinpoints the location of mobile phones to outside companies, the Associated Press has learned.
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    Museum collection reveals distribution of Carolina parakeet 100 years after its extinctionWhile 2018 marks the centenary of the death of the last captive Carolina parakeet—North America's only native parrot, a team of researchers have shed new light on the previously known geographical range of the species, which was officially declared extinct in 1920.
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    Scientific American Content: Global
    3
    World Has Only 20 Years to Meet Ambitious 1.5C Warming ThresholdBut a new calculation suggests that timeframe provides more room than thought to rein in carbon emissions -- Read more on ScientificAmerican.com
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    27
    Report For Defense Department Ranks Top Threats From 'Synthetic Biology'A committee of experts examined about a dozen different synthetic biology technologies that could be potentially misused. For each, they considered how likely it was to be usable as a weapon. (Image credit: Dr. Hans Gelderblom/Visuals Unlimited/Getty Images)
    1h
    The Atlantic
    10
    The Making of a Moral CrisisChildren as young as 2 have been pulled from their parents and moved to facilities that are, as Laura Bush put it , “eerily reminiscent” of the Japanese American internment camps of World War II. Families are being separated. Kids are sleeping under foil blankets inside cages. The main reason that this story has received so much attention is simple: It is awful. Of course most of the American vot
    1h
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    Scientists see human immune response in the fruit flyWashington State University researchers have seen how both humans and fruit flies deploy a protein that a plays a critical role in their immune responses to invading bacteria. The discovery gives scientists evolutionary insight and a model organism with which to explore ways to boost the human immune system and create infection-fighting medicines.
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    Science | The Guardian
    1
    Could coffee replace insulin injections for diabetics?Scientists have developed an implant which releases diabetes medication when it senses caffeine in the blood The days of the insulin pen may be numbered. According to researchers in Switzerland, the future of diabetes treatment will not be a shot in the arm after a meal, but a shot of espresso instead. The scientists hope to transform the lives of diabetics who need regular jabs with an implant t
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    New on MIT Technology Review
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    US military wants to know what synthetic-biology weapons could look likeRe-created viruses, toxic bacteria top new ranking of risks.
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    Technology that knows what you're feeling | Poppy CrumWhat happens when technology knows more about us than we do? Poppy Crum studies how we express emotions -- and she suggests the end of the poker face is near, as new tech makes it easy to see the signals that give away how we're feeling. In a talk and demo, she shows how "empathetic technology" can read physical signals like body temperature and the chemical composition of our breath to inform on
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    1
    Hypnosis may help reduce fear of cancer treatment in childrenHypnosis could help to reduce the fear of medical procedures in children and young people with cancer.
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    Mysterious IceCube event may be caused by a tau neutrinoTheoretical physicists from Maint and Stanford calculate the origin of a high-energy particle track captured by the IceCube Neutrino Observatory.
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    Responses of the tropical atmospheric circulation to climate changeAn international team describes the climate change-induced responses of the tropical atmospheric circulation and their impacts on the hydrological cycle. It also depicts the theoretically predicted changes and diagnose physical mechanisms for observational and model-projected trends in large-scale and regional climate.
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    1
    Is the sky the limit?What stops a species adapting to an ever-wider range of conditions, continuously expanding its geographic range? The biomathematician Jitka Polechová, an Elise Richter Fellow at the University of Vienna, has published a paper in PLoS Biology which explains the formation of species' range margins. The theory shows that just two compound parameters, important for both ecology and evolution of specie
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    1
    World's first intra-operative MRI-guided robot for bilateral stereotactic neurosurgeryA HKU Mechanical Engineering team led by Dr. Kwok Ka-wai recently designed the first neurosurgical robotic system capable of performing bilateral stereotactic neurosurgery inside a magnetic resonance imaging ('MRI') scanner. The team also conducted pre-clinical validation of the system with CUHK neurosurgeons, Dr Danny Chan Tat-ming and Professor Poon Wai-sang. This innovative technological breakt
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    7
    Give up on ‘finding your passion’ and try this insteadThe advice to “find your passion” might undermine how interests actually develop, according to new research. In a series of laboratory studies, researchers examined beliefs that may lead people to succeed or fail at developing their interests. Mantras like “find your passion” carry hidden implications, the researchers say. They imply that once an interest resonates, pursuing it will be easy. But,
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    1
    Lion conservation research can be bolstered by input from a wide-range of professionalsThe conservation of lions, while maintaining the well-being of people that live around them, is a complex problem that should be addressed by a wide-range of professionals working together, suggests a new review published in the open-access journal Frontiers in Ecology and Evolution. Rather than focusing solely on human-lion interaction, factors such as the environment, wild prey and domesticated
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    1
    Researchers use machine learning to search science dataAs scientific datasets increase in both size and complexity, the ability to label, filter and search this deluge of information has become a laborious, time-consuming and sometimes impossible task, without the help of automated tools.
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    New Scientist - News
    49
    Alien preppers could hoard stars to survive in a doomed universeDark energy is accelerating the expansion of the universe, meaning eventually all galaxies will be inaccessible, but aliens could be working on a solution right now
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    Ingeniøren
    Her er systemet, der giver besked, hvis dækkene er slidt nedEn sensor ved udkørslen til et parkeringshus i Oslo scanner dækkene automatisk og tilsender bilisterne en tilstandsrapport, hvis de ønsker det.
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    Warnings to texting pedestrians may not eliminate risks, but they can helpHuman factors researchers at the University of Iowa have been looking at ways to harness technology to prevent fatalities among pedestrians who are struck by vehicles while texting. In their latest study in Human Factors, "Harnessing Vehicle-to-Pedestrian (V2P) Communication Technology: Sending Traffic Warnings to Texting Pedestrians," Pooya Rahimian and colleagues simulated a busy roadway to dete
    2h
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    8
    World's first known manta ray nursery discoveredA graduate student at Scripps Institution of Oceanography at the University of California San Diego and colleagues from NOAA's Office of National Marine Sanctuaries have discovered the world's first known manta ray nursery.
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    Diagnostics of genetic cardiac diseases using stem cell-derived cardiomyocytesA new study by Professors Martti Juhola and Katriina Aalto-Setälä of the University of Tampere in Finland demonstrates that with the use of artificial intelligence and machine learning, it is possible not only to accurately sort sick cardiac cell cultures from healthy ones, but also to differentiate between genetic cardiac diseases.
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    1
    Lion conservation research can be bolstered by input from a wide-range of professionalsThe conservation of lions, while also maintaining the well-being of people that live around them, is a complex problem that should be addressed by a wide-range of professionals working together. Rather than focusing solely on human-lion interaction, other factors such as the environment, wild prey and domesticated livestock need to be considered to get a full evaluation of the problem. This approa
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    1
    Museum collection reveals distribution of Carolina parakeet 100 years after its extinctionWhile 2018 marks the centenary of the death of the last captive Carolina parakeet -- North America's only native parrot, a team of researchers have shed new light on the previously known geographical range of the species. Their data paper, published in the open access Biodiversity Data Journal, is the most comprehensive occurrence dataset for the species ever produced.
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    1
    Mechanism controlling multiple sclerosis risk identifiedWhile the DNA sequence remains the same throughout a person's life, the expression of the encoded genes may change with time and contribute to disease development in genetically predisposed individuals. Researchers at Karolinska Institutet have now discovered a new mechanism of a major risk gene for multiple sclerosis (MS) that triggers disease through epigenetic regulation. They also found a prot
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    1
    Spintronics: Controlling magnetic spin with electric fieldsEPFL physicists have found a way to reverse electron spins using electric fields for the first time, paving the way for programmable spintronics technologies.
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    7
    Bees love blue fluorescent light, and not just any wavelength will doResearchers at Oregon State University have learned that a specific wavelength range of blue fluorescent light set bees abuzz.
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    Deep-sea marine sponges may hold key to antibiotic drug resistanceDrug resistance to antibiotics is on the rise and there is an urgent need to develop new drugs to treat infectious diseases that are a major threat to human health globally. Researchers from Florida Atlantic University's Harbor Branch Oceanographic Institute may have a solution to this problem using sea sponges collected from the ocean depths.
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    BBC News - Science & Environment
    33
    Rover test: What's it like to ride a rocket to Mars?European engineers shake their Mars rover to see that it can survive the violence of a rocket launch.
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    4
    Road rules for gene transfer are written in DNAA new discovery suggests that bacteria's ability to transfer genes, like those associated with antibiotic resistance, are governed by a previously unknown set of rules that are written in the DNA of the recipient.
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    Nanoscale 'crack-junctions' can speed up DNA sequencingThe time-consuming, expensive process of sequencing DNA molecules – a technology used to identify, diagnose and possibly find cures for diseases – could become a whole lot faster and cheaper as a result of a new nanofabrication method that takes advantage of nano-sized air-gaps, or nanocracks, in electrically conductive materials.
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    The Atlantic
    57
    Photos: A Tent City for Detained Children in TexasTwenty miles outside of El Paso, Texas, along the U.S.-Mexico border, sits the Tornillo Port of Entry , a U.S. Customs and Border Protection facility which was selected by the Trump administration to be the first site for temporary housing for the overflow of unaccompanied minors and the children of detained migrant parents, under the new “zero-tolerance” policy. A quickly erected tent city insid
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    Nano crystals impact stem cell fate during bone formationScientists from the University of Freiburg and the University of Basel identified a master regulator for bone regeneration. Prasad Shastri, Professor of Biofunctional Macromolecular Chemistry at the Institute for Macromolecular Chemistry and Professor of Cell Signalling Environments in the Cluster of Excellence BIOSS Centre for Biological Signalling Studies at the University of Freiburg led the st
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    Futurity.org
    1
    BPA seems to alter communication for generationsMouse pups whose grandparents experienced BPA exposure show different vocalization patterns, which can affect the amount of parental care they receive, a new study shows. Past studies showed negative effects on offspring when when BPA-exposed mothers and fathers provide care. Scientists believe the new findings with grandparents could have important relevance to humans. “Rodent pups use vocalizat
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    1
    Game-changing finding pushes 3D-printing to the molecular limitNew University of Nottingham research proves that advanced materials containing molecules that switch states in response to environmental stimuli such as light can be fabricated using 3D printing.The study findings have the potential to vastly increase the functional capabilities of 3D-printed devices for industries such as electronics, healthcare and quantum computing.
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    2
    D for danger! Speech sounds convey emotionsIndividual speech sounds -- phonemes -- are statistically associated with negative or positive emotions in several languages, new research published in the journal Cognition by Bocconi Professor Zachary Estes, his Warwick colleague James Adelman and Bocconi student Martina Cossu shows. These associations help us quickly avoid dangers, because the phoneme-emotion associations are strongest at the b
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    3
    The first experimental discovery in the world of the propagation of plasma turbulenceThe research group of NIFS together with collaborators in the United States applied the 'heat pulse modulation method' in the magnetic island produced intentionally in the tokamak 'Doublet III-D.' Temperature gradient inherent in the magnetically confined plasma causes turbulence while there is no turbulence in the magnetic island because of the absence of the gradient. That the turbulence propaga
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    1
    Physicists solve the mystery of vanishing particles in grapheneA team of scientists explained the paradoxical phenomenon of the mutual annihilation of particles and antiparticles in graphene. The theoretical justification for this process was until recently one of the most complex riddles of solid-state physics. This discovery makes the idea of creating graphene lasers relevant.
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    3
    Mysterious IceCube event may be caused by a tau neutrinoEight years ago, the IceCube detector, a research center located at the South Pole to detect neutrinos emanating from the cosmos, was commissioned. Three years later, it began to register the first momentous results. The detection of high-energy neutrinos by IceCube made viable completely new options for explaining how our universe works.
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    Moving toward fast internet on the planeStreaming films and music or accessing business data in the cloud when flying to the holiday destination or to business meetings – this is the dream of passengers as well as airlines. So far, however, fast internet on the plane has failed due to the lacking capacity of data connections between the plane and the ground. For the first time, a team of researchers at Karlsruhe Institute of Technology
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    Ingeniøren
    VIDEO: Første tur med elektrisk fly i NorgeNorge går efter el gøre indenrigsflyvning eldreven. Men de fly, der skal tages i brug i 2020’erne, bliver hybrider.
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    4
    Schools must equip students to navigate alt-right websites that push fake newsMore than 60 percent of America's middle and high school students rely on alt-right internet sites as credible sources for their research papers. The students are using alt-right sites to write papers on topics that range from free speech and the Second Amendment to citizenship, immigration and the Holocaust.
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    11
    The public health benefits of adding offshore wind to the gridNew plans to build two commercial offshore wind farms near the Massachusetts and Rhode Island coasts have sparked a lot of discussion about the vast potential of this previously untapped source of electricity.
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    1
    How setting a schedule can make you less productiveIt can seem like there's never enough time – not enough for sleep and not enough for play, not enough for cooking and not enough for exercise.
    2h
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    5
    Scientists participate in month-long experiment to study indoor air pollutionScientists can tell us a lot about outdoor air pollution and its effects on human health and the environment, but less is known about the air we breathe in homes, offices and other indoor spaces.
    2h
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    1
    Grown-ups with supportive robotsRobots will be a necessity with the ageing population needing assistance to improve their mobility. On the long road to help seniors maintain their life quality, EU researchers have developed a unique prototype robot.
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    Futurity.org
    1
    Big data may only offer ‘fuzzy snapshot’ of healthWhen it comes to understanding what makes people tick—and get sick—medical science has long assumed that the bigger the sample of human subjects, the better. New research suggests this big-data approach may be wildly off the mark. That’s largely because emotions, behavior, and physiology vary markedly from one person to the next and one moment to the next. So averaging out data from a large group
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    3
    Everything big data claims to know about you could be wrongWhen it comes to understanding what makes people tick -- and get sick -- medical science has long assumed that the bigger the sample of human subjects, the better. But new research led by the University of California, Berkeley, suggests this big-data approach may be wildly off the mark.
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    Dagens Medicin
    Ny direktør for Børsen Associated MediaDagens Medicin og de øvrige aktiviteter under Børsen Associated Media (BAM) får ny administrerende direktør.
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    2
    Insights into group living shed light on ageing mechanismsA new study on how Cape ground squirrels live in the wild is revealing the effects of social stress on ageing. The research has potential to help understand ageing mechanisms in humans as well.
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    9
    Australia must embrace transformation for a sustainable futureLast Friday, the Australian government released its first report on our progress towards meeting the United Nations' Sustainable Development Goals by 2030.
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    Scientific American Content: Global
    7
    How Does the Quantum World Cross Over?The universe according to quantum mechanics is strange and probabilistic, but our everyday reality seems nailed down. New experiments aim to probe where—and why—one realm passes into the... -- Read more on ScientificAmerican.com
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    9
    Proposed NSW logging laws value timber over environmental protectionNew South Wales is revamping its logging laws for the first time in two decades, drafting regulations that will govern more than two million hectares of public native forest.
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    Grindr profile pics are all about the hookupHow do we present ourselves on our dating profiles? When we select our photos, what do our selections say about us? What do they say about the app or service we are using?
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    1
    Physicists solve the mystery of vanishing particles in grapheneResearchers from the Moscow Institute of Physics and Technology and Tohoku University (Japan) have explained the puzzling phenomenon of particle-antiparticle annihilation in graphene, recognized by specialists as Auger recombination. Although persistently observed in experiments, it was for a long time thought to be prohibited by the fundamental physical laws of energy and momentum conservation. T
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    I am not the sum of my personal dataThe Cambridge Analytica scandal scandalises everyone… and at the same time, no one. Similarly, Mark Zuckerberg's solemn yet insolent testimony before the US congress is both reassuring and troubling.
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    1
    In Paris, the risk of flooding is never far awayIn 1910, Paris was subject to a historic flood that is still remembered, and it's far from a unique event. In France, the risk of flooding is the number-one natural hazard, affecting one in four people, or 17 million residents. Rising river levels are a natural phenomenon that can lead – depending on their intensity (height, speed), duration and geographical reach – to overflow flooding (where the
    3h
    Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
    4
    From Cape Town to São Paulo, large cities are facing water shortagesWill South Africa's second largest city dry up on August 19 of this year? By launching an official countdown, Cape Town City Council wished to highlight the impending cuts to domestic water supply for its more than 3.7 million inhabitants.
    3h
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    2
    Image: A dexterous laboratory in spaceHave you ever considered yourself capable of manipulating gravity? When you grip an object, you are doing just that.
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    5
    Barriers between Realities: Irrational Thinking and the Quantum-Classical Divide-- Read more on ScientificAmerican.com
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    How I reconstruct the faces of early human ancestorsScience Sculptor Élisabeth Daynès works in paleo-reconstruction, bringing the faces of long-dead human ancestors back to life. Sculptor Élisabeth Daynès works in paleo-reconstruction, bringing the faces of long-dead human ancestors back to life. A.K.A. Science eye for the Neanderthal guy.
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    Low vitamin D levels associated with scarring lung diseaseReviewing medical information gathered on more than 6,000 adults over a 10-year period, Johns Hopkins researchers have found that lower than normal blood levels of vitamin D were linked to increased risk of early signs of interstitial lung disease (ILD).
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    Toothpaste and hand wash are causing antibiotic resistanceA common ingredient in toothpaste and hand wash could be contributing to antibiotic resistance, according to University of Queensland research.A study led by Dr Jianhua Guo from UQ's Advanced Water Management Centre focused on triclosan, a compound used in more than 2000 personal care products.
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    Methadone and buprenorphine reduce risk of death after opioid overdoseA National Institutes of Health-funded study found that treatment of opioid use disorder with either methadone or buprenorphine following a nonfatal opioid overdose is associated with significant reductions in opioid related mortality. The research, published today in the Annals of Internal Medicine, was co-funded by the National Institute on Drug Abuse (NIDA) and the National Center for Advancing
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    Nedtrapning af biologisk behandling kan gavne både økonomi og patienterMuligheden for at nedtrappe leddegigtpatienter i biologisk behandling bør vinde indpas nationalt, mener formand for tværregionalt forum for ibrugtagning af medicin, Hanne Rolighed Christensen.
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    Rigshospitalet har fundet ny direktør til NeurocentretOverlæge Jannick Brennum tiltræder 1. juli som direktør i Neurocentret på Rigshospitalet.
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    Why plant protein is superior to animal proteinChoosing a diet is hard for many people. But it doesn't have to be. Read More
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    Amino acid puts dates on Clovis remains and artifactsBoth the skeletal remains of a young child and the antler and stone artifacts at the Anzick site in Montana—the only known Clovis burial site—date back 12,725 to 12,900 years. The work raises new questions about the early inhabitants of North America. The main focus of the research centered on properly dating the Anzick site, which gets its name from the family who own the land. Construction work
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    Science | The Guardian
    1
    What is cannabis oil and how does it work?Your questions about the medical use of cannabis oil answered Cannabis oils are extracts from cannabis plants. Unprocessed, they contain the same 100 or so active ingredients as the plants, but the balance of compounds depends on the specific plants the oil comes from. The two main active substances in cannabis plants are cannabidiol, or CBD, and delta-9 tetrahydrocannabinol, or THC. Oil extracte
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    1
    'Smart stent' detects narrowing of arteriesUBC researchers have developed a type of 'smart stent' that monitors even subtle changes in the flow of blood through the artery, detecting the narrowing in its earliest stages and making early diagnosis and treatment possible.
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    2
    Deep-sea marine sponges may hold key to antibiotic drug resistanceFAU's Harbor Branch houses more than 1,000 strains of actinobacteria, one of the most prolific microbial groups for the production of natural products. Derived from sea sponges and other macro-organisms, several strains were identified for their potent antifungal activity, for anti-MRSA activity, and for both antifungal and antibacterial activities. A key finding was the identification of a strain
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    3
    Bad habits that lead to cancer, chronic disease corrected by simple lifestyle interventionFour of the most common bad habits -- too much screen time, too little exercise and high fat and low fruit and vegetable intake -- can lead to heart disease and cancer, but a simple intervention using mobile health tools and coaching normalized these behaviors, and improvements were sustained.
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    Good primary lowers ED use for those with intellectual and developmental disabilitiesOne in three adults with intellectual and developmental disabilities (IDD) visit the emergency department annually but effective primary care could reduce these numbers, suggests a new study led by St. Michael's Hospital and the Institute for Clinical Evaluative Sciences (ICES).
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    1
    Cells can trap viruses in protein cage to stop their spread, study revealsResearchers at The Francis Crick Institute in London have discovered that cells can trap viruses in a protein cage to stop them from spreading to neighboring cells. The study, which will be published June 19 in the Journal of Cell Biology, reveals that the vaccinia virus can escape this trap by recruiting additional proteins to dismantle the cage and propel the virus out of the cell.
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    1
    Breast cancer could be prevented by targeting epigenetic proteins, study suggestsResearchers at the Princess Margaret Cancer Centre in Toronto have discovered that epigenetic proteins promote the proliferation of mammary gland stem cells in response to the sex hormone progesterone. The study, which will be published June 19 in the Journal of Cell Biology, suggests that inhibiting these proteins with drugs could prevent the development of breast cancer in women at high risk of
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    2
    Warnings to texting pedestrians may not eliminate risks, but they can helpImproving pedestrian safety even in the presence of warnings remains a challenge.
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    Scripps graduate student discovers world's first known manta ray nurseryA graduate student at Scripps Institution of Oceanography at the University of California San Diego and colleagues from NOAA's Office of National Marine Sanctuaries have discovered the world's first known manta ray nursery.
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    2
    Blue gene regulation helps plants respond properly to lightResearchers at the RIKEN Center for Sustainable Resource Science (CSRS) have discovered a process through which gene expression in plants is regulated by light. Published in Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences USA, the study found that blue light triggers a shift in which portion of a gene is ultimately expressed.
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    Ingeniøren
    3D-print vil flytte rundt på partikler med lyd og lysForskere fra DTU vil fordele partikler i en væske med vibrationer og lys.
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    Futurity.org
    10
    1 anxiety and depression therapy could be really bad for leftiesA new model of emotion in the brain shows that a current treatment for the most common mental health problems could be ineffective or even detrimental to about 50 percent of the population—left-handers. Since the 1970s, hundreds of studies have suggested that each hemisphere of the brain is home to a specific type of emotion. The neural system for emotions linked to approaching and engaging with
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    How Does Language Shape the Way We Think? Cognitive Scientist Lera Boroditsky Explainssubmitted by /u/burtzev [link] [comments]
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    Madagascar’s predators are probably vulnerable to toxic toadsThe Asian common toad, an invasive species in Madagascar, produces a toxin in its skin that’s probably toxic to most of the island’s predators.
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    Professorer modtager stor pris for deres bidrag til lægevidenskabelig forskningProfessor og overlæge Anne Tybjærg-Hansen og professor Kristian Helin modtager i år KFJ-prisen for deres bidrag til forskningen inden for bl.a. hjertekarsygdomme og kræft.
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    79
    Cells can trap viruses in protein cage to stop their spread, study revealsResearchers at The Francis Crick Institute in London have discovered that cells can trap viruses in a protein cage to stop them from spreading to neighboring cells. The study, which will be published June 19 in the Journal of Cell Biology, reveals that the vaccinia virus can escape this trap by recruiting additional proteins to dismantle the cage and propel the virus out of the cell.
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    Iran’s Telegram Ban Has Impacted All Corners of the CountryIn Iran, secure messaging app Telegram effectively is the internet. The government has blocked it since April.
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    Bees love blue fluorescent light, and not just any wavelength will doResearchers have learned that a specific wavelength range of blue fluorescent light set bees abuzz.
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    Doc and the Street Beast | Street Outlaws: Crash CourseOnce the King, now barely in reach of his old kingdom atop the 405 List thanks to the dirty List Shakeup. Feast your eyes on the chaos that is the Doc and the Street Beast. Full episodes streaming now on DiscoveryGO: https://discovery.com/tv-shows/street-outlaws/ Binge watch all Street Outlaws: Crash Course now! https://www.discovery.com/tv-shows/street-outlaws-crash-course/ Subscribe to Discover
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    New testing method suggests baby Anzick-1 was same age as surrounding Clovis artifactsA team of researchers from the University of Oxford, Texas A&M University and Stafford Research LLC has found evidence bolstering the theory that the skeletal remains of an infant unearthed in Montana are those of the only known Clovis burial. In their paper published in Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences, the group describes their testing methods and what they found.
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    Image of the Day: Multiple ChoicePhotosynthesis can happen in more than one way.
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    Pancreatic Cell Size Negatively Relates to Lifespan in MammalsSpecies with larger pancreatic cells tend to have shorter lives, according to a study.
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    1
    California lawmakers debate creating regional electric gridA contentious proposal to link oversight of California's electric grid with other western states faces a crucial test Tuesday in a state Senate committee.
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    NYT > Science
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    ScienceTake: The Elephant’s Superb NoseElephants’ trunks are not only large and strong, they house one of the best mammalian smelling systems.
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    NYT > Science
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    Inside the Nose of an ElephantElephants have a keen nose. They have more smell receptors than any mammal – including dogs – and can sniff out food that is several miles away. A new study tests their ability to distinguish between similar smelling plants.
    1h
    Science-Based Medicine
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    H.O.P.E.: A Movie Promoting VeganismH.O.P.E., a movie promoting veganism, is short on science and long on appeals to emotion.
    1h
    Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
    3
    Most protein info ever captured from a single cell thanks to new 'nanoPOTS' technologyScientists have obtained a slew of key information about proteins, the molecular workhorses of all cells, from single human cells for the first time.
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    Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
    3
    Entrepreneurs seek to quantify pressure applied during manual therapyPhysical and occupational therapists, athletic trainers, chiropractors, veterinarians, and other medical professionals could improve the outcomes of manual therapy to treat soft-tissue injuries by using patent-pending, handheld instruments being developed by IUPUI entrepreneurs.
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    Now the Computer Can Argue With YouIBM shows off an artificial intelligence program that can engage in a debate, possibly pointing the way to the future of talking machines.
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    BBC News - Science & Environment
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    Puan, oldest known Sumatran orangutan, dies in AustraliaPuan left an "incredible legacy" of descendants for the critically endangered species, keepers say.
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    Ingeniøren
    IBM-projekt i Forsvarsministeriet fire år forsinket og dobbelt så dyrt som planlagtManglende funktionalitets- og performancetest og en HR-opgave, der er mere kompleks at digitalisere end først antaget, har gjort nyt planlægningssystem i Forsvarsministeriet dyrere.
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    Science | The Guardian
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    Out of their minds: wild ideas at the ‘Coachella of consciousness’An annual conference on consciousness in the Arizona desert takes an anything-goes approach to some seriously wacky theories By Tom Bartlett Start with Noam Chomsky, Deepak Chopra and a robot that loves you no matter what. Add a knighted British physicist, a renowned French neuroscientist and a prominent Australian philosopher/occasional blues singer. Toss in a bunch of psychologists, mathematici
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    5 gode råd: Sådan stopper du digital mobningMobning på nettet fordobler risikoen for selvmordsforsøg og selvskade, viser ny forskning. Få fem gode råd til, hvordan du fjerner digital mobning.
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    Digital mobning fordobler risikoen for selvskade og selvmordsforsøg16-årige Nanna Jensen blev mobbet på nettet. Hun er en af de unge, der har en øget risiko for at selvskade og forsøge selvmord, viser ny undersøgelse.
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    Study on social interactions could improve understanding of mental health risksInvestigators have released the results of a study that outlines how age, socioeconomic status, and other factors might contribute to social isolation and poorer mental health.
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    Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
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    Often overlooked glial cell is key to learning and memoryGlial cells surround neurons and provide support -- not unlike hospital staff and nurses supporting doctors to keep operations running smoothly. These often-overlooked cells, which include oligodendrocytes and astrocytes, are the most abundant cell types in the central nervous system. But these cells do more than support neurons.
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    'Artificial blubber' protects divers in frigid waterA treatment that infuses a conventional neoprene wetsuit with a heavy inert gas can improve a diver's survival time in frigid waters by a factor of three, according to scientists.
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    Factor important for ZIKA Virus host species restrictionIn 2013 and 2015, devastating outbreaks of ZIKA captured world attention. The virus is often transmitted from wild animals -- probably non-human primates -- via mosquitos to humans. This is the first comprehensive study to investigate which mammal species may host the ZIKA virus (ZIKV).
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    EurekAlert! - Breaking News
    1
    Ground-breaking discoveries could create superior alloys with many applicationsMany current and future technologies require alloys that can withstand high temperatures without corroding. Now, researchers at Chalmers University of Technology, Sweden, have hailed a major breakthrough in understanding how alloys behave at high temperatures, pointing the way to significant improvements in many technologies. The results are published in the highly ranked journal Nature Materials.
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    EurekAlert! - Breaking News
    1
    Combining different malaria vaccines could reduce cases by 91 percentUsing two experimental anti-malarial vaccines, which work in different ways, can greatly reduce the number of malaria infections in animal studies.
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    EurekAlert! - Breaking News
    1
    Twenty-five per cent of seafood sold in Metro Vancouver is mislabelledA new UBC study used DNA barcoding to determine that 70 of 281 seafood samples collected in Metro Vancouver between September 2017 and February 2018 were mislabelled.
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    1
    Children's immune system could hold the key to preventing sepsisScientists have identified the key response that children use to control infections.
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    Opioid dependence in patients with degenerative spondylolisthesis: More likely to occur before than after surgeryResearchers investigated risk factors for the development of opioid dependence in patients undergoing surgery for degenerative spondylolisthesis (DS). They found that, overall, patients were more likely to have a dependency on opioid medications before surgery than afterward.
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    Good relationships with siblings may buffer the effects of family conflictA new longitudinal study finds that having a good relationship with a sibling may help buffer the distress of ongoing hostility between parents.
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    Parents' explanations of peer interactions affect how children interpret peers' behaviorNew research in the journal Child Development shows that parents can help their children perceive less hostility in their social world by framing social situations in a positive way, and thus, reduce their likelihood of behaving aggressively.
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    1
    RFK's assassination: A medical analysis of his injuries and neurosurgical careCovers the assassination of Robert F. Kennedy. The authors 'review the eyewitness reports of the mechanism of injury, the care rendered for three hours prior to the emergency craniotomy, the clinical course, and, ultimately, the autopsy.' The discussion of autopsy findings is supplemented by an artist's depiction of the extent of Senator Kennedy's head injury.
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    Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
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    Reduction in sulfur emissions from power plants in ChinaAir pollution has smothered China's cities in recent decades. In response, the Chinese government has implemented measures to clean up its skies. But are those policies effective? Now scholars show that one of China's key antipollution laws is indeed working -- but unevenly, with one particular set of polluters most readily adapting to it.
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    Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
    12
    Overuse of agricultural chemicals on China's small farms harms health and environmentThe size of farms in China is a key contributor to the overuse of agricultural chemicals, and as a result they may be too small to be environmentally sustainable, a new study has found.
    3h
    BBC News - Science & Environment
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    Will Norway's electric plane take off?A battery-powered plane that could mean guilt-free travel is part of a plan to tackle climate change.
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    Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
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    Increased risk of birth defects in babies after first-trimester exposure to lithiumResearchers have found an elevated risk of major congenital malformations in fetuses after first-trimester exposure to lithium, in the largest study ever to examine the risk of birth defects in lithium-exposed babies.
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    Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
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    Carbon nanotube optics provide optical-based quantum cryptography and quantum computingResearchers are exploring the enhanced potential of carbon nanotubes as single-photon emitters for quantum information processing.
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    Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
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    Phoneme project creates new haptic communications futureCommunication could step beyond reading a cellular phone screen with a new technique by engineering researchers to learn and read messages through a person's sense of touch.
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    Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
    10
    Local interventions boost coral's resilience to bleachingLocal conservation actions can significantly boost coral's resilience to, and recovery from, climate-induced thermal bleaching by reducing other energy-sapping stresses the coral faces, a new study finds. Scientists found they could reduce the extent of bleaching by half if they removed or reduced populations of coral-eating snails from affected reefs. The coral's recovery from bleaching was also
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    Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
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    Why being left-handed matters for mental health treatmentTreatment for the most common mental health problems could be ineffective or even detrimental to about 50 percent of the population, according to a radical new model of emotion in the brain.
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    Coral reef 'oases' offer glimmer of hopeScientists have discovered small communities of corals that are flourishing against the odds while so many around the world are dying.
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    Scientists isolate protein data from the tiniest of caches -- single human cellsScientists have captured the most information yet about proteins within a single human cell, giving scientists one of their clearest looks yet at the molecular happenings inside a human cell. The team detected on average more than 650 proteins in each cell -- many times more than conventional techniques capture from single cells.
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    Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
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    The force is strong within us: New study explores cell mechanics at workA research team focused on measuring the stiffness, bending, twisting and viscosity of individual cells -- focused on a breast cancer cell line -- using all of the most state-of-the art technology at their disposal. How both healthy and cancerous cells respond to this environment -- and whether there are key differences that can be identified for future diagnostic applications was of keen interest
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    This AI program could beat you in an argument—but it doesn’t know what it’s sayingIBM Project DebaterThe latest human-versus-machine matchup involves an argumentative AI system.
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    Trump Hasn't Signed a Space Force Into Being—YetA brand-new sixth military branch lacks political support.
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    Science : NPR
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    Summer Melt: Why Aren't Students Showing Up For College?As many as 40 percent of students who intend to go to college don't show up in the fall. Education researchers call this phenomenon "summer melt," and it has long been a puzzling problem. (Image credit: Hill Street Studios/Getty Images/Blend Images)
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    The Atlantic
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    The Trump Administration’s Shifting Story on Family SeparationsThe Trump administration struggled to contain the fallout as outrage over migrant children being separated from their parents at the border accelerated on Monday. As more and more disturbing stories and images have come out in recent days showing the children’s plight, the administration has been unable to get its story straight on the matter, with different officials offering different, even fal
    7h
    New Scientist - News
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    Trump has directed the US military to establish a Space ForcePresident Trump has announced the creation of a Space Force, the first new US military branch since 1947, but it’s not yet clear what this new corps will do
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    AI, Robotics and Your HealthAt the second Science Meets Congress event, AI, Robotics and Your Health, experts from academia and the private sector talked with Scientific American Editor in Chief Mariette DiChristina about the... -- Read more on ScientificAmerican.com
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    Microsoft's Ethical Reckoning Is HereRevelation of contract with US immigration agency sparks criticism amid family separations
    8h
    NYT > Science
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    A Troubling Prognosis for Migrant Children in Detention: ‘The Earlier They’re Out, the Better’The longer children remain in institutional settings, the greater their risk of depression, post-traumatic stress and other mental health problems.
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    Rare mutation sheds light on the brain’s wiringThe study of a Québec family with an unusual gene provides new insight into how our brain is built and offers a better understanding of psychiatric disorders such as depression, addictions, and schizophrenia, researchers say. Very little is known about how the human brain wires itself. Mouse studies have previously shown that the gene DCC helps dopamine producing cells in the developing adolescen
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    Futurity.org
    4
    Cosmic ‘Frisbees’ hint at our solar system’s originsScientists have imaged a cluster of protoplanetary disks in the Orion Nebula and discovered that they are smaller than those previously studied in closer, less-dense regions. Protoplanetary disks—cosmic ‘Frisbees’ of gas and dust orbiting young stars across the galaxy—spin out new planets. But the size of those planets depends on just how much material these disks have to give. The smallness of t
    8h
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    1
    Coral reef 'oases' offer glimmer of hopeAn international team of scientists have discovered small communities of corals that are flourishing against the odds while so many around the world are dying.
    8h
    Futurity.org
    2
    Floridians were more vigilant about Zika, but there’s work to doFlorida residents felt more susceptible than others in the United States to getting the Zika virus in 2016, were more knowledgeable about it, and were more likely to support taking community action against it, according to a new study. Floridians were nearly twice as likely as non-Floridians to say they took steps to protect themselves from Zika. Whether or not they felt personally susceptible to
    9h
    Futurity.org
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    Cement-free material paves the way for ‘green’ concreteEngineers have developed a composite binder made primarily of fly ash—a byproduct of coal-fired power plants—that can replace Portland cement in concrete. The material is cementless and environmentally friendly, the engineers say. The current concrete manufacturing process contributes 5 to 10 percent of carbon dioxide to global emissions… Fly ash binder does not require the high-temperature proce
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    61
    The Pepper v. Apple Supreme Court Case Will Decide If Apple's App Store Is a Monopoly*Apple Inc. v. Pepper* could have wide-reaching implications not only for the Cupertino giant, but also for other companies like Amazon.
    9h
    Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
    72
    Coral reef 'oases' offer glimmer of hopeThe identification of small 'oases' in the world's oceans, where corals appear to be thriving, could offer vital insights in the race to save one of the world's most threatened ecosystems.
    9h
    Futurity.org
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    HPV vaccine is working to reduce cancer riskThe HPV vaccine is working to reduce the risk of cervical cancer, according to a new study. “It is the first study in the world to test the Gardasil-4 vaccine on a population level. The childhood vaccination [program], which includes the HPV vaccine, is targeted at the entire population. Therefore, it is important to look at the entire population and the effect of the vaccine after the first scre
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    The Atlantic
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    A Choice Between Cruelty and Mercy“The man the city sets up in authority must be obeyed in small things and just but also in their opposites,” declares the tyrannical king in the ancient Greek tragedy Antigone . The plan to which he demands obedience calls for separating a brother and a sister across the city’s border—an act terrible in its cruelty but, he argues, necessary for security. The king wants to reestablish order in the
    9h
    The Atlantic
    500+
    Watch the U.S. Turn Away Asylum Seekers at the Border“The [narcos] threatened to kill every last person in our house—even the dog,” says Wayner Berduo, a young Guatemalan asylum seeker at the U.S.-Mexican border, in a new documentary from The Atlantic . Berduo says he lost his left eye and the use of his right arm in a violent attack late last year. Like thousands of Central American families, the Berduos say they’re seeking legal protection in the
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    Futurity.org
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    In just a few years, Antarctic ‘ice loss’ tripledThe amount of ice lost from Antarctica has tripled since 2012 and increased global sea levels by 0.12 inch in five years, according to new research. “We are observing the effects of climate change.” Scientists studied the change in mass of the Antarctic ice sheet from 1992 to 2017 and found the ice losses have increased global sea levels by 0.3 inches. The research reveals a sharp uptick in ice l
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    Science | The Guardian
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    Tattoo health warning for people with weakened immune systemsA woman with cystic fibrosis and lung transplants suffered chronic pain for three years after she had a tattoo on her thigh Getting a tattoo if you have a weakened immune system could put you at risk of complications, doctors have warned. The caution comes after a woman with cystic fibrosis and lung transplants developed thigh and knee pain after having body art inked on her leg. Doctors say thos
    9h
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    Keyhole may trump robotic surgery for mitral valve repairKeyhole surgery for heart valve repair may trump robotic surgery, because it is associated with lower rates of subsequent heart flutter and blood transfusions, and a shorter hospital stay, reveals research looking at the pros and cons of different surgical approaches, published online in the journal Heart.
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    Beware of getting a tattoo if your immune system isn't up to scratch, doctors warnGetting a tattoo may have some unexpected complications if your immune system isn't up to scratch, warn doctors in the journal BMJ Case Reports.
    9h
    EurekAlert! - Breaking News
    1
    Marriage may protect against heart disease/stroke and associated risk of deathMarriage may protect against the development of heart disease/stroke as well as influencing who is more likely to die of it, suggests a pooled analysis of the available data, published online in the journal Heart.
    9h
    Popular Science
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    A pack of wolves is about to save this national parkEnvironment With any luck, a boatload of predators is headed to Isle Royale. After years of debate, the National Park Service announced its final decision to reintroduce 20 to 30 wolves to Isle Royale, a remote island in Lake Superior.
    9h
    Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
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    Two new creatures discovered from dawn of animal lifeEarth's first complex animals were an eclectic bunch that lived in the shallow oceans between 580-540 million years ago.
    10h
    The Atlantic
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    The Atlantic Politics & Policy Daily: Zero Tolerance-Written by Elaine Godfrey ( @elainejgodfrey ) Today in 5 Lines During a meeting of the National Space Council, President Trump ordered the Pentagon to create a “space force,” which would be the sixth branch of the U.S. military. Department of Homeland Security Secretary Kirstjen Nielsen defended the Trump administration’s “zero tolerance” immigration policy amid mounting pressure from Democrats
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    The Atlantic
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    The Atlantic Daily: Moral ReckoningWhat We’re Following Immigration Policy: The Trump administration’s policy of separating migrant children from their parents at the U.S–Mexico border continued to provoke outrage over the weekend. Evangelical leaders, members of Congress, and former First Lady Laura Bush added their voices to what Krishnadev Calamur calls a “national moral reckoning.” The children are being detained in chain-link
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    The Atlantic
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    How Exactly Do You Establish a Space Force?At about 8 a.m. on Monday, reporters called into a press conference with White House officials to discuss the day’s main event: a meeting of the National Space Council at noon. The conference was convened to discuss a spate of new proposals by the administration for, among other things, improving management of satellite traffic and cleaning up debris in Earth’s orbit. Not exactly thrilling stuff.
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    Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
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    BPA can induce multigenerational effects on ability to communicatePast studies have shown that biparental care of offspring can be affected negatively when females and males are exposed to bisphenol A (BPA); however, previous studies have not characterized how long-term effects of BPA exposure in grandmothers and grandfathers might affect offspring communication ability.
    10h
    Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
    6
    Researchers plunge into ocean 'twilight zone' to explore ecosystem carbon flowA large multidisciplinary team of scientists, equipped with advanced underwater robotics and an array of analytical instrumentation, will set sail for the northeastern Pacific Ocean this August. The team's mission for NASA and the National Science Foundation (NSF) is to study the life and death of the small organisms that play a critical role in removing carbon dioxide from the atmosphere and in t
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    Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
    50
    Purdue phoneme project creates new haptic communications futureCommunication could step beyond reading a cellular phone screen with a new technique by Purdue College of Engineering researchers to learn and read messages through a person's sense of touch.
    10h
    Live Science
    13
    Rare 1,000-Year-Old Amulet with Arabic Blessing Found in JerusalemArchaeologists discovered a 1,000-year-old clay amulet about the size of a dime at one of the oldest historical sites in Jerusalem. The tiny amulet belonged to a man named Kareem and is inscribed with a personal prayer.
    10h
    Live Science
    12
    The Oldest DNA from Giant Pandas Was Just Discovered in a Cave in ChinaScientists analyzed mitochondrial DNA to prove that a fossil belonged to an unknown, ancient cousin of modern pandas.
    10h
    Popular Science
    12
    Last week in tech: Look at all these new video gamesTechnology E3 2018 is in the books. Catch up on all the cool new game titles and the rest of the tech news you may have missed. Check out the latest episode of the Last Week in Tech podcast.
    10h
    Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
    51
    Checking China's pollution by satelliteAir pollution has smothered China's cities in recent decades. In response, the Chinese government has implemented measures to clean up its skies. But are those policies effective? Now an innovative study co-authored by an MIT scholar shows that one of China's key antipollution laws is indeed working—but unevenly, with one particular set of polluters most readily adapting to it.
    10h
    Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
    79
    Overuse of agricultural chemicals on China's small farms harms health and environmentThe size of farms in China is a key contributor to the overuse of agricultural chemicals, and as a result they may be too small to be environmentally sustainable, a new study has found.
    10h
    EurekAlert! - Breaking News
    1
    Study finds reduction in sulfur emissions from power plants in ChinaAir pollution has smothered China's cities in recent decades. In response, the Chinese government has implemented measures to clean up its skies. But are those policies effective? Now an innovative study co-authored by an MIT scholar shows that one of China's key antipollution laws is indeed working -- but unevenly, with one particular set of polluters most readily adapting to it.
    10h
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    Methadone and buprenorphine decrease mortality after nonfatal overdosenew study out of Boston Medical Center's Grayken Center for Addiction on opioid overdose survivors indicates that two FDA approved medications to treat opioid use disorder save lives, but only three out of 10 overdose survivors receive them.
    10h
    EurekAlert! - Breaking News
    Diagnosing Diabetes from a single blood sampleDiagnosing type 2 diabetes in clinical practice may require only a single blood sample, according to a study led by researchers at Johns Hopkins Bloomberg School of Public Health.
    10h
    Science : NPR
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    The Science Behind South Korea's Race-Based World Cup StrategySouth Korea's men's soccer team tried to confuse scouts from Sweden's team by swapping jerseys so their opponent couldn't tell the players apart. But could a strategy like that actually work? (Image credit: Clive Mason/Getty Images)
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    Science : NPR
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    Trump Calls For 'Space Force' To Defend U.S. Interests Among The StarsDonald Trump Space ForceThe president wants a "separate but equal branch" of the military to watch over the final frontier, but only Congress can make it happen. (Image credit: Michael Stonecypher/USAF)
    10h
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    50
    Local interventions boost coral's resilience to bleachingLocal conservation actions, like rounding up predatory snails, can significantly boost the resilience of corals to climate-induced bleaching, according to a study led by Duke University researchers.
    10h
    Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
    200+
    Two new creatures discovered from dawn of animal lifeEarth's first complex animals were an eclectic bunch that lived in the shallow oceans between 580-540 million years ago.
    10h
    Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
    15
    Scientists learn more about how gene linked to autism affects brainNew preclinical research shows a gene already linked to a subset of people with autism spectrum disorder is critical to healthy neuronal connections in the developing brain, and its loss can harm those connections to help fuel the complex developmental condition. Scientists report their data clarify the biological role of the gene CHD8 and its protein CHD8 in developing oligodendrocytes, cells tha
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    Faster, cheaper, better: A new way to synthesize DNAResearchers have pioneered a new way to synthesize DNA sequences through a creative use of enzymes that promises to be faster, cheaper, and more accurate. DNA synthesis is a fundamental tool in the rapidly growing field of synthetic biology, in which organisms can be engineered to do things like decompose plastic and manufacture biofuels and medicines. This discovery could dramatically accelerate
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    Chemists achieve major milestone of synthesis: Remote chiral inductionChemists have addressed one of the most formidable challenges in synthetic chemistry by inventing a method for enabling the making of chiral molecules that were previously difficult or impossible to synthesize.
    10h
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    Opinion: Constrain Speculation to Protect the Integrity of ScienceWhat we can know about biology before the last universal common ancestor is limited-and we should be circumspect in filling in the gaps.
    11h
    Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
    25
    360 degrees, 180 seconds: New technique speeds analysis of crop traitsA potted nine-leaf corn plant sits on a Frisbee-sized plate. The tandem begins rotating like the centerpiece atop a giant music box, three degrees per second, and after two minutes the plant has pirouetted to its original position.
    11h
    Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
    7
    Power starved Nigeria on the brink after six plants closedNigerian officials were working Monday to prevent the "collapse" of the electric grid after they had to close down six power plants following a pipeline failure and "technical issues" at Shell gas wells.
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    Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
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    Egypt's shrinking 'Pharaonic Sea' has fishermen worriedEgypt's shrinking freshwater "Pharaonic Sea" has residents in its nearly 50 surrounding fishing villages worried.
    11h
    Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
    2
    Biotech billionaire takes over at Los Angeles Times, new editor namedBiotech billionaire Patrick Soon-Shiong took over Monday as the new owner of the Los Angeles Times and immediately named respected journalist Norman Pearlstine as top editor.
    11h
    Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
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    Studies show groundwater holding own against drilling boomNew research suggests drinking water supplies in Pennsylvania have shown resilience in the face of a drilling boom that has turned swaths of countryside into a major production zone for natural gas.
    11h
    Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
    Tesla shares up despite viral video of sedan on fireElon Musk Tesla EmployeeTesla Motors was under another round of scrutiny on Monday after a homemade video of a Tesla sedan on fire went viral but the incident did not weigh on shares.
    11h
    Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
    3
    Tests confirm mystery animal shot in Montana was a wolfThe mystery is over: Wildlife officials have confirmed that an unusual-looking animal shot in central Montana was a gray wolf.
    11h
    Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
    100+
    Carbon nanotube optics poised to provide pathway to optical-based quantum cryptography and quantum computingResearchers at Los Alamos and partners in France and Germany are exploring the enhanced potential of carbon nanotubes as single-photon emitters for quantum information processing. Their analysis of progress in the field is published in this week's edition of the journal Nature Materials.
    11h
    Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
    1
    After brief wait, Beyonce, Jay-Z take album to SpotifyBeyonce and Jay-Z on Monday brought their surprise joint album to all platforms including Spotify after a wait of little more than a day, relenting on keeping an exclusive for their fledgling Tidal service.
    11h
    Big Think
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    Study: Trump voters show high levels of ‘sexual disgust’Past research on ‘disgust sensitivity’ show it’s linked to political orientation, but the new study is the first to explore exactly how it’s linked to voting behavior. Read More
    11h
    The Atlantic
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    The Unlabelling of an ‘Anti-Muslim Extremist’The Southern Poverty Law Center, the venerable civil-rights organization, has issued a formal apology to British political activist Maajid Nawaz and will make a $3.4 million payment over his inclusion in a 2016 list of “anti-Muslim extremists.” The settlement is the culmination of a bitter battle between the two sides that has stretched nearly two years. As I wrote when SPLC’s original report, A
    11h
    Science | The Guardian
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    We must have American dominance in space, says Donald Trump – videoDonald Trump has announced his plans to create an ambitious space programme in the US. Space Force will become a new branch of military that aims to ensure American's dominance in space. Trump wants America to return to the moon and land on Mars Continue reading...
    11h
    Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
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    22,000-year-old panda from cave in Southern China belongs to distinct, long-lost lineageResearchers who've analyzed ancient mitochondrial (mt)DNA isolated from a 22,000-year-old panda found in Cizhutuo Cave in the Guangxi Province of China -- a place where no pandas live today -- have revealed a new lineage of giant panda. The report shows that the ancient panda separated from present-day pandas 144,000 to 227,000 years ago, suggesting that it belonged to a distinct group not found t
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    Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
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    Targeting the engine room of the cancer cellResearchers have developed a highly innovative computational framework that can support personalized cancer treatment by matching individual tumors with the drugs or drug combinations that are most likely to kill them.
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    Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
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    Daily fasting works for weight loss, finds report on 16:8 dietDaily fasting is an effective tool to reduce weight and lower blood pressure, according to a new study that examines the effect of time-restricted eating on weight loss in obese individuals.
    11h
    Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
    13
    Meeting Paris climate targets will require a substantial reallocation of global investmentA new analysis by an international team of scientists shows that low carbon investments will need to markedly increase if the world is to achieve the Paris Agreement aim of keeping global warming well below 2°C.
    11h
    Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
    8
    Scientists create continuously emitting microlasers with nanoparticle-coated beadsResearchers have found a way to convert nanoparticle-coated microscopic beads into lasers smaller than red blood cells. These microlasers, which convert infrared light into light at higher frequencies, are among the smallest continuously emitting lasers of their kind ever reported and can constantly and stably emit light for hours at a time, even when submerged in biological fluids such as blood s
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    Odors are perceived the same way by hunter-gatherers and WesternersPrevious research has shown the hunter-gatherer Jahai are much better at naming odors than Westerners. They even have a more elaborate lexicon for it. New research by language scientists show that despite these linguistic differences, the Jahai and Dutch find the same odors pleasant and unpleasant.
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    Electrical wire properties of DNA linked to cancerNew research finds a connection between a cancer mutation and electron-mediated DNA repair.
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    When it comes to weight loss in overweight and obese adults with knee osteoarthritis, more is betterOverweight and obese individuals with knee osteoarthritis can reduce pain and significantly improve function and mobility with weight loss. New research reveals that a 20% or more weight loss has the added benefit of continued improvement in physical health-related quality of life along with an additional 25% reduction in pain and improvement in function.
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    The Many Factors Behind Getting Food to People After a DisasterThe Many Factors Behind Getting Food to People After a Disaster Nutrition, food safety and local norms among many considerations that aid groups weigh before and during disaster response. Foodaid.jpg Image credits: michelmond/ Shutterstock Culture Monday, June 18, 2018 - 16:00 James Gaines, Contributor (Inside Science) -- In the wake of a natural disaster a cascade of additional problems may emer
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    BPA can induce multigenerational effects on ability to communicatePast studies have shown that biparental care of offspring can be affected negatively when females and males are exposed to bisphenol A (BPA. In a study published today in the journal PLOS One, researchers at the University of Missouri found that mice pups whose grandparents had been exposed to BPA, had different vocalization patterns. This, in turn, could also affect the amount of parental care th
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    Why being left-handed matters for mental health treatmentTreatment for the most common mental health problems could be ineffective or even detrimental to about 50 percent of the population, according to a radical new model of emotion in the brain.
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    Princeton scientists uncover a factor important for ZIKA Virus host species restrictionIn 2013 and 2015, devastating outbreaks of ZIKA captured world attention. The virus is often transmitted from wild animals -- probably non-human primates -- via mosquitos to humans. This is the first comprehensive study to investigate which mammal species may host the ZIKA virus (ZIKV). 'We systematically tested the ability of ZIKV to infect cells from humans, great apes, New World and Old World m
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    Global Health: The Man Who (Almost) Wiped Out the Guinea WormsDr. Ernesto Ruiz-Tiben has saved tens of millions of people from painful parasitic infections.
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    Global Health: Nearly Eradicated in Humans, the Guinea Worm Finds New Victims: DogsFor 30 years, scientists have fought to eliminate a horrifying parasite. Suddenly, it has begun infecting dogs in Chad, threatening to undo decades of progress.
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    Apple's Latest iOS 12 Feature Will Save Lives by Pushing Your Location to 911Forget memoji. Apple's push to transmit instant, accurate locations during emergency calls will have a profound effect for first responders.
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    Adolescent binge drinking disrupts mouse memory in adulthoodExcessive drinking during adolescence may interfere with the activity of brain cells needed for sustaining short term memory, according to new research in adolescent male mice.
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    How a moderate dose of alcohol protects the heartResults suggest the effect is associated with activation of the enzyme ALDH2, which helps rid the organism of an aldehyde which is a toxic byproduct of alcohol digestion as much as it is a byproduct of heart cells submitted to stress.
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    Risky opioid prescriptions linked to higher chance of deathMost people who misuse opioids are first exposed to the drugs through prescriptions so improving prescribing is targeted as one way to help curb the nation's opioid abuse epidemic. A new study identified six types of risky opioid prescriptions and found that all were linked to a higher chance of death, including fatal opioid overdoses. The study found more than 6 percent of Massachusetts adults re
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    Organic crystals twist, bend, and healCrystals are brittle and inelastic? A novel class of smart, bendable crystalline organic materials has challenged this view. Now, scientists have engineered a molecular soft cocrystalline structure that bends and twists reversibly and without disintegration when stimulated by high temperature, mechanical force, or under UV light. This multifunctional quality makes it a robust candidate for advance
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    Novel information about the effects of in vitro fertilization on embryonic growthIn vitro fertilization affects the regulatory region of genes essential for placental and embryonic growth, as well as the birth weight. A new study suggests that the effects depend on genetic variation inherited from the parents. This information could be useful in development of assisted reproduction technologies.
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    Best evidence of rare black hole capturedScientists have been able to prove the existence of small black holes and those that are super-massive but the existence of an elusive type of black hole, known as intermediate-mass black holes (IMBHs) is hotly debated. New research shows the strongest evidence to date that this middle-of-the-road black hole exists, by serendipitously capturing one in action devouring an encountering star.
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    Neuroscientists map brain's response to cold touchNeuroscientists have mapped the feeling of cool touch to the brain's insula in a mouse model. The findings provide an experimental model that will advance research into conditions like pain and hypersensitivity to cold and help researchers to continue to unravel the multifaceted ways touch is represented in the brain.
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    Cementless fly ash binder makes concrete 'green'Engineers have developed a composite binder made primarily of fly ash, a byproduct of coal-fired power plants, that can replace Portland cement in concrete.
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    Novel combination as potential therapy for high-risk neuroblastomaResearchers at VCU Massey Cancer Center in Richmond, Virginia, have identified a promising target to reverse the development of high-risk neuroblastoma and potentially inform the creation of novel combination therapies for the disease.
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    'Slow earthquakes' on San Andreas Fault increase risk of large quakesA detailed study of the California fault has discovered a new kind of movement that isn't accounted for in earthquake forecasting.
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    Often overlooked glial cell is key to learning and memoryGlial cells surround neurons and provide support -- not unlike hospital staff and nurses supporting doctors to keep operations running smoothly. These often-overlooked cells, which include oligodendrocytes and astrocytes, are the most abundant cell types in the central nervous system. But these cells do more than support neurons. They also actively influence them, University of California, Riversi
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    First delivery episiotomies may require repeat procedures -- Ben-Gurion U. researchersAfter studying more than 43,000 deliveries at Soroka over 24 years (1991-2015), researchers found that 17.5 percent of mothers who had an episiotomy during their first delivery required repeat procedures, while only 3.1 percent of those who did not have an episiotomy the first time required one.
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    Theranos Leaders Indicted For FraudFederal prosecutors filed criminal charges that allege the company's promise to revolutionize blood testing swindled investors out of hundreds of millions of dollars and put patients in danger.
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    Rare mutation of gene carried by Quebec family gives insight into how the brain is wiredThe study of a Quebec family with an unusual gene provides novel insight into how our brain is built and, according to scientists, offers a better understanding of psychiatric disorders such as depression, addictions and schizophrenia.
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    Algorithm speeds up process for analyzing 3D medical imagesResearchers describe a machine-learning algorithm that can register brain scans and other 3D images more than 1,000 times more quickly using novel learning techniques.
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    Laser-sonic scanner aims to replace mammograms for finding breast cancerFor women over 40, mammography is a necessary yet annoying procedure to endure every year or two. The technique, while valuable for reducing breast cancer deaths, is less than ideal because it exposes patients to X-ray radiation and requires their breasts to be painfully squished between plates. The plates flatten the breast so the X-rays can more easily pass through it and produce a clear image.
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    When consumers don't want to talk about what they boughtOne of the joys of shopping for many people is the opportunity to brag about their purchases to friends and others. But new research found one common situation in which people would rather not discuss what they just bought: when they're feeling like money is a little tight. In a series of studies, researchers found that consumers who felt financially constrained didn't want to talk about their pur
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    Nature programs could put a spring in your stepA new study shows that watching films set in a natural environment boosts body image.
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    New 3D imaging analysis technique could lead to improved arthritis treatmentAn algorithm to monitor the joints of patients with arthritis, which could change the way that the severity of the condition is assessed, has been developed by a team of engineers, physicians and radiologists.
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    People Are Doing Ridiculous Things with Elon Musk's FlamethrowersNew owners of the first 1,000 flamethrowers distributed by Elon Musk's The Boring Company are using them like you'd expect.
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    ‘Stay safe’: why women are enraged by advice to steer clear of violent menIn the wake of yet another tragic loss of a woman’s life, police predictably advised people to “stay safe” by engaging in a range of “protective” strategies. Why is this a problem? Read More
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    WHO classifies 'gaming disorder' as a mental health conditionIn the 11th Revision of the International Classification of Diseases, a new one has appeared: Gaming Disorder. Read More
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    Venus’ thick atmosphere speeds up the planet’s spinVenus’ thick atmosphere can push on mountains on the surface, changing its rotation period by a few minutes every day.
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    How hats were placed atop the Easter Island statuesIt took only small teams using ramps and ropes to cap the giant statues of Rapa Nui, a new study says.
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    How free market ideology perverts the vocabulary of democracyFree market ideology uses democratic vocabulary as propaganda, obscuring a non-democratic reality. Read More
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    Inside the controversial new surgery to transplant human wombsScience Pioneering surgeons have made it possible to transplant a human uterus that can bear children, offering hope to millions of women who never thought they could give birth. Pioneering surgeons have made it possible to transplant a human uterus that can bear children, offering hope to millions of women who never thought they could give…
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    Constructing new tissue shapes with lightConstructing biological tissues, such as skin, muscle, or bone, in customized shapes is now one step closer. Researchers have succeeded in guiding the folding and thus shape of tissues with optogenetics: a technique to control protein activity with light.
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    Genomics offers new treatment options for infants with range of soft tissue tumorsThe genetic causes of a group of related infant cancers have been discovered by scientists. Whole genome sequencing of tumours revealed mutations which are targetable by existing drugs used to treat lung cancer and melanoma. The results have implications for clinical practice and the diagnosis of rare cancers in infants, and could lead to new, targeted treatment options for these children.
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    Devastating plant virus is revealed in atomic detailThe complex 3D structure of one of the world's most lethal families of plant viruses has been revealed in unprecedented detail by scientists.
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    Rising sea temperatures threaten survival of juvenile albatrossChanges in sea surface temperature affect the survival of albatross during their first year at sea, resulting in a reduced population growth rate when temperatures are warmer than the current average, a new study has revealed.
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    Why Are Rich, White Girls Struggling in Math?In recent years, the common wisdom has been that girls are dominating when it comes to academic achievement . In reading in particular, girls have consistently outperformed boys . Some studies have also found that in a typical U.S. school district, girls have all but caught up in math —a subject in which they had historically underperformed and from which they’d been discouraged thanks to persist
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    Novel transmitter protects wireless data from hackersDevice uses ultrafast “frequency hopping” and data encryption to protect wireless signals from being intercepted and jammed. Read More
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    Local interventions boost coral's resilience to bleachingLocal conservation actions can significantly boost coral's resilience to, and recovery from, climate-induced thermal bleaching by reducing other energy-sapping stresses the coral faces, a Duke-led study finds. Scientists found they could reduce the extent of bleaching by half if they removed or reduced populations of coral-eating snails from affected reefs. The coral's recovery from bleaching was
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    Study on social interactions could improve understanding of mental health risksMcLean Hospital investigators have released the results of a study that outlines how age, socioeconomic status, and other factors might contribute to social isolation and poorer mental health.
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    How to track and trace a protein: Nanosensors monitor intracellular deliveriesResearchers at the University of Basel's Biozentrum have developed a method for tracing the movement of proteins within the cell. They tagged proteins with tiny nanosensors, so-called nanobodies, which enable the scientists to live track and trace the proteins' pathway through the cell. The method described in the current issue of PNAS is suitable for a wide range of research purposes.
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    Overuse of agricultural chemicals on China's small farms harms health and environmentThe size of farms in China is a key contributor to the overuse of agricultural chemicals, and as a result they may be too small to be environmentally sustainable, a new study has found.
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    Scripps Research chemists design 'miniecosystems' to test drug functionScientists take on a major bottleneck in drug development.
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    Study finds 'hidden harvest' in world's inland fisheriesA new study published today in the Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences says we are dramatically underestimating the role inland fisheries play in global food security.
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    Synthetic receptors can rewire cell functions and minimize side-effectsEPFL and US scientists have developed a computational method that can design synthetic cell receptors that can be used to isolate how drugs work in a cell, minimize or even altogether prevent side effects and redirect their action.
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    UMass Amherst biologists identify a genetic mechanism in the evolution of novel traitsThere has long been a debate among biologists over whether the evolution of new traits requires new genes to evolve or whether they can arise simply from the recruitment of existing genetic pathways, says developmental biologist Craig Albertson at UMass Amherst. Now his lab reports evidence that novel traits can come from expanding gene-regulatory modules that have always existed in an organism.
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    Marine reserves are vital -- but under pressureA massive study of nearly 1,800 tropical coral reefs around the world has found that marine reserves near heavily populated areas struggle to do their job -- but are a vast improvement over having no protection at all.
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    Microglia protect sensory cells needed for vision after retinal detachmentA research team at Massachusetts Eye and Ear has shown that microglia, the primary immune cells of the brain and retina, play a protective role in response to retinal detachment.
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    Are smarter animals bigger troublemakers?A new paper examines whether smarter animals might be better at learning to live in cities -- but, at the same time, also may come into more conflict with humans.
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    Virtual reality headsets significantly reduce children's fear of needlesAlmost anyone can relate to being afraid of needles and injections. A pilot study is the first to use a 3D virtual reality headset to test this tool as a distraction method in a pediatric setting. Children were given the choice of a roller coaster ride, helicopter ride or a hot-air balloon ride. Results show that anticipated versus actual pain and fear were reduced in 94.1 percent of the pediatric
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    Childhood sibling dynamics may predict differences in college educationThe effects of sibling relationships may go beyond childhood bickering and bonding, according to researchers who found that these relationships may predict similarities and differences in siblings' education later in life.
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    Pesticide-free way to combat mosquitoes and West NileResearchers may have discovered a new, pesticide-free way to limit mosquito populations in some area and reduce the spread of the West Nile virus.
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    Explosive volcanoes spawned mysterious Martian rock formationExplosive volcanic eruptions that shot jets of hot ash, rock and gas skyward are the likely source of a mysterious Martian rock formation, a new study finds. The new finding could add to scientists' understanding of Mars's interior and its past potential for habitability, according to the study's authors.
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    Silence is golden when it comes to how our brains workIt's the comparative silence between the firing spikes of neurons that tells what they are really up to, scientists report.
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    'Space force': Trump orders new branch of US militaryTrump claims plan will keep US ahead in space race, prompting fears over militarisation of space Donald Trump said on Monday he would direct the Pentagon to create a “space force” as a new branch of the US military to shore up American dominance in space. Trump claimed that the plan will ensure that America, which plans a return to the moon and a mission to Mars, stays ahead of China and Russia i
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    Migration Is Down, Crime Is Low, but Merkel Is in TroubleAsylum applications are sharply down in Germany. So is crime. Yet Chancellor Angela Merkel’s hold on power is again under threat over the issue of migration—one which has upended politics throughout Europe and across the Atlantic. On Friday, Merkel clashed with her political allies in the Christian Social Union in Bavaria, and appeared on the verge of losing her coalition and potentially stepping
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    Trilobites: Sea Stars Started Dissolving. What Helped Some of Them Survive?Researchers say they’ve detected genetic differences that might help explain why some of these creatures on California’s coast survived a deadly plague.
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    Was Autism a Nazi Invention?In “Asperger’s Children,” Edith Sheffer explores the roots of autism, first diagnosed in Nazi Germany as the regime engaged in a program of child euthanasia.
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    It Was Supposed to Be an Unbiased Study of Drinking. They Wanted to Call It ‘Cheers.’Buried in a new N.I.H. report are disturbing examples of coordination between scientists and the alcohol industry on a study that could have changed America’s drinking habits.
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    The force is strong within us: New study explores cell mechanics at workAn ASU research team focused on measuring the stiffness, bending, twisting and viscosity of individual cells -- focused on a breast cancer cell line -- using all of the most state-of-the art technology at their disposal. How both healthy and cancerous cells respond to this environment -- and whether there are key differences that can be identified for future diagnostic applications was of keen int
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    Study finds 'hidden harvest' in world's inland fisheriesA new study published today in the Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences says we are dramatically underestimating the role inland fisheries play in global food security.
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    Biologists identify a genetic mechanism in the evolution of novel traitsThere has long been a debate among biologists over whether the evolution of new traits requires new genes to evolve or whether they can arise simply from the recruitment of existing genetic pathways, says developmental biologist Craig Albertson at the University of Massachusetts Amherst.
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    Chemists design 'miniecosystems' to test drug functionScripps Research scientists have solved a major problem in chemistry and drug development by using droplet-sized 'miniecosystems' to quickly see if a molecule can function as a potential therapeutic.
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    Synthetic receptors can rewire cell functions and minimize side-effectsOne of the challenges of modern pharmacology is specificity. Despite therapeutic effects, drugs can often have side effects. The biological basis for this has to do with the proteins and receptors that the drug targets and binds to. Many target receptors are connected to more than one biochemical pathway or more commonly, the drug is not specific enough to exclusively bind one particular receptor.
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    Marine reserves are vital—but under pressureA massive study of nearly 1800 tropical coral reefs around the world has found that marine reserves near heavily populated areas struggle to do their job—but are a vast improvement over having no protection at all.
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    Controversial Alcohol Study Cancelled by U.S. Health AgencyAn investigation by the U.S. National Institutes of Health finds missteps that put the industry-funded project’s credibility in doubt -- Read more on ScientificAmerican.com
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    The Supreme Court Would Prefer Not ToA 1960s novelty toy consisted of a small plastic box with a jointed lid and a switch. When the switch was turned on, a hand emerged, grabbed the switch and turned it off, then retreated back into the box. Big fun. The Supreme Court’s October 2017 term, which will lurch to its end next week, has, to a surprising extent, come to seem like that novelty toy. Though last October promised a crop of blo
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    The Atlantic
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    Partisan Gerrymandering Stands, for NowWhat anti-gerrymandering activists across the country wanted was a landmark ruling from the Supreme Court, determining once and for all that political maps could be held unconstitutional for partisan bias, and dictating how. What those activists got, however, was a punt. “The case is remanded to the District Court to give the plaintiffs an opportunity to prove concrete and particularized injuries
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    Yes, a tax bill can—and likely will—spoil America’s most pristine wildlife refugeEnvironment The public can submit comment until June 19. The Arctic National Wildlife Refuge is the largest swath of undeveloped land in the United States—a pristine frontier boasting unparalleled biodiversity and natural…
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    Scientists find potential disease-fighting 'warheads' hidden in bacteriaA new study suggests scientists could build better drugs by learning from bacteria-derived molecules called thiocarboxylic acids.
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    Great white sharks dive deep into warm-water whirlpools in the AtlanticTracking data from two great white sharks reveals that they spend more time deep inside warm-water eddies, suggesting that's where they like to feed.
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    Observation of anisotropic magneto-Peltier effectFor the first time in the world, scientists have observed an anisotropic magneto-Peltier effect -- a thermoelectric conversion phenomenon in which simple redirection of the flow of a charge current in a magnetic material induces heating and cooling.
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    Flexible blue vertical micro LEDsA research team developed a crucial source technology that will advance the commercialization of micro LEDs. Engineers have developed a low cost production technology for thin-film blue flexible vertical micro LEDs (f-VLEDs).
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    'Be personal and appreciative': Research shows effective responses to online feedbackAs more patients leave feedback on online platforms including social media, new research shows how health and social care organizations can offer value in their response.
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    First birth cohort to receive HPV vaccine: The vaccine worksGirls in the first birth cohort to be offered and receive the HPV vaccine showed a lower degree of dysplasia which may eventually lead to cervical cancer than a birth cohort from 1983.
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    New way to determine protection of Men B vaccine against different strainsA new approach is being assessed by Public Health England for its potential to routinely test all meningococcal disease cases.
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    Life in the fast lane: Ecologist says dispersal ability linked to plants' life cyclesEcologists say seed dispersal is an essential, yet overlooked, process of plant demography, but it's difficult to empirically observe, measure and assess its full influence.
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    Genomic testing for the causes of stillbirth should be considered for routine useThe use of whole genome and whole exome sequencing can uncover the cause of unexplained stillbirth and neonatal deaths. In addition to providing an explanation to bereaved parents, it can help the understand whether a recurrence in future pregnancies is likely.
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    New technique provides accurate dating of ancient skeletonsA new way of dating skeletons by using mutations in DNA associated with geography will avoid the difficulties and inaccuracies sometimes associated with existing dating methods. The technique will enable a better understanding of historical developments from the beginning of the Neolithic period, through the Bronze and Iron Ages.
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    Gut microbes may contribute to depression and anxiety in obesityLike everyone, people with type 2 diabetes and obesity suffer from depression and anxiety, but even more so. Researchers now have demonstrated a surprising potential contributor to these negative feelings -- and that is the bacteria in the gut or gut microbiome, as it is known.
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    Scientists isolate protein data from the tiniest of caches -- single human cellsScientists have captured the most information yet about proteins within a single human cell, giving scientists one of their clearest looks yet at the molecular happenings inside a human cell. The team detected on average more than 650 proteins in each cell -- many times more than conventional techniques capture from single cells.
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    360 degrees, 180 seconds: Technique speeds analysis of crop traitsResearchers from the University of Nebraska-Lincoln have devised a new LiDAR-based approach for automatically and efficiently gathering data about a plant's phenotype: the physical traits that emerge from its genetic code. The approach could allow researchers to better compare crops that have been bred or genetically engineered for specific traits - ideally those that help produce more food.
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    Are Children Being Kept in 'Cages' at the Border?It’s hard to think of something more tangible than a child incarcerated in a tent city or a former Walmart building—and yet as the story of families being separated at the border mushrooms, one of the central questions has been a semantic one: whether the migrant children are being kept in cages. Here’s what no one disputes: When the children are separated from their parents, they’re sent to faci
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    Keeping America first in quantum computing means avoiding these five big mistakesPotential pitfalls include putting the military in charge and spraying too much money around.
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    Enhancing the Ecological Validity of fMRI Memory Research Using Virtual Realitysubmitted by /u/aliendude93k [link] [comments]
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    Purdue phoneme project creates new haptic communications futureCommunication could step beyond reading a cellular phone screen with a new technique by Purdue College of Engineering researchers to learn and read messages through a person's sense of touch.
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    Two new creatures discovered from dawn of animal lifeUCR researchers have discovered two new Ediacaran era fossil animals. Their names honor President Barack Obama and Sir David Attenborough.
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    Carbon nanotube optics provide optical-based quantum cryptography and quantum computingResearchers at Los Alamos and partners in France and Germany are exploring the enhanced potential of carbon nanotubes as single-photon emitters for quantum information processing. Their analysis of progress in the field is published in this week's edition of the journal Nature Materials.
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    Deaths from cardiac arrest are misclassified, overestimatedForty percent of deaths attributed to cardiac arrest are not sudden or unexpected, and nearly half of the remainder are not arrhythmic -- the only situation in which CPR and defibrillators are effective -- according to an analysis by researchers at UC San Francisco and the City and County of San Francisco Office of the Chief Medical Examiner.
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    Study shows the detrimental long-term effects of helicopter parentingLet kids be kids. Watching over your children's every move is a bad idea, and the long-term effects of helicopter-parenting are far worse than thought. Read More
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    Archaeologists in Cambridgeshire find graves of two men with legs chopped offExclusive: men believed to be from late Roman or early Saxon period were found in pit being used as rubbish dump The graves of two men whose legs were chopped off at the knees and placed carefully by their shoulders before burial have been discovered by archaeologists working on a huge linear site in advance of roadworks in Cambridgeshire. The best scenario the archaeologists can hope for is that
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    The End of Civil RightsThe fires on the streets of Ferguson, Missouri, had barely stopped burning when the Department of Justice released an extraordinary report on the city’s police department. In the findings of the 2015 investigation of the Ferguson Police Department, the DOJ’s Civil Rights Division detailed how a municipality had built its social contract on a slow-rolling racist heist. Activists hoped that the Fer
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    Mirror, Shoulder, Signal and the Struggle of Changing GearsThe Danish writer Dorthe Nors likes to subject her characters to “the battle that you experience on the brink of something new,” she explained in a 2014 interview in The Paris Review . For the 40-something protagonist of her latest novel—the first to appear in English, and a finalist for the Man Booker International Prize last year—the battle is learning to drive. Shifting gears is a challenge fo
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    Scientists use neutrons to take a deeper look at record boost in thermoelectric efficiencyNeutron facilities at Oak Ridge National Laboratory are aiding scientists in research to boost the power and efficiency of thermoelectric materials. These performance increases could enable more cost-effective and practical uses for thermoelectrics, with wider industry adoption, to improve fuel economy in vehicles, make power plants more efficient, and advance body heat–powered technologies for wa
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    Five things to know about VW's 'dieselgate' scandalVolkswagen's emissions cheating scandal, for which Audi chief executive Rupert Stadler was arrested on Monday, has had repercussions for the car industry around the world.
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    Facebook used AI for an eye-opening trick
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    Trump wants to dominate space, Moon and Mars (Update)President Donald Trump boasted Monday of the US commercial space industry's deep wallet and enterprising spirit, and vowed US dominance in exploration of the Moon and Mars, as well as any future space race.
    15h
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    YouTube extends music streaming service to EuropeYouTube extended its music streaming service to Europe Monday a month after it launched in North America and parts of Asia.
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    UK debit cards overtake cash for first time: studyCash is no longer king in Britain—and has been usurped by debit cards, thanks to rapid changes in technology and consumer behaviour, new research showed Monday.
    15h
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    Peek at the future: Electric plane cruises skies over NorwayNorway's transportation minister and the head of the Scandinavian country's airport operator took off Monday for a short flight ... aboard a Slovenian-made two-seater electric airplane.
    15h
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    1
    Unique immune-focused AI model creates largest library of inter-cellular communicationsNew data published in Nature Biotechnology, represents the largest ever analysis of immune cell signaling research, mapping more than 3,000 previously unlisted cellular interactions, and yielding the first ever immune-centric modular classification of diseases. These data serve to rewrite the reference book on immune-focused inter-cellular communications and disease relationships.
    15h
    The Atlantic
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    The American Who Says He’s Been the Target of Five Air StrikesHe was born Darrell Lamont Phelps. He grew up in Mount Vernon, New York, moved down to the city, tried his hand at comedy, and later converted to Islam, adopting the name of Bilal Abdul Kareem. Now 46 years old, he lives in the Middle East, where he has a wife, five children, and a controversial freelance-journalism career focused on Islamist fighters in the Syrian civil war. In his estimation, t
    15h
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    Study identifies challenges and opportunities to safeguard one of Mesoamerica's last forest blocksThe Wildlife Conservation Society (WCS) and Yale University have created a plan to preserve one of the last intact forest strongholds for the jaguar and other iconic species in Central America: the Moskitia Forest Corridor.
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    Targeting the engine room of the cancer cellResearchers at Columbia University Irving Medical Center (CUIMC) have developed a highly innovative computational framework that can support personalized cancer treatment by matching individual tumors with the drugs or drug combinations that are most likely to kill them.
    15h
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    Plant-based diets improve cardiometabolic risk factors in diabetes patientsNew review in the journal Clinical Nutrition finds that plant-based diets improve cardiometabolic risk factors in those with type 2 diabetes.
    15h
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    1
    Addgene keeps flow of CRISPR plasmids fast and affordableAs a key global enabler of the revolutionary genome editing technology known as CRISPR, the nonprofit organization Addgene has made available more than 100,000 CRISPR plasmids (circular DNA fragments) to 3,400 laboratories worldwide. The origins, goals, global reach, and success of Addgene in democratizing CRISPR, which his dramatically changing medical research, are described in a Perspective art
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    200+
    Researchers capture best ever evidence of rare black holeESA's XMM-Newton observatory has discovered the best-ever candidate for a very rare and elusive type of cosmic phenomenon: a medium-weight black hole in the process of tearing apart and feasting on a nearby star.
    15h
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    NASA finds Tropical Depression Carlotta's strong storms over Mexico, Eastern PacificTropical Depression Carlotta continues to hug the coast of southwestern Mexico and drop heavy rainfall. NASA's Aqua satellite provided a look at cloud top temperatures through infrared imagery to find out where the most powerful parts of Tropical Depression Carlotta were located.
    15h

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Monday, June 18

  1. page Nyheder2018juni17 edited Nyheder MOST POPULAR EurekAlert! - Breaking News 61 Gut microbes may contribute to depressio…

    NyhederMOST POPULAR
    EurekAlert! - Breaking News
    61
    Gut microbes may contribute to depression and anxiety in obesityLike everyone, people with type 2 diabetes and obesity suffer from depression and anxiety, but even more so. Researchers at Joslin Diabetes Center now have demonstrated a surprising potential contributor to these negative feelings -- and that is the bacteria in the gut or gut microbiome, as it is known.
    16h
    Live Science
    67
    Jumping Soccer Fans Triggered a Small Earthquake in MexicoThe World Cup is literally shaking the world.
    18min
    Ingeniøren
    51
    Banedanmark skal betale
    for køreledninger, politikerne måske slet ikke vil haveTo ud af de ti strækninger, som Banedanmark har underskrevet en kontrakt om at elektrificere, vil regeringen slet ikke bruge penge på. Men intet tyder på, at staten kan slippe ud af kontrakten og slippe for at betale.
    6h
    LATEST
    Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
    Researchers explore whether smarter animals are bigger troublemakersYou have probably encountered a raccoon raiding the trash in your neighborhood, seen a rat scurrying through the subway or tried to shoo away birds from your picnic. But have you ever wondered what makes these animals so good at living in suburbs and cities, and whether these same traits also make them such a nuisance?
    2min
    The Atlantic
    Do Beyoncé Fans Have to Forgive Jay-Z?Jay-Z and Beyoncé find their way to each other at the water’s edge. On Beyoncé’s last surprise record, the landmark 2013 self-titled visual album awash in references to her husband, the two are “Drunk in Love” by the third track. She writhes in the sand while singing about her now-famous “surfbordt”; he joins her for his verse, rapping away from both the camera and his companion. In Lemonade , Be
    3min
    Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
    Organic crystals twist, bend, and healCrystals are brittle and inelastic? A novel class of smart, bendable crystalline organic materials has challenged this view. Now, scientists have engineered a molecular soft cocrystalline structure that bends and twists reversibly and without disintegration when stimulated by high temperature, mechanical force, or under UV light. This multifunctional quality makes it a robust candidate for advance
    8min
    Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
    'Slow earthquakes' on San Andreas Fault increase risk of large quakesGeologists have long thought that the central section of California's famed San Andreas Fault—from San Juan Bautista southward to Parkfield, a distance of about 80 miles—has a steady creeping movement that provides a safe release of energy.
    8min
    EurekAlert! - Breaking News
    1
    UNH researcher captures best ever evidence of rare black holeScientists have been able to prove the existence of small black holes and those that are super-massive but the existence of an elusive type of black hole, known as intermediate-mass black holes (IMBHs) is hotly debated. New research coming out of the Space Science Center at the University of New Hampshire shows the strongest evidence to date that this middle-of-the-road black hole exists, by seren
    8min
    EurekAlert! - Breaking News
    1
    NASA finds Tropical Depression Carlotta's strong storms over Mexico, Eastern PacificTropical Depression Carlotta continues to hug the coast of southwestern Mexico and drop heavy rainfall. NASA's Aqua satellite provided a look at cloud top temperatures through infrared imagery to find out where the most powerful parts of Tropical Depression Carlotta were located.
    8min
    EurekAlert! - Breaking News
    1
    Novel information about the effects of in vitro fertilization on embryonic growthIn vitro fertilization affects the regulatory region of genes essential for placental and embryonic growth, as well as the birth weight. A new study suggests that the effects depend on genetic variation inherited from the parents. This information could be useful in development of assisted reproduction technologies.
    8min
    EurekAlert! - Breaking News
    1
    Addgene keeps flow of CRISPR plasmids fast and affordableAs a key global enabler of the revolutionary genome editing technology known as CRISPR, the nonprofit organization Addgene has made available more than 100,000 CRISPR plasmids (circular DNA fragments) to 3,400 laboratories worldwide.
    8min
    EurekAlert! - Breaking News
    Graphic warning labels linked to reduced sugary drink purchasesWarning labels that include photos linking sugary drink consumption with obesity, type 2 diabetes, and tooth decay, may reduce purchases of the drinks, according to a new study by researchers from Harvard T.H. Chan School of Public Health and Harvard Business School
    8min
    EurekAlert! - Breaking News
    Pancreatic cell size linked to mammalian lifespan, finds zoo animal analysisAncient Greek philosopher Aristotle observed that larger animals tend to live longer than smaller ones. On June 18 in the journal Developmental Cell, scientists report that it's cell size, not body size, that intrinsically correlates with and perhaps affects lifespan. By examining the pancreases of 24 mammalian species -- including shrews, humans, and tigers -- researchers found that animals with
    8min
    Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
    Rewiring plant defence genes to reduce crop wastePlants can be genetically rewired to resist the devastating effects of disease—significantly reducing crop waste worldwide—according to new research into synthetic biology by the University of Warwick.
    14min
    New Scientist - News
    64
    A robot has performed eye surgery on humans for the first timeFor the first time, six people have had eye surgery performed by a robot that was able to filter out the tremors from a surgeon's hand
    17min
    Science | The Guardian
    3
    Did you solve it? Mirror, mirror on the wallThe solution to today’s puzzle Earlier today I set you a puzzle about a mirror : A man is facing a mirror hanging on a wall 1m in front of him. Continue reading...
    17min
    Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
    Chemists achieve major milestone of synthesis: Remote chiral inductionChemists at Scripps Research have addressed one of the most formidable challenges in synthetic chemistry by inventing a method for "enantioselective remote meta-CH activation," which enables the making of chiral molecules that were previously difficult or impossible to synthesize.
    20min
    EurekAlert! - Breaking News
    1
    Risky opioid prescriptions linked to higher chance of deathMost people who misuse opioids are first exposed to the drugs through prescriptions so improving prescribing is targeted as one way to help curb the nation's opioid abuse epidemic. A new study identified six types of risky opioid prescriptions and found that all were linked to a higher chance of death, including fatal opioid overdoses. The study found more than 6 percent of Massachusetts adults re
    29min
    EurekAlert! - Breaking News
    1
    Neuroscientists map brain's response to cold touchCarnegie Mellon neuroscientists have mapped the feeling of cool touch to the brain's insula in a mouse model. The findings provide an experimental model that will advance research into conditions like pain and hypersensitivity to cold and help researchers to continue to unravel the multifaceted ways touch is represented in the brain.
    29min
    EurekAlert! - Breaking News
    1
    Researchers explore whether smarter animals are bigger troublemakersA new paper in the journal Animal Behaviour examines whether smarter animals might be better at learning to live in cities -- but, at the same time, also may come into more conflict with humans.
    29min
    EurekAlert! - Breaking News
    1
    New method to preserve boy cancer patient fertility being developed at Ben-gurion U."Our results demonstrate, for the first time, the presence of biologically active SPGCs in testicular biopsies of chemotherapy-treated PCPBs, and their capacity to develop in vitro to different stages of spermatogenesis, including the generation of sperm-like cells," according to lead researcher Prof. Mahmoud Huleihel, a member of BGU's Shraga Segal Department of Microbiology, Immunology and Genet
    29min
    EurekAlert! - Breaking News
    1
    Compilation of research discussed at the Global Forum On Nicotine: Warsaw June 16 2018Below is a summary of the new and recent research discussed at this conference.
    29min
    EurekAlert! - Breaking News
    2
    Organic crystals twist, bend, and healCrystals are brittle and inelastic? A novel class of smart, bendable crystalline organic materials has challenged this view. Now, scientists have engineered a molecular soft cocrystalline structure that bends and twists reversibly and without disintegration when stimulated by high temperature, mechanical force, or under UV light. This multifunctional quality makes it a robust candidate for advance
    29min
    Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
    1
    Pancreatic cell size linked to mammalian lifespan, finds zoo animal analysisMore than two thousand years ago, Greek philosopher Aristotle observed that larger animals tend to live longer than smaller ones. On June 18 in the journal Developmental Cell, scientists report that it's cell size, not body size, that intrinsically correlates with and perhaps affects lifespan. By examining the pancreases of 24 mammalian species—including shrews, humans, and tigers—researchers in I
    32min
    Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
    12
    Hunting molecules to find new planetsIt's been impossible to obtain images of an exoplanet, so dazzling is the light of its star. However, astronomers have the idea of detecting molecules that are present in the planet's atmosphere in order to make it visible, provided that these same molecules are absent from its star. Thanks to this innovative technique, the device is sensitive to the selected molecules, making the star invisible a
    49min
    Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
    14
    In the gaping mouth of ancient crocodilesA new study has endeavoured to further explore the mouth of one of the earliest occurring and least understood groups of crocodilians, the shartegosuchids.
    49min
    EurekAlert! - Breaking News
    1
    Research shows how a moderate dose of alcohol protects the heartResults published in Cardiovascular Research suggest the effect is associated with activation of the enzyme ALDH2, which helps rid the organism of an aldehyde which is a toxic byproduct of alcohol digestion as much as it is a byproduct of heart cells submitted to stress.
    51min
    EurekAlert! - Breaking News
    2
    Violence against women significantly more likely after high-risk sexA study of the victimization of women who were living in areas of high poverty and HIV prevalence in multiple cities across the US has shown that high-risk-sex, characterized by one or more HIV risk factors, was associated with a significantly greater likelihood of physical violence against the female participant within the subsequent six months.
    51min
    EurekAlert! - Breaking News
    1
    Researchers create novel combination as potential therapy for high-risk neuroblastomaResearchers at VCU Massey Cancer Center in Richmond, Virginia, have identified a promising target to reverse the development of high-risk neuroblastoma and potentially inform the creation of novel combination therapies for the disease.
    51min
    TED Talks Daily (SD video)
    16
    Can home cooking change the world? | Gastón AcurioWhen Gastón Acurio started his now world-famous restaurant Astrid & Gastón in the 1990s, no one suspected that he would elevate the Peruvian home-cooking he grew up with to haute cuisine. Nearly thirty years and a storied career later, the chef wants the rest of us to embrace our culinary roots and transform the world with the meals we prepare each day. (In Spanish with English subtitles)
    57min
    The Atlantic
    17
    Beijing Wants to Remake the InternetIt’s never been a worse time to be a Chinese telecom company in America. This evening, the Senate is set to vote on whether to restore a ban on U.S. company sales to prominent Chinese telecom player ZTE, a penalty for its illegal shipments to Iran and North Korea. The bill also includes a measure that would ban U.S. government agencies from buying equipment and services made by ZTE and Huawei, on
    59min
    Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
    1
    'Uber for lawn care' launches in Kansas City, connects homeowners and landscapersNeed a ride at the drop of a hat or a late-night bite? Uber's got you. Wag! can walk your dog.
    1h
    Scientific American Content: Global
    7
    Sea Level Rise Will Threaten Thousands of California HomesChronic flooding will impact areas around San Francisco and Los Angeles by 2035 -- Read more on ScientificAmerican.com
    1h
    New Scientist - News
    27
    Male peacocks can make females’ heads vibrate at a distancePeahens have fan-shaped crests on their heads, and it seems males can make these crests resonate by making a specific noise with their tails
    1h
    Quanta Magazine
    15
    Four Is Not EnoughSuppose you want to cover a standard 8-by-8 chessboard entirely with rectangular dominoes that each cover two squares on the board. It’s easy to imagine how you might do it: You could line the dominoes up horizontally, four in a row, or vertically, four in a column. You could arrange them like stairs, concentric squares or gnashing teeth. There are nearly 13 million ways to do it, and each arrang
    1h
    EurekAlert! - Breaking News
    1
    BIDMC researchers develop decision-making tool to benefit patients with HCVBIDMC researchers led a retrospective analysis of four randomized clinical trials focused on the effects of DAA therapies in patients with HCV-associated liver failure, and developed a new means of predicting improvement in liver function in response to DAA treatment.
    1h
    EurekAlert! - Breaking News
    1
    Algorithm speeds up process for analyzing 3D medical imagesIn a pair of upcoming conference papers, MIT researchers describe a machine-learning algorithm that can register brain scans and other 3D images more than 1,000 times more quickly using novel learning techniques.
    1h
    EurekAlert! - Breaking News
    1
    Rare mutation of gene carried by Quebec family gives insight into how the brain is wiredThe study of a Quebec family with an unusual gene provides novel insight into how our brain is built and, according to the McGill-led team of scientists, offers a better understanding of psychiatric disorders such as depression, addictions and schizophrenia.
    1h
    EurekAlert! - Breaking News
    2
    Daily fasting works for weight lossA new study shows that daily fasting is an effective tool to reduce weight and lower blood pressure. The study is the first to examine the effect of time-restricted eating on weight loss in obese individuals.
    1h
    EurekAlert! - Breaking News
    1
    Hunting molecules to find new planetsIt's impossible to obtain images of an exoplanet, so dazzling is the light of its star. However, astronomers led by UNIGE have the idea of detecting molecules that are present in the planet's atmosphere in order to make it visible, provided that these same molecules are absent from its star. Thanks to this innovative technique, the device is sensitive to the selected molecules, making the star inv
    1h
    EurekAlert! - Breaking News
    1
    Chemists achieve major milestone of synthesis: Remote chiral induction'This new method should allow us to explore a large 'chemical space' that had been essentially off-limits.'
    1h
    EurekAlert! - Breaking News
    1
    Bolder targets needed to protect nature for people's sakeUniversity of Queensland researchers have found that humanity is at risk without more diverse, ambitious and area-specific conservation targets. Associate Professor Martine Maron, Dr. Jeremy Simmonds and Professor James Watson from UQ's School of Earth and Environmental Sciences say current targets lack the scope required to support the critical services that nature provides.
    1h
    EurekAlert! - Breaking News
    1
    'Slow earthquakes' on San Andreas Fault increase risk of large quakes, say ASU scientistsA detailed study of the California fault has discovered a new kind of movement that isn't accounted for in earthquake forecasting.
    1h
    EurekAlert! - Breaking News
    Bolder targets needed to protect nature for people's sakeUniversity of Queensland (UQ) and Wildlife Conservation Society (WCS) researchers argue that the world needs more diverse, ambitious and area-specific targets for retaining important natural systems to safeguard humanity.
    1h
    EurekAlert! - Breaking News
    Electrical wire properties of DNA linked to cancerNew research from the Barton lab finds a connection between a cancer mutation and electron-mediated DNA repair.
    1h
    EurekAlert! - Breaking News
    Recent clinical trial finds tamsulosin not effective in kidney stone passageResearch published in JAMA Internal Medicine found that tamsulosin does not significantly effect patient-reported passage or capture of kidney stones.
    1h
    EurekAlert! - Breaking News
    Dietary supplement use in children, adolescentsAbout one-third of children and adolescents in the United States use dietary supplements.
    1h
    EurekAlert! - Breaking News
    Scientists create continuously emitting microlasers with nanoparticle-coated beadsResearchers have found a way to convert nanoparticle-coated microscopic beads into lasers smaller than red blood cells. These microlasers, which convert infrared light into light at higher frequencies, are among the smallest continuously emitting lasers of their kind ever reported and can constantly and stably emit light for hours at a time, even when submerged in biological fluids such as blood s
    1h
    EurekAlert! - Breaking News
    Use of alternative medicines has doubled among kids, especially teensSince 2003, the use of alternative medicines among children has doubled. An increased use of omega-3 fatty acids and melatonin among adolescents ages 13 to 18 as the primary driver of the change.
    1h
    EurekAlert! - Breaking News
    Study suggests well-known growth suppressor actually fuels lethal brain cancersScientists report finding a potentially promising treatment target for aggressive and deadly high-grade brain cancers like glioblastoma. Publishing online June 18 in Nature Cell Biology, the study also reports the current lack of a drug that hits the molecular target keeps it from being advanced for testing as a therapeutic strategy for patients with few treatment options. The researchers point to
    1h
    EurekAlert! - Breaking News
    Meeting Paris climate targets will require a substantial reallocation of global investmentA new analysis by an international team of scientists led by IIASA shows that low carbon investments will need to markedly increase if the world is to achieve the Paris Agreement aim of keeping global warming well below 2°C.
    1h
    EurekAlert! - Breaking News
    Faster, cheaper, better: A new way to synthesize DNAResearchers at the Department of Energy's Joint BioEnergy Institute (JBEI) based at Berkeley Lab have pioneered a new way to synthesize DNA sequences through a creative use of enzymes that promises to be faster, cheaper, and more accurate. DNA synthesis is a fundamental tool in the rapidly growing field of synthetic biology, in which organisms can be engineered to do things like decompose plastic
    1h
    EurekAlert! - Breaking News
    New DNA synthesis technique promises rapid, high-fidelity DNA printingToday, DNA is synthesized as an organic chemist would, using toxic chemicals and error-prone steps that limit accuracy and thus length to about 200 base pairs. UC Berkeley and Berkeley Lab researchers have adapted a human enzyme that makes DNA in water to a repetitive process for adding base pairs. Initial tests show that the technique promises to make oligonucleotides 10 times longer, the size of
    1h
    EurekAlert! - Breaking News
    Electrically stimulating the brain may restore movement after strokeUC San Francisco scientists have improved mobility in rats that had experienced debilitating strokes by using electrical stimulation to restore a distinctive pattern of brain cell activity associated with efficient movement. The researchers say they plan to use the new findings to help develop brain implants that might one day restore motor function in human stroke patients.
    1h
    EurekAlert! - Breaking News
    Scientists learn more about how gene linked to autism affects brainNew preclinical research shows a gene already linked to a subset of people with autism spectrum disorder is critical to healthy neuronal connections in the developing brain, and its loss can harm those connections to help fuel the complex developmental condition. Scientists report in Developmental Cell their data clarify the biological role of the gene CHD8 and its protein CHD8 in developing oligo
    1h
    EurekAlert! - Breaking News
    22,000-year-old panda from cave in Southern China belongs to distinct, long-lost lineageResearchers who've analyzed ancient mitochondrial (mt)DNA isolated from a 22,000-year-old panda found in Cizhutuo Cave in the Guangxi Province of China -- a place where no pandas live today -- have revealed a new lineage of giant panda. The report, published in Current Biology on June 18, shows that the ancient panda separated from present-day pandas 144,000 to 227,000 years ago, suggesting that i
    1h
    Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
    1
    Everything you need to know about SnapchatIf you have tweens or teens, you know about Snapchat. And if you can't figure out how it works, you're probably over 25. One of the most popular social media apps out there, Snapchat gives kids and teens what they really want: a simple way to share everyday moments while simultaneously making them look awesome. And unlike Facebook and Twitter, which record and broadcast everything you do, Snapchat
    1h
    Popular Science
    21
    Why your brain loves mac and cheese more than macaroni or cheese aloneHealth The culinary sum of fat and carbs is greater than its parts Researchers found that our brain’s reward pathways value the combination of fats and carbs so much that we perceive the hybrid mix as having more calories than a fat or…
    1h
    Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
    16
    Helicopter parenting may negatively affect children's emotional well-being, behaviorIt's natural for parents to do whatever they can to keep their children safe and healthy, but children need space to learn and grow on their own, without Mom or Dad hovering over them, according to new research. The study found that overcontrolling parenting can negatively affect a child's ability to manage his or her emotions and behavior.
    1h
    Ingeniøren
    Atmosfæriske bølger ændrer døgnlængden på VenusKoblingen mellem atmosfæren og overfladen på Venus er så kraftig, at den kan ændre længden af døgnet på vores naboplanet.
    1h
    Ingeniøren
    Denne cement spiser CO₂Et fejlslået eksperiment satte forskeren David Stone på sporet af en jernbaseret miljøcement.
    1h
    Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
    Amazon to create more than 1,000 new jobs in IrelandAmazon will create more than 1,000 more jobs in Ireland over the next two years, it said Monday, vastly increasing its presence in the eurozone country.
    1h
    Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
    4
    Bolder targets needed to protect nature for people's sakeUniversity of Queensland (UQ) and Wildlife Conservation Society (WCS) researchers argue that the world needs more diverse, ambitious and area-specific targets for retaining important natural systems to safeguard humanity. The findings are published in Nature Ecology and Evolution.
    1h
    Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
    3
    Electrical wire properties of DNA linked to cancerOne of the biggest helpers in our bodies' ongoing efforts to prevent DNA mutations—mutations that can lead to cancer—is actually rather tiny. Electrons, as it turns out, can signal proteins that repair DNA to patch up DNA damage. More specifically, the movement of electrons through DNA, traveling between repair proteins bound to the double helix, helps our cells scan for mistakes that regularly ar
    1h
    Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
    3
    White House aims to reduce satellite clutter in spaceThe White House is establishing a new policy for reducing satellite clutter in space.
    1h
    Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
    9
    Scientists create continuously emitting microlasers with nanoparticle-coated beadsResearchers have found a way to convert nanoparticle-coated microscopic beads into lasers smaller than red blood cells.
    1h
    Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
    22,000-year-old panda from cave in Southern China belongs to distinct, long-lost lineageResearchers who've analyzed ancient mitochondrial (mt)DNA isolated from a 22,000-year-old panda found in Cizhutuo Cave in the Guangxi Province of China—a place where no pandas live today—have revealed a new lineage of giant panda. The report, published in Current Biology on June 18, shows that the ancient panda separated from present-day pandas 144,000 to 227,000 years ago, suggesting that it belo
    1h
    Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
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    New DNA synthesis technique promises rapid, high-fidelity DNA printingScientists at the University of California, Berkeley, and Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory have invented a new way to synthesize DNA that promises to be easier and faster, does not require the use of toxic chemicals and is potentially more accurate.
    1h
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    7
    Meeting Paris climate targets will require a substantial reallocation of global investmentA new analysis by an international team of scientists led by IIASA shows that low carbon investments will need to increase markedly if the world is to achieve the Paris Agreement aim of keeping global warming well below 2°C.
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    Small businesses vulnerable to cyberattacks, then don't actSmall businesses suffered a barrage of computer invasions last year but most took no action to shore up their security afterward, according to a survey by insurer Hiscox.
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    EurekAlert! - Breaking News
    1
    New study suggests ovarian hormone may make drug withdrawal symptoms worse for womenResearchers found that a form of the estrogen hormone can contribute to drug relapse in females by worsening withdrawal symptoms. The study looked at the interaction of the female sex hormone estradiol and methamphetamine.
    1h
    EurekAlert! - Breaking News
    2
    Cementless fly ash binder makes concrete 'green'Rice University engineers have developed a composite binder made primarily of fly ash, a byproduct of coal-fired power plants, that can replace Portland cement in concrete.
    1h
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    1
    Rewiring plant defence genes to reduce crop wastePlants could be genetically rewired to better resist disease, helping safeguard crop yields worldwide according to new research by the universities of Warwick and York. Defensive feedback control system developed enables plants to strengthen their defenses to withstand attack by re-wiring existing gene connectionsThe system uses same approach as aircraft autopilots use to counteract turbulence.
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    EurekAlert! - Breaking News
    1
    Odors are perceived the same way by hunter-gatherers and WesternersPrevious research has shown the hunter-gatherer Jahai are much better at naming odors than Westerners. They even have a more elaborate lexicon for it. New research by language scientist Asifa Majid of Radboud University shows that despite these linguistic differences, the Jahai and Dutch find the same odors pleasant and unpleasant.
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    1
    Using gold nanoparticles to trigger sequential unfolding of 3D structuresResearchers have developed a technique that takes advantage of gold nanoparticles to trigger the sequential unfolding of three-dimensional structures using different wavelengths of light.
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    Big Think
    2
    Why 'digital video portraits' should scare youDigital Video Portraits are already beating out deepfakes for creepy cultural dominance. Read More
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    In the gaping mouth of ancient crocodilesThe mouth of today's crocodilians inspires fear and awe, with their wide gape and the greatest known bite force in the vertebrate animal kingdom. However, this apex predator of today and its modus of attack (its mouth) had humble beginnings.
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    When consumers don't want to talk about what they boughtOne of the joys of shopping for many people is the opportunity to brag about their purchases to friends and others.
    1h
    Live Science
    13
    The Really Strange Way a Tick Bite Could Harm Your Heart (Hint: It Involves Red Meat)People with a rare red meat allergy may have a higher risk of heart disease, a new study suggests.
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    1
    In the gaping mouth of ancient crocodilesA new study by a team of international experts, led by University of Witwatersrand Ph.D. candidate Kathleen Dollman and Professor Jonah Choiniere published today in the American Museum Novitates, endeavoured to further explore the mouth of one of the earliest occurring and least understood groups of crocodilians, the shartegosuchids.
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    1
    How the brain plays a role in rheumatoid arthritis inflammationA new study from researchers at Michigan Medicine explores links between chronic joint inflammation and cognitive impairment.
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    1
    New material for splitting waterSolar energy is clean and abundant, but when the sun isn't shining, you must store the energy in batteries or through a process called photocatalysis. In photocatalytic water splitting, sunlight separates water into hydrogen and oxygen, which can then be recombined in a fuel cell to release energy. Now, a new class of materials -- halide double perovskites -- may have just the right properties to
    1h
    Futurity.org
    1
    Survey may have gotten Florida’s obesity rate wrongFlorida’s obesity rate may be higher than originally thought, according to a new study. A widely used national health survey puts the overall obesity rate in the state at 27.8 percent, but a new study based on an analysis of a robust clinical data repository shows a rate of 37.1 percent—nearly 10 percentage points higher. The researchers calculated obesity rates in Florida by analyzing data from
    1h
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    10
    Promising new material has the right properties to capture solar energy, split water into hydrogen and oxygenSolar energy is clean and abundant. But when the sun isn't shining, you must store the energy in batteries or through a process called photocatalysis—in which solar energy is used to make fuels. In photocatalytic water splitting, sunlight separates water into hydrogen and oxygen. The hydrogen and oxygen can then be recombined in a fuel cell to release energy.
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    1
    Nature programmes could put a spring in your stepA new study shows that watching films set in a natural environment boosts body image.
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    EurekAlert! - Breaking News
    1
    When consumers don't want to talk about what they boughtOne of the joys of shopping for many people is the opportunity to brag about their purchases to friends and others. But new research found one common situation in which people would rather not discuss what they just bought: when they're feeling like money is a little tight. In a series of studies, researchers found that consumers who felt financially constrained didn't want to talk about their pur
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    EurekAlert! - Breaking News
    1
    Cell technology used to treat osteochondral knee defectAs the publication describes, autologous cells of stromal vascular fraction were transplanted to a 36-year-old man with the use of fibrin matrix. The patient, whose injury had been caused by a fall, then has been under supervision for two years.
    2h
    EurekAlert! - Breaking News
    1
    Trojan Horse: How a killer fungus unleashes meningitis and brain infectionIn a world first, Australian researchers have revealed how a deadly fungus and primary cause of life-threatening meningitis exploits the immune system like a 'Trojan Horse' to promote infection.
    2h
    EurekAlert! - Breaking News
    1
    New articles in The CRISPR JournalThe CRISPR Journal, a new peer-reviewed journal from Mary Ann Liebert, Inc., publishers, announces the publication of its third issue.
    2h
    New Scientist - News
    62
    The first Americans had pet dogs 1000 years earlier than thoughtThere were domestic dogs in North America 10,200 years ago, according to a re-examination of an ancient dog skeleton that looks like a small English setter
    2h
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    1
    Japan, SKorea ban Canadian wheat imports over bioengineered plantsThe world's sixth largest wheat producer sought to reassure trading partners on Monday that genetically modified wheat plants discovered on an Alberta farm were few and posed no food safety risks, after Japan and South Korea halted Canadian wheat imports.
    2h
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    Supreme Court to take up iPhone app lawsuitThe Supreme Court will consider whether the purchasers of iPhone apps can sue Apple over allegations it has an illegal monopoly on the sale of the apps.
    2h
    Science : NPR
    100+
    'Cutting-Edge' Program For Children With Autism And ADHD Rests On Razor-Thin EvidenceWith 113 locations in the U.S., Brain Balance says its drug-free approach has helped tens of thousands of children. But experts say there's insufficient proof for its effectiveness. (Image credit: Hokyoung Kim for NPR)
    2h
    The Atlantic
    59
    ‘I Wanted to Take My Body Off’: DetransitionedIn October 2012, Carey Callahan began a course of bimonthly intramuscular testosterone injections. After years of harassment and discomfort in her female body, she had made the decision to transition to being male. In the short term, she was happy. But she soon discovered that life as a transgender man was not what she had expected. Her discomfort persisted, as did the harassment. Nine months aft
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    2
    Lifting of Saudi Arabia's ban on women driving poses policy challengesThis month Saudi Arabia will put an end to its ban on women driving, opening the way for millions of new drivers to navigate a country three times bigger than Texas. While the policy shift provides relief to women who lacked freedom of mobility, the long-term effects of ending the ban are far from clear and will present the Saudi government with several policy challenges, according to an issue bri
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    This Tug of War With a Lion Isn't About Strength—It's About FrictionIf you want a fair fight between a lion and a human playing tug of war, you should give the lion a pair of tennis shoes.
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    1
    Lots of news and lots of contacts at ZPID Twin ConferenceThe Leibniz Institute for Psychology Information (ZPID) had organized the two conferences from June 7-12 at its seat in Trier, Germany.
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    3
    4 U.S. states beat all others at cutting opioid dosagesPrescription drug monitoring programs in Kentucky, New Mexico, Tennessee, and New York have significantly reduced opioid dosages and the number of opioid fills, according to a new study. While most states currently have prescription drug monitoring programs, not all are created equal, says Rebecca Haffajee, assistant professor of health management policy at the School of Public Health at the Univ
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    Mere fleksible arbejdsgange skal mindske overbelægning i SjællandNy analyse for Region Sjælland peger på, at mere fleksible arbejdsgangene og en genindførelse af projektet ‘Sikkert Patientflow’ vil kunne mindske overbelægningen på regionens medicinske afdelinger.
    2h
    Dagens Medicin
    Tolkecenter på vej i Region SyddanmarkRegion Syddanmark er på udgik efter de første tolke til regionens kommende tolkecenter, der skal stå for tolkning på regionens sygehuse.
    2h
    Dagens Medicin
    #43 Når din verden vælterStetoskopet sætter i
    denne datopodcast fokus på, når alvorligt syge børn bliver patienter.
    2h
    Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
    1
    New approach in VR redirected walking presentedIn the burgeoning world of virtual reality (VR) technology, it remains a challenge to provide users with a realistic perception of infinite space and natural walking capabilities in the virtual environment. A team of computer scientists has introduced a new approach to address this problem by leveraging a natural human phenomenon: eye blinks.
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    Big Think
    15
    This is what God's face looks like, according to American ChristiansIs God an old white guy with a majestic, flowing beard? A new study has a surprise for you. Read More
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    Big Think
    37
    Why everything you know about the Stanford Prison Experiment might be wrongThe most famous study in psychology turns out to be theater, and the lead researcher is over defending his myth. Read More
    2h
    The Atlantic
    500+
    Trump’s Immigration Policy Gets Its Moral ReckoningOutrage over family separations at the U.S.–Mexico border intensified over the weekend, with two first ladies—Melania Trump and Laura Bush—both weighing in, and tension escalating on the ground. The United States government has separated some 2,000 migrant children from their parents in the last six weeks, according to the Department of Homeland Security. The Trump administration’s policy of sepa
    2h
    The Atlantic
    1
    The Atlantic’s July/August Issue Health Report Now at TheAtlantic.comWashington, D.C. (June 18, 2018)—The next issue of The Atlantic magazine features The Health Report , with investigations that probe three of the most complex subjects facing Americans today. All three reports are published now at TheAtlantic.com; The Atlantic’s July/August 2018 issue will appear on newsstands and online in full next week. The cover story, “ When a Child Says She’s Trans ,” by wr
    2h
    Popular Science
    21
    How to improve your postureDIY Start by tossing out the idea that you need to sit perfectly straight. Posture is a common boogeyman in modern medicine. It may not be the root of all your problems, but you can still improve your position and reduce back pain.
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    EurekAlert! - Breaking News
    4
    Study examines first birth cohort to receive HPV vaccine: The vaccine worksGirls in the first birth cohort to be offered and receive the HPV vaccine showed a lower degree of dysplasia which may eventually lead to cervical cancer than a birth cohort from 1983. This is the conclusion of a new study conducted by researchers at the University of Copenhagen, who have been the first to study the vaccine's effect on the general population.
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    1
    Research finds new way to determine protection of Men B vaccine against different strainsThis approach is being assessed by Public Health England for its potential to routinely test all meningococcal disease cases.
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    1
    New radiological procedure for the diagnosis of liver diseaseResearchers from Charité -- Universitätsmedizin Berlin have successfully tested a new technology for use in the assessment of overweight adolescents with liver disease. Known as 'time-harmonic elastography' (THE), the technology enables physicians to determine the disease's severity without having to resort to invasive liver biopsies. The results of this research have been published in Radiology.
    2h
    EurekAlert! - Breaking News
    1
    'Be personal and appreciative': Research shows effective responses to online feedbackAs more patients leave feedback on online platforms including social media, new research shows how health and social care organisations can offer value in their response. The study was led by University of Plymouth researcher Rebecca Baines and colleagues in collaboration with James Munro at online platform Care Opinion, and they will be sharing the full findings at a webinar on Thursday, June 21.
    2h
    The Atlantic
    25
    The Glorious, Bizarre History of Soccer and FashionRobbie Williams’s performance at the opening ceremony for the 2018 World Cup was a lot of things, but first and foremost it was fitting. In Moscow, Williams—the 44-year-old former wild child, pop musician, and soccer fanatic—wore a shiny, skintight crimson suit with a leopard-print pattern, black patent loafers, and a black shirt unbuttoned to mid-chest, revealing body tattoos and a massive silve
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    60
    Observations identify three different activity periods in the quasar 3C 279An international team of astronomers has conducted multi-wavelength photometric and spectropolarimetric observations of the quasar 3C 279, which revealed three different activity periods in this object. The finding is reported in a paper published June 5 on the arXiv pre-print repository.
    3h
    Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
    33
    Using gold nanoparticles to trigger sequential unfolding of 3-D structuresResearchers from North Carolina State University have developed a new technique that takes advantage of gold nanoparticles to trigger the sequential unfolding of three-dimensional structures using different wavelengths of light.
    3h
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    2
    Heart disease sufferers not exercising enoughEvidence shows that people with existing heart problems or who are at risk of developing them, are ignoring medical advice and not taking enough exercise. New medical treatments have helped people to live longer despite these health problems, but this is causing an escalating burden on public health systems worldwide.
    3h
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    2
    KAIST team develops flexible blue vertical micro LEDsA KAIST research team developed a crucial source technology that will advance the commercialization of micro LEDs.Professor Keon Jae Lee from the Department of Materials Science and Engineering and his team have developed a low cost production technology for thin-film blue flexible vertical micro LEDs (f-VLEDs).
    3h
    EurekAlert! - Breaking News
    1
    Great white sharks dive deep into warm-water whirlpools in the AtlanticTracking data from two great white sharks reveals that they spend more time deep inside warm-water eddies, suggesting that's where they like to feed.
    3h
    EurekAlert! - Breaking News
    1
    Virtual reality headsets significantly reduce children's fear of needlesAlmost anyone can relate to being afraid of needles and injections. A pilot study is the first to use a 3D virtual reality headset to test this tool as a distraction method in a pediatric setting. Children were given the choice of a roller coaster ride, helicopter ride or a hot-air balloon ride. Results show that anticipated versus actual pain and fear were reduced in 94.1 percent of the pediatric
    3h
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    2
    New approach in VR redirected walking to be presented at SIGGRAPH 2018In the burgeoning world of virtual reality (VR) technology, it remains a challenge to provide users with a realistic perception of infinite space and natural walking capabilities in the virtual environment. A team of computer scientists has introduced a new approach to address this problem by leveraging a natural human phenomenon: eye blinks.
    3h
    EurekAlert! - Breaking News
    1
    Helicopter parenting may negatively affect children's emotional well-being, behaviorIt's natural for parents to do whatever they can to keep their children safe and healthy, but children need space to learn and grow on their own, without Mom or Dad hovering over them, according to new research published by the American Psychological Association. The study, published in the journal Developmental Psychology, found that overcontrolling parenting can negatively affect a child's abili
    3h
    EurekAlert! - Breaking News
    1
    Lifting of Saudi Arabia's ban on women driving poses policy challengesThis month Saudi Arabia will put an end to its ban on women driving, opening the way for millions of new drivers to navigate a country three times bigger than Texas. While the policy shift provides relief to women who lacked freedom of mobility, the long-term effects of ending the ban are far from clear and will present the Saudi government with several policy challenges, according to an issue bri
    3h
    Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
    1
    Diamond watch componentsSNSF-funded researchers have developed a new technique for carving materials to create micromechanical systems. In particular, they have created a miniscule watch component out of synthetic single-crystal diamond.
    3h
    Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
    23
    MXene's tour de forceIs there anything MXene materials can't do?
    3h
    Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
    2
    Great white sharks dive deep into warm-water whirlpools in the AtlanticIt's always good to know where great white sharks are likely to be swimming. That's true if you're a nervous beachgoer, a fishing boat trying to avoid illegal bycatch, or a marine biologist hoping to conserve this vulnerable species.
    3h
    Science | The Guardian
    1K
    Leave those kids alone: 'helicopter parenting' linked to behavioural problemsChildren with over-controlling parents aged two struggled to manage their emotions later in life, study finds Children whose parents are over-controlling “helicopter parents” when they are toddlers, are less able to control their emotions and impulses as they get older apparently leading to more problems with school, new research suggests. The study looked at to what degree mothers of toddlers do
    3h
    Ingeniøren
    Digitale tvillingeskibe optimerer dansk søfartSoftwaremodeller af skibe skal for alvor sætte gang i digitaliseringen af Det Blå Danmark, hvor cloud, sensorer, big data og AI skal gøre det muligt at optimere design, drift og vedligehold af søfarten herhjemme.
    3h
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    Theranos collapse offers three big lessons for companiesLess than three months after being charged by the US Securities and Exchange Commission(SEC) with "massive fraud" and barred from being the CEO of a public company for ten years, entrepreneur Elizabeth Holmes is reportedly on the hunt for investors for a new company.
    3h
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    The Most Promising Indie Games That Showed Up at E3, From 'Sable' to 'NeoCab'Sure, the gaming event is a showcase for triple-A blockbusters, but a surprising number of small, thoughtful gems piqued our interest.
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    Star Wars News: No, Kathleen Kennedy Isn't Leaving Lucasfilm'Solo: A Star Wars Story' underperformed, but it's not a career-ender.
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    How Square Made Its Own iPad ReplacementSquare has always made hardware, but its new Android-based tablet shows it’s serious about controlling the payments experience.
    3h
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    Too Small for Big Muscles, Tiny Animals Use SpringsElastic springs help tiny animals stay fast and strong. New work is finding what size critters must be to benefit from the springs -- Read more on ScientificAmerican.com
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    Phone apps are helping scientists track suicidal thoughts in real timeResearchers are using smartphones to tap into the ups and downs of suicidal thinking that occur over hours and days, hoping to help prevent suicides.
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    Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
    10
    Why a minor change to how EPA makes rules could radically reduce environmental protectionSince the Reagan administration, federal agencies have been required to produce cost-benefit analyses of their major regulations. These assessments are designed to ensure that regulators are pursuing actions that make society better off.
    3h
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    Bitcoin could 'bring internet to a halt': BISThe Bank for International Settlements in a report warned digital currencies like bitcoin could overwhelm and break the internet if they continue to grow.
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    How emotions shape work lifeJochen Menges, an expert in organisational behaviour, thinks that emotions matter profoundly for employee performance and behaviour. His studies bring nuance to our understanding of how employees wish to feel at work.
    3h
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    3
    Observation of anisotropic magneto-Peltier effectFor the first time in the world, NIMS and Tohoku University jointly observed an anisotropic magneto-Peltier effect--a thermoelectric conversion phenomenon in which simple redirection of the flow of a charge current in a magnetic material induces heating and cooling.
    3h
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    2
    Laser-sonic scanner aims to replace mammograms for finding breast cancerLihong Wang, Caltech's Bren Professor of Medical Engineering and Electrical Engineering, has developed a laser-sonic scanning system that can identify breast tumors quickly and safely.
    3h
    EurekAlert! - Breaking News
    2
    MXene's tour de forceIs there anything MXene materials can't do? Since the discovery of a large new family of two-dimensional materials by Drexel University researchers in 2011, continued exploration has revealed their exceptional ability to store energy, block electromagnetic interference, purify water and even ward off bacteria. And, as recent research now suggests, MXenes are also very durable -- the strongest mate
    3h
    Discovery (uploads) on YouTube
    4
    Kamikaze | Street Outlaws: Crash CourseHe took The Slut from a retired shed dweller to a serious List contender. Check out the highs and lows of Kamikaze and the heavy '81 El Camino he inherited from his best friend Flip. Full episodes streaming now on DiscoveryGO: https://discovery.com/tv-shows/street-outlaws/ Binge watch all Street Outlaws: Crash Course now! https://www.discovery.com/tv-shows/street-outlaws-crash-course/ Subscribe t
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    Science | The Guardian
    11
    Evil spirit that haunts scary movie Hereditary is the gene genieAri Aster’s horror triumph feeds off suppressed fear that we cannot escape our biological fate – leaving audiences unnerved Warning: contains spoilers On the face of it, Hereditary is a slice of silly supernatural hokum replete with the threadbare tropes of the genre. However, Ari Aster’s debut scarer has nonetheless struck a nerve : it seems to linger in the minds of those who see it. Why? Many
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    Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
    2
    Image: Juice thermal development model and the sun simulatorA view of the Juice thermal development model inside the Large Space Simulator at ESA's technical heart in the Netherlands.
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    Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
    1
    Monitoring molten steel by laser – steel experts' invention could save industry millionsSteelworkers will be able to monitor in real time the temperature and chemical composition in molten metal furnaces, saving each steel plant up to £4.5 million a year, thanks to a new laser technology developed by a Swansea University spin-out company.
    3h
    Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
    1
    A new, digitised era for European manufacturingManufacturing in the EU is heading to another level that will make it more competitive than ever, thanks to better service models and to innovations such as digitisation, Big Data and the Internet of Things.
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    Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
    57
    Cementless fly ash binder makes concrete 'green'Rice University engineers have developed a composite binder made primarily of fly ash, a byproduct of coal-fired power plants, that can replace Portland cement in concrete.
    3h
    Ingeniøren
    Grønlandsk ingeniøruddannelse skal ud og fiskeCenter for Arktisk Teknologi i Grønland etablerer sammen med DTU Aqua en ny diplomingeniøruddannelse i fiskeriteknologi.
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    Futurity.org
    8
    Carb and fat combo makes food extra irresistibleFoods that have both fat and carbohydrates are more rewarding, calorie for calorie, than foods with either energy source alone, according to new research. Fatty foods like cheese trigger one pathway of signals to reward centers in the brain while carb-loaded foods like grain or a lollipop take another route, says Dana Small, professor of psychiatry at Yale University and senior author of a new pa
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    Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
    2
    Holistic approach increases safety for two-wheeled vehiclesIf we are to make the best use of urban transport, we need to increase safety for the most vulnerable users – especially those on two wheels. As well as new vehicle technology, this also needs improvements to rider behaviour and protective equipment.
    3h
    BBC News - Science & Environment
    43
    'Dumpling-shaped' space rock comes into viewA Japanese space probe has been sending back images as it approaches its target, the asteroid Ryugu.
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    Insightful research illuminates the newly possible in the realm of natural and synthetic imagesA pair of groundbreaking papers in computer vision open new vistas on possibilities in the realms of creating very real-looking natural images and synthesizing realistic, identity-preserving facial images. In CVAE-GAN: Fine-Grained Image Generation through Asymmetric Training, presented this past October at ICCV 2017 in Venice, the team of researchers from Microsoft and the University of Science a
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    Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
    2
    Professor says people are turning to 'socially mediated vigilante justice' to right perceived wrongsThe internet loves creating villains: People get caught on camera or social media behaving badly, the post or video goes viral and anyone with a computer or smartphone piles on and fans the flames.
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    Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
    7
    Bringing the heat out of the cityHeat waves are increasing worldwide—and that includes Switzerland. Cities in particular suffer as a result: the temperature difference between city and countryside can amount to several degrees. A new water tunnel at Empa could help to alleviate these urban heat islands in the future—for example by cities ensuring lower temperatures locally through vegetation, water surfaces and brighter materials
    3h
    Dana Foundation
    SfN Launches New Brain Facts BookCredit: Society for Neuroscience Interested in learning more about how your brain works? Whether you’re looking for information about psychiatric disorders, the developing brain, addiction, or other brain topics, the Brain Facts book by the Society for Neuroscience (SfN) has got you covered. Produced in partnership with The Kavli Foundation and the Gatsby Foundation, Brain Facts gives an overview
    3h
    Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
    1
    Control unit motor system for human-powered bikesA new initiative to fill the gap between bicycle and car is taking shape in the form of a super bike that offers several advantages to users. The technology can also be applied to scooters and skateboards.
    4h
    Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
    3
    Tiny quantum device to redefine ampereEU-funded scientists have succeeded in redefining the ampere in terms of fundamental constants of physics. Based on the electron charge, the newly developed microscopic device has been reported as the most accurate technique for making measurements of tiny currents to date.
    4h
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    An exoskeleton for paraplegicsRobotic devices are increasingly being used to assist patients with impaired motor functions. Through a novel adaptable exoskeleton, the Symbitron project hopes to revolutionise rehabilitation of patients.
    4h
    Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
    1
    Bees get stressed at work too (and it might be causing colony collapse)Ever been overworked, tired and felt muddle-headed? Research now shows honey bees suffer from the same thing – and we understand why.
    4h
    Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
    6
    A meteoroid smashed into the side of a crater on Mars and then started a landslideIn 2006, NASA's Mars Reconnaissance Orbiter (MRO) established orbit around the Red Planet. Using an advanced suite of scientific instruments – which include cameras, spectrometers, and radar – this spacecraft has been analyzing landforms, geology, minerals and ice on Mars for years and assisting with other missions. While the mission was only meant to last two years, the orbiter has remained in op
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    Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
    2
    'Face-to-face, humans are not good at violence': Randall Collins in conversation with Michel WieviorkaTen years ago, two major work about violence came out: "Violence: A Micro-Sociological Theory," by Randall Collins (Princeton University Press, 2008) and "Violence: A New Approach," by Michel Wieviorka (Sage, 2009). The two sociologists meet today to discuss their theories and renew the debate for The Conversation France.
    4h
    Popular Science
    94
    How the new World Cup ball was designed to not influence the gamesScience The quest for the perfect soccer ball continues. Every four years there’s a new ball for the World Cup—and every four years players are unhappy with it. Maybe it’s too light and has too much lift, like the 2002…
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    Image of the Day: Landing BlowsThe smashing mantis shrimp is strategic in its attack on sea snails.
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    China is creating a huge carbon market—but not a particularly aggressive oneThe biggest test of cap-and-trade to date may be too timid to make much of a difference for the world’s largest carbon polluter.
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    Weird Low-Light Bacteria Could Potentially Thrive on MarsThe photosynthetic organisms subsist on redder, lower-energy light than other species, and could be a new source of fuel and air for interplanetary outposts -- Read more on ScientificAmerican.com
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    33
    How Volvo's Making the Polestar 1 From an Old ConceptFive years after showing off the Concept Coupe, Volvo has resurrected the much-loved design as the first offering from its newly electric-focused brand, Polestar.
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    12 Best Tablets for Every Budget in 2018: iPad, Android, Fire HD, SurfaceNo matter if you prefer Android, iOS, Chrome, or Windows—these are the best tablets we've tried.
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    Volgograd—how a dam on the mighty Volga almost killed off the caviar fishThe floodlights will soon be turned on at the newly built Volgograd Arena for the first World Cup match to be held there, between England and Tunisia.
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    Enigmatic Stone Balls from 5,000 Years Ago Continue to Baffle ArchaeologistsThe balls are carved with intricate spiral patterns, but scientists can't figure out their meaning.
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    Why ordinary people must have a say in water governanceMost emerging democracies in Africa have implemented decentralisation in some form since the 1990s. In the water sector, decentralisation aims to share responsibility for managing water resources and services. It shifts responsibility from national government to include lower-level governmental and community organisations.
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    Physicists probing ever deeper into the stuff of the universeUniversity of Virginia physicists have recently played key roles in new particle physics discoveries. The scientists are involved with large international collaborations using major facilities designed for expanding our knowledge of the most intimate details of how the smallest known pieces of atoms may have given birth to the universe.
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    The Atlantic
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    When Children Say They’re TransClaire is a 14-year-old girl with short auburn hair and a broad smile. She lives outside Philadelphia with her mother and father, both professional scientists. Claire can come across as an introvert, but she quickly opens up, and what seemed like shyness reveals itself to be quiet self-assuredness. Like many kids her age, she is a bit overscheduled. During the course of the evening I spent with C
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    The most ancient African baobabs are dying and no one knows whyScientists aren’t sure what’s killing the oldest African baobabs, nine of which have lost big chunks or died in the last 13 years.
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    The 4th Flavor? Scientists Close in on a New Kind of NeutrinoThe history behind the discovery is a fascinating tale with twist and turns that would make Agatha Christie's head spin.
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    1
    Why reducing antibiotics in farm animals isn't as easy as it seemsThe use of antibiotics in meat production is a rapidly emerging issue in food discourse. The conversation around meat, eggs and dairy has focused on animal welfare over much of the past five years, but it's now moving to other elements of production.
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    Integrated approach is the best way to manage urban growth, expert saysUnwise government policy has given the Netherlands a serious traffic problem. For decades, spatial planning policy-makers have failed to take adequate account of the impact of individual travel behaviours, and of private car use in particular.
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    The secret to measuring the energy of an antineutrinoScientists study tiny particles called neutrinos to learn about how our universe evolved. These particles, well-known for being tough to detect, could tell the story of how matter won out over antimatter a fraction of a second after the Big Bang and, consequently, why we're here at all.
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    44
    You'll Have to Look Closer to Understand These Tiny WorldsPhotographer Frank Kunert photographs miniature scenes of modern life—with a bizarre twist.
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    Fake Video Will Complicate Viral JusticeOpinion: Videos provide transformative new avenues for justice, often summoning well-deserved Twitter mobs. Deep fakes could change all that.
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    The Collapse of a $40 Million Nutrition Science CrusadeThe Nutrition Science Initiative promised to study obesity and diabetes the right way. Now it’s broke, president-less, and all but gone.
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    The End of DyslexiaInnovations in brain research and AI-fueled assistive technologies could level the playing field for those with language-based learning disabilities.
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    AI could wreak economic havoc—we need more of itArtificial intelligence is offering an amazing opportunity to increase prosperity, but whether or not ­we will seize it is our choice.
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    Could Multiple Personality Disorder Explain Life, the Universe and Everything?A new paper argues that the condition now known as “Dissociative Identity Disorder” might help us understand the fundamental nature of reality -- Read more on ScientificAmerican.com
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    Britain’s drug laws are in the dark ages. Billy Caldwell’s case proves it | Simon JenkinsHow can Sajid Javid deny long-term access to the cannabis oil that would control this boy’s epilepsy? This cruelty must end What kind of country gets a politician rather than a doctor to prescribe medicine for a sick child? When the home secretary, Sajid Javid, decided at the weekend to allow 12-year-old Billy Caldwell “one bottle” of cannabis oil, his spokeswoman said it was an exceptional case t
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    Science | The Guardian
    36
    Cannabis oil: cabinet appears divided as Hunt calls for reviewPM appears to be at odds with health secretary, who says government has not got law right on medicinal use of substance Theresa May appeared at odds with her cabinet on Monday as she played down the prospect of a full-scale review into the medical use of cannabis oil despite Jeremy Hunt admitting that the government had not got the law right. The health secretary said he backed the use of the sub
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    Meet the skyrmions—exotic quasiparticles could revolutionise computingUnique physical properties of these "magic knots" might help to satisfy demand for IT power and storage using a fraction of the energy.
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    1
    Apple aims to solve problems locating 911 calls for helpApple is trying to drag the U.S.'s antiquated system for handling 911 calls into the 21st century.
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    2
    Rising tide: Floating device one step closer to generating green powerAn ocean energy technology project that will harness tidal power has successfully produced electricity during towing tests.
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    Germany will fail 2020 climate goals, now eyes 2030 targetGermany's environment minister says the country will likely miss its target of cutting carbon emissions by 2020, an embarrassment for a government that wants to lead the charge on limiting climate change.
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    Audi boss arrested in diesel probe (Update)Audi Rupert StadlerAudi chief executive Rupert Stadler was arrested Monday in connection with parent company Volkswagen's "dieselgate" emissions cheating scandal, with prosecutors saying they feared he might try to destroy evidence.
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    24
    Odors are perceived the same way by hunter-gatherers and WesternersPrevious research has shown the hunter-gatherer Jahai are much better at naming odors than Westerners. They even have a more elaborate lexicon for it. New research by language scientist Asifa Majid of Radboud University shows that despite these linguistic differences, the Jahai and Dutch find the same odors pleasant and unpleasant.
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    Google's new principles on AI need to be better at protecting human rightsThere are growing concerns about the potential risks of AI – and mounting criticism of technology giants. In the wake of what has been called an AI backlash or "techlash", states and businesses are waking up to the fact that the design and development of AI have to be ethical, benefit society and protect human rights.
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    The privacy problem with camera traps: you don't know who else could be watchingWe use remotely activated cameras – known as camera traps – to study the ecology and population responses of wildlife and pest species in management programs across Australia.
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    Weeds Are Winning in the War against Herbicide ResistanceHerbicides are under evolutionary threat. Can modern agriculture find a new way to fight back? -- Read more on ScientificAmerican.com
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    63
    The science behind pickled battery electrolytesBattery researchers at the U.S. Department of Energy's (DOE) Argonne National Laboratory have discovered an important chemical reaction that resembles the method used to make pickles. The reaction provides key insights into the behavior of a common electrolyte additive used to boost performance.
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    Forsker: Nej, fodboldfans skabte
    ikke blevet noteretet jordskælvDet var ”kulturel støj” og ikke jordskælv, som to jordskælvsmålere registrerede i Mexico City under en VM-kamp.
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    Following trends and easy answers isn’t the way to a good lifeVegan clothes, biofuel and wood-burning stoves have all been offered up as ethical, environmental choices – but the evidence behind them is much more murky
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    Techtopia #57: Ansvarlige algoritmerHvordan påvirker algoritmerne vores beslutningskraft, vores interesser og vores politiske holdninger? Og hvad skal vi stille af krav for at modvirke de værste fejl og misforståelser?
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    Ingeniøren
    1
    Novos restaffald leverer naturgas til 5000 husstande300.000 ton restprodukter fra Novo Nordisk og Novozymes omdannes nu i Østdanmarks største biogasanlæg.
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    NYT > Science
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    The New Health Care: Why the Medical Research Grant System Could Be Costing Us Great IdeasFunding is harder to find in general, and the current approach favors low-risk research and proposals by older scientists and white men.
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    17
    Proposed CAESAR mission to return a sample from comet 67P/Churyumov–GerasimenkoA proposed space mission known as the Comet Astrobiology Exploration Sample Return (CAESAR) could expand the knowledge of the origin and history of the comet 67P/Churyumov–Gerasimenko. If selected by NASA, it will return a sample from this comet to Earth, enabling scientists to study the leftover material from the formation of our Solar System.
    6h
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    81
    The Blockchain: A Love Story—And a Horror StoryCryptomania isn’t just a mad rush of scams and speculation. It’s a utopian dream. And a living nightmare.
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    Genetic engineering researcher: Politicians are deaf to people's ethical concernsWhile a many Danes question whether genetically modified foods are unnatural, this concern is much less apparent among politicians, according to Professor Jesper Lassen at the University of Copenhagen's Department of Food and Resource Economics. Lassen has investigated Danish attitudes about genetically modified foods since the early 90's.
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    3
    New technique provides accurate dating of ancient skeletonsInterest in the origins of human populations and their migration routes has increased greatly in recent years. A critical aspect of tracing migration events is dating them. However, radiocarbon techniques commonly used to date and analyse DNA from ancient skeletons can be inaccurate and difficult to apply. Inspired by the Geographic Population Structure model that can track mutations associated wi
    6h
    Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
    4
    Better safe than sorry—economic optimization risks tipping of Earth system elementsOptimizing economic welfare without constraints might put human well-being at risk, a new climate study argues. While being successful in bringing down costs of greenhouse gas reductions, the concept of profit maximization alone does not suffice to avoid the tipping of critical elements in the Earth system that could lead to dramatic climate change. Scientists at the Potsdam Institute for Climate
    6h
    Ingeniøren
    Californien vil tvinge it-branchens overvågning frem i lysetEt lovforslag skal tvinge firmaer til at offentliggøre, hvilke typer af informationer de indsamler, samt give borgere mulighed for at fravælge salg af informationer om dem. Lovforslaget modarbejdes dog af it-giganter, som smider penge efter modstandere af forslaget.
    6h
    Ingeniøren
    Apple satser på Augmentet RealityApple satser stort på augmentet reality og har lanceret en række værktøjer, for at gøre det lettere for applikations udviklere, at integrere AR apps med diverse Apple-enheder.
    6h
    Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
    3
    Novel method for investigating pore geometry in rocksBased on persistent homology theory, researchers from Japan's Kyushu University presented a new parameter and a new method for evaluating the heterogeneity of porosity
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    2
    Scientists discover how to control the 'excitation' of electronicsAn international team of scientists, including NUST MISIS's Professor Gotthard Seifert, has made an important step toward the control of excitonic effects in two-dimensional van der Waals heterostructures. In the future, this research could contribute to electronics with more controlled properties. The research has been published in Nature Physics.
    6h
    EurekAlert! - Breaking News
    4
    Scientists find potential disease-fighting 'warheads' hidden in bacteriaA new study by Scripps Research, published today in Nature Communications, suggests scientists could build better drugs by learning from bacteria-derived molecules called thiocarboxylic acids.
    7h
    EurekAlert! - Breaking News
    24
    New 3D imaging analysis technique could lead to improved arthritis treatmentAn algorithm to monitor the joints of patients with arthritis, which could change the way that the severity of the condition is assessed, has been developed by a team of engineers, physicians and radiologists led by the University of Cambridge.
    7h
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    3
    Devastating plant virus is revealed in atomic detailThe complex 3D structure of one of the world's most lethal families of plant viruses has been revealed in unprecedented detail by scientists at the University of Leeds.
    7h
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    1
    Genomics offers new treatment options for infants with range of soft tissue tumorsThe genetic causes of a group of related infant cancers have been discovered by scientists at the Wellcome Sanger Institute, the University of Wuerzburg and their collaborators. Whole genome sequencing of tumours revealed mutations which are targetable by existing drugs used to treat lung cancer and melanoma. The results have implications for clinical practice and the diagnosis of rare cancers in
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    5
    Constructing new tissue shapes with lightConstructing biological tissues, such as skin, muscle, or bone, in customized shapes is now one step closer. Researchers at EMBL have succeeded in guiding the folding and thus shape of tissues with optogenetics: a technique to control protein activity with light. Nature Communications publishes their results, with implications for regenerative medicine, on June 18.
    7h
    EurekAlert! - Breaking News
    1
    Studying heart disease after death can help the livingAutopsy findings provide valuable information about causes and natural history of overall cardiovascular disease. Several papers in a special issue of Circulation offer insight into how autopsy contributes to answers about the causes of sudden cardiac death, information from implantable device to improve heart function, and identifying the original cause of atherosclerosis.
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    EurekAlert! - Breaking News
    1
    Gene editing technology may improve accuracy of predicting individuals' heart disease riskGene-editing technology may help scientists discern whether genetic variations with undetermined effects are harmless or dangerous. Researchers used the technology to assess a genetic variant suspected to have a role in enlarged hearts. Gene editing may help assess a person's individual disease risk and improve the quality and predictive abilities of precision medicine.
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    EurekAlert! - Breaking News
    1
    Intravenous acetaminophen has limited benefit for colectomy patients, Mount Sinai study findsResults do not support routine use of this expensive drug.
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    Ingeniøren
    19
    Plugin hybrid-biler lever slet ikke op til lovet brændstofforbrugKørestil og testcyklus ser ud til at bære skylden.
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    Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
    1
    Constructing new tissue shapes with lightConstructing biological tissues, such as skin, muscle, or bone, in customized shapes is now one step closer. Researchers at EMBL have succeeded in guiding the folding and thus shape of tissues with optogenetics: a technique to control protein activity with light. Nature Communications publishes their results, with implications for regenerative medicine, on 18 June.
    7h
    Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
    64
    Devastating plant virus is revealed in atomic detailThe complex 3-D structure of one of the world's most lethal families of plant viruses has been revealed in unprecedented detail by scientists at the UK's University of Leeds.
    7h
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    Scientists find potential disease-fighting 'warheads' hidden in bacteriaBacteria found in soil may harbor a potential game-changer for drug design. A new study by Scripps Research, published today in Nature Communications, suggests scientists could build better drugs by learning from bacteria-derived molecules called thiocarboxylic acids.
    7h
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    2
    Google to invest $550 million in China e-commerce giant JD.comGoogle JD.com JD ChineseGoogle will invest more than half a billion dollars in China's second-largest e-commerce company JD.com as part of a move to expand retail services around the world, the companies said Monday.
    7h
    Ingeniøren
    13
    Ny rapport: Vikingeskibsmuseet bliver meget dyrt at reddeNiras har for kulturministeren vurderet, at det vil koste 55-65 mio. kr at reparere Vikingeskibsmuseet i Roskilde. Den høje pris styrker dem, der vil affrede museet
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    Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
    16
    Global warming cooks up 'a different world' over 3 decadesWe were warned.
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    Bumblebee blues: Pacific Northwest pollinator in troubleHundreds of citizen scientists have begun buzzing through locations across the Pacific Northwest seeking a better understanding about nearly 30 bumblebee species.
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    11
    James Hansen wishes he wasn't so right about global warmingJames Hansen wishes he was wrong. He wasn't.
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    13
    Landslides, flash floods as monsoon batters southern MyanmarFlooding in southern Myanmar has caused a landslide at a famed Buddhist pagoda, submerged homes and displaced hundreds of people as monsoon rains batter the country.
    8h
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    1
    France air traffic responsible for third of Europe delays: reportHindered by strikes and outdated equipment, French air traffic control is responsible for a third of aviation delays in Europe, Le Parisien said Monday, citing a senate finance committee report.
    8h
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    13
    Property crisis looms due to sea level rise, experts warnAlong Florida's sun-splashed shorelines, home prices are on the rise, developers are busy building new complexes, and listings just blocks from the beach describe homes that are "not in a flood zone," meaning no flood insurance is required.
    8h
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    5
    AP Was There: The age of climate change beginsOn June 23, 1988, a top NASA scientist told Congress and the world that global warming had arrived. NASA scientist James Hansen predicted that 1988 would be the world's hottest year on record, thanks to the burning of fossil fuels that released heat-trapping gases.
    8h
    Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
    14
    US property crisis looms as sea level rises, experts warnAlong sun-splashed shorelines in the US state of Florida, home prices are on the rise, developers are busy building new complexes, and listings just blocks from the beach describe homes that are "not in a flood zone," meaning no flood insurance is required.
    8h
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    2
    Autonomous Waymo vehicle involved in 5-car crash in ArizonaPolice in a Phoenix suburb say a self-driving Waymo vehicle was among five cars involved in a collision, but no serious injuries were reported.
    8h
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    Chesapeake Bay: Larger-than-average summer 'dead zone' forecast for 2018 after wet springEcologists from the University of Michigan and the University of Maryland Center for Environmental Science are forecasting a larger-than-average Chesapeake Bay "dead zone" in 2018, due to increased rainfall in the watershed this spring.
    9h
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    2
    Rising sea temperatures threaten survival of juvenile albatrossEcologists from Woods Hole Oceanographic Institution in the US and the French National Center for Scientific Research (CNRS) studied a population of black-browed albatross at Kerguelen Island, part of the French Southern and Antarctic Lands, where 200 breeding pairs have been monitored annually since 1979.
    9h
    Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
    87
    Explosive volcanoes spawned mysterious Martian rock formationExplosive volcanic eruptions that shot jets of hot ash, rock and gas skyward are the likely source of a mysterious Martian rock formation, a new study finds. The new finding could add to scientists' understanding of Mars's interior and its past potential for habitability, according to the study's authors.
    9h
    Science-Based Medicine
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    ASCO endorses the integration of quackery into breast cancer careIn 2014, the Society for Integrative Oncology first published clinical guidelines for the care of breast cancer patients. Not surprisingly, SIO advocated "integrating" dubious therapies with oncology. Last week, the most influential oncology society, the American Society of Clinical Oncology (ASCO), endorsed a 2017 update to the SIO guidelines, thus endorsing the "integration" of quackery with onc
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    100+
    Large outdoor study shows biodiversity improves stability of algal biofuel systemsA diverse mix of species improves the stability and fuel-oil yield of algal biofuel systems, as well as their resistance to invasion by outsiders, according to the findings of a federally funded outdoor study by University of Michigan researchers.
    9h
    Science | The Guardian
    27
    Can you solve it? Mirror, mirror on the wallA puzzle to reflect on UPDATE: The solution to the puzzle can be read here Hi guzzlers Here’s a puzzle about something we do every day: gaze at ourselves in the mirror. Who says maths is not relevant to the real world? In fact, You may have often pondered this question without realising it when trying on clothes. Continue reading...
    10h
    Science | The Guardian
    10
    'Smoke and mirror' tactics of drink-drive defence teams criticisedForensic science regulator launches investigation into a number of expert witnesses The “smoke and mirror” tactics of defence lawyers in drink-driving cases have been criticised by the government’s forensic science regulator, who has launched an investigation into the work of a number of expert witnesses. The review was triggered by a recent high court judgment that raised concerns about defence
    10h
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    4
    Large outdoor study shows biodiversity improves stability of algal biofuel systemsA diverse mix of species improves the stability and fuel-oil yield of algal biofuel systems, as well as their resistance to invasion by outsiders, according to the findings of a federally funded outdoor study by University of Michigan researchers.
    10h
    Ingeniøren
    Region H vil outsource hele sin it-infrastruktur: Er i dialog med indisk gigantRegion H planlægger at outsource hele sin it-infrastruktur. Men det er uklart, om regionens it-setup er standardiseret nok - og hvordan outsourcing vil påvirke driftskvaliteten for sygehusene.
    10h
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    1
    Americans view child abuse and neglect as a serious public health problemA strong majority of Americans view child abuse and neglect as a public health problem in the United States, a sentiment shared across populations with 81 percent of Hispanics, 76 percent of non-Hispanic whites, 74 percent of African-Americans and 67 percent of Asians in agreement, according to a new survey commissioned by Research!America and the National Foundation to End Child Abuse and Neglect
    11h
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    96
    'Westworld' Recap, Season 2 Episode 9: The Many Lives of the Man in BlackAs the series's second season wraps up, the wall between his real-life self and Westworld persona comes crashing down.
    11h
    Viden
    13
    Børn vil hellere chatte end snakke om mobning, selvskade og sorgFlere og flere børn chatter i stedet for at ringe, når de skal have hjælp. Teknologien gør børnene mere trygge, siger Børns Vilkår.
    11h
    EurekAlert! - Breaking News
    5
    Silence is golden when it comes to how our brains workIt's the comparative silence between the firing spikes of neurons that tells what they are really up to, scientists report.
    12h
    EurekAlert! - Breaking News
    7
    Study finds a pesticide-free way to combat mosquitos and West NileResearchers at the University of Waterloo may have discovered a new, pesticide-free way to limit mosquito populations in some area and reduce the spread of the West Nile virus.
    12h
    EurekAlert! - Breaking News
    1
    Explosive volcanoes spawned mysterious Martian rock formationExplosive volcanic eruptions that shot jets of hot ash, rock and gas skyward are the likely source of a mysterious Martian rock formation, a new study finds. The new finding could add to scientists' understanding of Mars's interior and its past potential for habitability, according to the study's authors.
    12h
    EurekAlert! - Breaking News
    1
    Childhood sibling dynamics may predict differences in college educationThe effects of sibling relationships may go beyond childhood bickering and bonding, according to Penn State researchers who found that these relationships may predict similarities and differences in siblings' education later in life.
    12h
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    4
    Valuing gluten-free foods relates to health behaviors in young adultsIn a new study featured in the Journal of the Academy of Nutrition and Dietetics, researchers found that among young adults valuing gluten-free foods could be indicative of an overall interest in health or nutrition. These young adults were more likely to engage in healthier behaviors including better dietary intake and also valued food production practices (e.g., organic, non-GMO, locally sourced
    12h
    EurekAlert! - Breaking News
    3
    Rising sea temperatures threaten survival of juvenile albatrossChanges in sea surface temperature affect the survival of albatross during their first year at sea, resulting in a reduced population growth rate when temperatures are warmer than the current average, a new study published in the Journal of Animal Ecology has revealed.
    12h
    EurekAlert! - Breaking News
    1
    Diabetes may be an early manifestation of pancreatic cancerA new study in the Journal of the National Cancer Institute indicates that recent-onset type 2 diabetes may be early expression of pancreatic cancer. Diabetes was associated with a more than twofold higher risk of pancreatic cancer in African-Americans and Latinos, but recent-onset diabetes was associated with a 2.3-fold greater increase in risk of pancreatic cancer than long-standing diabetes.
    12h
    EurekAlert! - Breaking News
    1
    When it comes to weight loss in overweight and obese adults with knee osteoarthritis, more is betterResearchers previously showed that overweight and obese individuals with knee osteoarthritis can reduce pain by 50 percent and significantly improve function and mobility with a 10 percent or more weight loss over an 18-month period.
    12h
    EurekAlert! - Breaking News
    1
    Researchers find a promising new approach for treating liver cirrhosisIn a study in The American Journal of Pathology, investigators report that treatment with aleglitazar, a dual peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor-alpha/gamma (PPARα/γ) agonist, reduced inflammation, vasoconstriction, angiogenesis, mucosal disruption, and tumor necrosis factor (TNF)-α overproduction in cirrhotic rats with PH. This suggests a promising new approach for treating liver cirrhosi
    12h
    EurekAlert! - Breaking News
    2
    One in 5 parents did not talk to kids about what to do if they got lost at an amusement parkNew report indicates several opportunities to reduce safety risks for children in the amusement park environment.
    12h
    EurekAlert! - Breaking News
    1
    Sensitive new assay finds abnormalities in tumor cells that other techniques may missRNA-Seq, a new next-generation assay, can detect gene fusions in solid tumor cells with high accuracy and excellent reproducibility. According to a new report in The Journal of Molecular Diagnostics, the assay detected 93 percent of gene fusions identified by currently available methods with no false positives. Importantly, gene fusions missed by other techniques were found, including 18 that had
    12h
    Ingeniøren
    16
    Nu bliver også elektrificeringen af jernbanen kulegravetTransportministeriet har bestilt en ekstern konsulentundersøgelse af elektrificeringen, efter at første strækning blev både forsinket og fordyret.
    13h
    BBC News - Science & Environment
    400+
    Hong Kong's fish are eating plastic - and people could be tooA lot of Hong Kong's fish contains tiny bits of plastic that could end up on your plate.
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    Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
    14
    The same characteristics can be acquired differently when it comes to neuronsDistinct molecular mechanisms can generate the same features in different neurons, a team of scientists has discovered. Its findings enhance our understanding of brain cell development.
    14h
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  2. page Hareskoven 95 edited ... Skønfodet rørhat :: Calobolerus calopus (Pers.)Vizzini med det tidligere navn Boletus calopus …
    ...
    Skønfodet rørhat :: Calobolerus calopus (Pers.)Vizzini med det tidligere navn Boletus calopus Fr. (og Boletus pachypus Fr.) (google) (photo) (bitter, overfladen brunlig og kun i top og bund af stok lidt rødviolet)
    {hsk95-broget-skorhat-DSC06581.jpg}
    ...
    ingen lugt.
    SVAMPEN TILHØRER JADESKØRHATGRUPPEN - SE OVERSIGTEN NEDENFOR.
    {hsk95-hoej-fluesvamp-DSC06533.jpg}
    ...
    Knoldet stilkporesvamp :: Polyporus tuberaster (Pers.: Fr.) Fr. (google) (photo) (frisk eksemplar)
    {hsk95-soe-med-vandnymfer-i-parring-DSC06536.jpg}
    Sø med vandnymfer i parring (se video)
    {hsk95-Vandnymfe-hanner-3stk-DSC06541.jpg}
    Vandnymfe-hanner
    (view changes)
    12:05 am
  3. page Hareskoven 95 edited ... Skønfodet rørhat :: Calobolerus calopus (Pers.)Vizzini med det tidligere navn Boletus calopus …
    ...
    Skønfodet rørhat :: Calobolerus calopus (Pers.)Vizzini med det tidligere navn Boletus calopus Fr. (og Boletus pachypus Fr.) (google) (photo) (bitter, overfladen brunlig og kun i top og bund af stok lidt rødviolet)
    {hsk95-broget-skorhat-DSC06581.jpg}
    ...
    ingen lugt.
    SVAMPEN TILHØRER JADESKØRHATGRUPPEN - SE OVERSIGTEN NEDENFOR.

    {hsk95-hoej-fluesvamp-DSC06533.jpg}
    Høj fluesvamp :: Amanita excelsa (Fr.: Fr.) Bertill. (google) (photo) (et lidt utypisk, delvis tørt eksemplar)
    (view changes)
    12:01 am
  4. page Hareskoven 95 edited ... Almindelig østershat :: Pleurotus ostreatus (Jacq.: Fr.) P.Kumm. (google) (photo) (ikke hvid…
    ...
    Almindelig østershat :: Pleurotus ostreatus (Jacq.: Fr.) P.Kumm. (google) (photo) (ikke hvid, men med svagt blågråt skær. Antages derfor ikke at være Sommer-østershat, men se noten herunder vedrørende disse to arter).
    Knoldet stilkporesvamp :: Polyporus tuberaster (Pers.: Fr.) Fr. (google) (photo) (frisk eksemplar)
    ...
    ingen lugt. SVAMPEN TILHØRER JADESKØRHATGRUPPEN - SE OVERSIGTEN NEDENFOR.
    Håret lædersvamp :: Stereum hirsutum (Willd.: Fr.) Gray (google) (photo) (meget tørre eksemplarer)
    Broget læderporesvamp :: Trametes versicolor (L.: Fr.) Quél. (google) (photo) (meget tørre eksemplarer)
    ...
    Kærmysse (med hvidt støtteblad)
    Muse-vikke i blomst
    Oversigt over egenskab-typer hos jadeskørhat-gruppen:
    Svampe i Jadeskørhatte-gruppen har mild smag, sporefældning er hvid til creme og hatten er overvejende med grønne, brune, blålige eller brunviolette farver.
    HATHUDENS FARVE Hatten er først lys, siden spanskgrøn til lyst olivengrøn
    HATHUDENS OPSPRÆKKETHED Med sprækkende hathud (broget skørhat-variant R. cyanoxantha var. cutefracta)
    HATHUDENS TØRHED Hatten er tør
    HATHUDENS UDSTRÆKNING TIL HATRANDEN Hathuden når typisk ikke helt ud til randen (se f.eks. Spiselig skørhat (R. vesca))
    HATHUDENS VOKSAGTIGHED Hathud som ung nærmest voks- eller stearinagtig (lup!), senere fint melet til kornet, som udvokset opsprækkende i små felter
    HATRANDENS KAMFURETHED Hatrand ikke eller kun let kamfuret - eller: Hatrand meget kamfuret
    HATTENS AFBLEGNING MED ALDEREN Hat afblegende i bleggullige pletter
    HATTENS BROGETHED Hat meget ensartet farvet
    - eller: Hat ret ensfarvet
    - eller: Hat broget med iblandede violette nuancer
    HATTENS DIMENSIONER Hat 3-7 cm bred
    - eller: Hat 5-10 cm bred,
    - eller: Hat 5-15 cm bred.
    - eller: Hat meget lille, kun op til 3 (-4) cm bred (se f.eks. Lillebitte skørhat (R. innocua))
    HATTENS DUGGETHED Hatoverflade dugget (se f.eks. Blågrå skørhat (R. parazurea))
    HATTENS FARVER Hat brun
    - eller: Hat kakaobrun til rødbrun (se f.eks. R. mustelina)
    - eller: Hat med gråblå, gråligt oliven eller grålilla farver
    - eller: Hat med lysegrøn midte og blegere, næsten hvid rand (se f.eks. Lillebitte skørhat (R. innocua))
    - eller: Hat med violette, lilla, brune eller grå farver, eventuelt iblandet grønne, oliven eller cremehvide farver
    - eller: Hat mørkviolet, brunviolet til purpurbrun
    - eller: Hat overvejende olivengrønlig, ofte stedvist violetagtig, sjældent i et udpræget koncentrisk mønster
    - eller: Hat rosabrun til teglrød
    - eller: Hat udelukkende med grønne, olivengrønne eller cremehvide farver
    HATTENS FARVEÆNDRING SOM ÆLDRE Hat i grav typisk violet anløben (se f.eks. Violetgrøn skørhat (R. ionochlora))
    HATTENS FILTETHED Hat ± filtet, især i randen
    - eller: Hatoverflade filtet
    HATTENS FLERFARVETHED Hat ofte ± koncentrisk tofarvet med blegt grøn midte og grå til violetagtig rand (se f.eks. Violetgrøn skørhat (R. ionochlora))
    - eller: Hattens grundfarve elfenbenshvid, men med gråoliven til smudsigt olivengrønne partier
    HATTENS FORM Halvkugleformet til hvælvet eller udbredt
    - eller: Hat hvælvet til affladet eller let nedtrykt
    HATTENS GLATHED Hatoverflade glat/skinnende
    HATTENS KLÆBRIGHED Hat klæbrig
    - eller: Hat svagt klæbrig
    HATTENS KORNETHED Hatmidte ikke kornet
    - eller: Hatmidte kornet (se f.eks. Lilla skørhat (R. lilacea))
    HATTENS MELETHED Hat glat til fint melet, dugget eller filtet, næppe opsprækkende i tydelige felter
    HATTENS OPSPRÆKKENHED Hat ofte uregelmæssig, ofte opsprækkende i felter (se f.eks. R. anatina)
    HATTENS SKINNENDE EGENSKAB Hatoverflade glat/skinnende
    KEMISK REAKTION PÅ STOKOVERFLADEN Reaktion med FeSO4 på stokoverfladen svagt rosa, tillige ofte grågrønlig.
    - eller: FeSO4 på stokoverfladen blegorange til rosabrun
    - eller: FeSO4-reaktion først ± rødlig, derefter undertiden grågrøn
    - eller: FeSO4-reaktion på stokoverfladen fraværende til let grønlig
    KØDETS FASTHED Kød meget fast
    LAMELLERNES FARVE Hvide
    LAMELLERNES TÆTHED Lameller tætte,
    LAMELLERS BLØDHED Lameller bløde og næsten fedtede at røre ved, brækker ikke så let
    LAMELLERS BRUNPLETTETHED Lameller efterhånden eventuelt brunplettet (se f.eks. R. mustelina)
    LAMELLERS EVNE TIL AT BRÆKKE Lameller bløde og næsten fedtede at røre ved, brækker ikke så let
    LAMELLERS FARVEÆNDRING MED ALDEREN Lameller efterhånden creme
    LAMELLERS FEDTETHED Lameller bløde og næsten fedtede at røre ved, brækker ikke så let
    LAMELLERS GAFFELGRENETHED Lameller ikke gaffelgrenede nær stokken
    - eller: Lameller stærkt gaffelgrenede nær stokken (se f.eks. Gaffelbladet skørhat (R. heterophylla (f. adusta))
    LAMELLERS LILLA SKÆR Lameller ofte med lilla skær (se f.eks. grålig skørhat (R. grisea))
    LAMELLERS SKØRHED Lameller ± skøre, ikke fedtede at røre ved, brækker let
    LAMELLERS TÆTHED Lameller påfaldende fjerne (se f.eks. Lillebitte skørhat (R. innocua))
    - eller: Lameller ret tætte
    - eller: Lameller tætte,
    LUGTEN Lugt ± frugtagtig (se f.eks. Brunviolet skørhat (R. brunneoviolacea))
    - eller: Lugt ubetydelig
    MIKROSKOPI AF HATTENS CYSTIDER Hatten er uden hatcystider
    - eller: Hatcystider 4-6(-7) µm brede, meget lange og cylindriske, eventuelt med et lille hoved
    MIKROSKOPI AF HATTENS HÅR Hathud med brune, tykvæggede hår.
    - eller: Hathud med lange, smalle, tykvæggede, farveløse eller brune hår
    - eller: Hathud med tykvæggede brune hår (se f.eks. spiselig skørhat (R. vesca))
    - eller: Hathud med tykvæggede, farveløse hår (se f.eks. Gaffelbladet skørhat (R. heterophylla))
    - eller: Hathud med tykvæggede, lange, spidse brune eller farveløse hår, især omkring hatmidten. (se f.eks. Gaffelbladet skørhat (R. heterophylla))
    - eller: Hathudshår 3-4(-5,5) µm brede, cellerne under endecellen kun lidt indsnørede ved tværvæggene
    - eller: Hathudshår 5-9 µm brede, cellerne under endecellen udpræget indsnørede ved tværvæggene så cellerne næsten bliver ellisoidiske. (se f.eks. Grågrøn skørhat (R. pseudoaeruginea))
    - eller: Hathudshår 8-12 µm brede, celler overvejende kugleformede til bredt ellipsoidiske. (se f.eks. Olivengrå skørhat (R. faustiana))
    - eller: Hår i hathuden med korte og ± opsvulmede delceller, typisk 5-7 µm brede, endecelle typisk but (se f.eks. Violetgrøn skørhat (R. ionochlora))
    - eller: Hår i hathuden slanke, bestående af udpræget aflange deleceller, typisk 4-5 µm brede, endecelle typisk langt tilspidset
    MIKROSKOPISK KEMISK REAKTION Med hatcystider der farves gråsorte i sulfovanilin (R. anatina)
    MIKROSKOPISK SPORE-NETMØNSTER Sporer med et næsten komplet netmønster med spredte lukkede masker. (se f.eks. Blågrå skørhat (R. parazurea))
    - eller: Sporer med helt isolerede vorter. (se f.eks. Lillebitte skørhat (R. innocua))
    - eller: Sporer med isolerede vorter, ofte forbundne af linier til et ufuldstændigt netmønster, men uden lukkede masker
    SPOREFÆLDNINGENS FARVE Sporefældning dybt creme (IIc)
    - eller: Sporefældning hvid eller hvidlig
    - eller: Sporefældning lyst creme (IIa) (se f.eks. Lillebitte skørhat (R. innocua) og Violetgrøn skørhat (R. ionochlora))
    STOKBASIS BRUNHED Stok brun forneden med alderen (se f.eks. Knippe-skørhat (R. viscida))
    STOKBASIS FORM Stok tilspidset nedefter
    - eller: Stok typisk tøndeformet
    STOKKENS DIMENSIONER Stok 0,8-1,5 cm tyk.
    - eller: Stok 1-2,2 cm tyk, ± cylindrisk
    - eller: Stok 2-4 cm tyk
    - eller: Stok 2-5 cm høj.
    - eller: Stok 2-7 x 1,5-2,5 cm.
    - eller: Stok 3-7 cm høj (lang)
    STOKKENS FARVE Hvid
    - eller: Stok ± lædergul
    STOKKENS FARVEÆNDRING Stok anløber lædergul til okkerbrun med alderen (se f.eks. gulstokket skørhat (R. puellaris)
    - eller: Stok ofte noget grånende (se f.eks. Purpurbroget skørhat (R. undulata))
    - eller: Stok ikke påfaldende lædergul eller brun forneden med alderen, men eventuelt med brunlige pletter ved basis
    STOKKENS FORM Stok cylindrisk
    STOKKENS VIOLETHED Stok eventuelt med violet anstrøg (se f.eks. Violetgrøn skørhat (R. ionochlora))
    SVAMPENS DIMENSIONER Frugtlegemer store og kraftig
    VOKSESTED I eller nær tørvemos (Sphagnum)(se f.eks. Tørvemos-skørhat (R. sphagnophila)
    - eller: I løvskove
    - eller: På ± tør bund med birk, ofte i plæner (f.eks. foranderlig skørhat (R. versicolor))
    - eller: På fugtig bund med nåletræer eller birk, men også på tør morbund under bøg
    - eller: Under nåletræer

    [[include page="Tegn abonnement"]]
    (view changes)
    12:00 am

Sunday, June 17

  1. page hareskoven 95 uden navne edited ... Denne billedsamling er fra tur nr. 95. Turene afholdes kl. 13 fra Hareskov Station hver måned.…
    ...
    Denne billedsamling er fra tur nr. 95. Turene afholdes kl. 13 fra Hareskov Station hver måned. Se årsprogram her. På denne tur deltog 10 personer. Ole Terney var turleder. Vejret var fint (der havde været en meget usædvanlig lang tørkeperiode med spredte skybrud den seneste nat). Turen varede ca. 2 timer. Af spisesvampe var der østershatte samt ung Kæmpeporesvamp. Der blev fundet ca. 15 arter.
    Herunder gives en detaljeret beskrivelse af turen.
    ...
    på siden herher (hvor billederne
    Se videoen
    {hsk95-sommerrorhat-og-kaempeporesv-DSC06576.jpg}
    NB ! Hvis du først vil tjekke, om du kan huske navnene, så klik i stedet ind her (hvor billederne er uden navne).NB ! Navnene står på siden her (hvor billederne er med navne).
    {hsk95-sommerrorhat-DSC06575.jpg}
    NB ! Hvis du først vil tjekke, om du kan huske navnene, så klik i stedet ind her (hvor billederne er uden navne).NB ! Navnene står på siden her (hvor billederne er med navne).
    {hsk95-kaempeporesvamp-DSC06572.jpg}
    NB ! Hvis du først vil tjekke, om du kan huske navnene, så klik i stedet ind her (hvor billederne er uden navne).NB ! Navnene står på siden her (hvor billederne er med navne).
    {hsk95-oestershat-DSC06578.jpg}
    NB ! Hvis du først vil tjekke, om du kan huske navnene, så klik i stedet ind her (hvor billederne er uden navne).NB ! Navnene står på siden her (hvor billederne er med navne).
    {hsk95-skoenfodet-rorhat-DSC06584.jpg}
    NB ! Hvis du først vil tjekke, om du kan huske navnene, så klik i stedet ind her (hvor billederne er uden navne).NB ! Navnene står på siden her (hvor billederne er med navne).
    {hsk95-broget-skorhat-DSC06581.jpg}
    NB ! Hvis du først vil tjekke, om du kan huske navnene, så klik i stedet ind her (hvor billederne er uden navne).NB ! Navnene står på siden her (hvor billederne er med navne).
    {hsk95-hoej-fluesvamp-DSC06533.jpg}
    NB ! Hvis du først vil tjekke, om du kan huske navnene, så klik i stedet ind her (hvor billederne er uden navne).NB ! Navnene står på siden her (hvor billederne er med navne).
    {hsk95-toendersvamp-DSC06564.jpg}
    NB ! Hvis du først vil tjekke, om du kan huske navnene, så klik i stedet ind her (hvor billederne er uden navne).NB ! Navnene står på siden her (hvor billederne er med navne).
    {hsk95-broget-laederporesvamp-DSC06568.jpg}
    NB ! Hvis du først vil tjekke, om du kan huske navnene, så klik i stedet ind her (hvor billederne er uden navne).NB ! Navnene står på siden her (hvor billederne er med navne).
    {hsk95_knoldet-stilk-poresvamp-DSC06569.jpg}
    NB ! Hvis du først vil tjekke, om du kan huske navnene, så klik i stedet ind her (hvor billederne er uden navne).NB ! Navnene står på siden her (hvor billederne er med navne).
    Liste over de fundne arter:
    Høj fluesvamp :: Amanita excelsa (Fr.: Fr.) Bertill. (google) (photo) (et lidt utypisk, delvis tørt eksemplar)
    (view changes)
    4:20 pm

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